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Sample records for pulsed beam deflectors

  1. Digital Beam Deflectors Based Partly on Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Kreminska, Liubov; Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Winker, Bruce K.

    2007-01-01

    A digital beam deflector based partly on liquid crystals has been demonstrated as a prototype of a class of optical beam-steering devices that contain no mechanical actuators or solid moving parts. Such beam-steering devices could be useful in a variety of applications, including free-space optical communications, switching in fiber-optic communications, general optical switching, and optical scanning. Liquid crystals are of special interest as active materials in nonmechanical beam steerers and deflectors because of their structural flexibility, low operating voltages, and the relatively low costs of fabrication of devices that contain them.

  2. Non-uniform space charge controlled KTN beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ju-Hung; Zhu, Wenbin; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Stuart; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    A non-uniform space charge-controlled KTN beam deflector is presented and analyzed. We found that a non-uniform space charge can result in a non-uniform beam deflection angles. This effect can be useful for some applications such as electric field controlled beam separation. However, a non-uniform space charge needs to be avoided if one wants uniform beam deflection throughout the entire crystal.

  3. Electro-optic Waveguide Beam Deflector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    beam deflection by variation in the electro - optic effect produced within the waveguide region in response to known or determinable magnitude variations in the electrical potential of an applied signal source.

  4. Polymeric waveguide prism-based electro-optic beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lin; Kim, Jin-ha; Jang, Chiou-Hung; An, Dechang; Lu, Xuejun; Zhou, Qingjun; Taboada, John M.; Chen, Ray T.; Maki, Jeffery J.; Tang, Suning; Zhang, Hua; Steier, William H.; Zhang, Cheng H.; Dalton, Larry R.

    2001-07-01

    Beam steering devices without moving parts are highly desirable for their potential application in emerging optical technologies such as holographic optical storage systems, all optical networks, and optical switches. We demonstrate a thin-film waveguide beam deflector device that consists of an electro-optic prism array within a polymer waveguide. An electrode structure defines the prism array within the planar waveguide. The deflection efficiency of 28 mrad/kV and the maximum deflection angle of +/- 8.4 mrad at +/- 300 V are obtained for this demonstration device. Further optimization of electrode-field poling and processing is likely to improve these results by at least an order of magnitude.

  5. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; ...

    2012-02-14

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the verticalmore » kick of the beam.« less

  6. Femtosecond X-ray Pulse Temporal Characterization in Free-Electron Lasers Using a Transverse Deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13

    We propose a novel method to characterize the temporal duration and shape of femtosecond x-ray pulses in a free-electron laser (FEL) by measuring the time-resolved electron-beam energy loss and energy spread induced by the FEL process, with a transverse radio-frequency deflector located after the undulator. Its merits are simplicity, high resolution, wide diagnostic range, and non-invasive to user operation. When the system is applied to the Linac Coherent Light Source, the first hard x-ray free-electron laser in the world, it can provide single-shot measurements on the electron beam and x-ray pulses with a resolution on the order of 1-2 femtoseconds rms.

  7. Electro-optical deflectors as a method of beam smoothing for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenberg, J.E.

    1997-01-01

    The electro-optic deflector is analyzed and compared to smoothing by spectral dispersion for efficacy as a beam smoothing method for ICF. It is found that the electro-optic deflector is inherently somewhat less efficient when compared either on the basis of equal peak phase modulation or equal generated bandwidth.

  8. Beam self-excited rf cavity driver for a deflector or focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1996-09-01

    A bunched beam from and accelerator can excite and power an rf cavity which then drives either a deflecting or focusing (including nonlinear focusing) rf cavity with and amplitude related to beam current. Rf power, generated when a bunched beam loses energy to an rf field when traversing an electric field that opposes the particle`s motion, is used to drive a separate (or the same) cavity to either focus or deflect the beam. The deflected beam can be stopped by an apertures or directed to a different area of a target depending on beam current. The beam-generated rf power can drive a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) that can change the focusing properties of a beam channel as a function of beam current (space- charge force compensation or modifying the beam distribution on a target). An rf deflector can offset a beam to a downstream sextupole, effectively producing a position-dependent quadrupole field. The combination of rf deflector plus sextupole will produce a beam current dependent quadropole-focusing force. A static quadrupole magnet plus another rf deflector can place the beam back on the optic axis. This paper describes the concept, derives the appropriate equations for system analysis, and fives examples. A variation on this theme is to use the wake field generated in an rf cavity to cause growth in the beam emittance. The beam current would then be apertured by emittance defining slits.

  9. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Shun-Le

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linerization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linerization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications.

  10. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, S.L.

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linearization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications. 6 figures.

  11. Digital Beam Steering Device Based on Decoupled Birefringent Prism Deflector and Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg; Kreminska, Lyubov; Laventovich, Oleg D.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Winker, Bruce K.

    2004-01-01

    We describe digital beam deflectors (DBDs) based on liquid crystals. Each stage of the device comprises a polarization rotator and a birefringent prism deflector. The birefringent prism deflects the beam by an angle that depends on polarization of the incident beam. The prism can be made of the uniaxial smectic A (SmA) liquid crystal (LC) or a solid crystal such as yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4). SmA prisms have high birefringence and can be constructed in a variety of shapes, including single prisms and prismatic blazed gratings of different angles and profiles. We address the challenges of uniform alignment of SmA, such as elimination of focal conic domains. Rotation of linear polarization is achieved by an electrically switched twisted nematic (TN) cell. A DBD composed of N rotator-deflector pairs steers the beam into 2(sup N) directions. As an example, we describe a four-stage DBD deflecting normally incident laser beam within the range of +/- 56 mrad with 8 mrad steps. Redirection of the beam is achieved by switching the TN cells.

  12. Multi-scanning mechanism enabled rapid non-mechanical multi-dimensional KTN beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a multi-dimensional KTN beam deflector is presented. The multi-scanning mechanisms, including space-charge- controlled beam deflection, composition gradient-induced beam deflection, and temperature gradient-induced beam deflection are harnessed. Since multi-dimensional scanning can be realized in a single KTN crystal, it represents a compact and cost-effective approach to realize multi-dimensional scanning, which can be very useful for many applications, including high speed, high resolution imaging, and rapid 3D printing.

  13. Study on controllable LC-micro blazed grating beam deflector in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junbo; Xu, Suzhi; Zhang, Jingjing; Chang, Shengli

    2015-02-01

    A liquid crystal (LC) beam deflector with a microblazed grating produced by stepping photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE) was reported. A homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) materials are filled inside the microcavity of blazed grating, and sandwiched between two glass plates. An indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode is deposited on it to provide the beam steering capability. Our LC-micro blazed grating device gives a high diffractive efficiency (about 95%) and a controllable large steering angle over 7.2° (for ne) and 1.7° (for no), respectively. It was found that this type of non-mechanical beam steering without any moving parts is ideally suited for applications in optical communication and optical interconnection network.

  14. Precision beam pointing control with jitter attenuation by optical deflector exhibiting dynamic hysteresis in COIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan-Hua; Zhang, Zeng-Bao; Zhang, Zhi-Guo; Liu, Qin; He, Xin; Shi, Wen-Bo; Mao, Jian-Qin; Jin, Yu-Qi

    2015-02-01

    Due to the existence of various disturbances during the lasing process of the chemical oxygen iodine laser (COIL), the optical beam pointing performance is severely degraded. In this paper, an adaptive control methodology is proposed for the precise pointing control of the optical beam with active beam jitter rejection using a giant magnetostrictive optical deflector (GMOD) which exhibits severe dynamic hysteresis nonlinearity. In particular, a least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) based fast compensator is employed to eliminate the dynamic hysteresis without the inverse model construction. Then an improved feedforward adaptive filter is developed to deal with jitter attenuation when the full-coherent reference signal is unavailable. To improve the stability and overall robustness of the controller, especially when a large initial bias exists, a PI controller is placed in parallel with the adaptive filter. Experimental results validate the precise pointing ability of the proposed control method.

  15. Development of novel high-speed en face optical coherence tomography system using KTN optical beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Fukuda, Akihiro; Miyazu, Jun; Ueno, Masahiro; Toyoda, Seiji; Kobayashi, Junya

    2015-02-01

    We developed a novel high-speed en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a KTa1-xNbxO3 (KTN) optical beam deflector. Using the imaging system, fast scanning was performed at 200 kHz by the KTN beam deflector, while slow scanning was performed at 400 Hz by the galvanometer mirror. In a preliminary experiment, we obtained en face OCT images of a human fingerprint at 400 fps. This is the highest speed reported in time-domain en face OCT imaging and is comparable to the speed of swept-source OCT. A 3D-OCT image of a sweat gland was also obtained by our imaging system.

  16. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1996-01-01

    An improved magnetically-confined anode plasma pulsed ion beam source. Beam rotation effects and power efficiency are improved by a magnetic design which places the separatrix between the fast field flux structure and the slow field structure near the anode of the ion beam source, by a gas port design which localizes the gas delivery into the gap between the fast coil and the anode, by a pre-ionizer ringing circuit connected to the fast coil, and by a bias field means which optimally adjusts the plasma formation position in the ion beam source.

  17. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  18. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  19. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  20. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    In this report, a short review of electron beam particle precharging using a pulsed electric field is presented in Section B-1. Section B-2 details the design and installation of a remote focusing gear train which will allow much greater control over the particle charge measurement capability of the charge vs. radius apparatus. Under Section B-3, progress on the electrical shielding of the rotating spark gap power supply using a large Faraday cage is described. Efforts to prevent RFI interference from adversely affecting the Climet particle counter and the MicroMac current measurement device using a variety of techniques are also presented in this section. The basic effort is to optimize the removal efficiency for fly ash particles. 13 figs.

  2. Ultrashort laser pulse beam shaping.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Ren, Yuhang; Lüpke, Gunter

    2003-02-01

    We calculated the temporal and spatial characteristics of an ultrashort laser pulse propagating through a diffractive beam-shaping system that converts a Gaussian beam into a beam with a uniform irradiance profile that was originally designed for continuous waves [Proc. SPIE 2863, 237(1996)]. The pulse front is found to be considerably curved for a 10-fs pulse, resulting in a temporal broadening of the pulse that increases with increasing radius. The spatial intensity distribution deviates significantly from a top-hat profile, whereas the fluence shows a homogeneous radial distribution.

  3. Optical Multiplications With Single Element 2-D Acousto-Optic Laser Beam Deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soos, Jolanta I.; Leepa, Douglas C.; Rosemeier, Ronald G.

    1989-05-01

    With the current need for developing very fast computers in comparison to conventional digital chip based systems, the future for optical based signal processing is very bright. Attention has turned to a different application of optics utilizing mathematical operations, in which case operations are numerical, sometimes discrete, and often algebraic in nature. Interest has been so vigorous that many view it as a small revolution in optics, whereby optical signal processing is beginning to encompass what is frequently described as optical computing. The term is fully intended to imply a close comparison with the operations performed by scientific digital canputers. This paper will describe the applications of single element 2-D acousto-optic deflectors for optical multiplication systems.

  4. Pulsed laser beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, C.M.; Jones, R.W.

    1982-07-13

    A pulsed laser beam intensity monitor measures the peak power within a selectable cross section of a test laser beam and measures integrated energy of the beam during the pulse period of a test laser. A continuous wave laser and a pulsed ruby laser are coaxially arranged for simultaneously transmitting optical output energy through a crystal flat during the time a test laser pulse is transmitted through the flat. Due to stress birefringence in the crystal, the ruby laser pulse transmitted through the flat is recorded and analyzed to provide peak power information about the test laser output pulse, and the continuous wave laser output reflected from the crystal flat provides a measurement of energy during the test laser pulse.

  5. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  6. Beam Wiggler operating in high frequency and single-pulse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltsov, A. Y.; Kolomiysky, Arkadiy N.; Kovalsky, N. G.; Kryzhko, V. V.; Manes, Kenneth R.; Pergament, Michael I.

    1999-07-01

    The possibility to control an intensity distribution in the far field of a powerful laser system by rapid motion of a focal spot is considered. Quadruple electro optic deflector on the base of LiNgO3 crystal installed in resonance capacity with 1 cm clear aperture has been developed, constructed and tested both in high frequency and single pulse operation modes. The main parameters of the device are as follows: amplitude of the angular deflection +/- 4 dif. limits at 6.5 GHz operation frequency, total angular deflection 12 dif. limits in the single ns-pulse operation mode. Results of the Beam Wiggler dynamic testing are presented and discussed.

  7. LARGE ANGLE ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM DEFLECTOR FOR THE INFRARED BASED ON A FERROELECTRIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Gahagan, K. T.; Casson, J. L.; Robinson, J. M.; Scymgeour, D. A.; Gopalan, V.; Libatique, N. J; Tafoya, J.; Jain, R.

    2001-01-01

    An electro-optic beam scanner fabricated on ferroelectric LiTaO{sub 3} is demonstrated which is capable of continuously scanning at wavelengths ranging from 0.4-5 {micro}m. The scanning performance varied from a total deflection angle of 13.38{sup o} at 1558 nm to 16.18{sup o} at 632.8 nm. The dispersion of the r{sub 33} and r{sub 13} electro-optic coefficients of LiTaO{sub 3} with wavelength was also determined.

  8. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  9. Accelerator Fast Kicker R&D with Ultra Compact 50MVA Nano-Second FID Pulse Generator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    overall length of magnet or deflector . This demands a faster kicker system. To inject a 24 GeV beam into RHIC, the rise time of the kicker...kicker magnet or deflector length. In order to maintaining the same overall strength, six kicker modules, instead of four, will be used with shorter...individual kicker magnets or deflector length. This reduces the electrical pulse rise time constraint. The main parameters of injection kicker

  10. Pulse beam heating of the solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlicky, Marian

    1990-12-01

    A response of the solar atmosphere to pulse beam heating is computed using a one-dimensional hybrid code. While the hydrodynamic part of this program is used to compute the atmospheric response, the pulse beam decelerated by electron-electron and electron-neutral hydrogen interactions in the dense layers of the solar atmosphere is represented by particles. In this new description of an electron beam, the finite transit time of accelerated electrons in the flare loops is taken into account and the hard X-ray radiation is computed directly. Four different pulse beams are considered and their effects are compared. Moreover, the return current losses of the pulse beam are discussed.

  11. Deflector for XFEL TDS BC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, E. V.; Zavadtsev, A. A.; Zavadtsev, D. A.; Kravchuk, L. V.; Paramonov, V. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Churanov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Deflector is the part of the Transverse Deflecting System TDS BC1 of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). TDS BC1 is located on the XFEL beam line at the coordinate z=206 m. This system is designed to monitor the longitudinal phase space and the emittance of the accelerated electron bunch after Bunch Compressor 1 (BC1), where electron beam energy is 600 MeV. The deflector includes waveguide window, waveguide load, E-bend, ion pump adapters, two antennas, two ion pumps and 1.7 m long disk-loaded EH-hybrid mode deflecting structure. Operating frequency is 2997.2 MHz. Input RF power is up to 24 MW. The deflector has been manufactured, and all designed RF parameters have been obtained experimentally at low RF power level.

  12. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  13. Breakdown mechanisms in electrostatic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, M.; Cuttone, G.; Zappalà, E.; Passarello, S.

    2001-12-01

    The Electrostatic Beam Deflectors for the K800 Superconducting Cyclotron are the most critical elements of the beam extraction system. It has been carried out an accurate investigation from the microscopic point of view, leading to a better comprehension of the complex phenomena taking part in the breakdown process. The environmental conditions are high electric field (up to 130 kV/cm), high magnetic field (up to 5 T) in addition with high energy (70 MeV/u) and high power ion beam. It has been found that all the materials constituent the electrostatic deflector, and not only the electrodes, give an important contribute to the mechanism of breakdown that occurs in two main ways: insulator metalization and enhanced electrodes electron emission. These two effects are involved in a positive feedback process which amplifies the effects leading to a fast breakdown. These phenomena are here shown and some possible solutions are at the moment under test using several bulk (Mo, Ti, Cu) and coating materials (TiN, Diamond Like Carbon).

  14. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  15. Multiple-beam pulse shaping and preamplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; VanWonterghem, B.W.; Burkhart, S.C.; Davin, J.M.

    1994-11-09

    Glass fusion laser systems typically use a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) architecture, where control of the optical pulse temporal and spatial parameters is accomplished mainly in the master oscillator and low power optics. The pulses from this low power ``front end`` are amplified in the power amplifier, which modifies the pulse shape temporally and spatially. Nonlinear frequency conversion crystals following the amplifier further change the pulse before it reaches the target. To effectively control the optical pulse on target for different types of experiments, and compensate for nonlinearity in the preceding optics, the front end system must be versatile enough to easily control many pulse parameters over a large range. The front end pulse generation system described in this article represents a new approach to this problem. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) has 192 beamlines, each of which requires an input pulse of up to 12 Joules in around 4 ns equivalent square pulse length. Considerations of laser architecture for supplying each of these beamlines from a central oscillator system were crucial in the design of the front end. Previous lasers have used bulk optics to split a single oscillator signal and report beams to multiple amplifier chains. A key idea in the current design is to replace bulk optic transport with fibers, eliminating large opto-mechanical subsystems. Another important concept is convenient pulse forming using low voltage integrated optic modulators. The integrated optic and fiber optic concepts resulted in the current pulse generation designs for NEF. An important advantage is that each of the beamlines can have an independently controlled temporal pulse shape, which provides for precise balance of instantaneous power on target.

  16. Generation of pulsed ion beams by an inductive storage pulsed power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; Maeda, Sadao

    1990-10-01

    A pulsed power generator by an inductive energy storage system is extremely compact and light in comparison with a conventional pulsed power generator, which consists of a Marx bank and a water pulse forming line. A compact and light pulse power generator is applied to the generation of pulsed ion beams. A thin copper fuse is used an an opening switch, which is necessary in the inductive storage pulsed power generator. A magnetically insulated diode is used for the generation of ion beams. The pulsed ion beams are successfully generated by the inductive storage pulsed power generator for the first time.

  17. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  18. Materials processing with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    We review research investigating the application of intense pulsed ion beams (IPIBs) for the surface treatment and coating of materials. The short range (0.1-10 {mu}m) and high-energy density (1-50 J/cm{sup 2}) of these short-pulsed ({le} 1 {mu}s) beams (with ion currents I = 5 - 50 kA, and energies E = 100 - 1000 keV) make them ideal to flash-heat a target surface, similar to the more familiar pulsed laser processes. IPIB surface treatment induces rapid melt and solidification at up to 10{sup 10} K/s to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures. At higher energy density the target surface is vaporized, and the ablated vapor is condensed as coatings onto adjacent substrates or as nanophase powders. Progress towards the development of robust, high-repetition rate IPIB accelerators is presented along with economic estimates for the cost of ownership of this technology.

  19. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 1: Invited papers, pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  20. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  1. Enhanced Photoacoustic Beam Profiling of Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Santiago, G.; Paz, M.; Slezak, V.; Peuriot, A.

    2013-09-01

    An improved version of a photoacoustic beam profiler of pulsed lasers is presented. The new model resorts to high-bandwidth condenser microphones to register higher-order, excited acoustic modes, thus enabling more accurate profiling. In addition, Xe was used as a buffer gas since its high atomic weight further reduces the eigenfrequencies. Furthermore, a new gas-handling system makes up for some deficiencies found in the first model. The system was calibrated using the Airy pattern generated with a pinhole illuminated by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser that excited traces. Once calibrated, the beam profile of a TEA laser was obtained, using ethylene as the absorbing species. This profiler returns more accurate profiles than thermal paper.

  2. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Altman, David A.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  3. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron.

    PubMed

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  4. Fabrication of miniaturized electrostatic deflectors using LIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.H.; Khan-Malek, C.; Muray, L.P.

    1997-04-01

    Miniaturized electron beam columns ({open_quotes}microcolumns{close_quotes}) have been demonstrated to be suitable candidates for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), e-beam lithography and other high resolution, low voltage applications. In the present technology, microcolumns consist of {open_quotes}selectively scaled{close_quotes} micro-sized lenses and apertures, fabricated from silicon membranes with e-beam lithography, reactive ion beam etching and other semiconductor thin-film techniques. These miniaturized electron-optical elements provide significant advantages over conventional optics in performance and ease of fabrication. Since lens aberrations scale roughly with size, it is possible to fabricate simple microcolumns with extremely high brightness sources and electrostatic objective lenses, with resolution and beam current comparable to conventional e-beam columns. Moreover since microcolumns typically operate at low voltages (1 KeV), the proximity effects encountered in e-beam lithography become negligible. For high throughput applications, batch fabrication methods may be used to build large parallel arrays of microcolumns. To date, the best reported performance with a 1 keV cold field emission cathode, is 30 nm resolution at a working distance of 2mm in a 3.5mm column. Fabrication of the microcolumn deflector and stigmator, however, have remained beyond the capabilities of conventional machining operations and semiconductor processing technology. This work examines the LIGA process as a superior alternative to fabrication of the deflectors, especially in terms of degree of miniaturization, dimensional control, placement accuracy, run-out, facet smoothness and choice of suitable materials. LIGA is a combination of deep X-ray lithography, electroplating, and injection molding processes which allow the fabrication of microstructures.

  5. High voltage conditioning of the electrostatic deflector of MARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, J.; Johansen, U.; Sarén, J.; Tuunanen, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2016-06-01

    MARA is a new recoil mass separator in the Accelerator Laboratory of University of Jyväskylä (JYFL-ACCLAB) with a mass resolving power of 250 and an ion-optical configuration of QQQDEDM . In this paper the construction, control and conditioning of its electrostatic deflector are described. The deflector was designed for voltages up to 500 kV accross the gap, corresponding to a 3.6 MV/m field, to accomodate fusion reactions with inverse kinematics. Titanium electrodes with a beam dump opening in the anode are used. The conditioning procedure, which has been used repeatedly to take the deflector to 450 kV, is described, along with the safety systems and precautions that are in place.

  6. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mc Cuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rose, Chris R; Sanchez, Manolito; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Trainham, C; Williams, John; Scarpetti, Raymond; Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  7. Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitively pulsed, intense- ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.A.; Olson, J.C.; Reass, W.A.; Coates, D.M.; Hunt, J.W.; Schleinitz, H.M.; Lovberg, R.H.; Greenly, J.B.

    1996-07-01

    A number of intense ion beams applications are emerging requiring repetitive high-average-power beams. These applications include ablative deposition of thin films, rapid melt and resolidification for surface property enhancement, advanced diagnostic neutral beams for the next generation of Tokamaks, and intense pulsed-neutron sources. We are developing a 200-250 keV, 15 kA, 1 {mu}s duration, 1-30 Hz intense ion beam accelerator to address these applications.

  8. Inactivation kinetics of Escherichia coli by pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Chalise, P R; Hotta, E; Matak, K E; Jaczynski, J

    2007-09-01

    A novel and compact low-energy (keV) high-power pulsed electron beam (e-beam) that utilizes a secondary emission electron gun (SEEG) was designed and constructed. Escherichia coli JM 109 at a concentration of 10(6) CFU/mL was spread-plated on Luria-Bertani (LB) medium and subjected to the SEEG e-beam. The e-beam was administered as 1 or 5 pulses. The duration of a single pulse was constant at 5 micros, e-beam current density was constant at 25 mA/cm2, and e-beam energy varied between 60 and 82.5 keV. Following treatment with the SEEG e-beam, survivors of the irradiated E. coli samples were enumerated by a standard 10-fold dilution and spread-plated. The survivor curves were plotted on logarithmic scale as a function of e-beam dose. The D10-values were calculated as a negative reciprocal of the slope of the survivor curves. The D10-values for E. coli inactivated with 1- and 5-pulse SEEG e-beam were 0.0026 and 0.0217 Gy, respectively. These D10-values were considerably lower than published D10-values for E. coli inactivated with conventional high-energy continuous e-beam, likely due to shorter exposure time (t), greater current density (J), and a pulse mode of the SEEG e-beam. The SEEG e-beam showed promising results for microbial inactivation in a nonthermal manner; however, due to low energy of the SEEG e-beam, current applications are limited to surface decontamination. The SEEG e-beam may be an efficient processing step for surface inactivation of food-borne pathogens on ready-to-eat products, including fresh and leafy vegetables.

  9. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  10. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  11. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  12. Ultra-Short Electron Bunch and X-Ray Temporal Diagnostics with an X-Band Transverse Deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; Behrens, C.; /DESY

    2011-12-13

    The measurement of ultra-short electron bunches on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), generation of sub-ten femtosecond X-ray pulses is possible, and some efforts have been put into both ultra-short electron and X-ray beam diagnostics. Here we propose a single-shot method using a transverse rf deflector (X-band) after the undulator to reconstruct both the electron bunch and X-ray temporal profiles. Simulation studies show that about 1 fs (rms) time resolution may be achievable in the LCLS and is applicable to a wide range of FEL wavelengths and pulse lengths. The jitter, resolution and other related issues will be discussed. The successful operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), with its capability of generating free-electron laser (FEL) X-ray pulses from a few femtoseconds (fs) up to a few hundred fs, opens up vast opportunities for studying atoms and molecules on this unprecedented ultrashort time scale. However, tremendous challenges remain in the measurement and control of these ultrashort pulses with femtosecond precision, for both the electron beam (e-beam) and the X-ray pulses. For ultrashort e-beam bunch length measurements, a standard method has been established at LCLS using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) deflector, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as {approx} 10 fs rms. However, the e-beam with low charges of 20 pC at LCLS, which is expected to be less than 10 fs in duration, is too short to be measured using this transverse deflector. The measurement of the electron bunch length is helpful in estimating the FEL X-ray pulse duration. However, for a realistic beam, such as that with a Gaussian shape or even a spiky profile, the FEL amplification varies along the bunch due to peak current or emittance variation. This will cause differences between the temporal

  13. Pulse to pulse beam trajectory determination at the IP

    SciTech Connect

    Koska, W.; Wagner, S.

    1988-08-02

    It has long been known that a precise measurement of the SLC beam trajectory through the IP region is vital both from a machine and a detector point of view. One of the primary techniques used to maximize luminosity is the measurement of the deflection angle of one beam produced by the electromagnetic interaction with the other beam. In order to implement this procedure a pair of precision Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) were installed within the Final Triplet of quadrapoles on each side of the IP. Before the IP BPMs could be used to measure beam-beam deflection, a series of measurements were made of the coefficients which relate the setting of an orbit correction magnet to the position of the beam at a particular BPM (R/sub 12/s). The purpose was to expose any problems such as misconnected cables, etc., by comparing the measured R/sub 12/s with theoretical predictions from the model of the Final Focus region. A technique developed that uses position measurements in the long BPMs to determine a three parameter fit to the beam trajectory at the IP. The three parameters in the fit are the beam position, the incoming angle and the deflection angle. The result was very successful and allows the observation of beam-beam deflection even under marginal conditions. The purpose of this memo is to clear up the technical points and to demonstrate that the simplicity of the fit should allow the implementation of this procedure at the micro level, where it could provide trajectory information in real time which would go a long way toward making it useful as a fast feedback tool and in addition allow easy real time access to beam position data by the Mark II.

  14. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  15. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  16. Pulsed Electric Discharge Laser Technology. Electron Beam Window Foil Material.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    6.0 INTERFEROMETRIC MEASUREMENT OF FOIL MOVEMENT A simple Michelson interferometer was used to measure foil movement on the test rig. Because the...TURNING BEAM MIRRORS BEAM DISPLAYFOCUEED IRIS AT FOOS. OPTICAL FIBRE * BUNDLE Figure 49. Schematic of interferometer . -98-7 reflected speckle. The...As a check on the pulse simulation, the actual movement of an electron-beam foil window was measured by interferometry. A speckle interferometer which

  17. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PULSING A CHARGED PARTICLE BEAM

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.; Kuenning, R.W.; Harmon, R.K.

    1961-05-01

    A system is offered for pulsing a continuous beam of charged particles to form beam pulses that are consistently rectangular and of precise time durations which may be varied over an extremely wide range at a widely variable range of repetition rates. The system generally comprises spaced deflection plates on opposite sides of a beam axis in between which a unidirectional bias field is established to deflect the beam for impingement on an off-axis collector. The bias field is periodically neutralized by the application of fast rise time substantially rectangular pulses to one of the deflection plates in opposition to the bias field and then after a time delay to the other deflection plate in aiding relation to the bias field and during the flat crest portion of the bias opposing pulses. The voltage distribution of the resulting deflection field then includes neutral or zero portions which are of symmetrical substantially rectangular configuration relative to time and during which the beam axially passes the collector in the form of a substantially rectangular beam pulse.

  18. Evolution of the frequency chirp of Gaussian pulses and beams when passing through a pulse compressor.

    PubMed

    Li, Derong; Lv, Xiaohua; Bowlan, Pamela; Du, Rui; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2009-09-14

    The evolution of the frequency chirp of a laser pulse inside a classical pulse compressor is very different for plane waves and Gaussian beams, although after propagating through the last (4th) dispersive element, the two models give the same results. In this paper, we have analyzed the evolution of the frequency chirp of Gaussian pulses and beams using a method which directly obtains the spectral phase acquired by the compressor. We found the spatiotemporal couplings in the phase to be the fundamental reason for the difference in the frequency chirp acquired by a Gaussian beam and a plane wave. When the Gaussian beam propagates, an additional frequency chirp will be introduced if any spatiotemporal couplings (i.e. angular dispersion, spatial chirp or pulse front tilt) are present. However, if there are no couplings present, the chirp of the Gaussian beam is the same as that of a plane wave. When the Gaussian beam is well collimated, the introduced frequency chirp predicted by the plane wave and Gaussian beam models are in closer agreement. This work improves our understanding of pulse compressors and should be helpful for optimizing dispersion compensation schemes in many applications of femtosecond laser pulses.

  19. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse.

  20. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Letzring, S.A.

    1993-11-16

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse. 10 figures.

  1. Methods for the shaping high-power picosecond laser pulses with a high-contrast ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Malinov, V. A.; Charukchev, A. V.; Chernov, V. N.; Nikitin, N. V.; Potapov, S. L.; Efanov, V. M.; Yarin, P. M.

    1998-02-20

    We present the performance of the electrooptical system based on four Pockels cells with 10 and 20 mm diameters, each of them is driving by its own drift step recovery diode pulse generator. We are developing electro-optic deflector system for CPA laser using two identical deflectors (diverging and converging) and three spatial filters. The results of numerical modeling of the time-dependent distributions of the intensity in the beam are presented. A peak-to-background intensity ratio more than five orders is achieved by this technique. We have developed a new pulse generator based on single drift step recovery diode producing two identical electrical pulses with output voltage up to 15 kV, FWHM of 1.5 ns, rise time of 0.7 ns and jitter of 100 ps at a 100 Hz repetition rate to electro-optic deflectors.

  2. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  3. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-01-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  4. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-08-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  5. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  6. Pulsed-electron-beam annealing of ion-implantation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, A. C.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Little, R. G.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Short-duration high-intensity pulsed electron beams have been used to anneal ion-implantation damage in silicon and to electrically activate the dopant species. Lattice regrowth and dopant activation were determined using He(+)-4 backscattering, SEM, TEM, and device performance characteristics as diagnostic techniques. The annealing mechanism is believed to be liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth initiating from the substrate. The high-temperature transient pulse produced by the electron beam causes the dopant to diffuse rapidly in the region where the liquid state is achieved.

  7. Study for compensation of unexpected image placement error caused by VSB mask writer deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun-joo; Choi, Min-kyu; Moon, Seong-yong; Cho, Han-Ku; Doh, Jonggul; Ahn, Jinho

    2012-11-01

    The Electron Optical System (EOS) is designed for the electron beam machine employing a vector scanned variable shaped beam (VSB) with the deflector. Most VSB systems utilize multi stage deflection architecture to obtain a high precision and a high-speed deflection at the same time. Many companies use the VSB mask writer and they have a lot of experiences about Image Placement (IP) error suffering from contaminated EOS deflector. And also most of VSB mask writer users are having already this error. In order to use old VSB mask writer, we introduce the method how to compensate unexpected IP error from VSB mask writer. There are two methods to improve this error due to contaminated deflector. The one is the usage of 2nd stage grid correction in addition to the original stage grid. And the other is the usage of uncontaminated area in the deflector. According to the results of this paper, 30% of IP error can be reduced by 2nd stage grid correction and the change of deflection area in deflector. It is the effective method to reduce the deflector error at the VSB mask writer. And it can be the one of the solution for the long-term production of photomask.

  8. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  9. Pulsed-Electron-Beam Processing of Materials for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koval, N. N.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Teresov, A. D.; Denisova, Yu. A.; Petrikova, E. A.

    2014-02-01

    The data on investigation of sample materials used for fabrication of medical implants (stainless steel 316L, and VT1-0 and CoCrMo (Wironit) alloys) are reported, which were subjected to surface treatment with the pulsed electron beam having the following parameters: pulse duration - 20-200 μs, energy density per pulse - 8-20 J/cm2, number of pulses - 1-5, and pulse repetition frequency - 0.3-1 Hz. A significant structure rearrangement is revealed, which is followed by changes in the modified surface layer properties of these materials. The surface roughness is found to decrease, while the corrosion resistance is improved; slight changes are also observed in the modified layer microhardness compared to the initial state.

  10. Radiation damping in pulsed Gaussian beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Chris; Marklund, Mattias

    2012-01-01

    We consider the effects of radiation damping on the electron dynamics in a Gaussian-beam model of a laser field. For high intensities, i.e., with dimensionless intensity a0≫1, it is found that the dynamics divides into three regimes. For low-energy electrons (low initial γ factor, γ0) the radiation damping effects are negligible. At higher energies, but still at 2γ0a0 one is in a regime of radiation-reaction-induced electron capture. This capture is found to be stable with respect to the spatial properties of the electron beam and results in a significant energy loss of the electrons. In this regime the plane-wave model of the laser field provides a good description of the dynamics, whereas for lower energies the Gaussian-beam and plane-wave models differ significantly. Finally the dynamics is considered for the case of an x-ray free-electron laser field. It is found that the significantly lower intensities of such fields inhibit the damping effects.

  11. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  12. Self-focusing of electromagnetic pulsed beams in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, Mohammad; Verma, M. P.; Sodha, Mahendra Singh

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, the self-focusing of an electromagnetic pulsed beam in a collisional plasma has been investigated in the paraxial approximation, following the formalism developed by Akhmanov. The energy balance equation for electrons, the equation expressing the equality of pressure gradient (of electrons and ions) to the force due to space charge field, and the equation for the beam width parameter f (obtained by following Akhmanov's approach) have been simultaneously solved for given initial (z=0) time profile of the pulse to obtain f as a function of {xi} (cz/{omega}r{sub 0}{sup 2}) and t{sup '}=t-z/V{sub g}, where V{sub g} is the group velocity. Both Gaussian and sine time profiles of the pulse have been investigated.

  13. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  14. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  15. Progress Towards Plasma Pulse Compression of High Energy, Long Pulse Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkwood, R K; Ping, Y; Rygg, R; Wilks, S; Meezan, N; Niemann, C; Landen, O; Fisch, N; Malkin, V; Valeo, E; Wurtele, J

    2008-06-19

    Compression of laser pulses to < {approx} 1-10 ps duration using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a plasma promises to provide unprecedented power and intensity for a variety of applications, by avoiding the limits to fluence and intensity that are needed to avoid damage to the solid state optics that are used in conventional approaches. In particular, the ability to compress pump beam pulses of {approx} ns duration will allow present facilities with 10's kJ to over a MJ of energy to produce ultra short pulses efficiently, advancing applications in; fusion by fast ignition, x-ray production of high energy density experiments, as well as laser driven particle accelerators. We will discuss a series of experiments to demonstrate the needed beam amplification rate, and focal spot quality in a < 3mm plasma with the properties needed for compression of these pulses (n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}, T{sub e} 200 to 300 eV) when the plasma is extended. The experiments use He plasmas produced with a 300 J, 1 ns, beam at the Jupiter Laser facility to amplify a counter-propagating, ultra-short pulse (USP) seed by a factor of 10x to 37x and study the dependence of the amplification, the associated non-linear wave response, and the resulting beam quality and energy, on the intensity of both seed and pump beam. In particular, a regime in which amplification of USP beams is achieved while maintaining a low angular divergence of the beam consistent with good focal spot quality will be discussed.

  16. Photovoltaic module with removable wind deflector

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-05-28

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module, a deflector, and a clip. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes a support arm forming a seat. The deflector defines a front face and a rear face, with the clip extending from either the trailing frame member or the rear face of the deflector. In a mounted state, the deflector is nested within the seat and is releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip. In some embodiments, the support arm forms a second seat, with the PV module assembly providing a second mounted state in which the deflector is in a differing orientation/slope, nested within the second seat and releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip.

  17. Photovoltaic module with removable wind deflector

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan [El Cerrito, CA; Graves, Simon [Berkeley, CA; Danning, Matt [Oakland, CA; Culligan, Matthew [Berkeley, CA

    2012-08-07

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module, a deflector, and a clip. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes a support arm forming a seat. The deflector defines a front face and a rear face, with the clip extending from either the trailing frame member or the rear face of the deflector. In a mounted state, the deflector is nested within the seat and is releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip. In some embodiments, the support arm forms a second seat, with the PV module assembly providing a second mounted state in which the deflector is in a differing orientation/slope, nested within the second seat and releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip.

