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Sample records for pulsed beam deflectors

  1. Switchable circular beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobing; Joshi, Pankaj; Tan, Jin-Yi; De Smet, Jelle; Cuypers, Dieter; Baghdasaryan, Tigran; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; De Smet, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we report two types of electrically tunable photonic devices with circularly symmetric polarization independent beam steering performance (beam condensing resp. beam broadening). The devices consist of circular micro grating structures combined with nematic liquid crystal (LC) layers with anti-parallel alignment. A single beam deflector converts a polarized and monochromatic green laser beam (λ =543.5 nm) into a diffraction pattern, with the peak intensity appearing at the third order when 0~{{V}\\text{pp}} is applied and at the zeroth order (no deflection) for voltages above 30~{{V}\\text{pp}} . Depending on the shape of the grating structure (non-inverted or inverted), the deflection is inwards or outwards. Both grating types can be made starting from the same diamond-tooled master mold. A polarized white light beam is symmetrically condensed resp. broadened over 2° in the off state and is passed through unchanged in the on state. By stacking two such devices with mutually orthogonal LC alignment layers, polarization independent switchable circular beam deflectors are realized with a high transmittance (>80%), and with the same beam steering performance as the polarization dependent single devices.

  2. Light beam deflector performance: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Zook, J D

    1974-04-01

    The performance of various types of analog light beam deflectors is summarized, and their relative positions in a deflector hierarchy are defined. The three types of deflectors considered are (1) mechanical (galvanometer) mirror deflectors, (2) acoustooptic deflectors, and (3) analog electrooptic deflectors. Material figures of merit are defined and compared, and the theoretical trade-off between speed and resolution is given for each type of deflector. PMID:20126095

  3. Digital Beam Deflectors Based Partly on Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Kreminska, Liubov; Pishnyak, Oleg; Golovin, Andrii; Winker, Bruce K.

    2007-01-01

    A digital beam deflector based partly on liquid crystals has been demonstrated as a prototype of a class of optical beam-steering devices that contain no mechanical actuators or solid moving parts. Such beam-steering devices could be useful in a variety of applications, including free-space optical communications, switching in fiber-optic communications, general optical switching, and optical scanning. Liquid crystals are of special interest as active materials in nonmechanical beam steerers and deflectors because of their structural flexibility, low operating voltages, and the relatively low costs of fabrication of devices that contain them.

  4. Modeling and measurement of a micro-optic beam deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milster, Tom D.; Wong, J. Nan

    1992-01-01

    The use is studied of a unity-magnification micro-optic beam deflector. The defelector consists of two arrays of positively powered lenslets. The lenslets on each array are arranged in a square grid. Design criteria are based on usefulness in optical data storage devices. The deflector is designed to operate over a + or - 1.6 range of deflection angles. Modeling results are compared with interferometric analysis of the wavefront from a single lenslet pair. The results indicate that the device is nearly diffraction limited, but there are substantial wavefront errors at the edges and corners of the lenslets.

  5. Beam dynamics studies for transverse electromagnetic mode type rf deflectors

    DOE PAGES

    Ahmed, Shahid; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Deitrick, Kirsten; De Silva, Subashini U.; Delayen, Jean R.; Spata, Mike; Tiefenback, Michael; Hofler, Alicia; Beard, Kevin

    2012-02-14

    We have performed three-dimensional simulations of beam dynamics for transverse electromagnetic mode (TEM) type rf deflectors: normal and superconducting. The compact size of these cavities as compared to the conventional TM110 type structures is more attractive particularly at low frequency. Highly concentrated electromagnetic fields between the parallel bars provide strong electrical stability to the beam for any mechanical disturbance. An array of six 2-cell normal conducting cavities or a single cell superconducting structure is enough to produce the required vertical displacement at the target point. Both the normal and superconducting structures show very small emittance dilution due to the verticalmore » kick of the beam.« less

  6. Formation of ultrashort electron pulses in an electrostatic laser reflectron-deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Aseev, S A; Mironov, B N; Chekalin, S V; Minogin, V G

    2014-03-28

    The temporal compression of photoelectron pulses obtained by irradiation of the target by femtosecond electron pulses is analysed by using an electrostatic reflectron with a deflecting pulse laser field. It is shown that the use of a reflectron-deflector allows one both to generate and deflect ultrashort, ∼30-fs electron pulses with a countable number of electrons by focusing them into a given region with a focal size about tens of microns. It is found that the laser ponderomotive potential can play a role of a dispersive element in the electrostatic reflectron to spatially separate the electron pulses with different energies. (ultrashort electron pulses)

  7. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chen, S.L.

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linearization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications. 6 figures.

  8. Linearization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chen, Shun-Le

    1991-01-15

    A means and method for producing linerization of scan velocity of resonant vibrating-mirror beam deflectors in laser scanning system including presenting an elliptical convex surface to the scanning beam to reflect the scanning beam to the focal plane of the scanning line. The elliptical surface is shaped to produce linear velocity of the reflective scanning beam at the focal plane. Maximization of linerization is accomplished by considering sets of criteria for different scanning applications.

  9. Digital Beam Steering Device Based on Decoupled Birefringent Prism Deflector and Polarization Rotator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pishnyak, Oleg; Kreminska, Lyubov; Laventovich, Oleg D.; Pouch, John J.; Miranda, Felix A.; Winker, Bruce K.

    2004-01-01

    We describe digital beam deflectors (DBDs) based on liquid crystals. Each stage of the device comprises a polarization rotator and a birefringent prism deflector. The birefringent prism deflects the beam by an angle that depends on polarization of the incident beam. The prism can be made of the uniaxial smectic A (SmA) liquid crystal (LC) or a solid crystal such as yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4). SmA prisms have high birefringence and can be constructed in a variety of shapes, including single prisms and prismatic blazed gratings of different angles and profiles. We address the challenges of uniform alignment of SmA, such as elimination of focal conic domains. Rotation of linear polarization is achieved by an electrically switched twisted nematic (TN) cell. A DBD composed of N rotator-deflector pairs steers the beam into 2(sup N) directions. As an example, we describe a four-stage DBD deflecting normally incident laser beam within the range of +/- 56 mrad with 8 mrad steps. Redirection of the beam is achieved by switching the TN cells.

  10. Low polarization dependent beam deflector based on Bragg reflector waveguide for C-band wavelength demultiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaodong; Matsutani, Akihiro; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-10-01

    We report a miniature beam deflector with a large angular dispersion based on a Bragg reflector waveguide operating in a full-C band. The device is extremely small with an effective footprint of 20 × 100 μm2. Continuous beam deflection of over 40° was obtained with large angular dispersion of ˜1°/nm. Polarization dependence was largely alleviated by optimizing the optical core thickness. Further decrease in the polarization dependence below 0.1° can be expected after considering the material birefringence inside the waveguide. A possible channel number can exceed 300, which could be the highest in C-band demultiplexing technologies ever reported.

  11. Linear time-to-space mapping system using double electrooptic beam deflectors.

    PubMed

    Hisatake, Shintaro; Tada, Keiji; Nagatsuma, Tadao

    2008-12-22

    We propose and demonstrate a linear time-to-space mapping system, which is based on two times electrooptic sinusoidal beam deflection. The direction of each deflection is set to be mutually orthogonal with the relative deflection phase of pi/2 rad so that the circular optical beam trajectory can be achieved. The beam spot at the observation plane moves with an uniform velocity and as a result linear time-to-space mapping (an uniform temporal resolution through the mapping) can be realized. The proof-of-concept experiment are carried out and the temporal resolution of 5 ps has been demonstrated using traveling-wave type quasi-velosity-matched electrooptic beam deflectors. The developed system is expected to be applied to characterization of ultrafast optical signal or optical arbitrary waveform shaping for modulated microwave/millimeter-wave generation.

  12. Study on controllable LC-micro blazed grating beam deflector in free space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Junbo; Xu, Suzhi; Zhang, Jingjing; Chang, Shengli

    2015-02-01

    A liquid crystal (LC) beam deflector with a microblazed grating produced by stepping photolithography and reactive ion etching (RIE) was reported. A homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (NLC) materials are filled inside the microcavity of blazed grating, and sandwiched between two glass plates. An indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent electrode is deposited on it to provide the beam steering capability. Our LC-micro blazed grating device gives a high diffractive efficiency (about 95%) and a controllable large steering angle over 7.2° (for ne) and 1.7° (for no), respectively. It was found that this type of non-mechanical beam steering without any moving parts is ideally suited for applications in optical communication and optical interconnection network.

  13. Beam deflector and position sensor using electrowetting and mechanical wetting of sandwiched droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Amir; Song, Jang-Kun

    2016-09-01

    Electrowetting (EW) offers a facile manipulation of a liquid droplet on a surface, and several different systems have been suggested to utilize EW on various applications. In this letter, the manipulation of an electrolyte droplet with a floating movable substrate was investigated on a solid substrate. Two types of approaches were made; firstly, we controlled the vertical position of a floating substrate using EW property of droplets. The tilting angle of a floating substrate can be precisely controlled along two orthogonal directions independently, which can be used to devise a beam deflector. In the other case, mechanical wetting of droplets via external pressure was used to detect the position of a floating substrate; this position sensor has at least four orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than the conventional position sensor based on capacitance.

  14. RF deflector system for beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, J.; Gustafsson, J.; Kivikoski, M.; Liukkonen, E.; Nieminen, V.

    1999-06-01

    In some in-beam experiments, an adjustment of the time structure of the cyclotron ion beam guided to the desired research target by a beamline is sometimes needed. This situation occurs if, for example, the decay times of the reaction products are too short compared to the period corresponding to the beam frequency. In the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä the frequency of the ion pulses hitting the research target is 10-21 MHz depending on the frequency of the acceleration voltage. A RF deflector system was constructed to adjust the ion beam pulse frequency according to the respective requirements. A desired portion of the ion pulses are deflected by feeding a high-amplitude RF-signal between deflecting plates located into the beam line. The specified deflecting voltage amplitude of 10-15 kV is achieved with 1 kW of RF power.

  15. Development of novel high-speed en face optical coherence tomography system using KTN optical beam deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Masato; Fukuda, Akihiro; Miyazu, Jun; Ueno, Masahiro; Toyoda, Seiji; Kobayashi, Junya

    2015-02-01

    We developed a novel high-speed en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) system using a KTa1-xNbxO3 (KTN) optical beam deflector. Using the imaging system, fast scanning was performed at 200 kHz by the KTN beam deflector, while slow scanning was performed at 400 Hz by the galvanometer mirror. In a preliminary experiment, we obtained en face OCT images of a human fingerprint at 400 fps. This is the highest speed reported in time-domain en face OCT imaging and is comparable to the speed of swept-source OCT. A 3D-OCT image of a sweat gland was also obtained by our imaging system.

  16. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Florida State University is investigating the concept of pulsed electron beams for fly ash precipitation. This report describes the results and data on three of the subtasks of this project and preliminary work only on the remaining five subtasks. Described are the modification of precharger for pulsed and DC energization of anode; installation of the Q/A measurement system; and modification and installation of pulsed power supply to provide both pulsed and DC energization of the anode. The other tasks include: measurement of the removal efficiency for monodisperse simulated fly ash particles; measurement of particle charge; optimization of pulse energization schedule for maximum removal efficiency; practical assessment of results; and measurement of the removal efficiency for polydisperse test particles. 15 figs., 1 tab. (CK)

  17. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  18. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  19. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, Thomas P.; Moses, Edward I.; Patterson, Ralph W.; Sawicki, Richard H.

    1994-01-01

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse (20) using one or more delay loops (10). The delay loops (10) have a partially reflective beam splitter (12) and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors (14) arranged such that the laser beam pulse (20) enters into the delay loop (10) through the beam splitter (12) and circulates therein along a delay loop length (24) defined by the mirrors (14). As the laser beam pulse (20) circulates within the delay loop (10) a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse (20) strikes the beam splitter (12). The laser beam pulse (20) is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56). The delay loops (10) are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses (50, 52, 54 and 56) using additive waveform synthesis.

  20. Vector-based synthesis of finite aperiodic diffractive micro-optical elements with subwavelength structures as beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Di; Yan, Yingbai; Tan, Qiaofeng

    2003-09-01

    An iterative optimization-based synthesis algorithm has been presented for the design of diffractive micro-optical elements (DMOE's) with subwavelength structures as beam controllers. The DMOE's with subwavelength structures only require single step fabrication, but the subwavelength and aperiodic nature of the DMOE's prevent the use of scalar diffraction theory and the use of coupled-wave theory. We apply the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method as the vector model and the iterative plane wave spectrum algorithm (IPWS) as the synthesis algorithm, which can make the design of DMOE's in reasonable time frames. The IPWS, the FDTD method, the plane wave spectrum propagation method have been discussed and a beam deflector with subwavelength structures has been designed.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  2. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  3. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Quarter Eight of the Pulsed Electron Precharging project was principally devoted to the operation of the E-beam precharger in the pulsed anode mode. We shall first briefly review the motivation for carrying out this project and the experimental approach used. The combustion of low sulfur coal for the purpose of generating electric energy in power plants results in the production of a flue gas containing very high resistivity fly ash. This fly ash is not easily collected by conventional electrostatic precipitators due to the large electric potential difference which develops across the layer of fly ash on the collector plate. If this layer of collected material is allowed to reach a thickness as great as is normally desirable before rapping'' the plates, then the collected fly ash is subject to re-entrainment into the flue gas stream due to back-corona. The back-corona corona problem is described more fully in the next section of this report. This re-entrainment problem can be eliminated through reduction of the voltage applied across the high voltage wires and the grounded plates of the electrostatic precipitator. This is not a good solution to the problem since the charging capability and collection efficiency of the precipitator system are both greatly reduced at the low voltages required to avoid the back-corona problem. Another approach to solving the problems inherent in collecting high resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator is to decouple the charging and collecting functions. At FSU an electron beam precharger is employed directly before (upstream in the flue gas pathway) the precipitator. This precharger can be optimized for the charging function while the downstream collector can be optimized for collection of the high-resistivity fly ash.

  4. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Quarter Nine of the Pulsed Electron Precharging project was principally devoted to reviewing and interpreting the experimental results obtained during the past eight quarters of the project. We shall first briefly review the motivation for carrying out this project and the experimental approach used. The combustion of low sulfur coal for the purpose of generating electric energy in power plants results in the production of a flue gas containing very high resistivity fly ash. This fly ash is not easily collected by conventional electrostatic precipitators due to the large electric potential difference which develops across the layer of fly ash on the collector plate. If this layer of collected material is allowed to reach a thickness as great as is nominally desirable before rapping'' the plates, then the collected fly ash is subject to re-entrainment into the flue gas stream due to back-corona. The back-corona corona problem is described more fully in the next section of this report. This re-entrainment problem can be eliminated through reduction of the voltage applied across the high voltage wires and the grounded plates of the electrostatic precipitator. This is not a good solution to the problem since the charging capability and collection efficiency of the precipitator system are both greatly reduced at the low voltages and resultant small corona currents required to avoid the back-corona problem. Another approach to solving the problems inherent in collecting high resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator is to decouple the charging and collecting functions. At FSU an electron beam precharger is employed directly before (upstream in the flue gas pathway) the precipitator.

  5. Subcycle Pulsed Focused Vector Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Qiang; Zheng Jian; Becker, Wilhelm

    2006-12-22

    An accurate description of a subcycle pulsed beam (SCPB) is presented based on the complex-source model. The fields are exact solutions of Maxwell's equations and applicable to a focused pulsed beam with a pulse duration down to and below one cycle of the carrier wave and with arbitrary polarization state. Depending on the pulse duration, the pulse is blueshifted, and its wings are chirped. This effect, which we refer to as 'self-induced blueshift' goes beyond the carrier-envelope description. The corresponding phase is a temporal analog of the Gouy phase. The energy gain of a relativistic electron swept over by an SCPB is very sensitive to the proper form chosen to describe the pulse.

  6. (Pulsed electron beam precharger)

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  7. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  8. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarters Five and Six). The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will generally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge.

  9. Pulsed electron beam precharger

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-01-01

    During the previous reporting period (Quarter Six), the charging and removal of a fine, high resistivity aerosol using the advanced technology of electron beam precipitation was successfully accomplished. Precharging a dust stream circulating through the EBP wind tunnel produced collection efficiency figures of up to 40 times greater than with corona charging and collection alone (Table 1). The increased system collection efficiency attributed to electron beam precharging was determined to be the result of increased particle charge. It was found that as precharger electric field was raised, collection efficiency became greater. In sequence, saturation particle charge varies with the precharger electric field strength, particle migration velocity varies with the precharger and collector electric field, and collection efficiency varies with the migration velocity. Maximizing the system collection efficiency requires both a high charging electric field (provided by the E-beam precharger), and a high collecting electric field (provided by the collector wires and plates). Because increased particle collection efficiency is directly attributable to higher particle charge, the focus of research during Quarter Seven was shifted to learning more about the actual charge magnitude on the aerosol particles. Charge determinations in precipitators have traditionally been made on bulk dust samples collected from the flue gas stream, which gives an overall charge vs. mass (Q/M) ratio measurement. More recently, techniques have been developed which allow the measurement of the charge on individual particles in a rapid and repeatable fashion. One such advanced technique has been developed at FSU for use in characterizing the electron beam precharger.

  10. High-power AlGaAs/GaAs single quantum well surface-emitting lasers with integrated 45° beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lang, Robert J.; Larsson, Anders; Lee, Luke P.; Narayanan, Authi A.

    1990-11-01

    We report on high-power AlGaAs/GaAs graded-index single quantum well surface-emitting lasers (SELs), with etched vertical mirrors and integrated 45° beam deflectors fabricated by a tilted ion beam etching technique. 100-μm-wide, 500-μm-long, broad-area SELs exhibited a threshold current of 300 mA, a peak power of more than 380 mW, and an external differential quantum efficiency of 17% without facet coating. The SELs showed stable operation up to 7th. These results show the highest power and external differential quantum efficiency reported to date for 45° beam deflecting SELs. The full widths at half maximum of the surface-emitting far-field pattern parallel and perpendicular to the laser axis were 8.5° and 14°, respectively.

  11. Pulsed high-power beams

    SciTech Connect

    Reginato, L.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1988-06-01

    The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

  12. Pulsed supersonic beams with nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Sarfraz, Adnan; Rademann, Klaus; Christen, Wolfgang

    2012-10-01

    The dissolution of the primary nucleobases in supercritical fluids has been investigated using pulsed molecular beam mass spectrometry. Due to the low critical temperatures of ethylene and carbon dioxide, their adiabatic jet expansion permits transferring thermally sensitive solutes into the gas phase. This feature is particularly attractive for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. In this study, adenine, guanine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil have been dissolved in supercritical ethylene with a few percent of ethanol as cosolvent. At source temperatures of 313 K, these solutions have been expanded from supercritical pressures into high vacuum using a customized pulsed nozzle. A mass spectrometer was used to monitor the relative amounts of solute, solvent, and cosolvent in the supersonic beam. The results suggest a paramount influence of the cosolvent.

  13. Deflector for XFEL TDS BC1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volobuev, E. V.; Zavadtsev, A. A.; Zavadtsev, D. A.; Kravchuk, L. V.; Paramonov, V. V.; Sobenin, N. P.; Churanov, D. V.

    2016-09-01

    Deflector is the part of the Transverse Deflecting System TDS BC1 of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). TDS BC1 is located on the XFEL beam line at the coordinate z=206 m. This system is designed to monitor the longitudinal phase space and the emittance of the accelerated electron bunch after Bunch Compressor 1 (BC1), where electron beam energy is 600 MeV. The deflector includes waveguide window, waveguide load, E-bend, ion pump adapters, two antennas, two ion pumps and 1.7 m long disk-loaded EH-hybrid mode deflecting structure. Operating frequency is 2997.2 MHz. Input RF power is up to 24 MW. The deflector has been manufactured, and all designed RF parameters have been obtained experimentally at low RF power level.

  14. Intense Pulsed Heavy Ion Beam Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masugata, Katsumi; Ito, Hiroaki

    Development of intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator technology is described for the application of materials processing. Gas puff plasma gun and vacuum arc discharge plasma gun were developed as an active ion source for magnetically insulated pulsed ion diode. Source plasma of nitrogen and aluminum were successfully produced with the gas puff plasma gun and the vacuum arc plasma gun, respectively. The ion diode was successfully operated with gas puff plasma gun at diode voltage 190 kV, diode current 2.2 kA and nitrogen ion beam of ion current density 27 A/cm2 was obtained. The ion composition was evaluated by a Thomson parabola spectrometer and the purity of the nitrogen ion beam was estimated to be 86%. The diode also operated with aluminum ion source of vacuum arc plasma gun. The ion diode was operated at 200 kV, 12 kA, and aluminum ion beam of current density 230 A/cm2 was obtained. The beam consists of aluminum ions (Al(1-3)+) of energy 60-400 keV, and protons (90-130 keV), and the purity was estimated to be 89 %. The development of the bipolar pulse accelerator (BPA) was reported. A double coaxial type bipolar pulse generator was developed as the power supply of the BPA. The generator was tested with dummy load of 7.5 ohm, bipolar pulses of -138 kV, 72 ns (1st pulse) and +130 kV, 70 ns (2nd pulse) were succesively generated. By applying the bipolar pulse to the drift tube of the BPA, nitrogen ion beam of 2 A/cm2 was observed in the cathode, which suggests the bipolar pulse acceleration.

  15. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  16. Beam chopper For the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) in the APS

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Y.; Wang, J.; Milton, S.; Teng, L.

    1997-08-01

    The low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) is being built and will be tested with a short beam pulse from an rf gun in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory. In the LEUTL a beam chopper is used after the rf gun to deflect the unwanted beam to a beam dump. The beam chopper consists of a permanent magnet and an electric deflector that can compensate for the magnetic deflection. A 30-kV pulsed power supply is used for the electric deflector. The chopper subsystem was assembled and tested for beamline installation. The electrical and beam properties of the chopper assembly are presented.

  17. Pulsed electron beam emission in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubert, T.; Hawkins, J. G.; Reeves, G. D; Banks, P. M.; Bush, R. I

    1988-01-01

    During the Spacelab-2 mission of July 1985, electron beams (1 keV, 50-150 mA) pulsed at ELF and VLF frequencies were emitted from the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The wave fields generated by the beam were monitored by a Plasma Diagnostics Package which was released as a free-flying subsatellite during a six hour period. Measurements of the Orbiter potential and the return current during beam emissions were obtained from a Charge and Current Probe mounted in the payload bay.

  18. Multiple-beam pulse shaping and preamplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; VanWonterghem, B.W.; Burkhart, S.C.; Davin, J.M.

    1994-11-09

    Glass fusion laser systems typically use a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) architecture, where control of the optical pulse temporal and spatial parameters is accomplished mainly in the master oscillator and low power optics. The pulses from this low power ``front end`` are amplified in the power amplifier, which modifies the pulse shape temporally and spatially. Nonlinear frequency conversion crystals following the amplifier further change the pulse before it reaches the target. To effectively control the optical pulse on target for different types of experiments, and compensate for nonlinearity in the preceding optics, the front end system must be versatile enough to easily control many pulse parameters over a large range. The front end pulse generation system described in this article represents a new approach to this problem. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) has 192 beamlines, each of which requires an input pulse of up to 12 Joules in around 4 ns equivalent square pulse length. Considerations of laser architecture for supplying each of these beamlines from a central oscillator system were crucial in the design of the front end. Previous lasers have used bulk optics to split a single oscillator signal and report beams to multiple amplifier chains. A key idea in the current design is to replace bulk optic transport with fibers, eliminating large opto-mechanical subsystems. Another important concept is convenient pulse forming using low voltage integrated optic modulators. The integrated optic and fiber optic concepts resulted in the current pulse generation designs for NEF. An important advantage is that each of the beamlines can have an independently controlled temporal pulse shape, which provides for precise balance of instantaneous power on target.

  19. Propagation of partially coherent pulsed beams in the spatiotemporal domain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-gang; Lin, Qiang; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Shi-yao

    2003-05-01

    A generalized model to describe the spatiotemporal partially coherent pulsed beams is presented. The corresponding propagation formula is derived by using the partially coherent light theory. Based on this formula, we obtain a nonstationary generalized ABCD law (which illustrates the transformation of optical beams or pulses passing through media) to describe the spatiotemporal behavior of partially coherent Gaussian pulsed beams. The physical meaning of such generalized pulsed beams is discussed. An example to illustrate the application of this law is given. PMID:12786302

  20. Stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams.

    PubMed

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-10-21

    We describe a generally applicable method for the experimental determination of stationary flow conditions in pulsed supersonic beams, utilizing time-resolved electron induced fluorescence measurements of high pressure jet expansions of helium. The detection of ultraviolet photons from electronically excited helium emitted very close to the nozzle exit images the valve opening behavior-with the decided advantage that a photon signal is not affected by beam-skimmer and beam-residual gas interactions; it thus allows to conclusively determine those operation parameters of a pulsed valve that yield complete opening. The studies reveal that a "flat-top" signal, indicating constant density and commonly considered as experimental criterion for continuous flow, is insufficient. Moreover, translational temperature and mean terminal flow velocity turn out to be significantly more sensitive in testing for the equivalent behavior of a continuous nozzle source. Based on the widely distributed Even-Lavie valve we demonstrate that, in principle, it is possible to achieve quasi-continuous flow conditions even with fast-acting valves; however, the two prerequisites are a minimum pulse duration that is much longer than standard practice and previous estimates, and a suitable tagging of the appropriate beam segment.

  1. Pseudomorphic In(y)Ga(1-y)As/GaAs/Al(x)Ga(1-x)As single quantum well surface-emitting lasers with integrated 45 deg beam deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Larsson, Anders; Lee, Luke P.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports on the first demonstration of pseudomorphic InGaAs single quantum well surface-emitting lasers (SELs), with etched vertical mirrors and integrated 45-deg beam deflectors fabricated by ion beam etching. 100-micron-wide broad-area SELs exhibited a threshold current of 320 mA, a total power of 126 mW, and a total external differential quantum efficiency of 0.09 W/A for a 500-micron-long cavity. The perpendicular far-field pattern of broad-area SELs showed a full width at half maximum of about 20 deg. Lasers with various types of cavities fabricated from the same wafer were compared. Broad-area edge-emitting lasers had a threshold current of 200 mA, a total power of 700 mW, and a total external differential quantum efficiency of 0.52 W/A.

  2. The pulsed beam facility at the 3 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in Florence: Overview and examples of applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taccetti, N.; Giuntini, L.; Casini, G.; Stefanini, A. A.; Chiari, M.; Fedi, M. E.; Mandò, P. A.

    2002-04-01

    An electrostatic chopper has been installed at the KN 3000 accelerator in Florence to obtain short beam pulses with a number of particles per pulse whose average value can be chosen by varying the current intensity at the deflector plates input. Beam pulses can be obtained containing an average number of particles per pulse from less than one to thousands. The transmitted beam pulses can be as short as 200 ps FWHM, at a repetition rate up to about 100 kHz. Among the many applications of the facility, the direct measurement of energy loss and straggling of protons in Kapton and aluminium is reported. In this measurement, the facility has been tuned for transmission of mainly single-proton pulses; the beam energy is directly measured downstream with a good energy-resolution detector, without and with absorbers in front. In general, measurements of this kind can be directed both to study the basic processes of charged particles interactions in materials, or more practically to obtain the effective values of energy parameters useful in many IBA applications, avoiding the need to rely on simulations or theoretical estimates. Also briefly described is an application to Si-detector testing. In this case, the facility has been tuned for transmission of pulses containing many hundreds of protons of energy Ep=2.5 MeV and the detector is directly exposed to the pulses. Spectra containing equally spaced peaks at energies multiple of Ep are obtained and the response linearity of the detector plus electronics system can thus be checked.

  3. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, Michael D.; Sadana, Devendra K.; True, Richard B.

    1983-01-01

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  4. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Altman, David A.; Singleton, Norman R.

    2011-02-15

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  5. Electro-optic and acousto-optic laser beam scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heberle, Johannes; Bechtold, Peter; Strauß, Johannes; Schmidt, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Electro-optical deflectors (EOD) and acousto-optical deflectors (AOD) are based on deflection of laser light within a solid state medium. As they do not contain any moving parts, they yield advantages compared to mechanical scanners which are conventionally used for laser beam deflection. Even for arbitrary scan paths high feed rates can be achieved. In this work the principles of operation and characteristic properties of EOD and AOD are presented. Additionally, a comparison to mirror based mechanical deflectors regarding deflection angles, speed and accuracy is made in terms of resolvable spots and the rate of resolvable spots. Especially, the latter one is up to one order of magnitude higher for EOD and AOD systems compared to conventional systems. Further characteristic properties such as response time, damage threshold, efficiency and beam distortions are discussed. Solid state laser beam deflectors are usually characterized by small deflection angles but high angular deflection velocities. As mechanical deflectors exhibit opposite properties an arrangement of a mechanical scanner combined with a solid state deflector provides a solution with the benefits of both systems. As ultrashort pulsed lasers with average power above 100 W and repetition rates in the MHz range have been available for several years this approach can be applied to fully exploit their capabilities. Thereby, pulse overlap can be reduced and by this means heat affected zones are prevented to provide proper processing results.

  6. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 1: Invited papers, pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Ion beam papers; electron beam, bremsstrahlung, and diagnostics papers; radiating Z- pinch papers; microwave papers; electron laser papers; advanced accelerator papers; beam and pulsed power applications papers; pulsed power papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  7. Pulsed power accelerators for particle beam fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.H.; Barr, G.W.; VanDevender, J.P.; White, R.A.; Johnson, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is completing the construction phase of the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator-I (PBFA-I). Testing of the 36 module, 30 TW, 1 MJ output accelerator is in the initial stages. The 4 MJ, PBFA Marx generator has provided 3.6 MA into water-copper sulfate load resistors with a spread from first to last Marx firing between 15 to 25 ns and an output power of 5.7 TW. This accelerator is a modular, lower voltage, pulsed power device that is capable of scaling to power levels exceeding 100 TW. The elements of the PBFA technology and their integration into an accelerator system for particle beam fusion will be discussed.

  8. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  9. High voltage conditioning of the electrostatic deflector of MARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partanen, J.; Johansen, U.; Sarén, J.; Tuunanen, J.; Uusitalo, J.

    2016-06-01

    MARA is a new recoil mass separator in the Accelerator Laboratory of University of Jyväskylä (JYFL-ACCLAB) with a mass resolving power of 250 and an ion-optical configuration of QQQDEDM . In this paper the construction, control and conditioning of its electrostatic deflector are described. The deflector was designed for voltages up to 500 kV accross the gap, corresponding to a 3.6 MV/m field, to accomodate fusion reactions with inverse kinematics. Titanium electrodes with a beam dump opening in the anode are used. The conditioning procedure, which has been used repeatedly to take the deflector to 450 kV, is described, along with the safety systems and precautions that are in place.

  10. Fabrication of miniaturized electrostatic deflectors using LIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.H.; Khan-Malek, C.; Muray, L.P.

    1997-04-01

    Miniaturized electron beam columns ({open_quotes}microcolumns{close_quotes}) have been demonstrated to be suitable candidates for scanning electron microscopy (SEM), e-beam lithography and other high resolution, low voltage applications. In the present technology, microcolumns consist of {open_quotes}selectively scaled{close_quotes} micro-sized lenses and apertures, fabricated from silicon membranes with e-beam lithography, reactive ion beam etching and other semiconductor thin-film techniques. These miniaturized electron-optical elements provide significant advantages over conventional optics in performance and ease of fabrication. Since lens aberrations scale roughly with size, it is possible to fabricate simple microcolumns with extremely high brightness sources and electrostatic objective lenses, with resolution and beam current comparable to conventional e-beam columns. Moreover since microcolumns typically operate at low voltages (1 KeV), the proximity effects encountered in e-beam lithography become negligible. For high throughput applications, batch fabrication methods may be used to build large parallel arrays of microcolumns. To date, the best reported performance with a 1 keV cold field emission cathode, is 30 nm resolution at a working distance of 2mm in a 3.5mm column. Fabrication of the microcolumn deflector and stigmator, however, have remained beyond the capabilities of conventional machining operations and semiconductor processing technology. This work examines the LIGA process as a superior alternative to fabrication of the deflectors, especially in terms of degree of miniaturization, dimensional control, placement accuracy, run-out, facet smoothness and choice of suitable materials. LIGA is a combination of deep X-ray lithography, electroplating, and injection molding processes which allow the fabrication of microstructures.

  11. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Kurashima, Satoshi Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-15

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  12. Full characterization of an intense pulsed hyperthermal molecular beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, D.; Che, D.-C.; Fukuyama, T.; Hashinokuchi, M.; Teraoka, Y.; Kasai, T.

    2005-05-01

    A molecular beam technique for generating an intense pulsed hyperthermal molecular beam (pulsed HTMB) was developed. The beam source consists of a pulse valve, a cooling-water bottle that protects the pulse valve from heat transfer of the high temperature nozzle, and a nozzle with a heater. The point was a pulse-valve operation with the high temperature nozzle which was 30-mm long and was made of pyrolytic boron nitride. The pulsed HTMB of HCl was practically generated. The total beam intensity of the pulsed HTMB was measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. It was determined that the beam intensity of the pulsed HTMB was two orders of magnitude larger than that obtained in continuous-HTMB conditions. The pulsed HTMB of HCl was fully characterized by means of (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and ion time-of-flight techniques. We found that the velocity distribution of the pulsed HTMB was well expressed as supersonic molecular beams. At the highest nozzle temperature of 1400 K, the mean translational energy value of HCl molecules was 1.38 eV. The translational energy distribution of the pulsed HTMB covered a range from 0.8 to 1.6 eV. The fraction of higher translational energy molecules greater than 1.0 eV was 80% in the 1400 K nozzle. The rotational state distributions of HCl molecules in the pulsed HTMB were expressed as the Boltzmann distribution. While the rotational temperature decreased by an adiabatic expansion of the beam, the vibrational temperature, which was determined by the ratio of the ground-state population to the excited state one, almost equaled the nozzle temperature.

  13. Ultra-Short Electron Bunch and X-Ray Temporal Diagnostics with an X-Band Transverse Deflector

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Emma, P.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Loos, H.; Krejcik, P.; Wang, M-H.; Behrens, C.; /DESY

    2011-12-13

    The measurement of ultra-short electron bunches on the femtosecond time scale constitutes a very challenging problem. In X-ray free-electron laser facilities such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), generation of sub-ten femtosecond X-ray pulses is possible, and some efforts have been put into both ultra-short electron and X-ray beam diagnostics. Here we propose a single-shot method using a transverse rf deflector (X-band) after the undulator to reconstruct both the electron bunch and X-ray temporal profiles. Simulation studies show that about 1 fs (rms) time resolution may be achievable in the LCLS and is applicable to a wide range of FEL wavelengths and pulse lengths. The jitter, resolution and other related issues will be discussed. The successful operation of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), with its capability of generating free-electron laser (FEL) X-ray pulses from a few femtoseconds (fs) up to a few hundred fs, opens up vast opportunities for studying atoms and molecules on this unprecedented ultrashort time scale. However, tremendous challenges remain in the measurement and control of these ultrashort pulses with femtosecond precision, for both the electron beam (e-beam) and the X-ray pulses. For ultrashort e-beam bunch length measurements, a standard method has been established at LCLS using an S-band radio-frequency (rf) deflector, which works like a streak camera for electrons and is capable of resolving bunch lengths as short as {approx} 10 fs rms. However, the e-beam with low charges of 20 pC at LCLS, which is expected to be less than 10 fs in duration, is too short to be measured using this transverse deflector. The measurement of the electron bunch length is helpful in estimating the FEL X-ray pulse duration. However, for a realistic beam, such as that with a Gaussian shape or even a spiky profile, the FEL amplification varies along the bunch due to peak current or emittance variation. This will cause differences between the temporal

  14. Strong scintillations of pulsed Laguerrian beams in a turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Banakh, Viktor A; Gerasimova, Liliya O

    2016-08-22

    Turbulent fluctuations of the energy density of broadband pulsed Laguerre-Gaussian beams are studied based on numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation for the complex spectral amplitude of the wave field by the split-step method. It is shown that in the regime of strong scintillations, the relative variance of energy density of the pulsed beams can take values smaller than unity, in contrast to the strong scintillation index of the continuous-wave beams, which tends to unity with increasing the turbulence strength. The level of residual spatial correlation of the energy density of pulsed beams exceeds that for the continuous-wave beams. It increases with shortening of the pulse duration and increasing of the refractive turbulence strength. PMID:27557206

  15. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mc Cuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rose, Chris R; Sanchez, Manolito; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Trainham, C; Williams, John; Scarpetti, Raymond; Genoni, Thomas; Hughes, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  16. Forces due to pulsed beams in optical tweezers: linear effects.

    PubMed

    du Preez-Wilkinson, Nathaniel; Stilgoe, Alexander B; Alzaidi, Thuraya; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Nieminen, Timo A

    2015-03-23

    We present a method for the precise calculation of optical forces due to a tightly-focused pulsed laser beam using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory or the T-matrix method. This method can be used to obtain the fields as a function of position and time, allowing the approximate calculation of weak non-linear effects, and provides a reference calculation for validation of calculations including non-linear effects. We calculate forces for femtosecond pulses of various widths, and compare with forces due to a continuous wave (CW) beam. The forces are similar enough so that the continuous beam case provides a useful approximation for the pulsed case, with trap parameters such as the radial spring constant usually differing by less than 1% for pulses of 100 fs or longer. For large high-index (e.g., polystyrene, with n = 1.59) particles, the difference can be as large as 3% for 100 fs pulses, and up to 8% for 25 fs pulses. A weighted average of CW forces for individual spectral components of the pulsed beam provides a simple improved approximation, which we use to illustrate the physical principles responsible for the differences between pulsed and CW beams.

  17. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1988-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .gtoreq.0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  18. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1987-01-01

    An electron beam accelerator comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of .gtoreq.0.1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electrons by about 0.1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially 0.1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of .ltoreq.1 .mu.sec.

  19. Electron beam accelerator with magnetic pulse compression and accelerator switching

    DOEpatents

    Birx, D.L.; Reginato, L.L.

    1984-03-22

    An electron beam accelerator is described comprising an electron beam generator-injector to produce a focused beam of greater than or equal to .1 MeV energy electrons; a plurality of substantially identical, aligned accelerator modules to sequentially receive and increase the kinetic energies of the beam electron by about .1-1 MeV per module. Each accelerator module includes a pulse-forming network that delivers a voltage pulse to the module of substantially .1-1 MeV maximum energy over a time duration of less than or equal to 1 ..mu..sec.

  20. Electron beam switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, Lyn D.; Murray, John R.; Goldhar, Julius; Bradley, Laird P.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  1. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  2. Acoustical problems in high energy pulsed E-beams lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, T. E.; Wylie, K. F.

    1976-01-01

    During the pulsing of high energy, CO2, electron beam lasers, a significant fraction of input energy ultimately appears as acoustical disturbances. The magnitudes of these disturbances were quantified by computer analysis. Acoustical and shock impedance data are presented on materials (Rayleigh type) which show promise in controlling acoustical disturbance in E-beam systems.

  3. Rarefied flow diagnostics using pulsed high-current electron beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojcik, Radoslaw M.; Schilling, John H.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of high-current short-pulse electron beams in low-density gas flow diagnostics is introduced. Efficient beam propagation is demonstrated for pressure up to 300 microns. The beams, generated by low-pressure pseudospark discharges in helium, provide extremely high fluorescence levels, allowing time-resolved visualization in high-background environments. The fluorescence signal frequency is species-dependent, allowing instantaneous visualization of mixing flowfields.

  4. Waveguide Deflector In Lithium Niobate (LiNbO3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tardieu, A.; Clair, JJ.

    1983-10-01

    We describe the realization of an ultra fast deflector in Ti-diffused LiNbO3 waveguide. We realize practically in 100 ns a linear scanning of an optical beam crossing the component. A driving voltage of 35 volts gives a deflection angle of one degree and the voltage causing deflection to the first spot position (following the Rayleigh resolution criterion) is 10 volts.

  5. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N2). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  6. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PULSING A CHARGED PARTICLE BEAM

    DOEpatents

    Aaland, K.; Kuenning, R.W.; Harmon, R.K.

    1961-05-01

    A system is offered for pulsing a continuous beam of charged particles to form beam pulses that are consistently rectangular and of precise time durations which may be varied over an extremely wide range at a widely variable range of repetition rates. The system generally comprises spaced deflection plates on opposite sides of a beam axis in between which a unidirectional bias field is established to deflect the beam for impingement on an off-axis collector. The bias field is periodically neutralized by the application of fast rise time substantially rectangular pulses to one of the deflection plates in opposition to the bias field and then after a time delay to the other deflection plate in aiding relation to the bias field and during the flat crest portion of the bias opposing pulses. The voltage distribution of the resulting deflection field then includes neutral or zero portions which are of symmetrical substantially rectangular configuration relative to time and during which the beam axially passes the collector in the form of a substantially rectangular beam pulse.

  7. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse.

  8. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Letzring, S.A.

    1993-11-16

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse. 10 figures.

  9. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, L.; Hickey, M. S.; Krasovitskiy, V.; Rathnayaka, K. D. D.; Lyuksyutov, I. F.; Herschbach, D. R.

    2012-06-01

    We describe a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source, evolved from an ancestral device [M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001)]. The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, cryocooling, and a shutter gate eliminated the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1-0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜1012 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜1015 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, Cl2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  10. Pulsed rotating supersonic source for merged molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheffield, Les; Hickey, Mark; Krasovitskiy, Vitaliy; Rathnayaka, Daya; Lyuksyutov, Igor; Herschbach, Dudley

    2012-10-01

    We continue the characterization of a pulsed rotating supersonic beam source. The original device was described by M. Gupta and D. Herschbach, J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 1626 (2001). The beam emerges from a nozzle near the tip of a hollow rotor which can be spun at high-speed to shift the molecular velocity distribution downward or upward over a wide range. Here we consider mostly the slowing mode. Introducing a pulsed gas inlet system, and a shutter gate eliminate the main handicap of the original device in which continuous gas flow imposed high background pressure. The new version provides intense pulses, of duration 0.1--0.6 ms (depending on rotor speed) and containing ˜10^12 molecules at lab speeds as low as 35 m/s and ˜10^15 molecules at 400 m/s. Beams of any molecule available as a gas can be slowed (or speeded); e.g., we have produced slow and fast beams of rare gases, O2, NO2, NH3, and SF6. For collision experiments, the ability to scan the beam speed by merely adjusting the rotor is especially advantageous when using two merged beams. By closely matching the beam speeds, very low relative collision energies can be attained without making either beam very slow.

  11. Performance and Controllability of Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Yazawa, Masaru; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    We propose novel propulsion driven by ablation plasma pressures produced by the irradiation of pulsed ion beams onto a propellant. The ion beam ablation propulsion demonstrates by a thin foil (50 {mu}mt), and the flyer velocity of 7.7 km/s at the ion beam energy density of 2 kJ/cm2 adopted by using the Time-of-flight method is observed numerically and experimentally. We estimate the performance of the ion beam ablation propulsion as specific impulse of 3600 s and impulse bit density of 1700 Ns/m2 obtained from the demonstration results. In the numerical analysis, a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model with ion beam energy depositions is used. The control of the ion beam kinetic energy is only improvement of the performance but also propellant consumption. The spacecraft driven by the ion beam ablation provides high performance efficiency with short-pulsed ion beam irradiation. The numerical results of the advanced model explained latent heat and real gas equation of state agreed well with experimental ones over a wide range of the incident ion beam energy density.

  12. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-01-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  13. BANSHEE: High-voltage repetitively pulsed electron-beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    VanHaaften, F.

    1992-08-01

    BANSHEE (Beam Accelerator for a New Source of High-Energy Electrons) this is a high-voltage modulator is used to produce a high-current relativistic electron beam for high-power microwave tube development. The goal of the BANSHEE research is first to achieve a voltage pulse of 700--750 kV with a 1-{mu}s pulse width driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}, the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of a few hertz. The ensuing goal is to increase the pulse amplitude to a level approaching 1 MV. We conducted tests using half the modulator with an output load of 200 {Omega}, up to a level of {approximately}650 kV at a PRF of 1 Hz and 525 kV at a PRF of 5 Hz. We then conducted additional testing using the complete system driving a load of {approximately}100 {Omega}.

  14. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation

    SciTech Connect

    Schlösser, Magnus Rudnev, Vitaly; Ureña, Ángel González

    2015-10-15

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated.

  15. Radio-frequency ion deflector for mass separation.

    PubMed

    Schlösser, Magnus; Rudnev, Vitaly; González Ureña, Ángel

    2015-10-01

    Electrostatic cylindrical deflectors act as energy analyzer for ion beams. In this article, we present that by imposing of a radio-frequency modulation on the deflecting electric field, the ion transmission becomes mass dependent. By the choice of the appropriate frequency, amplitude, and phase, the deflector can be used as mass filter. The basic concept of the new instrument as well as simple mathematic relations are described. These calculations and further numerical simulations show that a mass sensitivity is achievable. Furthermore, we demonstrate the proof-of-principle in experimental measurements, compare the results to those of from a 1 m linear time-of-flight spectrometer, and comment on the mass resolution of the method. Finally, some potential applications are indicated. PMID:26520948

  16. Electron beam-switched discharge for rapidly pulsed lasers

    DOEpatents

    Pleasance, L.D.; Murray, J.R.; Goldhar, J.; Bradley, L.P.

    1979-12-11

    A method and apparatus are designed for electrical excitation of a laser gas by application of a pulsed voltage across the gas, followed by passage of a pulsed, high energy electron beam through the gas to initiate a discharge suitable for laser excitation. This method improves upon current power conditioning techniques and is especially useful for driving rare gas halide lasers at high repetition rates.

  17. Pulsed electron beams for flue-gas treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, Gennady A.; Novoselov, Yuri N.; Kuznetsov, D. L.

    1995-03-01

    The development of industrial society creates serious threats to the safe existence of the biosphere, including man. Cleaning air from toxic exhausts becomes therefore one of the challenges. The global problem of air cleaning can be solved in a number of ways. We restrict our attention to one of the possible methods, the use of pulsed electron beams to clean sulfur oxides from the flue gases of power plants. Irradiation of flue gases by the increased density of pulsed electron beams permits a charges, excited particle concentration that is optical for the removal of specific toxic impurities. We present the most important results of these experiments.