  18. Photovoltaic module with removable wind deflector

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2014-02-18

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module, a deflector, and a clip. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes a support arm forming a seat. The deflector defines a front face and a rear face, with the clip extending from either the trailing frame member or the rear face of the deflector. In a mounted state, the deflector is nested within the seat and is releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip. In some embodiments, the support arm forms a second seat, with the PV module assembly providing a second mounted state in which the deflector is in a differing orientation/slope, nested within the second seat and releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip.

  19. Terahertz beam steering using interference of femtosecond optical pulses.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Koji; Maki, Ken-ichiro; Otani, Chiko

    2012-09-24

    A terahertz (THz) beam steering method is demonstrated by applying the characteristic of grating lobe (GL) radiation from a linear array antenna and the interference of femtosecond optical pulses. A photoconductive device is illuminated by two femtosecond laser beams combined at an angle of less than 0.5°. Considering the interference pattern as a THz point source array, THz GL radiation is generated through the superposition of radiation emitted from all point sources and steered by varying the interval of the interference pattern. The THz beam direction could be changed by 20° at 0.93THz by varying the relative incidence angle of the pump beams by 0.033°.

  20. Deposition and surface treatment with intense pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.C.; Davis, H.A.; Rej, D.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Stinnett, R.W.; McIntyre, D.C.

    1995-02-08

    Intense pulsed ion beams (500 keV, 30 kA, 0.5 {mu}s) are being investigated for materials processing. Demonstrated and potential applications include film deposition, glazing and joining, alloying and mixing, cleaning and polishing, corrosion improvement, polymer surface treatments, and nanophase powder synthesis. Initial experiments at Los Alamos have emphasized thin-film formation by depositing beam ablated target material on substrates. We have deposited films with complex stoichiometry such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, and formed diamond-like-carbon films. Instantaneous deposition rates of 1 mm/sec have been achieved because of the short ion range (typically 1{mu}m), excellent target coupling, and the inherently high energy of these beams. Currently the beams are produced in single shot uncomplicated diodes with good electrical efficiency. High-voltage modulator technology and diodes capable of repetitive firing, needed for commercial application, are being developed.

  1. Pulsed power requirements for the Sandia recirculating electron beam linac

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, W.K.; Shope, S.L.; Hasti, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Compact, high gradient, linear induction accelerators may be achieved by recirculating the electron beam in phase with a repeating accelerating voltage. A two-cavity recirculating accelerator has been designed and operated in a single-pass mode. The prototype accelerator uses a 2.5-MV, 20-kA, 25-ns duration injector and an accelerating cavity that will produce a total accelerating voltage of 5.3 MV for four passes. The design of this machine involved key areas of development in pulsed power, specifically, low-jitter spark gaps and vacuum-liquid interfaces for bipolar electric fields. The extension of this technology to multiple-pulse machines will require advances in liquid dielectric breakdown strength and switch surface flashover, as well as additional improvements in lower inductance switching and vacuum-liquid interface flashover. This paper will discuss the recirculation concept, pulsed-power design parameters, machine scaling relationships that are valid for state-of-the-art and near-term pulsed-power parameters, and summarize the pulsed-power and beam transport experiments.

  2. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  3. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  4. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at JPARC: Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishima, Kenji; Ino, Takashi; Taketani, Kaoru; Yamada, Takahito; Katayama, Ryo; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yamashita, Satoru; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is an important parameter for a test of the Standard Model of elementary particles, as well for the production of light mass nuclei in big bang nucleosynthesis. There are two principally different approaches to measure the neutron lifetime: In-beam methods and storage of ultracold neutron. At present, there is a discrepancy of 8.4 sec (3.8 sigma) between the two methods. We are performing a new In-beam experiment with an intense pulsed neutron source at J-PARC, which has different systematic uncertainties from the previous experiments. We introduce the overview of the experiment and report present status.

  5. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  6. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  7. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  8. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F. -J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  9. Silicon carbide formation with e-beam and laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Anna, E.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Nassisi, V.; Perrone, A.; Majni, G.; Mengucci, P.

    Polycrystalline SiC layers were obtained through pulsed annealing of thin (100 nm) carbon films deposited on single-crystalline silicon wafers. The samples were submitted to electron beam irradiation (25 keV, 50 ns) at various current densities in vacuum (˜10 -4 mbar) and to XeCl excimer laser pulses (308 nm, 15 ns) in air. Rutherford backscattering analysis showed that in the e-beam annealed samples mixing of the elements at the interface starts at current densities of about 1200 A/cm 2. The mixed layer thickness increases almost linearly with current density. At current densities higher than 2400 A/cm 2 ablation of the C film was always observed. Using the XeCl excimer laser, a good intermixing of the deposited C film with the Si substrate was observed after a single 0.3 J/cm 2 pulse. From the RBS spectra a composition of the intermixed layers close to the SiC compound was deduced. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction studies clearly evidenced the formation of SiC polycrystals.

  10. X-BAND TRAVELING WAVE RF DEFLECTOR STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.W.; Tantawi, S.; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    Design studies on the X-Band transverse RF deflectors operating at HEM{sub ll} mode have been made for two different applications. One is for beam measurement of time-sliced emittance and slice energy spread for the upgraded LCLS project, its optimization in RF efficiency and system design are carefully considered. Another is to design an ultra-fast RF kicker in order to pick up single bunches from the bunch-train of the B-factory storage ring. The challenges are to obtain very short structure filling time with high RF group velocity and good RF efficiency with reasonable transverse shunt impedance. Its RF system will be discussed.

  11. Modeling of beam-target interaction during pulsed electron beam ablation of graphite: Case of melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muddassir; Henda, Redhouane

    2017-02-01

    A one-dimensional thermal model based on a two-stage heat conduction equation is employed to investigate the ablation of graphite target during nanosecond pulsed electron beam ablation. This comprehensive model accounts for the complex physical phenomena comprised of target heating, melting and vaporization upon irradiation with a polyenergetic electron beam. Melting and vaporization effects induced during ablation are taken into account by introducing moving phase boundaries. Phase transition induced during ablation is considered through the temperature dependent thermodynamic properties of graphite. The effect of electron beam efficiency, power density, and accelerating voltage on ablation is analyzed. For an electron beam operating at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency of 0.6, the model findings show that the target surface temperature can reach up to 7500 K at the end of the pulse. The surface begins to melt within 25 ns from the pulse start. For the same process conditions, the estimated ablation depth and ablated mass per unit area are about 0.60 μm and 1.05 μg/mm2, respectively. Model results indicate that ablation takes place primarily in the regime of normal vaporization from the surface. The results obtained at an accelerating voltage of 15 kV and efficiency factor of 0.6 are satisfactorily in good accordance with available experimental data in the literature.

  12. Ion beam surface treatment: A new technique for thermally modifying surfaces using intense, pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stinnett, R.W.; Buchheit, R.G.; Neau, E.L.

    1995-08-01

    The emerging capability to produce high average power (10--300 kW) pulsed ion beams at 0.2{minus}2 MeV energies is enabling us to develop a new, commercial-scale thermal surface treatment technology called Ion Beam Surface Treatment (IBEST). This new technique uses high energy, pulsed ({le}500 ns) ion beams to directly deposit energy in the top 1--20 micrometers of the surface of any material. The depth of treatment is controllable by varying the ion energy and species. Deposition of the energy in a thin surface layer allows melft of the layer with relatively small energies (1--10J/cm2) and allows rapid cooling of the melted layer by thermal conduction into the underlying substrate. Typical cooling rates of this process (109 K/sec) are sufficient to cause amorphous layer formation and the production of non-equilibrium microstructures (nanocrystalline and metastable phases). Results from initial experiments confirm surface hardening, amorphous layer and nanocrystalline grain size formation, corrosion resistance in stainless steel and aluminum, metal surface polishing, controlled melt of ceramic surfaces, and surface cleaning and oxide layer removal as well as surface ablation and redeposition. These results follow other encouraging results obtained previously in Russia using single pulse ion beam systems. Potential commercialization of this surface treatment capability is made possible by the combination of two new technologies, a new repetitive high energy pulsed power capability (0.2{minus}2MV, 25--50 kA, 60 ns, 120 Hz) developed at SNL, and a new repetitive ion beam system developed at Cornell University.

  13. Physical source realization of complex source pulsed beams

    PubMed

    Heyman; Lomakin; Kaiser

    2000-04-01

    Complex source pulsed beams (CSPB) are exact wave-packet solutions of the time-dependent wave equation that are modeled mathematically in terms of radiation from a pulsed point source located at a complex space-time coordinate. In the present paper, the physical source realization of the CSPB is explored. This is done in the framework of the acoustic field, as a concrete physical example, but a similar analysis can be applied for electromagnetic CSPB. The physical realization of the CSPB is addressed by deriving exact expressions for the acoustic source distribution in the real coordinate space that generates the CSPB, and by exploring the power and energy flux near these sources. The exact source distribution is of finite support. Special emphasis is placed on deriving simplified source functions and parametrization for the special case where the CSPB are well collimated.

  14. Ultra-precise particle velocities in pulsed supersonic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-07-14

    We describe an improved experimental method for the generation of cold, directed particle bunches, and the highly accurate determination of their velocities in a pulsed supersonic beam, allowing for high-resolution experiments of atoms, molecules, and clusters. It is characterized by a pulsed high pressure jet source with high brilliance and optimum repeatability, a flight distance of few metres that can be varied with a tolerance of setting of 50 {mu}m, and a precision in the mean flight time of particles of better than 10{sup -4}. The technique achieves unmatched accuracies in particle velocities and kinetic energies and also permits the reliable determination of enthalpy changes with very high precision.

  15. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, Gilbert E.; Edwards, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A vacuum-to-air interface (10) is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve (18), from which extends a vacuum-tight duct (26), that termintes in an aperture (28). Means (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48) are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip (30) across the aperture (28) at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band (62) urges foil strip (30), when stationary, against and into the aperture (28). Gas pressure means (68, 70) periodically lift off and separate foil strip (30) from aperture (28), so that it may be readily advanced.

  16. Pulsed Electron Beam Spectroscopy for Temperature Measurements in Hypersonic Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    atmospheric pr essures wit hin the fligh t envelope of scramjet-powered flight vehicles. Because of the pressure disparity between measured flow and me...represents what might be o btained from the pulse d e-beam s ystem if it were used in the high-te mperature (but high-pr essure ) st agnation cha...di fferential pressure pump has been developed for pressure separations up to approximately 1 torr. F or higher pr essures , a f ast act ion r otary

  17. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P sub J) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus.

  18. Material selection for electrooptic deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The selection of a material for a practical device is generally guided by a number of criteria, including cost, size, difficulty of fabrication, durability, driver requirements, and system constraints. A quantitative analysis can usually be made for comparison, or a figure of merit can be computed. In the case of materials for electrooptical (EO) devices the choice is often made based on the availability of materials meeting some minimum system requirement. For fast EO deflectors, where a large number of resolvable spots is required, the choice of materials is quite limited. A model of just such a device is proposed; it is based on the resolution of 400 spots and reasonable boundary conditions. The model predicts that to be successful, an EO material must be chosen that has a linear EO coefficient (r/sub 33/) of at least 336 pm/V. A survey was conducted of the EO materials which are generally available. Based on the model and the survey, Czochralski crystal growth of strontium barium niobate (SBN:60) is recommended. Although SBN:60 does not have the largest EO coefficient, it may be the easiest to grow in the required size and optical quality, thus satisfying the availability criterion. It should be borne in mind that many materials may be grown by this technique and there are many new and potential applications for EO materials. 92 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

  19. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha

    2015-08-15

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  20. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Qu, Miao; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm(2) and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  1. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben; Gao, Bruce Z

    2012-09-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability.

  2. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  3. Photoemission studies using femtosecond pulses for high brightness electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Tsang, T.; Fischer, J.

    1990-06-01

    We present the results of a series of experiments where various metal photocathodes are irradiated with ultrashort laser pulses, whose characteristics are: (lambda) = 625 nm, (tau) = 100 fs, PRR = 89.5 MHz, H(nu) = 2 eV and average power 25 mW in each of the two beams. The quantum efficiency of the metals range from approximately 10(exp -12) to 10(exp -8) at a power density of 100 MW/sq cm at normal incidence. Since all the electrons are emitted due to multiphoton processes, these efficiencies are expected to increase substantially at large intensities. The efficiency at 100 MW/sq cm was increased by using p-polarized light at oblique incidence by approximately 20 x and by mediating the electron emission through surface plasmon excitation by approximately 10(exp 3) x. For the low intensities used in these experiments, the electron pulse duration is almost the same as the laser pulse duration for both the bulk and the surface plasmon mediated photoemission.

  4. Flame Deflector Section, Elevation, Water Supply Flow Diagram, Exploded ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Flame Deflector - Section, Elevation, Water Supply Flow Diagram, Exploded Deflector Manifolds, and Interior Perspective - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  5. Pulse-by-pulse multi-beam-line operation for x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Toru; Fukami, Kenji; Inagaki, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Kinjo, Ryota; Kondo, Chikara; Otake, Yuji; Tajiri, Yasuyuki; Takebe, Hideki; Togawa, Kazuaki; Yoshino, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    The parallel operation of plural undulator beam lines is an important means of improving the efficiency and usability of x-ray free-electron laser facilities. After the installation of a second undulator beam line (BL2) at SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA), pulse-by-pulse switching between two beam lines was tested using kicker and dc twin-septum magnets. To maintain a compact size, all undulator beam lines at SACLA are designed to be placed within the same undulator hall located downstream of the accelerator. In order to ensure broad tunability of the laser wavelength, the electron bunches are accelerated to different beam energies optimized for the wavelengths of each beam line. In the demonstration, the 30 Hz electron beam was alternately deflected to two beam lines and simultaneous lasing was achieved with 15 Hz at each beam line. Since the electron beam was deflected twice by 3° in a dogleg to BL2, the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects became non-negligible. Currently in a wavelength range of 4-10 keV, a laser pulse energy of 100 - 150 μ J can be obtained with a reduced peak current of around 1 kA by alleviating the CSR effects. This paper reports the results and operational issues related to the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA.

  6. High pulse energy, high beam quality microsecond-pulse Ti:sapphire laser at 819.7 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chang; Guo, Chuan; Yu, Hai-Bo; Wang, Zhi-Min; Zuo, Jun-Wei; Xia, Yuan-Qin; Bian, Qi; Bo, Yong; Gao, Hong-Wei; Guo, Ya-Ding; Zhang, Sheng; Cui, Da-Fu; Peng, Qin-Jun; Xu, Zu-Yan

    2017-03-01

    In this letter, a high pulse energy and high beam quality 819.7 nm Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser is demonstrated. At incident pump energy of 774 mJ, the maximum output energy of 89 mJ at 819.7 nm with a pulse width of 100 μs is achieved at a repetition rate of 5 Hz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest pulse energy at 819.7 nm with pulse width of hundred microseconds for a Ti:sapphire laser. The beam quality factor M 2 is measured to be 1.18. This specific wavelength with the high pulse energy and high beam quality at 819.7 nm is a promising light source to create a polychromatic laser guide star together with a home-made 589 nm laser via exciting the sodium atoms in the mesospheric atmosphere.

  7. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J. He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z.

    2014-09-15

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  8. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  9. Vibration control in smart coupled beams subjected to pulse excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Dominik; Bajer, Czesław I.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a control method to stabilize the vibration of adjacent structures is presented. The control is realized by changes of the stiffness parameters of the structure's couplers. A pulse excitation applied to the coupled adjacent beams is imposed as the kinematic excitation. For such a representation, the designed control law provides the best rate of energy dissipation. By means of a stability analysis, the performance in different structural settings is studied. The efficiency of the proposed strategy is examined via numerical simulations. In terms of the assumed energy metric, the controlled structure outperforms its passively damped equivalent by over 50 percent. The functionality of the proposed control strategy should attract the attention of practising engineers who seek solutions to upgrade existing damping systems.

  10. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; ...

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore » Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  11. Ultrafast Optical Beam Deflection in a Planar Waveguide for High Dynamic Range Recording at Picosecond Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantos, C H; Heebner, J E

    2008-07-02

    We report the latest performance of an ultrafast, all-optical beam deflector based on a prism array imprinted in a planar waveguide. The deflector enables single-shot, high dynamic range optical recording with picosecond resolution.

  12. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed x- ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, M. C.; Silva, C. R. E.; Oliveira, P. M. C.; da Silva, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed x-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed x-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC x-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed x-rays.

  13. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Chunning; Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  14. Plasma chemical conversion of sulphur hexafluoride initiated by a pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, Galina; Sazonov, Roman; Ponomarev, Denis; Guzeeva, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of plasma chemical conversion of sulphur hexafluoride initiated by a pulsed electron beam (TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator) with the following characteristics: 400-450 keV electron energy, 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J pulse energy, and 5 cm beam diameter. Experiments were conducted on the effect of the pulsed electron beam on SF6 and on mixtures of SF6 with O2, Ar, or N2. For the mixture of SF6 and oxygen, the results indicated chemical reactions involving the formation of a number of products of which one is sulphur, confirming the Wray - Fluorescence Analysis. The plasma chemical conversion of SF6 initiated by the pulsed electron beam was not detected when SF6 was mixed with Ar or N2, suggesting a possible mechanism for the reaction of SF6 in the presence of O2.

  15. Two and Three Beam Pumped Optical Parametric Amplifier of Chirped Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ališauskas, S.; Butkus, R.; Pyragaitė, V.; Smilgevičius, V.; Stabinis, A.; Piskarskas, A.

    2010-04-01

    We present two and three beam pumped optical parametric amplifier of broadband chirped pulses. The seed pulses from Ti:sapphire oscillator were stretched and amplified in a non-collinear geometry pumping with up to three beams derived from independent laser amplifiers. The signal with ˜90 nm bandwidth was amplified up to 0.72 mJ. The conversion efficiency dependence on intersection angles of pump beams is also revealed.

  16. Analysis of the dispersion compensation of acousto-optic deflectors used for multiphoton imaging.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Shaoqun; Lv, Xiaohua; Bi, Kun; Zhan, Cheng; Li, Derong; Chen, Wei R; Xiong, Wenhui; Jacques, Steven L; Luo, Qingming

    2007-01-01

    The acousto-optic deflector (AOD) is highly preferred in laser scanning microscopy for its fast scanning ability and random-addressing capability. However, its application in two-photon microscopy is frustrated by the dispersion of the AOD, which results in beam distortion and pulse lengthening. We report the analysis of simultaneous compensation for the angular dispersion and temporal dispersion of the AOD by merely introducing a single dispersive element such as a prism or a grating. Besides serving as a scanner, the AOD is also a part of the compressor pair by integrating the dispersive nature of the AO interaction. This compensation principle is effective for both one-dimensional (1-D) AOD and two-dimensional (2-D) AOD scanning. Switching from a 1-D to a 2-D system requires proper optical alignment with the compensation element, but does not involve any new components. Analytical expressions are given to illustrate the working principle and to help with understanding the design of the system. Fluorescence images of beads and cells are shown to demonstrate the performance of two-photon microscopy when applying this compensated 2-D AOD as scanner.

  17. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing. PMID:27610923

  18. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C

    2016-09-09

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing.

  19. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing.

  20. Design and performance of the pulsed positron beam at Chalmers University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileshina, L.; Nordlund, A.

    2009-09-01

    A slow monoenergetic pulsed positron beam at Chalmers University of Technology has been built. The system consists mainly of chopper, buncher and accelerator. The achieved positron energy range is in range between 230 eV and 15 keV. The FWHM of the beam resolution function is around 700 ps. The beam intensity is around 103 cps.

  1. Beam-target interactions in single-and multi-pulse radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.J.; Hughes, T.P.; Oliver, B.V.; Welch, D.R.

    1999-04-01

    This report describes calculations concerning the interaction of intense electron beam pulses with a solid target. In Section 2, we treat the propagation of a beam pulse through a dense plasma plume in front of the target, resulting from material blown off from the target by prior pulses. Because of the short magnetic decay-time, the primary effect of the plasma is to shift the focal spot of the beam longitudinally by an amount which is constant over most of the beam pulse. It may be possible to compensate for this effect by changing the upstream focusing elements from one beam pulse to the next. Section 3 describes a mechanism by which lighter ion species can diffuse to the surface of a plasma plume, thereby potentially increasing the concentration of bulk contaminant species such as hydrogen at the leading edge of the plume. These ions could then become a light-ion source for subsequent beam pulses. Based on the calculations, we tentatively recommend bulk contaminant fractions be limited to 10{sup -5}10{sup 4}. In Section 4, we estimate the number of adsorbed monolayers needed to provide a space-charge-limited (SCL) ion source at the target for the initial beam pulse. We find that {approx} 10 monolayers are required for SCL emission of H{sub 2}{sup +} ions. This may explain why there was little evidence of focus disruption in ETA-II target experiments.

  2. [Theoretical investigation of the saturation correction for ionization chambers irradiated with pulsed beams of arbitrary pulse length].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    In ionization chambers, not all released charge is collected due to the recombination of charge carriers. This effect is taken into account by the saturation correction factor kS. A physical description of the correction factor has been established for pulsed radiation. However, it is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared with the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this paper we develop a description of the saturation correction for radiation pulses of arbitrary length. For this, a system of partial differential equations is solved iteratively. The numerical solutions are verified experimentally for a Roos ionization chamber (PTW TM34001) exposed to a pulsed electron beam. The results of this iterative procedure describe the experimental data well. The calculations are also possible for beam structures which are experimentally hard to get and thereby contribute to a better understanding and correct description of the saturation correction at arbitrary pulse length. Among other things the pulse length dependent distributions of the charge carriers in the ionization chamber is calculated, inclusive of the transition to the conditions prevailing in the case of continuous irradiation. Furthermore is shown that the formula for kS established by Hochhäuser and Balk is applicable even at arbitrary pulse length, if pulse duration dependent effective values are used for the parameters a and p. These effective values have been determined for the Roos chamber at pulse lengths up to 300 μs.

  3. A fast switching electrostatic deflector system for actinide isotopic ratio measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorko, Benjamin; Child, D. P.; Hotchkis, M. A. C.

    2010-04-01

    We have implemented a fast switching electrostatic system on the actinides beamline on the ANTARES accelerator at ANSTO, to improve the precision of analyses by accelerator mass spectrometry. This high-energy bouncing system is based on a pair of deflector plates, deflecting in the orbit plane, set at the entrance and exit of the analysing magnet. The design of deflector plates is unique, and it was modelled by SIMION in order to minimize field inhomogenity and fringe field effects. The pair of deflector plates are supplied by a high-voltage amplifier driven by an EPICS-enabled control unit, with two 4 W power supplies providing up to ±10 kV modulation. The high-energy bouncing system is synchronized with the existing low-energy bouncing system. To measure the isotopic ratio with the new system, the magnetic fields of the injector and analysing magnets are set to transmit selected isotopes along the beam line with zero voltage applied. The other isotopes of interest are transmitted by keeping the magnetic fields constant and modulating the voltages on the injector magnet chamber and on the high-energy deflector plates.

  4. HiRadMat: A high-energy, pulsed beam, material irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat is a recently constructed facility designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where different material samples or accelerator components can be tested. The facility, located at the CERN SPS accelerator complex, uses a 440 GeV proton beam with a pulse length up to 7.2 μs and a maximum intensity up to 10{sup 13} protons / pulse. The facility, a unique place for performing state-of-the art beam-to-material experiments, operates under transnational access and welcomes and financially supports, under certain conditions, experimental teams to perform their experiments. (authors)

  5. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  6. Amplification of 1 ps Pulse Length Beam by Stimulated Raman Scattering of a 1 ns Beam in a Low Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kirkwood, R K; Niemann, C; Meezan, N; Wilks, S C; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Hur, M S; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N; Malkin, V M

    2005-06-12

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression with large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS [1] or non-resonantly [2]. We describe experiments in which a plasma suitable for pulse compression is created, and amplification of an ultra short pulse beam is demonstrated.

  7. Two-dimensional refractive index modulation by phased array transducers in acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiansi; Zhang, Chong; Aleksov, Aleksandar; Salama, Islam; Kar, Aravinda

    2017-01-20

    Acousto-optic deflectors are photonic devices that are used for scanning high-power laser beams in advanced microprocessing applications such as marking and direct writing. The operation of conventional deflectors mostly relies on one-dimensional sinusoidal variation of the refractive index in an acousto-optic medium. Sometimes static phased array transducers, such as step configuration or planar configuration transducer architecture, are used to tilt the index modulation planes for achieving higher performance and higher resolution than a single transducer AO device. However, the index can be modulated in two dimensions, and the modulation plane can be tilted arbitrarily by creating dynamic phase gratings in the medium using phased array transducers. This type of dynamic two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector can provide better performance using, for example, a large deflection angle and high diffraction efficiency. This paper utilizes an ultrasonic beam steering approach to study the two-dimensional strain-induced index modulation due to the photoelastic effect. The modulation is numerically simulated, and the effects of various parameters, such as the operating radiofrequency of the transducers, the ultrasonic beam steering angle, and different combinations of pressure on each element of the transducer array, are demonstrated.

  8. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  9. Improved safety of retinal photocoagulation with a shaped beam and modulated pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Christopher; Brown, Jefferson; Paulus, Yannis M.; Nomoto, Hiroyuki; Palanker, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Shorter pulse durations help confine thermal damage during retinal photocoagulation, decrease treatment time and minimize pain. However, safe therapeutic window (the ratio of threshold powers for rupture and mild coagulation) decreases with shorter exposures. A ring-shaped beam enables safer photocoagulation than conventional beams by reducing the maximum temperature in the center of the spot. Similarly, a temporal pulse modulation decreasing its power over time improves safety by maintaining constant temperature for a significant portion of the pulse. Optimization of the beam and pulse shapes was performed using a computational model. In vivo experiments were performed to verify the predicted improvement. With each of these approaches, the pulse duration can be decreased by a factor of two, from 20 ms down to 10 ms while maintaining the same therapeutic window.

  10. Modeling double pulsing of ion beams for HEDP target heating experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veitzer, Seth; Barnard, John; Stoltz, Peter; Henestroza, Enrique

    2008-04-01

    Recent research on direct drive targets using heavy ion beams suggests optimal coupling will occur when the energy of the ions increases over the course of the pulse. In order to experimentally explore issues involving the interaction of the beam with the outflowing blowoff from the target, double pulse experiments have been proposed whereby a first pulse heats a planar target producing an outflow of material, and a second pulse (˜10 ns later) of higher ion energy (and hence larger projected range) interacts with this outflow before reaching and further heating the target. We report here results for simulations of double pulsing experiments using HYDRA for beam and target parameters relevant to the proposed Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) II at LBNL.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Using a Pulsed Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Abdalla R.; Reutzel, Edward W.

    2015-06-01

    Microstructural development in directed-energy additive manufacturing of metal components is a complex process that produces parts with materials whose microstructure and properties are influenced by multiple heating and cooling cycles. Much work has been undertaken to correlate microstructural development with processing conditions, such as laser power and processing speed. Here, the microstructure and indentation hardness of a Ti-6Al-4V component processed with a pulsing laser beam and a continuous wave (CW) laser beam are investigated. It is found that the pulsed-beam build showed no statistically significant variation in lath width or indentation hardness with build height while the build deposited with the CW beam showed a statistically significant decrease in hardness and an increase in lath width near the middle of the build. The reduction in variability with beam pulsing is attributed to rapid cooling rates within the melt pool, a greater degree of melt pool stirring, and reduced aging during part build-up.

  12. Design and simulation of a pulsed positron beam at ELI-NP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djourelov, N.; Dinescu, D.

    2017-01-01

    The design of the pulsing system for the slow e+ beam at ELI-NP is presented. It will deliver narrow time width e+ pulses, achieved by a combination of prebuncher, chopper and buncher. The effect of the different components on the pulse compression is simulated by a Matlab program. The results show that the best compression of the e+ pulses, which can be achieved by the proposed pulsing system, is limited to about 100 ps (FWHM). The most effective solution, applied up to now, for minimizing the influence of the backscattered e+ on the PALS spectra by using a bent tube filter is simulated by Comsol Multiphysics.

  13. High-powered pulsed-ion-beam acceleration and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Humphries, S. Jr.; Lockner, T.R.

    1981-11-01

    The state of research on intense ion beam acceleration and transport is reviewed. The limitations imposed on ion beam transport by space charge effects and methods available for neutralization are summarized. The general problem of ion beam neutralization in regions free of applied electric fields is treated. The physics of acceleration gaps is described. Finally, experiments on multi-stage ion acceleration are summarized.

  14. The Boersch effect in a picosecond pulsed electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Nambo, Yoshito; Aoki, Kota; Sameshima, Kensuke; Jin, Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Asano, Hidefumi; Saitoh, Koh; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-07-01

    The space charge effect has been clearly observed in the energy distributions of picosecond pulse beams from a spin-polarized electron microscope, and was found to depend upon the quantity of charge per pulse. The non-linear phenomena associated with this effect have also been replicated in beam simulations that take into account of a three-dimensional space charge. The results show that a charge of 500 aC/pulse provides the highest brightness with a 16-ps pulse duration, a 30-keV beam energy, and an emission spot of 1.8 μm. Furthermore, the degeneracy of the wave packet of the pulsed electron beam has been evaluated to be 1.6 × 10-5 with a charge of 100 aC/pulse, which is higher than that for a continuously emitted electron beam despite the low beam energy of 30 keV. The high degeneracy and high brightness contribute to the realization of high temporal and energy resolutions in low-voltage electron microscopy, which will serve to reduce radiolysis damage and enhance scattering contrast.

  15. The System of Nanosecond 280-KeV He+ Pulsed Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Junphong, P.; Ano, V.; Lekprasert, B.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Thongnopparat, N.; Vilaithong, T.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-05-01

    At Fast Neutron Research Facility, the 150 kV-pulses neutron generator is being upgraded to a 280-kV-pulsed-He beam for time-of-flight Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. It involves replacing the existing beam line elements by a multicusp ion source, a 400-kV accelerating tube, 45{sup o}-double focusing dipole magnet and quadrupole lens. The multicusp ion source is a compact filament-driven of 2.6 cm in diameter and 8 cm in length. The current extracted is 20.4 {micro}A with 13 kV of extraction voltage and 8.8 kV of Einzel lens voltage. The beam emittance has found to vary between 6-12 mm mrad. The beam transport system has to be redesigned based on the new elements. The important part of a good pulsed beam depends on the pulsing system. The two main parts are the chopper and buncher. An optimized geometry for the 280 keV pulsed helium ion beam will be presented and discussed. The PARMELA code has been used to optimize the space charge effect, resulting in pulse width of less than 2 ns at a target. The calculated distance from a buncher to the target is 4.6 m. Effects of energy spread and phase angle between chopper and buncher have been included in the optimization of the bunch length.

  16. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  17. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  18. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; ...

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted onmore » the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.« less

  19. Long-pulse beam acceleration of MeV-class H(-) ion beams for ITER NB accelerator.

    PubMed

    Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Yamanaka, H; Inoue, T; Kojima, A; Hanada, M

    2014-02-01

    In order to realize neutral beam systems in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor whose target is to produce a 1 MeV, 200 A/m(2) during 3600 s D(-) ion beam, the electrostatic five-stages negative ion accelerator so-called "MeV accelerator" has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To extend pulse length, heat load of the acceleration grids was reduced by controlling the ion beam trajectory. Namely, the beam deflection due to the residual magnetic field of filter magnet was suppressed with the newly developed extractor with a 0.5 mm off-set aperture displacement. The new extractor improved the deflection angle from 6 mrad to 1 mrad, resulting in the reduction of direct interception of negative ions from 23% to 15% of the total acceleration power, respectively. As a result, the pulse length of 130 A/m(2), 881 keV H(-) ion beam has been successfully extended from a previous value of 0.4 s to 8.7 s. This is the first long pulse negative ion beam acceleration over 100 MW/m(2).

  20. Pulsed power for particle beam accelerators in military applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, I.D.

    1980-06-20

    Techniques useful for generating and conditioning power for high energy pulsed accelerators with potential weapon applications are described. Pulsed electron accelerators are exemplified by ETA and ATA at Lawrence Livermore Laboratories and RADLAC at Sandia Laboratories Albuquerque. Pulse-power techniques used in other applications are briefly mentioned, including some that may be useful for collective ion accelerators. The limitations of pulse-power and the general directions of desirable development are illustrated. The main needs are to increase repetition rate and to decrease size.

  1. Cosine-Gaussian correlated Schell-model pulsed beams.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chaoliang; Korotkova, Olga; Zhang, Yongtao; Pan, Liuzhan

    2014-01-13

    A new class of partially coherent pulses of Schell type with cosine-Gaussian temporal degree of coherence is introduced. Such waves are termed the Cosine-Gaussian Schell-model (CGSM) pulses. The analytic expression for the temporal mutual coherence function of the CGSM pulse in dispersive media is derived and used to study the evolution of its intensity distribution and its temporal degree of coherence. Further, the numerical calculations are performed in order to show the dependence of the intensity profile and the temporal degree of coherence of the CGSM pulse on the incident pulse duration, the initial temporal coherence length, the order-parameter n and the dispersion of the medium. The most important feature of the novel pulsed wave is its ability to split into two pulses on passage in a dispersive medium at some critical propagation distance. Such critical distance and the subsequent evolution of the split pulses are shown to depend on the source parameters and on the properties of the medium in which the pulse travels.

  2. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  3. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  4. Laser action in xenon pumped by pulsed beams of runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kolbychev, G.V.; Samyshkin, E.A.

    1983-02-01

    A report is given of the use of pulsed beams of runaway electrons for the pumping of gas lasers. Electron beams were generated inside a laser chamber. The average energy of these electrons was 1--4 keV. Lasing was observed as a result of the 3d/sub 2/--2p/sub 7/ transition in xenon. An analysis was made of the possibility of using runaway-electron beams in other types of gas laser.

  5. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  6. All-fiber phase-control-free coherent-beam combining toward femtosecond-pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambayashi, Yuta; Yoshida, Minoru; Sasaki, Toshiki; Yoshikawa, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    Our present work is to develop an all-fiber coherent-beam-combining system that achieves a high-energy femtosecond-pulse fiber laser beyond pulse energy limits due to the nonlinear effects in fiber amplifiers. Coherent-beam combining (CBC) using optical fibers is technically difficult because the optical phases and the polarizations in the optical fibers fluctuate due to disturbances. We developed an all-fiber passive CBC system that does not need to control optical phases and polarizations that achieved a beam-combining efficiency of 95.9%. The combined output changes of the passive CBC system are the less than 1.0% in full width.

  7. Pair Creation in QED-Strong Pulsed Laser Fields Interacting with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Naumova, Natalia M.; Nees, John A.; Mourou, Gerard A.

    2010-11-05

    QED effects are known to occur in a strong laser pulse interaction with a counterpropagating electron beam, among these effects being electron-positron pair creation. We discuss the range of laser pulse intensities of J{>=}5x10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} combined with electron beam energies of tens of GeV. In this regime multiple pairs may be generated from a single beam electron, some of the newborn particles being capable of further pair production. Radiation backreaction prevents avalanche development and limits pair creation. The system of integro-differential kinetic equations for electrons, positrons and {gamma} photons is derived and solved numerically.

  8. A 0.2 ns beam pulse for the 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, W. R.; Kritzinger, J. J.; Wikner, V. C.; Swart, T.; Schmitt, H.

    1984-01-01

    The 1.5 ns pulsed beam of the SUNI Van de Graaff accelerator has been used for neutron time-of-flight studies. To provide sufficient resolution for neutron scattering measurements at 22 MeV, a post-acceleration bunching system has been installed. Bunching of 2-6 MeV p, d and 3He beams is achieved in a simple quarter-wave coaxial resonator chamber designed for high Q and low power. The bunched pulse has a fwhm of less than 0.2 ns. The design and testing of the bunching system are outlined. Optimum power requirements are tabulated together with the induced beam energy spreads.

  9. Emission from Polymethyl Methacrylate Irradiated by a Beam of Runaway Electrons of Subnanosecond Pulse Durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-08-01

    Spectral and amplitude-temporal characteristics of emission from polymethyl methacrylate (fiberglass, PMMA) irradiated with a beam of runaway electrons of subnanosecond duration are investigated. It is found that at the beam current pulse duration within 200-600 ps at half maximum and the beam current density 10-200 A/cm2, the intensity maximum is registered at the wavelength ~490 nm and the emission pulse FWHM in the visible spectrum is ~1.5 ns at the half width. It is shown that the main contribution into the emission comes from luminescence.

  10. Pair creation in QED-strong pulsed laser fields interacting with electron beams.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Igor V; Naumova, Natalia M; Nees, John A; Mourou, Gérard A

    2010-11-05

    QED effects are known to occur in a strong laser pulse interaction with a counterpropagating electron beam, among these effects being electron-positron pair creation. We discuss the range of laser pulse intensities of J≥5×10(22) W/cm2 combined with electron beam energies of tens of GeV. In this regime multiple pairs may be generated from a single beam electron, some of the newborn particles being capable of further pair production. Radiation backreaction prevents avalanche development and limits pair creation. The system of integro-differential kinetic equations for electrons, positrons and γ photons is derived and solved numerically.

  11. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  12. Omnidirectional broadband acoustic deflector based on metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2017-02-01

    We report a theoretical, numerical, and experimental work on the design of an omnidirectional acoustic deflector capable of redirecting an incident wave to propagate along a predesigned direction over a broad frequency range, regardless of the incidence angle. An implementation by metamaterials is demonstrated both in simulation and experiment, with both showing the effectiveness of our scheme as long as the effective medium approximation stands. With the capability of omnidirectional broadband deflection and the flexibility of a controllable tuning angle, our design opens a route to the development of wave-steering devices and has great application potentials in various situations such as on-chip acoustic manipulations.

  13. 1. View of blast deflector fences along southwest side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of blast deflector fences along southwest side of the operational apron. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  14. 2. View of blast deflector fences along northeast side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of blast deflector fences along northeast side of the operational apron. View to northwest. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  15. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  16. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, David Richard

    2007-05-23

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  17. Generation of dark hollow femtosecond pulsed beam by phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yongming; Ma, Haotong; Li, Xiujian; Hu, Wenhua; Yang, Jiankun

    2011-07-20

    Based on the refractive laser beam shaping system, the dark hollow femtosecond pulse beam shaping technique with a phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) is demonstrated. The phase distribution of the LC-SLM is derived by the energy conservation and constant optical path principle. The effects of the shaping system on the temporal properties, including spectral phase distribution and bandwidth of the femtosecond pulse, are analyzed in detail. Experimental results show that the hollow intensity distribution of the output pulsed beam can be maintained much at more than 1200 mm. The spectral phase of the pulse is changed, and the pulse width is expanded from 199 to 230 fs, which is caused by the spatial-temporal coupling effect. The coupling effect mainly depends on the phase-only LC-SLM itself, not on its loaded phase distribution. The experimental results indicate that the proposed shaping setup can generate a dark hollow femtosecond pulsed beam effectively, because the temporal Gaussian waveform is unchanged.

  18. Towards pump-probe experiments of defect dynamics with short ion beam pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, T.; Lidia, S. M.; Weis, C. D.; Waldron, W. L.; Schwartz, J.; Minor, A. M.; Hosemann, P.; Kwan, J. W.

    2013-11-01

    A novel, induction type linear accelerator, the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II), is currently being commissioned at Berkeley Lab. This accelerator is designed to deliver intense (up to 3 × 1011 ions/pulse), 0.6 to ∼600 ns duration pulses of 0.05-1.2 MeV lithium ions at a rate of about 2 pulses per minute onto 1-10 mm scale target areas. When focused to mm-diameter spots, the beam is predicted to volumetrically heat micrometer thick foils to temperatures of ∼30,000 °K. At lower beam power densities, the short excitation pulse with tunable intensity and time profile enables pump-probe type studies of defect dynamics in a broad range of materials. We briefly describe the accelerator concept and design, present results from beam pulse shaping experiments and discuss examples of pump-probe type studies of defect dynamics following irradiation of materials with intense, short ion beam pulses from NDCX-II.

  19. Towards pump probe experiments of defect dynamics with short ion beam pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schenkel, T.; Lidia, S.; Weis, C. D.; Waldron, W. L.; Schwartz, J.; Minor, Andrew; Hosemann, P; Kwan, J. W.

    2013-01-01

    A novel, induction type linear accelerator, the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II), is currently being commissioned at Berkeley Lab. This accelerator is designed to deliver intense (up to 3 1011 ions/pulse), 0.6 to 600 ns duration pulses of 0.05 1.2 MeV lithium ions at a rate of about 2 pulses per minute onto 1 10 mm scale target areas. When focused to mm-diameter spots, the beam is predicted to volumetrically heat micrometer thick foils to temperatures of 30,000 K. At lower beam power densities, the short excitation pulse with tunable intensity and time profile enables pump probe type studies of defect dynamics in a broad range of materials. We briefly describe the accelerator concept and design, present results from beam pulse shaping experiments and discuss examples of pump probe type studies of defect dynamics following irradiation of materials with intense, short ion beam pulses from NDCX-II.

  20. Transient Self-Amplified Cerenkov Radiation with a Short Pulse Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Camacho, J F

    2009-01-22

    An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE) regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady state response, a macro-particle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of soliton-like pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macro-particle model, and PIC simulations are

  1. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  2. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  3. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  4. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  5. Retarding field energy analyzer for high energy pulsed electron beam measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jing; Rovey, Joshua L.; Zhao, Wansheng

    2017-01-01

    A retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) designed specifically for high energy pulsed electron beam measurements is described in this work. By proper design of the entrance grid, attenuation grid, and beam collector, this RFEA is capable of determining the time-resolved energy distribution of high energy pulsed electron beams normally generated under "soft vacuum" environment. The performance of the RFEA is validated by multiple tests of the leakage current, attenuation coefficient, and response time. The test results show that the retarding potential in the RFEA can go up to the same voltage as the electron beam source, which is 20 kV for the maximum in this work. Additionally, an attenuation coefficient of 4.2 is obtained in the RFEA while the percent difference of the rise time of the electron beam pulse before and after attenuation is lower than 10%. When compared with a reference source, the percent difference of the RFEA response time is less than 10% for fall times greater than 35 ns. Finally, the test results of the 10 kV pseudospark-based pulsed electron beam currents collected under varying retarding potentials are presented in this paper.

  6. Ultrashort Pulse Laser Accelerated Proton Beams for First Radiobiological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schramm, U.; Zeil, K.; Beyreuther, E.; Bussmann, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Kluge, T.; Kraft, S.; Metzkes, J.; Sauerbrey, R.; Richter, C.; Enghardt, W.; Pawelke, J.; Karsch, L.; Laschinsky, L.; Naumburger, D.

    2010-11-04

    We report on the generation of proton pulses with maximum energies exceeding 15 MeV by means of the irradiation of few micron thick metal foils by ultrashort (30 fs) laser pulses at a power level of 100 TW. In contrast to the well known situation for longer laser pulses, here, a near linear scaling of the maximum proton energy with laser power can be found. Aiming for radiobiological applications the long and short term stability of the laser plasma accelerator as well as a compact energy selection and dosimetry system is presented. The first irradiation of in vitro tumour cells showing dose dependent biological damage is demonstrated paving the way for systematic radiobiological studies.

  7. Suppressing beam-centroid motion in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, E. O.; Archuleta, R.; Bender, H.; Broste, W.; Carlson, C.; Cook, G.; Frayer, D.; Harrison, J.; Hughes, T.; Johnson, J.; Jacquez, E.; McCuistian, B. Trent; Montoya, N.; Nath, S.; Nielsen, K.; Rose, C.; Schulze, M.; Smith, H. V.; Thoma, C.; Tom, C. Y.

    2011-12-01

    The second axis of the dual-axis radiography of hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6μs. It does this by slicing four micropulses out of a 2-μs long electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The 1.8-kA beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated to more than 16 MeV by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for multipulse flash radiography. High-frequency motion, such as from beam-breakup (BBU) instability, would blur the individual spots. Low-frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed-power variation, would produce spot-to-spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it. Using the methods discussed, we have reduced beam motion at the accelerator exit to less than 2% of the beam envelope radius for the high-frequency BBU, and less than 1/3 of the envelope radius for the low-frequency sweep.

  8. Laser beam steering approaches for microstructuring of copper layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mur, Jaka; Podobnik, Boštjan; Poberaj, Igor

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the process of copper layer ablation with a tightly focused Q-switched 532 nm laser. Focusing 40 ns long laser pulses to a micrometer-sized spot results in high energy density and gives rise to ablation phenomena not seen during laser processing with larger beam diameters. Use of acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) enabled us to test different laser beam steering approaches in terms of choosing the position for each laser pulse independently of the previous pulses. Random addressing of desired positions across a microstructure proved to be the most efficient method compared to various scanning approaches. Assigning a random order to the spatial sequence of laser pulses resulted in the fastest microstructuring process and featured lowest residual heating of the substrate.

  9. Optics Elements for Modeling Electrostatic Lenses and Accelerator Components: III. Electrostatic Deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.A.; Gillespie, G.H.

    1999-10-21

    Ion-beam optics models for simulating electrostatic prisms (deflectors) of different geometries have been developed for the computer code TRACE 3-D. TRACE 3-D is an envelope (matrix) code, which includes a linear space charge model, that was originally developed to model bunched beams in magnetic transport systems and radiofrequency (RF) accelerators. Several new optical models for a number of electrostatic lenses and accelerator columns have been developed recently that allow the code to be used for modeling beamlines and accelerators with electrostatic components. The new models include a number of options for: (1) Einzel lenses, (2) accelerator columns, (3) electrostatic prisms, and (4) electrostatic quadrupoles. A prescription for setting up the initial beam appropriate to modeling 2-D (continuous) beams has also been developed. The models for electrostatic prisms are described in this paper. The electrostatic prism model options allow the modeling of cylindrical, spherical, and toroidal electrostatic deflectors. The application of these models in the development of ion-beam transport systems is illustrated through the modeling of a spherical electrostatic analyzer as a component of the new low energy beamline at CAMS.

  10. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  11. Electron Injection into Laser Wakefields by the Two-Beam Colliding Pulse Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, K.; Michel, P.; Toth, C. S.; Geddes, C. G. R.; van Tilborg, J.; Fubiani, G.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cary, J. R.; Giacone, R.; Bruhwiler, D.

    2004-11-01

    Laser driven acceleration in plasmas has succeeded in producing electron beams containing considerable amount of charge (> 100 pC) at energies in excess of 100 MeV. Control of the trapping process is needed to generate monoenergetic electron beams in a reproducible manner. We report on experimental progress of laser triggered injection of electrons into laser wakefields with a two-pulse colliding laser scheme[1]. The experiments use the multi-beam, multi-terawatt Ti:Al_2O3 laser at the l'OASIS facility of LBNL. In the experiments, two counter propagating beams 30^rc angle are focused onto a high density ( ˜10^19/cm^3) gas jet. Preliminary results indicate that electron beam properties are affected by the second beam. Details of the experiments will be shown as well as comparisons with simulations. [1] G. Fubiani, et., al, Phys. Rev. E 70, 016402 (2004).

  12. Effect of electron beam pulse width on time-of-flight spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but useful formula describing the effect of electron gun pulse width on the time of flight (TOF) spectra measured in translational spectroscopy experiments is developed. An approximately monoenergetic pulsed electrostatically focused electron beam traverses a scattering cell filled with a Maxwellian gas. Inelastic electron collisions with the gas produce metastable particles, ions, scattered electrons, and photons which then pass through a collimating slit system at right angles to the electron beam. TOF techniques are used to separate the photon signal from the metastable particle signal and to measure the TOF distribution of the metastable species.

  13. Application of strongly focused pulsed electron beam for the reaction wheels balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borduleva, A. O.; Bleykher, G. A.; Solovev, V. V.; Krivobokov, V. P.; Babihina, M. N.

    2016-11-01

    In the given work the material removing possibility by the strongly focused pulsed electron beam was investigated. The optimal mode of flywheels balancing was found. At this mode the power density is 1.6 MW/cm2 and pulse duration is 0.65 s. At such parameters the evaporation rate is equal to 11 g/scm2. It is possible to vary the amount of remote material from 1 to 100 mg, that is sufficient to balance flywheel. It is found that treatment by an electron beam does not change the material structure.

  14. Performance of Current-Mode Ion Chambers as Beam Monitors in a Pulsed Cold Neutron Beam for the NPDGamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, R. Chad

    2006-10-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has built and commissioned an apparatus to measure the parity-violating gamma asymmetry A in the low energy np capture process n+p->d+ γ. The asymmetry in question is a 10-8 correlation between the spin of the incident (polarized) neutron and the outgoing 2.2 MeV gamma ray. A set of purpose-built, 3He-filled ionization chambers read out in current mode is used to monitor the incident neutron flux, the beam polarization, and the transmission of the liquid para-hydrogen target during the NPDGamma measurements. As will be described in the talk, these beam monitors are simple, reliable, low-noise detectors that have performed excellently for NPDGamma. We have verified that the beam monitor signals can be interpreted to reproduce the known time-of-flight dependence of beam flux from the LANSCE pulsed cold neutron source, and that the neutron beam polarization can be measured at the 2% level from direct measurements of the transmission of the beam through the beam polarizer.

  15. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  16. Scanning irradiation device for mice in vivo with pulsed and continuous proton beams.

    PubMed

    Greubel, Christoph; Assmann, Walter; Burgdorf, Christian; Dollinger, Günther; Du, Guanghua; Hable, Volker; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Hertenberger, Ralf; Kneschaurek, Peter; Michalski, Dörte; Molls, Michael; Reinhardt, Sabine; Röper, Barbara; Schell, Stefan; Schmid, Thomas E; Siebenwirth, Christian; Wenzl, Tatiana; Zlobinskaya, Olga; Wilkens, Jan J

    2011-08-01

    A technical set-up for irradiation of subcutaneous tumours in mice with nanosecond-pulsed proton beams or continuous proton beams is described and was successfully used in a first experiment to explore future potential of laser-driven particle beams, which are pulsed due to the acceleration process, for radiation therapy. The chosen concept uses a microbeam approach. By focusing the beam to approximately 100 × 100 μm(2), the necessary fluence of 10(9) protons per cm(2) to deliver a dose of 20 Gy with one-nanosecond shot in the Bragg peak of 23 MeV protons is achieved. Electrical and mechanical beam scanning combines rapid dose delivery with large scan ranges. Aluminium sheets one millimetre in front of the target are used as beam energy degrader, necessary for adjusting the depth-dose profile. The required procedures for treatment planning and dose verification are presented. In a first experiment, 24 tumours in mice were successfully irradiated with 23 MeV protons and a single dose of 20 Gy in pulsed or continuous mode with dose differences between both modes of 10%. So far, no significant difference in tumour growth delay was observed.

  17. Intense Pulsed Ion Beams: Their Generation and Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-03

    on the acceleration of ions within vacuum diode-like sources. The ions originate in a plasma which is produced on the surface of the ,inode and are... flashover discharges on the anode surfaces . Ions extracted from these plasmas are accelerated toward both the cathode and the virtual cathode. ThC ions... pulse generator. For most of these experiments , the ratio of the extracted proton current I to the total current I i.e., the proton generation effici,ncyp

  18. Efficient generation of high beam-quality attosecond pulse with polarization-gating Bessel-Gauss beam from highly-ionized media.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Qingbin; Hong, Weiyi; Wang, Shaoyi; Wang, Zhe; Lu, Peixiang

    2012-07-02

    Single attosecond pulse generation with polarization gating Bessel-Gauss beam in relatively strongly-ionized media is investigated. The results show that Bessel-Gauss beam has the ability to suppress the spatial plasma dispersion effects caused by high density of free electrons, thus the laser field can maintain its spatial profile through highly-ionized medium. This indicates the use of Bessel-Gauss beam has advantages over Gaussian beam in high harmonic generation under high ionization conditions. In our scheme, significant improvement of spatiotemporal properties of harmonics is achieved and an isolated attosecond pulse with high beam quality is filtered out using polarization gating.

  19. Nonlinear Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Pre-formed Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Gennady Shvets; Edward Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2001-01-30

    The propagation of a high-current finite-length ion beam in a cold pre-formed plasma is investigated. The outcome of the calculation is the quantitative prediction of the degree of charge and current neutralization of the ion beam pulse by the background plasma. The electric magnetic fields generated by the ion beam are studied analytically for the nonlinear case where the plasma density is comparable in size with the beam density. Particle-in-cell simulations and fluid calculations of current and charge neutralization have been performed for parameters relevant to heavy ion fusion assuming long, dense beams with el >> V(subscript b)/omega(subscript b), where V(subscript b) is the beam velocity and omega subscript b is the electron plasma frequency evaluated with the ion beam density. An important conclusion is that for long, nonrelativistic ion beams, charge neutralization is, for all practical purposes, complete even for very tenuous background plasmas. As a result, the self-magnetic force dominates the electric force and the beam ions are always pinched during beam propagation in a background plasma.

  20. Development of ion source with a washer gun for pulsed neutral beam injection.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kajiya, H; Takahashi, T; Imanaka, H; Takase, Y; Ono, Y; Sato, K N

    2008-06-01

    A new type of economical neutral beam source has been developed by using a single washer gun, pulsed operation, and a simple electrode system. We replaced the conventional hot filaments for arc-discharge-type plasma formation with a single stainless-steel washer gun, eliminating the entire dc power supply for the filaments and the cooling system for the electrodes. Our initial experiments revealed successful beam extraction up to 10 kV and 8.6 A, based on spatial profile measurements of density and temperature in the plasma source. The system also shows the potential to control the beam profile by controlling the plasma parameters in the ion accumulation chamber.

  1. Electrostatic diagnostics of nanosecond pulsed electron beams in a Malmberg-Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, B.; Bettega, G.; Maero, G.; Rome, M.; Norgia, M.; Pesatori, A.; Svelto, C.

    2010-06-15

    A fast electrostatic diagnostic and analysis scheme on nanosecond pulsed beams in the keV energy range has been developed in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. Low-noise electronics has been used for the detection of small induced current signals on the trap electrodes. A discrete wavelet-based procedure has been implemented for data postprocessing. The development of an effective electrostatic diagnostics together with proper data analysis techniques is of general interest in view of deducing the beam properties through comparison of the postprocessed data with the theoretically computed signal shape, which contains beam radius, length, and average density as fit parameters.

  2. DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR IN THE FOREGROUND, WATER PIPES AND VALVE ASSEMBLIES ON THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  3. 9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 4. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 1. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 3. SOUTH FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 5. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, COUNTERFORT VISIBLE AT REAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, COUNTERFORT VISIBLE AT REAR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. 24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTOR, BRAKE, PINION SHAFT, DRIVE WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Possibility of Ion Beam Pulse Compression by X-Ray Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Takashi

    1985-02-01

    A previously proposed scheme for ion beam pulse compression is reexamined from a different viewpoint. It is shown that the criticisms made by Unterseer and Meyer-ter-Vehn are not reasonable in a real target configuration. In addition, the spherically converging effect is shown to offer further advantages.

  14. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  15. Generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams using passive axicon-theoretical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Shahrzad; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Ramezani, Mohsen; Soltanolkotabi, Mahmood

    2012-10-20

    We studied the conditions for generating passive Bessel-Gauss beams by using an axicon. We designed an appropriate Gaussian resonator and extracted a quasi-fundamental Gaussian mode from a pulsed Nd:YAG laser pumped by a Xenon flash lamp and measured its parameters, such as propagation factor, divergence angle, and Rayleigh range. Then we generated passive Bessel-Gauss beams using an axicon and investigated their propagation properties, theoretically and experimentally. For example, for the axicon of 1°, the output energy and the Rayleigh range of the generated Bessel-Gauss beams were measured to be 58 mJ and 229.3 mm, respectively. We compared these properties with our results of the Gaussian mode. Finally, by using axicons with different apex angles, and also by changing the beam spot size on the axicon, we generated Bessel-Gauss beams and studied their properties theoretically and experimentally.

  16. Beam breakup growth and reduction experiments in long-pulse electron beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menge, P. R.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Bosch, R. A.

    1994-02-01

    The results of an experimental program whose sole objective is to investigate the cumulative beam breakup instability (BBU) in electron beam accelerators are presented. The BBU growth rate scalings are examined with regard to beam current, focusing field, cavity Q, and propagation distance. A microwave cavity array was designed and fabricated to excite and measure the cumulative BBU resulting from beam interactions with the deflecting TM110 cavity mode. One phase of this experiment used high Q(≊1000) cavities with relatively large frequency spread (Δf/f0≊0.1%). The observed TM110 mode microwave growth between an upstream (second) and a downstream (tenth) cavity indicated BBU growth of 26 dB for an electron beam of kinetic energy of 750 keV, 45 A, and focused by a 1.1 kG solenoidal field. At beam currents of less than 100 A the experiments agreed well with a two-dimensional continuum theory; the agreement was worse at higher beam currents (≳100 A) due to beam loading. The second-phase experiments used lower Q(≊200) cavities with relatively low frequency spread (Δf/f0≊0.03%). Theory and experiment agreed well for beam currents up to 220 A. Distance scaling experiments were also performed by doubling the propagation length. Instability growth reduction experiments using the technique of external cavity coupling resulted in a factor of four decrease in energy in BBU growth when seven internal beam cavities were coupled by microwave cable to seven identical external dummy cavities. A theory invoking power sharing between the internal beam cavities and the external dummy cavities was used to explain the experimental reduction with excellent agreement using an equivalent circuit model.

  17. Power electron beam front shortening for intense microwave pulse generation

    SciTech Connect

    Galstjan, E.A.; Kazanskiy, L.N.

    1995-11-01

    The starting point for this investigation is a succession that it is possible to get a clearly defined shock electromagnetic wave in a quite short modified magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). The line modification resides in an inner coaxial dielectric insert. One may consider the insert as a distributed matched spark-gap. The parameters of the high voltage pulse supplying at the line input are as follows: 1.5 MV, 20--30 kA, 90 ns, front duration -- 30 ns. A current pulse with a front duration less than 1 ns has been observed at the line output. The output current has ranged up to about 10--12 kA. Efficiency of the sharp front formation grows owing to its dependence on the speed of the flashover front propagation. So, an estimation of this dependence is a step of great importance in solution of the problem. The flashover front speed has been estimated on physical grounds which can be derived from experimental data for the early phase of dielectric surface flashover in vacuum.

  18. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-04-27

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-01

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  20. Non-dissociative and dissociative ionization of a CO+ beam in intense ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaire, B.; Ablikim, U.; Zohrabi, M.; Roland, S.; Carnes, K. D.; Ben-Itzhak, I.

    2011-05-01

    We have investigated the ionization of CO+ beams in intense ultrashort laser pulses. With the recent upgrades to our coincidence three-dimensional momentum imaging method we are able to measure both non-dissociative and dissociative ionization of the molecular-ion beam targets. Using CO+ as an example, we have found that non-dissociative ionization (leading to the metastable dication CO2+) involves a direct transition, i.e. the molecule is ionized with little or no internuclear distance stretch. Dissociative ionization (C+ + O+) occurs both directly and indirectly, stretching first and then ionizing. Our results show that the yield of dissociative ionization is higher than that of non-dissociative ionization and can be manipulated with the laser pulse duration by suppressing the indirect ionization path using ultrashort pulses (<=10 fs). Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.

  1. The fan beam model for the pulse evolution of PSR J0737-3039B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, L.; Dyks, J.

    2017-01-01

    Average radio pulse profile of a pulsar B in a double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B exhibits an interesting behaviour. During the observation period between 2003 and 2009, the profile evolves from a single-peaked to a double-peaked form, following disappearance in 2008 indicating that the geodetic precession of the pulsar is a possible origin of such behaviour. The known pulsar beam models can be used to determine the geometry of PSR J0737-3039B in the context of the precession. We study how the fan-beam geometry performs in explaining the observed variations of the radio profile morphology. It is shown that the fan beam can successfully reproduce the observed evolution of the pulse width, and should be considered as a serious alternative for the conal-like models.

  2. Hyperenergetic manned aerospacecraft propelled by intense pulsed microwave power beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrabo, Leik N.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this research was to exploit wireless power transmission (microwave/millimeter)--to lower manned space transportation costs by two or three orders of magnitude. Concepts have been developed for lightweight, mass-producible, beam-propelled aerospacecraft called Lightcraft. The vehicles are designed for a 'mass-poor, energy-rich' (i.e. hyper-energentic flight infrastructure which utilizes remote microwave power stations to build an energy-beam highway to space. Although growth in laser power levels has lagged behind expectations, microwave and millimeter-wave source technology now exists for rapid scaling to the megawatt and gigawatt time-average power levels. The design exercise focused on the engine, structure, and receptive optics requirements for a 15 meter diameter, 5 person Earth- to-moon aerospacecraft. Key elements in the airbreathing accelerator propulsion system are: a) a 'flight-weight' 35GHz rectenna electric powerplant, b) microwave-induced 'Air Spike' and perimeter air-plasma generators, and c) MagnetoHydroDynamic-Fanjet engine with its superconducting magnets and external electrodes.

  3. Stability of aerosol droplets in Bessel beam optical traps under constant and pulsed external forces

    SciTech Connect

    David, Grégory; Esat, Kıvanç; Hartweg, Sebastian; Cremer, Johannes; Chasovskikh, Egor; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-04-21

    We report on the dynamics of aerosol droplets in optical traps under the influence of additional constant and pulsed external forces. Experimental results are compared with simulations of the three-dimensional droplet dynamics for two types of optical traps, the counter-propagating Bessel beam (CPBB) trap and the quadruple Bessel beam (QBB) trap. Under the influence of a constant gas flow (constant external force), the QBB trap is found to be more stable compared with the CPBB trap. By contrast, under pulsed laser excitation with laser pulse durations of nanoseconds (pulsed external force), the type of trap is of minor importance for the droplet stability. It typically needs pulsed laser forces that are several orders of magnitude higher than the optical forces to induce escape of the droplet from the trap. If the droplet strongly absorbs the pulsed laser light, these escape forces can be strongly reduced. The lower stability of absorbing droplets is a result of secondary thermal processes that cause droplet escape.

  4. Particle Simulations of a Long Pulse Electron Beam in a Bend

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B.R.; Chen, Y.J.

    2000-08-15

    Advanced x-ray radiography machines require that multiple electron beam pulses be delivered to x-ray converter targets over several lines of sight. This can be accomplished using a single accelerator by using a fast kicker to deliver the electron beam pulses to several beamlines. This type of radiography machine requires transport lines with several large achromatic bends in the individual transport lines. To maintain a small spot size and a large dose for an x-ray pulse created at the converter target at each transport line requires that emittance growth be kept to a minimum on each beamline. Emittance growth can arise from nonlinear forces associated with the external focusing elements, nonlinear image forces, and non-linear space charge fields associated with the curvature of the beam and the transport line. We have used a multi-slice, particle-in-cell code to study the emittance growth in a bend. The code uses the beam slice's local coordinates. Typically, the radius of curvature, R for such a beam and the transport line is much larger than the pipe radius, b. The space charge fields can be approximated as that in a straight beam with correction terms to first order in b/R. To include the effects of the bend geometry on the space charge fields, these correction terms are implemented in the code. The relative importance of emittance growth due to nonlinear image forces associated with envelope oscillations of a non-round beam in the bend and due to nonlinear space charge fields associated with the bend geometry will be quantified. Simulation results for the baseline design orbit as well as off-energy transport will be presented.

  5. Electron-Beam Switches For A High Peak Power Sled-II Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay, L.

    2015-12-02

    Omega-P demonstrated triggered electron-beam switches on the L=2 m dual-delay-line X-band pulse compressor at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). In those experiments, with input pulses of up to 9 MW from the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon, output pulses having peak powers of 140-165 MW and durations of 16-20 ns were produced, with record peak power gains M of 18-20. Switch designs are described based on the successful results that should be suitable for use with the existing SLAC SLED-II delay line system, to demonstrate C=9, M=7, and n>>78%, yielding 173ns compressed pulses with peak powers up to 350MW with input of a single 50-MW.

  6. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  7. Numerical investigation of output beam quality in efficient broadband optical parametric chirped pulse amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-Di; Xu, Lu; Liang, Xiao-Yan

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically analyzed output beam quality of broad bandwidth non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (NOPCPA) in LiB3O5 (LBO) centered at 800 nm. With a three-dimensional numerical model, the influence of the pump intensity, pump and signal spatial modulations, and the walk-off effect on the OPCPA output beam quality are presented, together with conversion efficiency and the gain spectrum. The pump modulation is a dominant factor that affects the output beam quality. Comparatively, the influence of signal modulation is insignificant. For a low-energy system with small beam sizes, walk-off effect has to be considered. Pump modulation and walk-off effect lead to asymmetric output beam profile with increased modulation. A special pump modulation type is found to optimize output beam quality and efficiency. For a high-energy system with large beam sizes, the walk-off effect can be neglected, certain back conversion is beneficial to reduce the output modulation. A trade-off must be made between the output beam quality and the conversion efficiency, especially when the pump modulation is large since. A relatively high conversion efficiency and a low output modulation are both achievable by controlling the pump modulation and intensity.

  8. White-light generation control with crossing beams of femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Kolomenskii, A A; Strohaber, J; Kaya, N; Kaya, G; Sokolov, A V; Schuessler, H A

    2016-01-11

    We investigated the variations in generated white-light when crossing two femtosecond laser beams in a Kerr medium. By changing the relative delay of two interacting intense femtosecond laser pulses, we show that white-light generation can be enhanced or suppressed. With a decrease of the relative delay an enhancement of the white-light output was observed, which at even smaller delays was reverted to a suppression of white-light generation. Under choosen conditions, the level of suppression resulted in a white-light output lower than the initial level corresponding to large delays, when the pulses do not overlap in time. The enhancement of the white-light generation takes place in the pulse that is lagging. We found that the effect of the interaction of the beams depends on their relative orientation of polarization and increases when the polarizations are changed from perpendicular to parallel. The observed effects are explained by noting that at intermediate delays, the perturbations introduced in the path of the lagging beam lead to a shortening of the length of filament formation and enhancement of the white-light generation, whereas at small delays the stronger interaction and mutual rescattering reduces the intensity in the central part of the beams, suppressing filamentation and white-light generation.

  9. Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K.

    2005-08-29

    Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

  10. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  11. Pulsed ion beam surface treatment for preparing rapidly solidified corrosion resistant steel and aluminum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Buchheit, R.G.; Maestas, L.M.; McIntyre, D.C.; Stinnett, R.W.; Greenly, J.B.

    1995-03-01

    Intense, pulsed ion beams were used to melt and rapidly resolidify Types 316F, 316L and sensitized 304 stainless steel surfaces to eliminate the negative effects of microstructural heterogeneity on localized corrosion resistance. Anodic polarization curves determined for 316F and 316L showed that passive current densities were reduced and pitting potentials were increased due to ion beam treatment. Type 304 samples sensitized at 600 C for 100 h showed no evidence of grain boundary attack when surfaces were ion beam treated. Equivalent ion beam treatments were conducted with a 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Electrochemical impedance experiments conducted with this alloy exposed to an aerated chloride solution showed that the onset of pitting was delayed compared to untreated control samples.

  12. Modeling of high efficiency solar cells under laser pulse for power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells have been used to convert sunlight to electrical energy for many years and also offer great potential for non-solar energy conversion applications. Their greatly improved performance under monochromatic light compared to sunlight, makes them suitable as photovoltaic (PV) receivers in laser power beaming applications. Laser beamed power to a PV array receiver could provide power to satellites, an orbital transfer vehicle, or a lunar base. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) solar cells have calculated efficiencies of more than 50 percent under continuous illumination at the optimum wavelength. Currently high power free-electron lasers are being developed which operate in pulsed conditions. Understanding cell behavior under a laser pulse is important in the selection of the solar cell material and the laser. An experiment by NAsA lewis and JPL at the AVLIS laser facility in Livermore, CA presented experimental data on cell performance under pulsed laser illumination. Reference 5 contains an overview of technical issues concerning the use of solar cells for laser power conversion, written before the experiments were performed. As the experimental results showed, the actual effects of pulsed operation are more complicated. Reference 6 discusses simulations of the output of GaAs concentrator solar cells under pulsed laser illumination. The present paper continues this work, and compares the output of Si and GaAs solar cells.

  13. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  14. Modeling of high efficiency solar cells under laser pulse for power beaming applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-09-01

    Solar cells have been used to convert sunlight to electrical energy for many years and also offer great potential for non-solar energy conversion applications. Their greatly improved performance under monochromatic light compared to sunlight, makes them suitable as photovoltaic (PV) receivers in laser power beaming applications. Laser beamed power to a PV array receiver could provide power to satellites, an orbital transfer vehicle, or a lunar base. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) solar cells have calculated efficiencies of more than 50 percent under continuous illumination at the optimum wavelength. Currently high power free-electron lasers are being developed which operate in pulsed conditions. Understanding cell behavior under a laser pulse is important in the selection of the solar cell material and the laser. An experiment by NAsA lewis and JPL at the AVLIS laser facility in Livermore, CA presented experimental data on cell performance under pulsed laser illumination. Reference 5 contains an overview of technical issues concerning the use of solar cells for laser power conversion, written before the experiments were performed. As the experimental results showed, the actual effects of pulsed operation are more complicated. Reference 6 discusses simulations of the output of GaAs concentrator solar cells under pulsed laser illumination. The present paper continues this work, and compares the output of Si and GaAs solar cells.

  15. Short time ion pulse extraction from the Dresden electron beam ion trapa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kentsch, U.; Zschornack, G.; Schwan, A.; Ullmann, F.

    2010-02-01

    We present measurements of the extraction of short time pulses of highly charged ions (4 keV, Ar16+) from the Dresden electron beam ion trap. Thereby the dependence of the extractable ionic charge on the extraction regime was investigated. The ion extraction time was varied between 20 ns and 1 μs. Furthermore the production of carbon ions and the influence of the extraction regime on the pulse widths was investigated to obtain information about the suitability of the Dresden EBIS-A in synchrotron based particle therapy facilities.

  16. Interaction of pulsed carbon dioxide laser beams with teeth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brune, D

    1980-08-01

    Beams of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers with energy densities of about 10, 100 or 200 J/mm2 have been applied perpendicularly to third molars in vitro for the purpose of preparing cavities or pin holes for retention. A pulsed beam with an energy density of about 10 J/mm2 produced a hole approximately 2 mm deep with a diameter of about 0.2 mm. With a beam of 100 J/mm2 the hole produced penetrated the tooth to a depth of 4 mm. Minor cracks around the hole in both enamel and dentin could be observed. Around the position where the beam entered the enamel matrix a white mineralized layer was observed, while a brown discoloration was formed around the hole in the dentin at the beam exit. With an energy density of 200 J/mm2 the formation of cracks and discoloration was very pronounced. X-ray diffraction of lased tissue revealed an apatite structure. The wall in the lased hole exhibited a Vicker hardness number similar to that of enamel.

  17. Synthesis of substituted lithium ferrites under the pulsed and continuous electron beam heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysenko, Elena N.; Surzhikov, Anatoliy P.; Vlasov, Vitaliy A.; Nikolaev, Evgeniy V.; Malyshev, Andrey V.; Bryazgin, Alexandr A.; Korobeynikov, Mikhail V.; Mikhailenko, Mikhail A.

    2017-02-01

    Synthesis of substituted lithium ferrites with chemical formulas Li0.6Fe2.2Ti0.2O4 and Li0.649Fe1.598Ti0.5Zn0.2Mn0.051O4 under the pulsed and continuous electron beam heating was investigated by X-ray diffraction and thermomagnetometric analysis. The electron beams heating of Li2CO3-Fe2O3-TiO2 or Li2CO3-ZnO-Fe2O3-TiO2-MnO mixtures was carried out at a temperature of 750 °C during 60 min using two types of electron accelerators: ELV accelerator generating continuous electron beam or ILU-6 accelerator generating pulse electron beam. It was established that a high energy electron beam heating of initial reagents mixtures allows obtaining the substituted lithium ferrites with final composition at significantly lower temperatures (at least 200 °C lower than in the case of using traditional thermal synthesis) and times of synthesis. That statement is in agreement with results obtained by XRD analysis, showing single phase formation; by magnetic measurements, showing high values of specific magnetization; by DTG measurements showing the certain Curie temperatures of the synthesized samples.

  18. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  19. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  20. BEAM TRANSPORT IN A COMPACT DIELECTRIC WALL INDUCTION ACCELERATOR SYSTEM FOR PULSED RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    McCarrick, J F; Caporaso, G J; Chen, Y

    2005-05-09

    Using dielectric wall accelerator technology, we are developing a compact induction accelerator system primarily intended for pulsed radiography. The accelerator would provide a 2-kA beam with an energy of 8 MeV, for a 20-30 ns flat-top. The design goal is to generate a 2-mm diameter, 10-rad x-ray source. We have a physics design of the system from injector to the x-ray converter. We present the results of injector modeling and PIC simulations of beam transport. We also discuss the predicted spot size and the on-axis x-ray dose.

  1. Generation of a beam of fast electrons by tightly focusing a radially polarized ultrashort laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Payeur, S.; Fourmaux, S.; Schmidt, B. E.; MacLean, J. P.; Tchervenkov, C.; Legare, F.; Kieffer, J. C.; Piche, M.

    2012-07-23

    The generation of an electron beam through longitudinal field acceleration from a tightly focused radially polarized (TM{sub 01}) laser mode is reported. The longitudinal field is generated by focusing a TM{sub 01} few-cycle laser pulse (1.8 {mu}m, 550 {mu}J, 15 fs) with a high numerical aperture parabola. The created longitudinal field in the focal region is intense enough to ionize atoms and accelerate electrons to 23 keV of energy from a low density oxygen gas. The characteristics of the electron beam are presented.

  2. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  3. Pulsed electron beam propagation in gases under pressure of 6.6 kPa in drift tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Poloskov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of pulsed electron beam transport propagated in a drift tube filled with different gases (He, H2, N2, Ar, SF6, and CO2). The total pressure in the drift tube was 6.6 kPa. The experiments were carried out using a TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The electron beam was propagated in the drift tube composed of two sections equipped with reverse current shunts. Under a pressure of 6.6 kPa, the maximum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded when the beam was propagated in hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The minimum value of the electron beam charge closed on the walls of the drift tube was recorded for sulfur hexafluoride. The visualization of the pulsed electron beam energy losses onto the walls of the drift chamber was carried out using radiation-sensitive film.