  18. Pulsed-electron-beam annealing of ion-implantation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwald, A. C.; Kirkpatrick, A. R.; Little, R. G.; Minnucci, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Short-duration high-intensity pulsed electron beams have been used to anneal ion-implantation damage in silicon and to electrically activate the dopant species. Lattice regrowth and dopant activation were determined using He(+)-4 backscattering, SEM, TEM, and device performance characteristics as diagnostic techniques. The annealing mechanism is believed to be liquid-phase epitaxial regrowth initiating from the substrate. The high-temperature transient pulse produced by the electron beam causes the dopant to diffuse rapidly in the region where the liquid state is achieved.

  19. Photovoltaic module with removable wind deflector

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2013-05-28

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module, a deflector, and a clip. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes a support arm forming a seat. The deflector defines a front face and a rear face, with the clip extending from either the trailing frame member or the rear face of the deflector. In a mounted state, the deflector is nested within the seat and is releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip. In some embodiments, the support arm forms a second seat, with the PV module assembly providing a second mounted state in which the deflector is in a differing orientation/slope, nested within the second seat and releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip.

  20. Photovoltaic module with removable wind deflector

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2012-08-07

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module, a deflector, and a clip. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes a support arm forming a seat. The deflector defines a front face and a rear face, with the clip extending from either the trailing frame member or the rear face of the deflector. In a mounted state, the deflector is nested within the seat and is releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip. In some embodiments, the support arm forms a second seat, with the PV module assembly providing a second mounted state in which the deflector is in a differing orientation/slope, nested within the second seat and releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip.

  1. Photovoltaic module with removable wind deflector

    DOEpatents

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

    2014-02-18

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module, a deflector, and a clip. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes a support arm forming a seat. The deflector defines a front face and a rear face, with the clip extending from either the trailing frame member or the rear face of the deflector. In a mounted state, the deflector is nested within the seat and is releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip. In some embodiments, the support arm forms a second seat, with the PV module assembly providing a second mounted state in which the deflector is in a differing orientation/slope, nested within the second seat and releasably mounted to the trailing frame member via the clip.

  2. Note: Emittance measurements of intense pulsed proton beam for different pulse length and repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Miracoli, R.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Mascali, D.; Castro, G.; Gobin, R.; Delferriere, O.; Adroit, G.; Senee, F.; Ciavola, G.

    2012-05-15

    The high intensity ion source (SILHI), in operation at CEA-Saclay, has been used to produce a 90 mA pulsed proton beam with pulse length and repetition rates suitable for the European Spallation Source (ESS) linac. Typical r-r{sup '} rms normalized emittance values smaller than 0.2{pi} mm mrad have been measured for operation in pulsed mode (0.01 < duty cycle < 0.15 and 1 ms < pulse duration < 10 ms) that are relevant for the design update of the Linac to be used at the ESS in Lund.

  3. Pulsed ion beam investigation of the kinetics of surface reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, C. C.; Eck, T. G.; Hoffman, R. W.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed ion beam measurements of the kinetics of surface reactions are discussed for the case where the width of the ion pulse is comparable to the measured reaction time, but short compared to the time between successive pulses. Theoretical expressions are derived for the time dependence of the ion-induced signals for linear surface reactions. Results are presented for CO emission from surface carbon and CF emission from Teflon induced by oxygen ion bombardment. The strengths and limitations of this technique are described.

  4. Beam dynamics analysis in pulse compression using electron beam compact simulator for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Sasaki, Toru; Harada, Nob.

    2013-11-01

    In a final stage of an accelerator system for heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), pulse shaping and beam current increase by bunch compression are required for effective pellet implosion. A compact simulator with an electron beam was constructed to understand the beam dynamics. In this study, we investigate theoretically and numerically the beam dynamics for the extreme bunch compression in the final stage of HIF accelerator complex. The theoretical and numerical results implied that the compact experimental device simulates the beam dynamics around the stagnation point for initial low temperature condition.

  5. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kokish, M G; Rajagopal, V; Marler, J P; Odom, B C

    2014-08-01

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  6. Note: High density pulsed molecular beam for cold ion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kokish, M. G.; Rajagopal, V.; Marler, J. P.; Odom, B. C.

    2014-08-15

    A recent expansion of cold and ultracold molecule applications has led to renewed focus on molecular species preparation under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Meanwhile, molecular beams have been used to study gas phase chemical reactions for decades. In this paper, we describe an apparatus that uses pulsed molecular beam technology to achieve high local gas densities, leading to faster reaction rates with cold trapped ions. We characterize the beam's spatial profile using the trapped ions themselves. This apparatus could be used for preparation of molecular species by reactions requiring excitation of trapped ion precursors to states with short lifetimes or for obtaining a high reaction rate with minimal increase of background chamber pressure.

  7. Long-pulse ion source for neutral-beam applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. C.; Menon, M. M.; Ryan, P. M.; Schechter, D. E.; Stirling, W. L.; Haselton, H. H.

    1982-04-01

    A rectangular ion source is being developed for producing 120-keV/25-A hydrogen ion beams for pulse durations up to 10 s. It consists of a plasma generator with a rectangular arc chamber (25×35 cm cross section) and an ion accelerator with rectangular grids (10×25 cm hole pattern). The plasma generator is a modified duoPIGatron type. It has been operated at 120 V, 1100 A, and 10 s arc durations to produce a dense and uniform plasma sufficient for supplying a 25-A ion beam current. The electron emitter used is either a LaB6 hollow cathode or a LM (molybdenum doped with La2O3) indirectly heated cathode. The ion accelerator having four (or three) rectangular grids with multiple circular apertures has been utilized to form high-energy ion beams above (or below) 80 keV. With substantial improvements in water cooling and mechanical stability, this ion accelerator has been operated reliably to deliver long-pulse ion beams with energies in excess of 100 keV and pulse lengths of many seconds. The results of measurements made on the power transmission efficiency (70%-80%), power density profile at the target (±0.5% HWHM near the focal plane), and grid loadings (≲1% for each grid) are elaborated. The important characteristics associated with this long-pulse ion source are also presented and discussed.

  8. A subnanosecond pulsed ion source for micrometer focused ion beams.

    PubMed

    Höhr, C; Fischer, D; Moshammer, R; Dorn, A; Ullrich, J

    2008-05-01

    A new, compact design of an ion source delivers nanosecond pulsed ion beams with low emittance, which can be focused to micrometer size. By using a high-power, 25 fs laser pulse focused into a gas region of 10(-6) mbar, ions at very low temperatures are produced in the small laser focal volume of 5 mum diameter by 20 mum length through multiphoton ionization. These ions are created in a cold environment, not in a hot plasma, and, since the ionization process itself does not significantly heat them, have as a result essentially room temperature. The generated ion pulse, up to several thousand ions per pulse, is extracted from the source volume with ion optical elements that have been carefully designed by simulation calculations. Externally triggered, its subnanosecond duration and even smaller time jitter allow it to be superimposed with other pulsed particle or laser beams. It therefore can be combined with any type of collision experiment where the size and the time structure of the projectile beam crucially affect the achievable experimental resolution.

  9. Materials Processing with Intense Pulsed Ion Beams*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renk, T. J.; Johnson, D. J.; Friedmann, T. A.; Provencio, P. P.; Thompson, M. O.; Sanders, P. G.; Kasuya, K.; Kishimoto, N.

    1999-11-01

    Materials applications are being investigated on the 700 kV RHEPP-1 facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Surface modification for property improvement is possible in the fluence range 1-5 J/cm^2, with ablation and thin-film synthesis at 5-20 J/cm^2 fluences. Differences from previous efforts include selectability of accelerating ions (H, He, C, N, Ne, Ar, and Xe), and repetitive pulsing of the MAP (Magnetically Confined Anode Plasma) gas-breakdown ion source. Surface modification using melt-resolidification cycles has led to improvement in hardness and corrosion resistance of various metals. Mixing of pre-applied thin-films into the bulk has led to even greater performance improvements. Characterization is ongoing to determine the microstructural basis for these improvements. We have characterized liquid-phase diffusion of implanted elements in Ti and Si during the power pulse. Experiments with Si device processing and polymer modification are also ongoing. Thin-films are being formed from graphite, YBCO, and ZnO targets for various applications, including hard-coatings and optical coatings. Surface topography, stoichiometry, and optical and infrared absorption measurements have been made. *Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Co., under US DOE Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. Self-focusing of electromagnetic pulsed beams in collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, Mohammad; Verma, M. P.; Sodha, Mahendra Singh

    2008-10-15

    In this paper, the self-focusing of an electromagnetic pulsed beam in a collisional plasma has been investigated in the paraxial approximation, following the formalism developed by Akhmanov. The energy balance equation for electrons, the equation expressing the equality of pressure gradient (of electrons and ions) to the force due to space charge field, and the equation for the beam width parameter f (obtained by following Akhmanov's approach) have been simultaneously solved for given initial (z=0) time profile of the pulse to obtain f as a function of {xi} (cz/{omega}r{sub 0}{sup 2}) and t{sup '}=t-z/V{sub g}, where V{sub g} is the group velocity. Both Gaussian and sine time profiles of the pulse have been investigated.

  11. Pulsed electron beam propagation in argon and nitrogen gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Kholodnaya, G. E.; Sazonov, R. V.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Zhirkov, I. S.

    2015-10-15

    The paper presents the results of current measurements for the electron beam, propagating inside a drift tube filled in with a gas mixture (Ar and N{sub 2}). The experiments were performed using the TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator. The main characteristics of electron beam were as follows: 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J energy, and 5 cm diameter. The electron beam propagated inside the drift tube assembled of three sections. Gas pressures inside the drift tube were 760 ± 3, 300 ± 3, and 50 ± 1 Torr. The studies were performed in argon, nitrogen, and their mixtures of 33%, 50%, and 66% volume concentrations, respectively.

  12. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  13. Intense ion beams accelerated by ultra-intense laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus; Cowan, T. E.; Gauthier, J. C.; Vehn, J. Meyer-Ter; Allen, M.; Audebert, P.; Blazevic, A.; Fuchs, J.; Geissel, M.; Hegelich, M.; Karsch, S.; Pukhov, A.; Schlegel, T.

    2002-04-01

    The discovery of intense ion beams off solid targets irradiated by ultra-intense laser pulses has become the subject of extensive international interest. These highly collimated, energetic beams of protons and heavy ions are strongly depending on the laser parameters as well as on the properties of the irradiated targets. Therefore we have studied the influence of the target conditions on laser-accelerated ion beams generated by multi-terawatt lasers. The experiments were performed using the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Laser Intense (LULI). The targets were irradiated by pulses up to 5×1019 W/cm2 (~300 fs,λ=1.05 μm) at normal incidence. A strong dependence on the surface conditions, conductivity, shape and purity was observed. The plasma density on the front and rear surface was determined by laser interferometry. We characterized the ion beam by means of magnetic spectrometers, radiochromic film, nuclear activation and Thompson parabolas. The strong dependence of the ion beam acceleration on the conditions on the target back surface was confirmed in agreement with predictions based on the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Finally shaping of the ion beam has been demonstrated by the appropriate tailoring of the target. .

  14. Progress of diagnostics for coherent beam combination on ultrashort pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xiaoping; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Baoqiang; Zhu, Jian; Zhu, Jianqiang

    2015-08-01

    Ultrashort pulse is important to exploring laser acceleration in many areas, such as fast ignition, advanced radiography capability. Petawatt laser should not only improve output energy on a single beam, but also combine multi-beams coherently. Diagnostics of temporal and phase synchronization is developed for coherent beam combination on a 10ps laser pulse. When two pulses are guided into the diagnostics, one goes through a temporal delay unit and a lens with a focal length 500mm, then arrives at detector unit, the other goes through a phase delay unit and the same lens, and then arrives at detector unit, too. First, temporal synchronization is adjusted by temporal delay unit and monitored by a cross-correlation generator in the detector unit. Second, phase synchronization is adjusted by phase delay unit and monitored by a far field interferogram in the detector unit. In our design, temporal resolution is 6.7fs in temporal synchronization, and phase resolution is 0.007π in phase synchronization. Experiment has proved that this diagnostics is useful to realize synchronization between two ultrashort pulses both in temporal and in spatial.

  15. Widely tunable repetition-rate and pulse-duration nanosecond pulses from two spectral beam combined fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Man; Zheng, Ye; Yang, Yifeng; Chen, Xiaolong; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Kai; Wang, Jianhua; Qi, Yunfeng; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Nanosecond pulses with a widely tunable repetition-rate and pulse-duration at 1 μm wavelength are obtained by spectrally combining two pulse fiber amplifiers using a home-made polarization-independent multilayer dielectric reflective diffraction grating. The width of the combined pulses can be tuned from 4 ns to 800 ns, and the pulse repetition-rate can be ranged from 1 MHz to 200 MHz. Thanks to the spectral beam combining system, the maximum repetition-rate and pulse-duration of the combined pulses are doubled, compared to the single pulse fiber amplifier, by setting a proper temporal delay between the two pulse channels.

  16. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, G.E.; Edwards, W.F.

    1987-06-18

    A vacuum-to-air interface is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve, from which extends a vacuum-tight duct, that terminates in an aperture. Means are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip across the aperture at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band urges foil strip, when stationary, against and into the aperture. Gas pressure means periodically lift off and separate foil strip from aperture, so that it may be readily advanced. 5 figs.

  17. Pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy of complex oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duray, S. J.; Buchholz, D. B.; Song, S. N.; Richeson, D. S.; Ketterson, J. B.; Marks, T. J.; Chang, R. P. H.

    1991-09-01

    The results are reported of a pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) process for growing complex oxide films at low background gas pressure and low substrate temperature using organometallic precursors in an oxygen plasma environment. The results show that POMBE can extend the capability of organometallic chemical vapor deposition to growing complex oxide films with high precision both in composition and structure without the need for post-deposition oxidation and heat treatments. The growth of phase-pure, highly oriented Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting oxide films is given as an example. Similar to the pulsed laser deposition process, the POMBE method has the potential for in situ processing of multilayer structures.

  18. Flexible control of femtosecond pulse duration and separation using an emittance-spoiling foil in x-ray free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Y.; Behrens, C.; Coffee, R.; Decker, F. -J.; Emma, P.; Field, C.; Helml, W.; Huang, Z.; Krejcik, P.; Krzywinski, J.; Loos, H.; Lutman, A.; Marinelli, A.; Maxwell, T. J.; Turner, J.

    2015-06-22

    We report experimental studies of generating and controlling femtosecond x-ray pulses in free-electron lasers (FELs) using an emittance spoiling foil. By selectivity spoiling the transverse emittance of the electron beam, the output pulse duration or double-pulse separation is adjusted with a variable size single or double slotted foil. Measurements were performed with an X-band transverse deflector located downstream of the FEL undulator, from which both the FEL lasing and emittance spoiling effects are observed directly.

  19. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOEpatents

    Zolotorev, Max

    2010-07-13

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  20. Hydrodynamic Efficiency of Ablation Propulsion with Pulsed Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Harada, Nobuhiro; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2006-05-02

    This paper presents the hydrodynamic efficiency of ablation plasma produced by pulsed ion beam on the basis of the ion beam-target interaction. We used a one-dimensional hydrodynamic fluid compressible to study the physics involved namely an ablation acceleration behavior and analyzed it as a rocketlike model in order to investigate its hydrodynamic variables for propulsion applications. These variables were estimated by the concept of ablation driven implosion in terms of ablated mass fraction, implosion efficiency, and hydrodynamic energy conversion. Herein, the energy conversion efficiency of 17.5% was achieved. In addition, the results show maximum energy efficiency of the ablation process (ablation efficiency) of 67% meaning the efficiency with which pulsed ion beam energy-ablation plasma conversion. The effects of ion beam energy deposition depth to hydrodynamic efficiency were briefly discussed. Further, an evaluation of propulsive force with high specific impulse of 4000s, total impulse of 34mN and momentum to energy ratio in the range of {mu}N/W was also analyzed.

  1. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  2. Material selection for electrooptic deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    The selection of a material for a practical device is generally guided by a number of criteria, including cost, size, difficulty of fabrication, durability, driver requirements, and system constraints. A quantitative analysis can usually be made for comparison, or a figure of merit can be computed. In the case of materials for electrooptical (EO) devices the choice is often made based on the availability of materials meeting some minimum system requirement. For fast EO deflectors, where a large number of resolvable spots is required, the choice of materials is quite limited. A model of just such a device is proposed; it is based on the resolution of 400 spots and reasonable boundary conditions. The model predicts that to be successful, an EO material must be chosen that has a linear EO coefficient (r/sub 33/) of at least 336 pm/V. A survey was conducted of the EO materials which are generally available. Based on the model and the survey, Czochralski crystal growth of strontium barium niobate (SBN:60) is recommended. Although SBN:60 does not have the largest EO coefficient, it may be the easiest to grow in the required size and optical quality, thus satisfying the availability criterion. It should be borne in mind that many materials may be grown by this technique and there are many new and potential applications for EO materials. 92 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Ultrafast random-access scanning in two-photon microscopy using acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Salomé, R; Kremer, Y; Dieudonné, S; Léger, J-F; Krichevsky, O; Wyart, C; Chatenay, D; Bourdieu, L

    2006-06-30

    Two-photon scanning microscopy (TPSM) is a powerful tool for imaging deep inside living tissues with sub-cellular resolution. The temporal resolution of TPSM is however strongly limited by the galvanometric mirrors used to steer the laser beam. Fast physiological events can therefore only be followed by scanning repeatedly a single line within the field of view. Because acousto-optic deflectors (AODs) are non-mechanical devices, they allow access at any point within the field of view on a microsecond time scale and are therefore excellent candidates to improve the temporal resolution of TPSM. However, the use of AOD-based scanners with femtosecond pulses raises several technical difficulties. In this paper, we describe an all-digital TPSM setup based on two crossed AODs. It includes in particular an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) placed at 45 degrees with respect to the AODs to pre-compensate for the large spatial distortions of femtosecond pulses occurring in the AODs, in order to optimize the spatial resolution and the fluorescence excitation. Our setup allows recording from freely selectable point-of-interest at high speed (1kHz). By maximizing the time spent on points of interest, random-access TPSM (RA-TPSM) constitutes a promising method for multiunit recordings with millisecond resolution in biological tissues.

  4. Ultrashort Electron Beam Pulses and Diagnosis by Advanced Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesaka, M.; Iijima, H.; Muroya, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Hosokai, T.

    2003-08-01

    240fs 18 MeV low emittance(6 pai mm.mrad) electron beam was generated and its pulse shape was diagnosed by the S-band laser photocathode RF gun and linac. The maximum charge per bunch was 7 nC. This electron pulse was synchronized with 100fs 0.3TW Ti:Sapphire laser with the timing jitter of 330fs(rms). Recently, the Cu cathode(QE10∧-4) was replaced by Mg cathode(QE10∧-3). This system is utilized for radiation chemistry analysis for supercritical water. We have adopted the four diagnostic methods(femtosecond streak camera, coherent transition radiation interferometer, far-infrared polychromator, fluctuation method) and checked their time-resolution precisely. Further, we are doing the experiment on laser plasma cathode by 12TW 50fs laser and He gas jet. Laser plasma wakefield acceleration and electron injection via wavebreaking are planned. We have developed a new theory of self-injection scheme to generate ˜10fs electron pulse. We have already succeeded in observing 40 MeV low emittance electron beam of 14 nC.

  5. Addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscopy based on 2D acousto-optical deflector and spatial light modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yonghong; Liu, Honghai; Qin, Wan; Qu, Junle; Peng, Xiang; Niu, Hanben

    2013-01-01

    We present an addressable, large-field second harmonic generation microscope by combining a 2D acousto-optical deflector with a spatial light modulator. The SLM shapes an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:Sapphire laser beam into a multifocus array, which can be rapidly scanned by changing the incident angle of the laser beam using a 2D acousto-optical deflector. Compared to the single-beam-scan technique, the multifocus array scan can increase the scanning rate and the field-of-view size with the multi-region imaging ability. PMID:24307756

  6. Flame Deflector Section, Elevation, Water Supply Flow Diagram, Exploded ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Flame Deflector - Section, Elevation, Water Supply Flow Diagram, Exploded Deflector Manifolds, and Interior Perspective - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. Pulsed particle beam vacuum-to-air interface

    DOEpatents

    Cruz, Gilbert E.; Edwards, William F.

    1988-01-01

    A vacuum-to-air interface (10) is provided for a high-powered, pulsed particle beam accelerator. The interface comprises a pneumatic high speed gate valve (18), from which extends a vacuum-tight duct (26), that termintes in an aperture (28). Means (32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48) are provided for periodically advancing a foil strip (30) across the aperture (28) at the repetition rate of the particle pulses. A pneumatically operated hollow sealing band (62) urges foil strip (30), when stationary, against and into the aperture (28). Gas pressure means (68, 70) periodically lift off and separate foil strip (30) from aperture (28), so that it may be readily advanced.

  8. Ultra-precise particle velocities in pulsed supersonic beams

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Wolfgang

    2013-07-14

    We describe an improved experimental method for the generation of cold, directed particle bunches, and the highly accurate determination of their velocities in a pulsed supersonic beam, allowing for high-resolution experiments of atoms, molecules, and clusters. It is characterized by a pulsed high pressure jet source with high brilliance and optimum repeatability, a flight distance of few metres that can be varied with a tolerance of setting of 50 {mu}m, and a precision in the mean flight time of particles of better than 10{sup -4}. The technique achieves unmatched accuracies in particle velocities and kinetic energies and also permits the reliable determination of enthalpy changes with very high precision.

  9. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy with Gaussian and multimode beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lednev, V. N.; Pershin, S. M.; Bunkin, A. F.; Samokhvalov, A. A.; Veiko, V. P.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Ionin, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Single vs multimode laser beams were compared for double pulse laser ablation, plasma properties and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analytical capabilities. Laser beams with Gaussian and multimode profiles were generated within the same Nd:YAG laser in single and double pulse regimes. Gaussian beam produced a small and deep crater while multimode beam formed a wide shallow crater. Greater double pulse enhancement of ablated material and plasma volume were observed for Gaussian beam sampling. The higher intensity for atomic/ionic lines in the plasma spectra was observed for multimode beam sampling due to greater laser pulse energy and larger ablated mass. Interestingly, spectra line intensity enhancement for double pulse ablation was 2-3 times greater for Gaussian than for multimode beam ablation. Background emission decreased for plasma induced by multimode beam when using double pulse mode while for Gaussian beam an opposite dependence was observed. Surprisingly, higher peak fluence at sample surface for Gaussian beam didn't provide higher plasma temperature and electron density for double pulse ablation. Analytical capabilities of LIBS method were compared for double pulse plasma induced by Gaussian and multimode beam in terms of precision, sensitivity and linearity of calibration curves. It was observed that Gaussian beam sampling leads to improvement of analysis precision while sensitivity was element dependent.

  10. Ultrashort-laser-pulse measurement using swept beams.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, D; Kimmel, M; O'Shea, P; Trebino, R

    2001-09-15

    We demonstrate a frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG) device that uses a sweepshot geometry that combines the advantages of multishot and single-shot pulse-measurement devices, has only one moving part, a galvanometer, and requires no computer control. Like a multishot device, it focuses the beam to a small spot (rather than a line focus) and has a high intensity in the nonlinear medium. Like single-shot devices, it makes measurements quickly, generating an entire FROG trace on a single camera screen (rather than requiring many camera downloads). PMID:18049632

  11. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P sub J) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus.

  12. Measuring effective area of spots from pulsed laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratan, Aurel; Zorila, Alexandru; Rusen, Laurentiu; Nemes, George

    2014-12-01

    The effective area of a laser spot is an important quantity used to characterize the laser-induced damage threshold of optical materials according to ISO 21254-1:2011 standard. A method for measuring the effective area/diameter of spots from pulsed laser beams using charge-coupled device camera-based beam profilers is presented. Factors affecting the measurement's accuracy, as the background noise and the size of the summation area, were evaluated using MATLAB. To minimize the noise contribution, we use an iterative method similar to the one used to measure the second-moment-based spot sizes. We find that the two analyzed components of the background noise, its zero-mean noise and its offset, have an opposite effect on the measurements of the effective area/diameter as compared with the second-moment-based measurements. We prove that there is an upper limit of the relative error of such iterative measurements of effective area, the iteration limit parameter, and that it is a measurable quantity. We measure the effective area/diameter of laser spots with different sizes from a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm, 6 ns pulse duration, 10 Hz repetition frequency, and estimate the standard uncertainty of the measurements. Further, we generalize the effective area/diameter concept to include elongated (elliptical/rectangular) spots.

  13. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun; Qu, Miao; Yan, Sha

    2015-08-15

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm{sup 2} and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  14. Infrared imaging diagnostics for intense pulsed electron beam.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao; Shen, Jie; Qu, Miao; Liu, Wenbin; Zhong, Haowen; Zhang, Jie; Yan, Sha; Zhang, Gaolong; Le, Xiaoyun

    2015-08-01

    Infrared imaging diagnostic method for two-dimensional calorimetric diagnostics has been developed for intense pulsed electron beam (IPEB). By using a 100-μm-thick tungsten film as the infrared heat sink for IPEB, the emitting uniformity of the electron source can be analyzed to evaluate the efficiency and stability of the diode system. Two-dimensional axisymmetric finite element method heat transfer simulation, combined with Monte Carlo calculation, was performed for error estimation and optimization of the method. The test of the method was finished with IPEB generated by explosive emission electron diode with pulse duration (FWHM) of 80 ns, electron energy up to 450 keV, and a total beam current of over 1 kA. The results showed that it is possible to measure the cross-sectional energy density distribution of IPEB with energy sensitivity of 0.1 J/cm(2) and spatial resolution of 1 mm. The technical details, such as irradiation protection of bremsstrahlung γ photons and the functional extensibility of the method were discussed in this work.

  15. Ultrafast Optical Beam Deflection in a Planar Waveguide for High Dynamic Range Recording at Picosecond Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantos, C H; Heebner, J E

    2008-07-02

    We report the latest performance of an ultrafast, all-optical beam deflector based on a prism array imprinted in a planar waveguide. The deflector enables single-shot, high dynamic range optical recording with picosecond resolution.

  16. Pulsed particle beam high pressure/shock research in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyam, Anurag; Shukla, Rohit

    2012-07-01

    We have two major facilities for particle beam driven shock wave/high pressure generation. One being AMBA and the other being 1.2MJ capacitor bank RUDRA. Apparatus for Mega-Ampere Beam Application which is known as AMBA is now with India and the experiments are being planned from the facility for the shock wave and high pressure studies using the AMBA for intense light-ion beam generation and then bombarding them on a flyer target. To enhance the AMBA machine to double the output current is also under consideration. AMBA is a pulsed power source which delivers 50kJ of energy in 50ns with 1.7 MV minimum peak voltages maintained as an average of various shots in the case of positive polarity output in a suitable ion-diode. The output impedance of the AMBA machine is 2.25ohms and hence it is a 1.5 TW machine. With peak power densities up to ~1TW/cm2, and proton ranges in condensed matter of 10 to 20 μm, specific energy depositions of several MJ/g at deposition rates of the order of 100 TW/g are obtained. This way the AMBA system can be used as a shock wave generator in both, direct drive and impact experiments. We also have 1.2MJ capacitor bank capable of delivering 3.6MA peak current at 44kV charging voltage to be used for Magnetized target fusion based on z-pinch regime of target material compression. The related diagnostics for the system, which are currently being developed, are mentioned in the present paper. Both the systems and the high pressure experiments to be conducted are described in the paper. A brief detail on the plasma focus devices, which also produce shock waves using particle beams, is also presented in the paper.

  17. Pulse-by-pulse multi-beam-line operation for x-ray free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Toru; Fukami, Kenji; Inagaki, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Kinjo, Ryota; Kondo, Chikara; Otake, Yuji; Tajiri, Yasuyuki; Takebe, Hideki; Togawa, Kazuaki; Yoshino, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    The parallel operation of plural undulator beam lines is an important means of improving the efficiency and usability of x-ray free-electron laser facilities. After the installation of a second undulator beam line (BL2) at SPring-8 Angstrom compact free-electron laser (SACLA), pulse-by-pulse switching between two beam lines was tested using kicker and dc twin-septum magnets. To maintain a compact size, all undulator beam lines at SACLA are designed to be placed within the same undulator hall located downstream of the accelerator. In order to ensure broad tunability of the laser wavelength, the electron bunches are accelerated to different beam energies optimized for the wavelengths of each beam line. In the demonstration, the 30 Hz electron beam was alternately deflected to two beam lines and simultaneous lasing was achieved with 15 Hz at each beam line. Since the electron beam was deflected twice by 3° in a dogleg to BL2, the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effects became non-negligible. Currently in a wavelength range of 4-10 keV, a laser pulse energy of 100 - 150 μ J can be obtained with a reduced peak current of around 1 kA by alleviating the CSR effects. This paper reports the results and operational issues related to the multi-beam-line operation of SACLA.

  18. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing. PMID:27610923

  19. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing.

  20. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing. PMID:27610923

  1. Three order increase in scanning speed of space charge-controlled KTN deflector by eliminating electric field induced phase transition in nanodisordered KTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Chao, Ju-Hung; Chen, Chang-Jiang; Yin, Shizhuo; Hoffman, Robert C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we report a three orders-of-magnitude increase in the speed of a space-charge-controlled KTN beam deflector achieved by eliminating the electric field-induced phase transition (EFIPT) in a nanodisordered KTN crystal. Previously, to maximize the electro-optic effect, a KTN beam deflector was operated at a temperature slightly above the Curie temperature. The electric field could cause the KTN to undergo a phase transition from the paraelectric phase to the ferroelectric phase at this temperature, which causes the deflector to operate in the linear electro-optic regime. Since the deflection angle of the deflector is proportional to the space charge distribution but not the magnitude of the applied electric field, the scanning speed of the beam deflector is limited by the electron mobility within the KTN crystal. To overcome this speed limitation caused by the EFIPT, we propose to operate the deflector at a temperature above the critical end point. This results in a significant increase in the scanning speed from the microsecond to nanosecond regime, which represents a major technological advance in the field of fast speed beam scanners. This can be highly beneficial for many applications including high-speed imaging, broadband optical communications, and ultrafast laser display and printing.

  2. Spatial and Transient Effects during the Amplification of a Picosecond Pulse Beam by a Nanosecond Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuville, C.; Baccou, C.; Debayle, A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Hüller, S.; Casanova, M.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Glize, K.; Labaune, C.; Depierreux, S.

    2016-09-01

    Amplification of a picosecond pulse beam by a lower intensity nanosecond pulse beam was experimentally observed in a flowing plasma. Modifications of intensity distributions in beam focal spots due to nonhomogeneous energy transfer and its transient regime were investigated. The mean transferred power reached 57% of the incident power of the nanosecond pulse beam. An imaging diagnostic allowed the intensity profile of the picosecond pulse beam to be determined, bringing to evidence the spatial nonuniformity of energy transfer in the amplified beam. This diagnostic also enabled us to observe the temporal evolution of the speckle intensity distribution because of the transfer. These results are reproduced by numerical simulations of two complementary codes. The method and the observed effects are important for the understanding of experiments with multiple crossing laser beams in plasmas.

  3. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystal Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.

  4. Accessing defect dynamics using intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Persaud, A.; Barnard, J. J.; Guo, H.; Hosemann, P.; Lidia, S.; Minor, A. M.; Seidl, P. A.; Schenkel, T.

    2015-06-18

    Gaining in-situ access to relaxation dynamics of radiation induced defects will lead to a better understanding of materials and is important for the verification of theoretical models and simulations. We show preliminary results from experiments at the new Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that will enable in-situ access to defect dynamics through pump-probe experiments. Here, the unique capabilities of the NDCX-II accelerator to generate intense, nanosecond pulsed ion beams are utilized. Preliminary data of channeling experiments using lithium and potassium ions and silicon membranes are shown. We compare these data to simulation results using Crystalmore » Trim. Furthermore, we discuss the improvements to the accelerator to higher performance levels and the new diagnostics tools that are being incorporated.« less

  5. Vibration control in smart coupled beams subjected to pulse excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Dominik; Bajer, Czesław I.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a control method to stabilize the vibration of adjacent structures is presented. The control is realized by changes of the stiffness parameters of the structure's couplers. A pulse excitation applied to the coupled adjacent beams is imposed as the kinematic excitation. For such a representation, the designed control law provides the best rate of energy dissipation. By means of a stability analysis, the performance in different structural settings is studied. The efficiency of the proposed strategy is examined via numerical simulations. In terms of the assumed energy metric, the controlled structure outperforms its passively damped equivalent by over 50 percent. The functionality of the proposed control strategy should attract the attention of practising engineers who seek solutions to upgrade existing damping systems.

  6. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, J. He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z.

    2014-09-15

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-Ω coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  7. Pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy of complex oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Duray, S.J.; Buchholz, D.B.; Song, S.N.; Richeson, D.S.; Ketterson, J.B.; Marks, T.J.; Chang, R.P.H. )

    1991-09-16

    We report the results of a pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) process for growing complex oxide films at low background gas pressure (10{sup {minus}4}--10{sup {minus}2} Torr) and low substrate temperature (600--680 {degree}C) using organometallic precursors in an oxygen plasma environment. Our results show that POMBE can extend the capability of organometallic chemical vapor deposition to growing complex oxide films with high precision both in composition and structure without the need for post-deposition oxidation and heat treatments. The growth of phase-pure, highly oriented Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting oxide films {l brace}({ital T}{sub {ital c}} ({ital R}=0)=90.5 K) and {ital J}{sub {ital c}} (77 K, 50 K gauss)=1.1{times}10{sup 5} A/cm{sup 2}{r brace} is given as an example. Similar to the pulsed laser deposition process, the POMBE method has the potential for {ital in} {ital situ} processing of multilayer structures (e.g., junctions).

  8. Heteroepitaxial oxide structures grown by pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, F. H.; Dai, J.-Y.; Markworth, P. R.; Buchholz, D. B.; Chang, R. P. H.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the design, construction, and use of pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE), a plasma-enhanced CVD technique to grow oxide heterostructures. Solid-state precursors are sampled in the gas line via quartz crystal monitors and injected into the O 2 microwave plasma with pulse time durations of a few seconds. The precursors are injected through pneumatic valves in a heated valve box. The valves and microwave power are under computer control. The microwave plasma is ramped between a forward power of 600 and 1500 W to improve film epitaxy. We use POMBE to grow epitaxial BaYZrO 3/MgO, Y-ZrO 2/LAO, and YBa 2Cu 3O 7/Y-ZrO 2/LAO structures. The processing parameters leading to the heteroepitaxy are described. The best epitaxy results in X-ray FWHM of 0.12°, 0.38°, and 0.87° for BaYZrO 3, Y-ZrO 2, and YBa 2Cu 3O 7, respectively. We show the advantages of the POMBE technique over that of plasma-enhanced CVD. Selected TEM results of the heteroepitaxial oxide structures are shown, and the role that temperature plays in the oxide epitaxy. The epitaxy of BaYZrO 3 is the first described in the literature, and that of YSZ is among the best reported.

  9. On the response of electronic personal dosimeters in constant potential and pulsed x- ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, M. C.; Silva, C. R. E.; Oliveira, P. M. C.; da Silva, T. A.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) based on solid state detectors have widely been used but some deficiencies in their response in pulsed radiation beams have been reported. Nowadays, there is not an international standard for pulsed x-ray beams for calibration or type testing of dosimeters. Irradiation conditions for testing the response of EPDs in both the constant potential and pulsed x-ray beams were established in CDTN. Three different types of EPDs were tested in different conditions in similar ISO and IEC x-ray qualities. Results stressed the need of performing additional checks before using EPDs in constant potential or pulsed x-rays.

  10. Development of deflector cavity and RF amplifier for bunch length detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, H. K.; Bhattacharya, T. K.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2016-02-01

    A minimally-interceptive bunch length detector system is being developed for measurement of longitudinal dimension of the bunch beam from RFQ of the radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility at VECC. This detector system is based on secondary electrons emission produced by the primary ion beam hitting a thin tungsten wire placed in the beam path. In this paper we report the design, development and off line testing results of deflector cavity together with its RF sysytem. The deflector cavity is a capacitive loaded helical type λ/2 resonator driven by RF source of 500 W at 37.8 MHz solid state amplifier, realized by combining two amplifier modules of 300 W each. The measured RF characteristics of the resonator, such as frequency, Q value and shunt impedance have been found to be reasonably good and close to the analytical estimation and results of simulation. The design philosophy and test results of individual components of the amplifier are discussed. The test result upto full power shows a good harmonic separation at the individual module level and this is found to improve further when modules are combined together.The results of high power performance test of the deflector cavity together with amplifier are also reported.

  11. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Chunning; Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  12. Fiber optic picosecond laser pulse transmission line for hydrogen ion beam longitudinal profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunning; Liu, Yun; Aleksandrov, Alexander

    2013-07-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for nonintrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H(-)) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multikilowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large-mode-area polarization-maintaining optical fiber to ensure high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter, and pulse width broadening over a 30 m long fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H(-) beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. The experiment is the first demonstration to our knowledge of particle beam profile diagnostics using a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  13. Evolution of electron beam pulses of short duration in the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casillas-Pérez, G. A.; Jeyakumar, S.; Pérez-Enríquez, H. R.; Trinidad, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    Narrowband radio bursts with durations of the order of milliseconds, called spikes, are known to be associated with solar flares. In order to understand the particle beams responsible for the radio spike phenomena, evolution of electron beam pulses injected from a solar flare region into the corona is studied. Numerical integration of the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation is used to follow the evolution of the electron beam pulse. The simulations show that the short duration pulses lose most of their energy within a second of propagation into the corona. Electron beam with a small low energy cut off is thermalized faster than that with a high low energy cut off.

  14. Transverse electric and transverse magnetic pulsed-beam decomposition of time-dependent aperture fields.

    PubMed

    Melamed, Timor; Abuhasira, Dor; Dayan, David

    2012-06-01

    The present contribution is concerned with applying beam-type expansion to a planar aperture time-dependent (TD) electromagnetic field in which the propagating elements, the electromagnetic pulsed-beams, are a priori decomposed into transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) field polarizations. The propagating field is described as a discrete superposition of tilted, shifted, and delayed TE and TM electromagnetic pulsed-beam propagators over the frame spectral lattice. These waveobjects are evaluated by using TD plane-wave spectral representations. Explicit asymptotic expressions for electromagnetic isodiffracting pulsed-quadratic beam propagators are presented, as well as a numerical example.

  15. Compact optical system for pulse-to-pulse laser beam quality measurement and applications in laser machining.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Robert W; Cortés-Martínez, Rodolpho; Waddle, Andrew J; Shephard, Jonathan D; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R; Greenaway, Alan H; Hand, Duncan P

    2004-09-10

    Fluctuations in beam quality (M2) have been observed on a pulse-to-pulse basis from an industrial Nd:YAG laser. This was achieved with a compact multiplane imaging method incorporating quadratically distorted diffraction gratings, which enabled simultaneous imaging of nine planes on a single CCD array. With this system, we measured across a range of beam qualities with an associated error (in M2 variation) of the order of 0.7%. Application of the system to fiber-optic beam delivery and laser drilling is demonstrated.

  16. Compact Optical System for Pulse-to-Pulse Laser Beam Quality Measurement and Applications in Laser Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Robert W.; Cortés-Martínez, Rodolpho; Waddie, Andrew J.; Shephard, Jonathan D.; Taghizadeh, Mohammad R.; Greenaway, Alan H.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2004-09-01

    Fluctuations in beam quality (M^2) have been observed on a pulse-to-pulse basis from an industrial Nd:YAG laser. This was achieved with a compact multiplane imaging method incorporating quadratically distorted diffraction gratings, which enabled simultaneous imaging of nine planes on a single CCD array. With this system, we measured across a range of beam qualities with an associated error (in M^2 variation) of the order of 0.7%. Application of the system to fiber-optic beam delivery and laser drilling is demonstrated.

  17. Two and Three Beam Pumped Optical Parametric Amplifier of Chirped Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ališauskas, S.; Butkus, R.; Pyragaitė, V.; Smilgevičius, V.; Stabinis, A.; Piskarskas, A.

    2010-04-01

    We present two and three beam pumped optical parametric amplifier of broadband chirped pulses. The seed pulses from Ti:sapphire oscillator were stretched and amplified in a non-collinear geometry pumping with up to three beams derived from independent laser amplifiers. The signal with ˜90 nm bandwidth was amplified up to 0.72 mJ. The conversion efficiency dependence on intersection angles of pump beams is also revealed.

  18. The design and construction of a pulsed beam generation system based on high intensity cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, ShiZhong; Yin, ZhiGuo; Li, PengZhan; Song, GuoFang; Wu, LongCheng; Guan, FengPing; Xie, HuaiDong; Jia, XianLu; Lu, YinLong; Zhang, TianJue

    2011-12-01

    In order to perform the studies on a pulsed beam generation system based on a high intensity cyclotron, a test beam line with a pulsed beam generation for a 10 MeV compact cyclotron (CYCIAE-10) has been designed and constructed at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). A 70 MHz continuous H-beam can be pulsed to the pulse length of less than 10 ns with a repetition rate of 4.4 MHz. The sine waveform with a frequency of 2.2 MHz is adopted for the chopper and a mesh structure with single drift and dual gaps is used for the 70 MHz buncher. A helical resonator is designed and constructed based on simulations and experiments on the RF matching for the chopper. A helical inductance loop that is exceptionally large of its kind and equipped with water cooling for the resonator has been successfully wound and a 500 W solid RF amplifier has been manufactured. A special measuring device has been designed, which can be used to measure both the DC beam and the pulsed beam. The required pulsed beam was obtained after pulsed beam tuning.

  19. Characterization and morphology of pulsed electron beam welding on 21-6-9 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kautz, D.D.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the usefulness of pulsed electron beam welding in an industrial setting. The author wished to find out whether a pulsed welding source would decrease the power input needed to obtain a given depth of weld penetration, without compromising the quality of the final weldment. The author also was interested in the use of pulsed electron beam welding of thin to thick sections. For this application, a decrease in the weld toe width was considered to be an improvement in the finished weld. The results of this work indicated that some increase in the weld penetration for a given power input could be obtained with pulsed electron beam welding. However, the fraction of penetration increase in the welds decreased as the power input to the welds was increased. The weld toe width also decreased as the incremental power input to a given length of weldment also decreased. These gains from the use of a pulsed electron beam welding source, were overwhelmed by the poor quality of the finished welds. The welds exhibited a much greater concentration of discontinuities than the continuous wave electron beam welds. The stability of the pulsed electron beam welds was also poor when compared with the continuous wave welds. This author would recommend against using pulsed electron beam welding for typical welding situations. In most cases, weld joint designs can be made to allow for the use of continuous wave electron beam welding. 47 refs., 20 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Pulse radiolysis based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with double-pulse injection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinfeng; Kondoh, Takafumi; Kozawa, Takahiro; Yoshida, Youichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2006-09-01

    A new pulse radiolysis system based on a femtosecond electron beam and a femtosecond laser light with oblique double-pulse injection was developed for studying ultrafast chemical kinetics and primary processes of radiation chemistry. The time resolution of 5.2 ps was obtained by measuring transient absorption kinetics of hydrated electrons in water. The optical density of hydrated electrons was measured as a function of the electron charge. The data indicate that the double-laser-pulse injection technique was a powerful tool for observing the transient absorptions with a good signal to noise ratio in pulse radiolysis.

  1. Design and performance of the pulsed positron beam at Chalmers University of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileshina, L.; Nordlund, A.

    2009-09-01

    A slow monoenergetic pulsed positron beam at Chalmers University of Technology has been built. The system consists mainly of chopper, buncher and accelerator. The achieved positron energy range is in range between 230 eV and 15 keV. The FWHM of the beam resolution function is around 700 ps. The beam intensity is around 103 cps.

  2. Removal of NOx from diesel generator exhaust by pulsed electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Penetrante, B. M., LLNL

    1997-07-03

    The objective of this paper is to determine the effects of electron beam pulse parameters on the utilization of the reactive free radicals for removal of NO{sub x} from diesel generator exhaust. A dose per pulse less than 1 kGy has been determined to be optimum for effective radical utilization. During each post-pulse period, the radicals are utilized in the removal of NO{sub x} in a timescale of around 100 microseconds; thus, with pulse frequencies of around 10 kHz or less, the radical concentrations remain sufficiently low to prevent any significant competition between radical-pollutant and radical-radical reactions. It is shown that a pulsed electron beam reactor, operating with a dose per pulse of less than 1 kGy/pulse and pulse repetition rate of less than 10 kHz, will have the same plasma chemistry efficiency (parts per million of removed NO{sub x} per kGy of electron beam dose) as an electron beam reactor operating with a low dose rate of 50 kGy/s in continuous mode. Ozone accumulation is a limiting factor under high pulse frequency conditions. The total dose requirement determines the optimum combination of dose per pulse and pulse frequency for both radical utilization and prevention of ozone buildup.

  3. A 100 microsec, reliable, 10 Hz pulsed supersonic molecular beam source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.; Duncan, M. D.

    1981-01-01

    A 10-Hz repetition rate, 100-microsec duration, reliable pulsed supersonic molecular beam source is described. Mechanical and electrical design of the pulsed valve are given in detail. Characteristics of the supersonic expansion obtained using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy in acetylene are presented. They include pulse shape, gas rotational and translational cooling as a function of distance from the nozzle, clustering effects, and shock heating at the leading edge of the pulse.

  4. Micro-beam and pulsed laser beam techniques for the micro-fabrication of diamond surface and bulk structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciortino, S.; Bellini, M.; Bosia, F.; Calusi, S.; Corsi, C.; Czelusniak, C.; Gelli, N.; Giuntini, L.; Gorelli, F.; Lagomarsino, S.; Mandò, P. A.; Massi, M.; Olivero, P.; Parrini, G.; Santoro, M.; Sordini, A.; Sytchkova, A.; Taccetti, F.; Vannoni, M.