  4. A Single Pulse Sub-Nanosecond Proton RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R W; Pearce-Percy, H; Pearson, D; Rougieri, M; Weir, J; Zografos, A; Guethlein, G; Hawkins, S; Falabella, S; Poole, B; Blackfield, D

    2011-03-29

    A Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac system has been developed to provide a single pulse of 2 MeV protons with a beam pulse width of {approx}300 ps and a charge of 30 pC, either for injection into a pulsed Dielectric Wall Accelerator or for bombardment of a target to produce a fast neutron pulse. The 1.2 m long RFQ structure operates at 425 MHz and bunches and accelerates a single 2.35 ns beam pulse injected into it at 35 keV using a parallel plate deflector placed directly in front of the RFQ entrance. The input acceptance properties of the RFQ allow a simple dc bias voltage on the plates to block acceleration of the unwanted beam, with a short rf voltage pulse applied to null the deflection field for the ions within the 8 mm 'kicker' plate length. The use of the RFQ as the accelerating structure allows one to efficiently produce a large charge in a single sub-ns bunch. In addition, the kicker can also be used without the dc bias voltage to produce a 'notch' in the normal RFQ output beam for synchrotron injection.

  5. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M.; Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kim, B. R.; Seo, C. S.; Jin, J. T.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.; Oh, B. H.; Kim, J.; Bae, Y. S.

    2011-06-15

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H{sup +}/D{sup +} ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H{sup +}/D{sup +} beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and {+-}7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Selective surface purification via crater eruption under pulsed electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Jianxin; Zhang Kemin; Dong Chuang; Qin Ying; Hao Shengzhi; Grosdidier, Thierry

    2006-07-24

    This letter reports an interesting phenomenon associated with the high-current pulsed electron beam treatment:selective surface purification. The treatment induces crater eruptions that preferentially occur at irregular composition and structure sites. The eruptions of second phase inclusions naturally lead to the purification and homogenization of the melted surface layer. This improves significantly the corrosion resistance of NiTi and 316L alloys.

  7. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  8. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  9. Electro-optic and Acousto-optic Laser Beam Scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Römer, G. R. B. E.; Bechtold, P.

    Optical solid state deflectors rely on the electro-optical or acousto-optic effect. These Electro-Optical Deflectors (EODs) and Acousto-Optical Deflectors (AODs) do not contain moving parts and therefore exhibit high deflection velocities and are free of drawbacks associated with mechanical scanners. A description of the principles of operation of EODs and AODs is presented. In addition, characteristics, properties and the (dis)advantages of EODs and AODs, when compared to mirror based mechanical deflectors, is discussed. Deflection angles, speed and accuracy are discussed in terms of resolvable spots and related quantities. Also, response time, damage threshold, efficiency and the type and magnitude of beam distortions is addressed. Optical deflectors are characterized by high angular deflection velocities, but small deflection angles. Whereas mechanical mechanical scanners are characterized by relatively small deflection velocities, but large deflection angles. Arranging an optical deflector and a mechanical scanner in series allows to take advantage of the best of both worlds.

  10. An experimental study of the interaction between a pulsed electron beam and a large-amplitude electromagnetic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Yu. A.; Starodubov, A. V.; Fokin, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the interaction between an electron beam with a periodically varying diameter and a large-amplitude electromagnetic wave. The effect of different factors on the pulsed beam formation and current density in bunches is established. Compared with the electron beam deceleration circuits (low-voltage vircator systems), the generators based on pulsed turbulent beams have a broader band due to the formation of a large number of space charge bunches and an integral power efficiency that is higher by a factor of 2-2.5.

  11. Distributed CAN-bus Based Beam Diagnostic System for Pulse Race-Track Microtron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepurnov, Alexander

    Very compact 70 MeV pulse race-track microtron is under construction now. To acquire outputs of beam-current transformers on every orbit and pulses of high voltage and RF field a distributed multi-channel beam diagnostic system was developed. Each acquisition controller consists of four fast differential amplifiers and one DSP-based micro-controller with on-chip ADC and CAN-bus controller. Each amplifier is coupled with beam-current transformer and has bandwidth of up to 150MHz and gain of up to 10. One of four channels is acquired during a measurement cycle. Another channel could be selected between two following pulses. All the controllers are connected via optically coupled CAN-bus with a host diskless PC running under Linux with the RTLinux extension. Dedicated software of the system consists of low level acquisition software for DSP, network software for controllers and host PC, application software for PC to present date for operator and control system. Standard CAN application layers were considered but refused because of the closed character of the whole system and centralised synchronisation of the whole system. Dedicated software of the system consists from low level acquisition software for DSP, network software for controllers and host PC, application software for PC to present date for operator and control system. Standard CAN application layers were considered but refused because of closed character of the whole system and centralised synchronisation of the whole system.

  12. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B. S. Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  13. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device.

    PubMed

    Elgarhy, M A I; Hassaballa, S E; Rashed, U M; ElSabbagh, M M; Soliman, H M; Saudy, A H

    2015-12-01

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  14. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device

    SciTech Connect

    Elgarhy, M. A. I. Hassaballa, S. E.; Rashed, U. M.; ElSabbagh, M. M.; Saudy, A. H.; Soliman, H. M.

    2015-12-15

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  15. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-09-30

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  16. Effects of beam steering in pulsed-wave ultrasound velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Aaron H; Yu, Alfred C H; Johnston, K Wayne; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2005-08-01

    Experimental and computer simulation methods have been used to investigate the significance of beam steering as a potential source of error in pulsed-wave flow velocity estimation. By simulating a typical linear-array transducer system as used for spectral flow estimation, it is shown that beam steering can cause an angle offset resulting in a change in the effective beam-flow angle. This offset primarily depends on the F-number and the nominal steering angle. For example, at an F-number of 3 and a beam-flow angle of 70 degrees , the velocity error changed from -5% to + 5% when the steering angle changed from -20 degrees to + 20 degrees . Much higher errors can occur at higher beam-flow angles, with smaller F-numbers and greater steering. Our experimental study used a clinical ultrasound system, a tissue-mimicking phantom and a pulsatile waveform to determine peak flow velocity errors for various steering and beam-flow angles. These errors were found to be consistent with our simulation results.

  17. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, R Glynn; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 muC will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 muC by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 mus after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 muC and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber ( approximately 300 mus), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  18. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  19. Generation of solid-density ultraintense ion beams by a picosecond laser pulse of circular polarization.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, S; Badziak, J

    2012-02-01

    This contribution reports particle-in-cell numerical studies of deuteron beam acceleration by a picosecond laser pulse of circular polarization. The effect of laser wavelength λ and the I(L)λ(2) product (I(L) is laser intensity) on the ion beam parameters is investigated. It is shown that at the I(L)λ(2) product fixed, the beam parameters (, I(i), F(i)) as well as the laser-ions energy conversion efficiency quickly increase with a decrease in the laser wavelength and the best results are achieved for a KrF laser (λ = 0.248 μm). In particular, a 2-ps KrF laser pulse of I(L)λ(2) ∼ 2 × 10(20) Wcm(-2) μm(2) interacting with a 10-μm deuteron target produces a quasi-monoenergetic, solid-density deuteron beam of parameters approaching those required for inertial confinement fusion fast ignition.

  20. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL < 1 / (2 πωpe)) laser pulses drive highly nonlinear plasma waves which can trap ~ nC of electrons and accelerate them to ~GeV energies over ~cm lengths. These electron beams can then be converted by a high-Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (< 20 mrad) beams of high-energy (<600 MeV) photons and subsequently into positrons via the Bethe-Heitler process. By increasing the material thickness and Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL < 40 fs) characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  1. Ion reflection by shock waves and pulse generation by cross-field ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    2017-02-01

    Comparisons are made of two different particle simulations: one for the study of plasma-based accelerators (Gueroult & Fisch, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 23, 2016, 032113) and the other for the study of shock formation in the interstellar medium (Yamauchi & Ohsawa, Phys. Plasmas, vol. 14, 2007, 053110). In the former, shock waves used for plasma density control create ion beams by reflection. In the latter, a fast and dense beam of exploding ions penetrates a surrounding plasma. In both simulations, magnetic bumps are generated from the motion of ion beams perpendicular to a magnetic field. Despite the apparent differences of their purposes, configurations and spatial scales, the two simulations show strong similarities in the generation processes and effects of the bumps, suggesting that these are not rare plasma phenomena. The bump created by the exploding ions develops into backward and forward magnetosonic pulses.

  2. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy J. Turman, Bob Senft, Donna Sorensen, Neil R. Stinnett, Regan Greenly, John B. Thompson, Michael O. Buchheit, Rudolph G.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  3. Spectrum superbroadening in self-focusing of pulsed vortex beams in air

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, R A; Volkov, V M; Dedkov, D Yu

    2013-02-28

    Based on numerical simulations, self-focusing of conventional and vortex optical beams produced by femtosecond pulses in air is comparatively analysed. It is shown that, other things being equal, in the case of self-focusing of vortex beams, a significantly higher concentration of energy is observed in the focal spot. As a consequence, there also arises a significant broadening of the space - time spectrum of the focused vortex beam as compared with the vortex-free self-focusing regime. The azimuthal instability of the vortex structure at small initial perturbations of the wave front leads to filamentation of radiation at distances greater than is usually the length of self-focusing. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  4. Evaluation of disparate laser beam deflection technologies by means of number and rate of resolvable spots.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Peter; Hohenstein, Ralph; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-08-15

    We introduce a method to objectively evaluate systems of differing beam deflection technologies that commonly are described by disparate technical specifications. Using our new approach based on resolvable spots we will compare commercially available random-access beam deflection technologies, namely galvanometer scanners, piezo scanners, MEMS scanners, acousto-optic deflectors, and electro-optic deflectors.

  5. INITIAL EVALUATION OF A PULSED WHITE SPECTRUM NEUTRON GENERATOR FOR EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel,, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-06-02

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is acritical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designedand fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set ofparallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80 - 120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing.

  6. Implementation of a SVWP-based laser beam shaping technique for generation of 100-mJ-level picosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Adamonis, J; Aleknavičius, A; Michailovas, K; Balickas, S; Petrauskienė, V; Gertus, T; Michailovas, A

    2016-10-01

    We present implementation of the energy-efficient and flexible laser beam shaping technique in a high-power and high-energy laser amplifier system. The beam shaping is based on a spatially variable wave plate (SVWP) fabricated by femtosecond laser nanostructuring of glass. We reshaped the initially Gaussian beam into a super-Gaussian (SG) of the 12th order with efficiency of about 50%. The 12th order of the SG beam provided the best compromise between large fill factor, low diffraction on the edges of the active media, and moderate intensity distribution modification during free-space propagation. We obtained 150 mJ pulses of 532 nm radiation. High-energy, pulse duration of 85 ps and the nearly flat-top spatial profile of the beam make it ideal for pumping optical parametric chirped pulse amplification systems.

  7. High-Beam-Quality Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Amplification in Periodically-Poled KTiOPO4

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbers, C A; Schmidt, J R; Jovanovic, I

    2003-09-25

    We have demonstrated a high-gain optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for Nd:glass-based short-pulse laser systems based on periodically poled potassium-titanyl-phosphate. Our amplifier produced high single-pass gain, broad bandwidth, excellent beam quality and stability.

  8. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H{sup −} ion beam for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, N. Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M.

    2015-04-08

    R and D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H{sup −} ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m{sup 2} for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m{sup 2} of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  9. [The effect of the pulsed radiation of a fast electron beam on the fluorescence of solutions of biological molecules].

    PubMed

    Vasin, A L; Ostrovskiĭ, A V; Erastov, A A; Vaĭner, E A; Garibov, R E; Ponomarev, V N; Kadomtseva, M B

    1993-01-01

    The intensity of fluorescence of amino acid and globular protein solutions, exposed to a pulsed electron beam in the presence and absence of the concurrent pulsed electromagnetic field was found to be a function of radiation dose. The observed decline in the fluorescence intensity was slightly dependent on the solution concentration and dependent on the time and dose-rate of irradiation. The effect of the concurrent pulsed radiation of the electromagnetic field was sometimes observed.

  10. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-15

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  11. ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM POSITION AND PULSED POWER MONITORS FOR THE SECOND AXIS OF DARHT.

    SciTech Connect

    M. BRUBAKER; C. EKDAHL; C. YAKYMYSHYN

    2001-05-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydro-Test (DARHT) facility utilizes a long pulse electron beam having a duration in excess of two microseconds. This time scale poses problems for many conventional diagnostics that rely upon electrical cables to transmit signals between the accelerator and recording equipment. Recognizing that transit time isolation is not readily achieved for the long pulse regime, difficulties resulting from ground loops are anticipated. An electro-optic (EO) voltage sensor technology has been developed to address this issue. The EO sensor exploits the Pockels effect in Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) to provide linear modulation of laser light in response to the voltage induced on a pickup electrode. Fiber coupling between the light source, Pockels cell and receiver ensures complete galvanic isolation with improved cost and performance as compared to conventional sensors fitted with fiber optic links. Furthermore, the EO approach requires that only the passive sensor element be located near the accelerator while the light source and receiver can be installed in remote locations. This paper describes the design and development of EO sensors for electron beam and pulsed power monitoring on the second axis of DARHT. Typical calibration and testing data for the sensors is also presented.

  12. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-16

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.

  13. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; ...

    2016-02-16

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposuremore » process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.« less

  14. Electra: A Repetitively Pulsed, Electron Beam Pumped KrF Laser to Develop the Technologies for Fusion Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    primary source of beam electrons comes from the inside of the capillary wall, and not explosive emission from the cathode material itself. This should...emitted from a field emission cathode driven by a fast pulsed power system. The electron beam propagates through a thin foil, which serves as the...pressure after the shot was reduced about five fold. In the case of the carbon fiber cathode , the RMS non-uniformity of the electron beam dropped

  15. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J-PARC:Incident Beam Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Risa; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Sugino, Tomoaki; Yamashita, Satoru; Katayama, Ryo; Yamada, Takahito; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Otono, Hidetoshi; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyuki; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Ino, Takashi; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Seki, Yoshichika; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is one of the important parameters in the estimation of the abundance of the light elements in the early universe through the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). The accuracy of 0.1% is desired in the neutron lifetime to quantitatively discuss the BBN in combination with the observation of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave. We have started a lifetime measurement with pulsed neutrons at J-PARC/BL05. To measure the lifetime, we detect the decay electrons from the bunched neutrons and the incident neutron flux in the TPC at the same time. By diluting a small amount of 3He gas into the TPC, the incident flux is estimated by counting protons via 3He(n,p)3H reactions. The accuracy of the selection of 3He(n,p)3H events and the influence of the contamination of nitrogen gas are the major systematic errors. In this paper, the estimation of the systematic error in the incident flux is reported.

  16. Note: Measurement of extreme-short current pulse duration of runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Rybka, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Balzovsky, E. V.

    2012-08-15

    This note reports the time-amplitude characteristic of the supershort avalanche electron beam with up to 20 ps time resolution. For the first time it is shown that the electron beam downstream of small-diameter diaphragms in atmospheric pressure air has a complex structure which depends on the interelectrode gap width and cathode design. With a spherical cathode and collimator the minimum duration at half maximum of the supershort avalanche electron beam current pulse was shown to be {approx}25 ps. The minimum duration at half maximum of one peak in the pulses with two peaks can reach {approx}25 ps too.

  17. Note: measurement of extreme-short current pulse duration of runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure air.

    PubMed

    Tarasenko, V F; Rybka, D V; Burachenko, A G; Lomaev, M I; Balzovsky, E V

    2012-08-01

    This note reports the time-amplitude characteristic of the supershort avalanche electron beam with up to 20 ps time resolution. For the first time it is shown that the electron beam downstream of small-diameter diaphragms in atmospheric pressure air has a complex structure which depends on the interelectrode gap width and cathode design. With a spherical cathode and collimator the minimum duration at half maximum of the supershort avalanche electron beam current pulse was shown to be ~25 ps. The minimum duration at half maximum of one peak in the pulses with two peaks can reach ~25 ps too.

  18. 6. DETAIL OF NORTH ELEVATION AND FOOTINGS FOR FLAME DEFLECTOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF NORTH ELEVATION AND FOOTINGS FOR FLAME DEFLECTOR, NOW MISSING. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. 8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER DRAINAGE AREA IN THE DISTANCE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, COUNTERFORT AT CENTER, FRAGMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, COUNTERFORT AT CENTER, FRAGMENT OF CONCRETE CAMERA STAND IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. 26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  4. 2. NORTH FRONT, FROM SUPERSTRUCTURE TO FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. NORTH FRONT, FROM SUPERSTRUCTURE TO FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking south southwest from Observation Post No. 1 (Building 8767). - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT UPPER LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  7. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-07-15

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  8. Nonlinear self-focus of pulsed-wave beams in Kerr media

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, J.B.

    1992-12-31

    A modified finite-difference time-domain method for solving Maxwell`s equations in nonlinear media is presented. This method allows for a finite response time to be incorporated in the medium, physically creating dispersion and absorption mechanisms. The technique models electromagnetic fields in two space dimensions and time and encompasses both the TE{sub z} and TM{sub z} set of decoupled field equations. Aspects of an ultra-short pulsed Gaussian beam are studied in a variety of linear and nonlinear environments to demonstrate that the methods developed here can be used efficaciously in the modeling of pulses in complex problem space geometries even when nonlinearities are present.

  9. Direct acceleration of an electron in infinite vacuum by a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam.

    PubMed

    Wong, Liang Jie; Kärtner, Franz X

    2010-11-22

    We study the direct acceleration of a free electron in infinite vacuum along the axis of a pulsed radially-polarized laser beam. We find that net energy transfer from laser pulse to electron is maximized with the tightest focusing. We show that the net energy gain of an electron initially moving at a relativistic velocity may exceed more than half the theoretical limit of energy transfer, which is not possible with an initially stationary electron in the parameter space studied. We determine and analyze the power scaling of maximum energy gain, extending our study to include a relatively unexplored regime of low powers and revealing that substantial acceleration is already possible without the use of petawatt peak-power laser technology.

  10. Surface composite nanostructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. C.; Hao, S. Z.; Wen, H.; Huang, R. F.

    2014-06-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on an AZ91 cast magnesium alloy with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2 and pulse duration 2.5 μs. The surface microstructure was characterized by optical microscope (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The surface corrosion property was tested with electrochemical method in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution. It is found that after 1 pulse of HCPEB treatment, the initial eutectic α phase and Mg17Al12 particles started to dissolve in the surface modified layer of depth ∼15 μm. When using 15 HCPEB pulses, the Al content in surface layer increased noticeably, and the phase structure was modified as composite nanostructures consisted of nano-grained Mg3.1Al0.9 domains surrounded by network of Mg17Al12 phase. The HCPEB treated samples showed an improved corrosion resistance with cathodic current density decreased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the initial AZ91 alloy.

  11. Self-Induced Transparency and Electromagnetic Pulse Compression in a Plasma or an Electron Beam under Cyclotron Resonance Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zotova, I. V.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2010-12-30

    Based on analogy to the well-known process of the self-induced transparency of an optical pulse propagating through a passive two-level medium we describe similar effects for a microwave pulse interacting with a cold plasma or rectilinear electron beam under cyclotron resonance condition. It is shown that with increasing amplitude and duration of an incident pulse the linear cyclotron absorption is replaced by the self-induced transparency when the pulse propagates without damping. In fact, the initial pulse decomposes to one or several solitons with amplitude and duration defined by its velocity. In a certain parameter range, the single soliton formation is accompanied by significant compression of the initial electromagnetic pulse. We suggest using the effect of self-compression for producing multigigawatt picosecond microwave pulses.

  12. Progress in long-pulse production of powerful negative ion beams for JT-60SA and ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, A.; Umeda, N.; Hanada, M.; Yoshida, M.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Watanabe, K.; Akino, N.; Komata, M.; Mogaki, K.; Sasaki, S.; Seki, N.; Nemoto, S.; Shimizu, T.; Endo, Y.; Ohasa, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Grisham, L. R.

    2015-06-01

    Significant progress in the extension of pulse durations of powerful negative ion beams has been made to realize the neutral beam injectors for JT-60SA and ITER. In order to overcome common issues of the long-pulse production/acceleration of negative ion beams in JT-60SA and ITER, new technologies have been developed in the JT-60SA ion source and the MeV accelerator in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. As for the long-pulse production of high-current negative ions for the JT-60SA ion source, the pulse durations have been successfully increased from 30 s at 13 A on JT-60U to 100 s at 15 A by modifying the JT-60SA ion source, which satisfies the required pulse duration of 100 s and 70% of the rated beam current for JT-60SA. This progress was based on the R&D efforts for the temperature control of the plasma grid and uniform negative ion productions with the modified tent-shaped filter field configuration. Moreover, each parameter of the required beam energy, current and pulse has been achieved individually by these R&D efforts. The developed techniques are useful to design the ITER ion source because the sustainment of the caesium coverage in the large extraction area is one of the common issues between JT-60SA and ITER. As for the long-pulse acceleration of high power density beams in the MeV accelerator for ITER, the pulse duration of MeV-class negative ion beams has been extended by more than 2 orders of magnitude by modifying the extraction grid with a high cooling capability and a high transmission of negative ions. A long-pulse acceleration of 60 s has been achieved at 70 MW m-2 (683 keV, 100 A m-2) which has reached the power density of JT-60SA level of 65 MW m-2. No degradations of the voltage holding capability of the acceleration voltage and the beam optics due to the distortion of the acceleration grids have been observed in this power density level. These results are the longest pulse durations of high-current and high-power-density negative ion beams in the

  13. The influence of magnetic fields on the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhang, Ya-ling; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Ling-yu; Yang, Lei E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn

    2015-09-15

    We performed two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate how a magnetic field affects the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in plasmas. The corresponding density of plasma electrons is investigated. At a weak magnetic field, the wakes exhibit typical V-shaped cone structures. As the magnetic field strengthens, the wakes spread and lose their typical V-shaped structures. At a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the wakes exhibit conversed V-shaped structures. Additionally, strengthening the magnetic field reduces the stopping power in regions of low and high beam density. However, the influence of the magnetic field becomes complicated in regions of moderate beam density. The stopping power increases in a weak magnetic field, but it decreases in a strong magnetic field. At high beam density and moderate magnetic field, two low-density channels of plasma electrons appear on both sides of the incident beam pulse trajectory. This is because electrons near the beam pulses will be attracted and move along with the beam pulses, while other electrons nearby are restricted by the magnetic field and cannot fill the gap.

  14. The characterization of latex particles prepared by pulsed electron beam induced emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongfei; Wang, Mozhen; Ge, Xuewu

    2012-10-01

    The emulsion polymerization of styrene (St) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) induced by 10 MeV pulsed electron beams (PEB) was investigated. The monomer conversion of MMA and St was found to be very low so that the final prepared poly(methyl methacrylate) (P(MMA)) and polystyrene (PS) latex particles exhibit porous structures, as verified by TEM and SEM observations. The results of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) showed that both the particle size and the molecular weight of PS and PMMA latexes decrease with the increase of the absorbed dose. However, the molecular weights and the particle sizes of the PS and PMMA latexes change differently with the irradiation time. This work indicated that emulsion polymerization induced by high energy electron beam has an advantage over that induced by γ-ray or chemical initiators in the preparation of latex with a low molecular weight and porous structure.

  15. Symmetry issues in a class of ion beam targets using sufficiently short direct drive pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.; Lindl, J.D.

    1986-10-23

    Controlling asymmetries in direct drive ion beam targets depends upon the ability to control the effects of residual target asymmetries after an appropriate illumination scheme has already been utilized. A class of modified ion beam targets where residual asymmetries are ameliorated is considered. The illumination scheme used is an axially symmetric one convenient for reactor designs. Residual asymmetries are controlled by limiting the radial motion of the radius R/sub dep/ of peak ion energy deposition. Limiting the motion of R/sub dep/ is achieved by lengthening the time scale t/sub s/ where changes in R/sub dep/ adversely affect asymmetries. In our example, t/sub s/ becomes longer than the duration ..delta..t/sub D/ of the entire direct drive pulse train (t/sub s/ > ..delta..t/sub D/).

  16. Multistaged acceleration of ions by circularly polarized laser pulse: Monoenergetic ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomei; Shen Baifei; Li Xuemei; Jin Zhangying; Wang Fengchao

    2007-07-15

    A multiple-staged ion acceleration mechanism in the interaction of a circularly polarized laser pulse with a solid target is studied by one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The ions are accelerated from rest to several MeV monoenergetically at the front surface of the target. After all the plasma ions are accelerated, the acceleration process is repeated on the resulting monoenergetic ions. Under suitable conditions multiple repetitions can be realized and a high-energy quasi-monoenergetic ion beam can be obtained.

  17. Development of time projection chamber for precise neutron lifetime measurement using pulsed cold neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Y.; Higashi, N.; Igarashi, Y.; Iwashita, Y.; Ino, T.; Katayama, R.; Kitaguchi, M.; Kitahara, R.; Matsumura, H.; Mishima, K.; Nagakura, N.; Oide, H.; Otono, H.; Sakakibara, R.; Shima, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Sugino, T.; Sumi, N.; Sumino, H.; Taketani, K.; Tanaka, G.; Tanaka, M.; Tauchi, K.; Toyoda, A.; Tomita, T.; Yamada, T.; Yamashita, S.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoshioka, T.

    2015-11-01

    A new time projection chamber (TPC) was developed for neutron lifetime measurement using a pulsed cold neutron spallation source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Managing considerable background events from natural sources and the beam radioactivity is a challenging aspect of this measurement. To overcome this problem, the developed TPC has unprecedented features such as the use of polyether-ether-ketone plates in the support structure and internal surfaces covered with 6Li-enriched tiles to absorb outlier neutrons. In this paper, the design and performance of the new TPC are reported in detail.

  18. Studies of Non-Linear Optical Effects for Agile Beam Steering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-11-01

    corresponded to: 1. An initial demonstration of the nonlinear optical enhancement effect in an off-the-shelf AO beam deflector . 2 . A demonstration of an...by showing an intensity-dependentertun• acousto - optic diffraction efficiency in a Tel) 2 Bragg ceUl un-ertures.der high-power pulsed illumination. The...proportional refractive-index d variation through the medium’s photoelastic response, the - d 2 (Ap)/dt- + v2V2 ( p) + ( 2 */0 2L,. - V(Ap) incident optical

  19. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  20. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  1. Pulse Power Compression by Cutting a Dense Z-Pinch with a Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1999-07-01

    A thin cut made through a z-pinch by an intense laser beam can become a magnetically insulated diode crossed by an intense ion beam. For larger cuts, the gap is crossed by an intense relativistic electron beam, stopped by magnetic bremsstrahlung resulting in a pointlike intense x-ray source. In either case, the impedance of the pinch discharge is increased, with the power delivered rising in the same pro-portion. A magnetically insulated cut is advantageous for three reasons: First, with the ion current com-parable to the Alfvèn ion current, the pinch instabilities are reduced. Second, with the energy deposit-ed into fast ions, a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution is established increasing<σ ν> value for nuclear fusion reactions taking place in the pinch discharge. Third, in a high density z-pinch plasma, the intense ion beam can launch a thermonuclear detonation wave propagating along the pinch discharge channel. For larger cuts the soft x-rays produced by magnetic bremsstrahlung can be used to drive a thermonuclear hohlraum target. Finally, the proposed pulse power compression scheme permits to use a cheap low power d.c. source charging a magnetic storage coil delivering the magnetically stored energy to the pinch discharge load by an exploding wire opening switch.

  2. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Dixit, S. N.; Shore, B. W.; Chambers, D. M.; Britten, J. A.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    LIDAR systems require a light transmitting system for sending a laser light pulse into space and a receiving system for collecting the retro-scattered light, separating it from the outgoing beam and analyzing the received signal for calculating wind velocities. Currently, a shuttle manifested coherent LIDAR experiment called SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) includes a silicon wedge (or prism) in its design in order to deflect the outgoing beam 30 degrees relative to the incident direction. The intent of this paper is to present two optical design approaches that may enable the replacement of the optical wedge component (in future, larger aperture, post-SPARCLE missions) with a surface relief transmission diffraction grating. Such a grating could be etched into a lightweight, flat, fused quartz substrate. The potential advantages of a diffractive beam deflector include reduced weight, reduced power requirements for the driving scanning motor, reduced optical sensitivity to thermal gradients, and increased dynamic stability.

  3. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  4. Method for determining the position, angle and other injection parameters of a short pulsed beam in the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Ahrens, L.

    1985-01-01

    As part of the effort to improve the monitoring of the injection process at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), we have developed a beam diagnostics package which processes the signals from the plates of a pick-up electrode (PUE) located near the injection region of the AGS and provides measurements of the position and angle (with respect to the equilibrium orbit) of the injected beam at the stripping foil where the incident H/sup -/ beam is converted into protons. In addition the package provides measurements of the tune and chromaticity of the AGS at injection, and a measurement of the momentum spread of the injected beam. Since these parameters are obtained for a short-pulsed beam at injection we shall refer to the diagnostics package as PIP which stands for Pulsed Injection Parameters.

  5. Generation of dual pulses of the runaway electron beam current during the subnanosecond breakdown of atomic and molecular gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.; Lomaev, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    With a diaphragm placed behind the anode foil, dual runaway electron beams have been provided in helium, hydrogen, nitrogen, and air under a pressure of several torrs to several dozen torrs and a high-voltage pulse amplitude of about 250 kV. These beams consist of two pulses with commensurable amplitudes with a time interval between them of several dozen picoseconds to several hundred picoseconds. It has been shown that the breakdown of the interelectrode gap at pressures from several torrs to several dozen torrs may occur in different regimes and dual pulses of the electron beam current are registered when the initial current through the gap is below 1 kA. It has been found that a supershort avalanche electron beam that consists of one pulse is generated when the delay of breakdown equals several hundred picoseconds. It has been shown that, when the gas pressure reaches several hundred Torr, including atmospheric pressure, the runaway electrons are detected behind the foil after the termination of the supershort avalanche electron beam pulse.

  6. Transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using step-index fibers having large cladding

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer P; Joshi, Sachin

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus and method for transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using large core step-index silica optical fibers having thick cladding, are described. The thick cladding suppresses diffusion of modal power to higher order modes at the core-cladding interface, thereby enabling higher beam quality, M.sup.2, than are observed for large core, thin cladding optical fibers. For a given NA and core size, the thicker the cladding, the better the output beam quality. Mode coupling coefficients, D, has been found to scale approximately as the inverse square of the cladding dimension and the inverse square root of the wavelength. Output from a 2 m long silica optical fiber having a 100 .mu.m core and a 660 .mu.m cladding was found to be close to single mode, with an M.sup.2=1.6. Another thick cladding fiber (400 .mu.m core and 720 .mu.m clad) was used to transmit 1064 nm pulses of nanosecond duration with high beam quality to form gas sparks at the focused output (focused intensity of >100 GW/cm.sup.2), wherein the energy in the core was <6 mJ, and the duration of the laser pulses was about 6 ns. Extending the pulse duration provided the ability to increase the delivered pulse energy (>20 mJ delivered for 50 ns pulses) without damaging the silica fiber.

  7. Pulsed electron beam water radiolysis for submicrosecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting.

    PubMed

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J; Sharp, Joshua S

    2009-04-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on submicrosecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for submicrosecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and beta-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one submicrosecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a time scale shorter than that of large scale protein motions.

  8. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Final report, September 1, 1989--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1992-12-31

    This is the fifth in a series of contracts and grants exploring the advanced particulate pollution control technology of electron beam precipitation. The project currently under contract with the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, US DOE, addresses the pressing problem of more efficiently controlling the emission of fine, high resistivity fly ash from low sulfur coal-burning power plants. As such, the project is an integral part of the DOE mission to advance technologies which provide for the safe and economically viable utilization of the nation`s large but potentially polluting coal resources. Within the University Coal Research Program of the DOE, the objective of the project is also consistent with the goal of improving the performance of electrostatic precipitators and possibly fabric filters through the use of a first-stage electron beam particle precharger. Reducing the emission of particulate matter from coal fired boilers is in the national interest from a respiratory health standpoint, while improved power efficiency of the removal process serves the goals of lowered energy consumption. In addition, an earlier spinoff of the ongoing program at FSU was the invention of a new technology using pulsed streamer corona for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, the pulse energized electron reactor (PEER) process.

  9. Pulsed Electron Beam Water Radiolysis for Sub-Microsecond Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on sub-microsecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for sub-microsecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one sub-microsecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a timescale shorter than that of large scale protein motions. PMID:19265387

  10. Sound waves generated due to the absorption of a pulsed electron beam in gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, A. I.; Pushkarev, M. A.; Remnev, G. E.

    2002-03-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of acoustic vibrations (their frequency, amplitude, and attenuation coefficient) generated in a gas mixture as a result of the injection of a high-current pulsed electron beam into a closed reactor are presented. It is shown that the change in the phase composition of the initial mixture under the action of the electron beam leads to a change in the frequency of the sound waves and to an increase in the attenuation coefficient. By measuring the change in frequency, it is possible to evaluate with sufficient accuracy (about 2%) the degree of conversion of the initial products in the plasmochemical process. Relations describing the dependence of the sound energy attenuation coefficient on the size of the reactor and on the thermal and physical properties of the gases under study are derived. It is shown that a simple experimental setup measuring the parameters of acoustic waves can be used for monitoring the plasmochemical processes initiated by a pulsed excitation of a gas mixture.

  11. Dose rate effect of pulsed electron beam on micronucleus frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Santhosh; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Bhat, Nagesh N; Narayana, Yerol

    2010-03-01

    The micronucleus assay in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage and could serve as a biological dosimeter in evaluating suspected overexposure to ionising radiation. Micronucleus (MN) frequency as a measure of chromosomal damage has also extensively been employed to quantify the effects of radiation dose rate on biological systems. Here we studied the effects of 8 MeV pulsed electron beam emitted by Microtron electron accelerator on MN induction at dose rates between 35 Gy min-1 and 352.5 Gy min-1. These dose rates were achieved by varying the pulse repetition rate (PRR). Fricke dosimeter was employed to measure the absorbed dose at different PRR and to ensure uniform dose distribution of the electron beam. To study the dose rate effect, blood samples were irradiated to an absorbed dose of (4.7+/-0.2) Gy at different rates and cytogenetic damage was quantified using the micronucleus assay. The obtained MN frequency showed no dose rate dependence within the studied dose rate range. Our earlier dose effect study using 8 MeV electrons revealed that the response of MN was linear-quadratic. Therefore, in the event of an accident, dose estimation can be made using linear-quadratic dose response parameters, without adding dose rate as a correction factor.

  12. Measurements on a FET based 1 MHz, 10 kV pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Wait, G.D.; Barnes, M.J.

    1995-08-01

    A prototype pulser, which incorporates thirty-two 1 kV Field-Effect Transistor (FET) modules, has been built and tested at TRIUMF. The pulser has been developed for application in a scheme for pulsed extraction from the TRIUMF 500 MeV cyclotron. Deflection of the beam will be provided by an electric field between a set of 1 in long deflector plates. The pulser generates a continuous, unipolar, pulse train at a fundamental frequency of approximately 1 MHz and a magnitude of 10 kV. The pulses have 38 ns rise and fall times and are stored on a low-loss coaxial cable which interconnects the pulse generator and the deflector plates. The circuit performance was evaluated with the aid of PSpice in the design stage and confirmed by measurements on the prototype. Temperature measurements have been performed on 1 kV FET modules under DC conditions and compared with temperatures under operating conditions to ensure that switching losses are acceptable. Results of various measurements are presented and compared with simulations.

  13. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  14. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Yu. Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm{sup 2}, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm{sup 2}), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  15. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm².

    PubMed

    Isakova, Yu; Pushkarev, A; Khailov, I; Zhong, H

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm(2), and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm(2)), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  16. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isakova, Yu.; Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm2, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm2), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  17. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  18. Low-emittance electron-beam generation with laser pulse shaping in photocathode radio-frequency gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Sakai, F.; Yanagida, T.; Yorozu, M.; Okada, Y.; Takasago, K.; Endo, A.; Yada, A.; Washio, M.

    2002-08-01

    A technique of laser-pulse shaping was developed for low-emittance electron-beam generation in a photocathode radio-frequency (rf) gun. The emittance growth due to space charge and rf effects in the rf gun was experimentally investigated with square and gaussian temporal pulse shapes. It was found that the square pulse shaping was a useful tool for both the reduction of nonlinear space-charge force and the correction of linear space charge. The normalized transverse rms emittance at 1 nC was obtained to be 1.20 pimm-mrad for the square pulse shape with pulse length of 9 ps full width at half maximum. The emittance was measured as a function of the electron bunch charge and the laser-pulse length.

  19. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  20. Pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams: a depleted wave model for type II second-harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Motazedian, Alireza; Mohammad Rezaee, Mostafa; Jalil-Abadi, Fatemeh Sedaghat

    2014-11-10

    In this work, a three-dimensional and time-dependent nonlinear wave model to describe the generation of pulsed Bessel-Gauss second-harmonic waves (SHWs) is presented. Three coupled equations, two for ordinary and extraordinary fundamental waves and one for extraordinary SHWs, describing type II second-harmonic generation (SHG) in a KTiOPO4 (KTP) crystal were solved by considering the depletion of fundamental waves (FWs). The results examined the validity of nondepleted wave approximation against the energy of pulses, beam spot size, and interaction length. It was shown that for pulses with spot sizes of ωf=80  μm and energy of 0.8j, the nonlinear interaction was accomplished over a distance of ∼5  mm. Therefore, for KTP crystals with lengths longer than 5 mm, the nondepleted wave approximation can no longer be valid. To be valid, the crystal must be shorter than the interaction length, i.e., 5 mm.

  1. Azobenzene liquid crystalline materials for efficient optical switching with pulsed and/or continuous wave laser beams.

    PubMed

    Hrozhyk, Uladzimir A; Serak, Svetlana V; Tabiryan, Nelson V; Hoke, Landa; Steeves, Diane M; Kimball, Brian R

    2010-04-12

    This study compares optical switching capabilities of liquid crystal (LC) materials based on different classes of azobenzene dyes. LCs based on molecules containing benzene rings with nearly symmetrical pi-pi conjugation respond more efficiently to a cw beam than to a nanosecond laser pulse and maintain the changes induced by the beam for tens of hours. Using azo dye molecules containing two benzene rings with push-pull pi-pi conjugation we demonstrate high photosensitivity to both a cw beam as well as nanosecond laser pulse with only 1 s relaxation of light-induced changes in material properties. Even faster, 1 ms restoration time is obtained for azo dye molecules containing hetaryl (benzothiazole) ring with enhanced push-pull pi-pi conjugation. These materials respond most efficiently to pulsed excitation while discriminating cw radiation.

  2. Modification of the velocity distribution of H(2) molecules in a supersonic beam by intense pulsed optical gradients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Serrano, Jaime; Strecker, Kevin E; Chandler, David W

    2006-07-07

    We report the acceleration and deceleration of H(2) molecules in a supersonic molecular beam by means of its interaction with an intense optical gradient from a nanosecond far-off-resonant optical pulse. The strong optical gradients are formed in the interference pattern of two intense optical pulses at 532 nm. The velocity distribution of the molecular beam, before and after the applied optical pulse, is measured by a velocity-mapped ion imaging technique. Changes in velocity up to 202 m s(-1)+/- 61 m s(-1) are observed in a molecular beam initially travelling at a mean speed of 563 m s(-1). We report the dependence of this change in velocity with the strength of the optical gradient applied.

  3. Radiation defect dynamics in Si at room temperature studied by pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J. B.; Myers, M. T.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Shao, L.

    2015-10-07

    The evolution of radiation defects after the thermalization of collision cascades often plays the dominant role in the formation of stable radiation disorder in crystalline solids of interest to electronics and nuclear materials applications. Here, we explore a pulsed-ion-beam method to study defect interaction dynamics in Si crystals bombarded at room temperature with 500 keV Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ions. The effective time constant of defect interaction is measured directly by studying the dependence of lattice disorder, monitored by ion channeling, on the passive part of the beam duty cycle. The effective defect diffusion length is revealed by the dependence of damage on the active part of the beam duty cycle. Results show that the defect relaxation behavior obeys a second order kinetic process for all the cases studied, with a time constant in the range of ∼4–13 ms and a diffusion length of ∼15–50 nm. Both radiation dynamics parameters (the time constant and diffusion length) are essentially independent of the maximum instantaneous dose rate, total ion dose, and dopant concentration within the ranges studied. However, both the time constant and diffusion length increase with increasing ion mass. This demonstrates that the density of collision cascades influences not only defect production and annealing efficiencies but also the defect interaction dynamics.

  4. Optimization of the profile of a pulsed slow positron beam extracted from a buffer-gas positron trap for the production of a variable energy positronium beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladen, R.; Michishio, K.; Chiari, L.; Oshima, N.; Nagashima, Y.

    In this poster we will present some details of steps taken to optimize the beam profile of a pulsed slow positron beam extracted from a buffer-gas positron trap. The beam will be employed for the production of a novel positronium beam by the acceleration and photodetachment of positronium negative ions. The TUS group is planning on using this beam to study positronium diffraction from solid surfaces, providing a unique neutral-particle spectroscopic method with several advantages over conventional neutral-particle spectroscopy, such as a reduced particle mass and, hence, the reduction of damage to the sample surface This work was performed at the Tokyo University of Science. The visit of R. G. to the laboratory was sponsored in part by the NSF EAPSI fellowship and the JSPS Summer Program.

  5. 90% pump depletion and good beam quality in a pulse-injection-seeded nanosecond optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Smith, A. V.

    2006-02-01

    We measured 90% pump depletion in a singly resonant image-rotating nanosecond optical parametric oscillator that was pulse-injection seeded by a self-generated signal pulse. The oscillator was pumped by an 8 ns duration single-frequency 532 nm pulse from an injection-seeded Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and resonated an 803 nm signal. The pump and pulsed-seed beams had flat-topped spatial fluence profiles with diameters of approximately 6 mm, giving a cavity Fresnel number at 803 nm approaching 400. The beam cleanup effects of the image-rotating cavity produce a far-field signal spatial fluence profile with approximately 60% of its energy falling within the diffraction-limited spot size.

  6. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  7. A two-dose-rate method for general recombination correction for liquid ionization chambers in pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tölli, Heikki; Sjögren, Rickard; Wendelsten, Mikael

    2010-08-01

    The correction for general recombination losses in liquid ionization chambers (LICs) is more complex than that in air-filled ionization chambers. The reason for this is that the saturation charge in LICs, i.e. the charge that escapes initial recombination, depends on the applied voltage. This paper presents a method, based on measurements at two different dose rates in a pulsed beam, for general recombination correction in LICs. The Boag theory for pulsed beams is used and the collection efficiency is determined by numerical methods which are equivalent to the two-voltage method used in dosimetry with air-filled ionization chambers. The method has been tested in experiments in water in a 20 MeV electron beam using two LICs filled with isooctane and tetramethylsilane. The dose per pulse in the electron beam was varied between 0.1 mGy/pulse and 8 mGy/pulse. The relative standard deviations of the collection efficiencies determined with the two-dose-rate method ranged between 0.1% and 1.5%. The dose-rate variations of the general recombination corrected charge measured with the LICs are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values obtained with an air-filled plane parallel ionization chamber.

  8. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  9. Charge and current neutralization of an ion-beam pulse propagating in a background plasma along a solenoidal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kaganovich, I D; Startsev, E A; Sefkow, A B; Davidson, R C

    2007-12-07

    The analytical studies show that the application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self-electric fields of the beam pulse propagating in a background plasma. Theory predicts that when omega_{ce} approximately omega_{pe}beta_{b}, where omega_{ce} is the electron gyrofrequency, omega_{pe} is the electron plasma frequency, and beta_{b} is the ion-beam velocity relative to the speed of light, there is a sizable enhancement of the self-electric and self-magnetic fields due to the dynamo effect. Furthermore, the combined ion-beam-plasma system acts as a paramagnetic medium; i.e., the solenoidal magnetic field inside the beam pulse is enhanced.

  10. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation. 2015 Annual Progress Report for DOE/NE/NEET

    SciTech Connect

    Kucheyev, S. O.

    2016-03-07

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation processes in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 2, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) measurement of the temperature dependence of defect dynamics in SiC and (ii) the evaluation of the robustness of the pulsed beam method from studies of the defect generation rate. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  11. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  12. Multiphase Modeling of Water Injection on Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Bachchan, Nili; Peroomian, Oshin; Akdag, Vedat

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an Eulerian Dispersed Phase (EDP) model to simulate the water injected from the flame deflector and its interaction with supersonic rocket exhaust from a proposed Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. The Eulerian formulation, as part of the multi-phase framework, is described. The simulations show that water cooling is only effective over the region under the liquid engines. Likewise, the water injection provides only minor effects over the surface area under the solid engines.

  13. An Ultra-Bright Pulsed Electron Beam With Low Longitudinal Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, M.; Commins, E.D.; Denes, P.; Hussain, Z.; Lebedev, G.V.; Lidia, S.M.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Vogel, R.A.; Wan, W.; Heifets, S.A.; /SLAC

    2006-02-10

    Most existing electron sources extract electrons from conductors. Since the actual temperature inside the conductor is much less than the Fermi temperature of the conduction electrons, the electron degeneracy {delta}{sub f} is close to 1, the maximum allowed by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, during extraction several factors conspire together to reduce {delta}{sub f} many orders of magnitude, limiting the achieved values to {approx} 10{sup -5}. A new concept is described for building a novel electron source designed to produce a pulsed beam with {delta}{sub f} {approx} 2 10{sup -3} and longitudinal emittance four orders of magnitude smaller than currently achieved values. This high brightness, low longitudinal emittance regime enables a wide range of novel applications that utilize angstrom-scale spatial resolution and eV-scale energy resolution. The current state of a proof-of-principle experiment conducted at LBNL is also described.

  14. An Ultra-Bright Pulsed Electron Beam with Low LongitudinalEmittance

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Denes, P.; Heifets, Samuel; Hussain, Zahid; Lebedev, Gennnadi V.; Lidia, Steven M.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Vogel, Robert; Wan, Weishi

    2005-05-01

    Most existing electron sources extract electrons from conductors. Since the actual temperature inside the conductor is much less than the Fermi temperature of the conduction electrons, the electron degeneracy ({delta}{sub f}) is close to 1, the maximum allowed by the Pauli exclusion principle. However, during extraction several factors conspire together to reduce {delta}{sub f} many orders of magnitude, limiting the achieved values to approx 10{sup -5}. A new concept is described for building a novel electron source designed to produce a pulsed beam with {delta}{sub f} approx 2 10{sup -3} and longitudinal emittance four orders of magnitude smaller than currently achieved values. This high brightness, low longitudinal emittance regime enables a wide range of novel applications that utilize angstrom-scale spatial resolution and eV-scale energy resolution. The current state of a proof-of-principle experiment conducted at LBNL is also described.

  15. Frozen plasma within the flow from a metal plate hit by an electron beam pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    When a pulsed electron beam hits a metal plate with sufficient energy a volume of the metal becomes hot fluid that subsequently sprays out of the plate. A portion of this flow is ionized. This report describes a fluid that expands so rapidly into a vacuum that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. This cold supersonic exhaust will have a much higher degree of ionization, and of higher electron temperature, than would be expected from a gas in thermodynamic equilibrium at the local temperature of the neutral flow. This report presents a continuation of the work described in reference (1). My aim is to develop as simple a model as will reasonably predict the speed and density of neutral flow, and the temperature and density of plasma. I use simplifying assumptions and mathematical approximations to develop convenient formulas, and I test them by comparing specific examples to experimental data and computations by DeVolder and other Los Alamos scientists (2). The phenomenon of sudden expansion of a gas cloud into vacuum is described in several sections of the two-volume work by ZelUdovich and Raizer (3). The criterion I use for estimating the point in the flow where plasma ceases to be in equilibrium is in principle that proposed by Bray (4), (5), and discussed extensively by Vincenti and Kruger (6). The immediate concern motivating this work is how to design a metal target that accurately converts an electron beam pulse train into a radiation pulse train for use in the high-speed radiography of implosion hydrodynamics experiments. In the radiography application, either the electron beam must be swept magnetically along the metal target more quickly than the spread of the debris plume, or the metal plate must move laterally past a fixed point of impact, carrying its plume with it. What is this speed, and how dense is this splash flow? Aside from its technological application, this problem has an intrinsic interest because it

  16. Neutron lifetime measurement with pulsed beam at J- PARC: TPC and DAQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takahito; Katayama, Ryo; Higashi, Nao; Yokoyama, Harumichi; Sumino, Hirochika; Yamashita, Satoru; Sakakibara, Risa; Sugino, Tomoaki; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Tanaka, Genki; Sumi, Naoyukio; Otono, Hidetoshi; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Kitahara, Ryunosuke; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Oide, Hideyuki; Shima, Tatsushi; Seki, Yoshichika; Mishima, Kenji; Taketani, Kaoru; Ino, Takashi; NOP Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The neutron lifetime is an important parameter for Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The best neutron lifetime measurements have uncertainties at the 0.1% level; however, they differ by 3.8 sigma. In order to resolve this discrepancy, we plan to measure the neutron lifetime using a method originally developed by Kossakowski et al. which is different from the other 0.1% accuracy experiments. In our method, which uses a pulsed cold neutron beam at J-PARC, the electrons from the beta decay of the neutron are detected with a time projection chamber (TPC). A small amount of 3He is added to the gas mixture in order to simultaneously measure the neutron flux. We report on the recent upgrade of the TPC and the Data Acquisition System which were used to take data during the period of February-June 2014.

  17. Stable GeV Ion-Beam Acceleration from Thin Foils by Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, B.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.; Geissler, M.

    2009-04-10

    A stable relativistic ion acceleration regime for thin foils irradiated by circularly polarized laser pulses is suggested. In this regime, the 'light-sail' stage of radiation pressure acceleration for ions is smoothly connected with the initial relativistic 'hole-boring' stage, and a defined relationship between laser intensity I{sub 0}, foil density n{sub 0}, and thickness l{sub 0} should be satisfied. For foils with a wide range of n{sub 0}, the required I{sub 0} and l{sub 0} for the regime are theoretically estimated and verified with the particle-in-cell code ILLUMINATION. It is shown for the first time by 2D simulations that high-density monoenergetic ion beams with energy above GeV/u and divergence of 10 deg. are produced by circularly polarized lasers at intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, which are within reach of current laser systems.0.

  18. Microstructure Analysis of HPb59-1 Brass Induced by High Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jike; Gao, Bo; Hu, Liang; Lu, Shuaidan; Tu, Ganfeng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) on the microstructure evolution of casting HPb59-1 (Cu 57.1 mass%, Pb 1.7 mass% and Zn balance) alloy were investigated. The results showed a "wavy" surface which was formed with Pb element existing in the forms of stacking block and microparticles on the top surface layer after treatment. Nanocrystalline structures including Pb grains and two phases (α and β) were formed on the top remelted layer and their sizes were all less than 100 nm. The disordered β phase was generated in the surface layer after HCPEB treatment, which is beneficial for the improvement of surface properties. Meanwhile, there was a large residual stress on the alloy surface, along with the appearance of microcracks, and the preferred orientations of grains also changed.

  19. Operation and beam profiling of an up to 200 kHz pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C. Den Hartog, D. J.

    2014-11-15

    A new, high-repetition rate laser is in development for use on the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The laser has been tested at a rate of 200 kHz in a pulse-burst operation, producing bursts of 5 pulses above 1.5 J each, while capable of bursts of 17 pulses at 100 kHz. A master oscillator-power amplifier architecture is used with a Nd:YVO{sub 4} oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifiers, and a Nd:glass amplifier. A radial profile over the pulse sequence is measured by using a set of graphite apertures and an energy meter, showing a change in beam quality over a pulsing sequence.

  20. Electromagnetic acceleration of material from a plate hit by a pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1998-04-16

    An intense pulsed electron beam traversing a thin metal plate creates a volume of dense plasma. Current flows in this plasma as a result of the charge and magnetic field introduced by the relativistic electrons. A magnetic field may linger after the electron beam pulse because of the conductivity of the material. This field decays by both diffusing out of the conducting matter and causing it to expand. If the magnetized matter is of low density and high conductivity it may expand quickly. Scaling laws for this acceleration are sought by analyzing the idealization of a steady axisymmetric flow. This case simplifies a general formulation based on both Euler`s and Maxwell`s equations. As an example, fluid with conductivity {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 4} Siemens/m, density {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -3} kg/m{sup 3}, and initially magnetized to B = 1 Tesla can accelerate to v = 10{sup 4} m/s within a distance comparable to L = 1 mm and a time comparable to {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 100 ns, which is the magnetic diffusion time. If instead, {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 3} Siemens/m and {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -5} kg/m{sup 3} then v = 10{sup 5} m/s with a magnetic diffusion time {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 10 ns. These idealized flows have R{sub M} = {sigma}{mu}vL = 1, where R{sub M} is the magnetic Reynolds number. The target magnetizes by a thermal electric effect.

  1. Cratering behavior in single- and poly-crystalline copper irradiated by an intense pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Bitteker, L.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Perry, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    When treated with intense pulsed ion beams (IPIB), many materials exhibit increased wear resistance, fatigue life, and hardness. However, this treatment often results in cratering and roughening of the surface. In this work, high purity single crystal and polycrystalline copper samples were irradiated with pulses from an IPIB to gain insight into the causes of this cratering behavior. Samples were treated with 1,2,5, and 10 shots at 2 J/cm{sup 2} and 5 J/cm{sup 2} average energy fluence per shot. Shots were about 400 ns in duration and consisted of a mixture of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen ions at 300 keV. It was found that the single crystal copper cratered far less than the polycrystalline copper at the lower energy fluence. At the higher energy fluence, cratering was replaced by other forms of surface damage, and the single crystal copper sustained less damage at all but the largest number of shots. Molten debris from the Lucite anode (the ion source) was removed and redeposited on the samples with each shot.

  2. Phase locked backward wave oscillator pulsed beam spectrometer in the submillimeter wave range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewen, F.; Gendriesch, R.; Pak, I.; Paveliev, D. G.; Hepp, M.; Schieder, R.; Winnewisser, G.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a new submillimeter wave pulsed molecular beam spectrometer with phase stabilized backward wave oscillators (BWOs). In the frequency ranges of 260-380 and 440-630 GHz, the BWOs output power varies between 3 and 60 mW. Part of the radiation was coupled to a novel designed harmonic mixer for submillimeter wavelength operation, which consists of an advanced whiskerless Schottky diode driven by a harmonic of the reference synthesizer and the BWO radiation. The resulting intermediate frequency of 350 MHz passed a low noise high electron mobility transistor amplifier, feeding the phase lock loop (PLL) circuit. The loop parameters of the PLL have been carefully adjusted for low phase noise. The half power bandwidth of the BWO radiation at 330 GHz was determined to be as small as 80 MHz, impressively demonstrating the low phase noise operation of a phase locked BWO. A double modulation technique was employed by combining an 80 Hz pulsed jet modulation and a 10-20 kHz source modulation of the BWO and reaching a minimum detectable fractional absorption of 2×10-7. For the first time, a number of pure rotational (Ka=3←2, Ka=4←3) and rovibrational transitions in the van der Waals bending and stretching bands of the Ar-CO complex were recorded.

  3. Short-pulse Calorimetric Load for High Power Millimeter-wave Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandini, F.; Bruschi, A.; Cirant, S.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Muzzini, V.; Sozzi, C.; Spinicchia, N.

    2007-02-01

    A spherical compact matched load, for high vacuum operation suited for short pulses (2 MW, 0.1 s) precise measurement has been designed to test high power gyrotrons Bruschi, Gandini, Muzzini, Spinicchia, Cirant, Gittini, Granucci, Mellera, Nardone, Simonetto, and Sozzi (Fusion Eng. Des. 56 57:649 654, 2001); Bruschi, Cirant, Gandini, Granucci, Mellera, Muzzini, Nardone, Simonetto, Sozzi, and Spinicchia (Nucl. Fusion 43:1513 1519, 2003); Bruschi, Cirant, Gandini, Gittini, Granucci, Mellera, Muzzini, Nardone, Simonetto, Sozzi, Spinicchia, Angella, and Signorelli (Development of CW and short-pulse calorimetric loads for high power millimeter-wave Beams, 23rd Symposium on Fusion Technology, September 20 24, 2004, Venice, Italy). In order to enhance the power handling capability of the load and to reduce the operation problems that may arise from an excessive reflection from the load, a ray tracing code has been written to model the power distribution on the inner surface and the pattern of the reflected radiation. The outcome of this code has been used to select a more convenient profile for the spreading mirror of the load and to optimize a pre-load specially conceived to minimize the power reflected fraction.

  4. Design and characterization of the annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source for circular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to irradiate circular components with high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB), an annular cathode based on carbon fiber bunches was designed and fabricated. Using an acceleration voltage of 25 kV, the maximum pulsed irradiation current and energy of this annular cathode can reach 7.9 kA and 300 J, respectively. The irradiation current density distribution of the annular cathode HCPEB source measured along the circumferential direction shows that the annular cathode has good emission uniformity. In addition, four 9310 steel substrates fixed uniformly along the circumferential direction of a metal ring substrate were irradiated by this annular cathode HCPEB source. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the irradiated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images of the surface reveal that crater and surface undulation have been formed, which hints that the irradiation energy of the HCPEB process is large enough for surface modification of 9310 steel. Meanwhile, SEM cross-section images exhibit that remelted layers with a thickness of about 5.4 μm have been obtained in all samples, which proves that a good practical irradiation uniformity can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  5. Conceptual design of a high precision dual directional beam position monitoring system for beam crosstalk cancellation and improved output pulse shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger P.; Dawson, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Hulsart, R.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2012-04-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ions Collider (RHIC) would benefit from improved beam position measurements near the interaction points that see both beams, especially as the tolerances become tighter when reducing the beam sizes to obtain increased luminosity. Two limitations of the present beam position monitors (BPMs) would be mitigated if the proposed approach is successful. The small but unavoidable cross-talk between signals from bunches traveling in opposite directions when using conventional BPMs will be reduced by adopting directional BPMs. Further improvements will be achieved by cancelling residual cross-talk using pairs of such BPMs. Appropriately delayed addition and integration of the signals will also provide pulses with relatively flat maxima that will be easier to digitize by relaxing the presently very stringent timing requirements.

  6. High current pulsed electron beam treatment of AZ31 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bo; Hao Shengzhi; Zou Jianxin; Grosdidier, Thierry; Jiang Limin; Zhou Jiyang; Dong Chuang

    2005-11-15

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of High Current Pulsed Electron Beam (HCPEB) on a Mg alloy. The AZ31 alloy was HCPEB treated in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} beam energy density used in the present work, the evaporation mode was operative and led to the formation of a ''wavy'' surface and the absence of eruptive microcraters. The selective evaporation of Mg over Al led to an Al-rich melted surface layer and precipitation hardening from the over saturated solid solution. Due to the increase in hardness of the top surface layer, the friction coefficient values were lowered by more than 20% after the HCPEB treatments, and the wear resistance was drastically (by a factor of 6) improved. The microhardness of the HCPEB samples was also increased significantly down to a depth of about 500 {mu}m, far exceeding the heat-affected zone (about 40 {mu}m). This is due to the effect of the propagation of the shockwave associated with this HCPEB treatment.

  7. Analysis of ionic mobilities in liquid isooctane with low dose radiotherapy pulsed photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardo-Montero, J.; Tegami, S.; Gago-Arias, A.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Gómez, F.

    2012-09-01

    In this work we present a model of signal temporal development in ionization chambers and we use it to determine ionic mobilities and relative densities of charge carriers in non-ultrapure liquid isooctane using a liquid-filled ionization chamber dosimeter. The detector has been irradiated with a low dose rate, short pulsed photon beam generated with a medical LINAC. Ionic mobilities have been obtained by studying the temporal development of the readout signal and fitting it to a model for low dose rate beams where recombination is negligible. The best fit has been obtained for 3 ionic species with mobilities k1 = (2.22±0.22) × 10-8, k2 = (3.37±0.43) × 10-8, k3 = (19.69±2.59) × 10-8 m2 V-1 s-1 and relative densities n1 = 0.5 (n1 is not a fitting parameter), n2 = 0.23±0.03 and n3 = 0.27±0.03.

  8. HiRadMat at CERN SPS - A test facility with high intensity beam pulses to material samples

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, N.; Fabich, A.; Efthymiopoulos, I.

    2015-07-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a 10{sup 16} maximum number of protons per year, in order to limit the activation to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and showing examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2014/2015. (authors)

  9. Ultrafast gating of a mid-infrared laser pulse by a sub-pC relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, D. B.; Musumeci, P.; Alesini, D.

    2015-12-21

    In this paper we discuss a relative time-of-arrival measurement scheme between an electron beam and a mid-infrared laser pulse based on the electron-beam controlled transmission in semiconductor materials. This technique can be used as a time-stamping diagnostic in ultrafast electron diffraction or microscopy. In particular, our characterization of Germanium demonstrates that sub-ps time-of-arrival sensitivity could be achieved in a single shot and with very low charge beams (<1 pC). Detailed measurements as a function of the beam charge and the laser wavelength offer insights on the free carrier dynamics in the semiconductor upon excitation by the electron beam.

  10. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Giant pulses of thermal neutrons in large accelerator beam dumps. Possibilities for experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavissky, Yurii Ya

    2006-12-01

    A short review is presented of the development in Russia of intense pulsed neutron sources for physical research — the pulsating fast reactors IBR-1, IBR-30, IBR-2 (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna), and the neutron-radiation complex of the Moscow meson factory — the 'Troitsk Trinity' (RAS Institute for Nuclear Research, Troitsk, Moscow region). The possibility of generating giant neutron pulses in beam dumps of superhigh energy accelerators is discussed. In particular, the possibility of producing giant pulsed thermal neutron fluxes in modified beam dumps of the large hadron collider (LHD) under construction at CERN is considered. It is shown that in the case of one-turn extraction ov 7-TeV protons accumulated in the LHC main rings on heavy targets with water or zirconium-hydride moderators placed in the front part of the LHC graphite beam-dump blocks, every 10 hours relatively short (from ~100 µs) thermal neutron pulses with a peak flux density of up to ~1020 neutrons cm-2 s-1 may be produced. The possibility of applying such neutron pulses in physical research is discussed.

  11. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  12. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  13. Deflection of high-intensity pulsed ion beam in focusing magnetically insulated ion diode with a passive anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Q.; Ding, L.; Zhang, Z. C.; Yu, N.; Pushkarev, A.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    The focused high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) of 100 ns order pulse is generated with respect to its spatial stability in two types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with geometrical focusing configuration using the passive anode, i.e., insulation of electrons with an external magnetic-field and a self-magnetic field, respectively. Anode plasma formation for the ion beam generation is based on different processes in the two types of MIDs, as the surface breakdown on the polymer-coated anode operated in the unipolar pulse mode for the external-magnetic field MID and the explosive electron emission on the graphite anode in the bipolar-pulse mode for the self-magnetic field MID. Typical energy density per pulse is in the range of 3-6 J/cm2, at an accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV with a pulse duration of 120-150 ns. The spatial deviations of the HIPIB is evaluated by measuring the energy density distribution by using an infrared diagnostic method considering neutralizing during the ion beam propagation to the focal plane with a spatial resolution of 1 mm. The ion beam deviation is about ±1.5 mm for the external-magnetic field MID and ±2.5 mm for the self-magnetic field MID, leading to a fluctuation in the energy density of 1%-12%, and 9%-27% within a 10 mm range at the focal point, respectively. It is revealed that the displacement of different parts of a beam spot occurs nonsynchronously, mainly attributable to the intrinsic diode processes of plasma generation and expansion, and ion beam extraction from the anode-cathode gap, while the influence of magnetic field in the transportation region is negligible. The ion beam spatial deviation has a major influence on the shot-to-shot stability of ion beam, and it is suggested that the stability can be enhanced via diode process improvement.

  14. A single-crystal diamond-based thermal neutron beam monitor for instruments at pulsed neutron sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Verona Rinati, G.; Verona, C.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.

    2009-11-01

    Single-crystal diamond detectors manufactured through a Chemical Vapour Deposition (CVD) technique are recent technology devices that have been employed in reactor and Tokamak environments in order to detect both thermal and almost monochromatic 14 MeV neutrons produced in deuterium-tritium ( d-t) nuclear fusion reactions. Their robustness and compactness are the key features that can be exploited for different applications as well. Aim of the present experimental investigation is the assessment of the performance of a diamond detector as a thermal neutron beam monitor at pulsed neutron sources. To this aim, a test measurement was carried out on the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) beam line at the ISIS spallation neutron source (Great Britain). The experiment has shown the capability of these devices to work at a pulsed neutron source for beam monitoring purposes. Other interesting possible applications are also suggested.

  15. Traceable charge measurement of the pulses of a 27 MeV electron beam from a linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüller, A.; Illemann, J.; Renner, F.; Makowski, C.; Kapsch, R.-P.

    2017-03-01

    This work presents a detailed description of measuring devices and calibration procedures which enable the nondestructive (non-intercepting) absolute measurement of the charge of individual beam pulses (macro-pulses) from an electron linear accelerator traceable to primary standards with high accuracy, i.e. with an expanded measurement uncertainty < 0.1%. In particular, we demonstrate the readout and calibration of a Bergoz integrating current transformer which is frequently applied at many different types of accelerators as a beam intensity monitor. The current transformer signal is calibrated against the absolute charge measurement by means of a custom-made compact Faraday cup with a high degree of collection efficiency for electron beams in the energy range of 6 MeV to 50 MeV (99.2% at 27 MeV), which is well known from measurements and consistently described by Monte Carlo calculations.

  16. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  17. Single-pulse femtosecond laser Bessel beams drilling of high-aspect-ratio microholes based on electron dynamics control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Li, Xiaowei; Xia, Bo; Yan, Xueliang; Han, Weina; Lu, Yongfeng; Jiang, Lan

    2014-11-01

    Microholes drilling has attracted extensive research efforts for its broad applications in photonics, microfluidics, optical fibers and many other fields. A femtosecond (fs) laser is a promising tool for high-precision materials processing with reduced recast/microcracks and minimized heat affected zones. But there remain many challenges in hole drilling using conventional fs laser with Gaussian beams, such as low aspect ratio and taper effects. We report small-diameter and high-aspect-ratio microholes with taper free drilling in PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) using single-pulse fs laser Bessel beams. Axicon is used to transform Gaussian beams into Bessel beams, which then irradiate in the sample by a telescope consisting of plano-convex lens and microscope objective. Using this technique, we enhance the aspect ratio of microholes by 55 times as compared with Gaussian beams. We attribute this high aspect ratio and high quality microholes formation to the unique spatial intensity distribution and propagation stability of Bessel beams, which can effectively adjust the transient localized electron density distribution leading to a long and uniform localized-interacted zone. By using the optimized pulse energy and focal depth position, the microholes diameter ranges between 1.4-2.1 μm and the aspect ratio can exceed 460. This efficient technique is of great potentials for fabrication of microphotonics devices and microfluidics.

  18. Formation of an intense pulsed beam of CH3Cl in the ‖111≳ state using a 2-m electrostatic hexapole field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, T.; Fukawa, T.; Matsunami, T.; Che, D.-C.; Ohashi, K.; Fukunishi, Y.; Ohoyama, H.; Kuwata, K.

    1993-05-01

    An intense pulsed beam of CH3Cl in the ‖111≳ state without velocity selection was focused using a 2-m electrostatic hexapole field. The beam intensity was estimated to be ˜1×1013 molecules pulse-1, which is much greater than the similar beams in the earlier study of Gandhi et al. by at least two orders of magnitude. The beam had a 3-ms pulse width and was focused with an angular divergence of 0.7 mrad. The improvements in beam intensity and in the divergence of the beam can be mainly ascribable to the efficient pumping of the hexapole field through the cylindrical electrodes, which enables us to employ the helium seeding to have the fast stream velocity, the narrow distribution of velocity, and the aerodynamic effects. Those factors altogether made the velocity selection of the beam unnecessary.

  19. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; ...

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  20. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  1. Generating high-current monoenergetic proton beams by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the phase-stable acceleration regime.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Lin, C; Sheng, Z M; Guo, Z Y; Liu, B C; Lu, Y R; Fang, J X; Chen, J E

    2008-04-04

    A new ion acceleration method, namely, phase-stable acceleration, using circularly-polarized laser pulses is proposed. When the initial target density n(0) and thickness D satisfy a(L) approximately (n(0)/n(c))D/lambda(L) and D>l(s) with a(L), lambda(L), l(s), and n(c) the normalized laser amplitude, the laser wavelength in vacuum, the plasma skin depth, and the critical density of the incident laser pulse, respectively, a quasiequilibrium for the electrons is established by the light pressure and the space charge electrostatic field at the interacting front of the laser pulse. The ions within the skin depth of the laser pulse are synchronously accelerated and bunched by the electrostatic field, and thereby a high-intensity monoenergetic proton beam can be generated. The proton dynamics is investigated analytically and the results are verified by one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  2. Post STS-134 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-134. The following items were submitted for analysis: 1018 steel witness rods 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, and A-286 piston sleeves. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-134. All of the items were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the 1018 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch

  3. Failure Analysis of Main Flame Deflector Nelson Studs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    NASA Structures engineers submitted two Nelson refractory studs from the main flame deflector at Launch Complex (LC) 39 A for analysis when they were observed to be missing a significant amount of material after launch. The damaged stud and an unused comparative stud were analyzed by macroscopic and microscopic examination along with metallographic evaluation of the microstructure. The stud lost material due to a combination of erosion and corrosion. Plain carbon steel readily forms an oxide layer in the coastal launch environment at Kennedy Space Center. The blast during a launch removes this brittle oxide layer, which then forms again post-launch, thereby further removing material. No indications of melting were observed.

  4. Post STS-135 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-135. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witnes rods, 304 sta inles steel caps, and tungsten pistons. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-135. The submitted samples were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  5. Time-resolved thermal lens spectroscopy with a single-pulsed laser excitation beam: an analytical model for dual-beam mode-mismatched experiments.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Rezaei, Hamidreza; Ghalambor-Dezfouli, Abdolmohammad

    2017-02-01

    Pulsed laser beam excitations are more commonly used in thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS) than continuous-wave (CW) ones, because CW excitations limit the measurement to linear absorption processes [J. Opt. A5, 256 (2003)]. In this work, we present a new and full analytical model for a single-pulsed laser excitation dual-beam mode-mismatched TLS for low absorption solid-state and liquid samples. Our model has been based on a new solution of time-dependent heat equation for a finite-radius cylindrical sample exposed to a single-pulsed excitation laser beam. For low absorbent samples, unlike previous models, all aberration terms associated in the thermal lens were taken into account in Fresnel integration. Besides, the model provides a full analytical mathematical expression for the temperature rise, normalized signal intensity, and Z-scan photothermal lens signal. The model was confirmed with experimental data of distilled deionized water with excellent agreement. Therefore, the model allows us to extract thermo-optical properties of samples in an analytical and more accurate way.

  6. Unsteady loading of a vertical-axis turbine in the interaction with an upstream deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daegyoum; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Torque generation and flow distribution of a lift-based vertical-axis turbine with an upstream deflecting plate are investigated in water tunnel experiments. The deployment of a deflector in front of a lift-based turbine is a promising approach to increase local flow velocity and enhance energy conversion efficiency without consideration for complicated control. For the turbine with the deflector, the phase during which the blade passes near the front end of the turbine has a major contribution to torque increase from the case without the deflector. Meanwhile, the deflector can have a negative effect in torque generation at the phase when the blade moves upstream against free stream if the turbine is placed close to the deflector in a crosswise direction. The change of nearby flow distribution by the deflector is also examined to find its correlation with torque generation. When the blade rotates through the near-wake region of the deflector, the blade can collides with the vortical structure shed from the deflector. This interaction causes significant torque fluctuation.

  7. Pump-probe studies of radiation induced defects and formation of warm dense matter with pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Gua, H.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Minior, A. M.

    2014-10-01

    We report results from the 2nd generation Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment at Berkeley Lab. NDCX-II is a pulsed, linear induction accelerator designed to drive thin foils to warm dense matter (WDM) states with peak temperatures of ~ 1 eV using intense, short pulses of 1.2 MeV lithium ions. Tunability of the ion beam enables pump-probe studies of radiation effects in solids as a function of excitation density, from isolated collision cascades to the onset of phase-transitions and WDM. Ion channeling is an in situ diagnostic of damage evolution during ion pulses with a sensitivity of <0.1% displacements per atom. We will report results from damage evolution studies in thin silicon crystals with Li + and K + beams. Detection of channeled ions tracks lattice disorder evolution with a resolution of ~ 1 ns using fast current measurements. We will discuss pump-probe experiments with pulsed ion beams and the development of diagnostics for WDM and multi-scale (ms to fs) access to the materials physics of collision cascades e.g. in fusion reactor materials. Work performed under auspices of the US DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. A pulsed electron beam synthesis of PEDOT conducting polymers by using sulfate radicals as oxidizing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletta, Cecilia; Cui, Zhenpeng; Dazzi, Alexandre; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Néron, Stéphane; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Remita, Samy

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an original radiolytic method, based on pulsed electron beam irradiation, is used for the synthesis of conducting PEDOT in an aqueous solution containing EDOT monomers in the presence of potassium persulfate, K2S2O8, at 0 °C. At this low temperature, EDOT monomers are not chemically oxidized by S2O82- anions, initiating PEDOT polymerization, but are rather oxidized by sulfate radicals, SO4•-, which are radiolytically generated by the reaction of solvated electrons, produced by water radiolysis, with persulfate anions. Successfully, as demonstrated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, irradiating the aqueous solution, by using a series of accumulated electron pulses, enables complete EDOT oxidation and quantitative in situ PEDOT polymerization through a step-by-step oxidation mechanism. The morphology of PEDOT polymers, mixed with unreacted K2S2O8 salt, is characterized by Cryo-TEM microscopy in aqueous solution and by SEM after deposition. Successfully, in the absence of any washing step, high resolution AFM microscopy, coupled with infrared nanospectroscopy, is used to discriminate between the organic polymers and the inorganic salt and to probe the local chemical composition of PEDOT nanostructures. The results demonstrate that PEDOT polymers form globular self-assembled nanostructures which preferentially adsorb onto unreacted K2S2O8 solid nanoplates. The present results first demonstrate the efficiency of sulfate radicals as oxidizing species for the preparation of nanostructured PEDOT polymers and second highlight the promising potentiality of electron accelerators in the field of conducting polymers synthesis.

  9. Large-charge quasimonoenergetic electron beams produced by off-axis colliding laser pulses in underdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Z. G.; Zhang, Z. M.; Zhang, B.; He, S. K.; Teng, J.; Hong, W.; Dong, K. G.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhu, B.; Gu, Y. Q.