    2015-04-01

    Micro-fabrication in diamond is applicable in a wide set of emerging technologies, exploiting the exceptional characteristics of diamond for application in bio-physics, photonics and radiation detection. Micro ion-beam irradiation and pulsed laser irradiation are complementary techniques, which permit the implementation of complex geometries, by modification and functionalization of surface and/or bulk material, modifying the optical, electrical and mechanical characteristics of the material. In this article we summarize the work done in Florence (Italy), concerning ion beam and pulsed laser beam micro-fabrication in diamond.

  5. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  6. Kerr self-cleaning of femtosecond-pulsed beams in graded-index multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanwei; Wright, Logan G; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Wise, Frank W

    2016-08-15

    We observe a nonlinear spatial self-cleaning process for femtosecond pulses in graded-index (GRIN) multimode fiber (MMF). Pulses with ∼80 fs duration at 1030 nm are launched into GRIN MMF with 62.5 μm core. The near-field beam profile at the output end of the fiber evolves from a speckled pattern to a centered, bell-shaped transverse structure with increasing pulse energy. The experimental observations agree well with numerical simulations, which show that the Kerr nonlinearity underlies the process. This self-cleaning process may find applications in ultrafast pulse generation and beam-combining.

  7. Kerr self-cleaning of femtosecond-pulsed beams in graded-index multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanwei; Wright, Logan G; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Wise, Frank W

    2016-08-15

    We observe a nonlinear spatial self-cleaning process for femtosecond pulses in graded-index (GRIN) multimode fiber (MMF). Pulses with ∼80 fs duration at 1030 nm are launched into GRIN MMF with 62.5 μm core. The near-field beam profile at the output end of the fiber evolves from a speckled pattern to a centered, bell-shaped transverse structure with increasing pulse energy. The experimental observations agree well with numerical simulations, which show that the Kerr nonlinearity underlies the process. This self-cleaning process may find applications in ultrafast pulse generation and beam-combining. PMID:27519060

  8. Using a short-pulse diffraction-limited laser beam to probe filamentation of a random phase plate smoothed beam.

    PubMed

    Kline, J L; Montgomery, D S; Flippo, K A; Johnson, R P; Rose, H A; Shimada, T; Williams, E A

    2008-10-01

    A short pulse (few picoseconds) laser probe provides high temporal resolution measurements to elucidate details of fast dynamic phenomena not observable with typical longer laser pulse probes and gated diagnostics. Such a short pulse laser probe (SPLP) has been used to measure filamentation of a random phase plate (RPP) smoothed laser beam in a gas-jet plasma. The plasma index of refraction due to driven density and temperature fluctuations by the RPP beam perturbs the phase front of a SPLP propagating at a 90 degree angle with respect to the RPP interaction beam. The density and temperature fluctuations are quasistatic on the time scale of the SPLP (approximately 2 ps). The transmitted near-field intensity distribution from the SPLP provides a measure of the phase front perturbation. At low plasma densities, the transmitted intensity pattern is asymmetric with striations across the entire probe beam in the direction of the RPP smoothed beam. As the plasma density increases, the striations break up into smaller sizes along the direction of the RPP beam propagation. The breakup of the intensity pattern is consistent with self-focusing of the RPP smoothed interaction beam. Simulations of the experiment using the wave propagation code, PF3D, are in qualitative agreement demonstrating that the asymmetric striations can be attributed to the RPP driven density fluctuations. Quantification of the beam breakup measured by the transmitted SPLP could lead to a new method for measuring self-focusing of lasers in underdense plasmas.

  9. Reference-beam storage for long-range low-coherence pulsed Doppler lidar.

    PubMed

    Dorrington, A A; Kunnemeyer, R; Danehy, P M

    2001-06-20

    We present a laser Doppler velocimeter that stores and delays the reference beam to preserve coherence with a long-path-length measurement beam. Our storage and delay technique relaxes the strict coherence requirements associated with lidar laser sources, permitting the use of low-coherence lasers. This technique potentially could reduce the cost and size of lidar systems for commercial applications. Experiments that use fiber-optic ring resonators to store the reference beams and generate reference pulse trains validated the concept. We obtained results at several simulated distances by beating each usable reference pulse with a delayed Doppler-shifted measurement beam reflected off a rotating mirror.

  10. Amplification of 1 ps Pulse Length Beam by Stimulated Raman Scattering of a 1 ns Beam in a Low Density Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Kirkwood, R K; Niemann, C; Meezan, N; Wilks, S C; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Wurtele, J; Charman, A E; Hur, M S; Lindberg, R; Fisch, N; Malkin, V M

    2005-06-12

    The compression of a laser pulse by amplification of an ultra short pulse beam which seeds the stimulated Raman scatter of the first beam has been long been discussed in the context of solid and gas media. We investigate the possibility of using intersecting beams in a plasma to compress nanosecond pulses to picosecond duration by scattering from driven electron waves. Recent theoretical studies have shown the possibility of efficient compression with large amplitude, non-linear Langmuir waves driven either by SRS [1] or non-resonantly [2]. We describe experiments in which a plasma suitable for pulse compression is created, and amplification of an ultra short pulse beam is demonstrated.

  11. 2. View of blast deflector fences along northeast side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View of blast deflector fences along northeast side of the operational apron. View to northwest. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  12. 1. View of blast deflector fences along southwest side of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View of blast deflector fences along southwest side of the operational apron. View to west. - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Blast Deflector Fences, Northeast & Southwest sides of Operational Apron, Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  13. Electron-beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A. )

    2010-01-01

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort X-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons are considered.

  14. A near-term ion-beam experiment to demonstrate pulse shortening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, K.; Woo, K. M.; Yu, S. S.

    2014-04-01

    Short beam pulse at a target is essential for High Energy Density Physics and Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF). A technique for ion-beam pulse shortening by the reduction of longitudinal emittance has recently been developed. An experimental demonstration of this technique would be important not only for the long-term design of HIF and HEDP targets, but would have immediate applications for near-term target experiments as well. To this end, using 3D PIC simulation code WARP, we have designed an experiment based on beam parameters of the existing NDCX-II machine at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The proposed experiment only requires non-invasive beam current measurements at two existing diagnostic stations and the implementation of two induction cells with special voltage waveforms, one for energy correction and a second one for final pulse compression. We show that the final pulse length in the NDCX-II experiment can be shortened by 46%.

  15. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    SciTech Connect

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-15

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60 J on target in a 500 fs pulse, around 100 TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054 {mu}m. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2} and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  16. Target diagnostics for commissioning the AWE HELEN Laser Facility 100 TW chirped pulse amplification beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eagleton, R. T.; Clark, E. L.; Davies, H. M.; Edwards, R. D.; Gales, S.; Girling, M. T.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hopps, N. W.; James, S. F.; Kopec, M. F.; Nolan, J. R.; Ryder, K.

    2006-10-01

    The capability of the HELEN laser at the Atomic Weapons Establishment Aldermaston has been enhanced by the addition of a short-pulse laser beam to augment the twin opposing nanosecond time scale beams. The short-pulse beam utilizes the chirped pulse amplification (CPA) technique and is capable of delivering up to 60J on target in a 500fs pulse, around 100TW, at the fundamental laser wavelength of 1.054μm. During the commissioning phase a number of diagnostic systems have been fielded, these include: x-ray pinhole imaging of the laser heated spot, charged particle time of flight, thermoluminescent dosimeter array, calibrated radiochromic film, and CR39 nuclear track detector. These diagnostic systems have been used to verify the performance of the CPA beam to achieve a focused intensity of around 1019Wcm-2 and to underwrite the facility radiological safety system.

  17. Tracing the plasma interactions for pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jikun; Stender, Dieter; Pichler, Markus; Pergolesi, Daniele; Schneider, Christof W.; Wokaun, Alexander; Lippert, Thomas; Döbeli, Max

    2015-10-28

    Pulsed reactive crossed-beam laser ablation is an effective technique to govern the chemical activity of plasma species and background molecules during pulsed laser deposition. Instead of using a constant background pressure, a gas pulse with a reactive gas, synchronized with the laser beam, is injected into vacuum or a low background pressure near the ablated area of the target. It intercepts the initially generated plasma plume, thereby enhancing the physicochemical interactions between the gaseous environment and the plasma species. For this study, kinetic energy resolved mass-spectrometry and time-resolved plasma imaging were used to study the physicochemical processes occurring during the reactive crossed beam laser ablation of a partially {sup 18}O substituted La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} target using oxygen as gas pulse. The characteristics of the ablated plasma are compared with those observed during pulsed laser deposition in different oxygen background pressures.

  18. Modeling of High Efficiency Solar Cells Under Laser Pulse for Power Beaming Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells may be used as receivers for laser power beaming. To understand the behavior of solar cells when illuminated by a pulsed laser, the time response of gallium arsenide and silicon solar cells to pulsed monochromatic input has been modeled using a finite element solar cell model.

  19. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  20. Short-pulse, compressed ion beams at the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidl, P. A.; Barnard, J. J.; Davidson, R. C.; Friedman, A.; Gilson, E. P.; Grote, D.; Ji, Q.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Persaud, A.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.

    2016-05-01

    We have commenced experiments with intense short pulses of ion beams on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with 1-mm beam spot size within 2.5 ns full-width at half maximum. The ion kinetic energy is 1.2 MeV. To enable the short pulse duration and mm-scale focal spot radius, the beam is neutralized in a 1.5-meter-long drift compression section following the last accelerator cell. A short-focal-length solenoid focuses the beam in the presence of the volumetric plasma that is near the target. In the accelerator, the line-charge density increases due to the velocity ramp imparted on the beam bunch. The scientific topics to be explored are warm dense matter, the dynamics of radiation damage in materials, and intense beam and beam-plasma physics including select topics of relevance to the development of heavy-ion drivers for inertial fusion energy. Below the transition to melting, the short beam pulses offer an opportunity to study the multi-scale dynamics of radiation-induced damage in materials with pump-probe experiments, and to stabilize novel metastable phases of materials when short-pulse heating is followed by rapid quenching. First experiments used a lithium ion source; a new plasma-based helium ion source shows much greater charge delivered to the target.

  1. Designing Neutralized Drift Compression for Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses in a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Startsev, E.A.; Barnard, J.J.; Friedman, A.; Lee, E.P.; Lidia, S.M.; Logan, B.G.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Welch, D.R.; Sefkow, A.B.

    2009-04-28

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective method for particle beam focusing and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear radial and longitudinal velocity drift is applied to a beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the drift-compression section. The beam intensity can increase more than a factor of 100 in both the radial and longitudinal directions, resulting in more than 10,000 times increase in the beam number density during this process. The self-electric and self-magnetic fields can prevent tight ballistic focusing and have to be neutralized by supplying neutralizing electrons. This paper presents a survey of the present theoretical understanding of the drift compression process and plasma neutralization of intense particle beams. The optimal configuration of focusing and neutralizing elements is discussed in this paper.

  2. Dose rate dependence of the PTW 60019 microDiamond detector in high dose-per-pulse pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla-González, Luis; Gómez, Faustino; Pombar, Miguel; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Recombination effects can affect the detectors used for the dosimetry of radiotherapy fields. They are important when using ionization chambers, especially in liquid-filled ionization chambers, and should be corrected for. The introduction of flattening-filter-free accelerators increases the typical dose-per-pulse used in radiotherapy beams, which leads to more important recombination effects. Diamond detectors provide a good solution for the dosimetry and quality assurance of small radiotherapy fields, due to their low energy dependence and small volume. The group of Università di Roma Tor Vergata has developed a synthetic diamond detector, which is commercialized by PTW as microDiamond detector type 60019. In this work we present an experimental characterization of the collection efficiency of the microDiamond detector, focusing on high dose-per-pulse FFF beams. The collection efficiency decreases with dose-per-pulse, down to 0.978 at 2.2 mGy/pulse, following a Fowler-Attix-like curve. On the other hand, we have found no significant dependence of the collection efficiency on the pulse repetition frequency (or pulse period).

  3. Long-pulse beam acceleration of MeV-class H(-) ion beams for ITER NB accelerator.

    PubMed

    Umeda, N; Kashiwagi, M; Taniguchi, M; Tobari, H; Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Yamanaka, H; Inoue, T; Kojima, A; Hanada, M

    2014-02-01

    In order to realize neutral beam systems in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor whose target is to produce a 1 MeV, 200 A/m(2) during 3600 s D(-) ion beam, the electrostatic five-stages negative ion accelerator so-called "MeV accelerator" has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. To extend pulse length, heat load of the acceleration grids was reduced by controlling the ion beam trajectory. Namely, the beam deflection due to the residual magnetic field of filter magnet was suppressed with the newly developed extractor with a 0.5 mm off-set aperture displacement. The new extractor improved the deflection angle from 6 mrad to 1 mrad, resulting in the reduction of direct interception of negative ions from 23% to 15% of the total acceleration power, respectively. As a result, the pulse length of 130 A/m(2), 881 keV H(-) ion beam has been successfully extended from a previous value of 0.4 s to 8.7 s. This is the first long pulse negative ion beam acceleration over 100 MW/m(2).

  4. Laser pulse shaping for generating uniform three-dimensional ellipsoidal electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Chmnerisov, S.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2009-02-01

    A scheme of generating a uniform ellipsoidal laser pulse for high-brightness photoinjectors is discussed. The scheme is based on the chromatic aberration of a dispersive lens. Fourier optics simulation reveals the interplay of group velocity delay and dispersion in the scheme, as well as diffractions. Particle tracking simulation shows that the beam generated by such a laser pulse approaches the performance of that by an ideal ellipsoidal laser pulse and represents a significant improvement from the traditionally proposed cylindrical beam geometry. The scheme is tested in an 800-nm, optical proof-of-principle experiment at lower peak power with excellent agreement between the measurement and simulation.

  5. Pulsed cathodoluminescence of diamond, calcite, spodumene, and fluorite under the action of subnanosecond electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2010-11-01

    Amplitude and temporal characteristics of pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) of diamond (natural and synthetic), calcite, spodumene, and fluorite have been studied at a temporal resolution of ˜0.3 ns. The PCL was generated by electron beam pulses with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.1, 0.25, and 0.65 ns. The PCL spectra have been measured for the emission induced by 0.1- and 0.25-ns pulses at a beam current density of ˜90 A/cm2.

  6. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  7. Pair Creation in QED-Strong Pulsed Laser Fields Interacting with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Igor V.; Naumova, Natalia M.; Nees, John A.; Mourou, Gerard A.

    2010-11-05

    QED effects are known to occur in a strong laser pulse interaction with a counterpropagating electron beam, among these effects being electron-positron pair creation. We discuss the range of laser pulse intensities of J{>=}5x10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2} combined with electron beam energies of tens of GeV. In this regime multiple pairs may be generated from a single beam electron, some of the newborn particles being capable of further pair production. Radiation backreaction prevents avalanche development and limits pair creation. The system of integro-differential kinetic equations for electrons, positrons and {gamma} photons is derived and solved numerically.

  8. Method and system for treating an interior surface of a workpiece using a charged particle beam

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, David Richard

    2007-05-23

    A method and system of treating an interior surface on an internal cavity of a workpiece using a charged particle beam. A beam deflector surface of a beam deflector is placed within the internal cavity of the workpiece and is used to redirect the charged particle beam toward the interior surface to treat the interior surface.

  9. Influence of Turbulent Atmosphere on Polarization Properties of Stochastic Electromagnetic Pulsed Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chao-Liang; Zhao, Zhi-Guo; Li, Xiao-Feng; Pan, Liu-Zhan; Yuan, Xiao

    2011-02-01

    Using the coherence theory of non-stationary fields and the characterization of stochastic electromagnetic pulsed beams, the analytical expression for the spectral degree of polarization of stochastic electromagnetic Gaussian Schell-model pulsed (GSMP) beams in turbulent atmosphere is derived and is used to study the polarization properties of stochastic electromagnetic GSMP beams propagating through turbulent atmosphere. The results of numerical calculation are given to illustrate the dependence of spectral degree of polarization on the pulse frequency, refraction index structure constant and spatial correlation length. It is shown that, compared with free-space case, in turbulent atmosphere propagation there are two positions at which the on-axis spectral degree of polarization P is equal to zero. The position change depends on the pulse frequency, refraction index structure constant and spatial correlation length.

  10. Propagation of the pulsed electron beam of nanosecond duration in gas composition of high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, G.; Sazonov, R.; Ponomarev, D.; Remnev, G.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation of the propagation of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions (50, 300, and 760 Torr): sulfur hexafluoride and hydrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrogen, sulfur hexafluoride and argon. The experiments have been performed using the TEA-500 laboratory accelerator. The main parameters of the accelerator are as follows: an accelerating voltage of 500 kV; an electron beam current of 10 kA; a pulse width at half maximum of 60 ns; a pulse energy of 200 J; a pulse repetition rate of up to 5 pulses per second, a beam diameter of 5 cm. The pulsed electron beam was injected into a 55 cm metal drift tube. The drift tube is equipped with three reverse-current shunts with simultaneous detecting of signals. The obtained results of the investigation make it possible to conclude that the picture of the processes occurring in the interaction of an electron beam in the high-pressure gas compositions is different from that observed in the propagation of the electron beam in the low-pressure gas compositions (1 Torr).

  11. Beamline pulsing system for cyclotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, Jouko; Gustafsson, Jouni; Kivikoski, Markku; Liukkonen, Esko; Nieminen, Veikko

    A beamline pulsing system for cyclotrons is presented. The function of this system is to modify the structure of a cyclotron ion beam guided to the desired research target by a beamline. In some in-beam experiments, an adjustment of the time structure of the beam is sometimes needed. This kind of situation occurs if, for example, the life time of the target material is longer than the period corresponding to the beam frequency. In this case, the frequency of the ion pulses hitting the target is 10-21 MHz depending on the frequency of the acceleration voltage. The adjustment of the ion beam pulse frequency is carried out by a beamline deflector. Deflection is achieved by feeding a high-amplitude (10-15 kV) RF-signal between the deflection plates positioned into the beamline. This signal is generated from the cyclotron reference signal by frequency division, phase adjustment and amplification. Simulation and test results indicate that the specified deflection signal level is achieved with 1 kW of RF-power.

  12. Thermal Acoustic Sensor for High Pulse Energy X-ray FEL Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, T.J.; Frisch, J.C.; Kraft, E.M.; Loos, J.; Bentsen, G.S.; /Rochester U.

    2011-12-13

    The pulse energy density of X-ray FELs will saturate or destroy conventional X-ray diagnostics, and the use of large beam attenuation will result in a beam that is dominated by harmonics. We present preliminary results at the LCLS from a pulse energy detector based on the thermal acoustic effect. In this type of detector an X-ray resistant material (boron carbide in this system) intercepts the beam. The pulse heating of the target material produces an acoustic pulse that can be detected with high frequency microphones to produce a signal that is linear in the absorbed energy. The thermal acoustic detector is designed to provide first- and second-order calorimetric measurement of X-ray FEL pulse energy. The first-order calorimetry is a direct temperature measurement of a target designed to absorb all or most of the FEL pulse power with minimal heat leak. The second-order measurement detects the vibration caused by the rapid thermoelastic expansion of the target material each time it absorbs a photon pulse. Both the temperature change and the amplitude of the acoustic signal are directly related to the photon pulse energy.

  13. Practical constraints on sources for pulsed beam lithographies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, J.Y.; Picraux, S.T.; Light, R.W.; Hsing, W.W.

    1988-03-01

    Many of the sources currently being considered for advanced microlithography are pulsed, rather than continuous. These sources are characterized not merely by brightness and lifetime, but more generally by shot-to-shot stability, lifetime, single-pulse fluence, and repetition rate. These four characteristics are constrained by practical considerations, and, within limits, can be traded off against each other. We describe these tradeoffs and optimal source operating regimes for lithographies based on broad- and narrow-band excimer laser sources and on pulsed x-ray sources. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  14. A new high intensity and short-pulse molecular beam valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, B.; Claus, P. F. H.; van Oorschot, B. G. M.; Gerritsen, L.; Eppink, A. T. J. B.; van de Meerakker, S. Y. T.; Parker, D. H.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we report on the design and performance of a new home-built pulsed gas valve, which we refer to as the Nijmegen Pulsed Valve (NPV). The main output characteristics include a short pulse width (as short as 20 μs) combined with operating rates up to 30 Hz. The operation principle of the NPV is based on the Lorentz force created by a pulsed current passing through an aluminum strip located within a magnetic field, which opens the nozzle periodically. The amplitude of displacement of the opening mechanism is sufficient to allow the use of nozzles with up to 1.0 mm diameter. To investigate the performance of the valve, several characterizations were performed with different experimental methods. First, a fast ionization gauge was used to measure the beam intensity of the free jet emanating from the NPV. We compare free jets from the NPV with those from several other pulsed valves in current use in our laboratory. Results showed that a high intensity and short pulse-length beam could be generated by the new valve. Second, the NPV was tested in combination with a skimmer, where resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization combined with velocity map imaging was used to show that the NPV was able to produce a pulsed molecular beam with short pulse duration (˜20 μs using 0.1% NO/He at 6 bars) and low rotational temperature (˜1 K using 0.5% NO/Ar at 6 bars). Third, a novel two-point pump-probe method was employed which we label double delay scan. This method allows a full kinematic characterization of the molecular beam, including accurate speed ratios at different temporal positions. It was found that the speed ratio was maximum (S = 50 using 0.1% NO/He at 3 bars) at the peak position of the molecular beam and decreased when it was on the leading or falling edge.

  15. Transient Self-Amplified Cerenkov Radiation with a Short Pulse Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, B R; Blackfield, D T; Camacho, J F

    2009-01-22

    An analytic and numerical examination of the slow wave Cerenkov free electron maser is presented. We consider the steady state amplifier configuration as well as operation in the selfamplified spontaneous emission (SASE) regime. The linear theory is extended to include electron beams that have a parabolic radial density inhomogeneity. Closed form solutions for the dispersion relation and modal structure of the electromagnetic field are determined in this inhomogeneous case. To determine the steady state response, a macro-particle approach is used to develop a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave, which are solved in conjunction with the particle dynamical equations to determine the response when the system is driven as an amplifier with a time harmonic source. We then consider the case in which a fast rise time electron beam is injected into a dielectric loaded waveguide. In this case, radiation is generated by SASE, with the instability seeded by the leading edge of the electron beam. A pulse of radiation is produced, slipping behind the leading edge of the beam due to the disparity between the group velocity of the radiation and the beam velocity. Short pulses of microwave radiation are generated in the SASE regime and are investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The nonlinear dynamics are significantly more complicated in the transient SASE regime when compared with the steady state amplifier model due to the slippage of the radiation with respect to the beam. As strong self-bunching of the electron beam develops due to SASE, short pulses of superradiant emission develop with peak powers significantly larger than the predicted saturated power based on the steady state amplifier model. As these superradiant pulses grow, their pulse length decreases and forms a series of soliton-like pulses. Comparisons between the linear theory, macro-particle model, and PIC simulations are

  16. Physics of Neutralization of Intense High-Energy Ion Beam Pulses by Electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-04-28

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self- magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  17. Physics of neutralization of intense high-energy ion beam pulses by electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D.; Davidson, R. C.; Dorf, M. A.; Startsev, E. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Lee, E. P.; Friedman, A.

    2010-05-15

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by electrons form the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100 G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating through the

  18. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  19. Flyer Acceleration by Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation and Application for Space Propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Nobuhiro; Buttapeng, Chainarong; Yazawa, Masaru; Kashine, Kenji; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    2004-02-04

    Flyer acceleration by ablation plasma pressure produced by irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam has been studied. Acceleration process including expansion of ablation plasma was simulated based on fluid model. And interaction between incident pulsed ion beam and a flyer target was considered as accounting stopping power of it. In experiments, we used ETIGO-II intense pulsed ion beam generator with two kinds of diodes; 1) Magnetically Insulated Diode (MID, power densities of <100 J/cm2) and 2) Spherical-focused Plasma Focus Diode (SPFD, power densities of up to 4.3 kJ/cm2). Numerical results of accelerated flyer velocity agreed well with measured one over wide range of incident ion beam energy density. Flyer velocity of 5.6 km/s and ablation plasma pressure of 15 GPa was demonstrated by the present experiments. Acceleration of double-layer target consists of gold/aluminum was studied. For adequate layer thickness, such a flyer target could be much more accelerated than a single layer. Effect of waveform of ion beam was also examined. Parabolic waveform could accelerate more efficiently than rectangular waveform. Applicability of ablation propulsion was discussed. Specific impulse of 7000{approx}8000 seconds and time averaged thrust of up to 5000{approx}6000N can be expected. Their values can be controllable by changing power density of incident ion beam and pulse duration.

  20. Pulsed single-photon Bessel beams propagation in non-Kolmogorov turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yixin; Sheng, Xueli

    2012-06-01

    The analytic expressions are derived for the turbulent broadening, the long-term temporal broadening, the acquisition probability of single-pulse and the transmittance probability density of a pulsed space-time Bessel photon-beam propagating along a slant path in weak non-Kolmogorov atmospheric turbulence, based on the assumption of a pulsed Bessel beam with the initial Gaussian temporal shape of pulse and diffraction-free spatial distribution. It is shown that the turbulent broadening and the long-term temporal broadening are the nolinear-increase functions of the index of non-Kolmogorov turbulence and the effect of non-Kolmogorov index on the acquisition probability of single-pulse can be approximatively described by a Gaussian function with a peak value at non-Kolmogorov index close to 3.7 for the case of the input half-pulse width greater than picosecond (ps). The transmittance of probability density is decreasing as the increasing of the structure constant of the index of refraction, the zenith angle of communication channel, the propagation path and the pulse broadening. There is turbulent diffraction for Bessel beam propagation in turbulent atmosphere, but its free-space diffraction-free characteristic is reservation.

  1. Laser beam deflection monitoring of Nd: YAG laser ablation: pulse shape and repetition rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaci, Janez; Možina, Janez

    1993-05-01

    The laser beam deflection probe has been employed to study blast waves generated during ablation of metallic surfaces by sequences of 1.06 μm Nd:YAG laser pulses separated by less than 1μs. A fluence threshold has been found, below which the effects of individual pulses can be resolved by the laser probe. Above that, the deflection signal has a similar form as if the surface were irradiated with a single pulse. Analysis of the signals in terms of the spherical blast wave theory shows that a pulse sequence generates a weaker blast wave than a single pulse of equal total energy. On the other hand, the sequence yields a higher etch depth than the single pulse.

  2. Single-beam Denisyuk holograms recording with pulsed 30Hz RGB laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacharovas, Stanislovas; Bakanas, Ramūnas; Stankauskas, Algimantas

    2016-03-01

    It is well known fact that holograms can be recorded either by continuous wave (CW) laser, or by single pulse coming from pulsed laser. However, multi-pulse or multiple-exposure holograms were used only in interferometry as well as for information storage. We have used Geola's single longitudinal mode pulsed RGB laser to record Denisyuk type holograms. We successfully recorded objects situated at the distance of more than 30cm, employing the multi-pulse working regime of the laser. To record Denisyuk hologram we have used 50 ns duration 440, 660nm wavelength and 35ns duration 532nm wavelength laser pulses at the repetition rate of 30Hz. As photosensitive medium we have used Slavich-Geola PFG-03C glass photoplate. Radiations with different wavelengths were mixed into "white" beam, collimated and directed onto the photoplate. For further objects illumination an additional flat silver coated mirror was used.

  3. 22. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTORS. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  4. 24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, OFF VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTOR, BRAKE, PINION SHAFT, DRIVE WHEEL. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  5. 23. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. UPPER STATION, LOWER FLOOR, MOTOR ROOM, VERTICAL DEFLECTOR SHEAVE, MOTORS. - Monongahela Incline Plane, Connecting North side of Grandview Avenue at Wyoming Street with West Carson Street near Smithfield Street, Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA

  6. DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW IN THE FLAME TRENCH LOOKING NORTH, FLAME DEFLECTOR IN THE FOREGROUND, WATER PIPES AND VALVE ASSEMBLIES ON THE FOREGROUND. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Redstone Rocket (Missile) Test Stand, Dodd Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  7. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT CENTER, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT CENTER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  9. 4. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  10. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  11. 1. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTH. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  12. 9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  13. 5. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, COUNTERFORT VISIBLE AT REAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, COUNTERFORT VISIBLE AT REAR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  14. 3. SOUTH FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE ROOF, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM THE REINFORCED CONCRETE ROOF, VIEW TOWARDS EAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. Edwards Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking southeast. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. Blast deflector traps smoke and debris from explosive trains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkowski, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    Blast deflector protects interior areas and personnel from the smoke and debris of explosive trains. It contains open-cell foam to absorb the pressure loads generated by explosive charges and control the smoke and debris.

  17. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT UPPER LEFT, FERROCEMENT APRON CONTROLS AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT UPPER LEFT, FERROCEMENT APRON CONTROLS AT LOWER RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  18. 7. COUNTERFORT, NORTHWEST SIDE OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. COUNTERFORT, NORTHWEST SIDE OF FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 8. NORTH FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS WEST. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. NORTH FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS WEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 5. SOUTHEAST FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. Glenn L. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHEAST FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  1. 1. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF FROM NORTHWEST EDGE, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  3. 6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AND FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARD SOUTHEAST. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FLAME DEFLECTOR AND FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARD SOUTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  4. 6. FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. Glenn L. Martin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  5. 7. FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. Glenn L. Martin ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. FLAME DEFLECTOR, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  6. 11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT FAR CENTER RIGHT. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-4, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  7. 2. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. CLOSE UP OF FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM FERROCEMENT APRON, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  8. 6. VIEW OF FLAME DEFLECTOR DIRECTLY UNDER CAPTIVE TEST STAND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF FLAME DEFLECTOR DIRECTLY UNDER CAPTIVE TEST STAND WITH MOBILE SERVICE STRUCTURE IN BACKGROUND; VIEW TO WEST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28501, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. Suppressing beam-centroid motion in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekdahl, Carl; Abeyta, E. O.; Archuleta, R.; Bender, H.; Broste, W.; Carlson, C.; Cook, G.; Frayer, D.; Harrison, J.; Hughes, T.; Johnson, J.; Jacquez, E.; McCuistian, B. Trent; Montoya, N.; Nath, S.; Nielsen, K.; Rose, C.; Schulze, M.; Smith, H. V.; Thoma, C.; Tom, C. Y.

    2011-12-01

    The second axis of the dual-axis radiography of hydrodynamic testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6μs. It does this by slicing four micropulses out of a 2-μs long electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The 1.8-kA beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated to more than 16 MeV by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for multipulse flash radiography. High-frequency motion, such as from beam-breakup (BBU) instability, would blur the individual spots. Low-frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed-power variation, would produce spot-to-spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it. Using the methods discussed, we have reduced beam motion at the accelerator exit to less than 2% of the beam envelope radius for the high-frequency BBU, and less than 1/3 of the envelope radius for the low-frequency sweep.

  10. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  11. Influence of Electron Beam Pulses on Hα Line Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varady, M.; Kašparova, J.; Karlický, M.; Heinzel, P.; Moravec, Z.

    In this contribution we present results of our simulations focused on determination of spectroscopic signs of the presence of non--thermal electrons in the formation region of Hα using three mutually communicating codes. The originally autonomous and highly specialised codes model three simultaneously acting processes in flares: the precipitation and energy dissipation of the non-thermal power--law electron beams in the solar atmosphere, the hydrodynamic response of the atmosphere to the energy deposited by the beams, and the radiative transfer in chromosphere and photosphere which determines the hydrogen line profiles and their time evolution. The results show possible existence of a new diagnostic method on presence of electron beams in the formation region of the Hα line.

  12. Radio frequency elevator for a pulsed positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickmann, Marcel; Mitteneder, Johannes; Kögel, Gottfried; Egger, Werner; Sperr, Peter; Ackermann, Ulrich; Piochacz, Christian; Dollinger, Günther

    2016-06-01

    An elevator increases the potential energy of a particle beam with respect to ground potential without any alteration of kinetic energy and other beam parameters. This elevator is necessary for the implementation of the Munich Scanning Positron Microscope (SPM) at the intense positron source NEPOMUC at the research reactor FRM II in Munich. The principles of the rf elevator for pure electrostatically guided positrons are described. Measurements of beam quality behind the elevator are reported, which confirm that after the implementation of elevator and SPM at NEPOMUC the SPM can be operated at a considerably improved resolution (~ 0.3 μm) and event rate (~3.7 kHz) compared to the laboratory based β+-source.

  13. Charge collection efficiency in ionization chambers exposed to electron beams with high dose per pulse.

    PubMed

    Laitano, R F; Guerra, A S; Pimpinella, M; Caporali, C; Petrucci, A

    2006-12-21

    The correction for charge recombination was determined for different plane-parallel ionization chambers exposed to clinical electron beams with low and high dose per pulse, respectively. The electron energy was nearly the same (about 7 and 9 MeV) for any of the beams used. Boag's two-voltage analysis (TVA) was used to determine the correction for ion losses, k(s), relevant to each chamber considered. The presence of free electrons in the air of the chamber cavity was accounted for in determining k(s) by TVA. The determination of k(s) was made on the basis of the models for ion recombination proposed in past years by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk to account for the presence of free electrons. The absorbed dose measurements in both low-dose-per-pulse (less than 0.3 mGy per pulse) and high-dose-per-pulse (20-120 mGy per pulse range) electron beams were compared with ferrous sulphate chemical dosimetry, a method independent of the dose per pulse. The results of the comparison support the conclusion that one of the models is more adequate to correct for ion recombination, even in high-dose-per-pulse conditions, provided that the fraction of free electrons is properly assessed. In this respect the drift velocity and the time constant for attachment of electrons in the air of the chamber cavity are rather critical parameters because of their dependence on chamber dimensions and operational conditions. Finally, a determination of the factor k(s) was also made by zero extrapolation of the 1/Q versus 1/V saturation curves, leading to the conclusion that this method does not provide consistent results in high-dose-per-pulse beams. PMID:17148826

  14. High-intensity pulsed source of polarized protons with an atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Belov, A.S.; Esin, S.K.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.E.; Stepanov, A.A.; Yakushev, V.P.

    1985-10-25

    A source of polarized protons with a beam current up to 2.5 mA in the pulse, a degree of polarization 0.78 +- 0.01, a current pulse length of 120 ..mu..s, and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz is described. This is the first source of polarized protons which makes use of the charge exchange of polarized hydrogen atoms with ions of a deuterium plasma.

  15. Effect of electron beam pulse width on time-of-flight spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but useful formula describing the effect of electron gun pulse width on the time of flight (TOF) spectra measured in translational spectroscopy experiments is developed. An approximately monoenergetic pulsed electrostatically focused electron beam traverses a scattering cell filled with a Maxwellian gas. Inelastic electron collisions with the gas produce metastable particles, ions, scattered electrons, and photons which then pass through a collimating slit system at right angles to the electron beam. TOF techniques are used to separate the photon signal from the metastable particle signal and to measure the TOF distribution of the metastable species.

  16. Terahertz emission during interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with gas cluster beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakin, A. V.; Borodin, A. V.; Dzhidzhoev, M. S.; Gorgienko, V. M.; Esaulkov, M. N.; Zhvaniya, I. A.; Kuzechkin, N. A.; Ozheredov, I. A.; Sidorov, A. Yu; Solyankin, P. M.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of experimental study of terahertz (THz) generation in gas cluster beam excited by intense femtosecond laser pulses. Cluster beam was produced by partial condensation of pure Ar and mixtures CF2Cl2+He, Ar+He during their expansion through a conical nozzle into vacuum. There were used two excitation schemes in our experiments: single color and two color (fundamental frequency mixed with its second harmonic). We have studied how THz signal scales with various control parameters such as laser pulse duration, gas backing pressure and laser pulse energy. Simultaneously we measured intensity of X-Ray emission which originates from laser-cluster interaction. We found that in a single color scheme energy of THz pulses from Ar cluster beam strongly decreases in the region of minimum laser pulse duration while X-Ray power is maximal under these conditions. Both in single- and two color excitation regimes THz signal demonstrated growth without saturation with increasing of optical pulse energy up to its peak value of 25 mJ.

  17. Diffraction of an optical pulse as an expansion in ultrashort orthogonal Gaussian beam modes.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Ronan J; Murphy, J Anthony

    2013-02-01

    The Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam expansion is described as a numerical and physical model of paraxial ultrashort pulse diffraction in the time domain. An overview of the dynamics of higher-order ultrashort planar LG modes is given through numerical simulations, and the finite width of these beams is shown to induce a dispersive-like axial broadening of the fields, which creates related variations in the on-axis amplitude of such pulses. The propagation of a pulsed plane wave scattered at an aperture is then illustrated as a finite weighted sum of individual planar LG pulses, which allows for intuitive illustration of the convergence of this expansion technique. By applying such an expansion to diffraction at a hard aperture, the planar pulsed LG beams are described as the paraxial analogs of the Bessel boundary waves typically observed in such situations, with both exhibiting superluminal group velocities along the optical axis. Numerical results of pulse diffraction at an aperture highlight the suitability of the LG expansion method for efficient and practical simulation of ultrashort fields in the paraxial regime.

  18. Collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power of an ion beam pulse in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Qi, Xin E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn Xiao, Guo-qing; Yang, Lei E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    A two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to study the collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power for a hydrogen ion beam pulse propagation in hydrogen plasmas. The dependence of collective effects on the beam velocity and density is obtained and discussed. For the beam velocity, it is found that the collective effects have the strongest impact on the wakefield as well as the stopping power in the case of the intermediate beam velocities, in which the stopping power is also the largest. For the beam density, it is found that at low beam densities, the collective contribution to the stopping power increase linearly with the increase of the beam density, which corresponds well to the results calculated using the dielectric theory. However, at high beam densities, our results show that after reaching a maximum value, the collective contribution to the stopping power starts to decrease significantly with the increase of the beam density. Besides, at high beam densities, the wakefield loses typical V-shaped cone structures, and the wavelength of the oscillation wakefield increases as the beam density increases.

  19. Amplification of stimulated Brillouin scattering of two collinear pulsed laser beams with orthogonal polarizations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinwei; Chen, Xudong; Ouyang, Min; Liu, Juan; Liu, Dahe

    2009-06-10

    A polarization-controlling device was developed based on the fact that there can be a time delay between the seeder and the pumping beams during the amplification of a stimulated Brillouin scattering signal. The device causes two coaxially transmitted pulsed beams with orthogonal polarizations to have the same polarization in order to implement amplification by the pumping effect. An experiment showed that good pumping amplification can be achieved by using this technique. PMID:19516374

  20. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  1. Electron molecular beam epitaxy: Layer-by-layer growth of complex oxides via pulsed electron-beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comes, Ryan; Gu, Man; Khokhlov, Mikhail; Liu, Hongxue; Lu, Jiwei; Wolf, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Complex oxide epitaxial film growth is a rich and exciting field, owing to the wide variety of physical properties present in oxides. These properties include ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, spin-polarization, and a variety of other correlated phenomena. Traditionally, high quality epitaxial oxide films have been grown via oxide molecular beam epitaxy or pulsed laser deposition. Here, we present the growth of high quality epitaxial films using an alternative approach, the pulsed electron-beam deposition technique. We demonstrate all three epitaxial growth modes in different oxide systems: Frank-van der Merwe (layer-by-layer); Stranski-Krastanov (layer-then-island); and Volmer-Weber (island). Analysis of film quality and morphology is presented and techniques to optimize the morphology of films are discussed.

  2. Development of ion source with a washer gun for pulsed neutral beam injection.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kajiya, H; Takahashi, T; Imanaka, H; Takase, Y; Ono, Y; Sato, K N

    2008-06-01

    A new type of economical neutral beam source has been developed by using a single washer gun, pulsed operation, and a simple electrode system. We replaced the conventional hot filaments for arc-discharge-type plasma formation with a single stainless-steel washer gun, eliminating the entire dc power supply for the filaments and the cooling system for the electrodes. Our initial experiments revealed successful beam extraction up to 10 kV and 8.6 A, based on spatial profile measurements of density and temperature in the plasma source. The system also shows the potential to control the beam profile by controlling the plasma parameters in the ion accumulation chamber.

  3. Electrostatic diagnostics of nanosecond pulsed electron beams in a Malmberg-Penning trap

    SciTech Connect

    Paroli, B.; Bettega, G.; Maero, G.; Rome, M.; Norgia, M.; Pesatori, A.; Svelto, C.

    2010-06-15

    A fast electrostatic diagnostic and analysis scheme on nanosecond pulsed beams in the keV energy range has been developed in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. Low-noise electronics has been used for the detection of small induced current signals on the trap electrodes. A discrete wavelet-based procedure has been implemented for data postprocessing. The development of an effective electrostatic diagnostics together with proper data analysis techniques is of general interest in view of deducing the beam properties through comparison of the postprocessed data with the theoretically computed signal shape, which contains beam radius, length, and average density as fit parameters.

  4. Pulsed power and electron beams in the 21st century.

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C. A.

    2002-01-01

    Pulsed power and accelerator technology for high energy density physics, radiography, and simulation has matured to the point that new facilities promise users reliability of quality data return unheard of just a short time ago. By this metric alone these machines and accelerators have graduated from being experiments in their own right, to the solid foundation of a new era of experimental science. The projected performance of a few of these new capabilities will be highlighted, along with some modest speculation concerning their future.

  5. Pulsed supersonic molecular-beam coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy of C2H2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, M. D.; Byer, R. L.; Osterlin, P.

    1981-01-01

    A high-resolution coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectrum of C2H2 in a pulsed molecular beam was obtained and the resolved Q-branch spectrum was used to study the properties of the expansion. Cluster formation limited the minimum observed rotational temperature in the pure-acetylene expansion to 30 K.

  6. Status and Planned Experiments of the Hiradmat Pulsed Beam Material Test Facility at CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Charitonidis, Nikolaos; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias; Fabich, Adrian; Meddahi, Malika; Gianfelice-Wendt, Eliana

    2015-06-01

    HiRadMat (High Irradiation to Materials) is a facility at CERN designed to provide high-intensity pulsed beams to an irradiation area where material samples as well as accelerator component assemblies (e.g. vacuum windows, shock tests on high power targets, collimators) can be tested. The beam parameters (SPS 440 GeV protons with a pulse energy of up to 3.4 MJ, or alternatively lead/argon ions at the proton equivalent energy) can be tuned to match the needs of each experiment. It is a test area designed to perform single pulse experiments to evaluate the effect of high-intensity pulsed beams on materials in a dedicated environment, excluding long-time irradiation studies. The facility is designed for a maximum number of 1016 protons per year, in order to limit the activation of the irradiated samples to acceptable levels for human intervention. This paper will demonstrate the possibilities for research using this facility and go through examples of upcoming experiments scheduled in the beam period 2015/2016.

  7. Calculation of laser pulse distribution maps for corneal reshaping with a scanning beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manns, Fabrice; Shen, Jin-Hui; Soederberg, Per G.; Matsui, Takaaki; Parel, Jean-Marie A.

    1995-05-01

    A method for calculating pulse distribution maps for scanning laser corneal surgery is presented. The accuracy, the smoothness of the corneal shape, and the duration of surgery were evaluated for corrections of myopia by using computer simulations. The accuracy and the number of pulses were computed as a function of the beam diameter, the diameter of the treatment zone, and the amount of attempted flattening. The ablation is smooth when the spot overlap is 80% or more. The accuracy does not depend on the beam diameter or on the diameter of the ablation zone when the ablation zone is larger than 5 mm. With an overlap of 80% and an ablation zone larger than 5 mm, the error is 5% of the attempted flattening, and 610 pulses are needed per Diopter of correction with a beam diameter of 1 mm. Pulse maps for the correction of astigmatism were computed and evaluated. The simulations show that with 60% overlap, a beam diameter of 1 mm, and a 5 mm treatment zone, 6 D of astigmatism can be corrected with an accuracy better than 1.8 D. This study shows that smooth and accurate ablations can be produced with a scanning spot.

  8. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.; Mangia, F.; Atzeni, S.; Riquier, R.

    2014-04-15

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  9. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device.

    PubMed

    Chen, S N; Gauthier, M; Higginson, D P; Dorard, S; Mangia, F; Riquier, R; Atzeni, S; Marquès, J-R; Fuchs, J

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams. PMID:24784604

  10. Monochromatic short pulse laser produced ion beam using a compact passive magnetic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Dorard, S.; Mangia, F.; Riquier, R.; Atzeni, S.; Marquès, J.-R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-04-01

    High-intensity laser accelerated protons and ions are emerging sources with complementary characteristics to those of conventional sources, namely high charge, high current, and short bunch duration, and therefore can be useful for dedicated applications. However, these beams exhibit a broadband energy spectrum when, for some experiments, monoenergetic beams are required. We present here an adaptation of conventional chicane devices in a compact form (10 cm × 20 cm) which enables selection of a specific energy interval from the broadband spectrum. This is achieved by employing magnetic fields to bend the trajectory of the laser produced proton beam through two slits in order to select the minimum and maximum beam energy. The device enables a production of a high current, short duration source with a reproducible output spectrum from short pulse laser produced charged particle beams.

  11. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-01

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  12. Collective Focusing of Intense Ion Beam Pulses for High-energy Density Physics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-04-27

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982) is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I) , and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations. 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Collective focusing of intense ion beam pulses for high-energy density physics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, Mikhail A.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2011-03-15

    The collective focusing concept in which a weak magnetic lens provides strong focusing of an intense ion beam pulse carrying a neutralizing electron background is investigated by making use of advanced particle-in-cell simulations and reduced analytical models. The original analysis by Robertson [Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 149 (1982)] is extended to the parameter regimes of particular importance for several high-energy density physics applications. The present paper investigates (1) the effects of non-neutral collective focusing in a moderately strong magnetic field; (2) the diamagnetic effects leading to suppression of the applied magnetic field due to the presence of the beam pulse; and (3) the influence of a finite-radius conducting wall surrounding the beam cross-section on beam neutralization. In addition, it is demonstrated that the use of the collective focusing lens can significantly simplify the technical realization of the final focusing of ion beam pulses in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-I (NDCX-I), and the conceptual designs of possible experiments on NDCX-I are investigated by making use of advanced numerical simulations.

  14. Controlling the betatron oscillations of a wakefield-accelerated electron beam by temporally asymmetric laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Inhyuk; Hur, Min Sup; Uhm, Han Sup; Hafz, Nasr A. M.; Suk, Hyyong

    2011-04-15

    Based on two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigated the electron beam's transverse oscillations by temporally asymmetric laser pulses in laser wakefield acceleration. Of particular interest in this article are the effects of ultrashort laser pulses having sharp rising and slow falling time scales. In this situation, the accelerated electron beam interacts directly with the laser field and undergoes transverse oscillations due to a phase-slip with the laser field. This oscillation can be matched with the betatron oscillation due to the focusing force of the ions, which can lead to a large transverse oscillation amplitude due to the resonance between them. Furthermore, in this case, the electron beam can be microbunched at the laser wavelength, which may provide the possibility for generation of a coherent synchrotron radiation.

  15. Stability of aerosol droplets in Bessel beam optical traps under constant and pulsed external forces

    SciTech Connect

    David, Grégory; Esat, Kıvanç; Hartweg, Sebastian; Cremer, Johannes; Chasovskikh, Egor; Signorell, Ruth

    2015-04-21

    We report on the dynamics of aerosol droplets in optical traps under the influence of additional constant and pulsed external forces. Experimental results are compared with simulations of the three-dimensional droplet dynamics for two types of optical traps, the counter-propagating Bessel beam (CPBB) trap and the quadruple Bessel beam (QBB) trap. Under the influence of a constant gas flow (constant external force), the QBB trap is found to be more stable compared with the CPBB trap. By contrast, under pulsed laser excitation with laser pulse durations of nanoseconds (pulsed external force), the type of trap is of minor importance for the droplet stability. It typically needs pulsed laser forces that are several orders of magnitude higher than the optical forces to induce escape of the droplet from the trap. If the droplet strongly absorbs the pulsed laser light, these escape forces can be strongly reduced. The lower stability of absorbing droplets is a result of secondary thermal processes that cause droplet escape.

  16. Electron-Beam Switches For A High Peak Power Sled-II Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay, L.

    2015-12-02

    Omega-P demonstrated triggered electron-beam switches on the L=2 m dual-delay-line X-band pulse compressor at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). In those experiments, with input pulses of up to 9 MW from the Omega-P/NRL X-band magnicon, output pulses having peak powers of 140-165 MW and durations of 16-20 ns were produced, with record peak power gains M of 18-20. Switch designs are described based on the successful results that should be suitable for use with the existing SLAC SLED-II delay line system, to demonstrate C=9, M=7, and n>>78%, yielding 173ns compressed pulses with peak powers up to 350MW with input of a single 50-MW.

  17. Modeling of coherent beam combining from multimillijoule chirped pulse tapered fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianov, A. V.; Kim, A. V.; Anashkina, E. A.; Meyerov, I. B.; Lebedev, S. A.; Sergeev, A. M.; Koenig, K.; Mourou, G.

    2015-10-01

    The amplification of high energy chirped pulses in Large Mode Area tapered fiber amplifiers and their coherent combining have been investigated numerically. We have developed a three-dimensional model of strongly chirped nanosecond pulse amplification and compression back to femtosecond duration fully taking into account transverse and longitudinal variations of refractive index profile and distribution of active ions in the fiber, wavelength dependence of emission and absorption cross sections, gain saturation and Kerr nonlinearity. Modeling of Yb-doped fiber amplifier shows that up to 3 mJ of output energy can be extracted in 1 ns pulse with single-mode beam quality. Finally, we have investigated numerically the capabilities of compression and coherent combining of up to 36 perturbed amplifying channels in which high-order modes were excited and have obtained more than 70% combining efficiency and 380 fs compressed pulse duration.

  18. Analytical and Numerical Studies of the Complex Interaction of a Fast Ion Beam Pulse with a Background Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-11-25

    Plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam pulse is of interest for many applications, including plasma lenses, heavy ion fusion, high energy physics, etc. Comprehensive analytical, numerical, and experimental studies are underway to investigate the complex interaction of a fast ion beam with a background plasma. The positively charged ion beam attracts plasma electrons, and as a result the plasma electrons have a tendency to neutralize the beam charge and current. A suite of particle-in-cell codes has been developed to study the propagation of an ion beam pulse through the background plasma. For quasi-steady-state propagation of the ion beam pulse, an analytical theory has been developed using the assumption of long charge bunches and conservation of generalized vorticity. The analytical results agree well with the results of the numerical simulations. The visualization of the data obtained in the numerical simulations shows complex collective phenomena during beam entry into and ex it from the plasma.

  19. Feedback-free single-beam pattern formation by nanosecond pulses in dye-doped liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepeshkin, Nick N.; Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Boyd, Robert W.; Marshall, Kenneth L.

    2006-08-01

    Generally, optical feedback and/or two counter-propagating beams are necessary to form high-definition patterns in the cross section of a laser beam after passing through a nonlinear medium. In this paper we present an observation of pattern formation in liquid crystal media in a single laser beam without any external feedback. We found that after irradiation of a dye-doped liquid crystal cell with repetitive nanosecond pulses, the beam coming out of the liquid crystal cell exhibits a spectacular kaleidoscopic change of beam patterns in the far field. The patterns vary from pulse to pulse in an ordered manner cycling through a variety of complicated forms. We speculate that localized phase separation of the dye from the liquid crystal host occurs in the focal region of the beam in our experiments, and that the observed far-field patterns result from the laser-beam diffraction on these absorptive and refractive inhomogeneities.

  20. How proton pulse characteristics influence protoacoustic determination of proton-beam range: simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kevin C; Seghal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2016-03-21

    The unique dose deposition of proton beams generates a distinctive thermoacoustic (protoacoustic) signal, which can be used to calculate the proton range. To identify the expected protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and arrival time for different proton pulse characteristics encountered at hospital-based proton sources, the protoacoustic pressure emissions generated by 150 MeV, pencil-beam proton pulses were simulated in a homogeneous water medium. Proton pulses with Gaussian widths ranging up to 200 μs were considered. The protoacoustic amplitude, frequency, and time-of-flight (TOF) range accuracy were assessed. For TOF calculations, the acoustic pulse arrival time was determined based on multiple features of the wave. Based on the simulations, Gaussian proton pulses can be categorized as Dirac-delta-function-like (FWHM < 4 μs) and longer. For the δ-function-like irradiation, the protoacoustic spectrum peaks at 44.5 kHz and the systematic error in determining the Bragg peak range is <2.6 mm. For longer proton pulses, the spectrum shifts to lower frequencies, and the range calculation systematic error increases (⩽ 23 mm for FWHM of 56 μs). By mapping the protoacoustic peak arrival time to range with simulations, the residual error can be reduced. Using a proton pulse with FWHM = 2 μs results in a maximum signal-to-noise ratio per total dose. Simulations predict that a 300 nA, 150 MeV, FWHM = 4 μs Gaussian proton pulse (8.0 × 10(6) protons, 3.1 cGy dose at the Bragg peak) will generate a 146 mPa pressure wave at 5 cm beyond the Bragg peak. There is an angle dependent systematic error in the protoacoustic TOF range calculations. Placing detectors along the proton beam axis and beyond the Bragg peak minimizes this error. For clinical proton beams, protoacoustic detectors should be sensitive to <400 kHz (for -20 dB). Hospital-based synchrocyclotrons and cyclotrons are promising sources of proton pulses for generating clinically measurable protoacoustic

  1. Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre amplifiers with active phase control

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X L; Zhou, Pu; Ma, Y X; Ma, H T; Xu, X J; Liu, Z J; Zhao, Y J

    2011-12-31

    Coherent beam combining of pulsed fibre lasers is a promising method for power scaling while simultaneously maintaining good beam quality. We propose and demonstrate a scalable architecture for coherent beam combining of all-fibre pulsed amplifiers with active phase control using the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. A low-pass filter is introduced to eliminate the fluctuation of the metric function caused by pulsed lasers and to extract the exact phase noise signal. Active control is thereby based on the SPGD algorithm, resulting in stable coherent beam combining at the receiving plane even in a turbulent environment. Experimental results show that the fringe visibility of the long exposure pattern increases from 0 to 0.4, and the power encircled in the main-lobe increases by 1.6 times when the system evolves from the open-loop phase-locking scheme to the closed-loop scheme. This architecture can be easily scaled up to a higher power by increasing the number of amplifying channels and the power of a single amplifier.

  2. A Single Pulse Sub-Nanosecond Proton RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    Hamm, R W; Pearce-Percy, H; Pearson, D; Rougieri, M; Weir, J; Zografos, A; Guethlein, G; Hawkins, S; Falabella, S; Poole, B; Blackfield, D

    2011-03-29

    A Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac system has been developed to provide a single pulse of 2 MeV protons with a beam pulse width of {approx}300 ps and a charge of 30 pC, either for injection into a pulsed Dielectric Wall Accelerator or for bombardment of a target to produce a fast neutron pulse. The 1.2 m long RFQ structure operates at 425 MHz and bunches and accelerates a single 2.35 ns beam pulse injected into it at 35 keV using a parallel plate deflector placed directly in front of the RFQ entrance. The input acceptance properties of the RFQ allow a simple dc bias voltage on the plates to block acceleration of the unwanted beam, with a short rf voltage pulse applied to null the deflection field for the ions within the 8 mm 'kicker' plate length. The use of the RFQ as the accelerating structure allows one to efficiently produce a large charge in a single sub-ns bunch. In addition, the kicker can also be used without the dc bias voltage to produce a 'notch' in the normal RFQ output beam for synchrotron injection.

  3. Apparatus and process for active pulse intensity control of laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    An optically controlled laser pulse energy control apparatus and process is disclosed wherein variations in the energy of a portion of the laser beam are used to vary the resistance of a photodetector such as a photoresistor through which a control voltage is fed to a light intensity controlling device through which a second portion of the laser beam passes. Light attenuation means are provided to vary the intensity of the laser light used to control the resistance of the photodetector. An optical delay path is provided through which the second portion of the beam travels before reaching the light intensity controlling device. The control voltage is supplied by a variable power supply. The apparatus may be tuned to properly attenuate the laser beam passing through the intensity controlling device by adjusting the power supply, the optical delay path, or the light attenuating means.

  4. Pulsed-ion-beam nitriding and smoothing of titanium surface in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X.P.; Suematsu, Hisayuki; Jiang Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Lei, M.K.

    2005-08-29

    Both nitriding and smoothing of titanium have been achieved under irradiation of intense pulsed ion beam in a vacuum of 2x10{sup -2} Pa. Applying a screening method, we find that medium ion-beam intensity and multi-shot irradiation are effective for the processing, where repetitive surface melting with limited ablation favored Ti nitride formation as well as surface smoothing. The present results demonstrate that ambient gas atoms/molecules can be efficiently incorporated in metal matrices to form compounds under the ion-beam irradiation. The finding is of great significance for extending application scope of the ion-beam technique in materials research and processing, combined with the recent success in introducing ambient gas into the processing chamber.

  5. Dynamic control of laser driven proton beams by exploiting self-generated, ultrashort electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Hanton, F.; Giesecke, A. L.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-05-01

    As part of the ultrafast charge dynamics initiated by high intensity laser irradiations of solid targets, high amplitude EM pulses propagate away from the interaction point and are transported along any stalks and wires attached to the target. The propagation of these high amplitude pulses along a thin wire connected to a laser irradiated target was diagnosed via the proton radiography technique, measuring a pulse duration of ˜20 ps and a pulse velocity close to the speed of light. The strong electric field associated with the EM pulse can be exploited for controlling dynamically the proton beams produced from a laser-driven source. Chromatic divergence control of broadband laser driven protons (upto 75% reduction in divergence of >5 MeV protons) was obtained by winding the supporting wire around the proton beam axis to create a helical coil structure. In addition to providing focussing and energy selection, the technique has the potential to post-accelerate the transiting protons by the longitudinal component of the curved electric field lines produced by the helical coil lens.

  6. Modeling of high efficiency solar cells under laser pulse for power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    Solar cells have been used to convert sunlight to electrical energy for many years and also offer great potential for non-solar energy conversion applications. Their greatly improved performance under monochromatic light compared to sunlight, makes them suitable as photovoltaic (PV) receivers in laser power beaming applications. Laser beamed power to a PV array receiver could provide power to satellites, an orbital transfer vehicle, or a lunar base. Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and indium phosphide (InP) solar cells have calculated efficiencies of more than 50 percent under continuous illumination at the optimum wavelength. Currently high power free-electron lasers are being developed which operate in pulsed conditions. Understanding cell behavior under a laser pulse is important in the selection of the solar cell material and the laser. An experiment by NAsA lewis and JPL at the AVLIS laser facility in Livermore, CA presented experimental data on cell performance under pulsed laser illumination. Reference 5 contains an overview of technical issues concerning the use of solar cells for laser power conversion, written before the experiments were performed. As the experimental results showed, the actual effects of pulsed operation are more complicated. Reference 6 discusses simulations of the output of GaAs concentrator solar cells under pulsed laser illumination. The present paper continues this work, and compares the output of Si and GaAs solar cells.

  7. Development of the plasma generator for a long pulse 10 x 40 neutral beam

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P.A.; Ehlers, K.W.; Lietzke, A.F.; Owren, H.M.; Paterson, J.A.; Pyle, R.V.; Vella, M.C.

    1986-11-01

    Users of fusion devices have identified heating requirements for positive ion based neutral beams to include energies of 80 or 120 kV with pulse length up to 30 s. Additional requirements are low beam divergence (0.3/sup 0/ x 1.0/sup 0/; 1/e half angles), low impurity (less than 1%), high species (over 80% atomic), and cathode lifetime exceeding 5 h of beam operation. Accelerator design remains as an engineering problem, whereas most of the performance goals have required development of the plasma generator. Problems of concern which relate to the performance goals are the heat dissipation, magnetic field configuration, and cathode placement. The plasma generator was tested on TS IIA (the plasma generator testing facility) which does not have beam extraction capability but is used to evaluate efficiency, operating conditions, arc notching characteristics, species, plasma uniformity, and cathode conditioning. The source, consisting of the plasma generator mounted on the long pulse accelerator was mounted on NBETF (Neutral Beam Engineering Test Facility) for beam testing. During beam operation the back-streaming electrons add power to the source and affect the arc operation. Source durability and stability were studied at 80 kV and 40 A of accelerator current (deuterium). The arc efficiency was higher than the value used for the design. Power loading from back-streaming electrons was much less than the design level. With feedback control, plasma density and accel current were constant to +- 2% during 30-s shots. The beam atomic fraction of 84%-88% (deuterium) was slightly higher than measured on TS IIA. Cathode durability was tested by operating over 500, 30-s full shots at 80 kV and 40 A of deuterium. Arc conditioning was found to be an important phase to avoid filament damage.

  8. A short pulse (7 μs FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A.; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Janssen, Maurice H. M.

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 μs have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 μm nozzle releases about 1016 particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4×1022 particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5×10-6 Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Δv /v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the cantilever

  9. A short pulse (7 {mu}s FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams

    SciTech Connect

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; Janssen, Maurice H. M.; Ende, Daan A. van den; Groen, Wilhelm A.

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 {mu}s have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 {mu}m nozzle releases about 10{sup 16} particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10{sup 22} particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10{sup -6} Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow ({Delta}v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas

  10. A short pulse (7 micros FWHM) and high repetition rate (dc-5 kHz) cantilever piezovalve for pulsed atomic and molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel; Dobrikov, Dimitar; Kortekaas, Rob; Voet, Han; van den Ende, Daan A; Groen, Wilhelm A; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2009-11-01

    In this paper we report on the design and operation of a novel piezovalve for the production of short pulsed atomic or molecular beams. The high speed valve operates on the principle of a cantilever piezo. The only moving part, besides the cantilever piezo itself, is a very small O-ring that forms the vacuum seal. The valve can operate continuous (dc) and in pulsed mode with the same drive electronics. Pulsed operation has been tested at repetition frequencies up to 5 kHz. The static deflection of the cantilever, as mounted in the valve body, was measured as a function of driving field strength with a confocal microscope. The deflection and high speed dynamical response of the cantilever can be easily changed and optimized for a particular nozzle diameter or repetition rate by a simple adjustment of the free cantilever length. Pulsed molecular beams with a full width at half maximum pulse width as low as 7 micros have been measured at a position 10 cm downstream of the nozzle exit. This represents a gas pulse with a length of only 10 mm making it well matched to for instance experiments using laser beams. Such a short pulse with 6 bar backing pressure behind a 150 microm nozzle releases about 10(16) particles/pulse and the beam brightness was estimated to be 4x10(22) particles/(s str). The short pulses of the cantilever piezovalve result in a much reduced gas load in the vacuum system. We demonstrate operation of the pulsed valve with skimmer in a single vacuum chamber pumped by a 520 l/s turbomolecular pump maintaining a pressure of 5x10(-6) Torr, which is an excellent vacuum to have the strong and cold skimmed molecular beam interact with laser beams only 10 cm downstream of the nozzle to do velocity map slice imaging with a microchannel-plate imaging detector in a single chamber. The piezovalve produces cold and narrow (Delta v/v=2%-3%) velocity distributions of molecules seeded in helium or neon at modest backing pressures of only 6 bar. The low gas load of the

  11. Pulse compression below 40fs at 1μm: The first step towards a short-pulse, high-energy beam line at LULI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaowei; Zou, Jiping; Martin, Luc; Simon, Francois; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo; Audebert, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    We present the upgrading project ELFIE (Equipement Laser de Forte Intensité et Energie) based on the "100TW" mixed Nd:glass CPA laser system at 1μm at LULI, which includes an energy enhancement and the development of a short-pulse, high-energy, good temporal contrast beam line (50fs/5J). We report the first experimental step towards the short-pulse, high-energy beam line: spectral broadening above 60nm from 7nm and temporal pulse compression below 40fs from 300fs at 1μm through a Krypton-filled hollow fiber compressor.

  12. Interaction of pulsed carbon dioxide laser beams with teeth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brune, D

    1980-08-01

    Beams of pulsed carbon dioxide lasers with energy densities of about 10, 100 or 200 J/mm2 have been applied perpendicularly to third molars in vitro for the purpose of preparing cavities or pin holes for retention. A pulsed beam with an energy density of about 10 J/mm2 produced a hole approximately 2 mm deep with a diameter of about 0.2 mm. With a beam of 100 J/mm2 the hole produced penetrated the tooth to a depth of 4 mm. Minor cracks around the hole in both enamel and dentin could be observed. Around the position where the beam entered the enamel matrix a white mineralized layer was observed, while a brown discoloration was formed around the hole in the dentin at the beam exit. With an energy density of 200 J/mm2 the formation of cracks and discoloration was very pronounced. X-ray diffraction of lased tissue revealed an apatite structure. The wall in the lased hole exhibited a Vicker hardness number similar to that of enamel.

  13. Laser initiation and beam quality evolution in a confocal unstable resonator, short-pulse-duration laser.

    PubMed

    Ewanizky, T F

    1997-11-20

    The subjects of laser initiation and beam quality evolution in short-pulse-duration systems that employ confocal unstable resonators motivated this work. Experimentation and analysis of the performance of a laser-pumped, organic dye laser are presented. Combined results indicate that a saturation flux arises through a coalescence of stabilized, diverging-mode components of the initially emitted fluorescence. The ABCD law method was used to devise calculational techniques that clearly demonstrate the particular mechanisms responsible for rapid mode stabilization, subsequent beam quality development, and laser initiation. PMID:18264413

  14. Analysis and measurements of Eddy current effects of a beam tube in a pulsed magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, S.

    1997-05-01

    The power supply design of the {gamma}{sub f} - jump system in FNAL Main Injector uses a resonant circuit. A critical design parameter is the ac losses of the beam tube in a pulsed quadrupole. This paper gives an analysis to this problem. An equivalent circuit model based on the impedance measurement was established. The measured and calculated losses are in agreement. Another effect of the eddy current is the distortion of the magnetic field inside the beam tube. A Morgan coil was used for field measurements up to 10 KHz. These results are presented in this paper.

  15. Evaluation of disparate laser beam deflection technologies by means of number and rate of resolvable spots.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Peter; Hohenstein, Ralph; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-08-15

    We introduce a method to objectively evaluate systems of differing beam deflection technologies that commonly are described by disparate technical specifications. Using our new approach based on resolvable spots we will compare commercially available random-access beam deflection technologies, namely galvanometer scanners, piezo scanners, MEMS scanners, acousto-optic deflectors, and electro-optic deflectors.

  16. Evaluation of disparate laser beam deflection technologies by means of number and rate of resolvable spots.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Peter; Hohenstein, Ralph; Schmidt, Michael

    2013-08-15

    We introduce a method to objectively evaluate systems of differing beam deflection technologies that commonly are described by disparate technical specifications. Using our new approach based on resolvable spots we will compare commercially available random-access beam deflection technologies, namely galvanometer scanners, piezo scanners, MEMS scanners, acousto-optic deflectors, and electro-optic deflectors. PMID:24104614

  17. Calibrating bead displacements in optical tweezers using acousto-optic deflectors

    SciTech Connect

    Vermeulen, Karen C.; Mameren, Joost van; Stienen, Ger J.M.; Peterman, Erwin J.G.; Wuite, Gijs J.L.; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2006-01-15

    Displacements of optically trapped particles are often recorded using back-focal-plane interferometry. In order to calibrate the detector signals to displacements of the trapped object, several approaches are available. One often relies either on scanning a fixed bead across the waist of the laser beam or on analyzing the power spectrum of movements of the trapped bead. Here, we introduce an alternative method to perform this calibration. The method consists of very rapidly scanning the laser beam across the solvent-immersed, trapped bead using acousto-optic deflectors while recording the detector signals. It does not require any knowledge of solvent viscosity and bead diameter, and works in all types of samples, viscous or viscoelastic. Moreover, it is performed with the same bead as that used in the actual experiment. This represents marked advantages over established methods.

  18. Combining microwave beams with high peak power and long pulse duration

    SciTech Connect

    Li Guolin; Shu Ting; Yuan Chengwei; Zhang Jun; Jin Zhenxing; Yang Jianhua

    2010-03-15

    The beam combining results with a metal dichroic plate illuminated by the S/X band gigawatt level high power microwaves are presented. According to the previous experiments, the microwave breakdown problem becomes obvious when the peak power and the pulse duration increase, thus, several methods for enhancing the power handling capacity have been considered, and the metal dichroic plates are redesigned to handle the S/X band high power microwaves. Then the design, fabrication, and testing procedure are discussed in detail. The further experimental results reveal that, operated on the self-built accelerator Spark-04, the radiated powers from the S and X band sources have reached 1.8 GW with pulse durations of about 80 ns, and both beams have been successfully operated on the selected dichroic plate without microwave breakdown.

  19. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    PubMed Central

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets. PMID:26329210

  20. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2(+) and He4(+), which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)(n)C(+), (He)(n)Cl(+), and (He)(n)CCl(+). Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  1. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He2+ and He4+, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl4 doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He)nC+, (He)nCl+, and (He)nCCl+. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  2. Facile time-of-flight methods for characterizing pulsed superfluid helium droplet beams

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Li, Yang; Freund, William M.; Kong, Wei

    2015-08-15

    We present two facile time-of-flight (TOF) methods of detecting superfluid helium droplets and droplets with neutral dopants. Without an electron gun and with only a heated filament and pulsed electrodes, the electron impact ionization TOF mass spectrometer can resolve ionized helium clusters such as He{sub 2}{sup +} and He{sub 4}{sup +}, which are signatures of superfluid helium droplets. Without ionizing any helium atoms, multiphoton non-resonant laser ionization of CCl{sub 4} doped in superfluid helium droplets at 266 nm generates complex cluster ions of dopant fragments with helium atoms, including (He){sub n}C{sup +}, (He){sub n}Cl{sup +}, and (He){sub n}CCl{sup +}. Using both methods, we have characterized our cryogenic pulsed valve—the Even-Lavie valve. We have observed a primary pulse with larger helium droplets traveling at a slower speed and a rebound pulse with smaller droplets at a faster speed. In addition, the pickup efficiency of dopant is higher for the primary pulse when the nozzle temperature is higher than 13 K, and the total time duration of the doped droplet pulse is only on the order of 20 μs. These results stress the importance of fast and easy characterization of the droplet beam for sensitive measurements such as electron diffraction of doped droplets.

  3. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Tobari, H.; Kashiwagi, M.; Inoue, T.; Hanada, M.; Jeong, S. H.; Chang, D. H.; Kim, T. S.; Kim, B. R.; Seo, C. S.; Jin, J. T.; Lee, K. W.; In, S. R.; Oh, B. H.; Kim, J.; Bae, Y. S.

    2011-06-15

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H{sup +}/D{sup +} ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H{sup +}/D{sup +} beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and {+-}7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  4. Investigation of industrial-scale carbon dioxide reduction using pulsed electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Apruzese, J. P.; Petrova, Tz. B.; Wolford, M. F.

    2016-03-01

    Carbon dioxide is the most important greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. To help mitigate increasing CO2 concentrations, we investigate a method of carbon dioxide reduction using high-power electron beams, which can be used on an industrial scale. A series of experiments are conducted in which the reduction of CO2 is measured for different gas compositions and power deposition rates. An electron beam deposition model is applied to compute reduction rates of CO2 and energy cost for breaking a CO2 molecule in flue gas and pure carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure. For flue gas consisting of 82% N2, 6% O2, and 12% CO2, the calculated energy cost is 85 eV per molecule. In order to dissociate 50% of the CO2 molecules, beam energy density deposition on the order of 20 J/cm3 is required. Electron beam irradiation of 12.6 liter gas volume containing 90% CO2 and 10% CH4 at beam energy density deposition of 4.2 J/cm3, accumulated over 43 shots in a 20 min interval, reduced the CO2 concentration to 78%. Analogous experiments with a gas mixture containing 11.5% CO2, 11.5% CH4, and balance of Ar, reduced the CO2 concentration to below 11% with energy deposition 0.71 J/cm3, accumulated over 10 shots in a 5 min interval. The experimental data and the theoretical predictions of CO2 reduction using pulsed electron beams are in agreement within the experimental error. Other techniques to enhance the removal of CO2 with pulsed electron beams are also explored, yielding new possible avenues of research.

  5. Development of a plasma generator for a long pulse ion source for neutral beam injectors.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Dairaku, M; Tobari, H; Kashiwagi, M; Inoue, T; Hanada, M; Jeong, S H; Chang, D H; Kim, T S; Kim, B R; Seo, C S; Jin, J T; Lee, K W; In, S R; Oh, B H; Kim, J; Bae, Y S

    2011-06-01

    A plasma generator for a long pulse H(+)/D(+) ion source has been developed. The plasma generator was designed to produce 65 A H(+)/D(+) beams at an energy of 120 keV from an ion extraction area of 12 cm in width and 45 cm in length. Configuration of the plasma generator is a multi-cusp bucket type with SmCo permanent magnets. Dimension of a plasma chamber is 25 cm in width, 59 cm in length, and 32.5 cm in depth. The plasma generator was designed and fabricated at Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Source plasma generation and beam extraction tests for hydrogen coupling with an accelerator of the KSTAR ion source have been performed at the KSTAR neutral beam test stand under the agreement of Japan-Korea collaborative experiment. Spatial uniformity of the source plasma at the extraction region was measured using Langmuir probes and ±7% of the deviation from an averaged ion saturation current density was obtained. A long pulse test of the plasma generation up to 200 s with an arc discharge power of 70 kW has been successfully demonstrated. The arc discharge power satisfies the requirement of the beam production for the KSTAR NBI. A 70 keV, 41 A, 5 s hydrogen ion beam has been extracted with a high arc efficiency of 0.9 -1.1 A/kW at a beam extraction experiment. A deuteron yield of 77% was measured even at a low beam current density of 73 mA/cm(2).

  6. Selective surface purification via crater eruption under pulsed electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Jianxin; Zhang Kemin; Dong Chuang; Qin Ying; Hao Shengzhi; Grosdidier, Thierry

    2006-07-24

    This letter reports an interesting phenomenon associated with the high-current pulsed electron beam treatment:selective surface purification. The treatment induces crater eruptions that preferentially occur at irregular composition and structure sites. The eruptions of second phase inclusions naturally lead to the purification and homogenization of the melted surface layer. This improves significantly the corrosion resistance of NiTi and 316L alloys.

  7. INITIAL EVALUATION OF A PULSED WHITE SPECTRUM NEUTRON GENERATOR FOR EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel,, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-06-02

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is acritical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designedand fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set ofparallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80 - 120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing.

  8. Theory of beam light pulse propagation through thick clouds: effects of beamwidth and scatterers behind the light source on pulse broadening.

    PubMed

    Ito, S

    1981-08-01

    Pulse propagation of beam waves from a source immersed in a slab of scatterers is investigated by means of analytically solving the diffusion equation. The on- and off-axis pulse intensities are calculated for collimated beam waves transmitted in the two typical directions of the slab. To a good approximation, the effect of finite beamwidth on the pulse intensity appears only through the diffusion factor in the radial direction of the beam, resulting in a faster decrease of the intensity in the tail part compared with that of the corresponding plane wave pulse. Also, the pulse shape does not appreciably change when the beamwidth is changed within the range of practical use. An analytical expression is obtained for the pulse width broadening and is applied to several typical cases leading to some simple expressions. The influence of the scatterers existing behind the source is discussed in some detail particularly in connection with pulse shape and width broadening, showing that, in many situations, the pulse width is determined mostly by the total optical thickness of the slab independently of the relative position of the wave source within the slab.

  9. Electron-beam pulse annealed Ti-implanted GaP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Z.; Barlak, M.; Ratajczak, R.; Konarski, P.; Markov, A. M.; Heller, R.

    2016-08-01

    Gallium phosphide heavily doped with substitutional titanium is a prospective material for intermediate band solar cells. To manufacture such a material, single crystals of GaP were implanted with 120 keV Ti ions to doses between 5 × 1014 cm-2 and 5 × 1015 cm-2. They were next pulse annealed with 2 μs electron-beam pulses of electron energy of about 13 keV and pulse energy density between 1 and 2 Jcm-2. The samples were studied by channeled Rutherford Backscattering, particle induced X-ray emission, and SIMS. The results show full recovery of crystal structure damaged by implantation and good retention of the implanted titanium without, however, its significant substitution at crystal sites.

  10. A trap-based pulsed positron beam optimised for positronium laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, B. S. Alonso, A. M.; Deller, A.; Wall, T. E.; Cassidy, D. B.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a pulsed positron beam that is optimised for positronium (Ps) laser-spectroscopy experiments. The system is based on a two-stage Surko-type buffer gas trap that produces 4 ns wide pulses containing up to 5 × 10{sup 5} positrons at a rate of 0.5-10 Hz. By implanting positrons from the trap into a suitable target material, a dilute positronium gas with an initial density of the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup −3} is created in vacuum. This is then probed with pulsed (ns) laser systems, where various Ps-laser interactions have been observed via changes in Ps annihilation rates using a fast gamma ray detector. We demonstrate the capabilities of the apparatus and detection methodology via the observation of Rydberg positronium atoms with principal quantum numbers ranging from 11 to 22 and the Stark broadening of the n = 2 → 11 transition in electric fields.

  11. Effect of turbulence on the spectral switches of diffracted spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulsed beams in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chaoliang; Pan, Liuzhan; Lü, Baida

    2009-10-01

    Taking the spectrally partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model pulsed (GSMP) beam as a typical example of spatially and spectrally partially coherent pulsed beams, an analytical expression for the spectrum of diffracted spectrally partially coherent GSMP beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence is derived by using the method of the complex Gaussian function expansion, and used to study the spectral switches of spectrally partially coherent GSMP beams in atmospheric turbulence. Numerical calculation results are given to illustrate the dependence of spectral switches on the refraction index structure constant and temporal coherent length. The results are interpreted physically.

  12. Generation of a cold pulsed beam of Rb atoms by transfer from a 3D magneto-optic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, Sapam Ranjita; Rathod, Ketan D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a technique for producing a cold pulsed beam of atoms by transferring a cloud of atoms trapped in a three dimensional magneto-optic trap (MOT). The MOT is loaded by heating a getter source of Rb atoms. We show that it is advantageous to transfer with two beams (with a small angle between them) compared to a single beam, because the atoms stop interacting with the beams in the two-beam technique, which results in a Gaussian velocity distribution. The atoms are further cooled in optical molasses by turning off the MOT magnetic field before the transfer beams are turned on.

  13. Effect of powerful pulsed and continuous ion beams on the Al- Cu-Mg alloy structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gushchina, N. V.; Makhin'ko, F. F.; Ovchinnikov, V. V.; Gusel'nikov, V. I.; Remnev, G. E.

    2016-02-01

    The paper considers the results of an electron microscopy study of the VD1 alloy of the Al-Cu-Mg system after cold working and subsequent irradiation with a powerful pulsed ion beam (70% C+ + 30% H+, E = 180 keV) in the pulsed-periodic mode (t = 80 ns, f = 0.1 Hz, j = 200 A/cm2, F = 1-1014 cm-2) and under the conditions of the generation of only one pulse (t = 180 ns, j = 100 A/cm2, F = 2-1015 cm-2). It is established that this irradiation noticeably affects the microstructure of the cold-worked 3 mm thick sheets of VD1 alloy. The initial cellular dislocation structure transforms into a subgrain one. The intensity of structural transformations in the alloy increases with ion current density of a pulse. A similar transformation of a dislocation structure over the entire thickness of the sample is observed under irradiation with continuous Ar+ ion beams (E = 20-40 keV) with not high fluences (1015-1016 cm-2).

  14. 8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. WEST FLAME DEFLECTOR FROM REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB ROOF, FORMER DRAINAGE AREA IN THE DISTANCE, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  15. 6. DETAIL OF NORTH ELEVATION AND FOOTINGS FOR FLAME DEFLECTOR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF NORTH ELEVATION AND FOOTINGS FOR FLAME DEFLECTOR, NOW MISSING. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-5, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 2. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, COUNTERFORT AT CENTER, FRAGMENT OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT RIGHT, COUNTERFORT AT CENTER, FRAGMENT OF CONCRETE CAMERA STAND IN FOREGROUND, VIEW TOWARDS SOUTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-1, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  17. 2. NORTH FRONT, FROM SUPERSTRUCTURE TO FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking south ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. NORTH FRONT, FROM SUPERSTRUCTURE TO FLAME DEFLECTOR. Looking south southwest from Observation Post No. 1 (Building 8767). - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  18. 5. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, FERROCEMENT APRON AT RIGHT CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, FERROCEMENT APRON AT RIGHT CENTER, CONTROL BUILDING A AT FAR RIGHT, CONNECTING TUNNEL AT UPPER CENTER, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHEAST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, Captive Test Stand D-2, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  19. 3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FLAME DEFLECTOR AT LEFT, COUNTERFORT AT RIGHT, CONTROL BUILDING B AT UPPER LEFT, VIEW TOWARDS NORTHWEST. - Glenn L. Martin Company, Titan Missile Test Facilities, CaptiveTest Stand D-3, Waterton Canyon Road & Colorado Highway 121, Lakewood, Jefferson County, CO

  20. 26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  1. 28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  2. 27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW OF EXHAUST AND DEFLECTOR FOR SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, BUILDING 25C, WHICH REPLACED THE 10-FOOT WIND TUNNEL (1991). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Buildings 25 & 24,10-foot & 20-foot Wind Tunnel Complex, Northeast side of block bounded by K, G, Third, & Fifth Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  3. Electron beam-based sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses.

    SciTech Connect

    Zholents, A.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2010-09-30

    A review of various methods for generation of ultrashort x-ray pulses using relativistic electron beam from conventional accelerators is presented. Both spontaneous and coherent emission of electrons is considered. The importance of the time-resolved studies of matter at picosecond (ps), femtosecond (fs), and atttosecond (as) time scales using x-rays has been widely recognized including by award of a Nobel Prize in 1999 [Zewa]. Extensive reviews of scientific drivers can be found in [BES1, BES2, BES3, Lawr, Whit]. Several laser-based techniques have been used to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses including laser-driven plasmas [Murn, Alte, Risc, Rose, Zamp], high-order harmonic generation [Schn, Rund, Wang, Arpi], and laser-driven anode sources [Ande]. In addition, ultrafast streak-camera detectors have been applied at synchrotron sources to achieve temporal resolution on the picosecond time scale [Wulf, Lind1]. In this paper, we focus on a different group of techniques that are based on the use of the relativistic electron beam produced in conventional accelerators. In the first part we review several techniques that utilize spontaneous emission of electrons and show how solitary sub-ps x-ray pulses can be obtained at existing storage ring based synchrotron light sources and linacs. In the second part we consider coherent emission of electrons in the free-electron lasers (FELs) and review several techniques for a generation of solitary sub-fs x-ray pulses. Remarkably, the x-ray pulses that can be obtained with the FELs are not only significantly shorter than the ones considered in Part 1, but also carry more photons per pulse by many orders of magnitude.

  4. Short-pulse laser beam interactions with biocompatible polymer materials and tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1996-12-01

    Pulsed laser beams, of very short duration, appear to be very promising tools for polymer surface processing. Recently we have studied the interaction of picosecond and femtosecond laser radiation in the visible region of the spectrum with synthetic polymer films and we have compared these studies with our similar studies with nanosecond duration laser radiation. Biocompatible polymers have been extensively used for sutures, vascular grafts or bone and other hard tissue replacements. The use of surgical lasers for intervention on biocompatible material - tissue interfaces has attracted a great deal of interest, as both the high intensity, short pulse duration lasers and the prosthetic biomaterials are in increasing use. Our recent ablation studies, using ultrashort laser pulses, of biocompatible materials, are described in this article. Lasers were introduced in medical research in the early sixties but the laser beam ability to remove efficiently and safely soft or hard tissue, the lateral thermal damage and the final surface characteristics are still under investigation. In the past few years, by virtue of their water or water and hydroxyapatite content respectively, exhibit strong absorption restricting residual thermal damage to a relatively small zone. Recently we have investigated the interaction of short pulse laser radiation of picosecond and femtosecond duration with soft and hard tissue, as this unexplored field is expected to be a potential alternative in powerful laser processing of biomedical structures. The experimental results obtained, including ablation rates, ablation wavelength dependence, pulse duration dependence, fluence dependence, etc. are presented. These results are discussed according to simple theoretical models of laser energy absorption and the possible mechanisms of ultrashort pulse laser ablation, which in some cases involves multiphoton photodissociation processes. Finally, the design characteristics of the lasers employed in our

  5. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device

    SciTech Connect

    Elgarhy, M. A. I. Hassaballa, S. E.; Rashed, U. M.; ElSabbagh, M. M.; Saudy, A. H.; Soliman, H. M.

    2015-12-15

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance.

  6. Generation of a pulsed low-energy electron beam using the channel spark device.

    PubMed

    Elgarhy, M A I; Hassaballa, S E; Rashed, U M; ElSabbagh, M M; Soliman, H M; Saudy, A H

    2015-12-01

    For the generation of low-energy electron beam, the design and characteristics of channel spark discharge (CSD) operating at a low voltage are presented in this paper. The discharge voltage, discharge current, X-ray emissions, and electron beam current were experimentally determined. The effects of the applied voltage, working gas pressure, and external capacitance on the CSD and beam parameters were measured. At an applied voltage of 11 kV, an oxygen gas pressure of 25 mTorr, and an external capacitance of 16.45 nF, the maximum measured current was 900 A. The discharge current increased with the increase in the pressure and capacitance, while its periodic time decreased with the increase in the pressure. Two types of the discharge were identified and recorded: the hollow cathode discharge and the conduction discharge. A Faraday cup was used to measure the beam current. The maximum measured beam current was 120 A, and the beam signal exhibited two peaks. The increase in both the external capacitance and the applied discharge voltage increased the maximum electron beam current. The electron-beam pulse time decreased with the increase in the gas pressure at a constant voltage and increased with the decrease in the applied discharge voltage. At an applied voltage of 11 kV and an oxygen gas pressure of 15 mTorr, the maximum beam energy was 2.8 keV. The X-ray signal intensity decreased with the increase in the gas pressure and increased with the increase in the capacitance. PMID:26724026

  7. Multi-beam pulsed laser deposition: new method of making nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Abdalla M.; Wilson, Simeon; Blackwell, Ashely; Taylor, Keylantra; Sarkisov, Sergey; Patel, Darayas; Mele, Paolo; Koplitz, Brent

    2015-08-01

    Huge number of new photonic devices, including light emitters, chemical sensors, and energy harvesters, etc. can be made of the nanocomposite coatings produced by the new multi-beam pulsed laser deposition (MB-PLD) process. We provide a short review of the conventional single-beam PLD method and explain why it is poorly suitable for making nanocomposite coatings. Then we describe the new MB-PLD process and system, particularly the multiple-beam matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MB-MAPLE) version with laser beam scanning and plume direction control. The latter one is particularly designed to make organic (polymer) - inorganic functionalized nanocomposite coatings. Polymer film serves as a host for inorganic nanoparticles that add a specific functionality to the film. We analyze the properties of such coatings using the examples of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films impregnated with the nanoparticles of rare-earth (RE) upconversion phosphors. They demonstrated the preservation of microcrystalline structure and bright upconversion emission in visible region of the phosphor nanoparticles after they were transferred in the polymer matrix during the MB-MAPLE process. The proposed technology has thus proven to serve its purpose: to make functionalized polymer nanocomposite coatings for a various potential applications.

  8. Beam-forming techniques with applications to pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, C. C.

    The near-field and array approaches to beam forming appear to be the most practical and useful methods for providing uniform illumination of the cross section of blood vessels. Through the near-field approach, the required beam patterns are produced in the near field of pulsed transducers and, as a result, it is most suitable for peripheral applications. Field patterns of pulsed transducers are defined and are investigated by theoretical analysis, numerical simulation, and experimental characterization to verify the validity and indicate the limitations of this approach. Transducers are designed and fabricated, based on these results, and are employed in the preliminary flowmeter system evaluation. The use of transducer arrays is the only viable approach to deepbody measurements and flexible beamwidth adjustment. A theory, founded on the finite Fourier-Bessel and Dini series expansions, is developed to synthesize circularly symmetrical beam patterns by means of concentric annular arrays. Its application to the generation of variable-width uniform beams results in a canonical design procedure. A prototype transducer array suitable for transcutaneous cardiac-output estimation was developed.

  9. Beam waist position study for surface modification of polymethyl-methacrylate with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Lucas, F.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.

    2016-06-01

    Femtosecond lasers are versatile tools to process transparent materials. This optical property poses an issue for surface modification. In this case, laser radiation would not be absorbed at the surface unless the beam is just focused there. Otherwise, absorption would take place in the bulk leaving the surface unperturbed. Therefore, strategies to position the material surface at the laser beam waist with high accuracy are essential. We investigated and compared two options to achieve this aim: the use of reflectance data and transmittance measurements across the sample, both obtained during z-scans with pulses from a 1027 nm wavelength laser and 450 fs pulse duration. As the material enters the beam waist region, a reflectance peak is detected while a transmittance drop is observed. With these observations, it is possible to control the position of the sample surface with respect to the beam waist with high resolution and attain pure surface modification. In the case of polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA), this resolution is 0.6 μm. The results prove that these methods are feasible for submicrometric processing of the surface.

  10. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  11. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL < 1 / (2 πωpe)) laser pulses drive highly nonlinear plasma waves which can trap ~ nC of electrons and accelerate them to ~GeV energies over ~cm lengths. These electron beams can then be converted by a high-Z target via bremsstrahlung into low-divergence (< 20 mrad) beams of high-energy (<600 MeV) photons and subsequently into positrons via the Bethe-Heitler process. By increasing the material thickness and Z, the resulting Ne+ /Ne- ratio can approach unity, resulting in a near neutral density plasma jet. These quasi-neutral beams are presumed to retain the short-pulse (τL < 40 fs) characteristic of the electron beam, resulting in a high peak density of ne- /e+ ~ 1016 cm-3 , making the source an excellent candidate for laboratory study of astrophysical leptonic jets. Alternatively, the electron beam can be interacted with a counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  12. Development of ion source with a washer gun for pulsed neutral beam injection.

    PubMed

    Asai, T; Yamaguchi, N; Kajiya, H; Takahashi, T; Imanaka, H; Takase, Y; Ono, Y; Sato, K N

    2008-06-01

    A new type of economical neutral beam source has been developed by using a single washer gun, pulsed operation, and a simple electrode system. We replaced the conventional hot filaments for arc-discharge-type plasma formation with a single stainless-steel washer gun, eliminating the entire dc power supply for the filaments and the cooling system for the electrodes. Our initial experiments revealed successful beam extraction up to 10 kV and 8.6 A, based on spatial profile measurements of density and temperature in the plasma source. The system also shows the potential to control the beam profile by controlling the plasma parameters in the ion accumulation chamber. PMID:18601403

  13. Prototype testing for the US common long pulse neutral beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.C.; Anderson, O.A.; Berkner, K.H.; Chan, C.F.; Cooper, W.S.; Lietzke, A.F.; Owren, H.M.; Paterson, J.A.; Pincosy, P.A.; Pyle, R.V.

    1985-11-01

    The US positive ion neutral beam program has developed a single design, the Common Long Pulse Source (CLPS), which will provide multi-second beam heating for TFTR, MFTF-B and GA's Big D. Following competitive prototype testing, the LBL design was selected for industrialization because it could both meet the performance requirements of all three users, and fit within all space constraints. The LBL accelerator design is based on a slot type of aperture, with water cooled molybdenum grid tubes. The plasma generator is a magnetic bucket arc chamber, with multiple tungsten wire filaments. Beam test results are presented for the 10 x 40 cm prototype source with 80 kV and 120 kV gaps. The initial test results from the first 12 x 48 cm CLPS industrial plasma generator, made by RCA, are also presented.

  14. Rapid Melt and Resolidification of Surface Layers Using Intense, Pulsed Ion Beams Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy J. Turman, Bob Senft, Donna Sorensen, Neil R. Stinnett, Regan Greenly, John B. Thompson, Michael O. Buchheit, Rudolph G.

    1998-10-02

    The emerging technology of pulsed intense ion beams has been shown to lead to improvements in surface characteristics such as hardness and wear resistance, as well as mechanical smoothing. We report hereon the use of this technology to systematically study improvements to three types of metal alloys - aluminum, iron, and titanium. Ion beam tieatment produces a rapid melt and resolidification (RMR) of the surface layer. In the case of a predeposited thin-fihn layer, the beam mixes this layer into the substrate, Ieading to improvements that can exceed those produced by treatment of the alloy alone, In either case, RMR results in both crystal refinement and metastable state formation in the treated surface layer not accessible by conventional alloy production. Although more characterization is needed, we have begun the process of relating these microstructural changes to the surface improvements we discuss in this report.