    2017-02-01

    Electrons can be efficiently injected into a plasma wave by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses in a laser wakefield acceleration. However, the generation of a high-quality electron beam with a large charge is difficult in the traditional on-axis colliding scheme due to the growth of the electron beam duration coming from the increase of the beam charge. To solve this problem, we propose an off-axis colliding scheme, in which the collision point is away from the axis of the driver pulse. We show that the electrons injected from the off-axis region are highly concentered on the tail of the bubble even for a large trapped charge, thus feeling almost the same accelerating field. As a result, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a large charge can be produced. The validity of this scheme is confirmed by both the particle-in-cell simulations and the Hamiltonian model. Furthermore, it is shown that a Laguerre-Gauss (LG) laser can be adopted as the injection pulse to realize the off-axis colliding injection in three dimensions symmetrically, which may be useful in simplifying the technical layout of the real experiment setup.

  10. Large-charge quasimonoenergetic electron beams produced by off-axis colliding laser pulses in underdense plasma.

    PubMed

    Deng, Z G; Zhang, Z M; Zhang, B; He, S K; Teng, J; Hong, W; Dong, K G; Wu, Y C; Zhu, B; Gu, Y Q

    2017-02-01

    Electrons can be efficiently injected into a plasma wave by colliding two counterpropagating laser pulses in a laser wakefield acceleration. However, the generation of a high-quality electron beam with a large charge is difficult in the traditional on-axis colliding scheme due to the growth of the electron beam duration coming from the increase of the beam charge. To solve this problem, we propose an off-axis colliding scheme, in which the collision point is away from the axis of the driver pulse. We show that the electrons injected from the off-axis region are highly concentered on the tail of the bubble even for a large trapped charge, thus feeling almost the same accelerating field. As a result, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a large charge can be produced. The validity of this scheme is confirmed by both the particle-in-cell simulations and the Hamiltonian model. Furthermore, it is shown that a Laguerre-Gauss (LG) laser can be adopted as the injection pulse to realize the off-axis colliding injection in three dimensions symmetrically, which may be useful in simplifying the technical layout of the real experiment setup.

  11. Matrix operations utilizing multichannel two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barocsi, Attila; Jakab, Laszlo; Richter, Peter I.

    1994-01-01

    A linear scanning light deflector, or Bragg-cell, is a widely utilized acousto-optic (AO) signal processing device. Its application is, however, limited due to its line scanning property. To overcome this deficiency an area (or matrix) scanning deflector can be built by consecutively placing two, orthogonally positioned, linear deflectors. A more sophisticated method, however, is the realization of a `monolithic' area scanning device, or 2-D (XY-) deflector, that contains a single Bragg cell. If each dimension of the cell has several input channels the element can serve as a special optical processor in various applications. In this work a multichannel XY-deflector is examined with special regard to its utilization as a fast optical crossbar switch and matrix processor. An experimental set-up with a 2 * 2 channel cell is also demonstrated.

  12. Stress-induced waveguides in Nd:YAG by simultaneous double-beam irradiation with femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Gabriel R.; Romero, Carolina; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel; Chen, Feng; Varela, Óscar; García-García, Enrique; Méndez, Cruz; Camacho-López, Santiago; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier R.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of stress-induced waveguides in Nd:YAG (neodymium doped yttrium aluminum garnet, Nd:Y3Al5O12) by simultaneous double-beam irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses. An interferometer was used to generate two femtosecond laser beams that, focused with certain lateral separation inside the crystal, produced two parallel damage tracks with a single scan. The propagation of the mechanical waves simultaneously created in both focal spots produced a highly symmetrical stress field that is clearly revealed in micro-luminescence maps. The optical properties of the double-beam waveguides are studied and compared to those of single-beam irradiation, showing relevant differences. The creation of more symmetric stress patterns and a slight reduction of propagation losses are explained in terms of the fact that simultaneous inscription allows for a drastic reduction in the magnitude of "incubation" effects related to the existence of pre-damaged states.

  13. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg Petyukevich, Maria Polisadova, Valentina; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga Ikonnikova, Irina

    2016-01-15

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm{sup 2}, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  14. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  15. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-01: Acoustic Range Verification of Proton Beams: Simulation of Heterogeneity and Clinical Proton Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K; Sehgal, C; Avery, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Through simulation, to assess acoustic-based range verification of proton beams (protoacoustics) under clinical conditions. Methods: Pressure waves generated by the energy deposition of a 150 MeV, 8 mm FWHM pulsed pencil proton beam were numerically simulated through two Methods: 1) For a homogeneous water medium, an analytical wave-equation solution was used to calculate the time-dependent pressure measured at detector points surrounding the proton Bragg peak. 2) For heterogeneity studies, a CT tissue image was used to calculate the proton dose deposition and define the acoustic properties of the voxels through which numerical pressure wave propagation was simulated with the k-Wave matlab toolbox. The simulations were used to assess the dependence of the acoustic amplitude and range-verification accuracy on proton pulse rise time and tissue heterogeneity. Results: As the proton pulse rise time is increased from 1 to 40 µs, the amplitude of the expected acoustic emission decreases (a 60% drop distal to the Bragg peak), the central frequency of the expected signal decreases (from 45 to 6 kHz), and the accuracy of the range-verification decreases (from <1 mm to 16 mm at 5 cm distal to the Bragg peak). For a 300 nA pulse, the expected pressure range is on the order of 0.1 Pa, which is observable with commercial detectors. For the heterogeneous medium, our test case shows that pressure waves emitted by an anterior pencil beam directed into the abdomen and detected posteriorly can determine the Bragg peak range to an accuracy of <2mm for a 1 µs proton pulse. Conclusion: For proton pulses with fast rise-times, protoacoustics is a promising potential method for monitoring penetration depth through heterogeneous tissue. The loss of range-verification accuracy with increasing rise-times, however, suggests the need for comparisons to modeling to improve accuracy for slower cyclotron proton sources.

  16. Effect of gas heating on the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam in the pulse-periodic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) in nitrogen in the pulse-periodic regime is investigated. The gas temperature in the discharge gap of the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is measured from the intensity distribution of unresolved rotational transitions ( C 3Π u , v' = 0) → ( B 3Π g , v″ = 0) in the nitrogen molecule for an excitation pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz. It is shown that an increase in the UAEB current amplitude in the pulse-periodic regime is due to gas heating by a series of previous pulses, which leads to an increase in the reduced electric field strength as a result of a decrease in the gas density in the zone of the discharge formation. It is found that in the pulse-periodic regime and the formation of the diffuse discharge, the number of electrons in the beam increases by several times for a nitrogen pressure of 9 × 103 Pa. The dependences of the number of electrons in the UAEB on the time of operation of the generator are considered.

  17. Absolute and relative dose measurements with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film for high energy electron beams with different doses per pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo; Ricardi, Umberto; Anglesio, Silvia; Giglioli, Francesca Romana

    2008-12-15

    The authors have evaluated the accuracy, in absolute and relative dose measurements, of the Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT film in pulsed high-energy electron beams. Typically, the electron beams used in radiotherapy have a dose-per-pulse value of less than 0.1 mGy/pulse. However, very high dose-per-pulse electron beams are employed in certain linear accelerators dedicated to intraoperatory radiation therapy (IORT). In this study, the absorbed dose measurements with Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT in both low (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high (30 and 70 mGy per pulse) dose-per-pulse electron beams were compared with ferrous sulfate chemical Fricke dosimetry (operated by the Italian Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory), a method independent of the dose per pulse. A summary of Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT in relative and absolute beam output determination is reported. This study demonstrates the independence of Gafchromic trade mark sign EBT absorption as a function of dose per pulse at different dose levels. A good agreement (within 3%) was found with Fricke dosimeters for plane-base IORT applicators. Comparison with a diode detector is presented for relative dose measurements, showing acceptable agreement both in the steep dose falloff zone and in the homogeneous dose region. This work also provides experimental values for recombination correction factor (K{sub sat}) of a Roos (plane parallel) ionization chamber calculated on the basis of theoretical models for charge recombination.

  18. Microstructural, textural and hardness evolution of commercially pure Zr surface-treated by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Linjiang; Chen, Baofeng; Wang, Shuyan; Zhang, Zhuo; Murty, Korukonda L.

    2016-12-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatments were performed for a commercially pure Zr sheet, with remarkable surface modifications demonstrated. After the HCPEB treatments, the prior equiaxed grains with a bimodal basal texture are replaced by ultra fine plates with dense nanotwins and an unusual fiber texture of < 11 2 bar 0 > normal to the sheet surface. Increased number of pulses leads to further refined microstructures and intensified textures, jointly resulting in continuous increase of hardness. Reasons for such modifications could mainly be attributed to ultra fast heating/cooling and strong variant selection due to presence of complex thermal and stress fields.

  19. [Experimental investigation of the collection efficiency of a PTW Roos ionization chamber irradiated with pulsed beams at high pulse dose with different pulse lengths].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Richter, Christian; Pawelke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In gas-filled ionization chambers as radiation detectors, the collection of the charge carriers is affected by the recombination effect. In dosimetry this effect must be accounted for by the saturation correction factor k(S). The physical description of the correction factor by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk for pulsed radiation is well established. However, this description is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared to the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this work experimental investigations of the saturation correction factor have been made for pulses of 4 μ s up to pulse doses of about 230 mGy, and the theory of Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk was again confirmed. For longer pulses, however, the correction factor decreases and at a pulse duration of about 200μs reaches 75% of the value valid for short pulses. This reduced influence of the ion recombination is interpreted by the reaction kinetics of ion recombination as a second-order reaction. This effect is negligible for PTW Roos chambers at clinical linear accelerators with 4 μ s pulse duration for pulse doses up to 120 mGy.

  20. An improved pulse-line accelerator-driven, intense current-density, and high-brightness pseudospark electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, L.; Wang, M.

    1996-02-01

    A high-voltage (200 kV), high current-density, low-emittance (23 {pi}{center_dot}mm mrd), high-brightness (8 {times} 10{sup 10} A/(mrd){sup 2}) electron beam was generated in a pseudospark chamber filled with 15 Pa nitrogen and driven by a modified pulse line accelerator. The beam ejected with {le}1-mm diameter, 2.2-kA beam current, 400-ns pulse length, and about 20 cm propagation distance. Exposure of 10 shots on the same film produced a hole of 1.6-mm diameter at 7 cm downstream of the anode, and showed its good reproducibility. After 60 shots, it was observed that almost no destructive damage traces were left on the surfaces of the various electrodes and insulators of the pseudospark discharge chamber. It was experimentally found that the quality of the pseudospark electron beam remains very high, even at high voltages (of several hundred kilovolts), similar to low voltages, and is much better than the quality of the cold-cathode electron beams.

  1. High energy micro electron beam generation using chirped laser pulse in the presence of an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Akou, H. Hamedi, M.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the generation of high-quality and high-energy micro electron beam in vacuum by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse in the presence of an axial magnetic field is numerically investigated. The features of energy and angular spectra, emittances, and position distribution of electron beam are compared in two cases, i.e., in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The electron beam is accelerated with higher energy and qualified in spatial distribution in the presence of the magnetic field. The presence of an axial magnetic field improves electron beam spatial quality as well as its gained energy through keeping the electron motion parallel to the direction of propagation for longer distances. It has been found that a 64 μm electron bunch with about MeV initial energy becomes a 20 μm electron beam with high energy of the order of GeV, after interacting with a laser pulse in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  2. Large Pulsed Electron Beam Welded Percolation Networks of Silver Nanowires for Transparent and Flexible Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisoo; Nam, Yun Seok; Song, Myoung Hoon; Park, Hyung Wook

    2016-08-17

    Mechanical properties of transparent electrodes, including flexibility, are important in flexible electronics for sustaining electrical conductivity under bending with small radius of curvature. Low contact resistance of junctions in metal nanowire percolation networks is the most important factor to produce electrodes with excellent optical, electrical and mechanical performance. Here, we report the fabrication of welded silver nanowire percolation networks using large pulsed electron beam (LPEB) irradiation as a welding process of silver nanowires (AgNWs). It results in modification of electrical and mechanical properties because of the low contact resistance at welded junctions. Consequently, the flexible and transparent AgNW electrodes fabricated by LPEB irradiation showed lower sheet resistance of 12.63 Ω sq(-1) at high transmittance of 93% (at 550 nm), and superb mechanical flexibility, compared with other AgNW electrodes prepared by thermal treatement and without any treatment. Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) using AgNWs by LPEB irradiation were fabricated to confirm that the AgNW electrode by LPEB irradiation was able to become alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) and they showed good device performance as a maximum luminous efficiency of 7.37 cd A(-1), and excellent mechanical flexibility under bending with small radius of curvature.

  3. The SPARC_LAB femtosecond synchronization for electron and photon pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaveglia, M.; Gallo, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Gatti, G.; Anania, M. P.; Petrarca, M.; Villa, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Biagioni, A.; Mostacci, A.

    2015-05-01

    The SPARC LAB complex hosts a 150 MeV electron photo-injector equipped with an undulator for FEL production (SPARC) together with a high power TW laser (FLAME). Recently the synchronization system reached the performance of < 100 fsRMS relative jitter between lasers, electron beam and RF accelerating fields. This matches the requirements for next future experiments: (i) the production of X-rays by means of Thomson scattering (first collisions achieved in 2014) and (ii) the particle driven PWFA experiment by means of multiple electron bunches. We report about the measurements taken during the machine operation using BAMs (Bunch Arrival Monitors) and EOS (Electro-Optical Sampling) system. A new R and D activity concerning the LWFA using the external injection of electron bunches in a plasma generated by the FLAME laser pulse is under design. The upgrade of the synchronization system is under way to guarantee the < 30 fs RMS jitter required specification. It foresees the transition from electrical to optical architecture that mainly affects the reference signal distribution and the time of arrival detection performances. The new system architecture is presented together with the related experimental data.

  4. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  5. Investigating the performances of a 1 MV high pulsed power linear transformer driver: from beam dynamics to x radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisonny, R.; Ribière, M.; Toury, M.; Plewa, J. M.; Caron, M.; Auriel, G.; d'Almeida, T.

    2016-12-01

    The performance of a 1 MV pulsed high-power linear transformer driver accelerator were extensively investigated based on a numerical approach which utilizes both electromagnetic and Monte Carlo simulations. Particle-in-cell calculations were employed to examine the beam dynamics throughout the magnetically insulated transmission line which governs the coupling between the generator and the electron diode. Based on the information provided by the study of the beam dynamics, and using Monte Carlo methods, the main properties of the resulting x radiation were predicted. Good agreement was found between these simulations and experimental results. This work provides a detailed understanding of mechanisms affecting the performances of this type of high current, high-voltage pulsed accelerator, which are very promising for a growing number of applications.

  6. Anode-temperature dependence of ion beam turn-on time in magnetically insulated pulsed ion diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, H.; Horioka, K.; Ohbayashi, K.; Kasuya, K.

    1986-05-05

    The temperature effect of anode dielectric materials on ion beam turn-on time is examined in a magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. It is observed that the turn-on time decreased with temperature increase. This effect may be explained by a simple model in which electrons bombard the anode surface to generate desorbed and evaporated gas and trigger surface flashover to produce an anode plasma.

  7. A measurement of the fast-neutron sensitivity of a Geiger - Müller detector in the pulsed neutron beam from a superconducting cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maughan, R. L.; Yudelev, M.; Kota, C.

    1996-08-01

    The value of a commercially available miniature energy compensated Geiger - Müller (GM) detector has been determined using the modified lead attenuation method of Hough. The measurements were made in a d(48.5) - Be neutron beam produced by the superconducting cyclotron based neutron therapy facility at Harper Hospital. The unique problems associated with making measurements in a 2 ms duration pulsed beam with a 20% duty cycle are discussed. The beam monitoring system, which allows the beam pulse shape at low beam intensities to be measured, is described. By gating the GM output with a discriminator pulse derived from the beam pulse shape, the gamma-ray count rates and dead-time corrections within the 2 ms pulse and between pulses can be measured separately. The value of determined for this GM detector is consistent with the values measured by other workers with identical and similar detectors in neutron beams with comparable, but not identical, neutron spectra.

  8. Histological and ultrastructural effect of an Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam on dental hard tissue and pulp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignato, Costantino; Vignato, Giuseppe; Nardelli, Antonella; Baldan, Arianna; Mason, Pier N.

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine histological and ultrastructural modifications produced by an Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam after an in vivo exposure of human molars. Using a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam delivered by a 600 micrometers optical fiber and concurrent air and water cooling spray, 14 human third molars with artificial first class cavities were exposed at different power levels (6, 7, and 8 W). All the teeth were extracted at different time periods between 10 and 25 days and prepared for histological examination. The results of the histological examination showed no evidence of degeneration or necrosis of the pulpar tissue. Analysis of the dentinal surfaces after exposure demonstrated that the dentinal tubules are completely closed due to the melted dentin. In conclusion a Nd:YAG pulsed laser beam with an air and water cooling spray is safe for treatments of class I decay and no necrosis or degeneration of the pulp was found for laser powers of 6, 7, and 8 W.

  9. 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chang; Ge, Tingwu; An, Na; Cao, Kang; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited beam quality all-fiber picosecond pulse laser, which consists of a passively mode-locked seed laser and three-stage master power amplifiers. A repetition frequency multiplier and a high Yb-doped gain fiber with shorter length are utilized in the laser system to suppress the nonlinear effects and reduce the pulse broadening caused by dispersion. Moreover, the homemade light mode controllers based on a coiling and tapering fiber technique and the active fiber of the amplifier with a relatively small mode area are adopted to improve the beam quality. In addition, by experimentally adjusting the active fiber length, the optical conversion efficiency of the overall laser system can be optimized. Eventually, a 160 W high-power, high-efficiency, near-diffraction-limited picosecond pulse fiber laser is obtained, with the beam quality factor M2 at 1.12 and an optical conversion efficiency of the system of 75%.

  10. Electro-Optic Beam Steering Using Non-Linear Organic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    York (SUNY), Buffalo, for potential application to the Hughes electro - optic beam deflector device. Evaluations include electro - optic coefficient...response time, transmission, and resistivity. Electro - optic coefficient measurements were made at 633 nm using a simple reflection technique. The

  11. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  12. Deep level transient spectroscopy study of electron traps in n-type GaAs after pulsed electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marrakchi, G.; Barbier, D.; Guillot, G.; Nouailhat, A.

    1987-10-01

    Electrical and deep level transient spectroscopy measurements on Schottky barriers were performed in order to characterize electrically active defects in n-type GaAs (Bridgman substrates or liquid-phase epitaxial layers) after pulsed electron beam annealing. Both surface damage and bulk defects were observed in the Bridgman substrates depending on the pulse energy density. No electron traps were detected in the liquid-phase epitaxial layers before and after annealing for an energy density of 0.4 J/cm/sup 2/. The existence of an interfacial insulating layer at the metal-semiconductor interface, associated with As out-diffusion during the pulsed electron irradiation, was revealed by the abnormally high values of the Schottky barrier diffusion potential. Moreover, two new electron traps with activation energy of 0.35 and 0.43 eV, called EP1 and EP2, were introduced in the Bridgman substrates after pulsed electron beam annealing. The presence of these traps, related to the As evaporation, was tentatively attributed to the decrease of the EL2 electron trap signal after 0.4-J/cm/sup 2/ annealing. It is proposed that these new defects states are due to the decomposition of the As/sub Ga/-As/sub i/ complex recently considered as the most probable defect configuration for the dominant EL2 electron trap usually detected in as-grown GaAs substrates.

  13. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  14. l- and n-changing collisions during interaction of a pulsed beam of Li Rydberg atoms with CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubreuil, B.; Harnafi, M.

    1989-07-01

    The pulsed Li atomic beam produced in our experiment is based on controlled transversely-excited-atmospheric CO2 laser-induced ablation of a Li metal target. The atomic beam is propagated in vacuum or in CO2 gas at low pressure. Atoms in the beam are probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. This allows the determination of time-of-flight and velocity distributions. Li Rydberg states (n=5-13) are populated in the beam by two-step pulsed-laser excitation. The excited atoms interact with CO2 molecules. l- and n-changing cross sections are deduced from the time evolution of the resonant or collision-induced fluorescence following this selective excitation. l-changing cross sections of the order of 104 AṦ are measured; they increase with n as opposed to the plateau observed for Li* colliding with a diatomic molecule. This behavior is qualitatively well explained in the framework of the free-electron model. n-->n' changing processes with large cross sections (10-100 AṦ) are also observed even in the case of large electronic energy change (ΔEnn'>103 cm-1). These results can be interpreted in terms of resonant-electronic to vibrational energy transfers between Li Rydberg states and CO2 vibrational modes.

  15. Ultrawideband doublet pulse generation based on nonlinear polarization rotation of an elliptically polarized beam and its distribution over a fiber/wireless link.

    PubMed

    Chang, You Min; Lee, Junsu; Lee, Ju Han

    2010-09-13

    Proposed herein is an alternative photonic scheme for the generation of a doublet UWB pulse, which is based on the nonlinear polarization rotation of an elliptically polarized probe beam. The proposed scheme is a modified optical-fiber Kerr shutter that uses an elliptically polarized probe beam together with a linearly polarized control beam. Through theoretical analysis, it was shown that the optical-fiber-based Kerr shutter is capable of producing an ideal transfer function for the successful conversion of input Gaussian pulses into doublet pulses under special elliptical polarization states of the probe beam. An experimental verification was subsequently carried out to verify the working principle. Finally, the system performance of the generated UWB doublet pulses was assessed by propagating them over a 25-km-long standard single-mode fiber link, followed by wireless transmission. Error-free transmission was successfully achieved.

  16. Amorphous formation on metal surfaces by an intense pulsed ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yatsuzuka, M.; Yamasaki, T.; Uchida, H.; Hashimoto, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Recently, intense pulsed ion beams (PIBs) have been interested as a tool for surface modification of metals, because irradiation of PIBs to metals leads to rapid heating of the near surface which is immediately followed by rapid cooling and resolidification. In this paper formation of an amorphous layer on a Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy by a PIB irradiation is successfully demonstrated. A shot of the mixed carbon and fluorine PIB was irradiated on a Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy to make amorphous structure. The amorphous nature of the PIB-processed surface was examined by the X-ray diffractometry. The diffraction pattern of the non-processed substrate reveals the crystalline phase which is characterized by the narrow spectrum. On the other hand, the PIB-processed Ni{sub 65}Cr{sub 15}P{sub 16}B{sub 4} alloy surface exhibit the typical diffraction pattern of the amorphous structure, when the maximum X-ray diffraction depth is within 0.66 {micro}m. Assuming that a single species of carbon of fluorine ions is injected into the nickel target, ion range, heating temperature and cooling rate for a nickel substrate are estimated to be 0.23 {micro}m, 3,150 K and 3.8 {times} 10{sup 5}K/sec, respectively. The cooling rate estimated above is enough for producing amorphous structure of nickel alloys.

  17. Time-resolved measurement technique for pulsed electron beam envelope basing on framing and streaking principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Huang; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The time-resolved electron beam envelope parameters, including cross sectional distribution and beam centroid position, are very important for the study of beam transmission characteristics in a magnetic field and for verifying the rationality of the magnetic field parameters employed. One kind of high time-resolved beam envelope measurement system has recently been developed, constituted of a high-speed framing camera and a streak camera. It can obtain three panoramic images of the beam and time continuous information along the given beam profile simultaneously. Recently obtained data has proved that several fast vibrations of the beam envelope along the diameter direction occur during the front and the tail parts of the electron beam. The vibration period is several nanoseconds. The effect of magnetic field on the electron beam is also observed and verified. Beam debugging experiments have proved that the existing beam transmission design is reasonable and viable. This beam envelope measurement system will establish a good foundation for beam physics research. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10675104, 11375162)

  18. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  19. Post STS-133 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA Structures engineers submitted main flame deflector witness materials for evaluation after the launch of STS-133. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, 17-4 precipitation hardened (PH) stainless steel and A-286 piston sleeves, Medtherm Corporation calorimeters, and Nanmac Corporation thermocouples. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-133, and before they were reinstalled at the launch pad for future launches. The HY -80 witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, and the piston sleeves were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod and 304 stainless steel cap metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  20. Pad A Main Flame Deflector Sensor Data and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlier, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Space shuttle launch pads use flame deflectors beneath the vehicle to channel hot gases away from the vehicle. Pad 39 A at the Kennedy Space Center uses a steel structure coated with refractory concrete. The solid rocket booster plume is comprised of gas and molten alumina oxide particles that erodes the refractory concrete. During the beginning of the shuttle program the loads for this system were never validated with a high level of confidence. This paper presents a representation of the instrumentation data collected and follow on materials science evaluation of the materials exposed to the SRB plume. Data collected during STS-133 and STS-134 will be presented that support the evaluation of the components exposed to the SRB plume.

  1. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Lei, M. K.; Pushkarev, A. I.

    2016-01-15

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200–300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  2. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  3. Effect of Beam Smoothing and Pulse Shape on the Implosion of DD-Filled CH Shell Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    Over the past two years several implosion experiments were carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser in which DD-filled CH shells (some with a CHTi layer imbedded) were irradiated with various laser pulse shapes and smoothing conditions. Target CH shell thicknesses varied from 20 μm to 27 μm with DD-fill variations from 3 to 20 atm, sometimes mixed with ^3He. Two pulse shapes---a 1-ns square pulse and a 2.5-ns pulse with a 10%, 1-ns foot, with and without SSD---provide several levels of laser imprint. Diagnostics include measured neutron yields, fuel ion temperatures, fuel ρR, and shell ρR. Simulations for these experimental conditions were carried out with the 2-D hydrocode ORCHID. The results are compared with the experimental results. The degradation of target performance due to laser nonuniformity is analyzed by comparing the 2-D results with those of 1-D simulations. The effects of pulse shape, target thickness, convergence ratio, and smoothing are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  4. Optical control of electron trapping: Generation of comb-like electron beams for tunable, pulsed, multi-color radiation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, Serge

    2014-10-01

    All-optical control over the electron phase space in laser-plasma accelerators enables production of ``designer'' electron beams that can be optimized for specific applications. GeV-scale acceleration with sub-100 TW (rather than PW) laser pulses, at repetition rates orders-of-magnitude higher than permitted by existing PW facilities, in a few-mm (rather than cm) length plasmas, requires maintaining an accelerating gradient as high as 10 GV/cm. This, in turn, dictates acceleration in the blowout regime in a dense plasma (~1019 cm-3). These highly dispersive plasmas rapidly transform the drive pulse into a relativistic optical shock, causing the plasma wake bucket (electron density bubble) to constantly expand, trapping background electrons, greatly degrading beam quality. We show that these effects can be overcome using a high-bandwidth driver (over 1/2 the carrier frequency) with a negative frequency chirp. Temporally advancing higher frequencies (thus compensating for the plasma-induced nonlinear frequency red-shift) and propagating the pulse in a plasma channel (to suppress diffraction of its leading edge) delays pulse self-steepening through electron dephasing and extends the dephasing length. As a result, continuous injection is suppressed and electron energy is boosted to the GeV level. In addition, periodic self-injection in the channel produces a sequence of femtosecond-length, quasi-monoenergetic bunches. The number of these spectral components, their charge, energy, and energy separation can be controlled by varying the channel radius and length, whereas accumulation of the noise (viz. continuously injected charge) is prevented by the negative chirp of the driver. This level of control is hard to achieve with conventional accelerator techniques. It is demonstrated that these clean, polychromatic, comb-like beams can drive high-brightness, tunable, multi-color gamma-ray sources. Work is supported by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0008382 and NSF Grant PHY-1104683.

  5. Effects of picosecond terawatt UV laser beam filamentation and a repetitive pulse train on creation of prolonged plasma channels in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.

    2013-08-01

    Amplitude-modulated UV laser pulse of up to 30 J energy was produced at hybrid Ti:Sapphire/KrF GARPUN-MTW laser facility when a preliminary amplified train of short pulses was injected into unstable resonator cavity of the main e-beam-pumped KrF amplifier. The combined radiation consisted of regeneratively amplified picosecond pulses with subTW peak power overlapped with 100-ns pulse of a free-running lasing. The advantages of combined radiation for production of long-lived prolonged plasma channels in air and HV discharge triggering were demonstrated: photocurrent sustained by modulated pulse is two orders of magnitude higher and HV breakdown distance is twice longer than for a smooth UV pulse. It was found that in contrast to IR radiation multiple filamentation of high-power UV laser beam does not produce extended nonlinear focusing of UV radiation.

  6. Four Pulse Drive System for the Beam Induction Cells for DARHT Axis 2

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, J.; Carlson, R.; Melton, J.; Fockler, J.

    1999-06-28

    The proposed drive system allows for the generation of up to four (4) high-quality radiographic pulses along one line-of-sight, having arbitrary pulse spacing ({approximately}500 ns), using demonstrated technologies. This concept uses a four-pulse drive system to drive both a 16-MeV ensemble of 250-kV, 4-kA induction cells and a four-pulse, 4-MeV injector. The key to this approach lies in the method used to combine four pulses from different generators in a manner that does not compromise the voltage flatness requirement of {+-} 1%. The induction cells use core material for only a single pulse. A simple reverse bias circuit is used to reset the cores between pulses, and the insulator has been redesigned to withstand the reverse reset voltage. This approach can be installed in stages so that the facility can be used for dual axis radiography while implementing the multi-pulsing capability. A dual double-pulse format has been identified which provides a sequence of two pulses along one line-of-sight within a 2-{micro}sec window. The 2-{micro}sec windows can be separated by arbitrary time intervals of 2- to 10-{micro}sec.

  7. Comparison of ultrashort-pulse frequency-resolved-optical-gating traces for three common beam geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. ); Kane, D.J. )

    1994-09-01

    We recently introduced frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring the intensity and phase of an individual, arbitrary, ultrashort laser pulse. FROG can use almost any instantaneous optical nonlinearity, with the most common geometries being polarization gate, self-diffraction, and second-harmonic generation. The experimentally generated FROG trace is intuitive, visually appealing, and can yield quantitative information about the pulse parameters (such as temporal and spectral width and chirp). However, the qualitative and the quantitative features of the FROG trace depend strongly on the geometry used. We compare the FROG traces for several common ultrashort pulses for these three common geometries and, where possible, develop scaling rules that allow one to obtain quantitative information about the pulse directly from the experimental FROG trace. We illuminate the important features of the various FROG traces for transform-limited, linearly chirped, self-phase modulated, and nonlinearly chirped pulses, pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and self-phase modulation, and pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and cubic phase distortion, as well as double pulses, pulses with phase jumps, and pulses with complex intensity and phase substructure.

  8. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Balmes, Anthony A; Bradley, Joseph T; Netz, Dana; Sandoval, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  9. Development of fast two-dimensional standing wave microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliko, Olga; Reddy, Duemani G.; Brownell, William E.; Saggau, Peter

    2008-02-01

    A novel scheme for two-dimensional (2D) standing wave fluorescence microscopy (SWFM) using acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) is proposed. Two laser beams were coupled into an inverted microscope and focused at the back focal plane of the objective lens. The position of each of two beams at the back focal plane was controlled by a pair of AODs. This resulted in two collimated beams that interfered in the focal plane, creating a lateral periodic excitation pattern with variable spacing and orientation. The phase of the standing wave pattern was controlled by phase delay between two RF sinusoidal signals driving the AODs. Nine SW patterns of three different orientations about the optical axis and three different phases were generated. The excitation of the specimen using these patterns will result in a SWFM image with enhanced 2D lateral resolution with a nearly isotropic effective point-spread function. Rotation of the SW pattern relative to specimen and varying the SW phase do not involve any mechanical movements and are only limited by the time required for the acoustic wave to fill the aperture of AOD. The resulting total acquisition time can be as short as 100 µs and is only further limited by speed and sensitivity of the employed CCD camera. Therefore, this 2D SWFM can provide a real time imaging of subresolution processes such as docking and fusion of synaptic vesicles. In addition, the combination of 2D SWFM with variable angle total internal reflection (TIR) can extend this scheme to fast microscopy with enhanced three-dimensional (3D) resolution.

  10. Interference of two pulse-like spatial beams with arbitrary transverse separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flórez, Jefferson; Álvarez, Juan-Rafael; Calderón-Losada, Omar; José Salazar-Serrano, Luis; Valencia, Alejandra

    2016-12-01

    We report the observation of interference in position and transverse momentum variables between two parallel-propagating Gaussian beams separated by an arbitrary distance. This resembles the Alford and Gold effect that has been reported for the time-frequency degree of freedom, and constitutes a method for spatial intensity shaping of light beams. We observe this interference by using a tunable beam displacer, which plays the role of a Michelson interferometer for the transverse spatial variables. Additionally, we employ the interference pattern as a function of the separation between the beams to determine the spatial coherence length of the original beam.

  11. Method and split cavity oscillator/modulator to generate pulsed particle beams and electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Clark, M.C.; Coleman, P.D.; Marder, B.M.

    1993-08-10

    A compact device called the split cavity modulator whose self-generated oscillating electromagnetic field converts a steady particle beam into a modulated particle beam. The particle beam experiences both signs of the oscillating electric field during the transit through the split cavity modulator. The modulated particle beam can then be used to generate microwaves at that frequency and through the use of extractors, high efficiency extraction of microwave power is enabled. The modulated beam and the microwave frequency can be varied by the placement of resistive wires at nodes of oscillation within the cavity. The short beam travel length through the cavity permit higher currents because both space charge and pinching limitations are reduced. The need for an applied magnetic field to control the beam has been eliminated.

  12. Method and split cavity oscillator/modulator to generate pulsed particle beams and electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Clark, M. Collins; Coleman, P. Dale; Marder, Barry M.

    1993-01-01

    A compact device called the split cavity modulator whose self-generated oscillating electromagnetic field converts a steady particle beam into a modulated particle beam. The particle beam experiences both signs of the oscillating electric field during the transit through the split cavity modulator. The modulated particle beam can then be used to generate microwaves at that frequency and through the use of extractors, high efficiency extraction of microwave power is enabled. The modulated beam and the microwave frequency can be varied by the placement of resistive wires at nodes of oscillation within the cavity. The short beam travel length through the cavity permit higher currents because both space charge and pinching limitations are reduced. The need for an applied magnetic field to control the beam has been eliminated.

  13. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Flame Deflector Protection System Life Cycle Cost Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Trejo, David; Reinschmidt, Ken; Kim, Hyung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    A 20-year life cycle cost analysis was performed to compare the operational life cycle cost, processing/turnaround timelines, and operations manpower inspection/repair/refurbishment requirements for corrosion protection of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad flame deflector associated with the existing cast-in-place materials and a newer advanced refractory ceramic material. The analysis compared the estimated costs of(1) continuing to use of the current refractory material without any changes; (2) completely reconstructing the flame trench using the current refractory material; and (3) completely reconstructing the flame trench with a new high-performance refractory material. Cost estimates were based on an analysis of the amount of damage that occurs after each launch and an estimate of the average repair cost. Alternative 3 was found to save $32M compared to alternative 1 and $17M compared to alternative 2 over a 20-year life cycle.

  14. Combination of a 2-D acousto-optic deflector with laser amplifier for efficient scanning of a Q-switched ND:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maák, P.; Jakab, L.; Richter, P. I.; Brignon, A.; Huignard, J.-P.

    2000-03-01

    A two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector has been combined with a large angular acceptance, laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG optical amplifier in order to obtain a scanning system with high angular resolution and with high and uniform optical transmission. Experiments have been carried out in order to optimize the set-up for intensity distribution and optical losses. The combination of newly developed nonlinear and active optical elements provides a relatively uniform intensity distribution over the scanned region corresponding to 300×300 discrete points in the back focal plane of a Fourier lens, at laser pulse energy levels of 1-5 mJ.

  15. Ultrafast, large-field multiphoton microscopy based on an acousto-optic deflector and a spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Qin, Wan; Liu, Honghai; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben; Gao, Bruce Z.

    2013-01-01

    We present an ultrafast, large-field multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscope with high lateral and axial resolutions based on a two-dimensional (2-D) acousto-optical deflector (AOD) scanner and spatial light modulator (SLM). When a phase-only SLM is used to shape the near-infrared light from a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser into a multifocus array including the 0-order beam, a 136 μm × 136 μm field of view is achieved with a 60× objective using a 2-D AOD scanner without any mechanical scan element. The two-photon fluorescence image of a neuronal network that was obtained using this system demonstrates that our microscopy permits observation of dynamic biological events in a large field with high-temporal and -spatial resolution. PMID:22743445

  16. Ultrafast, large-field multiphoton microscopy based on an acousto-optic deflector and a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yonghong; Qin, Wan; Liu, Honghai; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben; Gao, Bruce Z

    2012-07-01

    We present an ultrafast, large-field multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscope with high lateral and axial resolutions based on a two-dimensional (2-D) acousto-optical deflector (AOD) scanner and spatial light modulator (SLM). When a phase-only SLM is used to shape the near-infrared light from a mode-locked titanium:sapphire laser into a multifocus array including the 0-order beam, a 136 μm × 136 μm field of view is achieved with a 60× objective using a 2-D AOD scanner without any mechanical scan element. The two-photon fluorescence image of a neuronal network that was obtained using this system demonstrates that our microscopy permits observation of dynamic biological events in a large field with high-temporal and -spatial resolution.

  17. Design of a pulsed positron system at Trombay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Maheshwari, Priya; Gupta, S. K.; Pujari, P. K.

    2015-06-01

    We present here the design of a pulsed beam setup to deliver narrow time width positron pulses. The major constituents of the setup include- 22Na radioactive source and moderator assembly, ExB deflector for filtering out high energy positron and gamma rays, chopper-prebuncher-buncher assembly for time bunching of the slow positrons. In the ExB section, crossed electric and magnetic fields guide the slow positrons through an off-centered hole in a tungsten block. The initial beam will then be time bunched by using a reflection type chopper and a double gap prebuncher. The main buncheris designed as a quarter wave resonator with base frequency of 150 MHz.To prevent the sagging of the cantilevered inner tube of the resonator, we will support the inner conductor using an alumina post. There will be provision of tuning the frequency by using a tuner made of conducting material. The incident beam energy will be varied by biasing the sample.

  18. CW/Pulsed H- ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H- beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H- source able to produce very intense H- beams with important variation of the duty factor[1]. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H- ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H- ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H- beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π.mm.mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H- ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π.mm.mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H- source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H- source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  19. [Pulsed electron beam precharger]. Technical progress report No. 2, December 1, 1989--February 28, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  20. High-power, high-brightness pseudospark-produced electron beam driven by improved pulse line accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Junbino Zhu; Mingchang Wang; Zhijiang Wang

    1995-12-31

    A high power (200KV), intense current density, low emittance (71mmmrad), high brightness (8x10{sup 10}A/m rad) electron beam was generated in the 10cm long, high-voltage-resistive multi-gap hollow cathode pseudospark chamber filled with 15pa nitrogen and driven by an improved pulse line accelerator. The beam was ejected with the 1mm diameter, the 2.2KA beam current, and the 400ns pulse length, and could propagated 20cm in the drift tube. At a distance of 5cm from the anode it penetrated consecutively an acid-sensitive discoloring film and a 0.05mm-thick copper foil both stuck closely, left 0.6mm and 0.3mm holes on them, respectively. That 10 shots on an acid-sensitive film produced a hole of 1.6mm at 7cm downstream of anode showed its good repeatability. After 60 shots the pseudospark discharge chamber was disassembled and observed that almost no destructive damage traces left on the surfaces of its various electrodes and insulators. But on almost all the surfaces of changeable central hole parts installed on intermediate electrodes there are traces of electron emission from the sides facing the anode and of bombardment on the sides facing the cathode, in contrast with which on the front- and back-surfaces of hollow cathode no visible traces of electron emission from then was observed. In addition, there were different tints, strip-like regions on the side of anode facing the cathode. Another interesting phenomenon was that there were a set of concentric circular or elliptical ring pattern on the acid-sensitive discoloring film got at 5cm from the anode and observed tinder a metallograph. It seems that the pseudospark electron beam is Laminar beam i.e, being possessed of a multi-layer structure, at least in the case of multi-gap pseudospark discharge chamber. It was found experimentally that the quality of pseudospark electron beam is much better than that of the cold-cathode electron beam.

  1. Pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-yu; Dong, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The incident pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal passively Q-switched microchip laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically by moving the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction. Highest pulse energy of 0.4 mJ has been generated when the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal is moved about 6 mm away from the focused pump beam waist. Laser pulses with pulse width of 1.7 ns and peak power of over 235 kW have been achieved. The theoretically calculated effective laser beam area at different positions of Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction is in good agreement with the experimental results. The highest peak power can be generated by adjusting the pump beam waist incident on the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal to optimize the effective laser beam area in passively Q-switched microchip laser.

  2. Arrays of holes fabricated by electron-beam lithography combined with image reversal process using nickel pulse reversal plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Yousef; Lavallée, Eric; Lau, Kien Mun; Beauvais, Jacques; Drouin, Dominique; Cloutier, Melanie; Turcotte, David; Yang, Pan; Kelkar, Prasad

    2004-05-01

    A critical issue in fabricating arrays of holes is to achieve high-aspect-ratio structures. Formation of ordered arrays of nanoholes in silicon nitride was investigated by the use of ultrathin hard etch mask formed by nickel pulse reversal plating to invert the tonality of a dry e-beam resist patterned by e-beam lithography. Ni plating was carried out using a commercial plating solution based on nickel sulfamate salt without organic additives. Reactive ion etching using SF6/CH4 was found to be very effective for pattern transfer to silicon nitride. Holes array of 100 nm diam, 270 nm period, and 400 nm depth was fabricated on a 5×5 mm2 area. .

  3. Measurement of surface recombination velocity for silicon solar cells using a scanning electron microscope with pulsed beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Cheng, L. J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of surface recombination velocity in the design and fabrication of silicon solar cells is discussed. A scanning electron microscope with pulsed electron beam was used to measure this parameter of silicon surfaces. It is shown that the surface recombination velocity, s, increases by an order of magnitude when an etched surface degrades, probably as a result of environmental reaction. A textured front-surface-field cell with a high-low junction near the surface shows the effect of minority carrier reflection and an apparent reduction of s, whereas a tandem-junction cell shows an increasing s value. Electric fields at junction interfaces in front-surface-field and tandem-junction cells acting as minority carrier reflectors or sinks tend to alter the value of effective surface recombination velocity for different beam penetration depths. A range of values of s was calculated for different surfaces.

  4. Single-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy of N 2 using a shaped 7 fs laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sukesh; Wrzesinski, Paul; Pestov, Dmitry; Gunaratne, Tissa; Dantus, Marcos; Gord, James R.

    2009-08-01

    The feasibility is explored by single-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy of gas-phase diatomic molecules related to combusting flows, with implications for gas-phase thermometry. We demonstrate CARS of gas-phase N 2 using a shaped ˜ 7 fs laser pulse, investigate the dependence of the CARS signal on the total pressure of the probed environment, both in pure N 2 and in mixtures with Ar, discuss the observed signal-to-noise ratio, and suggest improvements to be considered for reliable single-shot measurements at flame temperatures.

  5. Applications of the Complex Huygens Principle and Gaussian Pulsed-beam Wavelet Representations in Acoustics and Electromagnetics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-22

    the complex Huygens principle and Gaussian pulsed-beam wavelet representations in acoustics and electromagnetics N/A FA9550-12-1-0122 N/A N/A N/A N/A...concept of electromagnetic inertia which I had defined in 2011, and which posed some conceptual problems since it implied that electromagnetic energy...energy. I further defined a complex radiation impedance density analogous to the impedance Z=R+iX of an RLC circuit. I hope to use this analogy to

  6. Simulation of temperature and thermally induced stress of human tooth under CO2 pulsed laser beams using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza

    2015-02-01

    The authors report the simulation of temperature distribution and thermally induced stresses of human tooth under CO2 pulsed laser beam. A detailed tooth structure comprising enamel, dentin, and pulp with realistic shapes and thicknesses were considered, and a numerical method of finite element was adopted to solve time-dependent bio-heat and stress equations. The realistic boundary conditions of constant temperature for those parts embedded in the gingiva and heat flux condition for those parts out of the gingiva were applied. The results which were achieved as a function of energy density (J/cm(2)) showed when laser beam is irradiated downward (from the top of the tooth), the temperature and thermal stresses decrease quickly as a function of depth that is a result of strong absorption of CO2 beams by enamel. This effect is so influential that one can use CO2 beams to remove micrometer layers while underlying tissues, especially the pulp, are safe from thermal effects.

  7. Release from ISOLDE molten metal targets under pulsed proton beam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Catherall, R.; Cyvoct, G.; Evensen, A. H. M.; Lindroos, M.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kugler, E.; Schindl, K.; Ravn, H.; Wildner, E.; Drumm, P.; Obert, J.; Putaux, J. C.; Sauvage, J.

    1996-04-01

    By moving the ISOLDE mass separators from the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC) to the 1 GeV Proton-Synchrotron-Booster (PS) the instantaneous energy density of the proton beam went up by 3 orders of magnitude. The developments of the molten metal target units and the optimization of the PS proton beam to cope with the effects of the thermal shocks induced by the proton beam are described. The energy density of the PS proton beam was reduced by spatial defocusing and time staggered extraction of the four PS-accelerators. The release from lanthanum, lead and tin targets is discussed for different settings of the proton beam and compared to the release observed at ISOLDE-SC. The yields of Hg isotopes are presented.

  8. Commercial Laser Beam Perforation Of Cigarette Tipping Paper Using An Acoustic-Optic Beam Deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H.; Ramsay, I.; Dyson, D.; Ross, I.

    1984-11-01

    The tobacco industry has required a means of reducing tar content of inhaled smoke from cigarettes for some time now. One effective way of achieving this is to perforate the tipping paper (cork or plain) which wraps the cigaratte filter plug. Air is drawn into and mixed with the smoke as the smoker inhales resulting in two effects on the smoke. The first is that it is diluted and the second is that the air-smoke mixture is cooled. The dilution of the smoke probably has little significant effect since the total smoke inhaled per cigarette is always the same. The cooling of the smoke, however, causes the tar present to condense more readily on the filter plug and so represents a genuine reduction in tar content. In the light of increasing health consciousness both from popular movement or deliberate Government propaganda the importance of this method of tar reduction is well recognised in the industry.

  9. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  10. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of

  11. Design challenges of EO polymer based leaky waveguide deflector for 40 Gs/s all-optical analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjloum, Massinissa; El Gibari, Mohammed; Li, Hongwu; Daryoush, Afshin S.

    2016-08-01

    Design challenges and performance optimization of an all-optical analog-to-digital converter (AOADC) is presented here. The paper addresses both microwave and optical design of a leaky waveguide optical deflector using electro-optic (E-O) polymer. The optical deflector converts magnitude variation of the applied RF voltage into variation of deflection angle out of a leaky waveguide optical beam using the linear E-O effect (Pockels effect) as part of the E-O polymer based optical waveguide. This variation of deflection angle as result of the applied RF signal is then quantized using optical windows followed by an array of high-speed photodetectors. We optimized the leakage coefficient of the leaky waveguide and its physical length to achieve the best trade-off between bandwidth and the deflected optical beam resolution, by improving the phase velocity matching between lightwave and microwave on one hand and using pre-emphasis technique to compensate for the RF signal attenuation on the other hand. In addition, for ease of access from both optical and RF perspective, a via-hole less broad bandwidth transition is designed between coplanar pads and coupled microstrip (CPW-CMS) driving electrodes. With the best reported E-O coefficient of 350 pm/V, the designed E-O deflector should allow an AOADC operating over 44 giga-samples-per-seconds with an estimated effective resolution of 6.5 bits on RF signals with Nyquist bandwidth of 22 GHz. The overall DC power consumption of all components used in this AOADC is of order of 4 W and is dominated by power consumption in the power amplifier to generate a 20 V RF voltage in 50 Ohm system. A higher sampling rate can be achieved at similar bits of resolution by interleaving a number of this elementary AOADC at the expense of a higher power consumption.

  12. Long-Pulse Relativistic Electron Beam Generation and Propagation in Gases and in Ultraviolet Laser Ionized Channels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, Robert Francis, Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Experiments on the propagation of relativistic electron beams (REB) in the ion-focus regime (IFR) are described. A novel feature of the experiments is the long -pulse nature of the electron beam from the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA), a Marx generator with voltage compensation (1 MV, 10 kA, 1 microsecond). The REB is extracted from the diode through a 2.5 cm diameter aperture. A cold cathode is used. To reduce voltage droop from diode gap closure, anode-cathode spacings >7 cm are used. A 7.6 cm dia. cotton velvet cathode provides 300 A of injected current for 800 ns before a rapid increase in injected current, attributed to diode instability. Loss of REB transport accompanies this current increase. Conclusions drawn from the empirical diode study are: (1) successful generation of microsecond electron beams without magnetic insulation from cold cathodes requires diode spacing of ~10 cm, (2) cotton velvet gives improved beam quality over carbon fiber "brush" cathodes, (3) velvet cathodes have slower closure velocity of the cathode plasma. In the IFR regime partial neutralization of the space-charge of an REB by an ion background with the magnetic pinch force of the REB current achieves radial force balance. Experiments are performed in neutral gas, and in diethylaniline (DEA), preionized with a KrF laser. A pressure window for propagation is observed. For helium this window is 50-300 mtorr. The longest propagated pulse is 300 ns with a peak transported efficiency of 80%. In air the pressure window is 5-75 mtorr with similar efficiency. In DEA, fractional ionization of 0.004 has been achieved at a laser fluence of 10 mJ per square cm. To provide sufficient preionization for propagation, pressures where impact ionization is not negligible are required. A pressure window for propagation is again observed. For the current density and laser fluence in this experiment the pressure window is 0.2-2 mTorr. Within the pressure window instability, of the REB

  13. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Scudiere, Matthew B.

    1993-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  14. ARTICLES: Propagation of an intensity-modulated laser beam through a pulsed CO2 amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Yur'ev, M. S.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical study was made (by a self-consistent solution of the equations of vibrational kinetics, hydrodynamics, and quasioptics) of the influence of self-interaction of laser radiation on the transmission of a beam through a CO2 amplifier. It was found that for times exceeding the time for collisional decay of the upper active level the radiation wavefront becomes unstable in the presence of small-scale perturbations of the transverse structure of the beam. It was shown that the harmful influence of the self-interaction on the divergence can be weakened by raising the intensity of the incident beam and the gain of the amplifier.

  15. Investigations on the beam pointing stability of a pulsed optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Fix, Andreas; Stöckl, Christian

    2013-05-06

    Although the beam pointing stability of optical parametric oscillators and amplifiers is important for various applications few results on this parameter have been published. Here, we investigate the beam pointing stability of an injection-seeded, nanosecond optical parametric oscillator, compare it to its pump laser, and measure correlations between them. Although correlation between both quantities are found, the beam pointing stability of the OPO is significantly better that the one of its pump. Furthermore, the concept of the Allan variance is applied to analyze the temporal components of the pointing stability.

  16. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  17. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Pulsed Laser Beam Welded Ti-2Al-1.5Mn Titanium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiuyang; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties in the pulsed laser beam welded joints of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy thin sheet were investigated in this study. The results show that the original α + β-phases and the transformed α + α'-phases are found in the partially transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) together with the remaining β-phase, and the microhardness gradually enhances in the region as the result of the increase of α'-phase. The martensitic α'-phase and the remaining β-phase are detected in the fully transformed HAZ and the fusion zone (FZ), and the highest microhardness is found in these regions in virtue of the dominant α'-phase structure. The fine α'-phase appeared in the FZ results in higher average microhardness at high welding speed. Moreover, similar to the results of microhardness test, the tensile test results mean that the HAZ and FZ are stronger than the base metal (BM). Therefore, pulsed laser beam welding is feasible for joining thin sheet of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy.

  18. Multi-color γ-rays from comb-like electron beams driven by incoherent stacks of laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2017-03-01

    Trains of fs-length, GeV-scale electron bunches with controlled energy spacing and a 5-D brightness up to 1017 A/m2 may be produced in a mm-scale uniform plasma. The main element of the scheme is an incoherent stack of 10-TW-scale laser pulses of different colors, with mismatched focal spots, with the highest-frequency pulse advanced in time. While driving an electron density bubble, this stack remains almost proof against nonlinear red-shift and self-compression. As a consequence, the unwanted continuous injection of background electrons is minimized. Weak focusing of the trailing (lower-frequency) component of the stack enforces expansions and contractions of the bubble, inducing controlled periodic injection. The resulting train of electron bunches maintains exceptional quality while being accelerated beyond the energy limits predicted by accepted scalings. Inverse Thomson scattering from this comb-like beam generates a sequence of quasi-monochromatic, fs-length γ-ray beams, an asset for nuclear forensics and pump-probe experiments in dense plasmas.

  19. Design of a secondary ionization target for direct production of a C(-) beam from CO2 pulses for online AMS.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Gary; Ognibene, Ted

    2013-01-01

    We designed and optimized a novel device "target" that directs a CO2 gas pulse onto a Ti surface where a Cs(+) beam generates C(-) from the CO2. This secondary ionization target enables an accelerator mass spectrometer to ionize pulses of CO2 in the negative mode to measure (14)C/(12)C isotopic ratios in real time. The design of the targets were based on computational flow dynamics, ionization mechanism and empirical optimization. As part of the ionization mechanism, the adsorption of CO2 on the Ti surface was fitted with the Jovanovic-Freundlich isotherm model using empirical and simulation data. The inferred adsorption constants were in good agreement with other works. The empirical optimization showed that amount of injected carbon and the flow speed of the helium carrier gas improve the ionization efficiency and the amount of (12)C(-) produced until reaching a saturation point. Linear dynamic range between 150 and 1000 ng of C and optimum carrier gas flow speed of around 0.1 mL/min were shown. It was also shown that the ionization depends on the area of the Ti surface and Cs(+) beam cross-section. A range of ionization efficiency of 1-2.5% was obtained by optimizing the described parameters.

  20. Beam-Riding Behavior of Lightcraft Engines with ˜ 1 μs Pulsed TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenoyer, D. A.; Salvador, I. I.; Myrabo, L. N.

    2011-11-01

    The beam-riding and angular impulse performance of four laser propulsion engine geometries were measured using a twin Lumonics K922M pulsed TEA CO2 laser system, with an Angular Impulse Measurement Device (AIMD). Airbreathing and solid ablative rocket (SAR) mode impulse data was collected to explore engine thrust-vectoring behavior, as a function of: a) laser beam lateral offset from the engine axis of symmetry; b) laser pulse duration (˜ 50 ns spike with selectable 1.5 or 2.5 μs tail—depending upon laser gas mixture); and c) engine geometry (Lightcraft Type ♯150, ♯200, ♯250, and parabolic bell). Maximum airbreathing lateral momentum coupling coefficients (CM) up to 77 N-s/MJ were achieved with the K922M laser; this represents a vast improvement over previous PLVTS laser (˜ 420 J, 18 μs duration) results which reached only 15 N-s/MJ. Lateral CM performance of the ♯200 SAR Lightcraft engine was measured experimentally for the first time, using Delrin® propellant inserts.

  1. Enhanced proton beam collimation in the ultra-intense short pulse regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, J. S.; Dover, N. P.; Borghesi, M.; Brenner, C. M.; Cameron, F. H.; Carroll, D. C.; Foster, P. S.; Gallegos, P.; Gregori, G.; McKenna, P.; Murphy, C. D.; Najmudin, Z.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Prasad, R.; Romagnani, L.; Quinn, K. E.; Schreiber, J.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Tresca, O.; Zepf, M.; Neely, D.

    2014-08-01

    The collimation of proton beams accelerated during ultra-intense laser irradiation of thin aluminum foils was measured experimentally whilst varying laser contrast. Increasing the laser contrast using a double plasma mirror system resulted in a marked decrease in proton beam divergence (20° to <10°), and the enhanced collimation persisted over a wide range of target thicknesses (50 nm-6 µm), with an increased flux towards thinner targets. Supported by numerical simulation, the larger beam divergence at low contrast is attributed to the presence of a significant plasma scale length on the target front surface. This alters the fast electron generation and injection into the target, affecting the resultant sheath distribution and dynamics at the rear target surface. This result demonstrates that careful control of the laser contrast will be important for future laser-driven ion applications in which control of beam divergence is crucial.

  2. NRL 1989 Beam Propagation Studies in Support of the ATA Multi-Pulse Propagation Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-31

    took place at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during December, 1989 and January, 1990. Analyses of the experimental results will appear in...because the head is so hot that it is quickly lost, leaviing behind a poorly- tail-ored beam. Even when the 4:1 emirtance variation is restored to a beam...TXN Patrick Air Force Base, FL 32925 Attn: CAPT Joseph Nicholas 31 Hudson Institute Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Center for Naval Analyses University

  3. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  4. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, S. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T.; Dong, C.

    2013-11-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC1-x, Co3W9C4, Co3W3C phases and graphite precipitate domains ˜50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ˜0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10-5 mm3/min to 6.3 × 10-6 mm3/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  5. Polarity and ion recombination corrections in continuous and pulsed beams for ionization chambers with high Z chamber walls.

    PubMed

    Aldosary, Ghada; Safigholi, Habib; Song, William; Seuntjens, Jan; Sarfehnia, Arman

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the response of Farmer-type ionization chambers fitted with high atomic number (Z) walls is studied, and results of the effects of such walls on polarity and ion recombination correction factors in both continuous and pulsed beams are presented. Measurements were made in a continuous Co-60 beam and a pulsed 6MV linac beam using an Exradin-A12 ionization chamber fitted with the manufacturer's C-552 plastic wall, as well as geometrically identical walls made from aluminum, copper and molybdenum. The bias voltage was changed between 10values (range: +50 to +560V). Ion recombination was determined from Jaffé plots and by using the "two-voltage technique". The saturation charge measured with each chamber wall was extrapolated from Jaffé plots. Additionally, the effect of different wall materials on chamber response was studied using MCNP simulations. Results showed that the polarity correction factor is not significantly affected by changes in chamber wall material (within 0.1%). Furthermore, although the saturation charges greatly vary with each chamber wall material, and charge multiplication increases for higher atomic number wall materials, the standard methods of calculating ion recombination yielded results that differed by only 0.2%. Therefore, polarity and ion recombination correction factors are not greatly affected by the chamber wall material. The experimental saturation charges for all the different wall materials agreed well within the uncertainty with MCNP simulations. The breakdown of the linear relationship in Jaffé plots that was previously reported to exist for conventional chamber walls was also observed with the different wall materials.

  6. Diagnosis of high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam generated by a novel magnetically insulated diode with gas puff plasma gun.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Miyake, H; Masugata, K

    2008-10-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beam is expected to be applied to materials processing including surface modification and ion implantation. For those applications, it is very important to generate high-purity ion beams with various ion species. For this purpose, we have developed a new type of a magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun. When the ion diode was operated at a diode voltage of about 190 kV, a diode current of about 15 kA, and a pulse duration of about 100 ns, the ion beam with an ion current density of 54 A/cm(2) was obtained at 50 mm downstream from the anode. By evaluating the ion species and the energy spectrum of the ion beam via a Thomson parabola spectrometer, it was confirmed that the ion beam consists of nitrogen ions (N(+) and N(2+)) of energy of 100-400 keV and the proton impurities of energy of 90-200 keV. The purity of the beam was evaluated to be 94%. The high-purity pulsed nitrogen ion beam was successfully obtained by the developed ion diode system.

  7. Enhancing ablation efficiency in micro structuring using a deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, M.; Dickmann, K.

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for the generation of microstructures results in a high flexible tool for free form geometries in the micro range. Increasing laser power and repetition rates increase as well the demand of high flexible and efficient process strategies. To increase the ablation efficiency the optimal fluency can be determined, which is a material specific value. By varying the beam shape, the ablation efficiency can be enhanced. In this study a deformable mirror was used to vary the beam shape. This mirror is built by combining a piezo-electric ceramic and a mirror substrate. The ceramic is divided into several segments, which can be controlled independently. This results in a high flexible deformable mirror which influences the beam shape and can be used to vary the spot size or generate line geometries. The ablation efficiency and roughness of small generated cavities were analyzed in this study as well as the dimensions of the cavity. This can be used to optimize process strategies to combine high volume ablation and fine detail generation.

  8. Use of pulsed high power ion beams to enhance tribological properties of stainless steel, Ti, and Al

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Renk, T.J.; Dugger, M.T.; Grabowski, K.S.; Thompson, M.O.

    1998-04-01

    Enhanced tribological properties have been observed after treatment with pulsed high power ion beams, which results in rapid melting and resolidification of the surface. The authors have treated and tested 440C martensitic stainless steel (Fe-17 Cr-1 C). Ti and Al samples were sputter coated and ion beam treated to produce surface alloying. The samples were treated at the RHEPP-I facility at Sandia National Laboratories (0.5 MV, 0.5--1 {micro}s at sample location, <10 J/cm{sup 2}, 1--5 {micro}m ion range). They have observed a reduction in size of second phase particles and other microstructural changes in 440C steel. The hardness of treated 440C increases with ion beam fluence and a maximum hardness increase of a factor of 5 is obtained. Low wear rates are observed in wear tested of treated 440C steel. Surface alloyed Ti-Pt layers show improvements in hardness up to a factor of 3 over untreated Ti, and surface alloys of Al-Si result in a hardness increase of a factor of two over untreated Al. Both surface alloys show increased durability in wear testing. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) measurements show overlayer mixing to the depth of the melted layer. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and TEM confirm the existence of metastable states within the treated layer. Treated layer depths have been measured from 1--10 {micro}m.

  9. Phase and Structural States Formed in Titanium Nickelide Subsurface Layers Exposed to High-Current Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, A. A.; Meisner, L. L.; Lotkov, A. I.; Semin, V. O.

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of the non-equilibrium states formed in the subsurface layers of a titanium nickelide-based alloy exposed to electron beams operated in the pulsed surface layer melting mode is investigated experimentally. Using methods of an x-ray diffraction analysis, and optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopies, an 8-10 μm thick surface layer is shown to exhibit В2 phase-based structure undergoing inhomogeneous lattice microstrain. The core layer located at a depth of 10-20 μm below the irradiated surface contains a small amount (up to 5 vol.%) of a phase with В19' martensite structure along with a slightly distorted lattice and unmelted Ti2Ni phase particles. Electron beam treatment brings about changes in the chemical composition of the surface-modified layer which becomes enriched in titanium owing to the dissolution of the Ti2Ni phase particles therein. Transmission electron microscopy has not revealed martensite phases in the modified layer. The electron beam exposure of the titanium nickelide surface is assumed to give rise to nonequilibrium highly distorted bcc structure.

  10. Numerical study for flame deflector design of a space launch vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hwayoung; Lee, Jungil; Um, Hyungsik; Huh, Hwanil

    2017-04-01

    A flame deflector is a structure that prevents damage to a launch vehicle and a launch pad due to exhaust plumes of a lifting-off launch vehicle. The shape of a flame deflector should be designed to restrain the discharged gas from backdraft inside the deflector and to reflect the impact to the surrounding environment and the engine characteristics of the vehicle. This study presents the five preliminary flame deflector configurations which are designed for the first-stage rocket engine of the Korea Space Launch Vehicle-II and surroundings of the Naro space center. The gas discharge patterns of the designed flame deflectors are investigated using the 3D flow field analysis by assuming that the air, in place of the exhaust gas, forms the plume. In addition, a multi-species unreacted flow model is investigated through 2D analysis of the first-stage engine of the KSLV-II. The results indicate that the closest Mach number and temperature distributions to the reacted flow model can be achieved from the 4-species unreacted flow model which employs H2O, CO2, and CO and specific heat-corrected plume.

  11. Measurement of Space Charges in Dielectric Materials by Pulse Electro-acoustic Method after Irradiation by High-energy Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaogang, Qin; Kai, Li; Mayali; Xiaoquan, Zheng; Xiaodong, Liu

    2009-01-01

    Dielectric materials are widely used in space environment. When they are irradiated, charges will accumulate in the bulk and on the surface of the material, leading to pulse discharge events that can cause permanent changes in their physical and chemical structure. In this paper, a special method called PEA (pulse electro-acoustic) was used to measure and analyze the space charging of several dielectric materials after they have been irradiated by different high-energy electron beams.

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam-Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-13

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6750--11-9333 Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in ...Pulsed Electron Beam–Generated Plasmas Produced in Pure Argon, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Their Mixtures May 13, 2011 Approved for public release...PAGE 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Experimental and Theoretical Estimation of Excited Species Generation in Pulsed Electron Beam

  13. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  14. Pulsed power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, David H.

    Pulsed power systems are critical elements for such prospective weapons technologies as high-power microwaves, electrothermal and electromagnetic projectile launchers, neutral particle beams, space-based FELs, ground-based lasers, and charged particle beams. Pulsed power will also be essential for the development of nonweapon military systems such as lidars and ultrawideband radars, and could serve as the bases for nuclear weapon effect simulators. The pulsed power generation requirements for each of these systems is considered.

  15. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J; Softley, Timothy P

    2015-05-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80,000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  16. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br{sub 2} down to 13 μs

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-15

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br{sub 2} and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br{sub 2}. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  17. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  18. Applications of Optical Coherent Transient Technology to Pulse Shaping, Spectral Filtering, Arbitrary Waveform Generation and RF Beamforming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-15

    optical pulses: (1) using acousto - optic modulators (AOMs) driven with a chirped RF source, ( 2 ) using EOPMs driven with a chirped RF source, (3) utilizing a...holograms (SSH) have the potential to duplicate the functional operation of acousto - optic (AO) deflectors , but with bandwidths (BW) in excess of 10 GHz... acousto - optic deflector to create a scanned optical signal that was recorded in an OCT crystal. The scanner functionality of the AOD was thus

  19. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Evolution of tubular singular pulsed beams in a nonlinear dielectric medium upon ionisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, R. A.; Khasanov, O. Kh; Smirnova, T. V.

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of a high-power femtosecond tubular pulsed beam in a dielectric medium is numerically analysed upon optically induced ionisation. It is found that the balance between nonlinearities of opposite sign and different magnitude in the case of multiphoton ionisation favours the establishment of a quasi-soliton regime of radiation propagation over a distance exceeding several diffraction lengths. The use of these beams enables attaining high-density light fields and generate high-density plasmas.

  20. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Coatings Systems Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Whitten, Mary; Perisich, Steven; Trejo, David

    2009-01-01

    When space vehicles are launched, extreme heat, exhaust, and chemicals are produced and these form a very aggressive exposure environment at the launch complex. The facilities in the launch complex are exposed to this aggressive environment. The vehicle exhaust directly impacts the flame deflectors, making these systems very susceptible to high wear and potential failure. A project was formulated to develop or identify new materials or systems such that the wear and/or damage to the flame deflector system, as a result of the severe environmental exposure conditions during launches, can be mitigated. This report provides a survey of potential protective coatings for the refractory concrete lining on the steel base structure on the flame deflectors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  1. An experimental investigation of convective heat transfer enhancement in electronic module using curved deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, A. S.; Ali, R. K.; Abdel-Aziz, A. A.; Elshazly, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    This work investigated experimentally the heat transfer and pressure drop in electronic module using a curved deflector to direct the flow towards the recirculation zone enclosed between the two heat sources. The experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of deflector dimensionless radius ( R r ) and both horizontal and vertical distances ( R x , R y ) within a range of Reynolds number from 5223 to 11,380. The results show that larger deflector at small vertical distance enhances the heat transfer for upstream and downstream heat sources while the horizontal distance has a contrast effect. Correlations are obtained for the average Nusselt number of both upstream and downstream heat sources utilizing the present measurements within 5223 ≤ Re L ≤ 11,380, 0.02 ≤ R x ≤ 0.4, 0.3 ≤ R y ≤ 0.5 and 0.15 ≤ R r ≤ 0.35.

  2. Development of a long-pulse (30-s), high-energy (120-keV) ion source for neutral-beam applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.C.; Barber, G.C.; Blue, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    Multimegawatt neutral beams of hydrogen or deuterium atoms are needed for fusion machine applications such as MFTB-B, TFTR-U, DIII-U, and FED (INTOR or ETR). For these applications, a duoPIGatron ion source is being developed to produce high-brightness deuterium beams at a beam energy of approx. 120 keV for pulse lengths up to 30 s. A long-pulse plasma generator with active water cooling has been operated at an arc level of 1200 A with 30-s pulse durations. The plasma density and uniformity are sufficient for supplying a 60-A beam of hydrogen ions to a 13- by 43-cm accelerator. A 10- by 25-cm tetrode accelerator has been operated to form 120-keV hydrogen ion beams. Using the two-dimensional (2-D) ion extraction code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a 13- by 43-cm tetrode accelerator has been designed and is being fabricated. The aperture shapes of accelerator grids are optimized for 120-keV beam energy.

  3. Probe beam-free detection of terahertz wave by electroluminescence induced by intense THz pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J.; Jin, Z.; Nosaka, Y.; Nakazawa, T.; Kodama, R.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a table-top fs laser system can generate MW terahertz (THz) pulse with its electric field higher than 100 kV/cm can be generated by several schemes. Such a strong THz field can directly drive electrons inside various materials. Here, we demonstrated a direct THz electric field detection method by measuring the electroluminescence induced by intense THz pulse inside commonly available light emitting diode. An intense THz wave obtained by the two-color laser scheme was focused onto LED along with an external DC bias to induce luminescence which we found proportional to the amplitude of the incident THz field. The scheme can be useful to realize a low-cost, probe-free THz detection and imaging system.

  4. Study of the Generation of Intense Pulsed Electron Beams Using Glow Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-01

    166 side the discharge chamber. The coil inside diameter is 5 mixture. The electronic component of the glow discharge .167 cm. It was placed coaxial...electron production in 188 of B. Wernsman and the skillful machining by J. Davis. gasesby fast helium (0.133-1.0 MeV): I. Experimental." Phys. Rev...current sure of 10 - Torr. Helium was continuously introduced in- is collected by the acceleration grid. and the pulse of electron side the electron gun

  5. Demonstration of Pulsed Electron Beam Applications (PEBA) for Fabricating Small Geometry Semiconductor Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    Results of PEBA on amorphous (BF 2 ) and non-amorphous (boron) ion-implant damaged surfaces. Sheet resistance R (ohms/square) measured by 4-point probe...the effect of varying fluence and low temperature preannealing on PEBA .. ......... .... 20 4 Sheet resistance (ohms/square) of 50 keV boron implanted...silicon annealed by a pulsed ruby laser . ...... .. 23 5 Sheet resistance measurements for phosphorus implants at 1014 ions/cm 2 and varying energy and

  6. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  7. Energy conservation in the transient response of nonlinear beam vibration problems subjected to pulse loading - A numerical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyer, E. T., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of a double cantilevered beam subjected to pulse loading over a central sector is studied. The initial response is generated in detail to ascertain the energetics of the response. The total energy is used as a gauge of the stability and accuracy of the solution. It is shown that to obtain accurate and stable initial solutions an extremely high spatial and time resolution is required. This requirement was only evident through an examination of the energy of the system. It is proposed, therefore, to use the total energy of the system as a necessary stability and accuracy criterion for the nonlinear response of conservative systems. The results also demonstrate that even for moderate nonlinearities, the effects of membrane forces have a significant influence on the system. It is also shown that while the fundamental response is contained in a first mode envelope, the fluctuations caused by the higher order modes must be resolved.

  8. 50 CFR Figures 14a and 14b to Part... - Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Bent Bars... 223—Maximum Angle of Deflector Bars With Straight Bars Attached to the Bottom of the Frame and...

  9. Wide-angle KTa1- x Nb x O3 deflector for swept light source using DC charge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Tatsuhiro; Shinagawa, Mitsuru; Ueno, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yuzo; Toyoda, Seiji; Sakamoto, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    A 5-pass KTa1- x Nb x O3 (KTN) deflector based on a DC charge technique for the swept light source of an optical coherence tomography system is proposed. The DC charge technique used in a 3-pass KTN deflector enables us to obtain the long-term stability of the optical power without any degradation of the important features of the swept light source. Experimental results confirm that the coherence length of a swept light source with the 5-pass KTN deflector using the DC charge technique is almost equal to that using a precharge technique reported previously. This means that the DC charge technique does not degrade the coherence length. There are limitation values for applied voltage, the KTN electrode gap, relative dielectric constant, and sweep frequency of the KTN deflector in terms of obtaining long coherence length. We believe that a 7-pass KTN deflector is effective for obtaining a longer coherence length.

  10. Lifetime of anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. P.; Dong, Z. H.; Han, X. G.; Xin, J. P.; Lei, M. K.

    2007-02-15

    Generation of high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) has been studied experimentally using polyethylene as the anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with an external magnetic field. The HIPIB is extracted from the anode plasma produced during the surface discharging process on polyethylene under the electrical and magnetic fields in MIDs, i.e., high-voltage surface breakdown (flashover) with bombardments by electrons. The surface morphology and the microstructure of the anode polymer are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The surface roughening of the anode polymer results from the explosive release of trapped gases or newly formed gases under the high-voltage discharging, leaving fractured surfaces with bubble formation. The polyethylene in the surface layer degrades into low-molecular-weight polymers such as polyethylene wax and paraffin under the discharging process. Both the surface roughness and the fraction of low molecular polymers apparently increase as the discharging times are prolonged for multipulse HIPIB generation. The changes in the surface morphology and the composition of anode polymer lead to a noticeable decrease in the output of ion beam intensity, i.e., ion current density and diode voltage, accompanied with an increase in instability of the parameters with the prolonged discharge times. The diode voltage (or surface breakdown voltage of polymer) mainly depends on the surface morphology (or roughness) of anode polymers, and the ion current density on the composition of anode polymers, which account for the two stages of anode polymer degradation observed experimentally, i.e., stage I which has a steady decrease of the two parameters and stage II which shows a slow decrease, but with an enhanced fluctuation of the two parameters with increasing pulses of HIPIB generation.

  11. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  12. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  13. Radiation-Induced Centers in Lead Silicate Glasses Irradiated by Stationary and Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Konev, S. F.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced centers formed in heavy flint glasses irradiated by electron beams are investigated by the methods of optical and EPR spectroscopy. It is revealed that stable and short-living optical absorption centers of close natures are formed under irradiation by fast electrons. A correlation is established between the stable optical absorption bands and the EPR signals interpreted as signals of the (Pb2+)/h+ hole centers. The shortliving color centers are formed due to short-term distortion of the O-Pb bonds, and the stable centers are formed due to the spatial separation, thermalization, and subsequent stabilization of excited electrons and holes in tails of the localized states. Irradiation by electron beams leads to a change in the spectral characteristics of the fundamental absorption edge and, in particular, of the Urbach energy that determines the degree of structural disorder.