  15. A compact post-acceleration beam chopper for a 4.5 MV Dynamitron pulsed neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuyama, S.; Fujisawa, M.; Baba, M.; Iwasaki, T.; Iwasaki, S.; Sakamoto, R.; Hirakawa, N.; Sugiyama, K.

    1994-08-01

    A post-acceleration beam chopper (PACS) has been installed for a 4.5 MV Dynamitron accelerator to improve the energy resolution of neutron time-of-flight (TOF) experiments by shortening the duration of the ion beam pulses. The PACS sweeps the accelerated ion pulses across a chopping slit and eliminates the tails of the beam pulses. It operates sinusoidally at a frequency of 8 MHz with a maximum voltage of 10 kV peak to peak in synchronization with the accelerated ion pulses. The high voltage generator of the PACS was constructed of commercially available amplifiers and components, which realized easy maintenance and low cost. The PACS proved to be very effective to improve the pulse shape and has been applied for double-differential neutron emission cross section measurements.

  16. High-energy-density electron beam from interaction of two successive laser pulses with subcritical-density plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. W.; Yu, W.; Yu, M. Y.; Xu, H.; Ju, J. J.; Luan, S. X.; Murakami, M.; Zepf, M.; Rykovanov, S.

    2016-02-01

    It is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that a narrow electron beam with high energy and charge density can be generated in a subcritical-density plasma by two consecutive laser pulses. Although the first laser pulse dissipates rapidly, the second pulse can propagate for a long distance in the thin wake channel created by the first pulse and can further accelerate the preaccelerated electrons therein. Given that the second pulse also self-focuses, the resulting electron beam has a narrow waist and high charge and energy densities. Such beams are useful for enhancing the target-back space-charge field in target normal sheath acceleration of ions and bremsstrahlung sources, among others.

  17. REX, a 5-MV pulsed-power source for driving high-brightness electron beam diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, R.L.; Kauppila, T.J.; Ridlon, R.N.

    1991-01-01

    The Relativistic Electron-beam Experiment, or REX accelerator, is a pulsed-power source capable of driving a 100-ohm load at 5 MV, 50 kA, 45 ns (FWHM) with less than a 10-ns rise and 15-ns fall time. This paper describes the pulsed-power modifications, modelling, and extensive measurements on REX to allow it to drive high impedance (100s of ohms) diode loads with a shaped voltage pulse. A major component of REX is the 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick Lucite insulator with embedded grading rings that separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. A radially tailored, liquid-based resistor provides a stiff voltage source that is insensitive to small variations of the diode current and, in addition, optimizes the electric field stress across the vacuum side of the insulator. The high-current operation of REX employs both multichannel peaking and point-plane diverter switches. This mode reduces the prepulse to less than 2 kV and the postpulse to less than 5% of the energy delivered to the load. Pulse shaping for the present diode load is done through two L-C transmission line filters and a tapered, glycol-based line adjacent to the water PFL and output switch. This has allowed REX to drive a diode producing a 4-MV, 4.5-kA, 55-ns flat-top electron beam with a normalized Lapostolle emittance of 0.96 mm-rad corresponding to a beam brightness in excess of 4.4 {times} 10{sup 8} A/m{sup 2} {minus}rad{sup 2}. 6 refs., 13 figs.

  18. Electrical trimming of ion-beam-sputtered polysilicon resistors by high current pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Soumen; Lahiri, Samir K.

    1994-08-01

    Phosphorus doped polysilicon resistors have been fabricated from microcrystalline silicon films which were deposited by ion beam sputtering using an argon ion beam of diameter 3 cm, energy 1 keV and current density 7mA/cm(sup 2), with a deposition rate of 100-120 angstrom/min. The resistors, having a sheet resistance of 70 Omega /square and a carrier concentration of 7.5 x 10(sup 19)cm(sup - 3), were stressed with current pulses of width 10 mu s and duty cycle 0.6% for 5 min. There was a steady decrease of resistance with increasing pulse current density above a threshold value 5 x 10(sup 5)A/cm(sup 2). A maximum fall of 27% was observed for a 95 micron long resistor. The current-voltage characteristics were also recorded during the trimming process. The trimming characteristics were simulated using a small-signal resistivity model of Lu et al. (11) and the I-V characteristics by a large-bias conduction model (12) . A close fitting of the experimental data with the theoretical values needed an adjustment of some grain boundary parameters for the different pulse current densities used for stressing. The nature of variation of the grain boundary parameters indicates that the rapid Joule heating of the grain boundaries due to current pulses passivates the grain boundary interfaces, at lower currents above the threshold, and then, at higher values of currents, causes zone melting and gradual recrystallization of the disordered boundary layers and subsequent dopant segregation. It confirms the mechanism suggested in the physical model of Kato et al. (7) . The role played by the field-enhanced diffusivity and electromigration of dopant ions, due to the high instantaneous temperature of the grain boundaries, has also been discussed. The pulse trimming technique is simple and does not cause damage to the adjacent components on a monolithic chip.

  19. Fast slit-beam extraction and chopping for neutron generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalvas, T.; Hahto, S. K.; Gicquel, F.; King, M.; Vainionpää, J. H.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K. N.; Miller, T. G.

    2006-03-01

    High-intensity fast white neutron pulses are needed for pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy (PFNTS). A compact tritium-tritium fusion reaction neutron generator with an integrated ion beam chopping system has been designed, simulated, and tested for PFNTS. The design consists of a toroidal plasma chamber with 20 extraction slits, concentric cylindrical electrodes, chopper plates, and a central titanium-coated beam target. The total ion beam current is 1A. The beam chopping is done at 30keV energy with a parallel-plate deflector integrated with an Einzel lens. Beam pulses with 5ns width can be achieved with a 15ns rise/fall time ±1500V sweep on the chopper plates. The neutrons are produced at 120keV energy. A three-dimensional simulation code based on Vlasov iteration was developed for simulating the ion optics of this system. The results with this code were found to be consistent with other simulation codes. So far we have measured 50ns ion beam pulses from the system.

  20. Fast slit-beam extraction and chopping for neutron generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kalvas, T.; Hahto, S.K.; Gicquel, F.; King, M.; Vainionpaeae, J.H.; Reijonen, J.; Leung, K.N.; Miller, T.G.

    2006-03-15

    High-intensity fast white neutron pulses are needed for pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy (PFNTS). A compact tritium-tritium fusion reaction neutron generator with an integrated ion beam chopping system has been designed, simulated, and tested for PFNTS. The design consists of a toroidal plasma chamber with 20 extraction slits, concentric cylindrical electrodes, chopper plates, and a central titanium-coated beam target. The total ion beam current is 1 A. The beam chopping is done at 30 keV energy with a parallel-plate deflector integrated with an Einzel lens. Beam pulses with 5 ns width can be achieved with a 15 ns rise/fall time {+-}1500 V sweep on the chopper plates. The neutrons are produced at 120 keV energy. A three-dimensional simulation code based on Vlasov iteration was developed for simulating the ion optics of this system. The results with this code were found to be consistent with other simulation codes. So far we have measured 50 ns ion beam pulses from the system.

  1. Long pulse acceleration of MeV class high power density negative H{sup −} ion beam for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, N. Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Tobari, H.; Hiratsuka, J.; Watanabe, K.; Dairaku, M.; Yamanaka, H.; Hanada, M.

    2015-04-08

    R and D of high power density negative ion beam acceleration has been carried out at MeV test facility in JAEA to realize ITER neutral beam accelerator. The main target is H{sup −} ion beam acceleration up to 1 MeV with 200 A/m{sup 2} for 60 s whose pulse length is the present facility limit. For long pulse acceleration at high power density, new extraction grid (EXG) has been developed with high cooling capability, which electron suppression magnet is placed under cooling channel similar to ITER. In addition, aperture size of electron suppression grid (ESG) is enlarged from 14 mm to 16 mm to reduce direct interception on the ESG and emission of secondary electron which leads to high heat load on the upstream acceleration grid. By enlarging ESG aperture, beam current increased 10 % at high current beam and total acceleration grid heat load reduced from 13 % to 10 % of input power at long pulse beam. In addition, heat load by back stream positive ion into the EXG is measured for the first time and is estimated as 0.3 % of beam power, while heat load by back stream ion into the source chamber is estimated as 3.5 ~ 4.0 % of beam power. Beam acceleration up to 60 s which is the facility limit, has achieved at 683 keV, 100 A/m{sup 2} of negative ion beam, whose energy density increases two orders of magnitude since 2011.

  2. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 5, September 1--November 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-12-31

    Electrostatic collection of a high resistivity aerosol using the Electron Beam Precipitator (EBP) collecting section was demonstrated during this reporting period (Quarter Five). Collection efficiency experiments were designed to confirm and extend some of the work performed under the previous contract. The reason for doing this was to attempt to improve upon the collection efficiency of the precipitator alone when testing with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high concentration dust load. From the collector shakedown runs, a set of suitable operational parameters were determined for the downstream electrostatic collecting sections of the Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. These parameters, along with those for the MINACC electron beam, will generally be held constant while the numerous precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electrostatic collector experiments were part of a larger, comprehensive investigation on electron beam precharging of high resistivity aerosol particles performed during the period covered by Quarters Five, Six, and Seven. This body of work used the same experimental apparatus and procedures and the experimental run period lasted nearly continuously for six months. A summary of the Quarter Five work is presented in the following paragraphs. Section II-A of TPR 5 contains a report on the continuing effort which was expended on the modification and upgrade of the pulsed power supply and the monitoring systems prior to the initiation of the electron beam precharging experimental work.

  3. Cooling of relativistic electron beams in intense laser pulses: Chirps and radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoffe, S. R.; Noble, A.; Macleod, A. J.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation high-power laser facilities (such as the Extreme Light Infrastructure) will provide unprecedented field intensities, and will allow us to probe qualitatively new physical regimes for the first time. One of the important fundamental questions which will be addressed is particle dynamics when radiation reaction and quantum effects play a significant role. Classical theories of radiation reaction predict beam cooling in the interaction of a relativistic electron bunch and a high-intensity laser pulse, with final-state properties only dependent on the laser fluence. The observed quantum suppression of this cooling instead exhibits a dependence on the laser intensity directly. This offers the potential for final-state properties to be modified or even controlled by tailoring the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In addition to beam properties, quantum effects will be manifest in the emitted radiation spectra, which could be manipulated for use as radiation sources. We compare predictions made by classical, quasi-classical and stochastic theories of radiation reaction, and investigate the influence of chirped laser pulses on the observed radiation spectra.

  4. Investigation of an X-band gigawatt long pulse multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhenbang; Huang, Hua; Lei, Lurong; Jin, Xiao; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Ganping; He, Hu; Wu, Yao; Ge, Yi; Yuan, Huan; Chen, Zhaofu

    2015-09-15

    To achieve a gigawatt-level long pulse radiation power in X-band, a multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier is proposed and studied experimentally. By introducing 18 electron drift tubes and extended interaction cavities, the power capacity of the device is increased. A radiation power of 1.23 GW with efficiency of 41% and amplifier gain of 46 dB is obtained in the particle-in-cell simulation. Under conditions of a 10 Hz repeat frequency and an input RF power of 30 kW, a radiation power of 0.9 GW, frequency of 9.405 GHz, pulse duration of 105 ns, and efficiency of 30% is generated in the experiment, and the amplifier gain is about 45 dB. Both the simulation and the experiment prove that the multi-beam relativistic klystron amplifier can generate a long pulse GW-level radiation power in X-band.

  5. ELECTRO-OPTIC BEAM POSITION AND PULSED POWER MONITORS FOR THE SECOND AXIS OF DARHT.

    SciTech Connect

    M. BRUBAKER; C. EKDAHL; C. YAKYMYSHYN

    2001-05-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydro-Test (DARHT) facility utilizes a long pulse electron beam having a duration in excess of two microseconds. This time scale poses problems for many conventional diagnostics that rely upon electrical cables to transmit signals between the accelerator and recording equipment. Recognizing that transit time isolation is not readily achieved for the long pulse regime, difficulties resulting from ground loops are anticipated. An electro-optic (EO) voltage sensor technology has been developed to address this issue. The EO sensor exploits the Pockels effect in Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) to provide linear modulation of laser light in response to the voltage induced on a pickup electrode. Fiber coupling between the light source, Pockels cell and receiver ensures complete galvanic isolation with improved cost and performance as compared to conventional sensors fitted with fiber optic links. Furthermore, the EO approach requires that only the passive sensor element be located near the accelerator while the light source and receiver can be installed in remote locations. This paper describes the design and development of EO sensors for electron beam and pulsed power monitoring on the second axis of DARHT. Typical calibration and testing data for the sensors is also presented.

  6. In situ mitigation of subsurface and peripheral focused ion beam damage via simultaneous pulsed laser heating

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Iberi, Vighter O.; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D.

    2016-02-16

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+) ) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+) /Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposuremore » process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. In conclusion, these results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.« less

  7. Modification of the sample's surface of hypereutectic silumin by pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygina, M. E.; Ivanov, Yu F.; Lasconev, A. P.; Teresov, A. D.; Cherenda, N. N.; Uglov, V. V.; Petricova, E. A.; Astashinskay, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The article presents the results of the analysis of the elemental and phase composition, defect substructures. It demonstrates strength and tribological characteristics of the aluminium-silicon alloy of the hypereutectic composition in the cast state and after irradiation with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam of a submillisecond exposure duration (a Solo installation, Institute of High Current Electrons of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences). The research has been conducted using optical and scanning electron microscopy, and the X-ray phase analysis. Mechanical properties have been characterized by microhardness, tribological properties - by wear resistance and the friction coefficient value. Irradiation of silumin with the high-intensity pulsed electron beam has led to the modification of the surface layer up to 1000 microns thick. The surface layer with the thickness of up to 100 microns is characterized by melting of all phases present in the alloy; subsequent highspeed crystallization leads to the formation of a submicro- and nanocrystalline structure in this layer. The hardness of the modified layer decreases with the increasing distance from the surface exposure. The hardness of the surface layer is more than twice the hardness of cast silumin. Durability of silumin treated with a high intensity electron beam is ≈ 1, 2 times as much as the wear resistance of the cast material.

  8. Heat generation and neutron beam characteristics in a high power pulsed spallation neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Jerng, D.W.; Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-11-01

    In the course of conceptual design of a high power pulsed spallation source, a Monte Carlo model was developed for heat generation and neutronics studies. In this paper, we present two sets of results. The first set of calculations was performed with a simple target model to investigate general characteristics of power distribution and neutron production with various proton energies ranging from 0.8 to 12 GeV. The second set was performed with a realistic target model including major components of the target system to provide basic parameters for engineering design of a high power pulsed spallation source. Calculated results generally confirm that higher proton energy provides and advantage in target cooling system requirements and yet somewhat lower neutron beam intensity as a counter effect. The heat generation in the systems surrounding the target was investigated in detail and found to have important variation with position and according to proton beam energy. Calculations of the neutron currents from the moderators showed that the neutron beam intensity from moderators in the front region of the target decreased fro higher proton energy while that from moderators in the back region of the target remained almost unchanged.

  9. In Situ Mitigation of Subsurface and Peripheral Focused Ion Beam Damage via Simultaneous Pulsed Laser Heating.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Iberi, Vighter; Fowlkes, Jason D; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D

    2016-04-01

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+)) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+)/Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. These results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams. PMID:26864147

  10. In Situ Mitigation of Subsurface and Peripheral Focused Ion Beam Damage via Simultaneous Pulsed Laser Heating.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Michael G; Lewis, Brett B; Iberi, Vighter; Fowlkes, Jason D; Tan, Shida; Livengood, Rick; Rack, Philip D

    2016-04-01

    Focused helium and neon ion (He(+)/Ne(+)) beam processing has recently been used to push resolution limits of direct-write nanoscale synthesis. The ubiquitous insertion of focused He(+)/Ne(+) beams as the next-generation nanofabrication tool-of-choice is currently limited by deleterious subsurface and peripheral damage induced by the energetic ions in the underlying substrate. The in situ mitigation of subsurface damage induced by He(+)/Ne(+) ion exposures in silicon via a synchronized infrared pulsed laser-assisted process is demonstrated. The pulsed laser assist provides highly localized in situ photothermal energy which reduces the implantation and defect concentration by greater than 90%. The laser-assisted exposure process is also shown to reduce peripheral defects in He(+) patterned graphene, which makes this process an attractive candidate for direct-write patterning of 2D materials. These results offer a necessary solution for the applicability of high-resolution direct-write nanoscale material processing via focused ion beams.

  11. System for measuring temporal profiles of scintillation at high and different linear energy transfers by using pulsed ion beams.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Masanori; Kurashima, Satoshi; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Iwamatsu, Kazuhiro; Kimura, Atsushi; Asai, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a system for measuring the temporal profiles of scintillation at high linear energy transfer (LET) by using pulsed ion beams from a cyclotron. The half width at half maximum time resolution was estimated to be 1.5-2.2 ns, which we attributed mainly to the duration of the pulsed ion beam and timing jitter between the trigger signal and the arrival of the ion pulse. The temporal profiles of scintillation of BaF2 at different LETs were successfully observed. These results indicate that the proposed system is a powerful tool for analyzing the LET effects in temporal profiles of scintillation.

  12. Short-wavelength soft-x-ray laser pumped in double-pulse single-beam non-normal incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, D.; Ros, D.; Guilbaud, O.; Habib, J.; Kazamias, S.; Zielbauer, B.; Bagnoud, V.; Ecker, B.; Aurand, B.; Kuehl, T.; Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P.

    2010-07-15

    We demonstrated a 7.36 nm Ni-like samarium soft-x-ray laser, pumped by 36 J of a neodymium:glass chirped-pulse amplification laser. Double-pulse single-beam non-normal-incidence pumping was applied for efficient soft-x-ray laser generation. In this case, the applied technique included a single-optic focusing geometry for large beam diameters, a single-pass grating compressor, traveling-wave tuning capability, and an optimized high-energy laser double pulse. This scheme has the potential for even shorter-wavelength soft-x-ray laser pumping.

  13. CLASHING BEAM PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Burleigh, R.J.

    1961-04-11

    A charged-particle accelerator of the proton synchrotron class having means for simultaneously accelerating two separate contra-rotating particle beams within a single annular magnet structure is reported. The magnet provides two concentric circular field regions of opposite magnetic polarity with one field region being of slightly less diameter than the other. The accelerator includes a deflector means straddling the two particle orbits and acting to collide the two particle beams after each has been accelerated to a desired energy. The deflector has the further property of returning particles which do not undergo collision to the regular orbits whereby the particles recirculate with the possibility of colliding upon subsequent passages through the deflector.

  14. Investigation of two-beam-pumped noncollinear optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification for the generation of few-cycle light pulses.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Daniel; Tautz, Raphael; Tavella, Franz; Krausz, Ferenc; Veisz, Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate a new and compact Phi-plane-pumped noncollinear optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (NOPCPA) scheme for broadband pulse amplification, which is based on two-beam-pumping (TBP) at 532 nm. We employ type-I phase-matching in a 5 mm long BBO crystal with moderate pump intensities to preserve the temporal pulse contrast. Amplification and compression of the signal pulse from 675 nm - 970 nm is demonstrated, which results in the generation of 7.1-fs light pulses containing 0.35 mJ energy. In this context, we investigate the pump-to-signal energy conversion efficiency for TBP-NOPCPA and outline details for few-cycle pulse characterization. Furthermore, it is verified, that the interference at the intersection of the two pump beams does not degrade the signal beam spatial profile. It is theoretically shown that the accumulated OPA phase partially compensates for wave-vector mismatch and leads to extended broadband amplification. The experimental outcome is supported by numerical split-step simulations of the parametric signal gain, including pump depletion and parametric fluorescence.

  15. Note: Measurement of extreme-short current pulse duration of runaway electron beam in atmospheric pressure air

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Rybka, D. V.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Balzovsky, E. V.

    2012-08-15

    This note reports the time-amplitude characteristic of the supershort avalanche electron beam with up to 20 ps time resolution. For the first time it is shown that the electron beam downstream of small-diameter diaphragms in atmospheric pressure air has a complex structure which depends on the interelectrode gap width and cathode design. With a spherical cathode and collimator the minimum duration at half maximum of the supershort avalanche electron beam current pulse was shown to be {approx}25 ps. The minimum duration at half maximum of one peak in the pulses with two peaks can reach {approx}25 ps too.

  16. Rectangular Relief Diffraction Gratings for Coherent Lidar Beam Deflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, H. J.; Dixit, S. N.; Shore, B. W.; Chambers, D. M.; Britten, J. A.; Kavaya, M. J.

    1999-01-01

    LIDAR systems require a light transmitting system for sending a laser light pulse into space and a receiving system for collecting the retro-scattered light, separating it from the outgoing beam and analyzing the received signal for calculating wind velocities. Currently, a shuttle manifested coherent LIDAR experiment called SPARCLE (SPAce Readiness Coherent Lidar Experiment) includes a silicon wedge (or prism) in its design in order to deflect the outgoing beam 30 degrees relative to the incident direction. The intent of this paper is to present two optical design approaches that may enable the replacement of the optical wedge component (in future, larger aperture, post-SPARCLE missions) with a surface relief transmission diffraction grating. Such a grating could be etched into a lightweight, flat, fused quartz substrate. The potential advantages of a diffractive beam deflector include reduced weight, reduced power requirements for the driving scanning motor, reduced optical sensitivity to thermal gradients, and increased dynamic stability.

  17. Compensation of spatial dispersion of an acousto-optic deflector with a special Keplerian telescope.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-15

    Compensation of spatial dispersion caused by the acousto-optic deflector (AOD) when using a femtosecond laser is difficult across the whole scanning range of the system, and this is a significant impediment to its use. In conventional methods, the dispersion of the AOD was compensated only when it was at a particular position, while at other positions, the quality of the light beam was reduced. We developed a novel method for compensating the spatial dispersion within the entire scanning range using a special Keplerian telescope. Our experimental results show that the residual dispersion of the AOD is compensated sufficiently, and the focal spots of the laser reach the diffraction limit within a 40-MHz ultrasound bandwidth. PMID:26766675

  18. Compensation of spatial dispersion of an acousto-optic deflector with a special Keplerian telescope.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Zhou, Zhenqiao; Lv, Xiaohua; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2016-01-15

    Compensation of spatial dispersion caused by the acousto-optic deflector (AOD) when using a femtosecond laser is difficult across the whole scanning range of the system, and this is a significant impediment to its use. In conventional methods, the dispersion of the AOD was compensated only when it was at a particular position, while at other positions, the quality of the light beam was reduced. We developed a novel method for compensating the spatial dispersion within the entire scanning range using a special Keplerian telescope. Our experimental results show that the residual dispersion of the AOD is compensated sufficiently, and the focal spots of the laser reach the diffraction limit within a 40-MHz ultrasound bandwidth.

  19. The energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Khaylov, I. P.

    2013-07-15

    The results of a study of the energy transfer in the TEMP-4M pulsed ion beam accelerator are presented. The energy transfer efficiency in the Blumlein and a self-magnetically insulated ion diode was analyzed. Optimization of the design of the accelerator allows for 85% of energy transferred from Blumlein to the diode (including after-pulses), which indicates that the energy loss in Blumlein and spark gaps is insignificant and not exceeds 10%–12%. Most losses occur in the diode. The efficiency of energy supplied to the diode to the energy of accelerated ions is 8%–9% for a planar strip self-magnetic MID, 12%–15% for focusing diode and 20% for a spiral self-magnetic MID.

  20. Plume dynamics of cross-beam pulsed-laser ablation of graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez Ake, C.; Sangines de Castro, R.; Sobral, H.; Villagran-Muniz, M.

    2006-09-01

    The dynamics of the interaction between two plasmas induced by cross-beam pulsed-laser ablation was analyzed by time resolved optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography. The plasmas were created in vacuum by irradiating two perpendicular graphite targets with an excimer (248 nm) and a Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (1064 nm) laser. In this configuration, a laser is focused onto a target generating a highly directed plume; subsequently, an additional laser produces a second plasma from the perpendicular target which expands through the first plume. Collisional processes cause a reduction of the kinetic energy of the second plume species as compared to the single pulse experiment. For a fixed delay between lasers of 2 {mu}s, the second plume was divided in two perpendicular directions. The dynamics of this plasma has been compared with laser-induced plume propagation through a background gas in terms of the drag model.

  1. Nonlinear self-focus of pulsed-wave beams in Kerr media

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, J.B.

    1992-12-31

    A modified finite-difference time-domain method for solving Maxwell`s equations in nonlinear media is presented. This method allows for a finite response time to be incorporated in the medium, physically creating dispersion and absorption mechanisms. The technique models electromagnetic fields in two space dimensions and time and encompasses both the TE{sub z} and TM{sub z} set of decoupled field equations. Aspects of an ultra-short pulsed Gaussian beam are studied in a variety of linear and nonlinear environments to demonstrate that the methods developed here can be used efficaciously in the modeling of pulses in complex problem space geometries even when nonlinearities are present.

  2. A comparison of the Cassegrain and other beam expanders in high-power pulsed dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebino, R.; Siegman, A. E.; Roller, J. P.

    1982-08-01

    Beiting and Smith (1979) introduced a pulsed dye laser cavity employing an on-axis reflective Cassegrain telescope in place of the refractive telescope beam expander used in the dye laser oscillator reported by Haensch (1972). The new design has the potential to overcome several drawbacks of the Haensch design. The characteristics of the Cassegrain dye laser are discussed, and a report is presented of some problems encountered in an attempt to achieve efficient high-power operation. Attention is given to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and alignment effects, and to a comparison of the Cassegrain dye laser with other commonly used pulsed dye laser designs. It is found that the Cassegrain dye laser has some advantages over the Haensch design. These advantages are mainly related to the larger possible magnification and, hence, better linewidth. But the Cassegrain dye laser retains also several drawbacks inherent in the Haensch model, including alignment difficulty, high cost, and ASE.

  3. Electron beam dynamics in the long-pulse, high-current DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, Carl A; Abeyta, Epifanio O; Aragon, Paul; Archuleta, Rita; Cook, Gerald; Dalmas, Dale; Esquibel, Kevin; Gallegos, Robert A; Garnett, Robert; Harrison, James F; Johnson, Jeffrey B; Jacquez, Edward B; Mccuistian, Brian T; Montoya, Nicholas A; Nath, Subrato; Nielsen, Kurt; Oro, David; Prichard, Benjamin; Rowton, Lawrence; Sanchez, Manolito; Scarpetti, Raymond; Schauer, Martin M; Seitz, Gerald; Schulze, Martin; Bender, Howard A; Broste, William B; Carlson, Carl A; Frayer, Daniel K; Johnson, Douglas E; Tom, C Y; Williams, John; Hughes, Thomas; Anaya, Richard; Caporaso, George; Chambers, Frank; Chen, Yu - Jiuan; Falabella, Steve; Guethlein, Gary; Raymond, Brett; Richardson, Roger; Trainham, C; Weir, John; Genoni, Thomas; Toma, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) now accelerates 2-kA electron beams to more than 17 MeV. This LIA is unique in that the accelerated current pulse width is greater than 2 microseconds. This pulse has a flat-top region where the final electron kinetic energy varies by less than 1% for more than 1.5 microseconds. The long risetime of the 6-cell injector current pulse is 0.5 {micro}s, which can be scraped off in a beam-head cleanup zone before entering the 68-cell main accelerator. We discuss our experience with tuning this novel accelerator; and present data for the resulting beam transport and dynamics. We also present beam stability data, and relate these to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  4. Pulsed Molecular Beams For Growth Of InAs On GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank J.

    1989-01-01

    Pauses for annealing reduce number of defects. Deposition process that includes pulsed molecular beams produces high-quality epitaxial layers of indium arsenide on gallium arsenide substrates. Layers made as much as 30 atoms thick without introducing excessive numbers of dislocations, despite 7.4-percent mismatch between InAs and GaAs crystal lattices. Layers offer superior electrical properties in such devices as optically addressed light modulators, infrared sensors, semiconductor lasers, and high-electron-mobility transistors. Technique applicable to other epitaxial systems in which lattices highly mismatched.

  5. Positron and positronium annihilation in silica-based thin films studied by a pulsed positron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Ito, K.; Shioya, Y.; Ishimaru, T.

    2003-10-01

    Positron and positronium annihilation in silica-based thin films has been investigated by means of measurement techniques with a monoenergetic pulsed positron beam. The age-momentum correlation study revealed that positron annihilation in thermally grown SiO 2 is basically the same as that in bulk amorphous SiO 2 while o-Ps in the PECVD grown SiCOH film predominantly annihilate with electrons of C and H at the microvoid surfaces. We also discuss time-dependent three-gamma annihilation in porous low- k films by two-dimensional positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

  6. The influence of oceanic turbulence on the spectral properties of chirped Gaussian pulsed beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dajun; Wang, Yaochuan; Wang, Guiqiu; Yin, Hongming; Wang, Jinren

    2016-08-01

    Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle, the spectral behaviors of a chirped Gaussian pulsed beam propagating in oceanic turbulence are illustrated. The influence of the parameters of oceanic turbulence (the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, rate of dissipation of mean-square temperature, relative strength of temperature and salinity fluctuations), relative position parameter and propagation distance on the spectra shift is analysed and given by numerical examples. The research results have the potential application in underwater wireless laser communication and remote sensing.

  7. Proton stopping power measurements using high intensity short pulse lasers produced proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. N.; Atzeni, S.; Gauthier, M.; Higginson, D. P.; Mangia, F.; Marques, J.-R.; Riquier, R.; Fuchs, J.

    2014-03-01

    Proton stopping power measurements in solids and gases, typically made using proton accelerators, Van de Graf machines, etc., have existed now for many decades for many elements and compounds. We propose a new method of making this type of measurement using a different source, namely proton beams created by high intensity short pulse lasers. The advantage of this type of source is that there is the high number of particles and short bunch lengths, which is ideal for measurements of evolving mediums such as hot dense plasmas. Our measurements are consistent with exiting data and theory which validates this method.

  8. Laser-Heated Thermionic Cathodes for Long-Pulse Electron Beam Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollers, D. E.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Jaynes, R. L.; Johnston, M. D.; Getty, W. D.; Hochman+, J. M.; Cohen, W. E.; Rintamaki, J. I.; Peters, C. W.; Spencer, T. A.

    1998-11-01

    Experiments are underway with the goal of utilizing a CW Nd:YAG laser (less than 700 W) to heat cathodes to thermionic emission temperatures. Advantages of a laser-heated cathode are that it obviates an isolation transformer on the -1 MV cathode stalk of the MELBA Accelerator and LaB6 would be immune from poisoning in a pulsed-power vacuum. In the initial proof-of-principle experiments, an unfocused Nd:YAG laser beam is incident on the front of a 2.3 cm diameter disk of LaB6 mounted in a cryopumped test stand. Cathode temperature is diagnosed by thermocouple, optical pyrometry, and optical spectroscopy. Oxide-coated cathodes (e.g., BaO) are also under consideration. Feasibility experiments to generate laser-heated thermionic-cathode electron beams will be reported.

  9. Symmetry issues in a class of ion beam targets using sufficiently short direct drive pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.; Lindl, J.D.

    1986-10-23

    Controlling asymmetries in direct drive ion beam targets depends upon the ability to control the effects of residual target asymmetries after an appropriate illumination scheme has already been utilized. A class of modified ion beam targets where residual asymmetries are ameliorated is considered. The illumination scheme used is an axially symmetric one convenient for reactor designs. Residual asymmetries are controlled by limiting the radial motion of the radius R/sub dep/ of peak ion energy deposition. Limiting the motion of R/sub dep/ is achieved by lengthening the time scale t/sub s/ where changes in R/sub dep/ adversely affect asymmetries. In our example, t/sub s/ becomes longer than the duration ..delta..t/sub D/ of the entire direct drive pulse train (t/sub s/ > ..delta..t/sub D/).

  10. The influence of magnetic fields on the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhang, Ya-ling; Duan, Wen-shan; Qi, Xin E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Ling-yu; Yang, Lei E-mail: lyang@impcas.ac.cn

    2015-09-15

    We performed two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate how a magnetic field affects the wake field and stopping power of an ion-beam pulse moving in plasmas. The corresponding density of plasma electrons is investigated. At a weak magnetic field, the wakes exhibit typical V-shaped cone structures. As the magnetic field strengthens, the wakes spread and lose their typical V-shaped structures. At a sufficiently strong magnetic field, the wakes exhibit conversed V-shaped structures. Additionally, strengthening the magnetic field reduces the stopping power in regions of low and high beam density. However, the influence of the magnetic field becomes complicated in regions of moderate beam density. The stopping power increases in a weak magnetic field, but it decreases in a strong magnetic field. At high beam density and moderate magnetic field, two low-density channels of plasma electrons appear on both sides of the incident beam pulse trajectory. This is because electrons near the beam pulses will be attracted and move along with the beam pulses, while other electrons nearby are restricted by the magnetic field and cannot fill the gap.

  11. Investigation of the propagation of a gigawatt pulsed electron beam in compositions of high-pressure gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sazonov, R. V.; Kholodnaya, G. E.; Ponomarev, D. V.; Remnev, G. E.

    2014-07-15

    The paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of pulsed electron beam propagation with a varying current density (electron energy E{sub e} = 350–400 keV; total current of a diode I{sub e} up to 11 kA; (half-amplitude) pulse duration t = 60 ns, pulse energy W{sub e} up to 120 J) in two- and three-component gas compositions used in the pulsed plasma chemical synthesis of nanosized oxides. The mean value of the specific absorbed energy within the zone of pulsed electron beam propagation with a current density of 0.05–0.06 kA/cm{sup 2} in gas compositions has been determined.

  12. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  13. A mass- and velocity-broadband ion deflector for off-axis ion injection into a cyclotron resonance ion trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Shenheng; Marshall, Alan G.

    1996-02-01

    Off-axis ion injection into an FT-ICR ion trap is desirable for capturing ions from a continuously generated beam (e.g., electrospray). A conventional E×B (Wien) filter focuses ions of a single velocity (independent of mass). Here we show that by segmenting opposed flat electrodes into small sections, the electric field may be tailored to produce well-focused ion trajectories over a wide range of ion velocity and mass-to-charge ratio, m/z. In the limit of infinitely extended deflector electrodes, small m/z, and/or high B, ion trajectories vary as powers or roots of distance.

  14. Electron, Photon, and Ion Beams from the Relativistic Interaction of Petawatt Laser Pulses with Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Hatchett, S.P.; Brown, C.G.; Cowan, T.E.; Henry, E.A.; Johnson, J.; Key, M.H.; Koch, J.A.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, R.W.; Mackinnon, A.J.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Phillips, T.W.; Roth, M.; Sangster, T.C.; Singh, M.S.; Snavely, R.A.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Yasuike, K.

    1999-11-12

    In our Petawatt laser experiments several hundred joules of 1 {micro}m laser light in 0.5-5.0 ps pulses with intensities up to 3 x 10{sup 20}Wcm{sup -2} were incident on solid targets producing a strongly relativistic interaction. The energy content, spectra, and angular patterns of the photon, electron, and ion radiations were diagnosed in a number of ways, including several novel (to laser physics) nuclear activation techniques. From the beamed bremsstrahlung we infer that about 40-50% of the laser energy is converted to broadly beamed hot electrons. Their direction centroid varies from shot to shot, but the beam has a consistent width. Extraordinarily luminous ion beams almost precisely normal to the rear of various targets are seen--up to 3 x 10{sup 13} protons with kT{sub ion} {approx} several MeV representing {approx}6% of the laser energy. We observe ion energies up to at least 55 MeV. The ions appear to originate from the rear target surfaces. The edge of the ion beam is very sharp, and collimation increases with ion energy. At the highest energies, a narrow feature appears in the ion spectra, and the apparent size of the emitting spot is smaller than the full back surface area. Any ion emission from the front of the targets is much less than from the rear and is not sharply beamed. The hot electrons generate a Debye sheath with electrostatic fields of order MV per micron which apparently accelerate the ions.

  15. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  16. Thermal interaction of short-pulsed laser focused beams with skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jian; Guo, Zhixiong

    2009-07-01

    Time-dependent thermal interaction is developed in a skin tissue cylinder subjected to the irradiation of a train of short laser pulses. The skin embedded with a small tumor is stratified as three layers: epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous fat with different optical, thermal and physiological properties. The laser beam is focused to the tumor site by an objective lens for thermal therapy. The ultrafast radiation heat transfer of the focused beam is simulated by the transient discrete ordinates method. The transient Pennes bio-heat equation is solved numerically by the finite volume method with alternating direction implicit scheme. Emphasis is placed on the characterization of the focused beam propagation and absorption and the temperature rise in the focal spot. The effects of the focal spot size and location, the laser power, and the bio-heat equation are investigated. Comparisons with collimated irradiation are conducted. The focused beam can penetrate a greater depth and produce higher temperature rise at the target area, and thus reduce the possibility of thermal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. It is ideal for killing cancerous cells and small tumors.

  17. Multiphase Modeling of Water Injection on Flame Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Bruce T.; Bachchan, Nili; Peroomian, Oshin; Akdag, Vedat

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an Eulerian Dispersed Phase (EDP) model to simulate the water injected from the flame deflector and its interaction with supersonic rocket exhaust from a proposed Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle. The Eulerian formulation, as part of the multi-phase framework, is described. The simulations show that water cooling is only effective over the region under the liquid engines. Likewise, the water injection provides only minor effects over the surface area under the solid engines.

  18. 12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; DEFLECTOR PIT DETAILS, SHEET NO. 1." Specifications No. ENG-04-353-55-72; Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 41 of 148; file no. 1320/92, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  19. Chirped-pulse manipulated carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chao-Kuei; Lin, Yuan-Yao; Lin, Sung-Hui; Lin, Gong-Ru; Pan, Ci-Ling

    2014-04-28

    Chirped pulse controlled carrier dynamics in low-temperature molecular-beam-epitaxy grown GaAs are investigated by degenerate pump-probe technique. Varying the chirped condition of excited pulse from negative to positive increases the carrier relaxation time so as to modify the dispersion and reshape current pulse in time domain. The spectral dependence of carrier dynamics is analytically derived and explained by Shockley-Read Hall model. This observation enables the new feasibility of controlling carrier dynamics in ultrafast optical devices via the chirped pulse excitations.

  20. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed Dipole Correctors and Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Slow extraction of protons beams from circular accelerators is currently widely used for a variety of beam-based experiments. The method has some deficiencies including limited efficiency of extraction, radiation induced due to scattering on the electrostatic septa and limited beam pipe aperture, beam dynamics effects of space charge forces and magnet power supplies ripple. Here we present a novel slow extraction scheme employing a number of non-standard accelerator elements, such as Silicone crystal strips and pulsed stripline dipole correctors, and illustrate practicality of these examples at the 8 GeV proton Recycler Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in simulations. We propose to initiate an R&D program in the Fermilab 8 GeV Recycler to address the key issues of the method: (a) feasibility of very short crystals - from few mm down to 0.2 mm; (b) their efficiency in the channelling and volume reflection regimes; (c) practical aspects of the fast deflectors.

  1. Bluff-body drag reduction using a deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourrié, Grégoire; Keirsbulck, Laurent; Labraga, Larbi; Gilliéron, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    A passive flow control on a generic car model was experimentally studied. This control consists of a deflector placed on the upper edge of the model rear window. The study was carried out in a wind tunnel at Reynolds numbers based on the model height of 3.1 × 105 and 7.7 × 105. The flow was investigated via standard and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, Kiel pressure probes and surface flow visualization. The aerodynamic drag was measured using an external balance and calculated using a wake survey method. Drag reductions up to 9% were obtained depending on the deflector angle. The deflector increases the separated region on the rear window. The results show that when this separated region is wide enough, it disrupts the development of the counter-rotating longitudinal vortices appearing on the lateral edges of the rear window. The current study suggests that flow control on such geometries should consider all the flow structures that contribute to the model wake flow.

  2. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  3. Transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using step-index fibers having large cladding

    DOEpatents

    Yalin, Azer P; Joshi, Sachin

    2014-06-03

    An apparatus and method for transmission of laser pulses with high output beam quality using large core step-index silica optical fibers having thick cladding, are described. The thick cladding suppresses diffusion of modal power to higher order modes at the core-cladding interface, thereby enabling higher beam quality, M.sup.2, than are observed for large core, thin cladding optical fibers. For a given NA and core size, the thicker the cladding, the better the output beam quality. Mode coupling coefficients, D, has been found to scale approximately as the inverse square of the cladding dimension and the inverse square root of the wavelength. Output from a 2 m long silica optical fiber having a 100 .mu.m core and a 660 .mu.m cladding was found to be close to single mode, with an M.sup.2=1.6. Another thick cladding fiber (400 .mu.m core and 720 .mu.m clad) was used to transmit 1064 nm pulses of nanosecond duration with high beam quality to form gas sparks at the focused output (focused intensity of >100 GW/cm.sup.2), wherein the energy in the core was <6 mJ, and the duration of the laser pulses was about 6 ns. Extending the pulse duration provided the ability to increase the delivered pulse energy (>20 mJ delivered for 50 ns pulses) without damaging the silica fiber.

  4. Enhanced proton beams from ultrathin targets driven by high contrast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Neely, D.; Foster, P.; Robinson, A.; Lindau, F.; Lundh, O.; Persson, A.; Wahlstroem, C.-G.; McKenna, P.

    2006-07-10

    The generation of proton beams from ultrathin targets, down to 20 nm in thickness, driven with ultrahigh contrast laser pulses is explored. The conversion efficiency from laser energy into protons increases as the foil thickness is decreased, with good beam quality and high efficiencies of 1% being achieved, for protons with kinetic energy exceeding 0.9 MeV, for 100 nm thick aluminum foils at intensities of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} with 33 fs, 0.3 J pulses. To minimize amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) induced effects disrupting the acceleration mechanism, exceptional laser to ASE intensity contrasts of up to 10{sup 10} are achieved by introducing a plasma mirror to the high contrast 10 Hz multiterawatt laser at the Lund Laser Centre. It is shown that for a given laser energy on target, regimes of higher laser-to-proton energy conversion efficiency can be accessed with increasing contrast. The increasing efficiency as the target thickness decreases is closely correlated to an increasing proton temperature.

  5. Ultrabroadband single-pulse CARS of liquids using a spatially dispersive Stokes beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astinov, V. H.; Georgiev, G. M.

    1996-07-01

    A double-channel spectrometer, which enables to acquire ultrabroadband single-pulse spectra of liquids by Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS), is described. The method used to fulfill the phase-matching condition is based on the fact that the CARS efficiency in dispersive media is the largest when the interactive waves cross each other under frequency-determined angles. The dependence of the spatial separation between the pump and Stokes beam, in front of the crossing CARS lens, due to their frequency difference is analysed. It is shown that the different spectral components of an ultrabroadband Stokes source have phase-matched the CARS process when they are laterally shifted by a conjugated prism pair and focused into the sample. The method is tested in the spectral region 2800 3800 cm-1 of a non-resonant medium (CCl4) using an ultrabroadband dye laser (1000 cm-1 FWHM). The influence of the Stokes beam spatial dispersion on the width of CARS generation is demonstrated. By this method, 1060 cm-1 wide single-pulse spectra of the OH stretching vibration of liquid water are obtained for the first time. The ratio between the resonant and non-resonant part of the third-order susceptibility in water and methanol is determined.

  6. Pulsed Electron Beam Water Radiolysis for Sub-Microsecond Hydroxyl Radical Protein Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Caroline; Janik, Ireneusz; Zhuang, Tiandi; Charvátová, Olga; Woods, Robert J.; Sharp, Joshua S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydroxyl radical footprinting is a valuable technique for studying protein structure, but care must be taken to ensure that the protein does not unfold during the labeling process due to oxidative damage. Footprinting methods based on sub-microsecond laser photolysis of peroxide that complete the labeling process faster than the protein can unfold have been recently described; however, the mere presence of large amounts of hydrogen peroxide can also cause uncontrolled oxidation and minor conformational changes. We have developed a novel method for sub-microsecond hydroxyl radical protein footprinting using a pulsed electron beam from a 2 MeV Van de Graaff electron accelerator to generate a high concentration of hydroxyl radicals by radiolysis of water. The amount of oxidation can be controlled by buffer composition, pulsewidth, dose, and dissolved nitrous oxide gas in the sample. Our results with ubiquitin and β-lactoglobulin A demonstrate that one sub-microsecond electron beam pulse produces extensive protein surface modifications. Highly reactive residues that are buried within the protein structure are not oxidized, indicating that the protein retains its folded structure during the labeling process. Time-resolved spectroscopy indicates that the major part of protein oxidation is complete in a timescale shorter than that of large scale protein motions. PMID:19265387

  7. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Final report, September 1, 1989--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1992-12-31

    This is the fifth in a series of contracts and grants exploring the advanced particulate pollution control technology of electron beam precipitation. The project currently under contract with the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, US DOE, addresses the pressing problem of more efficiently controlling the emission of fine, high resistivity fly ash from low sulfur coal-burning power plants. As such, the project is an integral part of the DOE mission to advance technologies which provide for the safe and economically viable utilization of the nation`s large but potentially polluting coal resources. Within the University Coal Research Program of the DOE, the objective of the project is also consistent with the goal of improving the performance of electrostatic precipitators and possibly fabric filters through the use of a first-stage electron beam particle precharger. Reducing the emission of particulate matter from coal fired boilers is in the national interest from a respiratory health standpoint, while improved power efficiency of the removal process serves the goals of lowered energy consumption. In addition, an earlier spinoff of the ongoing program at FSU was the invention of a new technology using pulsed streamer corona for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, the pulse energized electron reactor (PEER) process.

  8. Pulse compression and beam focusing with segmented diffraction gratings in a high-power chirped-pulse amplification glass laser system.

    PubMed

    Habara, Hideaki; Xu, Guang; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Kodama, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kenji; Sawai, Kiyonobu; Kondo, Kiminori; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Mima, Kunioki; Rushford, Michael C; Britten, Jerald A; Barty, Christopher P J

    2010-06-01

    Segmented (tiled) grating arrays are being intensively investigated for petawatt-scale pulse compression due to the expense and technical challenges of fabricating monolithic diffraction gratings with apertures of over 1m. However, the considerable freedom of motion among grating segments complicates compression and laser focusing. We constructed a real compressor system using a segmented grating for an 18cm aperture laser beam of the Gekko MII 100TW laser system at Osaka University. To produce clean pulse shapes and single focal spots tolerant of misalignment and groove density difference of grating tiles, we applied a new compressor scheme with image rotation in which each beam segment samples each grating segment but from opposite sides. In high-energy shots of up to 50J, we demonstrated nearly Fourier-transform-limited pulse compression (0.5ps) with an almost diffraction-limited spot size (20microm).

  9. Pulse compression and beam focusing with segmented diffraction gratings in a high-power chirped-pulse amplification glass laser system.

    PubMed

    Habara, Hideaki; Xu, Guang; Jitsuno, Takahisa; Kodama, Ryosuke; Suzuki, Kenji; Sawai, Kiyonobu; Kondo, Kiminori; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Tanaka, Kazuo A; Mima, Kunioki; Rushford, Michael C; Britten, Jerald A; Barty, Christopher P J

    2010-06-01

    Segmented (tiled) grating arrays are being intensively investigated for petawatt-scale pulse compression due to the expense and technical challenges of fabricating monolithic diffraction gratings with apertures of over 1m. However, the considerable freedom of motion among grating segments complicates compression and laser focusing. We constructed a real compressor system using a segmented grating for an 18cm aperture laser beam of the Gekko MII 100TW laser system at Osaka University. To produce clean pulse shapes and single focal spots tolerant of misalignment and groove density difference of grating tiles, we applied a new compressor scheme with image rotation in which each beam segment samples each grating segment but from opposite sides. In high-energy shots of up to 50J, we demonstrated nearly Fourier-transform-limited pulse compression (0.5ps) with an almost diffraction-limited spot size (20microm). PMID:20517415

  10. Splash flow from a metal plate hit by an electron beam pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    When a pulsed electron beam hits a metal plate with sufficient energy a volume of the metal becomes hot fluid that subsequently sprays out of the plate. A second pulse of electrons traveling toward the plate would scatter and degrade before impacting the solid plate because of its encounter with the diffuse material of the initial splash. People designing electron beam machines for use as pulsed radiation sources wish to eliminate the interaction between the electrons and the splash because they want sharp radiation pulses emitted from the solid plate. This report presents a compressible fluid model of this splash flow and compares specific cases with experiments and comprehensive calculations performed by B. DeVolder and others at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, see reference (1). My aim was to develop as simple a theory as possible to calculate the speed and density of the splash flow. I have used both simplifying assumptions and mathematical approximations to develop convenient formulas. As I wished to make a clear and interesting presentation of this work to a diverse audience that includes people outside the specialty of fluid dynamics, some of my descriptions may seem wordier than necessary. The plan of the report is as follows. In the section called ``energy deposition`` I describe how an electron beam deposits energy in a solid plate, converting some of the material into a hot fluid. The initial temperature of this fluid is the key parameter in determining the nature of the subsequent flow; an explicit formula is shown. Flow occurs in two regions: along a streamtube within the metal plate and as an expanding plume outside the metal plate. Flow within the plate is described in the section called ``isentropic flow.`` This flow occurs as expansion waves move at the speed of sound through the streamtube. The analysis of this flow provides a formula for the mass flow over time from the plate into the external splash. The section called ``centered expansion

  11. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm{sup 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Isakova, Yu. Pushkarev, A.; Khailov, I.; Zhong, H.

    2015-07-15

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm{sup 2}, and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm{sup 2}), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  12. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm².

    PubMed

    Isakova, Yu; Pushkarev, A; Khailov, I; Zhong, H

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm(2), and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm(2)), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied.

  13. Generation and diagnostics of pulsed intense ion beams with an energy density of 10 J/cm².

    PubMed

    Isakova, Yu; Pushkarev, A; Khailov, I; Zhong, H

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents the results of a study on transportation and focusing of a pulsed ion beam at gigawatt power level, generated by a diode with explosive-emission cathode. The experiments were carried out with the TEMP-4M accelerator operating in double-pulse mode: the first pulse is of negative polarity (500 ns, 100-150 kV), and this is followed by a second pulse of positive polarity (120 ns, 200-250 kV). To reduce the beam divergence, we modified the construction of the diode. The width of the anode was increased compared to that of the cathode. We studied different configurations of planar and focusing strip diodes. It was found that the divergence of the ion beam formed by a planar strip diode, after construction modification, does not exceed 3° (half-angle). Modification to the construction of a focusing diode made it possible to reduce the beam divergence from 8° to 4°-5°, as well as to increase the energy density at the focus up to 10-12 J/cm(2), and decrease the shot to shot variation in the energy density from 10%-15% to 5%-6%. When measuring the ion beam energy density above the ablation threshold of the target material (3.5-4 J/cm(2)), we used a metal mesh with 50% transparency to lower the energy density. The influence of the metal mesh on beam transport has been studied. PMID:26233370

  14. Pulsed supersonic molecular beam for characterization of chemically active metal-organic complexes at surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lear, Amanda M.

    Metal-organic coordination networks (MOCNs) at surfaces consist of a complex of organic ligands bound to an atomic metal center. The MOCNs, when chosen appropriately, can form highly-ordered arrays at surfaces. Ultra-high vacuum surface studies allow control of surface composition and provide 2D growth restrictions, which lead to under-coordinated metal centers. These systems provide an opportunity to tailor the chemical function of the metal centers due to the steric restrictions imposed by the surface. Tuning the adsorption/desorption energy at a metal center and developing a cooperative environment for catalysis are the key scientific questions that motivate the construction of a molecular beam surface analysis system. Characterization of the created systems can be performed utilizing a pulsed supersonic molecular beam (PSMB) in unison with a quadrupole mass spectrometer. A PSMB allows for the highly controlled delivery of reactants with well-defined energy to a given platform making it possible to elucidate detailed chemical tuning information. In this thesis, a summary of prior theoretical molecular beam derivations is provided. Design considerations and an overview of the construction procedure for the current molecular beam apparatus, including initial characterization experiments, are presented. By impinging an Ar beam on a Ag(111) surface, the location of the specular angle (˜65°) and rough sample perimeter coordinates were determined. Additionally, surface analysis experiments, mainly Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), were performed to investigate the oxidation of epitaxial graphene on the SiC(0001) surface utilizing an oxygen cracking method. The AES experiments are described in detail and highlight the challenges that were faced when several different graphene samples were used for the oxygen adsorption/desorption experiments.

  15. Pulsed electron-beam technology for surface modification of metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Proskurovsky, D.I.; Rotshtein, V.P.; Ozur, G.E.; Markov, A.B.; Nazarov, D.S.; Shulov, V.A.; Ivanov, Y.F.; Buchheit, R.G.

    1998-07-01

    This article concerns the foundations of a new technology for surface modification of metallic materials based on the use of original sources of low-energy, high-current electron beams. The sources contain an electron gun with an explosive-emission cathode and a plasma anode, placed in a guide magnetic field. The acceleration gap and the transportation channel are prefilled with plasma with the use of spark plasma sources or a low-pressure reflected discharge. The electron-beam sources produce electron beams with the parameters as follows: electron energy 10{endash}40 keV; pulse duration 0.5{endash}5 {mu}s; energy density 0.5{endash}40thinspJ/cm{sup 2}, and beam cross-section area 10{endash}50thinspcm{sup 2}. They are simple and reliable in operation. Investigations performed with a variety of constructional and tool materials (steels, aluminum and titanium alloys, hard alloys) have shown that the most pronounced changes of the structure-phase state occur in the near-surface layers quenched from the liquid state, where the crystallization front velocity reaches its maximum. In these layers partial or complete dissolving of second phases and formation of oversaturated solid solutions and ordered nanosized structures may take place. This makes it possible to improve substantially the electrochemical and strength properties of the surface layers. It has been established that the deformation processes occurring in the near-surface layers have the result that the thickness of the modified layer with improved strength properties is significantly greater than that of the heat-affected zone. Some examples of the use of low-energy, high-current electron beams for improving the performance of materials and articles are given. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  16. Microstructures and properties of zirconium-702 irradiated by high current pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shen; Cai, Jie; Lv, Peng; Zhang, Conglin; Huang, Wei; Guan, Qingfeng

    2015-09-01

    The microstructure, hardness and corrosion resistance of zirconium-702 before and after high-current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation have been investigated. The microstructure evolution and surface morphologies of the samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results indicate that the sample surface was melted after HCPEB irradiation, and martensitic phase transformation occurred. Besides, two kinds of craters as well as ultrafine structures were obtained in the melted layer. TEM observations suggest that high density dislocations and deformation twins were formed after HCPEB irradiation. With the increasing of pulses, microhardness of the irradiated samples was increased from the initial 178 Hv to 254 Hv. The corrosion resistance was tested by using electrode impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Electrochemical results show that, after HCPEB irradiation, all the samples had better corrosion resistance in 1 mol HNO3 solution compared to the initial one, among which the 5-pulsed sample owned the best corrosion resistance. Ultrafine structures, martensitic phase transformation, surface porosities, dislocations and deformation twins are believed to be the dominant reasons for the improvement of the hardness and corrosion resistance.

  17. Theoretical studies of defect formation and target heating by intense pulsed ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; Schenkel, T.; Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I.

    2015-11-01

    We present results of three studies related to experiments on NDCX-II, the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, a short-pulse (~ 1ns), high-current (~ 70A) linear accelerator for 1.2 MeV ions at LBNL. These include: (a) Coupled transverse and longitudinal envelope calculations of the final non-neutral ion beam transport, followed by neutralized drift and final focus, for a number of focus and drift lengths and with a series of ion species (Z =1-19). Predicted target fluences were obtained and target temperatures in the 1 eV range estimated. (b) HYDRA simulations of the target response for Li and He ions and for Al and Au targets at various ion fluences (up to 1012 ions/pulse/mm2) and pulse durations, benchmarking temperature estimates from the envelope calculations. (c) Crystal-Trim simulations of ion channeling through single-crystal lattices, with comparisons to ion transmission data as a function of orientation angle of the crystal foil and for different ion intensities and ion species. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE under contracts DE-AC52-07NA27344 (LLNL), DE-AC02-05CH11231 (LBNL) and DE-AC02-76CH0307 (PPPL) and was supported by the US DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences. LLNL-ABS-67521.

  18. A Kinematically Beamed, Low Energy Pulsed Neutron Source for Active Interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, D; Hagmann, C; Kerr, P; Nakae, L; Rowland, M; Snyderman, N; Stoeffl, W; Hamm, R

    2004-10-07

    We are developing a new active interrogation system based on a kinematically focused low energy neutron beam. The key idea is that one of the defining characteristics of SNM (Special Nuclear Materials) is the ability for low energy or thermal neutrons to induce fission. Thus by using low energy neutrons for the interrogation source we can accomplish three goals, (1) Energy discrimination allows us to measure the prompt fast fission neutrons produced while the interrogation beam is on; (2) Neutrons with an energy of approximately 60 to 100 keV do not fission 238U and Thorium, but penetrate bulk material nearly as far as high energy neutrons do and (3) below about 100keV neutrons lose their energy by kinematical collisions rather than via the nuclear (n,2n) or (n,n') processes thus further simplifying the prompt neutron induced background. 60 keV neutrons create a low radiation dose and readily thermal capture in normal materials, thus providing a clean spectroscopic signature of the intervening materials. The kinematically beamed source also eliminates the need for heavy backward and sideway neutron shielding. We have designed and built a very compact pulsed neutron source, based on an RFQ proton accelerator and a lithium target. We are developing fast neutron detectors that are nearly insensitive to the ever-present thermal neutron and neutron capture induced gamma ray background. The detection of only a few high energy fission neutrons in time correlation with the linac pulse will be a clear indication of the presence of SNM.

  19. Design of a New Acceleration System for High-Current Pulsed Proton Beams from an ECR Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Andrew L.; Pogrebnyak, Ivan; Surbrook, Jason T.; Kelly, Keegan J.; Carlin, Bret P.; Champagne, Arthur E.; Clegg, Thomas B.

    2014-03-01

    A primary objective for accelerators at TUNL's Laboratory for Experimental Nuclear Astrophysics (LENA) is to maximize target beam intensity to ensure a high rate of nuclear events during each experiment. Average proton target currents of several mA are needed from LENA's electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source because nuclear cross sections decrease substantially at energies of interest <200 keV. We seek to suppress undesired continuous environmental background by pulsing the beam and detecting events only during beam pulses. To improve beam intensity and transport, we installed a more powerful, stable microwave system for the ECR plasma, and will install a new acceleration system. This system will: reduce defocusing effects of the beam's internal space charge; provide better vacuum with a high gas conductance accelerating column; suppress bremsstrahlung X-rays produced when backstreaming electrons strike internal acceleration tube structures; and provide better heat dissipation by using deionized water to provide the current drain needed to establish the accelerating tube's voltage gradient. Details of beam optical modeling calculations, proposed accelerating tube design, and initial beam pulsing tests will be described. Work supported in part by USDOE Office of HE and Nuclear Physics.

  20. Laser-energy transfer and enhancement of plasma waves and electron beams by interfering high-intensity laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, P; Saleh, N; Chen, S; Sheng, Z M; Umstadter, D

    2003-11-28

    The effects of interference due to crossed laser beams were studied experimentally in the high-intensity regime. Two ultrashort (400 fs), high-intensity (4 x 10(17) and 1.6 x 10(18) W/cm(2)) and 1 microm wavelength laser pulses were crossed in a plasma of density 4 x 10(19) cm(3). Energy was observed to be transferred from the higher-power to the lower-power pulse, increasing the amplitude of the plasma wave propagating in the direction of the latter. This results in increased electron self-trapping and plasma-wave acceleration gradient, which led to an increased number of hot electrons (by 300%) and hot-electron temperature (by 70%) and a decreased electron-beam divergence angle (by 45%), as compared with single-pulse illumination. Simulations reveal that increased stochastic heating of electrons may have also contributed to the electron-beam enhancement.

  1. Radiation defect dynamics in Si at room temperature studied by pulsed ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, J. B.; Myers, M. T.; Charnvanichborikarn, S.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Shao, L.

    2015-10-07

    The evolution of radiation defects after the thermalization of collision cascades often plays the dominant role in the formation of stable radiation disorder in crystalline solids of interest to electronics and nuclear materials applications. Here, we explore a pulsed-ion-beam method to study defect interaction dynamics in Si crystals bombarded at room temperature with 500 keV Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe ions. The effective time constant of defect interaction is measured directly by studying the dependence of lattice disorder, monitored by ion channeling, on the passive part of the beam duty cycle. The effective defect diffusion length is revealed by the dependence of damage on the active part of the beam duty cycle. Results show that the defect relaxation behavior obeys a second order kinetic process for all the cases studied, with a time constant in the range of ∼4–13 ms and a diffusion length of ∼15–50 nm. Both radiation dynamics parameters (the time constant and diffusion length) are essentially independent of the maximum instantaneous dose rate, total ion dose, and dopant concentration within the ranges studied. However, both the time constant and diffusion length increase with increasing ion mass. This demonstrates that the density of collision cascades influences not only defect production and annealing efficiencies but also the defect interaction dynamics.

  2. Pulsed neutron-beam focusing by modulating a permanent-magnet sextupole lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Masako; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Tongu, Hiromu; Shimizu, Hirohiko M.; Mishima, Kenji; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Hirota, Katsuya; Otake, Yoshie; Seki, Yoshichika; Yamagata, Yutaka; Hino, Masahiro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Garbe, Ulf; Kennedy, Shane J.; Tung Lee, Wai; Andersen, Ken H.; Guerard, Bruno; Manzin, Giuliana; Geltenbort, Peter

    2015-04-01

    We have developed a compact permanent-magnet sextupole lens for neutrons that can focus a pulsed beam with a wide wavelength range-the maximum wavelength being more than double the minimum-while sufficiently suppressing the effect of chromatic aberration. The bore diameter is #x00F8;15 mm. Three units of a double-ring sextupole with a length of 66 mm are cascaded, resulting in a total length of 198 mm. The dynamic modulation range of the unit-averaged field gradient is 1.06 × 104-5.86 × 104Tm^{-2}. Permanent magnets and newly developed torque-canceling elements make the device compact, its production costs low, and its operation simpler than that of other magnetic lenses. The efficacy of this lens was verified using very cold neutrons. The diameter of the focused beam spots over the wavelength range of 27-55 Å was the same as that of the source aperture (2 mm diameter) when the magnification of the optical arrangement was unity. The total beam flux over this wavelength range was enhanced by a factor of 43. The focusing distance from the source to the detector was 1.84 m. In addition, in a demonstration of neutron image magnification, the image of a sample mask magnified by a factor of 4.1 was observed when the magnification of the optical arrangement was 5.0.

  3. Note: a short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator.

    PubMed

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M; Suits, Arthur G

    2014-11-01

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  4. Note: A short-pulse high-intensity molecular beam valve based on a piezoelectric stack actuator

    SciTech Connect

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Joalland, Baptiste; Shi, Yuanyuan; Kamasah, Alexander; Oldham, James M.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2014-11-15

    Solenoid and piezoelectric disk valves, which are widely used to generate molecular beam pulses, still suffer from significant restrictions, such as pulse durations typically >50 μs, low repetition rates, and limited gas flows and operational times. Much of this arises owing to the limited forces these actuators can achieve. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a new pulsed valve based on a high-force piezoelectric stack actuator. We show here that operation with pulse durations as low as 20 μs and repetition rates up to 100 Hz can be easily achieved by operating the valve in conjunction with a commercial fast high-voltage switch. We outline our design and demonstrate its performance with molecular beam characterization via velocity map ion imaging.

  5. Low-contrast visualization in megavoltage cone-beam CT at one beam pulse per projection using thick segmented scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Zhao, Qihua; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Wang, Yi

    2010-04-01

    Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is a highly promising technique for providing valuable volumetric information for image guidance in radiotherapy. However, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs), which are the established gold standard in portal imaging, require a relatively large dose to create images that are clinically useful. This is a consequence of the inefficiency of the phosphor screens employed in conventional MV AMFPIs, which utilize only ~2% of the incident radiation at 6 MV. Fortunately, the incorporation of thick, segmented scintillators can significantly improve the performance of MV AMFPIs, leading to improved image quality for projection imaging at extremely low dose. It is therefore of interest to explore the performance of such thick scintillators for MV CBCT toward the goal of soft-tissue contrast visualization. In this study, prototype AMFPIs incorporating segmented scintillators based on CsI:Tl and BGO crystals with thicknesses ranging from ~11 to 25 mm have been constructed and evaluated. Each prototype incorporates a detector consisting of a matrix of 120 × 60 scintillator elements separated by reflective septal walls, with an element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm, coupled to an overlying ~1 mm thick Cu plate. The prototype AMFPIs were incorporated into a bench-top CBCT system, allowing the acquisition of tomographic images of a contrast phantom using a 6 MV radiotherapy photon beam. The phantom consists of a water-equivalent (solid water) cylinder, embedded with tissue-equivalent inserts having electron densities, relative to water, varying from ~0.43 to ~1.47. Reconstructed images of the phantom were obtained down to the lowest available dose (one beam pulse per projection), corresponding to a total scan dose of ~4 cGy using 180 projections. In this article, reconstructed images, contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio for the tissue-equivalent objects using the

  6. Development of a fast risetime pulsed relativistic electron beam generator for the excitation of shorter wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Saito, Y.; Niki, S.; Yamagishi, A.; Inaba, H.

    1982-09-01

    A compact and simple high current relativistic electron beam (REB) generator for the excitation of lasers in the shorter wavelength region has been developed. This REB generator mainly consists of a Tesla transformer-type high-voltage generator, N2 gas insulated Blumlein-type pulse-forming line and cold-cathode electron gun to generate 800 keV, 12 kA pulsed electron beams with 6 ns current duration and approximately 4 ns current risetime. The design and operational characteristics along with discussions of the excitation capabilities of the gas laser media are presented.

  7. ERK/p38 MAPK inhibition reduces radio-resistance to a pulsed proton beam in breast cancer stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Myung-Hwan; Park, Jeong Chan

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have identified highly tumorigenic cells with stem cell-like characteristics, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human cancers. CSCs are resistant to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy owing to their high DNA repair ability and oncogene overexpression. However, the mechanisms regulating CSC radio-resistance, particularly proton beam resistance, remain unclear. We isolated CSCs from the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, which expressed the characteristic breast CSC membrane protein markers CD44+/CD24-/ low , and irradiated the CSCs with pulsed proton beams. We confirmed that CSCs were resistant to pulsed proton beams and showed that treatment with p38 and ERK inhibitors reduced CSC radio-resistance. Based on these results, BCSC radio-resistance can be reduced during proton beam therapy by co-treatment with ERK1/2 or p38 inhibitors, a novel approach to breast cancer therapy.

  8. Preparation of Fiber Optics for the Delivery of High-Energy High-Beam-Quality Nd:YAG Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; French, P; Hand, D P; Blewett, I J; Richmond, M; Jones, J D

    2000-11-20

    Recent improvements in design have made it possible to build Nd:YAG lasers with both high pulse energy and high beam quality. These lasers are particularly suited for percussion drilling of holes of as much as 1-mm diameter thick (a few millimeters) metal parts. An example application is the production of cooling holes in aeroengine components for which 1-ms duration, 30-J energy laser pulses produce holes of sufficient quality much more efficiently than with a laser trepanning process. Fiber optic delivery of the laser beam would be advantageous, particularly when one is processing complex three-dimensional structures. However, lasers for percussion drilling are available only with conventional bulk-optic beam delivery because of laser-induced damage problems with the small-diameter (approximately 200-400-mum) fibers that would be required for preserving necessary beam quality. We report measurements of beam degradation in step-index optical fibers with an input beam quality corresponding to an M(2) of 22. We then show that the laser-induced damage threshold of 400-mum core-diameter optical fibers can be increased significantly by a CO(2) laser treatment step following the mechanical polishing routine. This increase in laser-induced damage threshold is sufficient to propagate 25-J, 1-ms laser pulses with a 400-mum core-diameter optical fiber and an output M(2) of 31.

  9. Directionality effects in the transfer of X-rays from a magnetized atmosphere: Beam pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Bonazzola, S.

    1981-01-01

    A formalism is presented for radiation transfer in two normal polarization modes in finite and semiinfinite plane parallel uniform atmospheres with a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface and arbitrary propagation angles. This method is based on the coupled integral equations of transfer, including emission, absorption, and scattering. Calculations are performed for atmosphere parameters typical of X-ray pulsars. The directionality of the escaping radiation is investigated for several cases, varying the input distributions. Theoretical pencil beam profiles and X-ray pulse shapes are obtained assuming the radiation is emitted from the polar caps of spinning neutron stars. Implications for realistic models of accreting magnetized X-ray sources are briefly discussed.

  10. Pulsed ion beam technique for measuring diffusion coefficient of a slow diffusant in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.; Edelson, D.; Brown, W. L.

    1983-08-01

    The determination of diffusion coefficients (D) of small molecules in a polymer for D below 10-10 cm2 s-1 is a difficult measurement using conventional self-supporting polymer membrane techniques. We propose a new method for obtaining similar information by irradiating a polymer with a pulsed ion beam and studying the evolving gaseous products. Product molecules that are not limited by the rate of their production in the film tend to exhibit diffusion limited dynamical characteristics in their transient evolution from the surface. By numerically modeling the diffusion problem we can extract diffusion coefficients from the data. Since thin films (<1 μm) can be used in these experiments, diffusion coefficients less than 10-10 cm2 s-1, typical of many molecules in polymers, can be measured with ease.

  11. Frozen plasma within the flow from a metal plate hit by an electron beam pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    When a pulsed electron beam hits a metal plate with sufficient energy a volume of the metal becomes hot fluid that subsequently sprays out of the plate. A portion of this flow is ionized. This report describes a fluid that expands so rapidly into a vacuum that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. This cold supersonic exhaust will have a much higher degree of ionization, and of higher electron temperature, than would be expected from a gas in thermodynamic equilibrium at the local temperature of the neutral flow. This report presents a continuation of the work described in reference (1). My aim is to develop as simple a model as will reasonably predict the speed and density of neutral flow, and the temperature and density of plasma. I use simplifying assumptions and mathematical approximations to develop convenient formulas, and I test them by comparing specific examples to experimental data and computations by DeVolder and other Los Alamos scientists (2). The phenomenon of sudden expansion of a gas cloud into vacuum is described in several sections of the two-volume work by ZelUdovich and Raizer (3). The criterion I use for estimating the point in the flow where plasma ceases to be in equilibrium is in principle that proposed by Bray (4), (5), and discussed extensively by Vincenti and Kruger (6). The immediate concern motivating this work is how to design a metal target that accurately converts an electron beam pulse train into a radiation pulse train for use in the high-speed radiography of implosion hydrodynamics experiments. In the radiography application, either the electron beam must be swept magnetically along the metal target more quickly than the spread of the debris plume, or the metal plate must move laterally past a fixed point of impact, carrying its plume with it. What is this speed, and how dense is this splash flow? Aside from its technological application, this problem has an intrinsic interest because it

  12. Microstructure Analysis of HPb59-1 Brass Induced by High Current Pulsed Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jike; Gao, Bo; Hu, Liang; Lu, Shuaidan; Tu, Ganfeng

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) on the microstructure evolution of casting HPb59-1 (Cu 57.1 mass%, Pb 1.7 mass% and Zn balance) alloy were investigated. The results showed a "wavy" surface which was formed with Pb element existing in the forms of stacking block and microparticles on the top surface layer after treatment. Nanocrystalline structures including Pb grains and two phases (α and β) were formed on the top remelted layer and their sizes were all less than 100 nm. The disordered β phase was generated in the surface layer after HCPEB treatment, which is beneficial for the improvement of surface properties. Meanwhile, there was a large residual stress on the alloy surface, along with the appearance of microcracks, and the preferred orientations of grains also changed.

  13. Operation and beam profiling of an up to 200 kHz pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Young, W. C. Den Hartog, D. J.

    2014-11-15

    A new, high-repetition rate laser is in development for use on the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The laser has been tested at a rate of 200 kHz in a pulse-burst operation, producing bursts of 5 pulses above 1.5 J each, while capable of bursts of 17 pulses at 100 kHz. A master oscillator-power amplifier architecture is used with a Nd:YVO{sub 4} oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifiers, and a Nd:glass amplifier. A radial profile over the pulse sequence is measured by using a set of graphite apertures and an energy meter, showing a change in beam quality over a pulsing sequence.

  14. Operation and beam profiling of an up to 200 kHz pulse-burst laser for Thomson scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, W. C.; Den Hartog, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    A new, high-repetition rate laser is in development for use on the Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The laser has been tested at a rate of 200 kHz in a pulse-burst operation, producing bursts of 5 pulses above 1.5 J each, while capable of bursts of 17 pulses at 100 kHz. A master oscillator-power amplifier architecture is used with a Nd:YVO4 oscillator, four Nd:YAG amplifiers, and a Nd:glass amplifier. A radial profile over the pulse sequence is measured by using a set of graphite apertures and an energy meter, showing a change in beam quality over a pulsing sequence.

  15. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 8, June 1, 1991--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Quarter Eight of the Pulsed Electron Precharging project was principally devoted to the operation of the E-beam precharger in the pulsed anode mode. We shall first briefly review the motivation for carrying out this project and the experimental approach used. The combustion of low sulfur coal for the purpose of generating electric energy in power plants results in the production of a flue gas containing very high resistivity fly ash. This fly ash is not easily collected by conventional electrostatic precipitators due to the large electric potential difference which develops across the layer of fly ash on the collector plate. If this layer of collected material is allowed to reach a thickness as great as is normally desirable before ``rapping`` the plates, then the collected fly ash is subject to re-entrainment into the flue gas stream due to back-corona. The back-corona corona problem is described more fully in the next section of this report. This re-entrainment problem can be eliminated through reduction of the voltage applied across the high voltage wires and the grounded plates of the electrostatic precipitator. This is not a good solution to the problem since the charging capability and collection efficiency of the precipitator system are both greatly reduced at the low voltages required to avoid the back-corona problem. Another approach to solving the problems inherent in collecting high resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator is to decouple the charging and collecting functions. At FSU an electron beam precharger is employed directly before (upstream in the flue gas pathway) the precipitator. This precharger can be optimized for the charging function while the downstream collector can be optimized for collection of the high-resistivity fly ash.

  16. Electromagnetic acceleration of material from a plate hit by a pulsed electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M.

    1998-04-16

    An intense pulsed electron beam traversing a thin metal plate creates a volume of dense plasma. Current flows in this plasma as a result of the charge and magnetic field introduced by the relativistic electrons. A magnetic field may linger after the electron beam pulse because of the conductivity of the material. This field decays by both diffusing out of the conducting matter and causing it to expand. If the magnetized matter is of low density and high conductivity it may expand quickly. Scaling laws for this acceleration are sought by analyzing the idealization of a steady axisymmetric flow. This case simplifies a general formulation based on both Euler`s and Maxwell`s equations. As an example, fluid with conductivity {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 4} Siemens/m, density {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -3} kg/m{sup 3}, and initially magnetized to B = 1 Tesla can accelerate to v = 10{sup 4} m/s within a distance comparable to L = 1 mm and a time comparable to {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 100 ns, which is the magnetic diffusion time. If instead, {sigma} = 8 x 10{sup 3} Siemens/m and {rho} = 8 x 10{sup -5} kg/m{sup 3} then v = 10{sup 5} m/s with a magnetic diffusion time {sigma}{mu}L{sup 2} = 10 ns. These idealized flows have R{sub M} = {sigma}{mu}vL = 1, where R{sub M} is the magnetic Reynolds number. The target magnetizes by a thermal electric effect.

  17. Failure Analysis of Main Flame Deflector Nelson Studs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    NASA Structures engineers submitted two Nelson refractory studs from the main flame deflector at Launch Complex (LC) 39 A for analysis when they were observed to be missing a significant amount of material after launch. The damaged stud and an unused comparative stud were analyzed by macroscopic and microscopic examination along with metallographic evaluation of the microstructure. The stud lost material due to a combination of erosion and corrosion. Plain carbon steel readily forms an oxide layer in the coastal launch environment at Kennedy Space Center. The blast during a launch removes this brittle oxide layer, which then forms again post-launch, thereby further removing material. No indications of melting were observed.

  18. Post STS-134 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-134. The following items were submitted for analysis: 1018 steel witness rods 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, and A-286 piston sleeves. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-134. All of the items were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the 1018 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch

  19. Post STS-135 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA design engineers submitted witness materials from the solid rocket booster (SRB) main flame deflector for evaluation after the launch of STS-135. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witnes rods, 304 sta inles steel caps, and tungsten pistons. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-135. The submitted samples were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  20. Plasma Sprayed Metal-Ceramic Coatings and Modification of Their Structure with Pulsed Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solonenko, O. P.; Ovcharenko, V. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Golovin, A. A.

    2011-06-01

    Composite powder obtained from mechanically crushed titanium carbide—metal binder cermet compacts deserves special mention for plasma spraying of wear-resistant coatings. However, cermet coatings sprayed using this powder have comparatively high porosity. The porosity causes the mechanical strength of the coating to largely deteriorate, and it also lowers the strength of the bond between the coating and the substrate. Computational and physical experiments were performed in this area to reveal the possibilities offered by pulsed electron beam irradiation for structural modification of 70 vol.%TiC-(Ni-Cr) powder coatings. The authors evaluated optimal values of process parameters for suitability in implementing a controlled thermal treatment of coatings under conditions of solid-liquid interaction of components in the cermet composition with each other and with the steel substrate. Evolution of the structure and physical properties of the cermet coatings under rapid heating and following cooling in a wide range of temperatures typical of pulsed irradiation conditions have been examined.

  1. Design and characterization of the annular cathode high current pulsed electron beam source for circular components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Langping; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-01

    In order to irradiate circular components with high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB), an annular cathode based on carbon fiber bunches was designed and fabricated. Using an acceleration voltage of 25 kV, the maximum pulsed irradiation current and energy of this annular cathode can reach 7.9 kA and 300 J, respectively. The irradiation current density distribution of the annular cathode HCPEB source measured along the circumferential direction shows that the annular cathode has good emission uniformity. In addition, four 9310 steel substrates fixed uniformly along the circumferential direction of a metal ring substrate were irradiated by this annular cathode HCPEB source. The surface and cross-section morphologies of the irradiated samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images of the surface reveal that crater and surface undulation have been formed, which hints that the irradiation energy of the HCPEB process is large enough for surface modification of 9310 steel. Meanwhile, SEM cross-section images exhibit that remelted layers with a thickness of about 5.4 μm have been obtained in all samples, which proves that a good practical irradiation uniformity can be achieved by this annular cathode HCPEB source.

  2. Cratering behavior in single- and poly-crystalline copper irradiated by an intense pulsed ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.P.; Bitteker, L.J.; Waganaar, W.J.; Perry, A.J.

    1998-12-31

    When treated with intense pulsed ion beams (IPIB), many materials exhibit increased wear resistance, fatigue life, and hardness. However, this treatment often results in cratering and roughening of the surface. In this work, high purity single crystal and polycrystalline copper samples were irradiated with pulses from an IPIB to gain insight into the causes of this cratering behavior. Samples were treated with 1,2,5, and 10 shots at 2 J/cm{sup 2} and 5 J/cm{sup 2} average energy fluence per shot. Shots were about 400 ns in duration and consisted of a mixture of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen ions at 300 keV. It was found that the single crystal copper cratered far less than the polycrystalline copper at the lower energy fluence. At the higher energy fluence, cratering was replaced by other forms of surface damage, and the single crystal copper sustained less damage at all but the largest number of shots. Molten debris from the Lucite anode (the ion source) was removed and redeposited on the samples with each shot.

  3. High current pulsed electron beam treatment of AZ31 Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Bo; Hao Shengzhi; Zou Jianxin; Grosdidier, Thierry; Jiang Limin; Zhou Jiyang; Dong Chuang

    2005-11-15

    This paper reports, for the first time, an analysis of the effect of High Current Pulsed Electron Beam (HCPEB) on a Mg alloy. The AZ31 alloy was HCPEB treated in order to see the potential of this fairly recent technique in modifying its wear resistance. For the 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} beam energy density used in the present work, the evaporation mode was operative and led to the formation of a ''wavy'' surface and the absence of eruptive microcraters. The selective evaporation of Mg over Al led to an Al-rich melted surface layer and precipitation hardening from the over saturated solid solution. Due to the increase in hardness of the top surface layer, the friction coefficient values were lowered by more than 20% after the HCPEB treatments, and the wear resistance was drastically (by a factor of 6) improved. The microhardness of the HCPEB samples was also increased significantly down to a depth of about 500 {mu}m, far exceeding the heat-affected zone (about 40 {mu}m). This is due to the effect of the propagation of the shockwave associated with this HCPEB treatment.

  4. Hollow electron beam with a pulse length 10/sup -4/ s from a multitip explosive-emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilevskii, M.A.; Nikonov, A.G.; Roife, I.M.; Savel'ev, Y.M.; Engel'ko, V.I.

    1983-01-01

    In this letter we report experiments in which a hollow electron beam with a pulse length 0/sup -4/ s is produced. The cathode has a conical working surface of 1.5 x 10/sup -3/ cm/sup 2/ on which there are 500 fine tips made of carbon fibers. (AIP)

  5. Conceptual design of a high precision dual directional beam position monitoring system for beam crosstalk cancellation and improved output pulse shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger P.; Dawson, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Hulsart, R.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2012-04-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ions Collider (RHIC) would benefit from improved beam position measurements near the interaction points that see both beams, especially as the tolerances become tighter when reducing the beam sizes to obtain increased luminosity. Two limitations of the present beam position monitors (BPMs) would be mitigated if the proposed approach is successful. The small but unavoidable cross-talk between signals from bunches traveling in opposite directions when using conventional BPMs will be reduced by adopting directional BPMs. Further improvements will be achieved by cancelling residual cross-talk using pairs of such BPMs. Appropriately delayed addition and integration of the signals will also provide pulses with relatively flat maxima that will be easier to digitize by relaxing the presently very stringent timing requirements.

  6. Ultrafast gating of a mid-infrared laser pulse by a sub-pC relativistic electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cesar, D. B.; Musumeci, P.; Alesini, D.

    2015-12-21

    In this paper we discuss a relative time-of-arrival measurement scheme between an electron beam and a mid-infrared laser pulse based on the electron-beam controlled transmission in semiconductor materials. This technique can be used as a time-stamping diagnostic in ultrafast electron diffraction or microscopy. In particular, our characterization of Germanium demonstrates that sub-ps time-of-arrival sensitivity could be achieved in a single shot and with very low charge beams (<1 pC). Detailed measurements as a function of the beam charge and the laser wavelength offer insights on the free carrier dynamics in the semiconductor upon excitation by the electron beam.

  7. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high power fast laser beam transportation and pulse compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M.; Dutin, C. F.; Bradley, T. D.; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on recent design and fabrication of Kagome type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for the purpose of high power fast laser beam transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all Kagome fibers) of 40dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single modedness, low dispersion and relatively low banding loss makes it an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74μJ, 850fs and 40kHz repetition rate ultra-short pulse at 1550nm has been faithfully delivered with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105μJ laser pulse from 850fs to 300fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  8. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  9. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  10. Steps towards the hyperfine splitting measurement of the muonic hydrogen ground state: pulsed muon beam and detection system characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, A.; Baccolo, G.; Bakalov, D.; Baldazzi, G.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Campana, R.; Carbone, R.; Cervi, T.; Chignoli, F.; Clemenza, M.; Colace, L.; Curioni, A.; Danailov, M.; Danev, P.; D'Antone, I.; De Bari, A.; De Vecchi, C.; De Vincenzi, M.; Furini, M.; Fuschino, F.; Gadedjisso-Tossou, K. S.; Guffanti, D.; Iaciofano, A.; Ishida, K.; Iugovaz, D.; Labanti, C.; Maggi, V.; Margotti, A.; Marisaldi, M.; Mazza, R.; Meneghini, S.; Menegolli, A.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moretti, M.; Morgante, G.; Nardò, R.; Nastasi, M.; Niemela, J.; Previtali, E.; Ramponi, R.; Rachevski, A.; Rignanese, L. P.; Rossella, M.; Rossi, P. L.; Somma, F.; Stoilov, M.; Stoychev, L.; Tomaselli, A.; Tortora, L.; Vacchi, A.; Vallazza, E.; Zampa, G.; Zuffa, M.

    2016-05-01

    The high precision measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the muonic-hydrogen atom ground state with pulsed and intense muon beam requires careful technological choices both in the construction of a gas target and of the detectors. In June 2014, the pressurized gas target of the FAMU experiment was exposed to the low energy pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN RAL muon facility. The objectives of the test were the characterization of the target, the hodoscope and the X-ray detectors. The apparatus consisted of a beam hodoscope and X-rays detectors made with high purity Germanium and Lanthanum Bromide crystals. In this paper the experimental setup is described and the results of the detector characterization are presented.

  11. Improving the output voltage waveform of an intense electron-beam accelerator based on helical type Blumlein pulse forming line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xin-Bing; Liu, Jin-Liang; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Feng, Jia-Huai; Qian, Bao-Liang

    2010-07-01

    The Blumlein pulse forming line (BPFL) consisting of an inner coaxial pulse forming line (PFL) and an outer coaxial PFL is widely used in the field of pulsed power, especially for intense electron-beam accelerators (IEBA). The output voltage waveform determines the quality and characteristics of the output beam current of the IEBA. Comparing with the conventional BPFL, an IEBA based on a helical type BPFL can increase the duration of the output voltage in the same geometrical volume. However, for the helical type BPFL, the voltage waveform on a matched load may be distorted which influences the electron-beam quality. In this paper, an IEBA based on helical type BPFL is studied theoretically. Based on telegrapher equations of the BPFL, a formula for the output voltage of IEBA is obtained when the transition section is taken into account, where the transition section is between the middle cylinder of BPFL and the load. From the theoretical analysis, it is found that the wave impedance and transit time of the transition section influence considerably the main pulse voltage waveform at the load, a step is formed in front of the main pulse, and a sharp spike is also formed at the end of the main pulse. In order to get a well-shaped square waveform at the load and to improve the electron-beam quality of such an accelerator, the wave impedance of the transition section should be equal to that of the inner PFL of helical type BPFL and the transit time of the transition section should be designed as short as possible. Experiments performed on an IEBA with the helical type BPFL show reasonable agreement with theoretical analysis.

  12. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen; Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien; Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A.; Sehgal, Chandra M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  13. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributedmore » to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.« less

  14. Purification of Nanoscale Electron-Beam-Induced Platinum Deposits via a Pulsed Laser-Induced Oxidation Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stanford, Michael G.; Lewis, Brett B.; Noh, Joo Hyon; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Roberts, Nicholas A.; Plank, Harald; Rack, Philip D.

    2014-11-05

    Platinum–carbon deposits made via electron-beam-induced deposition were purified in this study via a pulsed laser-induced oxidation reaction and erosion of the amorphous carbon to form pure platinum. Purification proceeds from the top down and is likely catalytically facilitated via the evolving platinum layer. Thermal simulations suggest a temperature threshold of ~485 K, and the purification rate is a function of the PtC5 thickness (80–360 nm) and laser pulse width (1–100 μs) in the ranges studied. The thickness dependence is attributed to the ~235 nm penetration depth of the PtC5 composite at the laser wavelength, and the pulse-width dependence is attributed to the increased temperatures achieved at longer pulse widths. Finally, remarkably fast purification is realized at cumulative laser exposure times of less than 1 s.

  15. Excitation with a focused, pulsed optical beam in scattering media: diffraction effects.

    PubMed

    Daria, V R; Saloma, C; Kawata, S

    2000-10-01

    To gain a better understanding of the spatiotemporal problems that are encountered in two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging through highly scattering media, we investigate how diffraction affects the three-dimensional intensity distribution of a focused, pulsed optical beam propagating inside a scattering medium. In practice, the full potential of the two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging is unrealized at long scattering depths, owing to the unwanted temporal and spatial broadening of the femtosecond excitation light pulse that reduces the energy density at the geometric focus while it increases the excitation energy density in the out-of-focus regions. To analyze the excitation intensity distribution, we modify the Monte Carlo-based photon-transport model to a semi-quantum-mechanical representation that combines the wave properties of light with the particle behavior of the propagating photons. In our model the propagating photon is represented by a plane wave with its propagation direction in the scattering medium determined by the Monte Carlo technique. The intensity distribution in the focal region is given by the square of the linear superposition of the various plane waves that arrive at different incident angles and optical path lengths. In the absence of scattering, the propagation model yields the intensity distribution that is predicted by the Huygens-Fresnel principle. We quantify the decrease of the energy density delivered at the geometric focus as a function of the optical depth to the mean-free-path ratio that yields the average number of scattering events that a photon encounters as it propagates toward the focus. Both isotropic and anisotropic scattering media are considered. Three values for the numerical aperture (NA) of the focusing lens are considered: NA = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75.

  16. A pulsed electron beam synthesis of PEDOT conducting polymers by using sulfate radicals as oxidizing species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coletta, Cecilia; Cui, Zhenpeng; Dazzi, Alexandre; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Néron, Stéphane; Marignier, Jean-Louis; Remita, Samy

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an original radiolytic method, based on pulsed electron beam irradiation, is used for the synthesis of conducting PEDOT in an aqueous solution containing EDOT monomers in the presence of potassium persulfate, K2S2O8, at 0 °C. At this low temperature, EDOT monomers are not chemically oxidized by S2O82- anions, initiating PEDOT polymerization, but are rather oxidized by sulfate radicals, SO4•-, which are radiolytically generated by the reaction of solvated electrons, produced by water radiolysis, with persulfate anions. Successfully, as demonstrated by UV-vis absorption spectrophotometry and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, irradiating the aqueous solution, by using a series of accumulated electron pulses, enables complete EDOT oxidation and quantitative in situ PEDOT polymerization through a step-by-step oxidation mechanism. The morphology of PEDOT polymers, mixed with unreacted K2S2O8 salt, is characterized by Cryo-TEM microscopy in aqueous solution and by SEM after deposition. Successfully, in the absence of any washing step, high resolution AFM microscopy, coupled with infrared nanospectroscopy, is used to discriminate between the organic polymers and the inorganic salt and to probe the local chemical composition of PEDOT nanostructures. The results demonstrate that PEDOT polymers form globular self-assembled nanostructures which preferentially adsorb onto unreacted K2S2O8 solid nanoplates. The present results first demonstrate the efficiency of sulfate radicals as oxidizing species for the preparation of nanostructured PEDOT polymers and second highlight the promising potentiality of electron accelerators in the field of conducting polymers synthesis.

  17. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  18. [Experimental investigation of the collection efficiency of a PTW Roos ionization chamber irradiated with pulsed beams at high pulse dose with different pulse lengths].

    PubMed

    Karsch, Leonhard; Richter, Christian; Pawelke, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    In gas-filled ionization chambers as radiation detectors, the collection of the charge carriers is affected by the recombination effect. In dosimetry this effect must be accounted for by the saturation correction factor k(S). The physical description of the correction factor by Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk for pulsed radiation is well established. However, this description is only accurate when the pulse length is short compared to the collection time of the ionization chamber. In this work experimental investigations of the saturation correction factor have been made for pulses of 4 μ s up to pulse doses of about 230 mGy, and the theory of Boag, Hochhäuser and Balk was again confirmed. For longer pulses, however, the correction factor decreases and at a pulse duration of about 200μs reaches 75% of the value valid for short pulses. This reduced influence of the ion recombination is interpreted by the reaction kinetics of ion recombination as a second-order reaction. This effect is negligible for PTW Roos chambers at clinical linear accelerators with 4 μ s pulse duration for pulse doses up to 120 mGy.

  19. Laser-induced Bessel beams can realize fast all-optical switching in gold nanosol prepared by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Santhi Ani; Hari, Misha; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Sharma, Gaurav; Mathew, S.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2010-03-15

    We demonstrate the possibility of realizing, all-optical switching in gold nanosol. Two overlapping laser beams are used for this purpose, due to which a low-power beam passing collinear to a high-power beam will undergo cross phase modulation and thereby distort the spatial profile. This is taken to advantage for performing logic operations. We have also measured the threshold pump power to obtain a NOT gate and the minimum response time of the device. Contrary to the general notion that the response time of thermal effects used in this application is of the order of milliseconds, we prove that short pump pulses can result in fast switching. Different combinations of beam splitters and combiners will lead to the formation of other logic functions too.

  20. Design of a Highly Stable, High-Conversion-Efficiency, Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Amplification System with Good Beam Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Guardalben, M.J.; Keegan, J.; Waxer, L.J.; Bagnoud, V.; Begishev, I.A.; Puth, J.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2003-10-06

    OAK B204 An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) design that provides 40% pump-to-signal conversion efficiency and over-500-mJ signal energy at 1054 nm for front-end injection into a Nd:glass amplifier chain is presented. This OPCPA system is currently being built as the prototype front end for the OMEGA EP (extended performance) laser system at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Using a three-dimensional spatial and temporal numerical model, several design considerations necessary to achieve high conversion efficiency, good output stability, and good beam quality are discussed. The dependence of OPCPA output on the pump beam's spatiotemporal shape and the relative size of seed and pump beams is described. This includes the effects of pump intensity modulation and pump-signal walk-off. The trade-off among efficiency, stability, and low output beam intensity modulation is discussed.

  1. Effect of gas heating on the generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam in the pulse-periodic regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-07-01

    The generation of an ultrashort avalanche electron beam (UAEB) in nitrogen in the pulse-periodic regime is investigated. The gas temperature in the discharge gap of the atmospheric-pressure nitrogen is measured from the intensity distribution of unresolved rotational transitions ( C 3Π u , v' = 0) → ( B 3Π g , v″ = 0) in the nitrogen molecule for an excitation pulse repetition rate of 2 kHz. It is shown that an increase in the UAEB current amplitude in the pulse-periodic regime is due to gas heating by a series of previous pulses, which leads to an increase in the reduced electric field strength as a result of a decrease in the gas density in the zone of the discharge formation. It is found that in the pulse-periodic regime and the formation of the diffuse discharge, the number of electrons in the beam increases by several times for a nitrogen pressure of 9 × 103 Pa. The dependences of the number of electrons in the UAEB on the time of operation of the generator are considered.

  2. The e-SCRUB Machine: an 800-kV, 500-kW average power pulsed electron beam generator for flue-gas scrubbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, James R.; Briggs, Ray; Crewson, Walter F.; Johnson, R. D.; Ratafia-Brown, J. A.; Richardson, W. K.; Rienstra, W. W.; Ballard, Perry G.; Cukr, Jeffrey; Cassel, R. L.; Schlitt, Leland; Genuario, R. D.; Morgan, R. D.; Tripoli, G. A.

    1995-03-01

    This paper gives an overview of electron beam dry scrubbing (EBDS) to remove SOx and NOx from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. It also describes the e-SCRUB program, a program currently underway to commercialize this process with an integrated pulsed electron beam. The electron beam, together with injected water and ammonia, causes chemical reactions which convert the SOx and NOx into commercial grade agricultural fertilizer, a usable byproduct. The e-SCRUB facility is a test bed to demonstrate the feasibility and performance of a repetitive, reliable pulsed electron beam generator operating at average power levels of up to 1 MW. This facility contains the electron beam generator and all the auxiliary and support systems required by the machine, including a computer driven central experiment control system, a 100,000 SCFM flowing dry nitrogen load which simulates the characteristics of a power plant flue, and a 2 MVA dedicated electrical service to power the machine. The e-SCRUB electron beam machine is designed to produce an 800 kV pulsed electron beam with a repetition rate of 667 pps. The energy per pulse deposited into the flue gas is approximately 750 J. The pulsed power system converts the utility power input to a 667 pps, 800 kV pulse train which powers the electron gun. The functional units of the pulsed power system will be discussed in the paper, along with some preliminary experimental results.

  3. Features of the film-growth conditions by cross-beam pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselev, A.; Gorbunov, A.; Pompe, W.

    Spatial and energetic characteristics of the plasma plume by cross-beam pulsed-laser deposition (CBPLD) were investigated. Effective droplets filtering together with high efficiency of material usage are observed by this approach. Time-of-flight (TOF) technique with electrostatic ion collectors (Langmuir probes operating in the ion-collecting mode) were applied to obtain kinetic energy distribution functions of ionized particles and to compare the ionization degrees of the plasma by the CBPLD and by the conventional PLD. The average and maximum kinetic energies of the ions by the CBPLD are found to be 2-3 times lower as compared to the conventional PLD. At the same time, the fraction of ionized species and highly exited neutrals (Rydberg atoms) in the CBPLD plasma is 1.5-2 times larger in comparison to the conventional approach. Re-sputtering of the material of the growing film by fast ions is a considerable effect in both the PLD methods by the chosen experimental conditions. The angular width of the directional pattern of the plasma plume by CBPLD is comparable to that typical for the conventional PLD.

  4. Large Pulsed Electron Beam Welded Percolation Networks of Silver Nanowires for Transparent and Flexible Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisoo; Nam, Yun Seok; Song, Myoung Hoon; Park, Hyung Wook

    2016-08-17

    Mechanical properties of transparent electrodes, including flexibility, are important in flexible electronics for sustaining electrical conductivity under bending with small radius of curvature. Low contact resistance of junctions in metal nanowire percolation networks is the most important factor to produce electrodes with excellent optical, electrical and mechanical performance. Here, we report the fabrication of welded silver nanowire percolation networks using large pulsed electron beam (LPEB) irradiation as a welding process of silver nanowires (AgNWs). It results in modification of electrical and mechanical properties because of the low contact resistance at welded junctions. Consequently, the flexible and transparent AgNW electrodes fabricated by LPEB irradiation showed lower sheet resistance of 12.63 Ω sq(-1) at high transmittance of 93% (at 550 nm), and superb mechanical flexibility, compared with other AgNW electrodes prepared by thermal treatement and without any treatment. Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) using AgNWs by LPEB irradiation were fabricated to confirm that the AgNW electrode by LPEB irradiation was able to become alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) and they showed good device performance as a maximum luminous efficiency of 7.37 cd A(-1), and excellent mechanical flexibility under bending with small radius of curvature. PMID:27463783

  5. The SPARC_LAB femtosecond synchronization for electron and photon pulsed beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaveglia, M.; Gallo, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Gatti, G.; Anania, M. P.; Petrarca, M.; Villa, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Biagioni, A.; Mostacci, A.

    2015-05-01

    The SPARC LAB complex hosts a 150 MeV electron photo-injector equipped with an undulator for FEL production (SPARC) together with a high power TW laser (FLAME). Recently the synchronization system reached the performance of < 100 fsRMS relative jitter between lasers, electron beam and RF accelerating fields. This matches the requirements for next future experiments: (i) the production of X-rays by means of Thomson scattering (first collisions achieved in 2014) and (ii) the particle driven PWFA experiment by means of multiple electron bunches. We report about the measurements taken during the machine operation using BAMs (Bunch Arrival Monitors) and EOS (Electro-Optical Sampling) system. A new R and D activity concerning the LWFA using the external injection of electron bunches in a plasma generated by the FLAME laser pulse is under design. The upgrade of the synchronization system is under way to guarantee the < 30 fs RMS jitter required specification. It foresees the transition from electrical to optical architecture that mainly affects the reference signal distribution and the time of arrival detection performances. The new system architecture is presented together with the related experimental data.

  6. Development of exploding wire ion source for intense pulsed heavy ion beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Ochiai, Yasushi; Murata, Takuya; Masugata, Katsumi

    2012-10-01

    A Novel exploding wire type ion source device is proposed as a metallic ion source of intense pulsed heavy ion beam (PHIB) accelerator. In the device, multiple shot operations are realized without breaking the vacuum. The basic characteristics of the device are evaluated experimentally with an aluminum wire of diameter 0.2 mm and length 25 mm. A capacitor bank of capacitance 3 μF and a charging voltage of 30 kV was used, and the wire was successfully exploded by a discharge current of 15 kA with a rise time of 5.3 μs. Plasma flux of ion current density around 70 A/cm2 was obtained at 150 mm downstream from the device. The drift velocity of ions evaluated by a time-of-flight method was 2.7×104 m/ s, which corresponds to the kinetic energy of 100 eV for aluminum ions. From the measurement of the ion current density distribution, the ion flow is found to be concentrated toward the direction where the ion acceleration gap is placed. From the experiment, the device is found to be acceptable for applying the PHIB accelerator.

  7. Large Pulsed Electron Beam Welded Percolation Networks of Silver Nanowires for Transparent and Flexible Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisoo; Nam, Yun Seok; Song, Myoung Hoon; Park, Hyung Wook

    2016-08-17

    Mechanical properties of transparent electrodes, including flexibility, are important in flexible electronics for sustaining electrical conductivity under bending with small radius of curvature. Low contact resistance of junctions in metal nanowire percolation networks is the most important factor to produce electrodes with excellent optical, electrical and mechanical performance. Here, we report the fabrication of welded silver nanowire percolation networks using large pulsed electron beam (LPEB) irradiation as a welding process of silver nanowires (AgNWs). It results in modification of electrical and mechanical properties because of the low contact resistance at welded junctions. Consequently, the flexible and transparent AgNW electrodes fabricated by LPEB irradiation showed lower sheet resistance of 12.63 Ω sq(-1) at high transmittance of 93% (at 550 nm), and superb mechanical flexibility, compared with other AgNW electrodes prepared by thermal treatement and without any treatment. Polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs) using AgNWs by LPEB irradiation were fabricated to confirm that the AgNW electrode by LPEB irradiation was able to become alternative to indium tin oxide (ITO) and they showed good device performance as a maximum luminous efficiency of 7.37 cd A(-1), and excellent mechanical flexibility under bending with small radius of curvature.

  8. Post STS-133 Evaluation of Main Flame Deflector Witness Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    NASA and USA Structures engineers submitted main flame deflector witness materials for evaluation after the launch of STS-133. The following items were submitted for analysis: HY-80 steel witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, tungsten pistons, 17-4 precipitation hardened (PH) stainless steel and A-286 piston sleeves, Medtherm Corporation calorimeters, and Nanmac Corporation thermocouples. All of the items were photographed in order to document their condition after the launch of STS-133, and before they were reinstalled at the launch pad for future launches. The HY -80 witness rods, 304 stainless steel caps, and the piston sleeves were dimensionally measured in order to determine the amount of material lost during launch. Microstructural changes were observed in the HY-80 witness rod and 304 stainless steel cap metallographic samples due to the heat of the launch.

  9. Pad A Main Flame Deflector Sensor Data and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlier, Christopher R.

    2011-01-01

    Space shuttle launch pads use flame deflectors beneath the vehicle to channel hot gases away from the vehicle. Pad 39 A at the Kennedy Space Center uses a steel structure coated with refractory concrete. The solid rocket booster plume is comprised of gas and molten alumina oxide particles that erodes the refractory concrete. During the beginning of the shuttle program the loads for this system were never validated with a high level of confidence. This paper presents a representation of the instrumentation data collected and follow on materials science evaluation of the materials exposed to the SRB plume. Data collected during STS-133 and STS-134 will be presented that support the evaluation of the components exposed to the SRB plume.

  10. High energy micro electron beam generation using chirped laser pulse in the presence of an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Akou, H. Hamedi, M.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the generation of high-quality and high-energy micro electron beam in vacuum by a chirped Gaussian laser pulse in the presence of an axial magnetic field is numerically investigated. The features of energy and angular spectra, emittances, and position distribution of electron beam are compared in two cases, i.e., in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The electron beam is accelerated with higher energy and qualified in spatial distribution in the presence of the magnetic field. The presence of an axial magnetic field improves electron beam spatial quality as well as its gained energy through keeping the electron motion parallel to the direction of propagation for longer distances. It has been found that a 64 μm electron bunch with about MeV initial energy becomes a 20 μm electron beam with high energy of the order of GeV, after interacting with a laser pulse in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  11. Role of wavelength and pulse duration in laser ablation: implications to beam delivery, surface modifications, and diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafetinides, Alexander A.

    1999-05-01

    The basic interaction mechanism of pulsed laser ablation of tissue reveals a complexity of parameters, such as the optical properties of the tissue and the technical characteristics of the laser beam. The role of the laser wavelength, the pulse duration, the energy fluence, etc. as well as the implications on the beam delivery means, the ablated surface modifications and the diagnostic techniques employed are under investigation. For example, it was experimentally verified that when using mid-infrared lasers with pulse durations in the ns range, the photothermal mechanism involved exhibits strong absorption restricting the residual thermal damage to a relatively small zone. On the other hand the ablation of tissue with ultrashort, picosecond and femtosecond, visible and near-infrared laser pulses has been investigated as an alternative, as the energy threshold for ablation biological tissue, depends approximately on the square root of the pulse duration. However the pulse length shortening creates problems to the fibers or the waveguides ends, due to the very high laser power densities involved. Conventional and advanced microscopy, scanning electron microscopy--SEM and atomic force microscopy--AFM, were used to study the surface and ends alterations of the delivery system involved and the surface alterations of the soft or the hard tissue target in pulsed laser ablation. Finally differentiation between the normal and the pathological tissue was achieved by employing the laser induced fluorescence--LIF diagnostic technique in a long term effort to develop a computer aided system, which will facilitate the automated, real-time characterization of healthy or atherosclerotic plaques in a less invasive laser ablation clinical procedure.

  12. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  13. On the role of terahertz field acceleration and beaming of surface plasmon generated ultrashort electron pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, S. R. Elezzabi, A. Y.

    2014-07-28

    A mechanism for control of the energy and pitch angle of surface plasmon accelerated electron pulses is proposed. Electrons generated via multi-photon absorption in a silver film on a glass prism are ponderomotively accelerated in the surface plasmon field excited by a 30 fs, 800 nm optical pulse. Through introduction of a single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulse, the energy spectrum and trajectory of the generated electron pulse can be controlled via the THz field strength. Generated electron pulses achieve peak kinetic energies up to 1.56 keV, while utilizing an incident optical field strength five times less than comparable plasmon accelerated electron pulses. These results demonstrate that THz pulses can be utilized to achieve tunable, high energy, trajectory controlled electron pulses necessary for various applications that require ultrafast electron pulse manipulation.

  14. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  15. Damage Characteristics of TiD2 Films Irradiated by a Mixed Pulsed Beam of Titanium and Hydrogen Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Meng; He, Tie; Yan, Jie; Ke, Jianlin; Lin, Jufang; Lu, Biao

    2016-07-01

    Titanium deuteride is an important nuclear material used in the field of nuclear technology, and further research is needed into TiD2 films irradiated by pulsed ion beams of the vacuum arc discharge with hydrogen. In the current study, these irradiated TiD2 films have been investigated using scanning electronic microscopy and slow positron annihilation techniques. Both the thermal effect and irradiation defects of TiD2 films were studied, following their irradiation with mixed pulsed ion beams of titanium and hydrogen ions. It is found that the thermal effect is trivial on the irradiated surfaces, and the dominant effect is irradiation defects which can be enhanced by repetitive shots and is characterized by the inner diffusion of irradiation defects.

  16. Numerical investigations of non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplification for Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lu; Yu, Lianghong; Liang, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    We present for the first time a scheme to amplify a Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam based on non-collinear optical parametric chirped pulse amplification (OPCPA). In addition, a three-dimensional numerical model of non-collinear optical parametric amplification was deduced in the frequency domain, in which the effects of non-collinear configuration, temporal and spatial walk-off, group-velocity dispersion and diffraction were also taken into account, to trace the dynamics of the Laguerre-Gaussian vortex beam and investigate its critical parameters in the non-collinear OPCPA process. Based on the numerical simulation results, the scheme shows promise for implementation in a relativistic twisted laser pulse system, which will diversify the light-matter interaction field.

  17. The growth of the complex oxide YBCO by pulsed organo-metallic beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, Donald Bruce

    To address the problems associated with the thin film heteroepitaxial growth of complex oxides a deposition technique, called pulsed organo-metallic beam epitaxy (POMBE), is developed. POMBE is designed to grow films layer-by-layer. Organo-metallics are delivered to the substrate as a series of discrete pulses via a set of computer-controlled valves. The precursor sequence and the amount of precursor in each pulse is programmed as the computer. Quartz crystal microbalances monitor the precursor transport rates. Computer feedback control maintains the precursor pulses at their programmed values. The ability to grow films layer-by-layer and to control the amount of material in each layer is demonstrated by the growth of YBasb2CUsb3Osb{7-delta}/PrBasb2CUsb3Osb{7-delta} superlattices. This is the first report of a high temperature superconductor superlattice grown by a chemical vapor deposition technique. The ability to grow films layer-by-layer is used to investigate the effect of changing the type and amount of precursor used to start the film growth. The correct choice of these parameters allows the growth of (001) YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} with a single in-plane orientation and Jsb{c}(77 K,0T) = 1-2× 10sp6amp/cmsp2 on (100) LaAlOsb3, (100) NdGaOsb3, (100) MgO, and (100) YSZ. The ability to control the initial film layer provides a means to control the in-plane orientation of (001) YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} (YBCO) grown on (100) MgO. Depositions started with thin BaO layers ({}{≈}1.1× 10sp{15}Ba/cmsp2) grow lbrack 100rbrack YBCOVertlbrack 100rbrack MgO. A mechanism that relates the change of in-plane orientation to a structural change of the initial BaO layer is described. The in-plane orientation of (001) YBasb2Cusb3Osb{7-delta} grown on (100) MgO can also be controlled by the ex situ, low energy Arsp+ sputtering of the MgO surface prior to film growth. To simultaneously grow lbrack 110rbrack YBCOVertlbrack 100rbrack MgO on non-sputtered MgO and lbrack 100rbrack

  18. Time-resolved spectroscopy of solid poly/1-vinyl naphthalene/ following electron beam pulse radiolysis - Pulse radiolytic studies on polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, D. R.; Liang, R. H.; Di Stefano, S.; Moacanin, J.; Gupta, A.

    1982-01-01

    Transient emission studies following pulse radiolysis of solid poly(1-vinyl naphthalene) show existence of excited monomers and two excimers. Quenching experiments indicate that excimers are not formed directly by recombination of ions but probably by trapping of migrating monomeric excitation in preformed traps whose density is approximately one in 1000.

  19. Supercontinuum spectrum in IR Bessel-Gauss and Gauss pulsed beam filament under anomalous group velocity dispersion in fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokukina, A. E.; Smetanina, E. O.; Kompanets, V. O.; Chekalin, S. V.; Kandidov, V. P.

    2014-09-01

    Paper concerns experimental and numerical investigation on supercontinuum emission in the process of femtosecond beam filamentation under different geometrical focusing in presence of anomalous group velocity dispersion in fused silica. It was shown that energy of supercontinuum visible part increases discretely with increasing of input laser pulse energy. It is connected with light bullets formation. Also it was found that energy of supercontinuum visible part connected with each bullet doesn't depend on focusing geometry.

  20. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Flame Deflector Protection System Life Cycle Cost Analysis Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Kolody, Mark R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Trejo, David; Reinschmidt, Ken; Kim, Hyung-Jin

    2009-01-01

    A 20-year life cycle cost analysis was performed to compare the operational life cycle cost, processing/turnaround timelines, and operations manpower inspection/repair/refurbishment requirements for corrosion protection of the Kennedy Space Center launch pad flame deflector associated with the existing cast-in-place materials and a newer advanced refractory ceramic material. The analysis compared the estimated costs of(1) continuing to use of the current refractory material without any changes; (2) completely reconstructing the flame trench using the current refractory material; and (3) completely reconstructing the flame trench with a new high-performance refractory material. Cost estimates were based on an analysis of the amount of damage that occurs after each launch and an estimate of the average repair cost. Alternative 3 was found to save $32M compared to alternative 1 and $17M compared to alternative 2 over a 20-year life cycle.

  1. Internal Performance of a Fixed-Shroud Nonaxisymmetric Nozzle Equipped with an Aft-Hood Exhaust Deflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the model preparation area of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the internal performance of a fixed-shroud nonaxisymmetric nozzle equipped with an aft-hood exhaust deflector. Model geometric parameters investigated included nozzle power setting, aft-hood deflector angle, throat area control with the aft-hood deflector deployed, and yaw vector angle. Results indicate that cruise configurations produced peak performance in the range consistent with previous investigations of nonaxisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzles. The aft-hood deflector produced resultant pitch vector angles that were always less than the geometric aft-hood deflector angle when the nozzle throat was positioned upstream of the deflector exit. Significant losses in resultant thrust ratio occurred when the aft-hood deflector was deployed with an upstream throat location. At each aft-hood deflector angle, repositioning the throat to the deflector exit improved pitch vectoring performance and, in some cases, substantially improved resultant thrust ratio performance. Transferring the throat to the deflector exit allowed the flow to be turned upstream of the throat at subsonic Mach numbers, thereby eliminating losses associated with turning supersonic flow. Internal throat panel deflections were largely unsuccessful in generating yaw vectoring.

  2. Comparison of Island Formation Between Pulsed Laser Deposition and Molecular Beam Epitaxy:. a Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, X.; Zhou, Y. C.; Zheng, X. J.

    Based on a hexagonal lattice which includes deposition, dissociation, and diffusion, we performed a kinetic Monte Carlo model to explore thin film growth via pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) within the submonolayer regime. First and second nearest-neighbor interactions calculated by the Morse potential are taken into account in this case. These simulations show that thin film deposition by PLD is markedly different from that by MBE. With PLD, as pulse duration decreases, the island density increases and the island size decreases. Similarly, at temperature T = 550 K, the scaling function for MBE is rather similar to that of the analytical prediction for a critical island size of i = 2, while the scaling function for PLD changes from an i = 1 behavior to an i = 0 behavior with the decrease in pulse duration.

  3. Concept for Generation of Warm Dense Matter of Insulator due to Flyer Impact Accelerated by Electron Beam Irradiation using Intense Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAMURA, Fumihiro; HAYASHI, Ryota; KUDO, Takahiro; WATABE, Arata; KASHINE, Kenji; TOKUCHI, Akira; KIKUCHI, Takashi; TAKAHASHI, Kazumasa; SASAKI, Toru; ASO, Tsukasa; HARADA, Nob.; JIANG, Weihua

    2016-03-01

    We have proposed a concept for generation method of warm dense matter (WDM) by using flyer impact accelerated by intense electron beams. To generate the warm dense matter by using flyer impact, the output current of electron beams generated by the intense pulsed-power generator as ETIGO-II is evaluated. The results denote that the beam current and the pulse duration are 11 kA and 50 ns, respectively. The achievable parameters of WDM by using flyer impact are estimated by the simplified model. It indicated that the sample temperature achieves the provided electron beams with lower conversion efficiency.

  4. Investigation of stimulated raman scattering using short-pulse diffraction limited laser beam near the instability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Montgomery, David S; Flippo, Kirk A; Rose, Harvey A; Yin, L; Albright, B J; Johnson, R P; Shimada, T; Bowers, K; Rousseaux, C; Tassin, V; Baton, S D; Amiranoff, F; Hardin, R A

    2008-01-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and> 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using particle-in-cell codes to validate our understanding quantitatively. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser facility and the LULI (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses) to investigate stimulated Raman scattering near the threshold of the instability using 527 nm and 1059 nm laser light respectively with 1.5-3.0 ps pulses. In both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gas-jet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k{lambda}{sub D} were completed at the Trident laser facility. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Work is currently underway comparing the results of the experiments with simulations using the VPIC [K. J. Bowers, et at., Phys. Plasmas, 15 055703 (2008)] particle-in-cell code. Details of the experimental results are presented in this manuscript.

  5. Three-dimensional light distribution near the focus of a tightly focused beam of few-cycle optical pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Romallosa, Kristine Marie; Bantang, Johnrob; Saloma, Caesar

    2003-09-01

    Via the Richards-Wolf vector diffraction theory, we analyze the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the focal volume that is produced by a strongly focused 750-nm beam of ultrafast, Gaussian-shaped optical pulses (10{sup -9} s{>=} pulse width {tau}{>=}1 fs=10{sup -15} s). Knowledge of the three-dimensional distribution near focus is essential in determining the diffraction-limited resolution of an optical microscope. The optical spectrum of a short pulse is characterized by side frequencies about the carrier frequency. The effect of spectral broadening on the focused intensity distribution is evaluated via the Linfoot's criteria of fidelity, structural content, and correlation quality and with reference to a 750-nm cw focused beam. Different values are considered for {tau} and numerical aperture of the focusing lens (0.1{<=}X{sub NA}{<=}1.2). At X{sub NA}=0.8, rapid deterioration of the focused intensity distribution is observed at {tau}=1.2 fs. This happens because a 750-nm optical pulse with {tau}=1.2 fs has an associated coherence length of 359.7 nm which is less than the Nyquist sampling interval of 375 nm that is required to sample 750 nm sinusoid without loss of information. The ill-effects of spectral broadening is weaker in two-photon excitation microscope than in its single-photon counterpart for the same focusing lens and light source.

  6. Investigation of Stimulated Raman Scattering Using Short-Pulse Diffraction Limited Laser Beam near the Instability Threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; Yin, L.; Flippo, K. A.; Albright, B. J.; Johnson, R. P.; Shimada, T.; Rose, H. A.; Rousseaux, C.; Tassin, V.; Baton, S. D.; Amiranoff, F.; Hardin, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    Short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments using diffraction limited beams provide an excellent platform to investigate the fundamental physics of Stimulated Raman (SRS) and Stimulated Brillouin (SBS) Scattering. Detailed understanding of these laser plasma instabilities impacts the current inertial confinement fusion ignition designs and could potentially impact fast ignition when higher energy lasers are used with longer pulse durations ( > 1 kJ and > 1 ps). Using short laser pulses, experiments can be modeled over the entire interaction time of the laser using PIC codes to validate our understanding. Experiments have been conducted at the Trident laser and the LULI to investigate SRS near the threshold of the instability using 527 and 1064 nm laser light respectively with 1.5 -- 3 ps pulses. In the case of both experiments, the interaction beam was focused into a pre-ionized He gasjet plasma. Measurements of the reflectivity as a function of intensity and k?D were completed at the Trident laser. At LULI, a 300 fs Thomson scattering probe is used to directly measure the density fluctuations of the driven electron plasma and ion acoustic waves. Details of the experimental results will be presented.

  7. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Balmes, Anthony A; Bradley, Joseph T; Netz, Dana; Sandoval, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  8. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 9, September 1, 1991--November 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Quarter Nine of the Pulsed Electron Precharging project was principally devoted to reviewing and interpreting the experimental results obtained during the past eight quarters of the project. We shall first briefly review the motivation for carrying out this project and the experimental approach used. The combustion of low sulfur coal for the purpose of generating electric energy in power plants results in the production of a flue gas containing very high resistivity fly ash. This fly ash is not easily collected by conventional electrostatic precipitators due to the large electric potential difference which develops across the layer of fly ash on the collector plate. If this layer of collected material is allowed to reach a thickness as great as is nominally desirable before ``rapping`` the plates, then the collected fly ash is subject to re-entrainment into the flue gas stream due to back-corona. The back-corona corona problem is described more fully in the next section of this report. This re-entrainment problem can be eliminated through reduction of the voltage applied across the high voltage wires and the grounded plates of the electrostatic precipitator. This is not a good solution to the problem since the charging capability and collection efficiency of the precipitator system are both greatly reduced at the low voltages and resultant small corona currents required to avoid the back-corona problem. Another approach to solving the problems inherent in collecting high resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator is to decouple the charging and collecting functions. At FSU an electron beam precharger is employed directly before (upstream in the flue gas pathway) the precipitator.

  9. Simulation of ITER ELM transient heat events on tungsten grades using long pulse laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslova, Anastassiya

    Tungsten has been chosen as the main candidate for plasma facing components (PFCs) in the magnetic confinement nuclear fusion reactors such as International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and beyond due to its superior properties under extreme operating conditions expected in fusion rectors. One of the serious issues for the plasma facing components is the heat load during transient events such as edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption in the reactor. High temperature gradient and high thermal stresses developed during transients could lead to material recrystallization and grain growth, formation of a melt layer, material erosion, and crack formation, which can limit the power handling capacity of PFCs, decrease lifetime, and contribute to plasma contamination that affect subsequent operations. Mechanical and surface properties of different tungsten grades and their behavior under ITER-like conditions are the main focus of current research efforts in the fusion research community. The current work was focused primarily on detailed investigation of the effect of ELM-like transient heat events on pristine samples of two different grades of deformed tungsten with ultrafine and nanocrystlline grains. Significant efforts were made to understand the mechanisms behind recrystallization, grain growth, crack formation, surface nano-structuring, melting, and other phenomena observed under repeated transient heat loads, simulated by the use of long pulse laser beams. It was observed that cold rolled tungsten overall demonstrated better power handling capabilities and higher thermal stress fatigue resistance. It had higher recrystallization and melting threshold parameters, slower grain growth at similar irradiation conditions, lower degree of surface roughening, and less material losses. The difference in behavior of the two grades of tungsten under similar heat load conditions was attributed to the initial tensile properties of the samples, initial impurities

  10. Coherent Beam Combining of High-Power Broad-Area Laser Diode Array in CW and Pulsed Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Bo; Liu, Yun; Braiman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    We present experimental results on coherent beam combining from large arrays of high power broad-area semiconductor lasers. Our laser array consists of 47 high-power anti-reflection coated broad-area semiconductor lasers and each laser emitter is capable of emitting 1.8 W when uncoated with a maximum array output power of 80W. The total available power from the AR coated array is approximately 40W. By using an external V-shape cavity design, we experimentally demonstrated a coherently combined beam at the output power of {approx}13 W with the 0.07 nm FWHM spectrum linewidth that is limited by the sensitivity of the optical spectrum analyzer. We also discuss coherent beam combining of high power broad area laser diode array in current driver pulse mode operation.

  11. Multiple-beam, pulse-burst, passively Q-switched ceramic Nd:YAG laser under micro-lens array pumping.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Yu, Xin; Li, Xudong; Li, Jiang; Yan, Renpeng; Peng, Jiangbo; Zhang, Xinlu; Sun, Rui; Pan, Yubai; Chen, Deying

    2015-09-21

    A novel four-beam (named laserI, laser II, laser III and laser IV, respectively), passively Q-switched, pulse-burst ceramic Nd:YAG laser under 2 × 2 micro-lens array pumping was demonstrated for the purpose of laser-induced plasma ignition (LIPI). Multiple-beam output together with pulse-burst mode in which both high repetition rate and high pulse energy can be realized simultaneously were obtained to greatly improve the performance of LIPI. The pulse-burst contained a maximum of 5 pulses, 3 pulses, 2 pulses and 3 pulses for laserI, laser II, laser III and laser IV, respectively, and the corresponding repetition rate of laser pulses in pulse-burst was 10.8 kHz, 7.2 kHz, 6.8 kHz and 5.2 kHz, respectively. The output energy for single laser pulse in pulse-burst was in the range of 0.12 mJ to 0.22 mJ. PMID:26406695

  12. Time-resolved measurement technique for pulsed electron beam envelope basing on framing and streaking principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Wang, Yuan; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Huang; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The time-resolved electron beam envelope parameters, including cross sectional distribution and beam centroid position, are very important for the study of beam transmission characteristics in a magnetic field and for verifying the rationality of the magnetic field parameters employed. One kind of high time-resolved beam envelope measurement system has recently been developed, constituted of a high-speed framing camera and a streak camera. It can obtain three panoramic images of the beam and time continuous information along the given beam profile simultaneously. Recently obtained data has proved that several fast vibrations of the beam envelope along the diameter direction occur during the front and the tail parts of the electron beam. The vibration period is several nanoseconds. The effect of magnetic field on the electron beam is also observed and verified. Beam debugging experiments have proved that the existing beam transmission design is reasonable and viable. This beam envelope measurement system will establish a good foundation for beam physics research. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10675104, 11375162)

  13. Controlling Charge and Current Neutralization of an Ion Beam Pulse in a Background Plasma by Application of a Solenoidal Magnetic Field I: Weak Magnetic Field Limit

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, I. D., Startsev, E. A., Sefkow, A. B., Davidson, R. C.

    2008-10-10

    Propagation of an intense charged particle beam pulse through a background plasma is a common problem in astrophysics and plasma applications. The plasma can effectively neutralize the charge and current of the beam pulse, and thus provides a convenient medium for beam transport. The application of a small solenoidal magnetic field can drastically change the self-magnetic and self- electric fields of the beam pulse, thus allowing effective control of the beam transport through the background plasma. An analytic model is developed to describe the self-magnetic field of a finite- length ion beam pulse propagating in a cold background plasma in a solenoidal magnetic field. The analytic studies show that the solenoidal magnetic field starts to infuence the self-electric and self-magnetic fields when ωce > ωpeβb, where ωce = eβ/mec is the electron gyrofrequency, ωpe is the electron plasma frequency, and βb = Vb/c is the ion beam velocity relative to the speed of light. This condition typically holds for relatively small magnetic fields (about 100G). Analytical formulas are derived for the effective radial force acting on the beam ions, which can be used to minimize beam pinching. The results of analytic theory have been verified by comparison with the simulation results obtained from two particle-in-cell codes, which show good agreement.

  14. Surface modification of 40CrNiMo7 steel with high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shengzhi; Wang, Huihui; Zhao, Limin

    2016-02-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment was conducted on 40CrNiMo7 steel with accelerating voltage 27 kV, energy density 3 J/cm2, pulse duration 2.5 μs and 1-50 pulses. The evolutions of surface microstructure were investigated by using optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. It was found that the carbides in the surface remelted layer of depth ∼4 μm were dissolved gradually along with the increasing number of HCPEB pulses. Eventually, the surface microstructure of 40CrNiMo7 steel was transformed to a complex structure composed of very refined ∼150 nm austenite as the main part and a little quantity of martensite phases. After 15 pulses of HCPEB treatment, the surface microhardness was doubled to 553 HV, and the wear rate decreased to one third of the initial state correspondingly.

  15. Effect of Beam Smoothing and Pulse Shape on the Implosion of DD-Filled CH Shell Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    Over the past two years several implosion experiments were carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser in which DD-filled CH shells (some with a CHTi layer imbedded) were irradiated with various laser pulse shapes and smoothing conditions. Target CH shell thicknesses varied from 20 μm to 27 μm with DD-fill variations from 3 to 20 atm, sometimes mixed with ^3He. Two pulse shapes---a 1-ns square pulse and a 2.5-ns pulse with a 10%, 1-ns foot, with and without SSD---provide several levels of laser imprint. Diagnostics include measured neutron yields, fuel ion temperatures, fuel ρR, and shell ρR. Simulations for these experimental conditions were carried out with the 2-D hydrocode ORCHID. The results are compared with the experimental results. The degradation of target performance due to laser nonuniformity is analyzed by comparing the 2-D results with those of 1-D simulations. The effects of pulse shape, target thickness, convergence ratio, and smoothing are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  16. Comparison of ultrashort-pulse frequency-resolved-optical-gating traces for three common beam geometries

    SciTech Connect

    DeLong, K.W.; Trebino, R. ); Kane, D.J. )

    1994-09-01

    We recently introduced frequency-resolved optical gating (FROG), a technique for measuring the intensity and phase of an individual, arbitrary, ultrashort laser pulse. FROG can use almost any instantaneous optical nonlinearity, with the most common geometries being polarization gate, self-diffraction, and second-harmonic generation. The experimentally generated FROG trace is intuitive, visually appealing, and can yield quantitative information about the pulse parameters (such as temporal and spectral width and chirp). However, the qualitative and the quantitative features of the FROG trace depend strongly on the geometry used. We compare the FROG traces for several common ultrashort pulses for these three common geometries and, where possible, develop scaling rules that allow one to obtain quantitative information about the pulse directly from the experimental FROG trace. We illuminate the important features of the various FROG traces for transform-limited, linearly chirped, self-phase modulated, and nonlinearly chirped pulses, pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and self-phase modulation, and pulses with simultaneous linear chirp and cubic phase distortion, as well as double pulses, pulses with phase jumps, and pulses with complex intensity and phase substructure.

  17. Effects of picosecond terawatt UV laser beam filamentation and a repetitive pulse train on creation of prolonged plasma channels in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvorykin, V. D.; Ionin, A. A.; Levchenko, A. O.; Seleznev, L. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Sinitsyn, D. V.; Smetanin, I. V.; Ustinovskii, N. N.

    2013-08-01

    Amplitude-modulated UV laser pulse of up to 30 J energy was produced at hybrid Ti:Sapphire/KrF GARPUN-MTW laser facility when a preliminary amplified train of short pulses was injected into unstable resonator cavity of the main e-beam-pumped KrF amplifier. The combined radiation consisted of regeneratively amplified picosecond pulses with subTW peak power overlapped with 100-ns pulse of a free-running lasing. The advantages of combined radiation for production of long-lived prolonged plasma channels in air and HV discharge triggering were demonstrated: photocurrent sustained by modulated pulse is two orders of magnitude higher and HV breakdown distance is twice longer than for a smooth UV pulse. It was found that in contrast to IR radiation multiple filamentation of high-power UV laser beam does not produce extended nonlinear focusing of UV radiation.

  18. Ion beam enhancement in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation in non-relativistic mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, X. P.; Zhang, Z. C.; Pushkarev, A. I.; Lei, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    High-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) with ion current density above Child-Langmuir limit is achieved by extracting ion beam from anode plasma of ion diodes with suppressing electron flow under magnetic field insulation. It was theoretically estimated that with increasing the magnetic field, a maximal value of ion current density may reach nearly 3 times that of Child-Langmuir limit in a non-relativistic mode and close to 6 times in a highly relativistic mode. In this study, the behavior of ion beam enhancement by magnetic insulation is systematically investigated in three types of magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with passive anode, taking into account the anode plasma generation process on the anode surface. A maximal enhancement factor higher than 6 over the Child-Langmuir limit can be obtained in the non-relativistic mode with accelerating voltage of 200-300 kV. The MIDs differ in two anode plasma formation mechanisms, i.e., surface flashover of a dielectric coating on the anode and explosive emission of electrons from the anode, as well as in two insulation modes of external-magnetic field and self-magnetic field with either non-closed or closed drift of electrons in the anode-cathode (A-K) gap, respectively. Combined with ion current density measurement, energy density characterization is employed to resolve the spatial distribution of energy density before focusing for exploring the ion beam generation process. Consistent results are obtained on three types of MIDs concerning control of neutralizing electron flows for the space charge of ions where the high ion beam enhancement is determined by effective electron neutralization in the A-K gap, while the HIPIB composition of different ion species downstream from the diode may be considerably affected by the ion beam neutralization during propagation.

  19. Method and split cavity oscillator/modulator to generate pulsed particle beams and electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Clark, M. Collins; Coleman, P. Dale; Marder, Barry M.

    1993-01-01

    A compact device called the split cavity modulator whose self-generated oscillating electromagnetic field converts a steady particle beam into a modulated particle beam. The particle beam experiences both signs of the oscillating electric field during the transit through the split cavity modulator. The modulated particle beam can then be used to generate microwaves at that frequency and through the use of extractors, high efficiency extraction of microwave power is enabled. The modulated beam and the microwave frequency can be varied by the placement of resistive wires at nodes of oscillation within the cavity. The short beam travel length through the cavity permit higher currents because both space charge and pinching limitations are reduced. The need for an applied magnetic field to control the beam has been eliminated.

  20. Method and split cavity oscillator/modulator to generate pulsed particle beams and electromagnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Clark, M.C.; Coleman, P.D.; Marder, B.M.

    1993-08-10

    A compact device called the split cavity modulator whose self-generated oscillating electromagnetic field converts a steady particle beam into a modulated particle beam. The particle beam experiences both signs of the oscillating electric field during the transit through the split cavity modulator. The modulated particle beam can then be used to generate microwaves at that frequency and through the use of extractors, high efficiency extraction of microwave power is enabled. The modulated beam and the microwave frequency can be varied by the placement of resistive wires at nodes of oscillation within the cavity. The short beam travel length through the cavity permit higher currents because both space charge and pinching limitations are reduced. The need for an applied magnetic field to control the beam has been eliminated.

  1. Design challenges of EO polymer based leaky waveguide deflector for 40 Gs/s all-optical analog-to-digital converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjloum, Massinissa; El Gibari, Mohammed; Li, Hongwu; Daryoush, Afshin S.

    2016-08-01

    Design challenges and performance optimization of an all-optical analog-to-digital converter (AOADC) is presented here. The paper addresses both microwave and optical design of a leaky waveguide optical deflector using electro-optic (E-O) polymer. The optical deflector converts magnitude variation of the applied RF voltage into variation of deflection angle out of a leaky waveguide optical beam using the linear E-O effect (Pockels effect) as part of the E-O polymer based optical waveguide. This variation of deflection angle as result of the applied RF signal is then quantized using optical windows followed by an array of high-speed photodetectors. We optimized the leakage coefficient of the leaky waveguide and its physical length to achieve the best trade-off between bandwidth and the deflected optical beam resolution, by improving the phase velocity matching between lightwave and microwave on one hand and using pre-emphasis technique to compensate for the RF signal attenuation on the other hand. In addition, for ease of access from both optical and RF perspective, a via-hole less broad bandwidth transition is designed between coplanar pads and coupled microstrip (CPW-CMS) driving electrodes. With the best reported E-O coefficient of 350 pm/V, the designed E-O deflector should allow an AOADC operating over 44 giga-samples-per-seconds with an estimated effective resolution of 6.5 bits on RF signals with Nyquist bandwidth of 22 GHz. The overall DC power consumption of all components used in this AOADC is of order of 4 W and is dominated by power consumption in the power amplifier to generate a 20 V RF voltage in 50 Ohm system. A higher sampling rate can be achieved at similar bits of resolution by interleaving a number of this elementary AOADC at the expense of a higher power consumption.

  2. Optical spectroscopy of plasma in high power microwave pulse shortening experiments driven by a microsecond electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, W.E.; Gilgenbach, R.M.; Hochman, J.M.; Jaynes, R.L.; Rintamaki, J.I.; Peters, C.W.; Vollers, D.E.; Lau, Y.Y.; Spencer, T.A.

    1998-12-31

    Spectroscopic measurements have been performed to characterize the undesired plasma in a multi-megawatt coaxial gyrotron and a rectangular-cross-section (RCS) gyrotron. These gyrotrons are driven by the Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator (MELBA) at parameters: V = {minus}800 kV, I{sub tube} = 0.3 kA, and pulselengths of 0.5--1 {micro}s. Pulse shortening typically limits the highest ({approximately}10 MW) microwave power pulselength to 100--200 ns. Potential explanations of pulse shortening are being investigated, particularly plasma production inside the cavity and at the e-beam collector. The source of this plasma is believed to be due to water vapor absorbed on surfaces which is ejected, dissociated, and ionized by electron beam impact. Plasma H-{alpha} line radiation has been characterized in both time-integrated and temporally-resolved measurements and correlated with microwave power and microwave cutoff. Measurements from a residual gas analyzer (RGA) will be used to support this interpretation. Experiments involving RF plasma cleaning of the coaxial cavity are planned.

  3. Dominant front-side acceleration of energetic proton beams from plastic targets irradiated by an ultraintense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Park, S. H.; Cha, Y.-H.; Lee, Y. W.; Jeong, Y. U.; Lee, J. Y.; Kim, K. N.

    2011-01-15

    An experimental observation has been made by using aluminum-coated Mylar foils, which strongly supports that in the case of plastic target, the energetic part of the proton beam originates from the front-side of the target. When a 30 fs laser pulse with an intensity of 1.6x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} was irradiated on the 12.5-{mu}m-thick Mylar side of the aluminum-coated Mylar foil, the maximum proton energy was reduced by a factor 5.5 as compared to that of 3.3 MeV observed from the single layer of the Mylar foil. With the help of a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, these observations can be interpreted that in the case of plastic target, the energetic proton beam originates from the front-side of the target. In the case of an aluminum-coated 6-{mu}m-thick Mylar foil, more energetic proton beams of 4.7 MeV were also observed when the laser pulse was irradiated on the aluminum side as compared to those of 3.4 MeV from the single Mylar foil.

  4. Operational experience of the DIII-D neutral beam 12 cm x 48 cm long pulse source

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, R.; Colleraine, A.P.; Haskovec, J.S.; Kellman, D.H.; Kim, J.; Nerem, A.; Phillips, J.C.; Sleaford, B.W.; Wight, J.J.; Vella, M.

    1987-10-01

    All four neutral beamline of the DIII-D tokamak have been converted to long pulse source operation. These common long pulse sources (CLPS) were designed for full power operation at 80 kV, 80 A, 5 sec with hydrogen. The CLPS plasma generator is equipped with cusp magnets and operates in the emission limited regime. The accelerator has an actively cooled tetrode geometry with a 10 m focus in one direction. Each new CLPS requires conditioning of the arc chamber prior to any attempt at beam extraction. It was found that the filament temperature plays an important role in the performance of the arc chamber, and that the arc operated more smoothly with the arc power supply in an unregulated mode and the filament supply in a constant voltage mode. To avoid the collapse of the voltage between the plasma and gradient grids at initial beam formation, a capacitive compensation network between the grids was added. Initial beam extraction typically started at 40 kV and progressed quickly to the full 80 kV capability with little to no degradation during shutdown periods. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  5. CW/Pulsed H- ion beam generation with PKU Cs-free 2.45 GHz microwave driven ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, S. X.; Ren, H. T.; Xu, Y.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, A. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Zhao, J.; Guo, Z. Y.; Chen, J. E.

    2015-04-01

    Circular accelerators used for positron emission tomography (PET, i.e. accelerator used for make radio isotopes) need several mA of CW H- ion beam for their routine operation. Other facilities, like Space Radio-Environment Simulate Assembly (SPRESA), require less than 10 mA pulsed mode H- beam. Caesium free negative hydrogen ion source is a good choice for those facilities because of its compact structure, easy operation and low cost. Up to now, there is no H- source able to produce very intense H- beams with important variation of the duty factor[1]. Recently, a new version of 2.45 GHz microwave H- ion source was designed at PKU, based on lessons learnt from the previous one. This non cesiated source is very compact thanks to its permanent magnet configuration. Special attention was paid on the design of the discharge chamber structure, electron dumping and extraction system. Source test to produce H- ion beams in pulsed and CW mode was carried out on PKU ion source test bench. In CW mode, a 10.8 mA/30keV H- beam with rms emittance about 0.16 π.mm.mrad has been obtained with only 500 W rf power. The power efficiency reaches 21 mA/kW. In pulsed mode with duty factor of 10% (100Hz/1ms), this compact source can easily deliver 20 mA H- ion beam at 35 keV with rms emittance about 0.2 π.mm.mrad when RF power is set at 2.2 kW (peak power). Several hour successive running operation in both modes and totaling more than 200 hours proves its high quality. The outside dimension of this new H- source body is ϕ116 mm × 124 mm, and the entire H- source infrastructure, including rf matching section, plasma chamber and extraction system, is ϕ310 × 180 mm. The high voltage region is limited with in a ϕ310 mm × 230 mm diagram. Details are given in this paper.

  6. Generation and manipulation of proton beams by ultra-short laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nickles, P. V.; Schnuerer, M.; Steinke, S.; Sokollik, T.; Sandner, W.; Ter-Avetisyan, S.; Andreev, A.

    2009-07-25

    Applying a 21-channel Thomson spectrometer setup has revealed further insight to the connection between spatial and spectral beam characteristic of laser accelerated protons. Analyzing the central emission cone (plus/minus 3 degree) shows an increasing beam divergency for protons with increasing kinetic energies. This holds for protons emitted from the same source area at the target surface. The whole beam is a well ordered system with a clear functional dependence of trajectories on proton energy. This is a consequence of the source dynamics which is determined by the sheath development in time. Thus laser-driven ion beams can be advantageously manipulated for further propagation to an experiment. We demonstrate this capability with a magnetic quadrupole and obtain a nearly parallel and monochromatized beam. Furthermore we set our achievements in beam production efficiency into context with other laser systems and demonstrate the potential of very-thin target foils.

  7. Commercial Laser Beam Perforation Of Cigarette Tipping Paper Using An Acoustic-Optic Beam Deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, H.; Ramsay, I.; Dyson, D.; Ross, I.

    1984-11-01

    The tobacco industry has required a means of reducing tar content of inhaled smoke from cigarettes for some time now. One effective way of achieving this is to perforate the tipping paper (cork or plain) which wraps the cigaratte filter plug. Air is drawn into and mixed with the smoke as the smoker inhales resulting in two effects on the smoke. The first is that it is diluted and the second is that the air-smoke mixture is cooled. The dilution of the smoke probably has little significant effect since the total smoke inhaled per cigarette is always the same. The cooling of the smoke, however, causes the tar present to condense more readily on the filter plug and so represents a genuine reduction in tar content. In the light of increasing health consciousness both from popular movement or deliberate Government propaganda the importance of this method of tar reduction is well recognised in the industry.

  8. 120-kV testing of a 10 x 40-cm prototype of the U. S. common long pulse neutral beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.D.; Owren, H.M.; Paterson, J.A.; Pincosy, P.A.; Pyle, R.; Wells, R.P.; Vella, M.C.

    1986-11-01

    The 10 x 40-cm long pulse neutral beam source developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been selected as the prototype for the design of the U. S. common long pulse source to be used on tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR), Doublet-III, and mirror fusion test facility (MFTF-B). The long pulse source consists of a magnetic line cusp bucket with an actively cooled backplate electron dump and a four-grid accelerator using slot apertures and water-cooled molybdenum rails. Deuterium testing of the long pulse source at 120 kV and 53 A and with a 2-s pulse length has been completed on the neutral beam engineering test facility, including an 8-h 100-shot test to demonstrate the durability and reliability of the source. Maximum 2-s beam parameters obtained (not simultaneously) are 125 kV, 58 A (deuterium), and 7.1 MW. Beam pulse length has been extended to 5 s at 120 kV. Atomic species fractions in excess of 80% have been obtained, with a beam divergence (full energy, 1/e half-angle) of approximately 0.8 x 0.4/sup 0/. Calorimetric measurements on the accelerator grids and backplate electron dump indicate heat loads consistent with predictions and within the design limits of the source. This testing has verified the design of the source and its ability to exceed the basic performance requirements.

  9. [Pulsed electron beam precharger]. Technical progress report No. 2, December 1, 1989--February 28, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics on electron beam guns: Precharger Modification; Installation of Charge vs. Radius Apparatus; High Concentration Aerosol Generation; and Data Acquisition and Analysis System.

  10. Three-Dimensional Full-Beam Simulation of Ultrashort Laser Pulse Amplification by Brillouin Backscattering in the Strong Coupling Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Kathleen; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Thomas; Langer, Steven; Riconda, Caterina

    2014-10-01

    Laser amplification by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) has been previously proposed as a method of achieving high intensity sub-picosecond laser pulses. The 3D fluid simulation code pF3D is used to simulate the SBS interaction of two counterpropagating laser pulses in parameter regimes similar to current experiments. The optimal operating regime is explored by variation of the pump and seed intensity, pulse duration, and plasma properties. The sensitivity of seed intensity amplification, pulse compression, and wavefront quality are investigated with regards to spontaneous laser beam instabilities such as filamentation and amplified spontaneous emission. The influence of the spatial and temporal coherence of the pump and seed on the amplification process is presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and partly funded by the Laboratory Research and Development Program at LLNL under project tracking code 12-ERD-061.

  11. High-power, high-brightness pseudospark-produced electron beam driven by improved pulse line accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Junbino Zhu; Mingchang Wang; Zhijiang Wang

    1995-12-31

    A high power (200KV), intense current density, low emittance (71mmmrad), high brightness (8x10{sup 10}A/m rad) electron beam was generated in the 10cm long, high-voltage-resistive multi-gap hollow cathode pseudospark chamber filled with 15pa nitrogen and driven by an improved pulse line accelerator. The beam was ejected with the 1mm diameter, the 2.2KA beam current, and the 400ns pulse length, and could propagated 20cm in the drift tube. At a distance of 5cm from the anode it penetrated consecutively an acid-sensitive discoloring film and a 0.05mm-thick copper foil both stuck closely, left 0.6mm and 0.3mm holes on them, respectively. That 10 shots on an acid-sensitive film produced a hole of 1.6mm at 7cm downstream of anode showed its good repeatability. After 60 shots the pseudospark discharge chamber was disassembled and observed that almost no destructive damage traces left on the surfaces of its various electrodes and insulators. But on almost all the surfaces of changeable central hole parts installed on intermediate electrodes there are traces of electron emission from the sides facing the anode and of bombardment on the sides facing the cathode, in contrast with which on the front- and back-surfaces of hollow cathode no visible traces of electron emission from then was observed. In addition, there were different tints, strip-like regions on the side of anode facing the cathode. Another interesting phenomenon was that there were a set of concentric circular or elliptical ring pattern on the acid-sensitive discoloring film got at 5cm from the anode and observed tinder a metallograph. It seems that the pseudospark electron beam is Laminar beam i.e, being possessed of a multi-layer structure, at least in the case of multi-gap pseudospark discharge chamber. It was found experimentally that the quality of pseudospark electron beam is much better than that of the cold-cathode electron beam.

  12. Pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-yu; Dong, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The incident pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal passively Q-switched microchip laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically by moving the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction. Highest pulse energy of 0.4 mJ has been generated when the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal is moved about 6 mm away from the focused pump beam waist. Laser pulses with pulse width of 1.7 ns and peak power of over 235 kW have been achieved. The theoretically calculated effective laser beam area at different positions of Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction is in good agreement with the experimental results. The highest peak power can be generated by adjusting the pump beam waist incident on the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal to optimize the effective laser beam area in passively Q-switched microchip laser.

  13. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 6, December 1, 1990--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    Electron beam precharging of a high resistivity aerosol was successfully performed under a range of experimental conditions during Quarter Six of the contract. The initial E-beam particle precharging experiments completed this term were designed to extend the efficiency of particle charging and collection using a fine, monodisperse aerosol at relatively large loadings in the FSU Electron Beam Precipitator wind tunnel. There are several reasons for doing this: (1) to re-establish a baseline performance criterion for comparison to other runs, (2) to test several recently upgraded or repaired subsystems, and (3) to improve upon the collection efficiency of the electron beam precipitator when testing precharging effectiveness with a very high resistivity, moderate-to-high dust concentration. In addition, these shakedown runs were used to determine a set of suitable operational parameters for the wind tunnel, the electrostatic collecting sections, and the MINACC E-beam accelerator. These parameters will normally be held constant while the precharging parameters are varied to produce an optimum particle charge. The electron beam precharging investigation performed during the period covered by Quarter Six used virtually the same experimental apparatus and procedures as in previous contract work, and these are described for review in this report. This investigation was part of an experimental effort which ran nearly continuously for nine months, encompassing work on the electrostatic collecting section, electron beam precharger, and particle charge-to-radius measuring apparatus. A summary of the work on dc electron beam precipitation is presented here.

  14. Terahertz beam steering and frequency tuning by using the spatial dispersion of ultrafast laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Maki, Ken-ichiro; Otani, Chiko

    2008-07-01

    We demonstrate a terahertz (THz) beam steering method using difference frequency generation that is based on the principle of phased array antennas. A strip-line photoconductive antenna was illuminated by two spatially dispersed beams produced from an ultrafast laser. THz radiation with a bandwidth of 65 GHz was generated from the overlapping area of the two beams, between which the frequency difference was approximately constant. We confirmed that the THz beam can be steered by tilting one of the incident pump beams so as to change their relative phase relation. The steering range of the THz beam was 29 degrees when the angle between the incident pump beams was only varied within a range of 0.155 degrees, that is, 187 times less. In addition, by laterally shifting one of the pump beams, the frequency of the THz radiation could be tuned from 0.3 to 1.7 THz. This technique can be applied to high-speed terahertz imaging and spectroscopy systems. PMID:18607423

  15. Release from ISOLDE molten metal targets under pulsed proton beam conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Catherall, R.; Cyvoct, G.; Evensen, A. H. M.; Lindroos, M.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kugler, E.; Schindl, K.; Ravn, H.; Wildner, E.; Drumm, P.; Obert, J.; Putaux, J. C.; Sauvage, J.

    1996-04-01

    By moving the ISOLDE mass separators from the 600 MeV Synchrocyclotron (SC) to the 1 GeV Proton-Synchrotron-Booster (PS) the instantaneous energy density of the proton beam went up by 3 orders of magnitude. The developments of the molten metal target units and the optimization of the PS proton beam to cope with the effects of the thermal shocks induced by the proton beam are described. The energy density of the PS proton beam was reduced by spatial defocusing and time staggered extraction of the four PS-accelerators. The release from lanthanum, lead and tin targets is discussed for different settings of the proton beam and compared to the release observed at ISOLDE-SC. The yields of Hg isotopes are presented.

  16. Simulation of temperature and thermally induced stress of human tooth under CO2 pulsed laser beams using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Sabaeian, Mohammad; Shahzadeh, Mohammadreza

    2015-02-01

    The authors report the simulation of temperature distribution and thermally induced stresses of human tooth under CO2 pulsed laser beam. A detailed tooth structure comprising enamel, dentin, and pulp with realistic shapes and thicknesses were considered, and a numerical method of finite element was adopted to solve time-dependent bio-heat and stress equations. The realistic boundary conditions of constant temperature for those parts embedded in the gingiva and heat flux condition for those parts out of the gingiva were applied. The results which were achieved as a function of energy density (J/cm(2)) showed when laser beam is irradiated downward (from the top of the tooth), the temperature and thermal stresses decrease quickly as a function of depth that is a result of strong absorption of CO2 beams by enamel. This effect is so influential that one can use CO2 beams to remove micrometer layers while underlying tissues, especially the pulp, are safe from thermal effects.

  17. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  18. Intense terahertz pulses from SLAC electron beams using coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ziran; Fisher, Alan S.; Hogan, Mark; Loos, Henrik; Goodfellow, John; Fuchs, Matthias; Daranciang, Dan; Lindenberg, Aaron

    2013-02-15

    SLAC has two electron accelerators, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET), providing high-charge, high-peak-current, femtosecond electron bunches. These characteristics are ideal for generating intense broadband terahertz (THz) pulses via coherent transition radiation. For LCLS and FACET respectively, the THz pulse duration is typically 20 and 80 fs RMS and can be tuned via the electron bunch duration; emission spectra span 3-30 THz and 0.5 THz-5 THz; and the energy in a quasi-half-cycle THz pulse is 0.2 and 0.6 mJ. The peak electric field at a THz focus has reached 4.4 GV/m (0.44 V/A) at LCLS. This paper presents measurements of the terahertz pulses and preliminary observations of nonlinear materials response.

  19. Thrombus deflector stent for stroke prevention: A simulation study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Won; Navia, Jose A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-07-16

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a dysfunction of heart rhythm and represents an increased predisposition to ischemic stroke in AF patients. It has been shown that the AF-induced hemodynamic conditions may contribute to the increased embolic propensity through the carotid arteries. We simulated a stroke-prevention device with a unique strut structure to deflect the trajectory of a blood clot to the carotid artery. We identified the important determinants of functionality in a device design using computational fluid dynamics simulations. Quantitative assessment of deflection efficacy over various clot dimensions was carried out for the device with different strut configurations under AF flow conditions. The simulations demonstrate that the trajectory of a clot destined to the left common carotid artery (LCCA) can be deflected by a strut-structured device at the LCCA inlet with virtually no change in flow resistance. The deflection efficacy of the device is dependent on the clot properties and strut designs of the device. A configuration of 0.75 mm thick and 0.75 mm distant struts with 50% of surface convexity were found to provide maximum deflection efficacy (e.g., 36% greater deflection efficacy than a flat filter) among the strut structures considered. The results suggest that a deflector stent implanted in the aortic branch may be an effective stroke-prevention device. The present simulations motivate pre-clinical animal studies as well as further studies on patient-specific design of the device that maximize the deflection efficacy while minimizing device safety issues. PMID:26049978

  20. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hawsey, Robert A.; Scudiere, Matthew B.

    1993-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  1. Refractory Materials for Flame Deflector Protection System Corrosion Control: Coatings Systems Literature Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz M.; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Coffman, Brekke E.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Whitten, Mary; Perisich, Steven; Trejo, David

    2009-01-01

    When space vehicles are launched, extreme heat, exhaust, and chemicals are produced and these form a very aggressive exposure environment at the launch complex. The facilities in the launch complex are exposed to this aggressive environment. The vehicle exhaust directly impacts the flame deflectors, making these systems very susceptible to high wear and potential failure. A project was formulated to develop or identify new materials or systems such that the wear and/or damage to the flame deflector system, as a result of the severe environmental exposure conditions during launches, can be mitigated. This report provides a survey of potential protective coatings for the refractory concrete lining on the steel base structure on the flame deflectors at Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

  2. An experimental investigation of convective heat transfer enhancement in electronic module using curved deflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosas, A. S.; Ali, R. K.; Abdel-Aziz, A. A.; Elshazly, K. M.

    2016-07-01

    This work investigated experimentally the heat transfer and pressure drop in electronic module using a curved deflector to direct the flow towards the recirculation zone enclosed between the two heat sources. The experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of deflector dimensionless radius (R r ) and both horizontal and vertical distances (R x , R y ) within a range of Reynolds number from 5223 to 11,380. The results show that larger deflector at small vertical distance enhances the heat transfer for upstream and downstream heat sources while the horizontal distance has a contrast effect. Correlations are obtained for the average Nusselt number of both upstream and downstream heat sources utilizing the present measurements within 5223 ≤ Re L ≤ 11,380, 0.02 ≤ R x ≤ 0.4, 0.3 ≤ R y ≤ 0.5 and 0.15 ≤ R r ≤ 0.35.

  3. Ultrafast optical beam deflection in a pump probe configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Lingliang; Tian, Jinshou; Wang, Tao; Wu, Shengli; Li, Fuli; Wang, Junfeng; Gao, Guilong

    2016-09-01

    Propagation of a signal beam in an AlGaAs/GaAs waveguide multiple-prism light deflector is theoretically investigated by solving the scalar Helmholtz equation to obtain the dependences of the temporal and spatial resolvable characteristics of the ultrafast deflector on the material dispersion of GaAs including group velocity dispersion and angular dispersion, interface reflection, and interface scattering of multiple-prism deflector. Furthermore, we experimentally confirm that, in this ultrafast beam deflection device, the deflecting angle of the signal light beam is linear with the pump fluence and the temporal resolution of the ultrafast deflection is 10 ps. Our results show that the improvement of the temporal and spatial resolvable performances is possible by properly choosing the structural parameters and enhancing the quality of the device. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11274377 and 61176006) and the State Major Research Equipment Project, China (Grant No. ZDY2011-2).

  4. Microdrilling in steel using ultrashort pulsed laser beams with radial and azimuthal polarization.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Martin; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Michalowski, Andreas; Voss, Andreas; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2010-10-11

    A linear to radial and/or azimuthal polarization converter (LRAC) has been inserted into the beam delivery of a micromachining station equipped with a picosecond laser system. Percussion drilling and helical drilling in steel have been performed using radially as well as azimuthally polarized infrared radiation at 1030 nm. The presented machining results are discussed on the basis of numerical simulations of the polarization-dependent beam propagation inside the fabricated capillaries.

  5. Beam diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bogaty, J.; Clifft, B.E.; Zinkann, G.P.; Pardo, R.C.

    1995-08-01

    The ECR-PII injector beam line is operated at a fixed ion velocity. The platform high voltage is chosen so that all ions have a velocity of 0.0085c at the PII entrance. If a previous tune configuration for the linac is to be used, the beam arrival time must be matched to the previous tune as well. A nondestructive beam-phase pickup detector was developed and installed at the entrance to the PII linac. This device provides continuous phase and beam current information and allows quick optimization of the beam injected into PII. Bunches traverse a short tubular electrode thereby inducing displacement currents. These currents are brought outside the vacuum interface where a lumped inductance resonates electrode capacitance at one of the bunching harmonic frequencies. This configuration yields a basic sensitivity of a few hundred millivolts signal per microampere of beam current. Beam-induced radiofrequency signals are summed against an offset frequency generated by our master oscillator. The resulting kilohertz difference frequency conveys beam intensity and bunch phase information which is sent to separate processing channels. One channel utilizes a phase locked loop which stabilizes phase readings if beam is unstable. The other channel uses a linear full wave active rectifier circuit which converts kilohertz sine wave signal amplitude to a D.C. voltage representing beam current. A prototype set of electronics is now in use with the detector and we began to use the system in operation to set the arrival beam phase. A permanent version of the electronics system for the phase detector is now under construction. Additional nondestructive beam intensity and phase monitors at the {open_quotes}Booster{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}ATLAS{close_quotes} linac sections are planned as well as on some of the high-energy beam lines. Such a monitor will be particularly useful for FMA experiments where the primary beam hits one of the electric deflector plates.

  6. FY07 LDRD Final Report Precision, Split Beam, Chirped-Pulse, Seed Laser Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Messerly, M J; Phan, H H; Crane, J K; Beach, R J; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-11-12

    The goal of this LDRD ER was to develop a robust and reliable technology to seed high-energy laser systems with chirped pulses that can be amplified to kilo-Joule energies and recompressed to sub-picosecond pulse widths creating extremely high peak powers suitable for petawatt class physics experiments. This LDRD project focused on the development of optical fiber laser technologies compatible with the current long pulse National Ignition Facility (NIF) seed laser. New technologies developed under this project include, high stability mode-locked fiber lasers, fiber based techniques for reduction of compressed pulse pedestals and prepulses, new compact stretchers based on chirped fiber Bragg gratings (CFBGs), new techniques for manipulation of chirped pulses prior to amplification and new high-energy fiber amplifiers. This project was highly successful and met virtually all of its goals. The National Ignition Campaign has found the results of this work to be very helpful. The LDRD developed system is being employed in experiments to engineer the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) front end and the fully engineered version of the ARC Front End will employ much of the technology and techniques developed here.

  7. Wide-angle KTa1‑ x Nb x O3 deflector for swept light source using DC charge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Tatsuhiro; Shinagawa, Mitsuru; Ueno, Masahiro; Sasaki, Yuzo; Toyoda, Seiji; Sakamoto, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    A 5-pass KTa1‑ x Nb x O3 (KTN) deflector based on a DC charge technique for the swept light source of an optical coherence tomography system is proposed. The DC charge technique used in a 3-pass KTN deflector enables us to obtain the long-term stability of the optical power without any degradation of the important features of the swept light source. Experimental results confirm that the coherence length of a swept light source with the 5-pass KTN deflector using the DC charge technique is almost equal to that using a precharge technique reported previously. This means that the DC charge technique does not degrade the coherence length. There are limitation values for applied voltage, the KTN electrode gap, relative dielectric constant, and sweep frequency of the KTN deflector in terms of obtaining long coherence length. We believe that a 7-pass KTN deflector is effective for obtaining a longer coherence length.

  8. Proton and Ion Beams Generated with Picosecond CO{sub 2} Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Stolyarov, Daniil; Shkolnikov, Peter; Chen Min; Pukhov, Alexander; McKenna, Paul; Carroll, David; Neely, David; Najmudin, Zulfikar; Willingale, Louise; Stolyarova, Elena; Flynn, George

    2009-01-22

    1-TW, 6-ps, circularly polarized CO{sub 2} laser pulses focused onto thin Al foils are used to drive ion acceleration. The spectra of ions and protons generated in the direction normal to the rear surface, detected with a compact magnet spectrometer with CR39, reveals a broad proton high-energy peak at {approx}1 MeV. This observation conforms to the theoretical predictions that circularly polarized laser pulses are less efficient than linearly polarized pulses in driving ion acceleration via the Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. Instead, there is evidence that the circularly polarized laser may provide direct ponderomotive acceleration of ions and protons. We report also the first application of the BNL proton source in nano-science. Irradiation of graphite and graphene films produced local defects and membranes for variety of applications.

  9. Gigawatt, femtosecond VUV pulses from a SASE FEL: Photon beam characterisation and first applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiedtke, K.

    2002-11-01

    Parallel to the enormous progress in optical and conventional X-ray lasers there have also been tremendous advances in the field of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) based on the principle of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE). At the TESLA Test Facility (TTF FEL) at DESY, a linac-driven SASE FEL has produced short pulses with GW peak power in the wavelengths range of 80-120 nm. The radiation pulse length has been adjusted between 30 fs and 200 fs. Currently an energy upgrade of the TTF linear accelerator to 1 GeV is being prepared which will make radiation wavelengths down to 6 nm available for users.

  10. Diagnosis of high-intensity pulsed heavy ion beam generated by a novel magnetically insulated diode with gas puff plasma gun.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Miyake, H; Masugata, K

    2008-10-01

    Intense pulsed heavy ion beam is expected to be applied to materials processing including surface modification and ion implantation. For those applications, it is very important to generate high-purity ion beams with various ion species. For this purpose, we have developed a new type of a magnetically insulated ion diode with an active ion source of a gas puff plasma gun. When the ion diode was operated at a diode voltage of about 190 kV, a diode current of about 15 kA, and a pulse duration of about 100 ns, the ion beam with an ion current density of 54 A/cm(2) was obtained at 50 mm downstream from the anode. By evaluating the ion species and the energy spectrum of the ion beam via a Thomson parabola spectrometer, it was confirmed that the ion beam consists of nitrogen ions (N(+) and N(2+)) of energy of 100-400 keV and the proton impurities of energy of 90-200 keV. The purity of the beam was evaluated to be 94%. The high-purity pulsed nitrogen ion beam was successfully obtained by the developed ion diode system.

  11. Optimization of beam quality and optical-to-optical efficiency of Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier by pulsed pumping.

    PubMed

    Chyla, Michal; Miura, Taisuke; Smrz, Martin; Jelinkova, Helena; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2014-03-15

    We demonstrate an optimization method of beam quality and optical-to-optical (O-O) efficiency by using pulsed pumping. By changing the pulse duration and the peak intensity of pump pulse at the repetition rate of 1 kHz, the beam quality and O-O efficiency of the Yb:YAG thin-disk regenerative amplifier can be improved. We applied this method to the regenerative amplifier under the pumping wavelength of both 940 and 969 nm, and found that the method was effective in both pumping wavelengths. Although a Yb:YAG thin disk soldered on a copper tungsten heat sink, which has poor thermal properties compared with a thin disk mounted on a diamond substrate, was applied as a gain media, we obtained 45 mJ output with 19.3% O-O efficiency and nearly diffraction-limited beam.

  12. Pulsed and monoenergetic beams for neutron cross-section measurements using activation and scattering techniques at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, A.; Angell, C. T.; Becker, J. A.; Boswell, M.; Crowell, A. S.; Dashdorj, D.; Fallin, B.; Fotiades, N.; Howell, C. R.; Karwowski, H. J.; Kelley, J. H.; Kiser, M.; Macri, R. A.; Nelson, R. O.; Pedroni, R. S.; Tonchev, A. P.; Tornow, W.; Vieira, D. J.; Weisel, G. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2007-08-01

    In support of the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances initiative, an experimental program has been developed at Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL) to measure (n,xn) cross-sections with both in-beam and activation techniques with the goal of improving the partial cross-section database for the NNSA Stockpile Stewardship Program. First experimental efforts include excitation function measurements on 235,238U and 241Am using pulsed and monoenergetic neutron beams with En = 5-15 MeV. Neutron-induced partial cross-sections were measured by detecting prompt γ rays from the residual nuclei using various combinations of clover and planar HPGe detectors in the TUNL shielded neutron source area. Complimentary activation measurements using DC neutron beams have also been performed in open geometry in our second target area. The neutron-induced activities were measured in the TUNL low-background counting area. In this presentation, we include detailed information about the irradiation procedures and facilities and preliminary data on first measurements using this capability.

  13. Phase and Structural States Formed in Titanium Nickelide Subsurface Layers Exposed to High-Current Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyman, A. A.; Meisner, L. L.; Lotkov, A. I.; Semin, V. O.

    2015-06-01

    The behavior of the non-equilibrium states formed in the subsurface layers of a titanium nickelide-based alloy exposed to electron beams operated in the pulsed surface layer melting mode is investigated experimentally. Using methods of an x-ray diffraction analysis, and optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopies, an 8-10 μm thick surface layer is shown to exhibit В2 phase-based structure undergoing inhomogeneous lattice microstrain. The core layer located at a depth of 10-20 μm below the irradiated surface contains a small amount (up to 5 vol.%) of a phase with В19' martensite structure along with a slightly distorted lattice and unmelted Ti2Ni phase particles. Electron beam treatment brings about changes in the chemical composition of the surface-modified layer which becomes enriched in titanium owing to the dissolution of the Ti2Ni phase particles therein. Transmission electron microscopy has not revealed martensite phases in the modified layer. The electron beam exposure of the titanium nickelide surface is assumed to give rise to nonequilibrium highly distorted bcc structure.

  14. Use of pulsed high power ion beams to enhance tribological properties of stainless steel, Ti, and Al

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.C.; Renk, T.J.; Dugger, M.T.; Grabowski, K.S.; Thompson, M.O.

    1998-04-01

    Enhanced tribological properties have been observed after treatment with pulsed high power ion beams, which results in rapid melting and resolidification of the surface. The authors have treated and tested 440C martensitic stainless steel (Fe-17 Cr-1 C). Ti and Al samples were sputter coated and ion beam treated to produce surface alloying. The samples were treated at the RHEPP-I facility at Sandia National Laboratories (0.5 MV, 0.5--1 {micro}s at sample location, <10 J/cm{sup 2}, 1--5 {micro}m ion range). They have observed a reduction in size of second phase particles and other microstructural changes in 440C steel. The hardness of treated 440C increases with ion beam fluence and a maximum hardness increase of a factor of 5 is obtained. Low wear rates are observed in wear tested of treated 440C steel. Surface alloyed Ti-Pt layers show improvements in hardness up to a factor of 3 over untreated Ti, and surface alloys of Al-Si result in a hardness increase of a factor of two over untreated Al. Both surface alloys show increased durability in wear testing. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) measurements show overlayer mixing to the depth of the melted layer. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and TEM confirm the existence of metastable states within the treated layer. Treated layer depths have been measured from 1--10 {micro}m.

  15. A rapidly-tuned, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate CO{sub 2} laser for IR dial

    SciTech Connect

    Zaugg, T.; Thompson, D.; Leland, W.T.; Busch, G.

    1997-08-01

    Analysis of noise sources in Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) in the infrared region of the spectrum indicates that the signal-to-noise ratio for direct detection can be improved if multiple-wavelength, short-pulse-length beams are transmitted and received at high repetition rates. Atmospheric effects can be minimized, albedo can be rapidly scanned, and uncorrelated speckle can be acquired at the maximum possible rate. A compact, rugged, RF-excited waveguide laser can produce 15 nanosecond pulses at a 100 kHz rate with sufficient energy per pulse to reach the speckle limit of the signal-to-noise ratio. A high-repetition-rate laser has been procured and will be used to verify these signal and noise scaling relationships at high repetition rates. Current line-tuning devices are mechanical and are capable of switching lines at a rate up to a few hundred Hertz. Acousto-optic modulators, deflectors or tunable filters can be substituted for these mechanical devices in the resonator of a CO{sub 2} laser and used to rapidly line-tune the laser across the 9 and 10 micron bands at a rate as high as 100 kHz. Several configurations for line tuning using acousto-optic and electro-optic devices with and without gratings are presented. The merits of and constraints on each design are also discussed. A pair of large aperture, acousto-optic deflectors has been purchased and the various line-tuning designs will be evaluated in a conventional, glass tube, CO{sub 2} laser, with a view to incorporation into the high-repetition-rate, waveguide laser. A computer model of the dynamics of an RF-excited, short-pulse-length, high-repetition-rate waveguide laser has been developed. The model will be used to test the consequences of various line-tuning designs.

  16. Beam-based monitoring of the SLC linac optics with a diagnostic pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R.W.; Decker, F.J.; Hendrickson, L.J.; Phinney, N.; Siemann, R.H.; Underwood, K.K.; Woodley, M.

    1997-07-01

    The beam optics in a linear accelerator may be changed significantly by variations in the energy and energy spread profile along the linac. In particular, diurnal temperature swings in the SLC klystron gallery perturb the phase and amplitude of the accelerating RF fields. If such changes are not correctly characterized, the resulting errors will cause phase advance differences in the beam optics. In addition RF phase errors also affect the amplitude growth of betatron oscillations. The authors present an automated, simple procedure to monitor the beam optics in the SLC linac routinely and non-invasively. The measured phase advance and oscillation amplitude is shown as a function of time and is compared to the nominal optics.

  17. Electromagnetic fields from pulsed electron beam experiments in space - Spacelab-2 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, R. I.; Reeves, G. D.; Banks, P. M.; Neubert, T.; Williamson, P. R.

    1987-01-01

    During the Spacelab-2 mission a small satellite carrying various plasma diagnostic instruments was released from the Shuttle to coorbit at distances up to 300 m. During a magnetic conjunction of the Shuttle and the satellite an electron beam modulated at 1.22 kHz was emitted from the Shuttle during a 7 min period. The spatial structure of the electromagnetic fields generated by the beam was observed from the satellite out to a distance of 153 m perpendicular to the beam. The magnetic field amplitude of the strongest harmonics were comparable to the amplitude of simultaneously observed whistlers, while the electric field amplitudes were estimated to 1-10 mV/m.

  18. Beam delivery and pulse compression to sub-50 fs of a modelocked thin-disk laser in a gas-filled Kagome-type HC-PCF fiber.

    PubMed

    Emaury, Florian; Dutin, Coralie Fourcade; Saraceno, Clara J; Trant, Mathis; Heckl, Oliver H; Wang, Yang Y; Schriber, Cinia; Gerome, Frederic; Südmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2013-02-25

    We present two experiments confirming that hypocycloid Kagome-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HC-PCFs) are excellent candidates for beam delivery of MW peak powers and pulse compression down to the sub-50 fs regime. We demonstrate temporal pulse compression of a 1030-nm Yb:YAG thin disk laser providing 860 fs, 1.9 µJ pulses at 3.9 MHz. Using a single-pass grating pulse compressor, we obtained a pulse duration of 48 fs (FWHM), a spectral bandwidth of 58 nm, and an average output power of 4.2 W with an overall power efficiency into the final polarized compressed pulse of 56%. The pulse energy was 1.1 µJ. This corresponds to a peak power of more than 10 MW and a compression factor of 18 taking into account the exact temporal pulse profile measured with a SHG FROG. The compressed pulses were close to the transform limit of 44 fs. Moreover, we present transmission of up to 97 µJ pulses at 10.5 ps through 10-cm long fiber, corresponding to more than twice the critical peak power for self-focusing in silica.

  19. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br{sub 2} down to 13 μs

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-15

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br{sub 2} and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br{sub 2}. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  20. Novel technique for injecting and extracting beams in a circular hadron accelerator without using septum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchi, Andrea; Giovannozzi, Massimo

    2015-07-01

    With a few exceptions, all on-axis injection and extraction schemes implemented in circular particle accelerators, synchrotrons, and storage rings, make use of magnetic and electrostatic septa with systems of slow-pulsing dipoles acting on tens of thousands of turns and fast-pulsing dipoles on just a few. The dipoles create a closed orbit deformation around the septa, usually referred to as an orbit bump. A new approach is presented which obviates the need for the septum deflectors. Fast-pulsing elements are still required, but their strength can be minimized by choosing appropriate local accelerator optics. This technique should increase the beam clearance and reduce the usually high radiation levels found around the septa and also reduce the machine impedance introduced by the fast-pulsing dipoles. The basis of the technique is the creation of stable islands around stable fixed points in horizontal phase space. The trajectories of these islands may then be adjusted to match the position and angle of the incoming or outgoing beam.

  1. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 7, March 1--May 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1991-12-31

    During the previous reporting period (Quarter Six), the charging and removal of a fine, high resistivity aerosol using the advanced technology of electron beam precipitation was successfully accomplished. Precharging a dust stream circulating through the EBP wind tunnel produced collection efficiency figures of up to 40 times greater than with corona charging and collection alone (Table 1). The increased system collection efficiency attributed to electron beam precharging was determined to be the result of increased particle charge. It was found that as precharger electric field was raised, collection efficiency became greater. In sequence, saturation particle charge varies with the precharger electric field strength, particle migration velocity varies with the precharger and collector electric field, and collection efficiency varies with the migration velocity. Maximizing the system collection efficiency requires both a high charging electric field (provided by the E-beam precharger), and a high collecting electric field (provided by the collector wires and plates). Because increased particle collection efficiency is directly attributable to higher particle charge, the focus of research during Quarter Seven was shifted to learning more about the actual charge magnitude on the aerosol particles. Charge determinations in precipitators have traditionally been made on bulk dust samples collected from the flue gas stream, which gives an overall charge vs. mass (Q/M) ratio measurement. More recently, techniques have been developed which allow the measurement of the charge on individual particles in a rapid and repeatable fashion. One such advanced technique has been developed at FSU for use in characterizing the electron beam precharger.

  2. Pulsed electron beam precharger. Technical progress report No. 11, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, W.C.; Shelton, W.N.

    1992-12-31

    The use of an electron beam precharger to solve the problems inherent in collecting high-resistivity fly ash in an electrostatic precipitator was investigated. The experimental apparatus and results and their interpretation have been presented in previous progress reports. The project is complete except for completing reporting requirements. No scientific progress was made during the present reporting period.

  3. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, P. K.; Harada, H.; Hayashi, N.; Horino, K.; Hotchi, H.; Kinsho, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Tani, N.; Togashi, T.; Ueno, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Irie, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) as well as to the main ring (MR) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100πmmmrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150πmmmrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the present principle.

  4. 5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. FLAME DEFLECTOR, COMPLETE X-15 VEHICLE TEST STAND. Looking east. - Edwards Air Force Base, X-15 Engine Test Complex, Rocket Engine & Complete X-15 Vehicle Test Stands, Rogers Dry Lake, east of runway between North Base & South Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 50 CFR Figures 19a and 19b to Part... - Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details 19a Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Figs. 19 Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223—Chauvin Shrimp...

  6. 50 CFR Figures 19a and 19b to Part... - Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chauvin Shrimp Deflector Installation Details 19a Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Figs. 19 Figures 19a and 19b to Part 223—Chauvin Shrimp...

  7. Safety training and safe operating procedures written for PBFA (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator) II and applicable to other pulsed power facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, G.L.; Goldstein, S.A.

    1986-12-01

    To ensure that work in advancing pulsed power technology is performed with an acceptably low risk, pulsed power research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories must satisfy general safety guidelines established by the Department of Energy, policies and formats of the Environment, Safety, and Health (ES and H) Department, and detailed procedures formulated by the Pulsed Power Sciences Directorate. The approach to safety training and to writing safe operating procedures, and the procedures presented here are specific to the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) Facility but are applicable as guidelines to other research and development facilities which have similar hazards.

  8. Structural characterization of superconducting YBaCuO thin films, prepared by pulsed electron beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, S.; Mücke, F.; Markl, J.; Dorsch, W.; Stark, R.; Frank, K.; Strunk, H. P.; Saemann-Ischenko, G.; Christiansen, J.

    1996-09-01

    The surface morphology and the interface structure of superconducting YBaCuO thin films grown on SrTiO 3 substrates by pulsed electron beam evaporation have been studied using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The crystal structure and epitaxial orientation of the films have been analysed using X-ray diffraction. Parametric studies of the effect on the structural development of YBaCuO films of: (i) evaporation rate, (ii) deposition frequency, (iii) substrate temperature and (iv) target properties have been performed. Information has been deduced about the growth process in three aspects: (i) epitaxial growth, (ii) surface roughness and (iii) phase stability.

  9. Microwave surface resistance of YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ thin films deposited by pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGroot, D. C.; Hogan, T. P.; Kannewurf, C. R.; Buchholz, D. B.; Chang, R. P. H.; Gao, F.; Feng, M.; Nordin, R. A.

    1994-03-01

    The microwave surface resistance of superconducting YBa 2Cu 3O 7-δ thin films deposited by pulsed organometallic beam epitaxy (POMBE) has been characterized using the parallel plate transmission line resonator method. POMBE is an advanced organometric chemical vapor deposition technique where precursor vapors are precisely metered onto the substrate under computer control. In this study, the POMBE reactor was used to deposit epitaxial films of varying thickness onto LaAlO 3 substrates. The deposition procedure and surface-resistance results for films of varying thicknesses are described. The reduction of surface resistance achieved supports the use of the POMBE technique as a possible method for preparing device-quality high- Tc films and multi-layer structures.

  10. First Imaging Experiment of a Lithium Ion Battery by a Pulsed Neutron Beam at J-PARC/MLF/BL09

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, Koichi; Yonemura, Masao; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa; Parker, Joseph. Don.; Tanimori, Toru; Kamiyama, Takashi

    We obtain the transmission image of a commercial lithium ion (Li-ion) battery using a pulsed neutron beam at the beamline 09 of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. The purpose of this study is to improve the performance of the Li-ion battery by nondestructive observation of its charging and discharging. The transmission images for three charge states (3.2 V, 3.7 V, and 4.2 V) reveal differences between these three states, which we attribute to electrolyte migration. The transmission spectra show Bragg edges originating from the electrodes, current collectors, and battery vessel. Although the battery as a whole has the expected relation between the charge accumulation and the quantity of lithium amounts in the positive and negative electrodes, a portion of the battery deviates from this relation, which may imply a position dependent charging in the battery.

  11. Lifetime of anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes for high-intensity pulsed ion beam generation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, X. P.; Dong, Z. H.; Han, X. G.; Xin, J. P.; Lei, M. K.

    2007-02-15

    Generation of high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HIPIB) has been studied experimentally using polyethylene as the anode polymer in magnetically insulated ion diodes (MIDs) with an external magnetic field. The HIPIB is extracted from the anode plasma produced during the surface discharging process on polyethylene under the electrical and magnetic fields in MIDs, i.e., high-voltage surface breakdown (flashover) with bombardments by electrons. The surface morphology and the microstructure of the anode polymer are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. The surface roughening of the anode polymer results from the explosive release of trapped gases or newly formed gases under the high-voltage discharging, leaving fractured surfaces with bubble formation. The polyethylene in the surface layer degrades into low-molecular-weight polymers such as polyethylene wax and paraffin under the discharging process. Both the surface roughness and the fraction of low molecular polymers apparently increase as the discharging times are prolonged for multipulse HIPIB generation. The changes in the surface morphology and the composition of anode polymer lead to a noticeable decrease in the output of ion beam intensity, i.e., ion current density and diode voltage, accompanied with an increase in instability of the parameters with the prolonged discharge times. The diode voltage (or surface breakdown voltage of polymer) mainly depends on the surface morphology (or roughness) of anode polymers, and the ion current density on the composition of anode polymers, which account for the two stages of anode polymer degradation observed experimentally, i.e., stage I which has a steady decrease of the two parameters and stage II which shows a slow decrease, but with an enhanced fluctuation of the two parameters with increasing pulses of HIPIB generation.

  12. Radiation-Induced Centers in Lead Silicate Glasses Irradiated by Stationary and Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Konev, S. F.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced centers formed in heavy flint glasses irradiated by electron beams are investigated by the methods of optical and EPR spectroscopy. It is revealed that stable and short-living optical absorption centers of close natures are formed under irradiation by fast electrons. A correlation is established between the stable optical absorption bands and the EPR signals interpreted as signals of the (Pb2+)/h+ hole centers. The shortliving color centers are formed due to short-term distortion of the O-Pb bonds, and the stable centers are formed due to the spatial separation, thermalization, and subsequent stabilization of excited electrons and holes in tails of the localized states. Irradiation by electron beams leads to a change in the spectral characteristics of the fundamental absorption edge and, in particular, of the Urbach energy that determines the degree of structural disorder.

  13. Investigation of the ion beam emission from a pulsed power plasma device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henríquez, A.; Bhuyan, H.; Favre, M.; Retamal, M. J.; Volkmann, U.; Wyndham, E.; Chuaqui, H.

    2014-05-01

    Plasma Focus (PF) devices are well known as ion beam sources with characteristic energy among the hundreds of keV to tens of MeV. The information on ion beam energy, ion distribution and composition is essential from the viewpoint of understanding fundamental physics behind their production and acceleration and also their applications in various fields, such as surface properties modification, ion implantation, thin film deposition, semiconductor doping and ion assisted coating. An investigation from a low energy, 1.8 kJ 160 kA, Mather type plasma focus device operating with nitrogen using CR-39 detectors was conducted to study the emission of ions at different angular positions. Tracks on CR-39 detectors at different angular positions reveal the existence of angular ion anisotropy. The results obtained are comparable with the time integrated measurements using FC. Preliminary results of this work are presented.

  14. Eyesafe coherent detection wind lidar based on a beam-combined pulsed laser source.

    PubMed

    Lombard, L; Valla, M; Planchat, C; Goular, D; Augère, B; Bourdon, P; Canat, G

    2015-03-15

    We report on a coherent wind lidar built with two coherently-beam-combined fiber amplifiers. The lidar performances of the combined-amplifier and the single-amplifier are compared using two criterions: carrier-to-noise ratio and wind speed noise floor. In both cases, lidar performances are not degraded with a combined source and are close to the theoretical optimum. Combined sources are well suited to improve coherent wind lidar accuracy, range, and integration time.

  15. Method and means for measurement and control of pulsed charged beams

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, R.N.

    A beam of bunches of charged particles is controlled by generating a signal in response to the passage of a bunch and adding to that signal a phase-flipped reference signal. The sum is amplified, detected, and applied to a synchronous detector to obtain a comparison of the phase of the reference signal with the phase of the signal responsive to the bunch. The comparison provides an error signal to control bunching.

  16. The nature of glow arising in PETN monocrystals’ explosion initiated by a pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aduev, B. P.; Belokurov, G. M.; Grechin, S. S.; Liskov, I. Yu; Kalenskii, A. V.; Zvekov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The explosive decomposition of pentaerythritol tetranitrate monocrystals under the influence of a high-current electron beam (0.25 MeV, 20 ns, 15 J/cm2) was researched with the approach of high temporal resolution optic spectroscopy. We measured kinetics and emission spectra in real time scale. The thermal nature of the explosive glow was proven with the method of spectral pyrometry. The estimated temperature of the explosion is T ≈ 3000 K..

  17. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  18. Pulse stretcher

    DOEpatents

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  19. Generation of heavy ion beams using femtosecond laser pulses in the target normal sheath acceleration and radiation pressure acceleration regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; McGuffey, C.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-06-01

    Theoretical study of heavy ion acceleration from sub-micron gold foils irradiated by a short pulse laser is presented. Using two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, the time history of the laser pulse is examined in order to get insight into the laser energy deposition and ion acceleration process. For laser pulses with intensity 3 × 10 21 W / cm 2 , duration 32 fs, focal spot size 5 μm, and energy 27 J, the calculated reflection, transmission, and coupling coefficients from a 20 nm foil are 80%, 5%, and 15%, respectively. The conversion efficiency into gold ions is 8%. Two highly collimated counter-propagating ion beams have been identified. The forward accelerated gold ions have average and maximum charge-to-mass ratio of 0.25 and 0.3, respectively, maximum normalized energy 25 MeV/nucleon, and flux 2 × 10 11 ions / sr . An analytical model was used to determine a range of foil thicknesses suitable for acceleration of gold ions in the radiation pressure acceleration regime and the onset of the target normal sheath acceleration regime. The numerical simulations and analytical model point to at least four technical challenges hindering the heavy ion acceleration: low charge-to-mass ratio, limited number of ions amenable to acceleration, delayed acceleration, and high reflectivity of the plasma. Finally, a regime suitable for heavy ion acceleration has been identified in an alternative approach by analyzing the energy absorption and distribution among participating species and scaling of conversion efficiency, maximum energy, and flux with laser intensity.

  20. Radiation-Pressure Acceleration of Ion Beams Driven by Circularly Polarized Laser Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Henig, A.; Hoerlein, R.; Kiefer, D.; Jung, D.; Habs, D.; Steinke, S.; Schnuerer, M.; Sokollik, T.; Nickles, P. V.; Sandner, W.; Schreiber, J.; Hegelich, B. M.; Yan, X. Q.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Tajima, T.

    2009-12-11

    We present experimental studies on ion acceleration from ultrathin diamondlike carbon foils irradiated by ultrahigh contrast laser pulses of energy 0.7 J focused to peak intensities of 5x10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. A reduction in electron heating is observed when the laser polarization is changed from linear to circular, leading to a pronounced peak in the fully ionized carbon spectrum at the optimum foil thickness of 5.3 nm. Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations reveal that those C{sup 6+} ions are for the first time dominantly accelerated in a phase-stable way by the laser radiation pressure.