  14. Generation of heavy ion beams using high-intensity short pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George; McGuffey, Chris; Thomas, Alec; Krushelnick, Karl; Beg, Farhat

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of ion acceleration from high-Z material irradiated by intense sub-picosecond lasers is presented. The underlying physics of beam formation and acceleration is similar for light and heavy ions, however, nuances of the acceleration process make the heavy ions more challenging. At least four technical hurdles have been identified: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration and poor energy coupling due to high reflectivity of the plasma. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we observed transitions from Radiation Pressure Acceleration (RPA) to the Breakout Afterburner regime (BoA) and to Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) akin to light ions. The numerical simulations predict gold ions beams with high directionality (<10 degrees half-angle), high fluxes (>1011 ions/sr) and energy (>10 MeV/nucleon) from laser systems delivering >20 J of energy on target.

  15. Wide-band acousto-optic deflectors with high efficiency for visible range fringe pattern projector.

    PubMed

    Dupont, S; Kastelik, J C; Causa, F

    2007-10-01

    A laser fringe projection system based on a pair of identical acousto-optic TeO(2) deflectors operated at the same frequency and using tangential phase matching anisotropic interaction is demonstrated, achieving large bandwidth and high efficiency. A 40 MHz bandwidth and an acousto-optic efficiency higher than 60% have been measured at wavelength of 514 nm. The specific pris-matic configuration of the in-house developed deflectors greatly facilitates optical alignment of the instrument. The spatial period of the interference fringes can be dynamically controlled over almost one decade by tuning the frequency of the acoustic carriers.

  16. Eyesafe coherent detection wind lidar based on a beam-combined pulsed laser source.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; Valla, M; Planchat, C; Goular, D; Augère, B; Bourdon, P; Canat, G

    2015-03-15

    We report on a coherent wind lidar built with two coherently-beam-combined fiber amplifiers. The lidar performances of the combined-amplifier and the single-amplifier are compared using two criterions: carrier-to-noise ratio and wind speed noise floor. In both cases, lidar performances are not degraded with a combined source and are close to the theoretical optimum. Combined sources are well suited to improve coherent wind lidar accuracy, range, and integration time.

  17. Modeling of Beam Wave Pulse Propagation in Vegetation Using Transport Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-31

    T5 •T•IT A July 31, 2005DjSTRIBUT,,t• t;.•~ k Approve , lM - jease Disirlo lited FINAL REPORT New Jersey Institute of Technology STATEMENT OF...intensity at small penetration depths without resorting to computer intensive calculations while maintaining good accuracy. The second new theory...wave in a random medium. Their approach, however, is computational intensive, and does not provide numerical data for off-axis beam scattering’. In the

  18. Method and means for measurement and control of pulsed charged beams

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, R.N.

    A beam of bunches of charged particles is controlled by generating a signal in response to the passage of a bunch and adding to that signal a phase-flipped reference signal. The sum is amplified, detected, and applied to a synchronous detector to obtain a comparison of the phase of the reference signal with the phase of the signal responsive to the bunch. The comparison provides an error signal to control bunching.

  19. Aluminum surface layer strengthening using intense pulsed beam radiation of substrate film system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopotov, A. A.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Vlasov, V. A.; Kondratyuk, A. A.; Teresov, A. D.; Shugurov, V. V.; Petrikova, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    The paper presents formation of the substrate film system (Zr-Ti-Cu/Al) by electric arc spraying of cathode having the appropriate composition. It is shown that the intense beam radiation of the substrate film system is accompanied by formation of the multi-phase state, the microhardness of which exceeds the one of pure A7 aluminum by ≈4.5 times.

  20. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  1. Development of a low-energy and high-current pulsed neutral beam injector with a washer-gun plasma source for high-beta plasma experiments.

    PubMed

    Ii, Toru; Gi, Keii; Umezawa, Toshiyuki; Asai, Tomohiko; Inomoto, Michiaki; Ono, Yasushi

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a novel and economical neutral-beam injection system by employing a washer-gun plasma source. It provides a low-cost and maintenance-free ion beam, thus eliminating the need for the filaments and water-cooling systems employed conventionally. In our primary experiments, the washer gun produced a source plasma with an electron temperature of approximately 5 eV and an electron density of 5 × 10(17) m(-3), i.e., conditions suitable for ion-beam extraction. The dependence of the extracted beam current on the acceleration voltage is consistent with space-charge current limitation, because the observed current density is almost proportional to the 3/2 power of the acceleration voltage below approximately 8 kV. By optimizing plasma formation, we successfully achieved beam extraction of up to 40 A at 15 kV and a pulse length in excess of 0.25 ms. Its low-voltage and high-current pulsed-beam properties enable us to apply this high-power neutral beam injection into a high-beta compact torus plasma characterized by a low magnetic field.

  2. A versatile source to produce high-intensity, pulsed supersonic radical beams for crossed-beam experiments: The cyanogen radical CN(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) as a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, R.I.; Ting, J.W.; Huang, L.C.; Balucani, N.; Asvany, O.; Lee, Y.T.; Chan, H.; Stranges, D.; Gee, D.

    1999-11-01

    In our laboratory a novel and convenient technique has been developed to generate an intense pulsed cyano radical beam to be employed in crossed molecular beam experiments investigating the chemical dynamics of bimolecular reactions. CN radicals in their ground electronic state {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} are produced {ital in situ} via laser ablation of a graphite rod at 266 nm and 30 mJ output power and subsequent reaction of the ablated species with molecular nitrogen, which acts also as a seeding gas. A chopper wheel located after the ablation source and before the collision center selects a 9 {mu}s segment of the beam. By changing the delay time between the pulsed valve and the choppper wheel, we can select a section of the pulsed CN(X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}) beam choosing different velocities in the range of 900{endash}1920 ms{sup {minus}1} with speed ratios from 4 to 8. A high-stability analog oscillator drives the motor of the chopper wheel (deviations less than 100 ppm of the period), and a high-precision reversible motor driver is interfaced to the rotating carbon rod. Both units are essential to ensure a stable cyanogen radical beam with velocity fluctuations of less than 3{percent}. The high intensity of the pulsed supersonic CN beam of about 2{endash}3{times}10{sup 11} cm{sup {minus}3} is three orders of magnitude higher than supersonic cyano radical beams employed in previous crossed molecular beams experiments. This data together with the tunable velocity range clearly demonstrate the unique power of our newly developed {ital in situ} production of a supersonic CN radical beam. This versatile concept is extendible to generate other intense, pulsed supersonic beams of highly unstable diatomic radicals, among them BC, BN, BO, BS, CS, SiC, SiN, SiO, and SiS, which are expected to play a crucial role in interstellar chemistry, chemistry in the solar system, and/or combustion processes. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renis, M.; Borghesi, M.; Favetta, M.; Malfa, G.; Manti, L.; Romano, F.; Schettino, G.; Tomasello, B.; Cirrone, G. A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  4. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    SciTech Connect

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B.; Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G.; Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Manti, L.

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  5. The Role of Beam Geometry in Population Statistics and Pulse Profiles of Radio and Gamma-ray Pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; VanGuilder, Robert; Harding, Alice K.

    2004-01-01

    We present results of a pulsar population synthesis study that incorporates a number of recent developments and some significant improvements over our previous study. We have included the results of the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey in our select group of nine radio surveys, doubling our sample of radio pulsars. More realistic geometries for the radio and gamma-ray beams are included in our Monte Carlo computer code that simulates the characteristics of the Galactic population of radio and gamma-ray pulsars. We adopted with some modifications the radio beam geometry of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002). For the gamma-ray beam, we have assumed the slot gap geometry described in the work of Muslimov & Harding (2003). To account for the shape of the distribution of radio pulsars in the P(dot) - P diagram, we continue to find that decay of the magnetic field on a timescale of 2.8 Myr is needed. With all nine surveys, our model predicts that EGRET should have seen 7 radio-quiet (below the sensitivity of these radio surveys) and 19 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. AGILE (nominal sensitivity map) is expected to detect 13 radio-quiet and 37 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars, while GLAST, with greater sensitivity is expected to detect 276 radio-quiet and 344 radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. When the Parkes multi-beam pulsar survey is excluded, the ratio of radio-loud to radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars decreases, especially for GLAST. The decrease for EGRET is 45%, implying that some fraction of EGRET unidentified sources are radio-loud gamma-ray pulsars. In the radio geometry adopted, short period pulsars are core dominated. Unlike the EGRET gamma-ray pulsars, our model predicts that when two gamma-ray peaks appear in the pulse profile, a dominant radio core peak appears in between the gamma-ray peaks. Our findings suggest that further improvements are required in describing both the radio and gamma-ray geometries.

  6. Radiation-pressure acceleration of ion beams driven by circularly polarized laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Henig, A; Steinke, S; Schnürer, M; Sokollik, T; Hörlein, R; Kiefer, D; Jung, D; Schreiber, J; Hegelich, B M; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Tajima, T; Nickles, P V; Sandner, W; Habs, D

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10(19) W/cm2. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C6+ ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.

  7. Evaluation of Methods to Increase Beam Pulse Width on the DARHT Axis-II Accelerator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    lanl.gov Abstract The second axis (Axis II) of the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory ( LANL ...of the cell pulses are of less importance than 665U.S. Government work not protected by U.S. copyright Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...19th). Held in San Francisco, CA on 16-21 June 2013., The original document contains color images. 14. ABSTRACT The second axis (Axis II) of the Dual

  8. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  9. The modified SRRS threshold criteria for high peak power laser pulses in long air-path transmission considering the near-field beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, C. Y.; Lin, D. Y.; Lu, Z. W.; Wang, Y. X.; Wang, Z.; Liang, L. X.; Ba, D. X.

    2016-11-01

    This paper demonstrates that the stimulated rotational Raman scattering (SRRS) threshold for high peak power laser pulses propagating through a long air path can be influenced strongly by the near-field quality of the laser beams, and the relationship between the SRRS threshold and the near-field beam quality (i.e., spatial intensity modulation index and contrast ratio) can be evaluated quantitatively. By using our three-dimensional numerical model, which can describe the spatial-temporal evolution behaviors of SRRS and is verified by previously published SRRS experimental data, the criteria of the safe transmission distance for high peak power nanosecond laser pulses are obtained, and the modified SRRS threshold criterion formulas considering the near-field beam conditions are presented.

  10. Experimental study of transmission of a pulsed focused beam through a skull phantom in nonlinear regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsysar, S. A.; Nikolaeva, A. V.; Svet, V. D.; Khokhlova, V. A.; Yuldashev, P. V.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2015-10-01

    In the paper the use of receiving and radiating system, which allows to determine the parameters of bone by nonlinear pulse-echo technique and to image of brain structures through the skull bones, was proposed. Accuracy of the skull bone characterization is due to higher measured harmonic and is significantly better than in linear case. In the experimental part focused piezoelectric transducer with diameter 100 mm, focal distance 100 mm, the frequency of 1.092 MHz was used. It was shown that skull bone profiling can be performed with the use of 3rd harmonic since 1st harmonic can be used for visualization of the underlying objects. The use of wideband systems for both skull profiling and brain visualization is restricted by skull attenuation and resulting low effective sensitivity.

  11. Experimental study of transmission of a pulsed focused beam through a skull phantom in nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Tsysar, S. A. Nikolaeva, A. V.; Khokhlova, V. A.; Yuldashev, P. V.; Svet, V. D.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2015-10-28

    In the paper the use of receiving and radiating system, which allows to determine the parameters of bone by nonlinear pulse-echo technique and to image of brain structures through the skull bones, was proposed. Accuracy of the skull bone characterization is due to higher measured harmonic and is significantly better than in linear case. In the experimental part focused piezoelectric transducer with diameter 100 mm, focal distance 100 mm, the frequency of 1.092 MHz was used. It was shown that skull bone profiling can be performed with the use of 3rd harmonic since 1st harmonic can be used for visualization of the underlying objects. The use of wideband systems for both skull profiling and brain visualization is restricted by skull attenuation and resulting low effective sensitivity.

  12. 50 CFR Figures 19a and 19b to Part... - Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details 19a Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Figs. 19 Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223—Chauvin Shrimp...

  13. 5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. 50 CFR Figures 19a and 19b to Part... - Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details 19a Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED...

  15. Pulsed ion beam-assisted carburizing of titanium in methane discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafiq, M.; Hassan, M.; Shahzad, K.; Qayyum, A.; S., Ahmad; Rawat S., R.; Zakaullah, M.

    2010-01-01

    The carburizing of titanium (Ti) is accomplished by utilizing energetic ion pulses of a 1.5 kJ Mather type dense plasma focus (DPF) device operated in methane discharge. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirms the deposition of polycrystalline titanium carbide (TiC). The samples carburized at lower axial and angular positions show an improved texture for a typical (200)TiC plane. The Williamson-Hall method is employed to estimate average crystallite size and microstrains in the carburized Ti surface. Crystallite size is found to vary from ~ 50 to 100 nm, depending on the deposition parameters. Microstrains vary with the sample position and hence ion flux, and are converted from tensile to compressive by increasing the flux. The carburizing of Ti is confirmed by two major doublets extending from 300 to 390 cm-1 and from 560 to 620 cm-1 corresponding to acoustic and optical active modes in Raman spectra, respectively. Analyses by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) have provided qualitative and quantitative profiles of the carburized surface. The Vickers microhardness of Ti is significantly improved after carburizing.

  16. Generation of high beam quality, high-energy and broadband tunable mid-infrared pulse from a KTA optical parametric amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Li, Yanyan; Li, Wenkai; Guo, Xiaoyang; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-04-01

    We have demonstrated efficient generation of high beam quality, high-energy and broadband tunable femtosecond mid-infrared pulses using a three-stage collinear optical parametric amplifier (OPA). The white-light continuum (WLC) seeded OPA setup, based on KTA crystal in three stages and pumped by a femtosecond laser pulse at 800 nm, is capable of producing idler wavelength ranging from 2.4 μm to 4.0 μm with energy up to 82 μJ at 3.27 μm, which corresponds to signal energy of 350 μJ at 1060 nm. The output pulse has excellent intensity distribution with measured beam quality factor M2~1.1 for signal and M2~1.7 for idler. To our knowledge, this is the best beam quality reported in 3-5 μm femtosecond OPA until now. The achieved mid-infrared pulse also has a good energy stability with a fluctuation of 1.01% rms over half an hour.

  17. Investigation of variation of energy of laser beam on structural, electrical and optical properties of pulsed laser deposited CuO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dahiya, V. Kumar, A.; Kaur, G.; Mitra, A.

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, copper oxide (CuO) thin films have been deposited successfully by pulsed laser deposition technique using copper metal as target material. Thin films have been prepared under different energy of laser pulses ranging from 100mJ/pulse to 250 mJ/pulse. These films have been characterized for their structural, electrical and optical properties by using X-Ray Diffractometer (XRD), Four probe method and UV spectroscopy. Morphological and structural studies show that there is increase in crystallite size with the increase in energy of laser beam. Thus resulting in improved crystallinity and degree of orientation of the CuO thin films. Optoelectrical properties show direct relation between conductivity and energy of laser beam. Optical analysis of CuO thin films prepared under different energy of laser beam shows good agreement with structural analysis. The prepared CuO thin films show high absorbance in the UV and visible range and thus are suitable candidate for thin films solar cell application.

  18. Search for Defocusing During a Single Pulse of a 2 kA Relativistic Electron Beam Due to Ions Accelerated from a Target

    SciTech Connect

    Lauer, E J; Caporaso, G J; Chambers, F W; Chen, Y-J; Falabella, S; Guethlein, G; McCarrick, J; Richardson, R; Sampayan, S; Weir, J

    2002-09-05

    The DARHT accelerator will deliver several intense relativistic electron beam pulses to an x-ray conversion target during a few microseconds. Plasma from the target can cause a partial neutralization of the vacuum self-Er field resulting in an unacceptably large beam radius at the target. The Livermore group has been developing barrier foils to block the plasma from moving upstream. Positive ions accelerated upstream from the foil in the self-Ez field during a single pulse could defocus the beam. In May, 2001 LANL used a sensitive ''two foil'' experiment to search for such effects. They measured significant time dependent effects using conducting foils (1). In January, 2002, the Livermore group repeated the experiment using the ETA II accelerator. We expected to see similar effects and planned to collect data that we could model. We saw no significant effect from conducting foils unless the beam radius was small enough to damage the foil. The reason for the different results has not been explained and is still being investigated. Possibilities have to do with the longer pulse length at LANL, (60 ns compared to 40) or with the higher energy at LANL, (20 Mev compared to 5.7) We also did some tests on dielectric targets where there is a strong effect to test our techniques.

  19. Fiber Bragg grating inscription combining DUV sub-picosecond laser pulses and two-beam interferometry.

    PubMed

    Becker, Martin; Bergmann, Joachim; Brückner, Sven; Franke, Marco; Lindner, Eric; Rothhardt, Manfred W; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2008-11-10

    The combination of fiber Bragg grating inscription with femtosecond laser sources and the usage of the Talbot interferometer setup not only gives access to the fabrication of Bragg gratings in new types of materials but also allows, at the same time, to keep the high flexibility of an interferometric setup in choosing the Bragg grating wavelength. Since the spatial and temporal coherence properties of the femtosecond laser source differ strongly from those of conventional laser sources, specific limits and tolerances in the interferometric setup have to be considered. Such limits are investigated on the basis of an analytical ray tracing model. The results are applied to tolerance measurements of fiber Bragg grating reflections recorded with a DUV sub-picosecond laser source at 262 nm. Additionally we demonstrate the wavelength versatility of the two-beam interferometer setup for femtosecond inscription over a 40 nm wavelength band. Inscription experiments in Al/Yb doped silica glasses are demonstrated as a prove for the access to non-photosensitive fibers.

  20. Spatial characterization of pulsed and continuous atom sources

    SciTech Connect

    Huie, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A new concept for the determination of spatially resolved vibrational temperatures in atomic spectroscopic methods is demonstrated. A collimated laser beam is coupled to a vidicon camera to allow spatial mapping of absorption in flames. Vibrational temperature for each spatial location of the flame can be calculated by measuring the relative intensities of absorption from different vibrational levels in the ground states of the molecules. Temperature information generated by this system is very helpful to the understanding of dissociation and recombination of molecules in flames. The laser microprobe is a powerful technique for in situ elemental analysis of a small spot on the surfaces of any materials. Optimizations of the laser microprobe require the understanding of the fundamental processes that occur in the formation of the laser-generated plume. The availability of dynamic information such as spatial and temporal distribution of atoms and molecules is very important for the study of vaporization mechanisms. The spatial distribution of sodium dimers in a lower-generated plume is obtained for the first time in the laboratory. A new imaging instrument based on acousto-optic deflector has been developed for diagnostic studies of pulsed atoms sources. The device which has the capability of deflecting a laser beam across a spatial region of interest in the microsecond regime so that the transient events can be recorded in real-time is described. The instrument has been applied to the acquisition of spatially resolved scattering profiles of particles and absorption profiles of atoms in a laser microprobe.

  1. Enhanced thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutated by high-energy pulse electron beam and protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Xiao, Yu; Zhu, Rongrong; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Shi-Long

    2012-11-01

    To increase thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YZ1, the strategies of high-energy pulse electron beam (HEPE) and three rounds of protoplast fusion were explored. The YF31 strain had the characteristics of resistant to high-temperature, high-ethanol tolerance, rapid growth and high yield. The YF31 could grow on plate cultures up to 47 °C, containing 237.5 g L(-1) of ethanol. In particular, the mutant strain YF31 generated 94.2 ± 4.8 g L(-1) ethanol from 200 g glucose L(-1) at 42 °C, which was 2.48 times the production of the wild strain YZ1. Results demonstrated that the variant phenotypes from the strains screening by HEPE irradiation could be used as parent stock for yeast regeneration and the protoplast fusion technology is sufficiently powerful in combining suitable characteristics in a single strain for ethanol fermentation.

  2. Hybrid deburring process assisted by a large pulsed electron beam (LPEB) for laser-fabricated patterned metal masks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jisoo; Park, Hyung Wook

    2015-12-01

    The quality of pixels on displays and semiconductors is directly related to the surface quality of the patterned metal mask used. Burrs generated on the patterned metal mask can degrade the quality of pixels on microelectronic devices during the deposition process. In this study, experimental observations of abrasive deburring along with large pulsed electron beam (LPEB) irradiation were performed to evaluate the deburring effects on patterned metal masks. Numerical modeling of LPEB irradiation approximately predicted melting depths and the experimental studies revealed limitations in the size of burrs removed by LPEB irradiation. Thus a LPEB-assisted hybrid deburring process was developed to eliminate burrs of metal masks regardless of their size. The size of burrs remaining after the LPEB-assisted hybrid deburring process was reduced to approximately 7.2 μm which was much less than the results of abrasive deburring alone (38.01 μm). The burr size distribution was reduced by 85% and surface roughness (Ra) was decreased from 640 nm to 121 nm, indicating a uniform surface texture.

  3. Combined effect of pulse electron beam treatment and thin hydroxyapatite film on mechanical features of biodegradable AZ31 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surmeneva, M. A.; Tyurin, A. I.; Teresov, A. D.; Koval, N. N.; Pirozhkova, T. S.; Shuvarin, I. A.; Surmenev, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    The morphology, elemental, phase composition, nanohardness, and Young's modulus of the hydroxyapatite (HA) coating deposited via radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering onto the AZ31 surface were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and nanoindentationtechniques. The calcium phosphate (Ca/P) molar ratio of the HA coating deposited via RF-magnetron sputtering onto AZ31 substrates according to EDX was 1.57+0.03. The SEM experiments revealed significant differences in the morphology of the HA film deposited on untreated and treated with the pulsed electron beam (PEB) AZ31 substrate. Nanoindentation studies demonstrated significant differences in the mechanical responses of the HA film deposited on the initial and PEB-modified AZ31 substrates. The nanoindentation hardness and the Young's modulus of the HA film on the magnesium alloy modified using the PEB treatment were higher than that of the HA layer on the untreated substrate. Moreover, the HA film fabricated onto the PEB-treated surface was more resistant to plastic deformation than the same film on the untreated AZ31 surface.

  4. Comparison of morphology evolution of Ge(001) homoepitaxial films grown by pulsed laser deposition and molecular-beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Byungha; Leonard, John P.; McCamy, James W.; Aziz, Michael J.

    2005-10-31

    Using a dual molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE)-pulsed laser deposition (PLD) ultrahigh vacuum chamber, we have conducted the first experiments under identical thermal, background, and surface preparation conditions to compare Ge(001) homoepitaxial growth morphology in PLD and MBE. We find that in PLD with low kinetic energy and in MBE the film morphology evolves in a similar fashion: initially irregularly shaped mounds form, followed by pyramidal mounds with edges of the square-base along the <100> directions; the film roughness and mound separation increase with film thickness. In PLD with high kinetic energy, well-defined pyramidal mounds are not observed and the morphology rather resembles that of an ion-etched Ge(001) surface. The areal feature density is higher for PLD films than for MBE films grown at the same average growth rate and temperature. Furthermore, the dependence upon film thickness of roughness and feature separation differ for PLD and MBE. We attribute these differences to the higher yield of defect generation by energetic species in PLD.

  5. Modeling the Effects of Beam Size and Flaw Morphology on Ultrasonic Pulse/Echo Sizing of Delaminations in Carbon Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margetan, Frank J.; Leckey, Cara A.; Barnard, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The size and shape of a delamination in a multi-layered structure can be estimated in various ways from an ultrasonic pulse/echo image. For example the -6dB contours of measured response provide one simple estimate of the boundary. More sophisticated approaches can be imagined where one adjusts the proposed boundary to bring measured and predicted UT images into optimal agreement. Such approaches require suitable models of the inspection process. In this paper we explore issues pertaining to model-based size estimation for delaminations in carbon fiber reinforced laminates. In particular we consider the influence on sizing when the delamination is non-planar or partially transmitting in certain regions. Two models for predicting broadband sonic time-domain responses are considered: (1) a fast "simple" model using paraxial beam expansions and Kirchhoff and phase-screen approximations; and (2) the more exact (but computationally intensive) 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT). Model-to-model and model-to experiment comparisons are made for delaminations in uniaxial composite plates, and the simple model is then used to critique the -6dB rule for delamination sizing.

  6. Pulsed electron-beam-pumped laser based on AlGaN/InGaN/GaN quantum-well heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Gamov, N A; Zhdanova, E V; Zverev, M M; Peregudov, D V; Studenov, V B; Mazalov, A V; Kureshov, V A; Sabitov, D R; Padalitsa, A A; Marmalyuk, A A

    2015-07-31

    The parameters of pulsed blue-violet (λ ≈ 430 nm at T = 300 K) lasers based on an AlGaN/InGaN/GaN structure with five InGaN quantum wells and transverse electron-beam pumping are studied. At room temperature of the active element, the minimum electron energy was 9 keV and the minimum threshold electron beam current density was 8 A cm{sup -2} at an electron energy of 18 keV. (lasers)

  7. Delivery of 10-MW Nd:YAG laser pulses by large-core optical fibers: dependence of the laser-intensity profile on beam propagation.

    PubMed

    Richou, B; Schertz, I; Gobin, I; Richou, J

    1997-03-01

    A large-core multimode optical fiber of a few meters length is studied as a 10-MW beam delivery system for a 15-ns pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A laser-to-fiber vacuum coupler is used to inhibit air breakdown and reduce the probability of dielectric breakdown on the fiber front surface. Laser-induced damage inside the fiber core is observed behind the fiber front surface. An explanation based on a high power density is illustrated by a ray trace. Damaged spots and measurements of fiber output energies are reported for two laser beam distributions: a flat-hat type and a near-Gaussian type. Experiments have been performed to deliver a 100-pulse mean energy between 100 and 230 mJ without catastrophic damage.

  8. Preliminary Results of Mono-energetic Electron Beams from a Laser-plasma Accelerator Driven by 200 TW Femto Second Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Taki, R.; Kameshima, T.; An, W. M.; Hua, J. F.; Huang, W. H.; Tang, C. X.; Gu, Y. Q.; Guo, Y.; Hong, W.; Jiao, C. Y.; Lin, Y. Z.; Liu, H. J.; Peng, H. S.; Sun, L.; Tang, C. M.; Wang, X. D.; Wen, T. S.; Wen, X. L.; Wu, Y. C.; Zhang, B. H.

    2006-11-27

    Relativistic mono-energetic electron beams have been demonstrated by worldwide laser-plasma accelerator experiments in the range of a few tens TW. Laser-plasma accelerator experiment has been carried out with 200TW, 30fs Ti:Sapphire laser pulses focused on helium gas-jets with F/8.7 optics. Intense mono-energetic electron beams have been produced in the energy range of 30 to 150 MeV by controlling plasma length and density precisely. Images of Thomson scattering and fluorescence side scattering from plasma indicate highly relativistic effects such as a long self-channeling and filamentation as well as energetic electron deflection and intense backward Raman scattering. Preliminary results of the first laser-plasma accelerator experiment in the range of 200TW femto second pulses are presented.

  9. Quantum well, beam deflecting surface emitting lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to surface emitting semiconductor lasers (SELs), with integrated 45 deg. beam deflectors. A SEL is formed on a wafer including vertical mirrors and 45 deg. beam deflectors formed in grooves by tilted ion beam etching. A SEL is a lattice matched, or unstrained, AlGaAs/GaAs GRINSCH SQW SEL. An alternate embodiment is shown, in which a SEL is lattice mismatched, strained or pseudomorphic, or InGaAs/AlGaAs GRINSCH SQW SEL which emits radiation at a wavelength to which its substrate is transparent. Both SELs exhibit high output power, low threshold current density, and relatively high efficiency, and each are processing compatible with conventional large scale integration technology. Such SELs may be fabricated in large numbers from single wafers. The novel features of this invention include the use of tilted ion beam etching to form a pair of grooves each including vertical mirrors and 45 deg. beam deflectors. The embodiment provides substantial circuit design flexibility because radiation may be coupled both up and/or down through the substrate.

  10. Multi-GeV electron beams from capillary discharge guided sub-petawatt class laser pulses in the self-trapping regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leemans, Wim

    2014-10-01

    Laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) can produce acceleration gradients on the order of tens to hundreds of GV/m, making them attractive as compact particle accelerators. During the past decade, quasi-monochromatic electron beams at the 1 GeV energy level have been produced using laser pulses at the 40-50 TW peak power level. With the availability of petawatt class lasers, beams up to 2 GeV have been produced from 7 cm long gas cells at UT Austin using 150 J laser pulses and at the 1 GeV level with tails extending to 3 GeV at the GIST facility in Korea. In this talk we present experimental results using the 1 Hz petawatt class BELLA laser at LBNL of the generation of multi-GeV electron beams with center energy up to 4.2 GeV, 6% rms energy spread, charge approximately 10 pC and an rms divergence around 0.3 mrad. The beams were produced from 9 cm long capillary discharge waveguide structure with a plasma density of ~ 7 ×1017cm-3 , powered by laser pulses with peak power up to 0.3 PW. Preformed plasma waveguides allow the use of lower laser power compared to unguided plasma structures to achieve the same beam energy. Detailed comparison between experiment and simulation indicates the importance of the near-field laser transverse mode quality on guiding and acceleration in the LPA. By tuning the plasma density, regimes were found where laser beams with a top hat near-field profile were guided well, and where high energy electron beams can be produced, with narrow divergence [ <0.8 mrad (FWHM)], and relatively small integrated energy spread (<10%). Provided that the slice energy spread and emittance are sufficiently low, electron beams with this energy could power x-ray free electron lasers. Future experiments will aim at increasing the beam energy to the 10 GeV level. Work supported by Office of Science, Office of HEP, US DOE Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  11. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  12. A mechanical-free 150-kHz repetition swept light source incorporated a KTN electro-optic deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Shogo; Naganuma, Kazunori; Imai, Tadayuki; Shibata, Yasuo; Ishibashi, Shigeo; Sasaki, Yuzo; Sasaura, Masahiro; Fujiura, Kazuo; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2011-03-01

    We present a new light source for the swept-source OCT, that is, an external-cavity LD incorporating an electro-optic deflector. We use a KTN deflector that is unique in being very fast and simultaneously providing an appreciable deflection caused by injected carriers. Particularly, high-speed and nearly linear to the applied voltage operation is attained when KTN crystal is pre-charged. Our 1.3-μm Littman-Metcalf external-cavity laser exhibits static linewidth < 0.1 nm, and a 110-nm scanning range up to 150-kHz under a +/-200 V sinusoidal driving voltage to the deflector. Being free of mechanical resonance, the laser would hopefully realize a faster (in a separate study, deflector itself worked up to 400 kHz) and wavenumber-linear scan that is ideal for the swept-source OCT by designing the waveform of driving voltage. And as for the resolving power of deflector, while our KTN deflector has only 35 spatial resolvable points, the number of wavelength points for the swept source clearly exceeds to this limit, which we attribute to line narrowing effect accompanied by the laser operation. Preliminary OCT images taken using the swept source are also presented.

  13. X-ray acoustic computed tomography with pulsed x-ray beam from a medical linear accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liangzhong; Han, Bin; Carpenter, Colin; Pratx, Guillem; Kuang, Yu; Xing, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of medical imaging using a medical linear accelerator to generate acoustic waves is investigated. This modality, x-ray acoustic computed tomography (XACT), has the potential to enable deeper tissue penetration in tissue than photoacoustic tomography via laser excitation. Methods: Short pulsed (μs-range) 10 MV x-ray beams with dose-rate of approximately 30 Gy/min were generated from a medical linear accelerator. The acoustic signals were collected with an ultrasound transducer (500 KHz central frequency) positioned around an object. The transducer, driven by a computer-controlled step motor to scan around the object, detected the resulting acoustic signals in the imaging plane at each scanning position. A pulse preamplifier, with a bandwidth of 20 KHz–2 MHz at −3 dB, and switchable gains of 40 and 60 dB, received the signals from the transducer and delivered the amplified signals to a secondary amplifier. The secondary amplifier had bandwidth of 20 KHz–30 MHz at −3 dB, and a gain range of 10–60 dB. Signals were recorded and averaged 128 times by an oscilloscope. A sampling rate of 100 MHz was used to record 2500 data points at each view angle. One set of data incorporated 200 positions as the receiver moved 360°. The x-ray generated acoustic image was then reconstructed with the filtered back projection algorithm. Results: The x-ray generated acoustic signals were detected from a lead rod embedded in a chicken breast tissue. The authors found that the acoustic signal was proportional to the x-ray dose deposition, with a correlation of 0.998. The two-dimensional XACT images of the lead rod embedded in chicken breast tissue were found to be in good agreement with the shape of the object. Conclusions: The first x-ray acoustic computed tomography image is presented. The new modality may be useful for a number of applications, such as providing the location of a fiducial, or monitoring x-ray dose distribution during radiation therapy

  14. Prefabricated Refractory Panels for Use in KSC's Flame Deflectors: A Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Maria; Trejo, David

    2010-01-01

    The launch complexes at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have been used to launch space vehicles for the Apollo and Space Shuttle programs. NASA is currently designing and developing a new space vehicle. The launch complexes have been in service for a significant duration and the aggressive conditions of the Florida coast and the launches have resulted in failures within the launch complexes. Of particular interests is the performance of the refractory lining that covers the steel base structure for the diversion of the exhaust from the launched vehicles (i.e., the flame deflectors). An unprotected steel base structure would likely experience loss of strength and possible failure when subjected to the high temperatures during launches. The refractory lining is critical for successful launches. The refractory material currently used in the flame trenches was developed in 1959 and is the only refractory material approved for use in these facilities. Significant effort and costs are expended in repairing the lining system after each launch. NASA is currently performing a comprehensive research program to assess and develop refractory materials for improved performance in the flame trenches. However, one challenge associated with the use of refractory materials in the flame trench is that the materials should be cured, dried, and fired to maximize their properties and characteristics. Because of the large size of the deflectors and trenches, drying and firing of the lining system is difficult, if not impossible. Most refractory materials are dried and fired before use. Because the refractory materials used for the deflector lining cannot be dried and fired, the full potential of the materials are not being realized. A system that could use refractory materials that could be cured, dried, and sintered in a controlled environment would likely improve the performance of the lining system. This report evaluates the feasibility of fabricating and placing prefabricated

  15. Analysis of Flame Deflector Spray Nozzles in Rocket Engine Test Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachdev, Jai S.; Ahuja, Vineet; Hosangadi, Ashvin; Allgood, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    The development of a unified tightly coupled multi-phase computational framework is described for the analysis and design of cooling spray nozzle configurations on the flame deflector in rocket engine test stands. An Eulerian formulation is used to model the disperse phase and is coupled to the gas-phase equations through momentum and heat transfer as well as phase change. The phase change formulation is modeled according to a modified form of the Hertz-Knudsen equation. Various simple test cases are presented to verify the validity of the numerical framework. The ability of the methodology to accurately predict the temperature load on the flame deflector is demonstrated though application to an actual sub-scale test facility. The CFD simulation was able to reproduce the result of the test-firing, showing that the spray nozzle configuration provided insufficient amount of cooling.

  16. Functionally-Graded NPR (Negative Poisson’s Ratio) Material for a Blast-Protective Deflector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-17

    deflector. INTRODUCTION Negative Poisson’s Ratio (NPR) material, also known as auxetic material [1-2], has attracted attention due to its unique...Advanced Materials, 1993.-Vol.5.- P.293- 296. 3. K. E. Evans and A. Alderson, “ Auxetic Materials: Functional Materials and Structures from Lateral...No. 9, pp617- 628 (2000). 4. G. E. Stavroulakis, “ Auxetic behavior: appearance and engineering applications”, Phys. Stat. Sol. (b), Vol. 202, No. 3

  17. Theoretical and experimental investigation of generating pulsed Bessel-Gauss beams by using an axicon-based resonator.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Shahrzad; Fallah, Hamid Reza; Ramezani, Mohsen; Soltanolkotabi, Mahmood

    2012-11-01

    Nondiffracting Bessel-Gauss beams are assumed as the superposition of infinite numbers of Gaussian beams whose wave vectors lie on a cone. Based on such a description, different methods are suggested to generate these fields. In this paper, we followed an active scheme to generate these beams. By introducing an axicon-based resonator, we designed the appropriate resonator, studied its resonance modes, and analyzed the beam propagation outside the resonator. Experimentally, we succeeded to obtain Bessel-Gauss beams of the first kind and zero order. We also investigated the changes in effective parameters on the output beam, both theoretically and experimentally.

  18. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Numerical Study of Coolant Mixing Caused by the Flow Deflectors in a Nuclear Fuel Bundle

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang Kee

    2001-05-15

    A numerical study was conducted to investigate the nuclear fuel assembly coolant flow mixing that is promoted by the flow deflectors on the grid spacer. Four typical flow deflectors (split vane, side-supported vane, swirl vane, and twisted vane) were chosen for this study. A single subchannel of one grid span is modeled using the flow symmetry. The predicted axial and lateral mean flow velocities, and the turbulent kinetic energy in the subchannel for the split-vane design, are in good agreement with the experimental results.The split vane and the twisted vane generate a large cross flow between the subchannels and a skewed elliptic swirling flow in the subchannel near the grid spacer. The cross flow rapidly decreases and the swirling flow becomes dominant downstream of the spacer. The side-supported vane induces a horizontally elongated elliptic swirl in the subchannel and a secondary flow in the near downstream of the spacer. The swirl vane produces a circular swirling flow in the subchannel and a negligible cross flow. For the twisted-vane and side-supported vane designs, the change in direction of the cross flow was predicted. The average turbulent kinetic energy in the subchannel sharply increases near the spacer and rapidly decreases to a fully developed level. In summary, the numerical results showed a somewhat large difference from the experimental results near the spacer but represented the overall characteristics of coolant mixing well in a nuclear fuel bundle with the flow deflectors on the grid spacer.

  20. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOEpatents

    Moses, Edward I.

    1992-01-01

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter.