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Sample records for pulsed ultrasound cavitational

  1. Thresholds for cavitation produced in water by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Atchley, A A; Frizzell, L A; Apfel, R E; Holland, C K; Madanshetty, S; Roy, R A

    1988-09-01

    The threshold for transient cavitation produced in water by pulsed ultrasound was measured as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency at both 0.98 and 2.30 MHz. The cavitation events were detected with a passive acoustic technique which relies upon the scattering of the irradiation field by the bubble clouds associated with the events. The results indicate that the threshold is independent of pulse duration and acoustic frequency for pulses longer than approximately 10 acoustic cycles. The threshold increases for shorter pulses. The cavitation events are likely to be associated with bubble clouds rather than single bubbles.

  2. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications. PMID:27150739

  3. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p−) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p− = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p− = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p− = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  4. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 μs, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  5. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  6. Evolution of bubble clouds induced by pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy - histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, M; Hall, T L; Mycek, M-A; Fowlkes, J B

    2008-05-01

    Mechanical tissue fractionation can be achieved using successive, high-intensity ultrasound pulses in a process termed histotripsy. Histotripsy has many potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue removal is desired. The primary mechanism for histotripsy is believed to be cavitation. Using fast-gated imaging, this paper studies the evolution of a cavitating bubble cloud induced by a histotripsy pulse (10 and 14 cycles) at peak negative pressures exceeding 21MPa. Bubble clouds are generated inside a gelatin phantom and at a tissue-water interface, representing two situations encountered clinically. In both environments, the imaging results show that the bubble clouds share the same evolutionary trend. The bubble cloud and individual bubbles in the cloud were generated by the first cycle of the pulse, grew with each cycle during the pulse, and continued to grow and collapsed several hundred microseconds after the pulse. For example, the bubbles started under 10 microm, grew to 50 microm during the pulse, and continued to grow 100 microm after the pulse. The results also suggest that the bubble clouds generated in the two environments differ in growth and collapse duration, void fraction, shape, and size. This study furthers our understanding of the dynamics of bubble clouds induced by histotripsy.

  7. High speed imaging of bubble clouds generated in pulsed ultrasound cavitational therapy--histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, Mekhala; Hall, Timothy L; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-10-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical fractionation of tissue structure with sharply demarcated boundaries can be achieved using short (< 20 micros), high intensity ultrasound pulses delivered at low duty cycles. We have called this technique histotripsy. Histotripsy has potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue fractionation and/or tissue removal are desired. The primary mechanism of histotripsy is thought to be acoustic cavitation, which is supported by a temporally changing acoustic backscatter observed during the histotripsy process. In this paper, a fast-gated digital camera was used to image the hypothesized cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses. The bubble cloud was produced at a tissue-water interface and inside an optically transparent gelatin phantom which mimics bulk tissue. The imaging shows the following: (1) Initiation of a temporally changing acoustic backscatter was due to the formation of a bubble cloud; (2) The pressure threshold to generate a bubble cloud was lower at a tissue-fluid interface than inside bulk tissue; and (3) at higher pulse pressure, the bubble cloud lasted longer and grew larger. The results add further support to the hypothesis that the histotripsy process is due to a cavitating bubble cloud and may provide insight into the sharp boundaries of histotripsy lesions.

  8. Histotripsy beyond the “Intrinsic” Cavitation Threshold using Very Short Ultrasound Pulses: “Microtripsy”

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L.; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. Conventional histotripsy treatments have used longer pulses from 3 to 10 cycles wherein the lesion-producing bubble cloud generation depends on the pressure-release scattering of very high peak positive shock fronts from previously initiated, sparsely distributed bubbles (the “shock-scattering” mechanism). In our recent work, the peak negative pressure (P−) for generation of dense bubble clouds directly by a single negative half cycle, the “intrinsic threshold,” was measured. In this paper, the dense bubble clouds and resulting lesions (in RBC phantoms and canine tissues) generated by these supra-intrinsic threshold pulses were studied. A 32-element, PZT-8, 500 kHz therapy transducer was used to generate very short (< 2 cycles) histotripsy pulses at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 Hz and P− from 24.5 to 80.7 MPa. The results showed that the spatial extent of the histotripsy-induced lesions increased as the applied P− increased, and the sizes of these lesions corresponded well to the estimates of the focal regions above the intrinsic cavitation threshold, at least in the lower pressure regime (P− = 26–35 MPa). The average sizes for the smallest reproducible lesions were approximately 0.9 × 1.7 mm (lateral × axial), significantly smaller than the −6dB beamwidth of the transducer (1.8 × 4.0 mm). These results suggest that, using the intrinsic threshold mechanism, well-confined and microscopic lesions can be precisely generated and their spatial extent can be estimated based on the fraction of the focal region exceeding the intrinsic cavitation threshold. Since the supra-threshold portion of the negative half cycle can be precisely controlled, lesions considerably less than a wavelength are easily produced, hence the term “microtripsy.” PMID:24474132

  9. Histotripsy beyond the intrinsic cavitation threshold using very short ultrasound pulses: microtripsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang-Wei; Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy produces tissue fractionation through dense energetic bubble clouds generated by short, high-pressure, ultrasound pulses. Conventional histotripsy treatments have used longer pulses from 3 to 10 cycles, wherein the lesion-producing bubble cloud generation depends on the pressure-release scattering of very high peak positive shock fronts from previously initiated, sparsely distributed bubbles (the shock-scattering mechanism). In our recent work, the peak negative pressure (P-) for generation of dense bubble clouds directly by a single negative half cycle, the intrinsic threshold, was measured. In this paper, the dense bubble clouds and resulting lesions (in red blood cell phantoms and canine tissues) generated by these supra-intrinsic threshold pulses were studied. A 32-element, PZT-8, 500-kHz therapy transducer was used to generate very short (<2 cycles) histotripsy pulses at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 1 Hz and P- from 24.5 to 80.7 MPa. The results showed that the spatial extent of the histotripsy-induced lesions increased as the applied P- increased, and the sizes of these lesions corresponded well to the estimates of the focal regions above the intrinsic cavitation threshold, at least in the lower pressure regime (P- = 26 to 35 MPa). The average sizes for the smallest reproducible lesions were approximately 0.9 × 1.7 mm (lateral × axial), significantly smaller than the -6-dB beamwidth of the transducer (1.8 × 4.0 mm). These results suggest that, using the intrinsic threshold mechanism, well-confined and microscopic lesions can be precisely generated and their spatial extent can be estimated based on the fraction of the focal region exceeding the intrinsic cavitation threshold. Because the supra-threshold portion of the negative half cycle can be precisely controlled, lesions considerably less than a wavelength are easily produced, hence the term microtripsy.

  10. Inertial cavitation in theranostic nanoemulsions with simultaneous pulsed laser and low frequency ultrasound excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation is a mechanical process used for site-localized therapies such as non-invasive surgery. Initiating cavitation in tissue requires very high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-frequencies. Hence, some applications like thrombolysis require targeted contrast agents to reduce peak intensities and the potential for secondary effects. A new type of theranostic nanoemulsion has been developed as a combined ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic(PA) agent for molecular imaging and therapy. It includes a nanoscale emulsion core encapsulated with a layer of gold nanospheres at the water/ oil interface. Its optical absorption exhibits a spectrum broadened up to 1100 nm, opening the possibility that 1064 nm light can excite cavitation nuclei. If optically-excited nuclei are produced at the same time that a low-frequency US wave is at peak negative pressure, then highly localized therapies based on acoustic cavitation may be enabled at very low US pressures. We have demonstrated this concept using a low-cost, low energy, portable 1064 nm fiber laser in conjunction with a 1.24 MHz US transducer for simultaneous laser/US excitation of nanoemulsions. Active cavitation detection from backscattered signals indicated that cavitation can be initiated at very low acoustic pressures (less than 1 MPa) when laser excitation coincides with the rarefaction phase of the acoustic wave, and that no cavitation is produced when light is delivered during the compressive phase. US can sustain cavitation activity during long acoustic bursts and stimulate diffusion of the emulsion, thus increasing treatment speed. An in vitro clot model has been used to demonstrate combined US and laser excitation of the nanoemulsion for efficient thrombolysis.

  11. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s-1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  12. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s‑1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  13. Precision control of lesions by high-intensity focused ultrasound cavitation-based histotripsy through varying pulse duration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Nagaraju, Ravindra

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this experimental study was to explore the feasibility of acquiring controllable precision through varying pulse duration for lesions generated by cavitation-based histotripsy. Histotripsy uses high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region. It uses cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while minimizing heating, and has the advantages of real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. In our study, histotripsy was applied to three groups of tissue-mimicking agar samples of different stiffnesses (29.4 ± 5.3, 44.8 ± 5.9, and 66.4 ± 7.1 kPa). B-mode imaging was used first to quantify bubble cluster dimensions in both water and agar. Then, a 4.5-mm-wide square (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm in agar histotripsy experiments to estimate equivalent bubble cluster dimensions based on the histotripsyinduced damage. The 15-s exposure at each treatment location comprised 5000 sine-wave tone bursts at a spatial-peak pulseaverage intensity of 41.1 kW/cm2, with peak compressional and rarefactional pressures of 102 and 17 MPa, respectively. The results showed that bubble cluster width and length increased with pulse duration and decreased with agar stiffness. Therefore, a significant improvement in histotripsy precision could be achieved by reducing the pulse duration.

  14. Passive imaging with pulsed ultrasound insonations.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Mast, T Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Burgess, Mark T; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2012-07-01

    Previously, passive cavitation imaging has been described in the context of continuous-wave high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation. However, the technique has potential use as a feedback mechanism for pulsed-wave therapies, such as ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. In this paper, results of experiments and simulations are reported to demonstrate the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging using pulsed ultrasound insonations and how the images depend on pulsed ultrasound parameters. The passive cavitation images were formed from channel data that was beamformed in the frequency domain. Experiments were performed in an invitro flow phantom with an experimental echo contrast agent, echogenic liposomes, as cavitation nuclei. It was found that the pulse duration and envelope have minimal impact on the image resolution achieved. The passive cavitation image amplitude scales linearly with the cavitation emission energy. Cavitation images for both stable and inertial cavitation can be obtained from the same received data set.

  15. Measurement of the cavitation pattern by two non-intrusive techniques: laser imaging and ultrasound pulsed echography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, Alberto; Di Felice, Fabio; Pereira, Francisco A.

    2013-03-01

    We propose the use of ultrasound pulsed echography (UPE) for the mapping of the leading edge cavitation pattern, in view of its application to full-scale measurements on propeller blades aboard a ship in actual service. Measurements are done on a two-dimensional NACA16009 hydrofoil, and a comparison is performed against a well-tested technique based on laser light scattering imaging. On a reference solid surface, the mean location of the surface is recovered within ±0.5 % of the foil maximum thickness, against ±0.1 % for the imaging technique. In terms of uncertainty, UPE displays error levels four to six times higher with respect to the reference imaging data. In presence of cavitation, the UPE approach tends to overestimate the thickness dimension of the vapor volume as a result of its sensitivity to noise scattering from wall reverberation and from particles in the bulk fluid. However, the overall performance is highly satisfactory for a potential use in a full-scale context, and specific improvements are suggested to fulfill this long-term goal.

  16. Relationship between cavitation and loss of echogenicity from ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Raymond, Jason L; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pulse-duration dependent pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation. Previous studies have demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs as a function of pulse duration. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the on-screen echogenicity in clinical applications. Two lipid-shelled UCAs, echogenic liposomes (ELIP) and Definity®, were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations (“sample volumes”) in both a static system and a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a passive cavitation detection system and stable and inertial cavitation thresholds ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity® was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. A numerical model based on UCA rupture predicted the functional form of the loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity®. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were found to have a weak dependence on pulse duration. Stable cavitation thresholds were lower than inertial cavitation thresholds. The power of cavitation emissions was an exponential function of the loss of echogenicity over the investigated range of acoustic pressures. Both ELIP and Definity® lost more than 80% echogenicity before the onset of stable or inertial cavitation. Once this level of echogenicity loss occurred, both stable and inertial cavitation were detected in the physiologic flow phantom. These results imply that stable and

  17. Control of inertial acoustic cavitation in pulsed sonication using a real-time feedback loop system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, Cyril; Poizat, Adrien; Gilles, Bruno; Inserra, Claude; Bera, Jean-Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Owing to the complex behavior of ultrasound-induced bubble clouds (nucleation, linear and nonlinear oscillations, collapse), acoustic cavitation remains a hardly controllable phenomenon, leading to poorly reproducible ultrasound-based therapies. A better control of the various aspects of cavitation phenomena for in vivo applications is a key requirement to improve emerging ultrasound therapies. Previous publications have reported on systems performing regulation of acoustic cavitation in continuous sonication when applied in vitro, but the main challenge today is to achieve real-time control of cavitation activity in pulsed sonication when used in vivo. The present work aims at developing a system to control acoustic cavitation in a pulsed wave condition using a real-time feedback loop. The experimental setup consists of a water bath in which is submerged a focused transducer (pulsed waves, frequency 550 kHz) used for sonication and a hydrophone used to listen to inertial cavitation. The designed regulation process allows the cavitation activity to be controlled through a 300 μs feedback loop. Without regulation, cavitation exhibits numerous bursts of intense activity and large variations of inertial cavitation level over time. In a regulated regime, the control of inertial cavitation activity within a pulse leads to consistent cavitation levels over time with an enhancement of the reproducibility.

  18. Relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified by spectral Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability in the United States and worldwide. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are theragonistic ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) being developed for the early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Stability of the echogenicity of ELIP in physiologic conditions is crucial to their successful translation to clinical use. The stability of ELIP echogenicity was determined in vitro under physiologic conditions of total dissolved gas concentration, temperature, and hydrodynamic pressure in porcine plasma and whole blood. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Previous studies have also demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the on-screen echogenicity in clinical applications. ELIP were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations and four PRFs in a static fluid and in a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) system and a passive cavitation imaging (PCI) system. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. Stable cavitation thresholds were found to be lower than inertial

  19. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the ‘bubble removal pulse.’ Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 – 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  20. HIFU-Induced Hyperecho in Ultrasound Images, Cavitation Activity and Thermal Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabkin, Brian A.; Zderic, Vesna; Vaezy, Shahram

    2005-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of soft tissues has been shown to result in a hyperechoic region in B-mode ultrasound (US) images. This is believed to result from bubble activity at the HIFU focus. Here we report our in vivo results of detecting inertial and stable cavitation in correlation with the appearance of a hyperechoic region, along with in vitro confirmation of these results that included measurement of the temperature at the HIFU focus. The ultrasound system consisted of a HIFU transducer (3.3 MHz), a broadband A-mode transducer for active and passive cavitation detection (ACD and PCD), and an US-imaging probe that were all co-focal and synchronized. HIFU, at in situ intensities of 220- 1,710 W/cm2, was applied for 10 s to pig muscles in vivo or polyacrylamide in vitro at a focal depth of 2 cm. A thermocouple placed at the HIFU focus was added to the above system during the in vitro portion of this study. ACD and PCD results showed a strong correlation between the onset of cavitation and the appearance of a hyperechoic region. In vivo PCD results showed that inertial cavitation typically occurred prior (within 0.5 s) to the appearance of a hyperechoic region. In vitro PCD results show that inertial cavitation occurred at or within 1-2 pulses prior to the appearance of a hyperechoic region and typically preceded rapid heating up to 110 °C at the HIFU focus within 1-2 pulses. The observed cavitation activity suggests that bubbles are present during the formation of a hyperechoic region at the HIFU focus and that boiling occurs rapidly after the onset of cavitation. Further investigation is needed to determine if the hyperechoic region in the US image originates from bubbles formed during cavitation alone or during cavitation-induced boiling.

  1. Control of cavitation activity by different shockwave pulsing regimes.

    PubMed

    Huber, P; Debus, J; Jöchle, K; Simiantonakis, I; Jenne, J; Rastert, R; Spoo, J; Lorenz, W J; Wannenmacher, M

    1999-06-01

    The aim of the study was to control the number of inertial cavitation bubbles in the focal area of an electromagnetic lithotripter in water independently of peak intensity, averaged intensity or pressure waveform. To achieve this, the shockwave pulses were applied in double pulse sequences, which were administered at a fixed pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.33 Hz. The two pulses of a double pulse were separated by a variable short pulse separation time (PST) ranging from 200 micros to 1500 ms. The number and size of the cavitation bubbles were monitored by scattered laser light and stroboscopic photographs. We found that the number of inertial cavitation bubbles as a measure of cavitation dose was substantially influenced by variation of the PST, while the pressure pulse waveform, averaged acoustic intensity and bubble size were kept constant. The second pulse of each double pulse generated more cavitation bubbles than the first. At 14 kV capacitor voltage, the total number of cavitation bubbles generated by the double pulses increased with shorter PST down to approximately 400 micros, the cavitation lifespan. The results can be explained by cavitation nuclei generated by the violently imploding inertial cavitation bubbles. This method of pulse administration and cavitation monitoring could be useful to establish a cavitation dose-effect relationship independently of other acoustic parameters.

  2. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  3. Effect of controlled offset of focal position in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kota; Takagi, Ryo; Miyashita, Takuya; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive treatment for tumors such as cancer. In this method, ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused to the target tissue. Therefore, physical and mental stresses on the patient are minimal. A drawback of the HIFU treatment is a long treatment time for a large tumor due to the small therapeutic volume by a single exposure. Enhancing the heating effect of ultrasound by cavitation bubbles may solve this problem. However, this is rather difficult because cavitation clouds tend to be formed backward from the focal point while ultrasonic intensity for heating is centered at the focal point. In this study, the focal points of the trigger pulses to generate cavitation were offset forward from those of the heating ultrasound to match the cavitation clouds with the heating patterns. Results suggest that the controlled offset of focal points makes the thermal coagulation more predictable.

  4. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  5. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order

  6. Regulating Ultrasound Cavitation in order to Induce Reproducible Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; El Maalouf, J.; Béra, J.-C.; Gilles, B.

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation would be linked to cavitation, which generally appears to be a non reproducible and unstationary phenomenon. In order to obtain an acceptable trade-off between cell mortality and transfection, a regulated cavitation generator based on an acoustical cavitation measurement was developed and tested. The medium to be sonicated is placed in a sample tray. This tray is immersed in in degassed water and positioned above the face of a flat ultrasonic transducer (frequency: 445 kHz; intensity range: 0.08-1.09 W/cm2). This technical configuration was admitted to be conducive to standing-wave generation through reflection at the air/medium interface in the well thus enhancing the cavitation phenomenon. Laterally to the transducer, a homemade hydrophone was oriented to receive the acoustical signal from the bubbles. From this spectral signal recorded at intervals of 5 ms, a cavitation index was calculated as the mean of the cavitation spectrum integration in a logarithmic scale, and the excitation power is automatically corrected. The device generates stable and reproducible cavitation level for a wide range of cavitation setpoint from stable cavitation condition up to full-developed inertial cavitation. For the ultrasound intensity range used, the time delay of the response is lower than 200 ms. The cavitation regulation device was evaluated in terms of chemical bubble collapse effect. Hydroxyl radical production was measured on terephthalic acid solutions. In open loop, the results present a great variability whatever the excitation power. On the contrary the closed loop allows a great reproducibility. This device was implemented for study of sonodynamic effect. The regulation provides more reproducible results independent of cell medium and experimental conditions (temperature, pressure). Other applications of this regulated cavitation device concern internalization of different particles (Quantum Dot) molecules (SiRNA) or plasmids (GFP, DsRed) into different

  7. Loss of echogenicity and onset of cavitation from echogenic liposomes: pulse repetition frequency independence

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are being developed for the early detection and treatment of atherosclerotic lesions. An 80% loss of echogenicity of ELIP (Radhakrishnan et al. 2013) has been shown to be concomitant with the onset of stable and inertial cavitation. The ultrasound pressure amplitude at which this occurs is weakly dependent on pulse duration. Smith et al. (2007) have reported that the rapid fragmentation threshold of ELIP (based on changes in echogenicity) is dependent on the insonation pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The current study evaluates the relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from ELIP insonified by duplex Doppler pulses at four PRFs (1.25 kHz, 2.5 kHz, 5 kHz, and 8.33 kHz). Loss of echogenicity was evaluated on B-mode images of ELIP. Cavitation emissions from ELIP were recorded passively on a focused single-element transducer and a linear array. Emissions recorded by the linear array were beamformed and the spatial widths of stable and inertial cavitation emissions were compared to the calibrated azimuthal beamwidth of the Doppler pulse exceeding the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds. The inertial cavitation thresholds had a very weak dependence on PRF and stable cavitation thresholds were independent of PRF. The spatial widths of the cavitation emissions recorded by the passive cavitation imaging system agreed with the calibrated Doppler beamwidths. The results also show that 64%–79% loss of echogenicity can be used to classify the presence or absence of cavitation emissions with greater than 80% accuracy. PMID:25438849

  8. Cavitation in ultrasound and shockwave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic waves, especially high-intensity ultrasound and shock waves, are used for medical imaging and intra- and extra-corporeal manipulation of cells, tissue, and urinary calculi. Waves are currently used to treat kidney stone disease, plantar fasciitis, and bone nonunion, and they are being investigated as a technique to ablate cancer tumors and mediate drug delivery. In many applications, acoustic waves induce the expansion and collapse of preexisting or newly cavitating bubbles whose presence can either mediate the generation of localized stresses or lead to collateral damage, depending on how effectively they can be controlled. We describe efforts aimed at simulating the collapse of bubbles, both individually and in clusters, with the aim to characterize the induced mechanical stresses and strains. To simulate collapse of one or a few bubbles, compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations of multi-component materials are performed with WENO-based shock and interface capturing schemes. Repetitive insonification generates numerous bubbles that are difficult to resolve numerically. Such clouds are also important in traditional engineering applications such as caveating hydrofoils. Models that incorporate the dynamics of an unresolved dispersed phase consisting of the bubble cloud are also developed. The results of several model problems including bubble collapse near rigid surfaces, bubble collapse near compliant surfaces and in small capillaries are analyzed. The results are processed to determine the potential for micron-sized preexisting gas bubbles to damage capillaries. The translation of the fundamental fluid dynamics into improvements in the design and clinical application of shockwave lithotripters will be discussed. NIH Grant PO1-DK043881.

  9. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  10. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  11. Effects of Ultrasound Frequency and Tissue Stiffness on the Histotripsy Intrinsic Threshold for Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Mancia, Lauren; Singh, Rahul; Putnam, Andrew J.; Fowlkes, Brian; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has demonstrated a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude directly exceeds a pressure threshold intrinsic to the medium. We hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold in water-based tissues is determined by the properties of the water inside the tissue and changes in tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency will have a minimal impact on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold. To test this hypothesis, the histotripsy intrinsic threshold was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of cavitation was measured by subjecting tissue phantoms with adjustable mechanical properties and ex vivo tissues to a histotripsy pulse of 1–2 cycles produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured vs. pressure amplitude. The results demonstrated that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which probability=0.5) is independent of stiffness for Young’s moduli (E) < 1 MPa with only a small increase (~2–3 MPa) in the intrinsic threshold for tendon (E=380 MPa). Additionally, results for all samples showed only a small increase of ~2–3 MPa when the frequency was increased from 345 kHz to 3 MHz. The intrinsic threshold was measured to be between 24.7–30.6 MPa for all samples and frequencies tested in this study. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the intrinsic threshold to initiate a histotripsy bubble cloud is not significantly impacted by tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency in hundreds of kHz to MHz range. PMID:25766571

  12. Variations of bubble cavitation and temperature elevation during lesion formation by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in both thermal ablations for solid tumor/cancer and soft-tissue fragmentation. Mechanical and thermal effects, which play an important role in the HIFU treatment simultaneously, are dependent on the operating parameters and may vary with the progress of therapy. Mechanical erosion in the shape of a "squid," a "dumbbell" lesion with both mechanical and thermal lesions, or a "tadpole" lesion with mechanical erosion at the center and thermal necrosis on the boundary in the transparent gel phantom could be produced correspondingly with the pulse duration of 5-30 ms, which is much longer than histotripsy burst but shorter than the time for tissue boiling, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.2-5 Hz. Meanwhile, variations of bubble cavitation (both inertial and stable cavitation) and temperature elevation in the focal region (i.e., z = -2.5, 0, and 2.5 mm) were measured by passive cavitation detection (PCD) and thermocouples during the therapeutic procedure, respectively. Stable cavitation increased with the pulse duration, PRF, and the number of pulses delivered. However, inertial cavitation was found to increase initially and then decrease with long pulse duration and high PRF. Temperature in the pre-focal region is always higher than those at the focal and post-focal position in all tests. Great variations of PCD signals and temperature elevation are due to the generation and persistence of large bubble, which is resistant to collapse and occurs with the increase of pulse duration and PRF. Similar lesion pattern and variations were also observed in ex vivo porcine kidneys. Hyperechoes in the B-mode ultrasound image were comparable to the shape and size of lesions in the dissected tissue. Thermal lesion volume increased with the increase of pulse duration and PRF, but mechanical erosion reached its maximum volume with the pulse duration of 20 ms and PRF of 1

  13. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-01-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. The in vivo measurements were made under different combinations of HIFU treatment depths, laser wavelengths, and HIFU durations. The results demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to enhance cavitation effect by reducing cavitation threshold in vivo. PMID:23653486

  14. Diagnostic Ultrasound Induced Inertial Cavitation to Non-Invasively Restore Coronary and Microvascular Flow in Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Feng; Gao, Shunji; Wu, Juefei; Lof, John; Radio, Stanley; Vignon, Francois; Shi, William; Powers, Jeffry; Unger, Evan; Everbach, E. Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Porter, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound induced cavitation has been explored as a method of dissolving intravascular and microvascular thrombi in acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to determine the type of cavitation required for success, and whether longer pulse duration therapeutic impulses (sustaining the duration of cavitation) could restore both microvascular and epicardial flow with this technique. Accordingly, in 36 hyperlipidemic atherosclerotic pigs, thrombotic occlusions were induced in the mid-left anterior descending artery. Pigs were then randomized to either a) ½ dose tissue plasminogen activator (0.5 mg/kg) alone; or same dose plasminogen activator and an intravenous microbubble infusion with either b) guided high mechanical index short pulse (2.0 MI; 5 usec) therapeutic ultrasound impulses; or c) guided 1.0 mechanical index long pulse (20 usec) impulses. Passive cavitation detectors indicated the high mechanical index impulses (both long and short pulse duration) induced inertial cavitation within the microvasculature. Epicardial recanalization rates following randomized treatments were highest in pigs treated with the long pulse duration therapeutic impulses (83% versus 59% for short pulse, and 49% for tissue plasminogen activator alone; p<0.05). Even without epicardial recanalization, however, early microvascular recovery occurred with both short and long pulse therapeutic impulses (p<0.005 compared to tissue plasminogen activator alone), and wall thickening improved within the risk area only in pigs treated with ultrasound and microbubbles. We conclude that although short pulse duration guided therapeutic impulses from a diagnostic transducer transiently improve microvascular flow, long pulse duration therapeutic impulses produce sustained epicardial and microvascular re-flow in acute myocardial infarction. PMID:23922797

  15. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. Methods: The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30–110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. Results: When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was −3.4 ± 2.1 mm and −0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small

  16. PASSIVE CAVITATION DETECTION DURING PULSED HIFU EXPOSURES OF EX VIVO TISSUES AND IN VIVO MOUSE PANCREATIC TUMORS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been demonstrated to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rarefactional focal pressures (1–12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms, pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KPC mice and closely recapitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50 % cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5–10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but ex vivo it decreased rapidly and stopped over the first few pulses

  17. Passive cavitation detection during pulsed HIFU exposures of ex vivo tissues and in vivo mouse pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been shown to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rare factional focal pressures (1-12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms and pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KrasLSL.G12 D/+; p53 R172 H/+; PdxCretg/+ (KPC) mice and closely re-capitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50% cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5-10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but it decreased rapidly and stopped

  18. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40 μs and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2 kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further.

  19. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40 μs and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2 kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further. PMID:25994689

  20. Optimization of Ultrasound Parameters of Myocardial Cavitation Microlesions for Therapeutic Application

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Owens, Gabe E.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent high intensity ultrasound scanning with contrast microbubbles can induce scattered cavitation microlesions in the myocardium, which may be of value for tissue reduction therapy. Anesthetized rats were treated in a heated water bath with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound pulses, guided by an 8 MHz imaging transducer. The relative efficacy with 2 or 4 MPa pulses, 1:4 or 1:8 trigger intervals and 5 or 10 cycle pulses was explored in 6 groups. ECG premature complexes (PCs) induced by the triggered pulse bursts were counted, and Evans blue stained cardiomyocyte scores (SCSs) were obtained. The increase from 2 to 4 MPa produced significant increases in PCs and SCSs, and eliminated an anticipated decline in the rate of PC induction with time, which might hinder therapeutic efficacy. Increased intervals and pulse durations did not yield significant increases in the effects. The results suggest that cavitation microlesion production can be refined and potentially lead to a clinically robust therapeutic method. PMID:24613640

  1. Exploring the Acoustic Parameter Space in Ultrasound Therapy: Defining the Threshold for Cavitational Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieran, Kathleen; Hall, Timothy L.; Parsons, Jessica E.; Wolf, J. Stuart; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2007-05-01

    Focused ultrasound energy is capable of noninvasively, nonthermally ablating tissue. However, the relative contributions of thermal and cavitational effects in the therapeutic use of ultrasound are poorly understood. We sought to identify the ultrasound parameter space within which tissue can be ablated by solely mechanical means (cavitation), without a significant thermal component. Methods: Ultrasound energy (750 kHz, 20 microsecond pulses) was applied sequentially in a 3×3 grid configuration to the cortical tissue of ex vivo porcine kidneys submerged in degassed water. While maintaining constant energy density, intensity (0.11-211 kW/cm2) and duty cycle (0.04%-CW) were varied widely. A thermocouple co-localized with the center of each grid provided continuous temperature measurements. Following ablations, the kidneys were examined grossly and histologically. Results: Ablated tissue was classified into one of four discrete morphologic categories: blanched (firm, pale, desiccated tissue), disrupted (cavity containing thin, isochromatic liquid; no blanching), mixed blanched/disrupted (cavity containing pale, thick liquid; minimal blanching), and no grossly visible effect. Morphologically similar lesions clustered together within the ultrasound parameter space. Disrupted lesions had significantly lower maximal temperatures (44.2 °C) than desiccated (67.5 °C; p<0.0001) or mixed (59.4 °C; p<0.0001) lesions. Conclusions: In an ex vivo model, we have defined the ultrasound parameters within which mechanical tissue ablation, with minimal thermal components, is possible. Future research in vivo is directed toward optimizing the parameters for cavitational tissue ablation, and better understanding the impact of tissue perfusion on lesion generation and intralesional temperature rise.

  2. Sonoluminescence characterization of inertial cavitation inside a BSA phantom treated by pulsed HIFU.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Chang, Nan; Xu, Shanshan; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inertial cavitation inside a phantom treated by pulsed HIFU (pHIFU). Basic bovine serum albumin (BSA) phantoms without any inherent ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) or phase-shift nano-emulsions (PSNEs) were used. During the treatment, sonoluminescence (SL) recordings were performed to characterize the spatial distribution of inertial cavitation adjacent to the focal region. High-speed photographs and thermal coagulations, comparing with the SL results, were also recorded and presented. A series of pulse parameters (pulse duration (PD) was between 1 and 23 cycles and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) was between 0.5kHz and 100kHz) were performed to make a systematic investigation under certain acoustic power (APW). Continuous HIFU (cHIFU) investigation was also performed to serve as control group. It was found that, when APW was 19.5W, pHIFU with short PD was much easier to form SL adjacent to the focal region inside the phantom, while it was difficult for cHIFU to generate cavitation bubbles. With appropriate PD and PRF, the residual bubbles of the previous pulses could be stimulated by the incident pulses to oscillate in a higher level and even violently collapse, resulting to enhanced physical thermogenesis. The experimental results showed that the most violent inertial cavitation occurs when PD was set to 6 cycles (5μs) and PRF to 10kHz, while the highest level of thermal coagulation was observed when PD was set to 10 cycles. The cavitational and thermal characteristics were in good correspondence, exhibiting significant potentiality regarding to inject-free cavitation bubble enhanced thermal ablation under lower APW, compared to the conventional thermotherapy. PMID:27150756

  3. Sonoluminescence characterization of inertial cavitation inside a BSA phantom treated by pulsed HIFU.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Chang, Nan; Xu, Shanshan; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inertial cavitation inside a phantom treated by pulsed HIFU (pHIFU). Basic bovine serum albumin (BSA) phantoms without any inherent ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) or phase-shift nano-emulsions (PSNEs) were used. During the treatment, sonoluminescence (SL) recordings were performed to characterize the spatial distribution of inertial cavitation adjacent to the focal region. High-speed photographs and thermal coagulations, comparing with the SL results, were also recorded and presented. A series of pulse parameters (pulse duration (PD) was between 1 and 23 cycles and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) was between 0.5kHz and 100kHz) were performed to make a systematic investigation under certain acoustic power (APW). Continuous HIFU (cHIFU) investigation was also performed to serve as control group. It was found that, when APW was 19.5W, pHIFU with short PD was much easier to form SL adjacent to the focal region inside the phantom, while it was difficult for cHIFU to generate cavitation bubbles. With appropriate PD and PRF, the residual bubbles of the previous pulses could be stimulated by the incident pulses to oscillate in a higher level and even violently collapse, resulting to enhanced physical thermogenesis. The experimental results showed that the most violent inertial cavitation occurs when PD was set to 6 cycles (5μs) and PRF to 10kHz, while the highest level of thermal coagulation was observed when PD was set to 10 cycles. The cavitational and thermal characteristics were in good correspondence, exhibiting significant potentiality regarding to inject-free cavitation bubble enhanced thermal ablation under lower APW, compared to the conventional thermotherapy.

  4. Alternative approach for cavitation damage study utilizing repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation is a common phenomenon in fluid systems that can lead to dramatic degradation of solid materials surface in contact with the cavitating media. Study of cavitation damage has great significance in many engineering fields. Current techniques for cavitation damage study either require large scale equipments or tend to introduce damages from other mechanisms. In this project, we utilized the cavitation phenomenon induced by laser optical breakdown and developed a prototype apparatus for cavitation damage study. In our approach, cavitation was generated by the repetitive pressure waves induced by high-power laser pulses. As proof of principal study, stainless steel and aluminum samples were tested using the novel apparatus. Surface characterization via scanning electron microscopy revealed damages such as indentation and surface pitting, which were similar to those reported in literature using other state-of-the-art techniques. These preliminary results demonstrated the new device was capable of generating cavitation damages and could be used as an alternative method for cavitation damage study.

  5. Suitability research on the cavitation model and numerical simulation of the unsteady pulsed cavitation jet flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. Y.; Yu, X. F.; Luan, D. Y.; Qu, Y. P.; Zhou, C.

    2016-05-01

    In order to explore the cavitation jet mechanism, it can first study its critical state of single-phase flow before cavity occurrence to explore the trend of pulsed cavitation jet. Then select the cavitation model to simulate the complex multiphase flow state. Such a step-by-step approach is beneficial to advance research reliably and steady, relying on the foundation for further solving the problem. Three turbulence models such as Euler Hybrid Model, Euler Two Phase Model and Euler Lagrange Model are discussed on their suitability. In this paper, it states only RNG k- ε turbulent model can simulate small scale vortex of jet in the transient simulation. Grid independent verification and the effect of time step is presented. The simulation results show that a large scale vortex ring surrounding jet flow in the nozzle, the pressure of vortex core is slightly lower than the upstream nozzle pressure. Considering the capture ability of small scale eddies, an equivalent pressure is established. The single-phase flow turbulence model is modified to simulate the turbulence flow in the self-excited pulsed cavitation after the cavitation occurs. Through different results comparison of not modified cavitation model and the modified cavitation model to the experimental results, it proves that the latter simulation results are relatively accurate.

  6. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  7. The disruption of tissue structure using high intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian; Parsons, Jessica E.; Xu, Zhen; Cooper, Michol; Tran, Binh C.; Hall, Timothy L.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.

    2005-04-01

    Recent investigations of pulsed ultrasound at high acoustic intensities have revealed a regime in which significant breakdown of tissue structure can be achieved. This therapeutic modality, which might be termed histotripsy, is dependent on the presence of highly active cavitation evidenced by significant temporal fluctuations in acoustic backscatter. In the presence of tissue interfaces, erosion can result yielding, for example, well-defined perforations potentially useful in creating temporary shunts for the treatment of hypoplastic left heart syndrome. When applied in bulk tissue, the process results in a near emulsification with little structural integrity remaining or chance of cellular survival. In each case, the process is dependent on acoustic parameters of the field to not only produce damage for a given pulse but also to sustain the cavitation nuclei population for subsequent pulses. Fluctuations in acoustic backscatter indicate both initiation and extinction of the appropriate cavitation activity during application of therapeutic ultrasound, which leads to a potential feedback mechanism to minimize acoustic exposure. This presentation will discuss the observed tissue damage as affected by acoustic parameters and the ability to monitor the presence of cavitation activity expected to be responsible for these effects. [Work supported by NIH grants RO1 RR14450.

  8. Mechanotransduction of Ultrasound is Frequency Dependent Below the Cavitation Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Tobias M.; Budhiraja, Gaurav; Viljoen, Hendrik J.; Subramanian, Anuradha

    2013-01-01

    This study provides evidence that low-intensity ultrasound directly affects nuclear processes, and the magnitude of the effect varies with frequency. In particular, we show that the transcriptional induction of first load-inducible genes, which is independent of new protein synthesis, is frequency dependent. Bovine chondrocytes were exposed to low-intensity below the cavitational threshold) ultrasound at 2,5 and 8 MHz. Ultrasound elevated the expression of early response genes c-Fos, c-Jun and c-Myc, maximized at 5 MHz. The phosphorylated ERK inhibitor PD98059 abrogated any increase in c-series gene expression, suggesting that signaling occurs via the MAPPK/ERK pathway. However, phosphorylated ERK levels did not change with ultrasound frequency, indicating that processes downstream of ERK phosphorylation (such as nuclear transport and chromatin reorganization) respond to ultrasound with frequency dependence. A quantitative, biphasic mathematical model based on Biot theory predicted that cytoplasmic and nuclear stress is maximized at 5.2 ± 0.8 MHz for a chondrocyte, confirming experimental measurements. PMID:23562015

  9. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W.

  10. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W. PMID:16571378

  11. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  12. Identifying the Inertial Cavitation Pressure Threshold and Skull Effects in a Vessel Phantom Using Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James J.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2010-03-01

    Using Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been shown promising for brain drug delivery. However, the exact mechanism behind the opening remains unknown. Here, the effects of the murine skull on the threshold of inertial cavitation were investigated. In order to investigate the pressure threshold for inertial cavitation of preformed microbubbles during sonication, passive cavitation detection in conjunction with B-mode imaging was used. A cylindrical vessel with a 610-μm diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel was generated within a polyacrylamide gel to simulate large blood vessels. Definity® (Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA) microbubbles with a 1.1-3.3 μm in diameter at 2.5×107 bubbles/mL were injected into the channel before sonication (frequency: 1.525 MHz; pulse length: 100 cycles; PRF: 10 Hz; sonication duration: 2 s) through an excised mouse skull. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, acted as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold. A 7.5 MHz linear array with the field-of-view perpendicular to the axial length of the FUS beam was also used to image the occurrence of bubble fragmentation. The broadband spectral response acquired at the passive cavitation detector (PCD) and the B-mode images identified the occurrence and location of the inertial cavitation, respectively. Findings indicated that the peak-rarefactional pressure threshold was approximately equal to 0.45 MPa at the presence or the absence of the skull. However, the skull induced 10-50% lower inertial cavitation dose. Mouse skulls did not affect the pressure threshold of inertial cavitation but resulted in a lower inertial cavitation dose. The broadband response could be captured through the murine skull, so the same PCD setup can be used in future in vivo applications.

  13. Exploiting flow to control the in vitro spatiotemporal distribution of microbubble-seeded acoustic cavitation activity in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Bonaccorsi, Simone; Choi, James J.

    2014-11-01

    Focused ultrasound and microbubbles have been extensively used to generate therapeutic bioeffects. Despite encouraging in vivo results, there remains poor control of the magnitude and spatial distribution of these bioeffects due to the limited ability of conventional pulse shapes and sequences to control cavitation dynamics. Thus current techniques are restricted by an efficacy-safety trade-off. The primary aim of the present study was to incorporate the presence of flow in the design of new short pulse sequences, which can more uniformly distribute the cavitation activity. Microbubbles flowing (fluid velocity: 10 mm s-1) through a 300 μm tube were sonicated with a focused 0.5 MHz transducer while acoustic emissions were captured with an inserted focused 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector. The two foci were co-axially aligned and their focal points were overlapped. Whereas conventional sequences are composed of a long burst (>10 000 cycles) emitted at a low burst repetition frequency (<10 Hz), we decomposed this burst into short pulses by adding intervals to facilitate inter-pulse microbubble movement. To evaluate how this sequence influenced cavitation distribution, we emitted short pulses (peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 40-366 kPa, pulse length (PL): 5-25 cycles) at high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF: 0.625-10 kHz) for a burst length of 100 ms. Increased cavitation persistence, implied by the duration of the microbubble acoustic emissions, was a measure of improved distribution due to the presence of flow. Sonication at lower acoustic pressures, longer pulse intervals and lower PLs improved the spatial distribution of cavitation. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the microbubble emissions revealed that the improvement at low pressures is due to persisting stable cavitation. In conclusion, new short-pulse sequences were shown to improve spatiotemporal control of acoustic cavitation dynamics during physiologically relevant flow. This

  14. Sonosensitive nanoparticles for controlled instigation of cavitation and drug delivery by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaffe, Sarah J.; Schiffter, Heiko A.; Arora, Manish; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2012-10-01

    Reliable instigation of cavitation in-vivo during ultrasound therapy is notoriously difficult. Lowering the peak rarefractional pressure required to initiate cavitation (the cavitation threshold) has been previously addressed using ultrasound contrast agents in the form of encapsulated stabilized micron scale bubbles. These agents lack stability and are generally too large to extravasate into tumours and other target tissues. Solid nanoparticles are proposed as novel cavitation nucleation agents, which overcome these limitations. Such agents are manufactured to achieve high surface roughness and hydrophobicity, facilitating air entrapment upon drying, thus harboring an abundance of cavitation nucleation sites. These nanoparticulate nucleating agents have been found to lower the cavitation threshold significantly in aqueous biological media, enabling reproducible cavitation activity during repeated exposure to therapeutic ultrasound. This paper investigates the engineering of core-shell nanoparticles and examines their ability to initiate inertial cavitation in the context of ultrasound-enhanced localized drug delivery for cancer. Core-shell nanoparticles have been found to decrease the peak focal pressure where the probability of cavitation is greater than 0.5, by factors of five- to ten-fold, dependent on particle size, total surface area and surface morphology.

  15. The use of twinkling artifact of Doppler imaging to monitor cavitation in tissue during high intensity focused ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana; Li, Tong; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy, it is important to monitor the presence and activity of microbubbles in tissue during treatment. The current methods, - passive cavitation detection (PCD) and B-mode imaging - have limited sensitivity, especially to small-size, non-violently-collapsing microbubbles. Here, a new method for microbubble detection is proposed, based on “twinkling” artifact (TA) of Doppler imaging. TA occurs when Color Doppler ultrasound is used to image hard objects in tissue (e.g., kidney stones), and is displayed as brightly colored spots. As demonstrated recently, TA can be explained by irregular scattering of the Doppler ensemble pulses from the fluctuating microbubbles trapped in crevices of the kidney stone. In this work, TA was used to detect cavitation in tissue and in polyacrylamide gel phantoms during pulsed 1 MHz HIFU exposures with different peak negative pressures (1.5–11 MPa). At each pressure level, the probability of cavitation occurrence was characterized using TA and the broadband signals recorded by PCD, aligned confocally with the HIFU transducer. The results indicate that TA is more sensitive to the onset of cavitation than conventional PCD detection, and allows for accurate spatial localization of the bubbles. Work supported by RFBR and NIH (EB007643, 1K01EB015745, R01CA154451). PMID:26185591

  16. Numerical simulation of cavitation bubble dynamics induced by ultrasound waves in a high frequency reactor.

    PubMed

    Servant, G; Caltagirone, J P; Gérard, A; Laborde, J L; Hita, A

    2000-10-01

    The use of high frequency ultrasound in chemical systems is of major interest to optimize chemical procedures. Characterization of an open air 477 kHz ultrasound reactor shows that, because of the collapse of transient cavitation bubbles and pulsation of stable cavitation bubbles, chemical reactions are enhanced. Numerical modelling is undertaken to determine the spatio-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles. The calculus of the emergence of cavitation bubbles due to the acoustic driving (by taking into account interactions between the sound field and bubbles' distribution) gives a cartography of bubbles' emergence within the reactor. Computation of their motion induced by the pressure gradients occurring in the reactor show that they migrate to the pressure nodes. Computed bubbles levitation sites gives a cartography of the chemical activity of ultrasound. Modelling of stable cavitation bubbles' motion induced by the motion of the liquid gives some insight on degassing phenomena. PMID:11062879

  17. Microbubble Cavitation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, William T.; Powers, Jeffry E.; Everbach, E. Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Gao, Shunji; Xie, Feng; Porter, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications such as sonothrombolysis (STL) in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (moderate oscillations, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation) and activity level in and around a treatment area. Acoustic passive cavitation detectors (PCDs) have been used to this end but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2-D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and activity level in a region of interest. Similar to PCDs, the cavitation imaging described here is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, whereas elevated noise bands indicate inertial cavitation; the absence of both indicates moderate oscillations. The prototype system is a modified commercially available ultrasound scanner with a sector imaging probe. The lateral resolution of the system is 1.5 mm at a focal depth of 3 cm, and the axial resolution is 3 cm for a therapy pulse length of 20 µs. The maximum frame rate of the prototype is 2 Hz. The system has been used for assessing and mapping the relative importance of the different cavitation states of a microbubble contrast agent. In vitro (tissue-mimicking flow phantom) and in vivo (heart, liver, and brain of two swine) results for cavitation states and their changes as a function of acoustic amplitude are presented. PMID:23549527

  18. Histological and Ultrastructural Effects of Ultrasound-induced Cavitation on Human Skin Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Alessandro Quattrini; Freschi, Giancarlo; Russo, Giulia Lo

    2013-01-01

    Background: In aesthetic medicine, the most promising techniques for noninvasive body sculpturing purposes are based on ultrasound-induced fat cavitation. Liporeductive ultrasound devices afford clinically relevant subcutaneous fat pad reduction without significant adverse reactions. This study aims at evaluating the histological and ultrastructural changes induced by ultrasound cavitation on the different cell components of human skin. Methods: Control and ultrasound-treated ex vivo abdominal full-thickness skin samples and skin biopsies from patients pretreated with or without ultrasound cavitation were studied histologically, morphometrically, and ultrastructurally to evaluate possible changes in adipocyte size and morphology. Adipocyte apoptosis and triglyceride release were also assayed. Clinical evaluation of the effects of 4 weekly ultrasound vs sham treatments was performed by plicometry. Results: Compared with the sham-treated control samples, ultrasound cavitation induced a statistically significant reduction in the size of the adipocytes (P < 0.001), the appearance of micropores and triglyceride leakage and release in the conditioned medium (P < 0.05 at 15 min), or adipose tissue interstitium, without appreciable changes in microvascular, stromal, and epidermal components and in the number of apoptotic adipocytes. Clinically, the ultrasound treatment caused a significant reduction of abdominal fat. Conclusions: This study further strengthens the current notion that noninvasive transcutaneous ultrasound cavitation is a promising and safe technology for localized reduction of fat and provides experimental evidence for its specific mechanism of action on the adipocytes. PMID:25289235

  19. Trans-Stent B-Mode Ultrasound and Passive Cavitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Raymond, Jason L; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Moody, Melanie R; Huang, Shao-Ling; Peng, Tao; Shekhar, Himanshu; Klegerman, Melvin E; Kim, Hyunggun; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-02-01

    Angioplasty and stenting of a stenosed artery enable acute restoration of blood flow. However, restenosis or a lack of re-endothelization can subsequently occur depending on the stent type. Cavitation-mediated drug delivery is a potential therapy for these conditions, but requires that particular types of cavitation be induced by ultrasound insonation. Because of the heterogeneity of tissue and stochastic nature of cavitation, feedback mechanisms are needed to determine whether the sustained bubble activity is induced. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging through a metal stent in a flow phantom and an animal model. In this study, an endovascular stent was deployed in a flow phantom and in porcine femoral arteries. Fluorophore-labeled echogenic liposomes, a theragnostic ultrasound contrast agent, were injected proximal to the stent. Cavitation images were obtained by passively recording and beamforming the acoustic emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified with a low-frequency (500 kHz) transducer. In vitro experiments revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio for detecting stable cavitation activity through the stent was greater than 8 dB. The stent did not significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio. Trans-stent cavitation activity was also detected in vivo via passive cavitation imaging when echogenic liposomes were insonified by the 500-kHz transducer. When stable cavitation was detected, delivery of the fluorophore into the arterial wall was observed. Increased echogenicity within the stent was also observed when echogenic liposomes were administered. Thus, both B-mode ultrasound imaging and cavitation imaging are feasible in the presence of an endovascular stent in vivo. Demonstration of this capability supports future studies to monitor restenosis with contrast-enhanced ultrasound and pursue image-guided ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to inhibit restenosis.

  20. Cavitation-induced damage in soft tissue phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Hutchens, Shelby B.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation in soft tissues, similar to that in purely hydrodynamic configurations, is thought to cause tissue injury in therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Our goal is to generalize bubble dynamics models to represent this phenomenon, which we pursue experimentally with observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms and semi-analytic generalization of Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics models. The phantoms were imaged with high-speed cameras while subjected to a series of multiple pressure wave bursts, of the kind being considered specifically for burst-wave lithotripsy (BWL). The experimental observations show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. After multiple pulses, a further onset of cavitation is observed at some new locations suggesting material failure due to fatigue under cyclic loading. A nonlinear strain-energy with strain hardening is used to represent the elasticity of the surrounding medium. Griffith's fracture criterion is then applied in order to determine the onset of material damage. The damaged material is then represented as a Newtonian fluid. By assuming that such a decrease in the fracture toughness occurs under cyclic loading, the fatigue behavior observed in the experiments can be reproduced by our model. This work was supported by NIH grant NIDDK PO1-DK043881.

  1. The inception of cavitation bubble clouds induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-12-22

    In many therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) the appearance of cavitation bubbles is unavoidable, whereas the dynamics of the bubbles induced by HIFU have not been clarified. The objective of the present work is to observe the inception process of cavitation bubble clouds generated by HIFU transducer in water using high-speed photography. Sequential images captured within 600 micros after the onset of ultrasound transmission show the dynamics of cavitation bubbles' generation, growth, deformation, expansion and collapse in the focal region. However, when the observation time is narrowed to the initial 145 micros, both the still and streak images reveal that the cavitation bubbles astonishingly stay stable in the focal region for at least 60 micros. The results imply that through adjusting the HIFU exposure time while other physical parameters are appropriately chosen, it might be possible to control the generation of stable cavitation bubbles locally in the focal region.

  2. The inception of cavitation bubble clouds induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-12-22

    In many therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) the appearance of cavitation bubbles is unavoidable, whereas the dynamics of the bubbles induced by HIFU have not been clarified. The objective of the present work is to observe the inception process of cavitation bubble clouds generated by HIFU transducer in water using high-speed photography. Sequential images captured within 600 micros after the onset of ultrasound transmission show the dynamics of cavitation bubbles' generation, growth, deformation, expansion and collapse in the focal region. However, when the observation time is narrowed to the initial 145 micros, both the still and streak images reveal that the cavitation bubbles astonishingly stay stable in the focal region for at least 60 micros. The results imply that through adjusting the HIFU exposure time while other physical parameters are appropriately chosen, it might be possible to control the generation of stable cavitation bubbles locally in the focal region. PMID:16782158

  3. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies.

  4. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies. PMID:27586712

  5. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore

  6. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  7. Dynamic Behavior of Microbubbles during Long Ultrasound Tone-Burst Excitation: Mechanistic Insights into Ultrasound-Microbubble Mediated Therapeutics Using High-Speed Imaging and Cavitation Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Pacella, John J; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB)-mediated therapies have been found to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. On the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes use short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore, we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing, acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects.

  8. Dynamic Behavior of Microbubbles during Long Ultrasound Tone-Burst Excitation: Mechanistic Insights into Ultrasound-Microbubble Mediated Therapeutics Using High-Speed Imaging and Cavitation Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Pacella, John J; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB)-mediated therapies have been found to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. On the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes use short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore, we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing, acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. PMID:26603628

  9. Initiate and Maintain Cavitation by Combining High Amplitude Bursts and Continuous Ultrasound Exposure in Culture Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; Chesnais, S.; Lafon, C.; Blay, J.-Y.; Cathignol, D.

    2006-05-01

    Ultrasound can produce a variety of nonthermal bioeffects via acoustic cavitation. Most studies on cavitation effects pointed on the difficulty of initiating and controlling the cavitation phenomenon. Our objective is to obtain reproducible viability and transfection rate in the case of the application of a continuous low intensity ultrasound exposure. We propose to initiate and maintain cavitation in the medium by combining a continuous ultrasound exposure with periodical high amplitude bursts. Cells were exposed to ultrasound (444.5 kHz) transmitted through the bottom of twelve-well culture plates containing prostatic cells (AT2, 2.5 106 cells/mL), the plasmid DsRed in transfection case (200 μg/mL) and culture media. The cavitation effects were evaluated on the cell viability and transfection, determined 0 to 3 days after exposure by a flow cytometer (FACScan; total counted events: 10 000). Bursts of 1.73 W/cm2 intensity level had no effect on cells when their duration was lower than 100 ms and their frequency lower than 4 bursts/min. When combined with continuous exposure, only one burst of 1.73 W/cm2 intensity level and 50 ms duration was sufficient to activate the cavitation phenomenon in the medium.

  10. Timing of high-intensity pulses for myocardial cavitation-enabled therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-intensity ultrasound pulses intermittently triggered from an ECG signal can interact with circulating contrast agent microbubbles to produce myocardial cavitation microlesions of potential therapeutic value. In this study, the timing of therapy pulses relative to the ECG R wave was investigated to identify the optimal time point for tissue reduction therapy with regard to both the physiological cardiac response and microlesion production. Methods Rats were anesthetized, prepared for ultrasound, placed in a heated water bath, and treated with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound pulses targeted to the left ventricular myocardium with an 8 MHz imaging transducer. Initially, the rats were treated for 1 min at each of six different time points in the ECG while monitoring blood pressure responses to assess cardiac functional effects. Next, groups of rats were treated at three different time points: end diastole, end systole, and mid-diastole to assess the impact of timing on microlesion creation. These rats were pretreated with Evans blue injections and were allowed to recover for 1 day until hearts were harvested for scoring of injured cardiomyocytes. Results The initial results showed a wide range of cardiac premature complexes in the ECG, which corresponded with blood pressure pulses for ultrasound pulses triggered during diastole. However, the microlesion experiment did not reveal any statistically significant variations in cardiomyocyte injury. Conclusion The end of systole (R + RR/3) was identified as an optimal trigger time point which produced identifiable ECG complexes and substantial cardiomyocyte injury but minimal cardiac functional disruption during treatment. PMID:25279221

  11. [Cavitation and boiling of bubbles at the focal region during high intensity focused ultrasound exposure].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Mingsong; Ai, Huijian; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a very complex transient process and can cause tissue coagulation necrosis. The cavitation and boiling behaviour of bubbles in the focal region play very important roles throughout an injury process. This paper reviews the research done by domestic and foreign scholars on behaviours of bubbles in HIFU irradiation process and summarizes in the focal region bubble cavitation and boiling generation, related detective means and relationships with hyperecho, temperature rise of the focus and injury shape.

  12. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  13. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  14. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  15. Ultrasound-Mediated Transfection Enhanced by Cavitation Facilitation and Membrane Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Ryohei; Nozaki, Tetsuo; Kagiya, Go; Feril, Loreto B.; Fuse, Hideki; Kondo, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    The mechanism of ultrasound-mediated transfection (USMT) was explored to get a better understanding and improvement of the efficiency. Efficiency of USMT was linked to cavitational effects and also to plasma membrane conditions. These results indicate that the mechanism underlying USMT is possibly explained by the interaction between the cavitational effect and a plasma membrane response. When both were combined, transfection efficiency was significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo. This enhancement could be useful for ultrasound-mediated gene therapy in the future.

  16. Enhanced cavitation by using two consecutive ultrasound waves at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinmai; Jo, Janggun

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and noninvasive generation of cavitation bubbles in soft tissue is a challenging task due to the lack of cavitation nuclei (i.e., pre-existing gas bubbles). In this study, we present a method to generate and enhance cavitation activity based on the utilization of two consecutive ultrasound waves at different frequencies. First, a high frequency (5 MHz) high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) wave was applied to a tissue-mimicking phantom to induce a rapid temperature rise in the ultrasound focal region. Immediately following the high frequency HIFU wave, a low frequency (1 MHz) HIFU wave was applied to the same focal region to induce acoustic cavitation. We found that cavitation activity was enhanced when the temperature in the tissue-mimicking phantom was first elevated by the high frequency HIFU wave. The enhancement was greater when a higher intensity of high frequency HIFU wave was applied. This result may be due to the temporary super-saturation of air in the initially air-saturated test samples and the reduction of surface tension at an elevated temperature. PMID:25425746

  17. Experimental quantification of cavitation yield revisited: focus on high frequency ultrasound reactors.

    PubMed

    Kirpalani, D M; McQuinn, K J

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation plays an important role in enhancing the reaction rate of chemical processes in sonochemical systems. However, quantification of cavitation intensity in sonochemical systems is generally limited to low frequency systems. In this study, an empirical determination of cavitation yield in high frequency ultrasound systems was performed by measuring the amount of iodine liberated from the oxidation of potassium iodide (KI) solution at 1.7 and 2.4 MHz. Experiments for determining cavitation were carried out at various solute (KI) concentrations under constant temperature, obtained by direct cooling of the solution and variable temperature conditions, in the absence of external cooling. Cavitation yield measurements, reported in this work, extend previously reported results and lend credence to the two step reaction pathway in high frequency systems. Additionally, the concentration of KI and temperature affect the cavitation yield of a system such that the iodine production is proportional to both conditions. It is proposed that direct cooling of sonicated KI solution may be advantageous for optimization of cavitation intensity in high frequency sonochemical reactors.

  18. AUGMENTATION OF LIMB PERFUSION AND REVERSAL OF TISSUE ISCHEMIA PRODUCED BY ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED MICROBUBBLE CAVITATION

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Mott, Brian H.; Xie, Aris; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Lindner, Nathan J.; Ammi, Azzdine; Linden, Joel M.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound can increase tissue blood flow in part through the intravascular shear produced by oscillatory pressure fluctuations. We hypothesized that ultrasound-mediated increases in perfusion can be augmented by microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation, and sought to characterize the biologic mediators. Methods and Results Contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging of hindlimb skeletal muscle and femoral artery diameter measurement were performed in non-ischemic mice after unilateral 10 min exposure to intermittent ultrasound alone (mechanical index [MI] 0.6 or 1.3) or ultrasound with lipid microbubbles (2×108 I.V.). Studies were also performed after inhibiting shear- or pressure-dependent vasodilator pathways, and in mice with hindlimb ischemia. Ultrasound alone produced a 2-fold increase (p<0.05) in muscle perfusion regardless of ultrasound power. Ultrasound-mediated augmentation in flow was greater with microbubbles (3-fold and 10-fold higher than control for MI 0.6 and 1.3, respectively; p<0.05), as was femoral artery dilation. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) attenuated flow augmentation produced by ultrasound and microbubbles by 70% (p<0.01), whereas inhibition of adenosine-A2a receptors and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids had minimal effect. Limb nitric oxide (NO) production and muscle phospho-eNOS increased in a stepwise fashion by ultrasound and ultrasound with microbubbles. In mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia (40–50% reduction in flow), ultrasound (MI 1.3) with microbubbles increased perfusion by 2-fold to a degree that was greater than the control non-ischemic limb. Conclusions Increases in muscle blood flow during high-power ultrasound are markedly amplified by the intravascular presence of microbubbles and can reverse tissue ischemia. These effects are most likely mediated by cavitation-related increases in shear and activation of eNOS. PMID:25834183

  19. Development of a Pulsed Pressure-Based Technique for Cavitation Damage Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in many fluid systems and can lead to severe material damage. To assist the study of cavitation damage, a novel testing method utilizing pulsed pressure was developed. In this talk, the scientific background and the technical approach of this development are present and preliminary testing results are discussed. It is expected that this technique can be used to evaluate cavitation damage under various testing conditions including harsh environments such as those relevant to geothermal power generation.

  20. Cancer treatment using an optically inert Rose Bengal derivative combined with pulsed focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Rubio, Valentina; Qi, Jianjun; Xia, Rongmin; Shi, Zheng-Zheng; Peterson, Leif; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) produced has been combined with a photo-insensitive Rose Bengal derivative (RB2) to provide a synergistic cytotoxicity requiring the presence of both ultrasonic cavitation and drug. In vitro tests have shown that a short treatment (less than 30 s) of pulsed HIFU with peak negative pressure >7 MPa (˜27 W acoustic power at 1.4 MHz) destroys >95 % of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in suspension with >10 μM of the compound. Neither the pulsed HIFU nor the RB2 compound was found to have any significant impact on the viability of the cells when used alone. Introducing an antioxidant (Nacetylcysteine) reduced the effectiveness of the treatment. In vivo tests using these same cells growing as a xenograft in nu/nu mice were also done. An ultrasound contrast agent (Optison) and lower frequency (1.0 MHz) was used to help initiate cavitation at the tumor site. We were able to demonstrate tumor regression with cavitation alone, however, addition of RB2 compound injected i.v. yielded a substantial synergistic improvement over either cavitation or RB2 injection alone.

  1. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2 dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  2. Cavitation-enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound ablation of rabbit tumors in vivo using phase shift nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A; Park, Eun-Joo; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia I; McDannold, Nathan J; Porter, Tyrone M

    2014-01-01

    Advanced tumors are often inoperable due to their size and proximity to critical vascular structures. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been developed to non-invasively thermally ablate inoperable solid tumors. However, the clinical feasibility of HIFU ablation therapy has been limited by the long treatment times (on the order of hours) and high acoustic intensities required. Studies have shown that inertial cavitation can enhance HIFU-mediated heating by generating broadband acoustic emissions that increase tissue absorption and accelerate HIFU-induced heating. Unfortunately, initiating inertial cavitation in tumors requires high intensities and can be unpredictable. To address this need, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) have been developed. PSNE consist of lipid-coated liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that are less than 200 nm in diameter, thereby allowing passive accumulation in tumors through leaky tumor vasculature. PSNE can be vaporized into microbubbles in tumors in order to nucleate cavitation activity and enhance HIFU-mediated heating. In this study, MR-guided HIFU treatments were performed on intramuscular rabbit VX2 tumors in vivo to assess the effect of vaporized PSNE on acoustic cavitation and HIFU-mediated heating. HIFU pulses were delivered for 30 seconds using a 1.5 MHz, MR-compatible transducer, and cavitation emissions were recorded with a 650-kHz ring hydrophone while temperature was monitored using MR thermometry. Cavitation emissions were significantly higher (P<0.05) after PSNE injection and this was well correlated with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. The peak temperature rise induced by sonication was significantly higher (P<0.05) after PSNE injection. For example, the mean percent change in temperature achieved at 5.2 W of acoustic power was 46 ± 22% with PSNE injection. The results indicate that PSNE nucleates cavitation which correlates with enhanced HIFU-mediated heating in tumors. This suggests that PSNE could

  3. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  4. Feasibility of noninvasive cavitation-guided blood-brain barrier opening using focused ultrasound and microbubbles in nonhuman primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2011-04-01

    In vivo transcranial and noninvasive cavitation detection with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in nonhuman primates is hereby reported. The BBB in monkeys was opened transcranically using focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles. A passive cavitation detector, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used to identify and monitor the bubble behavior. During sonication, the cavitation spectrum, which was found to be region-, pressure-, and bubble-dependent, provided real-time feedback regarding the opening occurrence and its properties. These findings demonstrate feasibility of transcranial, cavitation-guided BBB opening using FUS and microbubbles in noninvasive human applications.

  5. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  6. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  7. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  8. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  9. Cavitation thresholds of contrast agents in an in vitro human clot model exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Matthew J.; Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) can be employed to nucleate cavitation to achieve desired bioeffects, such as thrombolysis, in therapeutic ultrasound applications. Effective methods of enhancing thrombolysis with ultrasound have been examined at low frequencies (<1 MHz) and low amplitudes (<0.5 MPa). The objective of this study was to determine cavitation thresholds for two UCAs exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. A commercial ultrasound contrast agent (Definity®) and echogenic liposomes were investigated to determine the acoustic pressure threshold for ultraharmonic (UH) and broadband (BB) generation using an in vitro flow model perfused with human plasma. Cavitation emissions were detected using two passive receivers over a narrow frequency bandwidth (540–900 kHz) and a broad frequency bandwidth (0.54–1.74 MHz). UH and BB cavitation thresholds occurred at the same acoustic pressure (0.3 ± 0.1 MPa, peak to peak) and were found to depend on the sensitivity of the cavitation detector but not on the nucleating contrast agent or ultrasound duty cycle. PMID:25234874

  10. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) enhances delivery of doxorubicin in a preclinical model of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Wang, Yak-Nam; Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; D’Andrea, Samantha; Starr, Frank; Chen, Hong; McCune, Jeannine S.; Risler, Linda J.; Mashadi-Hossein, Afshin; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by extensive stromal desmoplasia which decreases blood perfusion and impedes chemotherapy delivery. Breaking the stromal barrier could both increase perfusion and permeabilize the tumor, enhancing chemotherapy penetration. Mechanical disruption of the stroma can be achieved using ultrasound-induced bubble activity – cavitation. Cavitation is also known to result in microstreaming and could have the added benefit of actively enhancing diffusion into the tumors. Here, we report the ability to enhance chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (Dox) penetration using ultrasound-induced cavitation in a genetically engineered mouse model (KPC mouse) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. To induce localized inertial cavitation in pancreatic tumors, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) was used either during or before doxorubicin administration to elucidate the mechanisms of enhanced drug delivery (active versus passive drug diffusion). For both types, the pHIFU exposures which were associated with high cavitation activity resulted in disruption of the highly fibrotic stromal matrix and enhanced the normalized Dox concentration by up to 4.5 fold compared to controls. Furthermore, normalized Dox concentration was associated with the cavitation metrics (p < 0.01), indicating that high and sustained cavitation results in increased chemotherapy penetration. No significant difference between the outcomes of the two types, i.e., Dox infusion during or after pHIFU treatment, was observed, suggesting that passive diffusion into previously permeabilized tissue is the major mechanism for the increase in drug concentration. Together, the data indicate that pHIFU treatment of pancreatic tumors when resulting in high and sustained cavitation can efficiently enhance chemotherapy delivery to pancreatic tumors. PMID:26216548

  11. Cavitation-induced damage of soft materials by focused ultrasound bursts: A fracture-based bubble dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D; Hutchens, Shelby B; Freund, Jonathan B

    2016-08-01

    A generalized Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model with a damage mechanism is developed for cavitation and damage of soft materials by focused ultrasound bursts. This study is linked to recent experimental observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agar gel phantoms subjected to bursts of a kind being considered specifically for lithotripsy. These show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. More cavities appear continuously through the course of the observations, similar to what is deduced in pig kidney tissues in shock-wave lithotripsy. Two different material models are used to represent the distinct properties of the two gel materials. The polyacrylamide gel is represented with a neo-Hookean elastic model and damaged based upon a maximum-strain criterion; the agar gel is represented with a strain-hardening Fung model and damaged according to the strain-energy-based Griffith's fracture criterion. Estimates based upon independently determined elasticity and viscosity of the two gel materials suggest that bubble confinement should be sufficient to prevent damage in the gels, and presumably injury in some tissues. Damage accumulation is therefore proposed to occur via a material fatigue, which is shown to be consistent with observed delays in widespread cavitation activity.

  12. Cavitation-induced damage of soft materials by focused ultrasound bursts: A fracture-based bubble dynamics model.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D; Hutchens, Shelby B; Freund, Jonathan B

    2016-08-01

    A generalized Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model with a damage mechanism is developed for cavitation and damage of soft materials by focused ultrasound bursts. This study is linked to recent experimental observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agar gel phantoms subjected to bursts of a kind being considered specifically for lithotripsy. These show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. More cavities appear continuously through the course of the observations, similar to what is deduced in pig kidney tissues in shock-wave lithotripsy. Two different material models are used to represent the distinct properties of the two gel materials. The polyacrylamide gel is represented with a neo-Hookean elastic model and damaged based upon a maximum-strain criterion; the agar gel is represented with a strain-hardening Fung model and damaged according to the strain-energy-based Griffith's fracture criterion. Estimates based upon independently determined elasticity and viscosity of the two gel materials suggest that bubble confinement should be sufficient to prevent damage in the gels, and presumably injury in some tissues. Damage accumulation is therefore proposed to occur via a material fatigue, which is shown to be consistent with observed delays in widespread cavitation activity. PMID:27586763

  13. Using Passive Cavitation Images to Classify High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin J.; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Corregan, Nicholas M.; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Passive cavitation imaging provides spatially resolved monitoring of cavitation emissions. However the diffraction limit of a linear imaging array results in relatively poor range resolution. Poor range resolution has limited prior analyses of the spatial specificity and sensitivity of passive cavitation imaging for predicting thermal lesion formation. In this study, this limitation is overcome by orienting a linear array orthogonal to the HIFU propagation direction and performing passive imaging. Fourteen lesions were formed in ex vivo bovine liver samples as a result of 1.1 MHz continuous-wave ultrasound exposure. The lesions were classified as focal, “tadpole”, or pre-focal based on their shape and location. Passive cavitation images were beam-formed from emissions at the fundamental, harmonic, ultraharmonic, and inharmonic frequencies with an established algorithm. Using the area under a receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC), fundamental, harmonic, and ultraharmonic emissions were shown to be significant predictors of lesion formation for all lesion types. For both harmonic and ultraharmonic emissions, pre-focal lesions were classified most successfully (AUROC values of 0.87 and 0.88, respectively), followed by tadpole lesions (AUROC values of 0.77 and 0.64, respectively), and focal lesions (AUROC values of 0.65 and 0.60, respectively). PMID:26051309

  14. Using pulsed wave ultrasound to evaluate the suitability of hydroxyl radical scavengers in sonochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Diaz-Rivera, David; He, Ziqi; Weavers, Linda K

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyl radical (()OH) scavengers are commonly used in sonochemistry to probe the site and nature of reaction in aqueous cavitational systems. Using pulsed wave (PW) ultrasound with comparative sonochemistry we evaluated the performance of ()OH scavengers (i.e., formic acid, carbonic acid, terephthalic acid/terephthalate, iodide, methanesulfonate, benzenesulfonate, and acetic acid/acetate) in a sonochemical system to determine which ()OH scavengers react only in bulk solution and which ()OH scavengers interact with cavitation bubbles. The ability of each scavenger to interact with cavitation bubbles was assessed by comparing the pulse enhancement (PE) of 10μM of a probe compound, carbamazepine (CBZ), in the presence and absence of a scavenger. Based on PE results, acetic acid/acetate appears to scavenge ()OH in bulk solution, and not interact with cavitation bubbles. Methanesulfonate acts as reaction promoter, increasing rather than inhibiting the degradation of CBZ. For formic acid, carbonic acid, terephthalic acid/terephthalate, benzenesulfonate, and iodide, the PE was significantly decreased compared to in the absence of the scavenger. These scavengers not only quench ()OH in bulk solution but also affect the cavity interface. The robustness of acetic acid/acetate as a bulk ()OH scavenger was validated for pH values between 3.5 and 8.9 and acetic acid/acetate concentrations from 0.5 to 0.1M.

  15. Cavitating ultrasound hydrogenation of water-soluble olefins employing inert dopants: Studies of activity, selectivity and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Chajkowski, Sarah M.; Boyles, Kelly R.; Hart, Todd R.; Peden, Charles HF

    2006-12-07

    Here we discuss results obtained as part of a three-year investigation at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of ultrasound processing to effect selectivity and activity in the hydrogenation of water-soluble olefins on transition metal catalysts. We have shown previously that of the two regimes for ultrasound processing, high-power cavitating and high-power non-cavitating, only the former can effect product selectivity dramatically (> 1000%) whereas the selectivity of the latter was comparable with those obtained in stirred/silent control experiments [R.S. Disselkamp, Y.-H. Chin, C.H.F. Peden, J. Catal., 227, 552 (2005)]. As a means of ensuring the benefits of cavitating ultrasound processing, we introduced the concept of employing inert dopants into the reacting solution. These inert dopants do not partake in solution chemistry but enable a more facile transition from high-power non-cavitating to cavitating conditions during sonication treatment. With cavitation processing conditions ensured, we discuss here results of isotopic H/D substitution for a variety of substrates and illustrate how such isotope dependent chemistries during substrate hydrogenation elucidate detailed mechanistic information about these reaction systems.

  16. Overview of experimental studies of biological effects of medical ultrasound caused by gas body activation and inertial cavitation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L

    2007-01-01

    Ultrasound exposure can induce bioeffects in mammalian tissue by the nonthermal mechanism of gas body activation. Pre-existing bodies of gas may be activated even at low-pressure amplitudes. At higher-pressure amplitudes, violent cavitation activity with inertial collapse of microbubbles can be generated from latent nucleation sites or from the destabilization of gas bodies. Mechanical perturbation at the activation sites leads to biological effects on nearby cells and structures. Shockwave lithotripsy was the first medical ultrasound application for which significant cavitational bioeffects were demonstrated in mammalian tissues, including hemorrhage and injury in the kidney. Lithotripter shockwaves can also cause hemorrhage in lung and intestine by activation of pre-existing gas bodies in these tissues. Modern diagnostic ultrasound equipment develops pressure amplitudes sufficient for inertial cavitation, but the living body normally lacks suitable cavitation nuclei. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are suspensions of microscopic gas bodies created to enhance the echogenicity of blood. Ultrasound contrast agent gas bodies also provide nuclei for inertial cavitation. Bioeffects from contrast-aided diagnostic ultrasound depend on pressure amplitude, UCA dose, dosage delivery method and image timing parameters. Microvascular leakage, capillary rupture, cardiomyocyte killing, inflammatory cell infiltration, and premature ventricular contractions have been reported for myocardial contrast echocardiography with clinical ultrasound machines and clinically relevant agent doses in laboratory animals. Similar bioeffects have been reported in intestine, skeletal muscle, fat, lymph nodes and kidney. These microscale bioeffects could be induced unknowingly in diagnostic examinations; however, the medical significance of bioeffects of diagnostic ultrasound with contrast agents is not yet fully understood in relation to the clinical setting.

  17. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound mediated nanoparticle delivery: Mechanisms and efficacy in murine muscle

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian E.; Vo, Howard; Angstadt, Mary; Li, King P. C.; Quinn, Tim; Frenkel, Victor

    2009-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is generally thought to interact with biological tissues in two ways: hyperthermia (heat) and acoustic cavitation. Pulsed mode HIFU has recently been demonstrated to increase the efficacy of a variety of drug therapies. Generally, it is presumed that the treatment acts to temporarily increase the permeability of the tissue to the therapeutic agent, however, the precise mechanism remains in dispute. In this paper, we present evidence precluding hyperthermia as a principal mechanism for enhancing delivery, using a quantitative analysis of systemically administered fluorescent nanoparticles delivered to muscle in the flanks of mice. Comparisons were carried out on the degree of enhancement between an equivalent heat treatment, delivered without ultrasound, and that of the pulsed-HIFU itself. In the murine calf muscle, pulsed-HIFU treatment resulted in a significant increase in distribution of 200 nm particles (p<0.016, N=6), while the equivalent thermal dose showed no significant increase. Additional studies using this tissue/agent model also demonstrated that the pulsed HIFU enhancing effects persist for more than 24 hours, which is longer than that of hyperthermia and acoustic cavitation, and offers the possibility of a novel third mechanism for mediating delivery. PMID:19081668

  18. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  19. Cavitation-based third ventriculostomy using MRI-guided focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Alkins, Ryan; Huang, Yuexi; Pajek, Dan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    Object Transcranial focused ultrasound is increasingly being investigated as a minimally invasive treatment for a range of intracranial pathologies. At higher peak rarefaction pressures than those used for thermal ablation, focused ultrasound can initiate inertial cavitation and create holes in the brain by fractionation of the tissue elements. The authors investigated the technical feasibility of using MRI-guided focused ultrasound to perform a third ventriculostomy as a possible noninvasive alternative to endoscopic third ventriculostomy for hydrocephalus. Methods A craniectomy was performed in male pigs weighing 13–19 kg to expose the supratentorial brain, leaving the dura mater intact. Seven pigs were treated through the craniectomy, while 2 pigs were treated through ex vivo human skulls placed in the beam path. Registration and targeting was done using T2-weighted MRI sequences. For transcranial treatments a CT scan was used to correct the beam from aberrations due to the skull and maintain a small, high-intensity focus. Sonications were performed at both 650 kHz and 230 kHz at a range of intensities, and the in situ pressures were estimated both from simulations and experimental data to establish a threshold for tissue fractionation in the brain. Results In craniectomized animals at 650 kHz, a peak pressure ≥ 22.7 MPa for 1 second was needed to reliably create a ventriculostomy. Transcranially at this frequency the ExAblate 4000 was unable to generate the required intensity to fractionate tissue, although cavitation was initiated. At 230 kHz, ventriculostomy was successful through the skull with a peak pressure of 8.8 MPa. Conclusions This is the first study to suggest that it is possible to perform a completely noninvasive third ventriculostomy using ultrasound. This may pave the way for future studies and eventually provide an alternative means for the creation of CSF communications in the brain, including perforation of the septum pellucidum or

  20. Characterization of the dynamic activities of a population of microbubbles driven by pulsed ultrasound exposures in sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Z.; Chen, D.; Deng, C.X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound driven microbubble activities have been exploited to transiently disrupt the cell membrane (sonoporation) for non-viral intracellular drug delivery and gene transfection both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the dynamic behaviors of a population of microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound exposures and their impact on adherent cells in terms of intracellular delivery and cell viability. By systematically analyzing the bubble activities at time scales relevant to pulsed ultrasound exposures, we identified two quantification parameters that categorized the diverse bubble activities subjected to various ultrasound conditions into three characteristic behaviors, i.e., stable cavitation/aggregation (Type I), growth/coalescence and translation (Type II), and localized inertial cavitation/collapse (Type III). Correlation of the bubble activities with sonoporation outcome suggested that Type III behavior resulted in intracellular delivery, while Type II behavior caused death of a large number of cells. These results provide useful insights for rational selection of ultrasound parameters to optimize outcomes of sonoporation and other applications that exploit the use of ultrasound-driven bubble activities. PMID:24486236

  1. Precise spatial control of cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom by using an ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiwei; Huang, Peixuan; Guo, Shifang; Zhao, Lu; Jia, Yingjie; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic inducement in animal models, the conventionally used balloon injury is invasive, produces excessive vessel injuries at unpredictable locations and is inconvenient in arterioles. Fortunately, cavitation erosion, which plays an important role in therapeutic ultrasound in blood vessels, has the potential to induce atherosclerosis noninvasively at predictable sites. In this study, precise spatial control of cavitation erosion for superficial lesions in a vessel phantom was realised by using an ultrasonic standing wave (USW) with the participation of cavitation nuclei and medium-intensity ultrasound pulses. The superficial vessel erosions were restricted between adjacent pressure nodes, which were 0.87 mm apart in the USW field of 1 MHz. The erosion positions could be shifted along the vessel by nodal modulation under a submillimetre-scale accuracy without moving the ultrasound transducers. Moreover, the cavitation erosion of the proximal or distal wall could be determined by the types of cavitation nuclei and their corresponding cavitation pulses, i.e., phase-change microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 5 MHz and SonoVue microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 1 MHz. Effects of acoustic parameters of the cavitation pulses on the cavitation erosions were investigated. The flow conditions in the experiments were considered and discussed. Compared to only using travelling waves, the proposed method in this paper improves the controllability of the cavitation erosion and reduces the erosion depth, providing a more suitable approach for vessel endothelial injury while avoiding haemorrhage. PMID:26964937

  2. Precise spatial control of cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom by using an ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiwei; Huang, Peixuan; Guo, Shifang; Zhao, Lu; Jia, Yingjie; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic inducement in animal models, the conventionally used balloon injury is invasive, produces excessive vessel injuries at unpredictable locations and is inconvenient in arterioles. Fortunately, cavitation erosion, which plays an important role in therapeutic ultrasound in blood vessels, has the potential to induce atherosclerosis noninvasively at predictable sites. In this study, precise spatial control of cavitation erosion for superficial lesions in a vessel phantom was realised by using an ultrasonic standing wave (USW) with the participation of cavitation nuclei and medium-intensity ultrasound pulses. The superficial vessel erosions were restricted between adjacent pressure nodes, which were 0.87 mm apart in the USW field of 1 MHz. The erosion positions could be shifted along the vessel by nodal modulation under a submillimetre-scale accuracy without moving the ultrasound transducers. Moreover, the cavitation erosion of the proximal or distal wall could be determined by the types of cavitation nuclei and their corresponding cavitation pulses, i.e., phase-change microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 5 MHz and SonoVue microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 1 MHz. Effects of acoustic parameters of the cavitation pulses on the cavitation erosions were investigated. The flow conditions in the experiments were considered and discussed. Compared to only using travelling waves, the proposed method in this paper improves the controllability of the cavitation erosion and reduces the erosion depth, providing a more suitable approach for vessel endothelial injury while avoiding haemorrhage.

  3. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome.

  4. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  5. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  6. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble clouds near a tissue boundary in high-intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2009-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds generated near a tissue boundary by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were studied using high-speed photography. In all, 171 image series were captured during the initial 100 ms of continuous HIFU exposure, which showed that cavitation bubble clouds at the tissue boundary organized into two structures - "cone-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 146 image series and "crown-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 18 image series. The remaining 7 image series showed the interchanging of these two structures. It was found that when cavitation bubbles first appeared at the tissue boundary, they developed to cone-shape bubble cloud. The cone-shape bubble cloud structure was characterized by a nearly fixed tip in front of the tissue boundary. When the cavitation bubbles initially appeared away from the tissue boundary they evolved into a crown-shape bubble cloud. Deformation of tissue boundary was shown in all the recorded image series.

  7. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble clouds near a tissue boundary in high-intensity focused ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2009-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds generated near a tissue boundary by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) were studied using high-speed photography. In all, 171 image series were captured during the initial 100 ms of continuous HIFU exposure, which showed that cavitation bubble clouds at the tissue boundary organized into two structures - "cone-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 146 image series and "crown-shape bubble cloud structure" recorded in 18 image series. The remaining 7 image series showed the interchanging of these two structures. It was found that when cavitation bubbles first appeared at the tissue boundary, they developed to cone-shape bubble cloud. The cone-shape bubble cloud structure was characterized by a nearly fixed tip in front of the tissue boundary. When the cavitation bubbles initially appeared away from the tissue boundary they evolved into a crown-shape bubble cloud. Deformation of tissue boundary was shown in all the recorded image series. PMID:19041998

  8. Characterization of Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Drug and Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Anthony W.; Wang, Honghui; Thomasson, David; Farahani, Keyvan; Li, King C. P.

    2006-05-01

    Within a certain range of parameters, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to increase the delivery of systemically administered drugs and plasmid DNA in tumors in mice. The sonicated tissue is not damaged by light microscopy. The mechanism for the enhanced delivery has not been shown conclusively and can include thermal, cavitational, and non-cavitation mechanical effects. In order to assess the effects of pulsed HIFU in a manner that allows for clinical translation, pulsed HIFU is performed within a magnetic resonance (MR) scanner. In this work, the thermal effect is evaluated with phase-shift MR thermometry in ex vivo chicken muscle. The thermal effect is small at the most common exposure parameters. In the future, non-thermal effects like permeability, diffusion, and elasticity changes will be evaluated with dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and MR elastography. If changes in permeability, diffusion, and shear modulus are associated with pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery, then these parameters can be used as markers for optimization of pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery.

  9. Efficient Generation of Cavitation Bubbles in Gel Phantom by Ultrasound Exposure with Negative-Followed by Positive-Peak-Pressure-Emphasized Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Asai, Ayumu; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles have much potential for emphasizing therapeutic treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, histotripsy, and sonodynamic therapy. Their highly efficient as well as controlled generation is important to utilize them effectively as well as safely. However, producing negative pressure over the cavitation threshold by focused ultrasound is difficult because of the nonlinear propagation combined with the focal phase shift. We have suggested a dual-frequency ultrasound exposure method, in which N- and P-waves emphasizing either the peak negative or positive pressure, respectively, are synthesized by superimposing the second harmonic onto the fundamental frequency. In this study, high-speed camera observation demonstrated that the exposure with N-waves immediately followed by P-waves could generate cavitation bubbles most efficiently in gel phantom. Furthermore, the measured negative and positive pressure distributions of the N- and P-wave fields, respectively, agreed well with the optically observed distributions of cavitation inception and cavitation cloud growth.

  10. Advantage of annular focus generation by sector-vortex array in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, Hayato; Takagi, Ryo; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive method for cancer treatment. One of the disadvantages of this method is that it has a long total treatment time because of the smallness of the treatment volume by a single exposure. To solve this problem, we have proposed a method of cavitation-enhanced heating, which utilized the heat generated by oscillating the cavitation bubbles, in combination with the method of lateral enlargement of a HIFU focal zone to minimize the surface volume ratio. In a previous study, focal spot scanning at multiple points was employed for the enlargement. This method involves nonlinear propagation and absorption due to the high spatial-peak temporal-peak (SPTP) intensity in addition to the cavitation-enhanced heating. However, it is difficult to predict the size and position of the coagulation volume because they are significantly affected by the nonlinear parameters of the tissue. In this study, a sector vortex method was employed to directly synthesize an annular focal pattern. Since this method can keep the SPTP intensity at a manageably low level, nonlinear propagation and absorption can be minimized. Experimental results demonstrate that the coagulation was generated only in the region where both the cavitation cloud and the heating ultrasound were matched. The proposed method will make the cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment more accurate and predictable.

  11. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  12. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, Δt, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P−/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as Δt increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer Δts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for Δt ≥ 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  13. Acoustic Cavitation Enhances Focused Ultrasound Ablation with Phase-Shift Inorganic Perfluorohexane Nanoemulsions: An In Vitro Study Using a Clinical Device.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu-Yan; Zou, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Zong-Gui; Liu, Shan; Jiao, Jiao; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether acoustic cavitation could increase the evaporation of a phase-shift inorganic perfluorohexane (PFH) nanoemulsion and enhance high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Materials and Methods. PFH was encapsulated by mesoporous silica nanocapsule (MSNC) to form a nanometer-sized droplet (MSNC-PFH). It was added to a tissue-mimicking phantom, whereas phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was added as a control (PBS-control). HIFU (P ac = 150 W, t = 5/10 s) exposures were performed in both phantoms with various duty cycles (DC). US images, temperature, and cavitation emissions were recorded during HIFU exposure. HIFU-induced lesions were measured and calculated. Results. Compared to PBS-control, MSNC-PFH nanoemulsion could significantly increase the volume of HIFU-induced lesion (P < 0.01). Peak temperatures were 78.16 ± 5.64°C at a DC of 100%, 70.17 ± 6.43°C at 10%, 53.17 ± 4.54°C at 5%, and 42.00 ± 5.55°C at 2%, respectively. Inertial cavitation was much stronger in the pulsed-HIFU than that in the continuous-wave HIFU exposure. Compared to 100%-DC exposure, the mean volume of lesion induced by 5 s exposure at 10%-DC was significantly larger, but smaller at 2%-DC. Conclusions. MSNC-PFH nanoemulsion can significantly enhance HIFU ablation. Appropriate pulsed-HIFU exposure could significantly increase the volume of lesion and reduce total US energy required for HIFU ablation. PMID:27419138

  14. Acoustic Cavitation Enhances Focused Ultrasound Ablation with Phase-Shift Inorganic Perfluorohexane Nanoemulsions: An In Vitro Study Using a Clinical Device

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lu-Yan; Zou, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Zong-Gui; Liu, Shan; Jiao, Jiao; Wu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether acoustic cavitation could increase the evaporation of a phase-shift inorganic perfluorohexane (PFH) nanoemulsion and enhance high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Materials and Methods. PFH was encapsulated by mesoporous silica nanocapsule (MSNC) to form a nanometer-sized droplet (MSNC-PFH). It was added to a tissue-mimicking phantom, whereas phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was added as a control (PBS-control). HIFU (Pac = 150 W, t = 5/10 s) exposures were performed in both phantoms with various duty cycles (DC). US images, temperature, and cavitation emissions were recorded during HIFU exposure. HIFU-induced lesions were measured and calculated. Results. Compared to PBS-control, MSNC-PFH nanoemulsion could significantly increase the volume of HIFU-induced lesion (P < 0.01). Peak temperatures were 78.16 ± 5.64°C at a DC of 100%, 70.17 ± 6.43°C at 10%, 53.17 ± 4.54°C at 5%, and 42.00 ± 5.55°C at 2%, respectively. Inertial cavitation was much stronger in the pulsed-HIFU than that in the continuous-wave HIFU exposure. Compared to 100%-DC exposure, the mean volume of lesion induced by 5 s exposure at 10%-DC was significantly larger, but smaller at 2%-DC. Conclusions. MSNC-PFH nanoemulsion can significantly enhance HIFU ablation. Appropriate pulsed-HIFU exposure could significantly increase the volume of lesion and reduce total US energy required for HIFU ablation. PMID:27419138

  15. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  16. Ultrasound vibrometry using orthogonal- frequency-based vibration pulses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2013-11-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals, the amplitudes of which increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses.

  17. The role of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming in mediating ultrasound-induced changes of TGF-beta gene expression in bone cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harle, J.; Mayia, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper relates ultrasound-induced changes in bone cell function to quantitative data assessing the level of several interaction mechanisms within the exposure environment. Characterisation of ultrasound fields in terms of resultant levels of heating, cavitation and acoustic streaming may provide a novel means of accurately assessing the likelihood of biological effects in vitro.

  18. Spatial distribution of sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence generated by cavitation bubbles in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi; Qiao, Yangzi; Zhang, Shusheng; Li, Ruixue

    2012-03-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera was used to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound (FU) field in order to investigate the mechanisms of acoustic cavitation under different sonication conditions for FU therapeutic applications. It was found that SL emissions were located in the post-focal region. When the intensity of SL and SCL increased as the power rose, the growth of SCL was much higher than that of SL. In the post-focal region, the SCL emissions moved along specific paths and formed branch-like streamers. At the beginning of the ultrasound irradiation, cavitation bubbles generated SCL in both the pre-focal and the post-focal region. When the electrical power or the sonication time increased, the SCL in the post-focal region increased and became higher than that in the pre-focal region. The intensity of SCL in the focal region is usually the weakest because of "oversaturation". The spatial distribution of SCL near a tissue boundary differed from that obtained in free fields. It organized into special structures under different acoustic amplitudes. When the electrical power was relatively low, the SCL emission was conical shape which suggested a standing wave formation at the tissue-fluid boundary. When the electrical power exceeded a certain threshold, only a bright spot could be captured in the focus. The cavitation bubbles which centralized in the focus concentrated energy and hindered the formation of standing waves. With rising electrical power at high levels, besides a bright spot in the focus, there were some irregular light spots in pre-focal region, which indicated some cavitation bubbles or small bubble clusters achieved the threshold of SCL and induced the reaction with the luminol solution.

  19. A Low Cost Compact 512 Channel Therapeutic Ultrasound System For Transcutaneous Ultrasound Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Tim; Cain, Charles

    2006-05-01

    A low cost 512 channel therapeutic ultrasound system was designed and tested with a 2D array transducer. The system was optimized for high energy, low duty cycle pulsing applications (cavitation mediated therapy), but is also folly compatible with continuous wave applications. The effective steering range was measured to be 40 mm FWHM over a 3D volume. Well defined volumes of liver tissue were disrupted with high energy cavitation generating ultrasound pulses in ex-vivo liver experiments.

  20. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  1. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  2. Impact of preconditioning pulse on lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Riesberg, Grant M

    2012-11-01

    Therapeutic applications with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fall into two classifications-one using thermal effect for coagulation or ablation while generally avoiding cavitation and the other using cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while suppressing heating. Representative of the latter, histotripsy uses HIFU at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region and has the advantages in real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. We explored the impact of a preconditioning/heating pulse on histotripsy lesion formation in porcine muscle samples. During sonication, a targeted square region 9 mm wide (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm. The 20-s exposure at each treatment location consisted of a 5-s duration preconditioning burst at spatial-peak intensities from 0-1386 W/cm² followed by 5000 tone bursts at high intensity (with spatial-peak pulse-average intensity of 47.34 kW/cm², spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 284 W/cm², peak compressional pressure of 102 MPa and peak rarefactional pressure of 17 MPa). The temperature increase for all exposures was measured using a thermal imager immediately after each exposure. Lesion volume increased with increasing amplitude of the preconditioning pulse until coagulation was observed, but lesion width/area did not change significantly with the amplitude. In addition, the lesion dimensions became smaller when the global tissue temperature was raised before applying the histotripsy pulsing sequence. Therefore, the benefit of the preconditioning pulse was not caused by global heating.

  3. Impact of preconditioning pulse on lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Riesberg, Grant M

    2012-11-01

    Therapeutic applications with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fall into two classifications-one using thermal effect for coagulation or ablation while generally avoiding cavitation and the other using cavitation-mediated mechanical effects while suppressing heating. Representative of the latter, histotripsy uses HIFU at low duty factor to create energetic bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region and has the advantages in real-time monitoring and lesion fidelity to treatment planning. We explored the impact of a preconditioning/heating pulse on histotripsy lesion formation in porcine muscle samples. During sonication, a targeted square region 9 mm wide (lateral to the focal plane) was scanned in a raster pattern with a step size of 0.75 mm. The 20-s exposure at each treatment location consisted of a 5-s duration preconditioning burst at spatial-peak intensities from 0-1386 W/cm² followed by 5000 tone bursts at high intensity (with spatial-peak pulse-average intensity of 47.34 kW/cm², spatial-peak temporal-average intensity of 284 W/cm², peak compressional pressure of 102 MPa and peak rarefactional pressure of 17 MPa). The temperature increase for all exposures was measured using a thermal imager immediately after each exposure. Lesion volume increased with increasing amplitude of the preconditioning pulse until coagulation was observed, but lesion width/area did not change significantly with the amplitude. In addition, the lesion dimensions became smaller when the global tissue temperature was raised before applying the histotripsy pulsing sequence. Therefore, the benefit of the preconditioning pulse was not caused by global heating. PMID:22929656

  4. Exploitation of sub-micron cavitation nuclei to enhance ultrasound-mediated transdermal transport and penetration of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sunali; Kwan, James J; Shah, Apurva R; Coussios, Constantin-C; Carlisle, Robert C

    2016-09-28

    Inertial cavitation mediated by ultrasound has been previously shown to enable skin permeabilisation for transdermal drug and vaccine delivery, by sequentially applying the ultrasound then the therapeutic in liquid form on the skin surface. Using a novel hydrogel dosage form, we demonstrate that the use of sub-micron gas-stabilising polymeric nanoparticles (nanocups) to sustain and promote cavitation activity during simultaneous application of both drug and vaccine results in a significant enhancement of both the dose and penetration of a model vaccine, Ovalbumin (OVA), to depths of 500μm into porcine skin. The nanocups themselves exceeded the penetration depth of the vaccine (up to 700μm) due to their small size and capacity to 'self-propel'. In vivo murine studies indicated that nanocup-assisted ultrasound transdermal vaccination achieved significantly (p<0.05) higher delivery doses without visible skin damage compared to the use of a chemical penetration enhancer. Transdermal OVA doses of up to 1μg were achieved in a single 90-second treatment, which was sufficient to trigger an antigen-specific immune response. Furthermore, ultrasound-assisted vaccine delivery in the presence of nanocups demonstrated substantially higher specific anti-OVA IgG antibody levels compared to other transdermal methods. Further optimisation can lead to a viable, safe and non-invasive delivery platform for vaccines with potential use in a primary care setting or personalized self-vaccination at home. PMID:27417040

  5. The role of cavitation microjets in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brujan, E A

    2004-03-01

    The dynamics of a gas bubble situated in a sound-irradiated liquid and near a rigid boundary was studied theoretically to get a better understanding of the role of cavitation microjets in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US). The boundary integral method was adopted to simulate the temporal development of the bubble shape, jet formation during bubble collapse and bubble migration. It was found that the dynamic behaviour of the jet and the migratory characteristics of the bubble depend not only on the distance between bubble and boundary but, also, on the properties of the acoustic field. For frequencies of sound fields smaller than or equal to the resonance frequency of the bubble, jet formation and bubble migration toward the boundary are the main features of the interaction. No jet formation was observed for frequencies of sound fields larger than the resonance frequency of the bubble, and the bubble kept its initial position from the boundary throughout its motion. The pressure generated by the impact of the jet developed during bubble collapse close to the boundary may result in the fragmentation of brittle objects, such as renal calculi, dental tartar or intraocular lens.

  6. Modeling of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced lesions in the presence of cavitation bubbles

    PubMed

    Chavrier; Chapelon; Gelet; Cathignol

    2000-07-01

    The classical "Bio Heat Transfer Equation (BHTE)" model is adapted to take into account the effects of oscillating microbubbles that occur naturally in the tissue during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment. First, the Gilmore-Akulichev model is used to quantify the acoustic pressure scattered by microbubbles submitted to HIFU. Because this scattered pressure is not monochromatic, the concept of harmonic attenuation is introduced and a global attenuation coefficient is estimated for bubble-filled tissues. The first results show that this global attenuation coefficient varies significantly with respect to several parameters such as the frequency and the density of microbubbles in the medium, but also with respect to the incident acoustic pressure which thus becomes a transcendental function. Under these conditions, a layer-by-layer modeling, in the direction of propagation, is proposed to calculate the ultrasonic beam. Finally, the BHTE is solved and the HIFU-induced lesions are estimated by the calculation of the thermal dose. Using this model, it can be observed first that, when the firing power increases, the lesion develops clearly in the direction of the transducer, with a shape agreeing with in vivo experimentation. Next, it is observed that the lesion can be significantly modified in size and position, if an interface (skin or inner wall) is simulated as a zone with multiple cavitation nuclei. With a firing power increase, it is also shown how a secondary lesion can appear at the interface and how, beyond a certain threshold, this lesion develops at the main lesion expense. Finally, a better in-depth homogeneity of lesions is observed when the acoustic frequency of HIFU is increased.

  7. Imaging monitored loosening of dense fibrous tissues using high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Li, Pai-Chi; Shih, Wen-Pin; Huang, Pei-Shin; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is proposed as a new alternative treatment for contracture of dense fibrous tissue. It is hypothesized that the pulsed-HIFU can release the contracted tissues by attenuating tensile stiffness along the fiber axis, and that the stiffness reduction can be quantitatively monitored by change of B-mode images. Fresh porcine tendons and ligaments were adapted to an ex vivo model and insonated with pulsed-HIFU for durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. The pulse length was 91 µs with a repetition frequency of 500 Hz, and the peak rarefactional pressure was 6.36 MPa. The corresponding average intensities were kept around 1606 W cm-2 for ISPPA and 72.3 W cm-2 for ISPTA. B-mode images of the tissues were acquired before and after pulsed-HIFU exposure, and the changes in speckle intensity and organization were analyzed. The tensile stiffness of the HIFU-exposed tissues along the longitudinal axis was examined using a stretching machine. Histology examinations were performed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Pulsed-HIFU exposure significantly decreased the tensile stiffness of the ligaments and tendons. The intensity and organization of tissue speckles in the exposed region were also decreased. The speckle changes correlated well with the degree of stiffness alteration. Histology examinations revealed that pulsed-HIFU exposure probably damages tissues via a cavitation-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that pulsed-HIFU with a low duty factor is a promising tool for developing new treatment strategies for orthopedic disorders.

  8. Pulse sequences for uniform perfluorocarbon droplet vaporization and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Puett, C; Sheeran, P S; Rojas, J D; Dayton, P A

    2014-09-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) consist of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles by pulsed ultrasound waves at diagnostic pressures and frequencies. These activatable contrast agents provide benefits of longer circulating times and smaller sizes relative to conventional microbubble contrast agents. However, optimizing ultrasound-induced activation of these agents requires coordinated pulse sequences not found on current clinical systems, in order to both initiate droplet vaporization and image the resulting microbubble population. Specifically, the activation process must provide a spatially uniform distribution of microbubbles and needs to occur quickly enough to image the vaporized agents before they migrate out of the imaging field of view. The development and evaluation of protocols for PCCA-enhanced ultrasound imaging using a commercial array transducer are described. The developed pulse sequences consist of three states: (1) initial imaging at sub-activation pressures, (2) activating droplets within a selected region of interest, and (3) imaging the resulting microbubbles. Bubble clouds produced by the vaporization of decafluorobutane and octafluoropropane droplets were characterized as a function of focused pulse parameters and acoustic field location. Pulse sequences were designed to manipulate the geometries of discrete microbubble clouds using electronic steering, and cloud spacing was tailored to build a uniform vaporization field. The complete pulse sequence was demonstrated in the water bath and then in vivo in a rodent kidney. The resulting contrast provided a significant increase (>15 dB) in signal intensity.

  9. Correlation between microbubble-induced acoustic cavitation and hemolysis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Bing; Liu, Zheng; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Zhang, Dong

    2011-02-01

    Microbubbles promise to enhance the efficiency of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery and gene therapy by taking advantage of artificial cavitation nuclei. The purpose of this study is to examine the ultrasound-induced hemolysis in the application of drug delivery in the presence of microbubbles. To achieve this goal, human red blood cells mixed with microbubbles were exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound. The hemolysis level was measured by a flow cytometry, and the cavitation dose was detected by a passive cavitation detecting system. The results demonstrate that larger cavitation dose would be generated with the increase of acoustic pressure, which might give rise to the enhancement of hemolysis. Besides the experimental observations, the acoustic pressure dependence of the radial oscillation of microbubble was theoretically estimated. The comparison between the experimental and calculation results indicates that the hemolysis should be highly correlated to the acoustic cavitation.

  10. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  11. Investigation of spatial distribution of sound field parameters in ultrasound cleaning baths under the influence of cavitation.

    PubMed

    Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Koch, Christian

    2006-12-22

    Ultrasound cleaning baths fitting the full range from micromechanical components up to large machine parts, are regularly used in industry and in the lab. Despite the large number of applications, generally approved principles and objective criteria for parameter settings which allow an efficient operation are non-existent. The empirical selections of the running parameters often impede an optimization in terms of produce and reproducibility. One proposal for an objective description of the processes is the characterization of the sound field in the cleaning bath, which causes cavities, and subsequently, the cleaning process. Sound field measurements in the appropriate frequency range from 20kHz up to more then 1MHz incorporate a number of problems, such as large sensors disturbing the sound field, a lack of accuracy and the risk of being destroyed by cavitation bubbles. Measurement systems based on optical fiber tips and piezo-electrical hydrophones will be presented, which fulfil the accuracy requirements and withstand ultrasound fields with high power and cavitation. The spatial distribution of sound field parameters such as positive and negative peak pressure, amplitudes of fundamentals, harmonics and sub-harmonics as well as the energy density and spectral density in several frequency ranges are determined in experiments. Finally, the determined field parameters are related to the cavitation effects by means of photometric analysis of perforated aluminium foil. Perforations as well as intentions are analyzed and quantified from scanner images of the exposed foil samples using special image processing software. The experiments indicate clear differences in the structure of the sound fields and the spectral properties between the several types of cleaning baths, transducer arrangements and excitations.

  12. Using light scattering to measure the response of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jingfeng; Matula, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    Light scattering was used to measure the radial pulsations of individual ultrasound contrast microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound. Highly diluted Optison or Sonazoid microbubbles were injected into either a water bath or an aqueous solution containing small quantities of xanthan gum. Individual microbubbles were insonified by ultrasound pulses from either a commercial diagnostic ultrasound machine or a single element transducer. The instantaneous response curves of the microbubbles were measured. Linear and nonlinear microbubble oscillations were observed. Good agreement was obtained by fitting a bubble dynamics model to the data. The pulse-to-pulse evolution of individual microbubbles was investigated, the results of which suggest that the shell can be semipermeable, and possibly weaken with subsequent pulses. There is a high potential that light scattering can be used to optimize diagnostic ultrasound techniques, understand microbubble evolution, and obtain specific information about shell parameters. PMID:15603131

  13. The role of positive and negative pressure on cavitation nucleation in nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Aydin, Omer; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Durmaz, Yasemin Yuksel; Fowlkes, Brian; ElSayed, Mohamed; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-21

    Nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy (NMH) is an ultrasound ablation technique combining histotripsy with acoustically sensitive perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets that can be selectively delivered to tumor cells for targeted tumor ablation. NMH takes advantage of the significantly reduced cavitation threshold of the nanodroplets, allowing for cavitation to be selectively generated only in regions containing nanodroplets. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the nanodroplet cavitation process is essential to the development of NMH. In this study, we hypothesize that cavitation nucleation is caused by the negative pressure (p-) exposed to the PFC, and the NMH cavitation threshold is therefore determined by the incident p-  of the single-cycle pulses commonly used in NMH. This paper reports the first study that separately investigates the effects of negative and positive pressure on the NMH cavitation threshold using near half-cycle ultrasound pulses with dominant negative (negative-polarity pulses) or positive (positive-polarity pulses) pressure phases. Tissue phantoms containing perfluorohexane (PFH) nanodroplets were exposed to negative-polarity and positive-polarity pulses generated by a frequency compounding transducer recently developed in our lab, and the probability of generating cavitation was measured as a function of peak negative (p-) and peak positive (p+) pressure. The results showed close agreement in the p- cavitation threshold for PFH phantoms exposed to negative-polarity (11.4 ± 0.1 MPa) and positive-polarity (11.7 ± 0.2 MPa) pulses. The p+ at the cavitation threshold, in contrast, was measured to be sign ficantly different for the negative-polarity (4.0 ± 0.1 MPa) and positive-polarity (42.6 ± 0.2 MPa) pulses. In the final part of this study, the experimental results were compared to the cavitation threshold predicted by classical nucleation theory (CNT), with results showing close agreement between simulations and experiments

  14. Oxidative DNA damage caused by pulsed discharge with cavitation on the bactericidal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Ken-ichi; Ito, Hironori; Ihara, Satoshi; Terato, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-based techniques are expected to have practical use for wastewater purification with a potential for killing contaminated microorganisms and degrading recalcitrant materials. In the present study, we analysed oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells treated by the plasma to unveil its mechanisms in the bactericidal process. Escherichia coli cell suspension was exposed to the plasma induced by applying an alternating-current voltage of about 1 kV with bubbling formed by water-cavitation, termed pulsed discharge with cavitation. Chromosomal DNA damage, such as double strand break (DSB) and oxidative base lesions, increased proportionally with the applied energy, as determined by electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses. Among the base lesions identified, the yields of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-G) and 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OH-C) in chromosomal DNA increased by up to 4- and 15-fold, respectively, compared to untreated samples. The progeny DNA sequences, derived from plasmid DNA exposed to the plasma, indicated that the production rate of 5-OH-C exceeded that of 8-OH-G, as G:C to A:T transitions accounted for 65% of all base changes, but only a few G:C to T:A transversions were observed. The cell viabilities of E. coli cells decreased in direct proportion to increases in the applied energy. Therefore, the plasma-induced bactericidal mechanism appears to relate to oxidative damage caused to bacterial DNA. These results were confirmed by observing the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide molecules following the plasma exposure. We also compared our results with the plasma to those obtained with 137Cs γ-rays, as a well-known ROS generator to confirm the DNA-damaging mechanism involved.

  15. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery. PMID:27630037

  16. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  17. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery. PMID:27630037

  18. Pulsed ultrasound enhances the delivery of nitric oxide from bubble liposomes to ex vivo porcine carotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Sutton, J T; Raymond, J L; Verleye, M C; Pyne-Geithman, G J; Holland, C K

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery is a novel technique for enhancing the penetration of drugs into diseased tissue beds noninvasively. By encapsulating drugs into microsized and nanosized liposomes, the therapeutic can be shielded from degradation within the vasculature until delivery to a target site by ultrasound exposure. Traditional in vitro or ex vivo techniques to quantify this delivery profile include optical approaches, cell culture, and electrophysiology. Here, we demonstrate an approach to characterize the degree of nitric oxide (NO) delivery to porcine carotid tissue by direct measurement of ex vivo vascular tone. An ex vivo perfusion model was adapted to assess ultrasound-mediated delivery of NO. This potent vasodilator was coencapsulated with inert octafluoropropane gas to produce acoustically active bubble liposomes. Porcine carotid arteries were excised post mortem and mounted in a physiologic buffer solution. Vascular tone was assessed in real time by coupling the artery to an isometric force transducer. NO-loaded bubble liposomes were infused into the lumen of the artery, which was exposed to 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at a peak-to-peak acoustic pressure amplitude of 0.34 MPa. Acoustic cavitation emissions were monitored passively. Changes in vascular tone were measured and compared with control and sham NO bubble liposome exposures. Our results demonstrate that ultrasound-triggered NO release from bubble liposomes induces potent vasorelaxation within porcine carotid arteries (maximal relaxation 31%± 8%), which was significantly stronger than vasorelaxation due to NO release from bubble liposomes in the absence of ultrasound (maximal relaxation 7%± 3%), and comparable with relaxation due to 12 μM sodium nitroprusside infusions (maximal relaxation 32%± 3%). This approach is a valuable mechanistic tool for assessing the extent of drug release and delivery to the vasculature caused by ultrasound.

  19. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of Ultrasound Cavitation and Its Effect on Solidification Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Jiawei; Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik

    2015-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in studying the mechanism and effectiveness of using ultrasound waves to manipulate the solidification microstructures of metallic alloys. However, uncertainties remain in both the underlying physics of how microstructures evolve under ultrasonic waves, and the best technological approach to control the final microstructures and properties. We used the ultrafast synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging facility housed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US to study in situ the highly transient and dynamic interactions between the liquid metal and ultrasonic waves/bubbles. The dynamics of ultrasonic bubbles in liquid metal and their interactions with the solidifying phases in a transparent alloy were captured in situ. The experiments were complemented by the simulations of the acoustic pressure field, the pulsing of the bubbles, and the associated forces acting onto the solidifying dendrites. The study provides more quantitative understanding on how ultrasonic waves/bubbles influence the growth of dendritic grains and promote the grain multiplication effect for grain refinement.

  20. Surface vibration and nearby cavitation of an ex vivo bovine femur exposed to high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Chong; Yin, Hui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2013-08-01

    The acoustic pressure distribution, thermal ablation, and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation near the surface of an ex vivo bovine femur were investigated at normal and oblique incidences of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), as were the characteristics of bone surface vibrations. The acoustic pressure at the HIFU focus, the width of thermal ablation, and the SCL intensity in the pre-focal region were 1.3 MPa, 7 mm, and 454 electrons, respectively, in the control group at normal incidence, and they respectively increased to 1.5 MPa, 12 mm and 968 electrons in the presence of the bone. At oblique incidence from the left, the acoustic pressure at 3 mm to the right of the HIFU focus was 0.6 MPa and decreased to 0.4 MPa at 3 mm to the left of the focus. The thermal ablation was 20 mm in width and extended along the front surface of the bone to the right of the HIFU focus. The SCL intensity on the right of the HIFU focus was 394 electrons and was 362 electrons on the left. The presence of bone would directionally change the spatial distribution of acoustic pressure, thermal and cavitation effects for oblique incidence of HIFU.

  1. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble cloud structures in the focal region of a 1.2 MHz high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2007-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds in the focal region of HIFU play important roles in therapeutic applications of HIFU. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds generated in the focal region of a 1.2 MHz single element concave HIFU transducer in water are investigated by high-speed photography. It is found that during the initial 600 micro s insonation cavitation bubble clouds organize to the "screw-like structure" or "cap-like structure". The screw-like structure is characterized by a nearly fixed tip at the geometrical focus of the HIFU transducer, and the cap-like structure is marked by a dent formed in the direction of ultrasound transmission. After 600 micro s, another two structures are recorded - "streamer structure" and "cluster structure". The streamer structure is also featured by a nearly fixed bottom position at the focus, while the cluster structure is distinguished by agglomerations of bubbles around the focus.

  2. High-speed observation of cavitation bubble cloud structures in the focal region of a 1.2 MHz high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi; Wang, Supin

    2007-03-01

    Cavitation bubble clouds in the focal region of HIFU play important roles in therapeutic applications of HIFU. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds generated in the focal region of a 1.2 MHz single element concave HIFU transducer in water are investigated by high-speed photography. It is found that during the initial 600 micro s insonation cavitation bubble clouds organize to the "screw-like structure" or "cap-like structure". The screw-like structure is characterized by a nearly fixed tip at the geometrical focus of the HIFU transducer, and the cap-like structure is marked by a dent formed in the direction of ultrasound transmission. After 600 micro s, another two structures are recorded - "streamer structure" and "cluster structure". The streamer structure is also featured by a nearly fixed bottom position at the focus, while the cluster structure is distinguished by agglomerations of bubbles around the focus. PMID:17071124

  3. Synchrotron quantification of ultrasound cavitation and bubble dynamics in Al-10Cu melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Tzanakis, I; Srirangam, P; Mirihanage, W U; Eskin, D G; Bodey, A J; Lee, P D

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics of gas bubble formation and evolution under cavitation conditions in molten alloys is important for the control casting defects such as porosity and dissolved hydrogen. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography, we studied the dynamic behaviour of ultrasonic cavitation gas bubbles in a molten Al-10 wt%Cu alloy. The size distribution, average radius and growth rate of cavitation gas bubbles were quantified under an acoustic intensity of 800 W/cm(2) and a maximum acoustic pressure of 4.5 MPa (45 atm). Bubbles exhibited a log-normal size distribution with an average radius of 15.3 ± 0.5 μm. Under applied sonication conditions the growth rate of bubble radius, R(t), followed a power law with a form of R(t)=αt(β), and α=0.0021 &β=0.89. The observed tendencies were discussed in relation to bubble growth mechanisms of Al alloy melts. PMID:26964960

  4. Synchrotron quantification of ultrasound cavitation and bubble dynamics in Al-10Cu melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Tzanakis, I; Srirangam, P; Mirihanage, W U; Eskin, D G; Bodey, A J; Lee, P D

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics of gas bubble formation and evolution under cavitation conditions in molten alloys is important for the control casting defects such as porosity and dissolved hydrogen. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography, we studied the dynamic behaviour of ultrasonic cavitation gas bubbles in a molten Al-10 wt%Cu alloy. The size distribution, average radius and growth rate of cavitation gas bubbles were quantified under an acoustic intensity of 800 W/cm(2) and a maximum acoustic pressure of 4.5 MPa (45 atm). Bubbles exhibited a log-normal size distribution with an average radius of 15.3 ± 0.5 μm. Under applied sonication conditions the growth rate of bubble radius, R(t), followed a power law with a form of R(t)=αt(β), and α=0.0021 &β=0.89. The observed tendencies were discussed in relation to bubble growth mechanisms of Al alloy melts.

  5. Toward a reference ultrasonic cavitation vessel: Part 2--investigating the spatial variation and acoustic pressure threshold of inertial cavitation in a 25 kHz ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Hodnett, Mark; Zeqiri, Bajram

    2008-08-01

    As part of an ongoing project to establish a reference facility for acoustic cavitation at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), carefully controlled studies on a 25 kHz, 1.8 kW cylindrical vessel are described. Using a patented high-frequency acoustic emission detection method and a sonar hydrophone, results are presented of the spatial variation of inertial acoustic cavitation with increasing peak-negative pressure. Results show that at low operating levels, inertial acoustic cavitation is restricted to, and is strongly localized on, the vessel axis. At intermediate power settings, inertial acoustic cavitation also occurs close to the vessel walls, and at higher settings, a complex spatial variation is seen that is not apparent in measurements of the 25 kHz driving field alone. At selected vessel locations, a systematic investigation of the inertial cavitation threshold is described. This was carried out by making simultaneous measurements of the peak-negative pressures leading to inertial cavitation and the resultant MHz-frequency emissions, and indicates an inertial cavitation threshold of 101 kPa +/- 14% (estimated expanded uncertainty). However, an intermediate threshold at 84 kPa +/- 14% (estimated expanded uncertainty) is also seen. The results are discussed alongside theoretical predictions and recent experimental findings.

  6. Inertial cavitation threshold of nested microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Wallace, N; Dicker, S; Lewin, Peter; Wrenn, S P

    2015-04-01

    Cavitation of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) promotes both beneficial and detrimental bioeffects in vivo (Radhakrishnan et al., 2013) [1]. The ability to determine the inertial cavitation threshold of UCA microbubbles has potential application in contrast imaging, development of therapeutic agents, and evaluation of localized effects on the body (Ammi et al., 2006) [2]. This study evaluates a novel UCA and its inertial cavitation behavior as determined by a home built cavitation detection system. Two 2.25 MHz transducers are placed at a 90° angle to one another where one transducer is driven by a high voltage pulser and the other transducer receives the signal from the oscillating microbubble. The sample chamber is placed in the overlap of the focal region of the two transducers where the microbubbles are exposed to a pulser signal consisting of 600 pulse trains per experiment at a pulse repetition frequency of 5 Hz where each train has four pulses of four cycles. The formulation being analyzed is comprised of an SF6 microbubble coated by a DSPC PEG-3000 monolayer nested within a poly-lactic acid (PLA) spherical shell. The effect of varying shell diameters and microbubble concentration on cavitation threshold profile for peak negative pressures ranging from 50 kPa to 2 MPa are presented and discussed in this paper. The nesting shell decreases inertial cavitation events from 97.96% for an un-nested microbubble to 19.09% for the same microbubbles nested within a 2.53 μm shell. As shell diameter decreases, the percentage of inertially cavitating microbubbles also decreases. For nesting formulations with average outer capsule diameters of 20.52, 14.95, 9.95, 5.55, 2.53, and 1.95 μm, the percentage of sample destroyed at 1 MPa was 51.02, 38.94, 33.25, 25.27, 19.09, and 5.37% respectively.

  7. Cavitation dynamics and directional microbubble ejection induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses in liquids.

    PubMed

    Faccio, D; Tamošauskas, G; Rubino, E; Darginavičius, J; Papazoglou, D G; Tzortzakis, S; Couairon, A; Dubietis, A

    2012-09-01

    We study cavitation dynamics when focusing ring-shaped femtosecond laser beams in water. This focusing geometry reduces detrimental nonlinear beam distortions and enhances energy deposition within the medium, localized at the focal spot. We observe remarkable postcollapse dynamics of elongated cavitation bubbles with high-speed ejection of microbubbles out of the laser focal region. Bubbles are ejected along the laser axis in both directions (away and towards the laser). The initial shape of the cavitation bubble is also seen to either enhance or completely suppress jet formation during collapse. In the absence of jetting, microbubble ejection occurs orthogonal to the laser propagation axis.

  8. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  9. Investigation of Cellular and Molecular Responses to Pulsed Focused Ultrasound in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Hancock, Hilary A.; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Dean, Dana D.; Lewis, Bobbi K.; Frenkel, Victor; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous focused ultrasound (cFUS) has been widely used for thermal ablation of tissues, relying on continuous exposures to generate temperatures necessary to induce coagulative necrosis. Pulsed FUS (pFUS) employs non-continuous exposures that lower the rate of energy deposition and allow cooling to occur between pulses, thereby minimizing thermal effects and emphasizing effects created by non-thermal mechanisms of FUS (i.e., acoustic radiation forces and acoustic cavitation). pFUS has shown promise for a variety of applications including drug and nanoparticle delivery; however, little is understood about the effects these exposures have on tissue, especially with regard to cellular pro-homing factors (growth factors, cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules). We examined changes in murine hamstring muscle following pFUS or cFUS and demonstrate that pFUS, unlike cFUS, has little effect on the histological integrity of muscle and does not induce cell death. Infiltration of macrophages was observed 3 and 8 days following pFUS or cFUS exposures. pFUS increased expression of several cytokines (e.g., IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, INFγ, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and GMCSF) creating a local cytokine gradient on days 0 and 1 post-pFUS that returns to baseline levels by day 3 post-pFUS. pFUS exposures induced upregulation of other signaling molecules (e.g., VEGF, FGF, PlGF, HGF, and SDF-1α) and cell adhesion molecules (e.g., ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) on muscle vasculature. The observed molecular changes in muscle following pFUS may be utilized to target cellular therapies by increasing homing to areas of pathology. PMID:21931834

  10. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R T; Zijlstra, Aaldert G; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W M; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2012-09-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip.

  11. The Effect of Cavitating Ultrasound on the Aqueous Phase Hydrogenation of Cis-2-buten-1-ol and Cis-2-penten-1-ol on Pd-black

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Hart, Todd R.; White, James F.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2005-07-15

    We have studied the effect of cavitating ultrasound on the heterogeneous aqueous hydrogenation of cis-2-buten-1-ol (C4 olefin) and cis-2-penten-1-ol (C5 olefin) on Pd-black to form the trans-olefins (trans-2-buten-1-ol and trans-2-penten-1-ol) and saturated alcohols (1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively). Silent (and magnetically stirred) experiments served as control experiments. As described in an earlier publication by our group, we have added an inert dopant, 1-propanol, in the reaction mixture to ensure the rapid onset of cavitation in the ultrasound-assisted reactions that can lead to altered selectivity compared to silent reaction systems [Disselkamp et al., J. Catal., 227 (2004) 552]. The motivation for this study is to examine whether cavitating ultrasound can reduce the [trans-olefin/saturated alcohol] molar ratio during the course of the reaction. This could have practical application in that it may offer an alternative processing methodology of synthesizing healthier edible seed oils by reducing trans-fat content. We have observed that cavitating ultrasound results in a [(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)ultrasound/(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)silent] ratio quantity less than 0.5 at the reaction mid-point for both the C4 and C5 olefin systems. This indicates that ultrasound reduces trans-olefin production compared to the silent control experiment. Furthermore, there is an added 30% reduction for the C5 versus C4 olefin compounds again at reaction mid-point. We attribute differences in the ratio quantity as a moment of inertia effect. In principle, the C4 versus C5 olefins has a {approx}52% increase in moment of inertia about C2=C3 double bond slowing isomerization. Since seed oils are C18 multiple cis olefins and have an moment of inertia even greater than our C5 olefin here, our study suggests that even a greater reduction in trans-olefin content may occur for partial hydrogenation of C18 seed oils.

  12. The effect of cavitating ultrasound on the aqueous phase hydrogenation of cis-2-buten-1-ol and cis-2-penten-1-ol on Pd-black

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Hart, Todd R.; White, James F.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2005-07-15

    We have studied the effect of cavitating ultrasound on the heterogeneous aqueous hydrogenation of cis-2-buten-1-ol (C4 olefin) and cis-2-penten-1-ol (C5 olefin) on Pd-black to form the trans-olefins (trans-2-buten-1-ol and trans-2-penten-1-ol) and saturated alcohols (1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively). Silent (and magnetically stirred) experiments served as control experiments. As described in an earlier publication by our group, we have added an inert dopant, 1-propanol, in the reaction mixture to ensure the rapid onset of cavitation in the ultrasound-assisted reactions that can lead to altered selectivity compared to silent reaction systems [R.S. Disselkamp, Ya-Huei Chin, C.H.F. Peden, J. Catal. 227 (2004) 552]. The motivation for this study is to examine whether cavitating ultrasound can reduce the [trans-olefin/saturated alcohol] molar ratio during the course of the reaction. This could have practical application in that it may offer an alternative processing methodology of synthesizing healthier edible seed oils by reducing trans-fat content.We have observed that cavitating ultrasound results in a [(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)ultrasound/(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)silent] ratio quantity less than 0.5 at the reaction mid-point for both the C4 and C5 olefin systems. This indicates that ultrasound reduces trans-olefin production compared to the silent control experiment. Furthermore, there is an added 30% reduction for the C5 versus C4 olefin compounds again at reaction mid-point. We attribute differences in the ratio quantity as a moment of inertia effect. In principle, the C4 versus C5 olefins has a {approx}52% increase in moment of inertia about C2 C3 double bond slowing isomerization. Since seed oils are C18 multiple cis-olefins and have a moment of inertia even greater than our C5 olefin here, our study suggests that even a greater reduction in trans-olefin content may occur for partial hydrogenation of C18 seed oils.

  13. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  14. Focused Ultrasound and Lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Koizumi, Norihiro; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy has generally been a first choice for kidney stone removal. The shock wave lithotripter uses an order of microsecond pulse durations and up to a 100 MPa pressure spike triggered at approximately 0.5-2 Hz to fragment kidney stones through mechanical mechanisms. One important mechanism is cavitation. We proposed an alternative type of lithotripsy method that maximizes cavitation activity to disintegrate kidney stones using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Here we outline the method according to the previously published literature (Matsumoto et al., Dynamics of bubble cloud in focused ultrasound. Proceedings of the second international symposium on therapeutic ultrasound, pp 290-299, 2002; Ikeda et al., Ultrasound Med Biol 32:1383-1397, 2006; Yoshizawa et al., Med Biol Eng Comput 47:851-860, 2009; Koizumi et al., A control framework for the non-invasive ultrasound the ragnostic system. Proceedings of 2009 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robotics and Systems (IROS), pp 4511-4516, 2009; Koizumi et al., IEEE Trans Robot 25:522-538, 2009). Cavitation activity is highly unpredictable; thus, a precise control system is needed. The proposed method comprises three steps of control in kidney stone treatment. The first step is control of localized high pressure fluctuation on the stone. The second step is monitoring of cavitation activity and giving feedback on the optimized ultrasound conditions. The third step is stone tracking and precise ultrasound focusing on the stone. For the high pressure control we designed a two-frequency wave (cavitation control (C-C) waveform); a high frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create a cavitation cloud, and a low frequency trailing pulse (0.5 MHz) following the high frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High speed photography showed cavitation collapse on a kidney stone and shock wave emission from the cloud. We also conducted in-vitro erosion tests of model and natural

  15. Dependence of ablative ability of high-intensity focused ultrasound cavitation-based histotripsy on mechanical properties of agar.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A; Davis, Gabriel; Avendano, Alex; Shrotriya, Pranav; Bergler, Kevin; Hu, Zhong

    2014-12-01

    Cavitation-based histotripsy uses high-intensity focused ultrasound at low duty factor to create bubble clouds inside tissue to liquefy a region, and provides better fidelity to planned lesion coordinates and the ability to perform real-time monitoring. The goal of this study was to identify the most important mechanical properties for predicting lesion dimensions, among these three: Young's modulus, bending strength, and fracture toughness. Lesions were generated inside tissue-mimicking agar, and correlations were examined between the mechanical properties and the lesion dimensions, quantified by lesion volume and by the width and length of the equivalent bubble cluster. Histotripsy was applied to agar samples with varied properties. A cuboid of 4.5 mm width (lateral to focal plane) and 6 mm depth (along beam axis) was scanned in a raster pattern with respective step sizes of 0.75 and 3 mm. The exposure at each treatment location was either 15, 30, or 60 s. Results showed that only Young's modulus influenced histotripsy's ablative ability and was significantly correlated with lesion volume and bubble cluster dimensions. The other two properties had negligible effects on lesion formation. Also, exposure time differentially affected the width and depth of the bubble cluster volume.

  16. Temporal effect of inertial cavitation with and without microbubbles on surface deformation of agarose S gel in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Y; Matsuura, T; Kodama, T

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation has the potential to deliver extraneous molecules into a target tissue non-invasively. There have been numerous investigations of cell membrane permeabilization induced by microbubbles, but very few studies have been carried out to investigate sonoporation by inertial cavitation, especially from a temporal perspective. In the present paper, we show the temporal variations in nano/micro-pit formations following the collapse of inertial cavitation bubbles, with and without Sonazoid® microbubbles. Using agarose S gel as a target material, erosion experiments were conducted in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound applied for various exposure times, Tex (0.002-60 s). Conventional microscopy was used to measure temporal variations in micrometer-scale pit numbers, and atomic force microscopy utilized to detect surface roughness on a nanometer scale. The results demonstrated that nanometer-scale erosion was predominantly caused by Sonazoid® microbubbles and C4F10 gas bubbles for 0.002 scavitation bubbles such as C4F10 gas bubbles and vapor bubbles, increased exponentially with increasing Tex in the range 0.1 scavitation-induced sonoporation can produce various pore sizes in membranes, enabling the delivery of external molecules of differing sizes into cells or tissues.

  17. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  18. [Contribution of low-intensity pulsed ultrasounds to bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Gleizal, A; Lavandier, B; Paris, M; Béra, J-C

    2011-09-01

    A maxillo-facial surgeon manages patients with bone defects due to trauma, malformations or of iatrogenic origin. The surgical management has potentially deleterious effects and its cost for society is increasing. Hence, it is crucial to develop techniques stimulating bone growth, stimulating the regeneration of a fracture or filling bone deficit. Ultrasounds (US), vibrations of the same nature as sound but with frequencies above the highest audible frequency for men (above 20 kHz), are used in many fields, particularly in medicine, usually at frequencies of around 0.5 to 5 MHz (million cycles per second). Their biological effects are not fully understood yet, but it is well known that US have effects on organic tissues when their mechanical energy is converted into thermic energy. These effects induce vasodilation and modification of membrane permeability. Several publications present the benefit of US for the stimulation of bone regeneration after a fracture. We present an overview of current knowledge on the effect of pulsed ultrasound on craniofacial bone regeneration, with study results conducted within Inserm unit U1032 in Lyon, the current reference lab on this issue. PMID:21820690

  19. Efficacy of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound in wound healing: a single-case design.

    PubMed

    Selkowitz, David M; Cameron, Michelle H; Mainzer, Aleah; Wolfe, Ron

    2002-04-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is used clinically to enhance healing of pressure ulcers. Limited clinical research is available and no consensus exists regarding the efficacy of ultrasound for treating pressure ulcers, particularly full-thickness pressure ulcers, in the elderly. To assess the efficacy of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound on wound healing, a double-blind, single-case, baseline-AB study was conducted. The participant, a patient in a skilled nursing facility, was a 75-year-old woman with a Stage III pressure ulcer over the coccyx. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound was compared to placebo ultrasound. After the 1-week baseline period, each ultrasound treatment was administered 5 days a week for two consecutive weeks. Throughout the baseline and ultrasound treatment periods, the patient additionally received the standard wound care treatment program at the facility. The rate of wound surface area reduction was used as the measure of wound healing. Healing was significantly faster (P = 0.001) during the pulsed low-intensity ultrasound period (34.0 mm2/day) compared to the placebo ultrasound period (12.6 mm2/day), but was significantly faster (P = 0.001) during the baseline period (50.8 mm2/day) compared to the pulsed low-intensity ultrasound period. Healing in this patient was faster than rates noted in the literature under similar conditions. The precise effect of either ultrasound intervention in this study could not be determined. Neither pulsed low-intensity ultrasound nor placebo ultrasound likely had an appreciable effect on healing of this patient's pressure ulcer beyond that of the standard-care protocol.

  20. Cavitation bubble-driven cell and particle behavior in an ultrasound standing wave.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Larisa A; Khanna, Sanjay; Amso, Nazar N; Coakley, W Terence; Doinikov, Alexander A

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of human erythrocytes and 1-microm-diameter fluorescent latex beads in the presence of Optison contrast agent in a single half-wavelength (lambda/2) ultrasound standing wave (USSW) resonator has been studied. The particle movements were observed with an epi-fluorescent microscope and the velocity of the particles and cells was measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Acoustic emissions were monitored with a microphone and a spectrum analyzer. Optison contrast agent disintegrated immediately on exposure to ultrasound of 0.98-MPa acoustic pressure amplitude or higher in a chamber driven at its resonance frequency of 1.56 MHz. A discrete cloud of active microbubbles, detected at the pressure node plane, disappeared gradually and was completely lost within 15 s. The microscopy showed three-dimensional regions of circulation of both 1-microm tracer particles and erythrocytes in planes perpendicular to the pressure node plane. A numerical simulation showed that, for parameters that conform to the experimental conditions, a bubble of a subresonance size moves towards and translates about a pressure node plane. This result is in agreement with the experimental observation that the particle and cell circulation is induced by the presence and/or translational motion of microbubbles at the pressure node plane. PMID:15704403

  1. Stable Support Recovery of Stream of Pulses With Application to Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendory, Tamir; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Adam, Dan; Dekel, Shai; Feuer, Arie

    2016-07-01

    This paper considers the problem of estimating the delays of a weighted superposition of pulses, called stream of pulses, in a noisy environment. We show that the delays can be estimated using a tractable convex optimization problem with a localization error proportional to the square root of the noise level. Furthermore, all false detections produced by the algorithm have small amplitudes. Numerical and in-vitro ultrasound experiments corroborate the theoretical results and demonstrate their applicability for the ultrasound imaging signal processing.

  2. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size.

  3. Evaluation of a shock wave induced cavitation activity both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tu, Juan; Matula, Thomas J; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the cavitation activity induced by shock wave (SW) pulses, both in vitro and in vivo, based on the area measurements of echogenic regions observed in B-mode ultrasound images. Residual cavitation bubble clouds induced by SW pulses were detected as echogenic regions in B-mode images. The temporal evolution of residual bubble clouds, generated by SWs with varying lithotripter charging voltage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF), was analyzed by measuring the time-varying behaviors of the echogenic region areas recorded in B-mode images. The results showed that (1) the area of SW-induced echogenic regions enlarged with increased SW pulse number; (2) echogenic regions in the B-mode images dissipated gradually after ceasing the SWs, which indicated the dissolution of the cavitation bubbles; and (3) larger echogenic regions were generated with higher charging voltage or PRF.

  4. Application of ultrasound in periodontics: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vive K.; Mohan, Ranjana; Bains, Rhythm

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic is a branch of acoustics concerned with sound vibrations in frequency ranges above audible level. Ultrasound uses the transmission and reflection of acoustic energy. A pulse is propagated and its reflection is received, both by the transducer. For clinical purposes ultrasound is generated by transducers, which converts electrical energy into ultrasonic waves. This is usually achieved by magnetostriction or piezoelectricity. Primary effects of ultrasound are thermal, mechanical (cavitation and microstreaming), and chemical (sonochemicals). Knowledge of the basic and other secondary effects of ultrasound is essential for the development of techniques of application. PMID:20142941

  5. Harness cavitation to improve processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, A.G.; Moholkar, V.S.

    1996-07-01

    Mention cavitation to most chemical engineers, and they undoubtedly think of it as an operational problem. Indeed, the rapid creation and then collapse of bubbles, which is after all what cavitation involves, can destroy pumps and erode other equipment. Cavitation, however, also can have a positive side--presuming it is designed for and not unplanned. In this article, the authors look at how cavitation can be harnessed to improve processes, and the mechanisms for inducing cavitation--ultrasonics and hydrodynamics--and their likely roles. Sonication, that is, the use of ultrasound, is the conventional approach for creating cavitation, and so they turn to it first. Over the past few years, a number of groups have attempted to solve the problem of scale-up and design of ultrasonic reactors. The authors review the systems that already exist and also explore a simpler and efficient alternative to the ultrasonic reactor, the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor.

  6. Influence of Microbubble Size on Postexcitation Collapse Thresholds for Single Ultrasound Contrast Agents Using Double Passive Cavitation Detection

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Marianne; King, Daniel A.; O'Brien, William D.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, and using an acoustical method, it has been shown experimentally that the inertial cavitation threshold pressure of an albumin-shelled microbubble is significantly correlated with its initial size. PMID:23661121

  7. Pulsed ultrasound expands the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hersh, David S; Nguyen, Ben A; Dancy, Jimena G; Adapa, Arjun R; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J; Frenkel, Victor

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain plays an important role in biological processes, therapeutic delivery, and clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system. Recently, ultrasound has been used to enhance the dispersion of locally administered molecules and particles within the brain, but ultrasound-mediated effects on the brain parenchyma remain poorly understood. We combined an electron microscopy-based ultrastructural analysis with high-resolution tracking of non-adhesive nanoparticles in order to probe changes in the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain following a non-destructive pulsed ultrasound regimen known to alter diffusivity in other tissues. Freshly obtained rat brain neocortical slices underwent sham treatment or pulsed, low intensity ultrasound for 5min at 1MHz. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intact cells and blood vessels and evidence of enlarged spaces, particularly adjacent to blood vessels, in ultrasound-treated brain slices. Additionally, ultrasound significantly increased the diffusion rate of 100nm, 200nm, and 500nm nanoparticles that were injected into the brain slices, while 2000nm particles were unaffected. In ultrasound-treated slices, 91.6% of the 100nm particles, 20.7% of the 200nm particles, 13.8% of the 500nm particles, and 0% of the 2000nm particles exhibited diffusive motion. Thus, pulsed ultrasound can have meaningful structural effects on the brain extracellular and perivascular spaces without evidence of tissue disruption. PMID:27369449

  8. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  9. Examination of Inertial Cavitation of Optison™ in Producing Sonoporation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Monica M.; Steinberg, Ryan L.; O’Brien, William D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this project is to elucidate the relationship between ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and sonoporation. Sonoporation is an ultrasound-induced, transient cell membrane permeability change, which allows for the uptake of normally impermeable macromolecules. Specifically, this study will determine the role that inertial cavitation plays in eliciting sonoporation. The inertial cavitation thresholds of the UCA, Optison™, are directly compared to the results of sonoporation in order to determine the involvement of inertial cavitation in sonoporation. Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells were exposed as a monolayer, in a solution of Optison™, 500,000 Da Fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran (FITC-dextran), and Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) to 30 seconds of pulsed ultrasound (US) at 3.15-MHz center frequency, 5-cycle pulse duration, and 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency. The peak rarefactional pressure (Pr) was varied over a range from 120 kPa to 3.5 MPa, and five independent replicates were performed at each pressure. As the Pr was increased, from 120 kPa to 3.5 MPa, the fraction of sonoporated cells among the total viable population increased from 0.63% to 10.21%, with the maximum occurring at 2.4 MPa. The inertial cavitation threshold for Optison™ at these exposure conditions has previously been shown to be in the range 0.77–0.83 MPa, at which sonoporation activity was found to be 50% of its maximum level. Furthermore, significant sonoporation activity was observed at pressure levels below the threshold for inertial cavitation of Optison™. Above 2.4 MPa, a significant drop in sonoporation activity occurred, corresponding to pressures where >95% of the Optison™ was collapsing. These results demonstrate that sonoporation is not directly due to inertial cavitation of the UCA, rather that the effect was related to linear and/or nonlinear oscillation of the UCA occurring at pressure levels below the inertial cavitation threshold. PMID:18692296

  10. Enhanced pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using superparamagnetic nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, M; Yoon, KY; Qu, M; Johnston, KP; Emelianov, SY

    2011-01-01

    Recently, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging augmented with ultra-small magnetic nanoparticles has been introduced as a tool capable of imaging events at molecular and cellular levels. The sensitivity of a pMMUS system depends on several parameters, including the size, geometry and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Under the same magnetic field, larger magnetic nanostructures experience a stronger magnetic force and produce larger displacement, thus improving the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of pMMUS imaging. Unfortunately, large magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles are typically ferromagnetic and thus are very difficult to stabilize against colloidal aggregation. In the current study we demonstrate improvement of pMMUS image quality by using large size superparamagnetic nanoclusters characterized by strong magnetization per particle. Water-soluble magnetic nanoclusters of two sizes (15 and 55 nm average size) were synthesized from 3 nm iron precursors in the presence of citrate capping ligand. The size distribution of synthesized nanoclusters and individual nanoparticles was characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Tissue mimicking phantoms containing single nanoparticles and two sizes of nanoclusters were imaged using a custom-built pMMUS imaging system. While the magnetic properties of citrate-coated nanoclusters are identical to those of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, the magneto-motive signal detected from nanoclusters is larger, i.e. the same magnetic field produced larger magnetically induced displacement. Therefore, our study demonstrates that clusters of superparamagnetic nanoparticles result in pMMUS images with higher contrast and SNR. PMID:21157009

  11. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in dentofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kuroda, Shingo; Horiuchi, Shinya; Tabata, Akira; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    Oral and maxillofacial diseases affect millions of people worldwide and hence tissue engineering can be considered an interesting and clinically relevant approach to regenerate orofacial tissues after being affected by different diseases. Among several innovations for tissue regeneration, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used extensively in medicine as a therapeutic, operative, and diagnostic tool. LIPUS is accepted to promote bone fracture repair and regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of LIPUS on soft tissues regeneration has been paid much attention, and many studies have performed to evaluate the potential use of LIPUS to tissue engineering soft tissues. The present article provides an overview about the status of LIPUS stimulation as a tool to be used to enhance regeneration/tissue engineering. This review consists of five parts. Part 1 is a brief introduction of the acoustic description of LIPUS and mechanical action. In Part 2, biological problems in dentofacial tissue engineering are proposed. Part 3 explores biologic mechanisms of LIPUS to cells and tissues in living body. In Part 4, the effectiveness of LIPUS on cell metabolism and tissue regeneration in dentistry are summarized. Finally, Part 5 relates the possibility of clinical application of LIPUS in orthodontics. The present review brings out better understanding of the bioeffect of LIPUS therapy on orofacial tissues which is essential to the successful integration of management remedies for tissue regeneration/engineering. To develop an evidence-based approach to clinical management and treatment of orofacial degenerative diseases using LIPUS, we would like to be in full pursuit of LIPUS biotherapy. Still, there are many challenges for this relatively new strategy, but the up to date achievements using it promises to go far beyond the present possibilities.

  12. MHz-ultrasound generation by chirped femtosecond laser pulses from gold nano-colloidal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Masim, Frances Camille P; Hsu, Wei-Hung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Porta, Matteo; Nguyen, Mai Thanh; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Balčytis, Armandas; Wang, Xuewen; Juodkazis, Saulius; Hatanaka, Koji

    2016-07-25

    Strong absorption of femtosecond laser pulses in Au nano-colloidal suspensions was used to generate coherent ultrasound signals at 1-20 MHz frequency range. The most efficient ultrasound generation was observed at negative chirp values and was proportional to the pulse duration. Maximization of a dimensionless factor A ≡ αc0tp defined as the ratio of pulse duration tp and the time required for sound at speed c0 to cross the optical energy deposition length (an inverse of the absorption coefficient α) given by 1/(αc0). Chirp controlled pulse duration allows effective enhancement of ultrasound generation at higher frequencies (shorter wavelengths) and is promising for a high spatial resolution acoustic imaging. PMID:27464156

  13. GPU simulation of nonlinear propagation of dual band ultrasound pulse complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, Johannes Angelsen, Bjørn A. J.; Elster, Anne C.

    2015-10-28

    In a new method of ultrasound imaging, called SURF imaging, dual band pulse complexes composed of overlapping low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) pulses are transmitted, where the frequency ratio LF:HF ∼ 1 : 20, and the relative bandwidth of both pulses are ∼ 50 − 70%. The LF pulse length is hence ∼ 20 times the HF pulse length. The LF pulse is used to nonlinearly manipulate the material elasticity observed by the co-propagating HF pulse. This produces nonlinear interaction effects that give more information on the propagation of the pulse complex. Due to the large difference in frequency and pulse length between the LF and the HF pulses, we have developed a dual level simulation where the LF pulse propagation is first simulated independent of the HF pulse, using a temporal sampling frequency matched to the LF pulse. A separate equation for the HF pulse is developed, where the the presimulated LF pulse modifies the propagation velocity. The equations are adapted to parallel processing in a GPU, where nonlinear simulations of a typical HF beam of 10 MHz down to 40 mm is done in ∼ 2 secs in a standard GPU. This simulation is hence very useful for studying the manipulation effect of the LF pulse on the HF pulse.

  14. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm(2)) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers.

  15. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm2) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers. PMID:26379793

  16. Alternate pulses of ultrasound and electricity enhanced electrochemical process for p-nitrophenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fengchun; Xu, Yun; Xia, Kunyuan; Jia, Caixia; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A novel alternated ultrasonic and electric pulse enhanced electrochemical process was developed and used for investigating its effectiveness on the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in an aqueous solution. The impacts of pulse mode, pH, cell voltage, supporting electrolyte concentration, ultrasonic power and the initial concentration of PNP on the performance of PNP degradation were evaluated. Possible pathway of PNP degradation in this system was proposed based on the intermediates identified by GC-MS. Experimental results showed that 94.1% of PNP could be removed at 2h in the dual-pulse ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (dual-pulse US-EC) process at mild operating conditions (i.e., pulse mode of electrochemical pulse time (TEC)=50 ms and ultrasonic pulse time (T US)=100 ms, initial pH of 3.0, cell voltage of 10 V, Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 M, ultrasonic powder of 48.8 W and initial concentration of PNP of 100mg/L), compared with 89.0%, 58.9%, 2.4% in simultaneous ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (US-EC) process, pulsed electrochemical (EC) process and pulsed ultrasound (US), respectively. Moreover, energy used in the dual-pulse US-EC process was reduced by 50.4% as compared to the US-EC process. The degradation of PNP in the pulsed EC process, US-EC process and dual-pulse process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Therefore, the dual-pulse US-EC process was found to be a more effective technique for the degradation of PNP and would have a promising application in wastewater treatment.

  17. Alternate pulses of ultrasound and electricity enhanced electrochemical process for p-nitrophenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fengchun; Xu, Yun; Xia, Kunyuan; Jia, Caixia; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A novel alternated ultrasonic and electric pulse enhanced electrochemical process was developed and used for investigating its effectiveness on the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in an aqueous solution. The impacts of pulse mode, pH, cell voltage, supporting electrolyte concentration, ultrasonic power and the initial concentration of PNP on the performance of PNP degradation were evaluated. Possible pathway of PNP degradation in this system was proposed based on the intermediates identified by GC-MS. Experimental results showed that 94.1% of PNP could be removed at 2h in the dual-pulse ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (dual-pulse US-EC) process at mild operating conditions (i.e., pulse mode of electrochemical pulse time (TEC)=50 ms and ultrasonic pulse time (T US)=100 ms, initial pH of 3.0, cell voltage of 10 V, Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 M, ultrasonic powder of 48.8 W and initial concentration of PNP of 100mg/L), compared with 89.0%, 58.9%, 2.4% in simultaneous ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (US-EC) process, pulsed electrochemical (EC) process and pulsed ultrasound (US), respectively. Moreover, energy used in the dual-pulse US-EC process was reduced by 50.4% as compared to the US-EC process. The degradation of PNP in the pulsed EC process, US-EC process and dual-pulse process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Therefore, the dual-pulse US-EC process was found to be a more effective technique for the degradation of PNP and would have a promising application in wastewater treatment. PMID:26384900

  18. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on l929 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Franco de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Pires Oliveira, Deise A. A.; Soares, Cristina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound has proven to be an important therapeutic resource regarding musculoskeletal disease and is routinely used in physical therapy and medicine both therapeutically and diagnostically. The aim of the present study was to analyse the effects with different ultrasound intensities in order to establish the ideal radiation level in cell cultures. Material and methods Fibroblast cell cultures were divided into five groups: group I – control (did not receive irradiation); group II – 0.2 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle); group III – 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle); group IV – 0.2 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle); and group V – 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle). Each group was irradiated with 24-h intervals, observing the following post-irradiation incubation times: 24, 48, 72 and 96 h; after 24 h of each irradiation, cultures were analysed using the MTT method. Results Analysis of the results following ultrasound irradiation demonstrated that the effect of ultrasound with 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle) was statistically significant in relation to ultrasonic irradiation in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle) (p < 0.05). Conclusions According to parameters used in the irradiation of cultivated fibroblasts, the pulse mode regime and the control of intensity are of fundamental importance for the optimal use of therapeutic ultrasound. Furthermore, low and medium intensities decreased cell damage, which establishes that acoustic pulsed energy induces the proliferation of fibroblast cells. PMID:22291760

  19. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1–4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5–12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound. PMID:26819648

  20. Role of H2O2 in the fluctuating patterns of COD (chemical oxygen demand) during the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using pilot scale triple frequency ultrasound cavitation reactor.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Sivakumar; Abidin, Norhaida binti Zainal; Parthasarathy, Shridharan; Alzorqi, Ibrahim; Ng, Ern Huay; Tiong, Timm Joyce; Gomes, Rachel L; Ali, Asgar

    2014-07-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is a highly contaminating wastewater due to its high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Conventional treatment methods require longer residence time (10-15 days) and higher operating cost. Owing to this, finding a suitable and efficient method for the treatment of POME is crucial. In this investigation, ultrasound cavitation technology has been used as an alternative technique to treat POME. Cavitation is the phenomenon of formation, growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. The end process of collapse leads to intense conditions of temperature and pressure and shock waves which assist various physical and chemical transformations. Two different ultrasound systems i.e. ultrasonic bath (37 kHz) and a hexagonal triple frequency ultrasonic reactor (28, 40 and 70 kHz) of 15 L have been used. The results showed a fluctuating COD pattern (in between 45,000 and 60,000 mg/L) while using ultrasound bath alone, whereas a non-fluctuating COD pattern with a final COD of 27,000 mg/L was achieved when hydrogen peroxide was introduced. Similarly for the triple frequency ultrasound reactor, coupling all the three frequencies resulted into a final COD of 41,300 mg/L compared to any other individual or combination of two frequencies. With the possibility of larger and continuous ultrasonic cavitational reactors, it is believed that this could be a promising and a fruitful green process engineering technique for the treatment of POME.

  1. Role of H2O2 in the fluctuating patterns of COD (chemical oxygen demand) during the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using pilot scale triple frequency ultrasound cavitation reactor.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Sivakumar; Abidin, Norhaida binti Zainal; Parthasarathy, Shridharan; Alzorqi, Ibrahim; Ng, Ern Huay; Tiong, Timm Joyce; Gomes, Rachel L; Ali, Asgar

    2014-07-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is a highly contaminating wastewater due to its high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Conventional treatment methods require longer residence time (10-15 days) and higher operating cost. Owing to this, finding a suitable and efficient method for the treatment of POME is crucial. In this investigation, ultrasound cavitation technology has been used as an alternative technique to treat POME. Cavitation is the phenomenon of formation, growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. The end process of collapse leads to intense conditions of temperature and pressure and shock waves which assist various physical and chemical transformations. Two different ultrasound systems i.e. ultrasonic bath (37 kHz) and a hexagonal triple frequency ultrasonic reactor (28, 40 and 70 kHz) of 15 L have been used. The results showed a fluctuating COD pattern (in between 45,000 and 60,000 mg/L) while using ultrasound bath alone, whereas a non-fluctuating COD pattern with a final COD of 27,000 mg/L was achieved when hydrogen peroxide was introduced. Similarly for the triple frequency ultrasound reactor, coupling all the three frequencies resulted into a final COD of 41,300 mg/L compared to any other individual or combination of two frequencies. With the possibility of larger and continuous ultrasonic cavitational reactors, it is believed that this could be a promising and a fruitful green process engineering technique for the treatment of POME. PMID:24485395

  2. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Hiroyuki Ogasawara, Toshiyuki Mori, Naoto Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  3. Investigating natural organic carbon removal and structural alteration induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Yusaf, Talal; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-01-15

    The application of pulsed ultrasound for DOC removal from natural water samples has been thoroughly investigated in this work. Natural water samples were treated with ultrasound at power levels of 48 and 84 W with treatment times of 5 and 15 min. Chemical fractionation was conducted for both untreated and treated samples to clearly identify the change in DOC structure caused by ultrasonic treatments. Statistical analyses applying 2(3) factorial design were performed to study the behaviour of the response (i.e. DOC removal) under different operating conditions. Overall, ultrasonic treatments resulted in DOC removal of 7-15% depending on the applied operating conditions. The treated water had high microbial loading that interfered with DOC removal due primarily to the release of microbial products when exposed to ultrasound. Pulse ultrasound was found to be more effective than the continuous mode for DOC removal at the same effective power level. A regression model was developed and tested for DOC removal prediction. The model was adequate in predicting DOC removal with a maximum deviation from the experimental data of <11%. Pulsed ultrasound at low power levels and short treatment times was found to be the most energy efficient treatment for DOC removal. PMID:26473704

  4. Spatial specificity and sensitivity of passive cavitation imaging for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound thermal ablation in ex vivo bovine liver

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Kevin; Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Corregan, Nicholas M.; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Passive cavitation images (PCIs) generated from scattered acoustic waves are a potential technique for monitoring lesion formation during high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation. HIFU lesion prediction by PCIs was assessed in ex vivo bovine liver samples (N=14) during 30-s sonications with 1.1-MHz continuous-wave ultrasound (1989 W/cm^2 estimated spatial-peak intensity). Treated samples were sectioned, optically scanned, and the HIFU lesions segmented based on tissue discoloration. During each insonation, a 192-element, 7-MHz linear array (L7/Iris 2, Ardent Sound) passively recorded emissions from a plane containing the HIFU propagation axis oriented parallel to the image azimuth direction. PCIs were formed from beamformed A-lines filtered into fundamental, harmonic, ultraharmonic, and inharmonic frequency bands. Lesion prediction was tested using binary classification of local tissue ablation based on thresholded PCIs, with spatial specificity and sensitivity of lesion prediction quantified by the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC). Tadpole-shaped lesions were best predicted by harmonic emissions (AUROC=0.76), prefocal lesions were best predicted by harmonic or ultraharmonic emissions (AUROC=0.86), and cigar-type focal lesions were best predicted by fundamental and harmonic emissions (AUROC=0.65). These results demonstrate spatial specificity and sensitivity when predicting HIFU lesions with PCIs. PMID:24817990

  5. Activation of microbubbles by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances the cytotoxicity of curcumin involving apoptosis induction and cell motility inhibition in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xiyang; Hu, Jianmin; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubbles-mediated drug delivery has become a promising strategy to promote drug delivery and its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of microbubbles (MBs)-combined low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LPUS) on the delivery and cytotoxicity of curcumin (Cur) to human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Under the experimental condition, MBs raised the level of acoustic cavitation and enhanced plasma membrane permeability; and cellular uptake of Cur was notably improved by LPUS-MBs treatment, aggravating Cur-induced MDA-MB-231 cells death. The combined treatment markedly caused more obvious changes of cell morphology, F-actin cytoskeleton damage and cell migration inhibition. Our results demonstrated that combination of MBs and LPUS may be an efficient strategy for improving anti-tumor effect of Cur, suggesting a potential effective method for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:27245953

  6. Activation of microbubbles by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound enhances the cytotoxicity of curcumin involving apoptosis induction and cell motility inhibition in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xiyang; Hu, Jianmin; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Quanhong

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubbles-mediated drug delivery has become a promising strategy to promote drug delivery and its therapeutic efficacy. The aim of this research was to assess the effects of microbubbles (MBs)-combined low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LPUS) on the delivery and cytotoxicity of curcumin (Cur) to human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Under the experimental condition, MBs raised the level of acoustic cavitation and enhanced plasma membrane permeability; and cellular uptake of Cur was notably improved by LPUS-MBs treatment, aggravating Cur-induced MDA-MB-231 cells death. The combined treatment markedly caused more obvious changes of cell morphology, F-actin cytoskeleton damage and cell migration inhibition. Our results demonstrated that combination of MBs and LPUS may be an efficient strategy for improving anti-tumor effect of Cur, suggesting a potential effective method for antineoplastic therapy.

  7. Simultaneous Real-time Monitoring of Thermal and Mechanical Tissue Responses to Pulsed HIFU Using Pulse-Echo Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-04-01

    Pulsed HIFU beams are being increasingly used in a number of therapeutic applications, including thermal therapy, drug and gene delivery, and hemostasis. This wide range of applications is based on a range of HIFU-tissue interactions from purely thermal to purely mechanical to produce the desired therapeutic effects. We have developed a real-time system for monitoring tissue displacements in response to pulsed HIFU beams at high PRFs. The imaging component of the system comprises an FPGA-based signal processing unit for real-time filtering of M-mode pulse-echo data followed by real-time speckle tracking for tissue displacements before, during, and after exposure to pulsed HIFU. The latter can be used in evaluating temperature and/or viscoelastic response to the applied HIFU beam. The high acquisition rate of the M-mode system, together with the real-time displacement tracking are necessary for simultaneous estimation and separation of the thermal and viscoelastic tissue responses. In addition, the system provides a real-time link to MATLAB-based nonlinear spectral estimation routines for cavitation detection. The system has been tested in vitro bovine heart tissue and the results show that the displacement tracking captures the full dynamics of tissue displacements for the full range of HIFU exposures of interest.

  8. Portable high-intensity focused ultrasound system with 3D electronic steering, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms: a preclinical study in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety and accuracy of a new portable ultrasonography-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (USg-HIFU) system with a 3-dimensional (3D) electronic steering transducer, a simultaneous ablation and imaging module, real-time cavitation monitoring, and 3D image reconstruction algorithms. Methods: To address the accuracy of the transducer, hydrophones in a water chamber were used to assess the generation of sonic fields. An animal study was also performed in five pigs by ablating in vivo thighs by single-point sonication (n=10) or volume sonication (n=10) and ex vivo kidneys by single-point sonication (n=10). Histological and statistical analyses were performed. Results: In the hydrophone study, peak voltages were detected within 1.0 mm from the targets on the y- and z-axes and within 2.0-mm intervals along the x-axis (z-axis, direction of ultrasound propagation; y- and x-axes, perpendicular to the direction of ultrasound propagation). Twenty-nine of 30 HIFU sessions successfully created ablations at the target. The in vivo porcine thigh study showed only a small discrepancy (width, 0.5-1.1 mm; length, 3.0 mm) between the planning ultrasonograms and the pathological specimens. Inordinate thermal damage was not observed in the adjacent tissues or sonic pathways in the in vivo thigh and ex vivo kidney studies. Conclusion: Our study suggests that this new USg-HIFU system may be a safe and accurate technique for ablating soft tissues and encapsulated organs. PMID:25038809

  9. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses.

  10. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses.

  11. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  12. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on wound healing in corneas of dogs following keratoplasty.

    PubMed

    Vicenti, F A M; Laus, J L; Costa Neto, J M; Talieri, I C; Campos, C F; Jorge, A T; Ferreira, A L; Fantinatti, A P

    2003-09-01

    The effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on wound healing were evaluated at the graft-cornea transition in dogs following lamellar keratoplasty using tunica vaginalis preserved in 98% glycerin. Twenty-one dogs were subdivided into three groups of seven animals. The first group (W/US) received daily treatment of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (20 mW/cm2) for 15 min for the first 10 days post surgery. The second group (N/US) was submitted to the same procedure but with the ultrasound apparatus turned off. The third group, the control (CO), underwent the surgical procedure only. The animals were clinically evaluated during the initial (1-15 days), intermediate (16-30 days) and late (31-120 days) postoperative period. The corneas were evaluated by light microscopy at 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60 and 120 days after surgery. Clinically, there were no differences which would promote an advantage to any of the treatments. Light microscopy, however, revealed more extensive vascularization and more advanced wound healing in the W/US group, as well as a tendency towards early graft incorporation. Based on the present results, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound shows advantages, especially in situations where trophic support is a mandatory condition, facilitating better graft incorporation and rapid recovery of stromal organization.

  13. Clinical applications of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and its potential role in urology.

    PubMed

    Xin, Zhongcheng; Lin, Guiting; Lei, Hongen; Lue, Tom F; Guo, Yinglu

    2016-04-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity (<3 W/cm(2)) than traditional ultrasound energy and output in the mode of pulse wave, and it is typically used for therapeutic purpose in rehabilitation medicine. LIPUS has minimal thermal effects due to its low intensity and pulsed output mode, and its non-thermal effects which is normally claimed to induce therapeutic changes in tissues attract most researchers' attentions. LIPUS have been demonstrated to have a rage of biological effects on tissues, including promoting bone-fracture healing, accelerating soft-tissue regeneration, inhibiting inflammatory responses and so on. Recent studies showed that biological effects of LIPUS in healing morbid body tissues may be mainly associated with the upregulation of cell proliferation through activation of integrin receptors and Rho/ROCK/Src/ERK signaling pathway, and with promoting multilineage differentiation of mesenchyme stem/progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Hopefully, LIPUS may become an effective clinical procedure for the treatment of urological diseases, such as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the field of urology. It still needs an intense effort for basic-science and clinical investigators to explore the biomedical applications of ultrasound.

  14. Clinical applications of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and its potential role in urology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Lei, Hongen; Lue, Tom F.; Guo, Yinglu

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity (<3 W/cm2) than traditional ultrasound energy and output in the mode of pulse wave, and it is typically used for therapeutic purpose in rehabilitation medicine. LIPUS has minimal thermal effects due to its low intensity and pulsed output mode, and its non-thermal effects which is normally claimed to induce therapeutic changes in tissues attract most researchers’ attentions. LIPUS have been demonstrated to have a rage of biological effects on tissues, including promoting bone-fracture healing, accelerating soft-tissue regeneration, inhibiting inflammatory responses and so on. Recent studies showed that biological effects of LIPUS in healing morbid body tissues may be mainly associated with the upregulation of cell proliferation through activation of integrin receptors and Rho/ROCK/Src/ERK signaling pathway, and with promoting multilineage differentiation of mesenchyme stem/progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Hopefully, LIPUS may become an effective clinical procedure for the treatment of urological diseases, such as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the field of urology. It still needs an intense effort for basic-science and clinical investigators to explore the biomedical applications of ultrasound. PMID:27141455

  15. Understanding ultrasound induced sonoporation: definitions and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lentacker, I; De Cock, I; Deckers, R; De Smedt, S C; Moonen, C T W

    2014-06-01

    In the past two decades, research has underlined the potential of ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance drug delivery. However, there is less consensus on the biophysical and biological mechanisms leading to this enhanced delivery. Sonoporation, i.e. the formation of temporary pores in the cell membrane, as well as enhanced endocytosis is reported. Because of the variety of ultrasound settings used and corresponding microbubble behavior, a clear overview is missing. Therefore, in this review, the mechanisms contributing to sonoporation are categorized according to three ultrasound settings: i) low intensity ultrasound leading to stable cavitation of microbubbles, ii) high intensity ultrasound leading to inertial cavitation with microbubble collapse, and iii) ultrasound application in the absence of microbubbles. Using low intensity ultrasound, the endocytotic uptake of several drugs could be stimulated, while short but intense ultrasound pulses can be applied to induce pore formation and the direct cytoplasmic uptake of drugs. Ultrasound intensities may be adapted to create pore sizes correlating with drug size. Small molecules are able to diffuse passively through small pores created by low intensity ultrasound treatment. However, delivery of larger drugs such as nanoparticles and gene complexes, will require higher ultrasound intensities in order to allow direct cytoplasmic entry.

  16. Shadowgraph Imaging and Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Bubbles Formed in Pulsed Laser Ablation Plasmas in the Vicinity of the Critical Point of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneoka, Hitoshi; Himeno, Shohei; Urabe, Keiichiro; Stauss, Sven; Baba, Motoyoshi; Suemoto, Tohru; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-09-01

    The characteristic behavior of cavitation bubbles formed in pulsed laser ablation plasmas in supercritical CO2 were investigated by shadowgraph imaging and numerical simulations. The time evolution of the cavitation bubbles could be divided into three phases near the critical point: Expansion, Double layer formation, and Contraction. The distribution of the refractive index was estimated from the variation of the direction of the refracted light in the shockwave in the expansion phase. It was suggested that the cause of the reduction of the transmitted light in the outer shell in the double-layer phase was not due to refraction, and the contributions of nanoparticles and clusters generated in supercritical fluids were implied. The characteristics in time evolution of the bubble size in the contraction phase, in particular almost constant position of the interface in a relatively long time, was proposed to be due to zero surface tension by numerical simulations. The results suggest that the properties and fluid structure peculiar to SCF affect the structure of cavitation bubbles.

  17. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A; Fowlkes, J Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Bailey, Michael R; Xu, Zhen

    2011-10-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5-20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis.

  18. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  19. Pulsed-ultrasound tagging of light in living tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Aner; Rubanov, E.; Pomerantz, Ami; Sfez, Bruno G.

    2004-07-01

    Ultrasound can be used in order to locally modulate, or tag, light in a turbid medium. This tagging process is made possible due to the extreme sensitivity of laser speckle distribution to minute changes within the medium. This hybrid technique presents several advantages compared to all-optical tomographic techniques, in that the image resolution is fixed by the ultrasound focus diameter. To our best knowledge, only in vitro experiments have been performed, either on tissue-like phantoms or meat. However a strong difference exists between these sample and living tissues. In living tissues, different kind of liquids flow through the capillaries, strongly reducing the sspeckle autocorrelation time. We have performed experiments on both mice and humans, showing that the autocorrelation time is much shorter than what was previously thought. We show however that it is possible to obtain signal with acceptable signal to noise ratio down to a few cm depth. We will also discuss the origin and characteristics of the speckle noise.

  20. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Fractionation of Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Remnant bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy soft tissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect—referred to as cavitation memory—manifests in inefficient lesion formation, as certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated while others remain undertreated. While the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remnant nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remnant bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubble removal sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real-time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz in order to provide a point of comparison when cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble removal sequences identified for the single-focal-spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 × 10

  1. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy fractionation of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Remanent bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy softtissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect-referred to as cavitation memory- manifests in inefficient lesion formation, because certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated whereas others remain undertreated. Although the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remanent nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein, we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remanent bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low-amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble-removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubbleremoval sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz to provide a point of comparison for which cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble-removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble-removal sequences identified for the singlefocal- spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10

  2. Surfactant shedding and gas diffusion during pulsed ultrasound through a microbubble contrast agent suspension.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jean-Pierre; Stride, Eleanor; Ovenden, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    Interest in coated microbubbles as agents for therapeutic and quantitative imaging applications in biomedical ultrasound has increased the need for their accurate theoretical characterization. Effects such as gas diffusion, variation in the properties of the coating and the resulting changes in bubble behavior under repeated exposure to ultrasound pulses are, however, still not well understood. In this study, a revised equation for microbubble motion is proposed that includes the effects of gas diffusion, as well as adsorption, desorption and shedding of a surfactant from the bubble surface. This is incorporated into a nonlinear wave propagation model to account for these additional time dependent effects in the response of microbubble populations. The results from the model indicate there can be significant changes in both bubble behavior and the propagated pulse over time. This is in agreement with existing experimental data but is not predicted by existing propagation models. The analysis indicates that changes in bubble dynamics are dominated by surfactant shedding on the timescale of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse and gas diffusion over the timescale of the pulse repetition frequency. The implications of these results for the development of more accurate algorithms for quantitative imaging and for therapeutic applications are discussed.

  3. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  4. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two- ... sound waves and appear dark or black. An ultrasound can supply vital information about a mother's pregnancy ...

  5. Pulsed Radiofrequency Ablation Under Ultrasound Guidance for Huge Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Il; Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Se Hun; Kim, Jin Sun; Yoo, Byoung Woo

    2014-01-01

    Amputation neuroma can cause very serious, intractable pain. Many treatment modalities are suggested for painful neuroma. Pharmacologic treatment shows a limited effect on eliminating the pain, and surgical treatment has a high recurrence rate. We applied pulsed radiofrequency treatment at the neuroma stalk under ultrasonography guidance. The long-term outcome was very successful, prompting us to report this case. PMID:25031817

  6. Non-invasive and real-time passive acoustic mapping of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Carlisle, Robert C.; Coviello, Christian; Seymour, Len; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2014-09-01

    New classes of biologically active materials, such as viruses, siRNA, antibodies and a wide range of engineered nanoparticles have emerged as potent agents for diagnosing and treating diseases, yet many of these agents fail because there is no effective route of delivery to their intended targets. Focused ultrasound and its ability to drive microbubble-seeded cavitation have been shown to facilitate drug delivery. However, cavitation is difficult to control temporally and spatially, making prediction of therapeutic outcomes deep in the body difficult. Here, we utilized passive acoustic mapping in vivo to understand how ultrasound parameters influence cavitation dynamics and to correlate spatial maps of cavitation to drug delivery. Focused ultrasound (center frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 1.2 MPa, pulse length: 25 cycles or 50,000 cycles, pulse repetition interval: 0.02, 0.2, 1 or 3 s, number of pulses: 80 pulses) was applied to murine xenograft-model tumors in vivo during systemic injection of microbubbles with and without cavitation-sensitive liposomes or type 5 adenoviruses. Analysis of in vivo cavitation dynamics through several pulses revealed that cavitation was more efficiently produced at a lower pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz than at 50 Hz. Within a pulse, inertial cavitation activity was shown to persist but reduced to 50% and 25% of its initial magnitude in 4.3 and 29.3 ms, respectively. Both through several pulses and within a pulse, the spatial distribution of cavitation was shown to change in time due to variations in microbubble distribution present in tumors. Finally, we demonstrated that the centroid of the mapped cavitation activity was within 1.33  ±  0.6 mm and 0.36 mm from the centroid location of drug release from liposomes and expression of the reporter gene encoded by the adenovirus, respectively. Thus passive acoustic mapping not only unraveled key mechanisms whereby a successful outcome is achieved

  7. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound increases proliferation and extracelluar matrix production by human dermal fibroblasts in three-dimensional culture

    PubMed Central

    Bohari, Siti PM; Grover, Liam M; Hukins, David WL

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound on cell proliferation, collagen production and glycosaminoglycan deposition by human dermal fibroblasts encapsulated in alginate. Hoechst 33258 assay for cell number, hydroxyproline assay for collagen content, dimethylmethylene blue assay for glycosaminoglycan content and scanning electron microscopy were performed on the encapsulated cells treated with pulsed low-intensity ultrasound and a control group that remained untreated. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound showed a significant effect on cell proliferation and collagen deposition but no consistent pattern for glycosaminoglycan content. Alcian blue staining showed that glycosaminoglycans were deposited around the cells in both treated and control groups. These results suggest that pulsed low-intensity ultrasound alone shows a positive effect on cell proliferation and collagen deposition even without growth factor supplements. PMID:26668710

  8. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats.

    PubMed

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm(2), 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2 ± 182.1 μm(2), p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4 ± 125.3 μm(2), p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148 ± 11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3 ± 8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue.

  9. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2±182.1 μm2, p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4±125.3 μm2, p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148±11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3±8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue. PMID:24551303

  10. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  11. Sister chromatid exchanges in mouse after exposure to pulse-wave ultrasound in utero.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Y; Takabayashi, T; Sasaki, H; Ozawa, N; Yajima, A

    1993-06-01

    The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was investigated in mice after a ten min exposure, in vivo, to 2 MHz focused, pulse-wave ultrasound with a pulse repetition rate of 1000 Hz, pulse duration of 10 microseconds. The bone marrow cells of the pregnant female mice and the fetal liver cells were analyzed. The cell cycle specific metaphase patterns were additionally evaluated. In the bone marrow cells, the mean frequencies of SCEs were 2.77 in control, 3.56 in the cells exposed to ultrasound at 586.2 mW/cm2 (spatial average temporal average, SATA); in the fetal liver cells, 2.64 in control, 3.84 in the cells exposed. The frequencies of SCEs significantly were increased by the treatment. Faster cell kinetics was observed in fetal liver cells than bone marrow cells of pregnant female. But there was no cell-growth inhibitory effect of ultrasound on both bone marrow and fetal liver cells. In fetal liver cells, the critical acoustic power was 160.0-278.9 mW/cm2 (SATA).

  12. Cavitational Hydrothermal Oxidation: A New Remediation Process - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K. S.

    2001-07-05

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions.

  13. In vivo pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging using high-performance magnetoactive contrast nanoagents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Shin, Tae-Hyun; Qu, Min; Kruizinga, Pieter; Truby, Ryan L.; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cheon, Jinwoo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2013-10-01

    Previously, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging has been introduced as a contrast-agent-assisted ultrasound-based imaging modality capable of visualizing biological events at the cellular and molecular level. In pMMUS imaging, a high intensity pulsed magnetic field is used to excite cells or tissue labeled with magnetic nanoparticles. Then, ultrasound (US) imaging is used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue to an externally applied magnetic field (i.e., tissue displacement). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) in pMMUS imaging can be improved by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles with larger saturation magnetization. Metal-doped magnetic nanoparticles with enhanced tunable nanomagnetism are suitable candidates to improve the SNR and, therefore, sensitivity of pMMUS imaging, which is essential for in vivo pMMUS imaging. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of pMMUS imaging to identify the presence and distribution of zinc-doped iron oxide nanoparticles in live nude mice bearing A431 (human epithelial carcinoma) xenograft tumors.Previously, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging has been introduced as a contrast-agent-assisted ultrasound-based imaging modality capable of visualizing biological events at the cellular and molecular level. In pMMUS imaging, a high intensity pulsed magnetic field is used to excite cells or tissue labeled with magnetic nanoparticles. Then, ultrasound (US) imaging is used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue to an externally applied magnetic field (i.e., tissue displacement). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) in pMMUS imaging can be improved by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles with larger saturation magnetization. Metal-doped magnetic nanoparticles with enhanced tunable nanomagnetism are suitable candidates to improve the SNR and, therefore, sensitivity of pMMUS imaging, which is essential for in vivo pMMUS imaging. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of pMMUS imaging to identify

  14. Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging using a photorefractive interferometer and a powerful long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides the optical spectroscopic signature and the spatial localization of an optically absorbing object embedded in a strongly scattering medium. The transverse resolution of the technique is determined by the lateral extent of ultrasound beam focal zone while the axial resolution is obtained by using short ultrasound pulses. The practical application of this technique is presently limited by its poor sensitivity. Moreover, any method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio must satisfy the biomedical safety limits. In this paper, we propose to use a pulsed single-frequency laser source to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and to collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Such a laser source allows illuminating the tissues mainly during the transit time of the ultrasonic wave. A single-frequency Nd:YAG laser emitting 500-μs pulses with a peak power superior to 100 W was used. Tagged photons were detected with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer characterized by a large optical etendue. When pumped by high intensity laser pulses, such an interferometer provides the fast response time essential to obtain an apparatus insensitive to the speckle decorrelation encountered in biomedical applications. Consequently, the combination of a large-etendue photorefractive interferometer with a high-power pulsed laser could allow obtaining both the sensitivity and the fast response time necessary for biomedical applications. Measurements performed in 30- and 60-mm thick optical phantoms made of titanium dioxide particles dispersed in sunflower oil are presented. Results obtained in 30- and 60-mm thick chicken breast samples are also reported.

  15. Review on Lithotripsy and Cavitation in Urinary Stone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Morteza; Oral, Ozlem; Ekici, Sinan; Gozuacik, Devrim; Kosar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation is the sudden formation of vapor bubbles or voids in liquid media and occurs after rapid changes in pressure as a consequence of mechanical forces. It is mostly an undesirable phenomenon. Although the elimination of cavitation is a major topic in the study of fluid dynamics, its destructive nature could be exploited for therapeutic applications. Ultrasonic and hydrodynamic sources are two main origins for generating cavitation. The purpose of this review is to give the reader a general idea about the formation of cavitation phenomenon and existing biomedical applications of ultrasonic and hydrodynamic cavitation. Because of the high number of the studies on ultrasound cavitation in the literature, the main focus of this review is placed on the lithotripsy techniques, which have been widely used for the treatment of urinary stones. Accordingly, cavitation phenomenon and its basic concepts are presented in Section II. The significance of the ultrasound cavitation in the urinary stone treatment is discussed in Section III in detail and hydrodynamic cavitation as an important alternative for the ultrasound cavitation is included in Section IV. Finally, side effects of using both ultrasound and hydrodynamic cavitation in biomedical applications are presented in Section V. PMID:27249837

  16. Can pulsed ultrasound increase tissue damage during ischemia? A study of the effects of ultrasound on infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium in anesthetized pigs

    PubMed Central

    Olivecrona, Göran K; Härdig, Bjarne Madsen; Roijer, Anders; Block, Mattias; Grins, Edgars; Persson, Hans W; Johansson, Leif; Olsson, Bertil

    2005-01-01

    Background The same mechanisms by which ultrasound enhances thrombolysis are described in connection with non-beneficial effects of ultrasound. The present safety study was therefore designed to explore effects of beneficial ultrasound characteristics on the infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium. Methods In an open chest porcine model (n = 17), myocardial infarction was induced by ligating a coronary diagonal branch. Pulsed ultrasound of frequency 1 MHz and intensity 0.1 W/cm2 (ISATA) was applied during one hour to both infarcted and non-infarcted myocardial tissue. These ultrasound characteristics are similar to those used in studies of ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Using blinded assessment technique, myocardial damage was rated according to histopathological criteria. Results Infarcted myocardium exhibited a significant increase in damage score compared to non-infarcted myocardium: 6.2 ± 2.0 vs. 4.3 ± 1.5 (mean ± standard deviation), (p = 0.004). In the infarcted myocardium, ultrasound exposure yielded a further significant increase of damage scores: 8.1 ± 1.7 vs. 6.2 ± 2.0 (p = 0.027). Conclusion Our results suggest an instantaneous additive effect on the ischemic damage in myocardial tissue when exposed to ultrasound of stated characteristics. The ultimate damage degree remains to be clarified. PMID:15831106

  17. Effects of Ultrasound Frequency on Nanodroplet-Mediated Histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Aydin, Omer; Yuksel Durmaz, Yasemin; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Fowlkes, Brian; ElSayed, Mohamed; Xu, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy (NMH) is a targeted ultrasound ablation technique combining histotripsy with nanodroplets that can be selectively delivered to tumor cells for targeted tumor ablation. In a previous study, it was reported that by use of extremely short, high-pressure pulses, histotripsy cavitation bubbles were generated in regions containing nanodroplets at significantly lower pressure (∼10.8 MPa) than without nanodroplets (∼28 MPa) at 500 kHz. Furthermore, it was hypothesized that lower frequency would improve the effectiveness of NMH by increasing the size of the focal region, increasing bubble expansion, and decreasing the cavitation threshold. In this study, we investigated the effects of ultrasound frequency (345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz) on NMH. First, the NMH cavitation threshold was measured in tissue phantoms with and without nanodroplets, with results indicating that the NMH threshold was significantly below the histotripsy intrinsic threshold at all frequencies. Results also indicated that the NMH threshold decreased at lower frequency, ranging from 7.4 MPa at 345 kHz to 13.2 MPa at 3 MHz. In the second part of this study, the effects of frequency on NMH bubble expansion were investigated, with results indicating larger expansion at lower frequency, even at a lower pressure. In the final part of this study, the ability of perfluoropentane-encapsulated nanodroplets to act as sustainable cavitation nuclei over multiple pulses was investigated, with results indicating that the nanodroplets are destroyed by the cavitation process and only function as cavitation nuclei for the first few pulses, with this effect being most pronounced at higher frequencies. Overall, the results of this study support our hypothesis that using a lower frequency will improve the effectiveness of NMH by increasing the size of the focal region, increasing bubble expansion and decreasing the cavitation threshold.

  18. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part II: Primary Bjerknes force and bubble structures.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O

    2012-01-01

    In a companion paper, a reduced model for propagation of acoustic waves in a cloud of inertial cavitation bubbles was proposed. The wave attenuation was calculated directly from the energy dissipated by a single bubble, the latter being estimated directly from the fully nonlinear radial dynamics. The use of this model in a mono-dimensional configuration has shown that the attenuation near the vibrating emitter was much higher than predictions obtained from linear theory, and that this strong attenuation creates a large traveling wave contribution, even for closed domain where standing waves are normally expected. In this paper, we show that, owing to the appearance of traveling waves, the primary Bjerknes force near the emitter becomes very large and tends to expel the bubbles up to a stagnation point. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric computations of the acoustic field created by a large area immersed sonotrode are also performed, and the paths of the bubbles in the resulting Bjerknes force field are sketched. Cone bubble structures are recovered and compare reasonably well to reported experimental results. The underlying mechanisms yielding such structures is examined, and it is found that the conical structure is generic and results from the appearance a sound velocity gradient along the transducer area. Finally, a more complex system, similar to an ultrasonic bath, in which the sound field results from the flexural vibrations of a thin plate, is also simulated. The calculated bubble paths reveal the appearance of other commonly observed structures in such configurations, such as streamers and flare structures. PMID:21764349

  19. Adaptive Light Modulation for Improved Resolution and Efficiency in All-Optical Pulse-Echo Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Alles, Erwin J; Colchester, Richard J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-01-01

    In biomedical all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound systems, ultrasound is generated with the photoacoustic effect by illuminating an optically absorbing structure with a temporally modulated light source. Nanosecond range laser pulses are typically used, which can yield bandwidths exceeding 100 MHz. However, acoustical attenuation within tissue or nonuniformities in the detector or source power spectra result in energy loss at the affected frequencies and in a reduced overall system efficiency. In this work, a laser diode is used to generate linear and nonlinear chirp optical modulations that are extended to microsecond time scales, with bandwidths constrained to the system sensitivity. Compared to those obtained using a 2-ns pulsed laser, pulse-echo images of a phantom obtained using linear chirp excitation exhibit similar axial resolution (99 versus 92 μm, respectively) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) (10.3 versus 9.6 dB). In addition, the axial point spread function (PSF) exhibits lower sidelobe levels in the case of chirp modulation. Using nonlinear (time-stretched) chirp excitations, where the nonlinearity is computed from measurements of the spectral sensitivity of the system, the power spectrum of the imaging system was flattened and its bandwidth broadened. Consequently, the PSF has a narrower axial extent and still lower sidelobe levels. Pulse-echo images acquired with time-stretched chirps as optical modulation have higher axial resolution (64 μm) than those obtained with linear chirps, at the expense of a lower SNR (6.8 dB). Using a linear or time-stretched chirp, the conversion efficiency from optical power to acoustical pressure improved by a factor of 70 or 61, respectively, compared to that obtained with pulsed excitation. PMID:26552084

  20. Adaptive Light Modulation for Improved Resolution and Efficiency in All-Optical Pulse-Echo Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Alles, Erwin J; Colchester, Richard J; Desjardins, Adrien E

    2016-01-01

    In biomedical all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound systems, ultrasound is generated with the photoacoustic effect by illuminating an optically absorbing structure with a temporally modulated light source. Nanosecond range laser pulses are typically used, which can yield bandwidths exceeding 100 MHz. However, acoustical attenuation within tissue or nonuniformities in the detector or source power spectra result in energy loss at the affected frequencies and in a reduced overall system efficiency. In this work, a laser diode is used to generate linear and nonlinear chirp optical modulations that are extended to microsecond time scales, with bandwidths constrained to the system sensitivity. Compared to those obtained using a 2-ns pulsed laser, pulse-echo images of a phantom obtained using linear chirp excitation exhibit similar axial resolution (99 versus 92 μm, respectively) and signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) (10.3 versus 9.6 dB). In addition, the axial point spread function (PSF) exhibits lower sidelobe levels in the case of chirp modulation. Using nonlinear (time-stretched) chirp excitations, where the nonlinearity is computed from measurements of the spectral sensitivity of the system, the power spectrum of the imaging system was flattened and its bandwidth broadened. Consequently, the PSF has a narrower axial extent and still lower sidelobe levels. Pulse-echo images acquired with time-stretched chirps as optical modulation have higher axial resolution (64 μm) than those obtained with linear chirps, at the expense of a lower SNR (6.8 dB). Using a linear or time-stretched chirp, the conversion efficiency from optical power to acoustical pressure improved by a factor of 70 or 61, respectively, compared to that obtained with pulsed excitation.

  1. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Erosion of Model Urinary Stones

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy with pulses applied at low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison to those applied at high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. While the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 µs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 second—inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei—effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill-effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through

  2. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Alexander S.; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent—named photoacoustic nanodroplet—has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths. PMID:25401018

  3. Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiulian; You, Qinghong; Ma, Haile; Dai, Chunhua; Zhang, Henan; Li, Kexin; Li, Yunliang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound was studied. Effect of static probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (SPUE) and counter-current probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (CCPUE) on the biodiesel conversion were compared. The results indicated that CCPUE was a better method for enhancing transesterification. The working conditions of CCPUE were studied by single-factor experiment design and the results showed that the optimal conditions were: initial temperature 25 °C, methanol to triglyceride molar ratio 10:1, flow rate 200 mL/min, catalyst content 1.8%, ultrasound working on-time 4 s, off-time 2 s, total working time 50 min. Under these conditions, the average biodiesel conversion of three experiments was 96.1%.

  4. Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiulian; You, Qinghong; Ma, Haile; Dai, Chunhua; Zhang, Henan; Li, Kexin; Li, Yunliang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound was studied. Effect of static probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (SPUE) and counter-current probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (CCPUE) on the biodiesel conversion were compared. The results indicated that CCPUE was a better method for enhancing transesterification. The working conditions of CCPUE were studied by single-factor experiment design and the results showed that the optimal conditions were: initial temperature 25 °C, methanol to triglyceride molar ratio 10:1, flow rate 200 mL/min, catalyst content 1.8%, ultrasound working on-time 4 s, off-time 2 s, total working time 50 min. Under these conditions, the average biodiesel conversion of three experiments was 96.1%. PMID:25199445

  5. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  6. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Lesioning of the Phrenic Nerve in a Patient with Intractable Hiccup

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keum Nae; Park, In Kyung; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2010-01-01

    Persistent and intractable hiccups (with respective durations of more than 48 hours and 1 month) can result in depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, dehydration, weight loss, malnutrition, and aspiration syndromes. The conventional treatments for hiccups are either non-pharmacological, pharmacological or a nerve block treatment. Pulsed radiofrequency lesioning (PRFL) has been proposed for the modulation of the excited nervous system pathway of pain as a safe and nondestructive treatment method. As placement of the electrode in close proximity to the targeted nerve is very important for the success of PRFL, ultrasound appears to be well suited for this technique. A 74-year-old man suffering from intractable hiccups that had developed after a coronary artery bypass graft and had continued for 7 years was referred to our pain clinic. He had not been treated with conventional methods or medications. We performed PRFL of the phrenic nerve guided by ultrasound and the hiccups disappeared. PMID:20830266

  7. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts.

  8. A new method for evaluating the degeneration of articular cartilage using pulse-echo ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sun, Anyu; Bai, Xiaolong; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel nondestructive ultrasonic technique for measuring the sound speed and acoustic impedance of articular cartilage using the pulsed Vz,t technique. Vz,t data include a series of pulsed ultrasonic echoes collected using different distances between the ultrasonic transducer and the specimen. The 2D Fourier transform is applied to the Vz,t data to reconstruct the 2D reflection spectrum Rθ,ω. To obtain the reflection coefficient of articular cartilage, the Vz,t data from a reference specimen with a well-known reflection coefficient are obtained to eliminate the dependence on the general system transfer function. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus (Ha) is computed based on the measured reflection coefficient and the sound speed. In the experiment, 32 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from bovine articular cartilage, and 16 samples were digested using 0.25% trypsin solution. The sound speed and Ha of these cartilage samples were evaluated before and after degeneration. The magnitude of the sound speed decreased with trypsin digestion (from 1663 ± 5.6 m/s to 1613 ± 5.3 m/s). Moreover, the Young's modulus in the corresponding degenerative state was measured and was correlated with the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus was determined to be highly correlated with the Young's modulus (n = 16, r>0.895, p<0.003, Pearson correlation test for each measurement). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed method to assess the changes in sound speed and the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus of cartilage after degeneration. PMID:25832249

  9. Pulsed laser generation of ultrasound in a metal plate between the melting and ablation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2015-03-31

    The generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation, is treated. Consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the evolution of the melt pool, and thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place over a few nanoseconds, and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. Because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be represented as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response at the opposite surface to these forces is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green’s functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method, and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported of the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold. Comparison is made between results obtained using available temperature dependent thermophysical data, and room temperature materials constants except near the melting point.

  10. Non-human primate skull effects on the cavitation detection threshold of FUS-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-11-01

    Microbubble (MB)-assisted focused ultrasound is a promising technique for delivering drugs to the brain by noninvasively and transiently opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and monitoring BBB opening using passive cavitation detection (PCD) is critical in detecting its occurrence, extent as well as assessing its mechanism. One of the main obstacles in achieving those objectives in large animals is the transcranial attenuation. To study the effects, the cavitation response through the in-vitro non-human primate (NHP) skull was investigated. In-house manufactured lipid-shelled MB (medium diameter: 4-5 um) were injected into a 4-mm channel of a phantom below a degassed monkey skull. A hydrophone confocally aligned with the FUS transducer served as PCD during sonication (frequency: 0.50 MHz, peak rarefactional pressures: 0.05-0.60 MPa, pulse length: 100 cycles, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 2 s) for four cases: water without skull, water with skull, MB without skull and MB with skull. A 5.1-MHz linear-array transducer was also used to monitor the MB disruption. The frequency spectra, spectrograms, stable cavitation dose (SCD) and inertial cavitation dose (ICD) were quantified. Results showed that the onset of stable cavitation and inertial cavitation in the experiments occurred at 50 kPa, and was detectable throught the NHP skull since the both the detection thresholds for stable cavitation and inertial cavitation remained unchanged compared to the non-skull case, and the SCD and ICD acquired transcranially may not adequately represent the true extent of stable and inertial cavitation due to the skull attenuation.

  11. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event: A Parametric Study

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 – 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index (MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested. Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): (1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remnant cavitation nuclei; (2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; (3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  12. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as hock-wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 to 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index(MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested.Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): 1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remanent cavitation nuclei; 2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; and 3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high-magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  13. Ultrasound contrast imaging: influence of scatterer motion in multi-pulse techniques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fanglue; Cachard, Christian; Mori, Riccardo; Varray, Francois; Guidi, Francesco; Basset, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    In ultrasound contrast imaging, many techniques based on multiple transmissions have been proposed to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR). They are generally based on the response of static scatterers inside the imaged region. However, scatterer motion, for example in blood vessels, has an inevitable influence on multi-pulse techniques, which can either enhance or degrade the technique involved. This paper investigates the response of static nonlinear media insonated by multi-pulses with various phase shifts, and the influence of scatterer motion on multi-pulse techniques. Simulations and experimental results from a single bubble and clouds of bubbles show that the phase shift of the echoes backscattered from bubbles is dependent on the transmissions' phase shift, and that the bubble motion influences the efficiency of multi-pulse techniques: fundamental and second-harmonic amplitudes of the processed signal change periodically, exhibiting maximum or minimum values, according to scatterer motion. Furthermore, experimental results based on the second-harmonic inversion (SHI) technique reveal that bubble motion can be taken into account to regulate the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). With the optimal PRF, the CTR of SHI images can be improved by about 12 dB compared with second-harmonic images.

  14. Cost-effective design of a concurrent photoacoustic-ultrasound microscope using single laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Shao; Liu, Wei-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    A method for concurrent photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) imaging with single laser pulses was previously demonstrated. An optical-absorbing multilayer film that can generate a US pulse based on the thermoelastic effect is used. With such a film, the generated US can be adjusted so that it does not overlap with the spectrum of the PA signal generated by the light transmitting through the layer. Thus, the US signal and the PA signal can be generated and separated by using a single laser pulse with spectral filtering. In this study, we continue with the same concurrent imaging approach and propose a cost-effective and portable design. The design consists of a pulsed laser diode with the repetition rate up to 25 kHz and energy of 2 μJ/pulse. A multilayer film is employed to generate narrow band US signals under laser excitation for US imaging. With simple spectral filtering, the PA signals and the US signals can be separated. With optical resolution, the system has a theoretical lateral resolution of 2 μm in PA imaging and 200 μm in US imaging. One of the applications of the proposed microscope is for tumor biology, where angiogenesis is an essential topic for understanding tumor growth and tumor metastasis. We will demonstrate performance of the proposed system by imaging vasculature networks.

  15. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  16. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle Integrated Photo-responsive Liposomes and Measurement of Their Microbubble Cavitation upon Pulse Laser Excitation.

    PubMed

    Mathiyazhakan, Malathi; Chan, Weiwei; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Xu, Chenjie

    2016-01-01

    Photo-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) have received considerable attention because of their potential in providing spatial, temporal, and dosage control over the drug release. However, most of the relevant technologies are still in the development process and are unprocurable by clinics. Here, we describe a facile fabrication of these photo-responsive NPs with commercially available gold NPs and thermo-responsive liposomes. Calcein is used as a model drug to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency and the release kinetic profile upon heat/light stimulation. Finally, we show that this photo-triggered release is due to the membrane disruption caused by microbubble cavitation, which can be measured with hydrophone. PMID:26967978

  17. Pulsed radiofrequency under ultrasound guidance for the tarsal tunnel syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jin Young; Hahn, Yun Jin; Sung, Choon Ho; Jung, Sung Hoon; Moon, Ho Sik

    2014-12-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a compression neuropathy that results from entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or its branches. TTS may be treated either by conservative measures, including physical therapy, medications, and steroid injections, or by surgical decompression. Despite a variety of treatments, a few cases of TTS will relapse, and many cases of recurrent TTS will require re-operation. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) is known to have a number of advantages for pain management, particularly as this technique does not cause neural compromise such as motor weakness. Here, we report a new application of ultrasound-guided PRF in two cases of intractable TTS. Both patients had a long duration of severe foot pain and had been treated with various therapeutic modalities without lasting relief. We applied ultrasound-guided PRF to the affected posterior tibial nerve in each patient, and both had significantly reduced pain intensity scores and analgesic requirements without any complications. Ultrasound-guided PRF for intractable TTS relieved severe foot pain. It may supersede surgery as a reliable treatment for intractable TTS.

  18. Low intensity-pulsed ultrasound induced apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shi, Mingfang; Liu, Bangzhong; Liu, Guanghua; Wang, Ping; Yang, Mingzhen; Li, Yun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine whether low intensity-pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) could induce apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, SMMC-7721, and to define the mechanism of ultrasound-induced apoptosis, in vitro. MTT assay was used to measure cell proliferation. Apoptosis was investigated by multiple methods such as flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, Ca(2+) mobilizations, pro- and anti-apoptotic protein expression, and light as well as ultramicroscopic morphology. The results provide evidence that LIPUS induced a dose-dependent effect on cell viability and apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cells. Specifically, exposure of cells to >0.5 W/cm(2) intensity significantly increased cell apoptosis, caused shifts in cell cycle phase, and induced structural changes. Ultrasound significantly increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations and modulated expression of caspase-3, Bcl-2 and Bax. The findings suggest that this novel technology can be used to induce SMMC-7721 apoptosis via the Ca(2+)/mitochondrial pathway and could potentially be of clinical use for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (SMMC-7721 cell line) and other cancers.

  19. Ultrasound-assisted pulse electrodeposition and characterization of Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fenghua; Liu, Cansen; Huang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings were synthesized by pulse electrodeposition with help of ultrasound agitation. Effect of agitation techniques of electrolyte on the microstructure and morphology of the nanocomposite coatings were evaluated. The Co-W/MWCNTs composite coating produced by mechanical agitation shows rough surface and has large and poorly dispersed CNT agglomerates in its layer and surface, resulting in this coating displaying low hardness and inferior wear resistance and friction reduction. Ultrasound agitation is much better than mechanical stirring to evenly distribute MWCNTs in the layer and surface of the composite coatings. The nanocomposite coatings produced with ultrasound agitation exhibits smoother surface, higher hardness and better tribological properties than the one produced with mechanical agitation. In addition, the ultrasonic power greatly affects the morphology and properties of the as-prepared composite coatings. As the ultrasonic power of 400 W was applied, a large number of MWCNTs are successfully incorporated and evenly distributed in the as-prepared composite coating, which result in this composite coating exhibiting the highest hardness and the best friction-reducing and anti-wear ability. In general, the differences of the friction and wear behaviors and the corresponding mechanisms of these coatings produced under different conditions are attributed to their different hardness and microstructures.

  20. High speed observation of HIFU-induced cavitation cloud near curved rigid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Z. G.; Wang, F. B.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental study of the influence of surface curvature to the behaviour of HIFU-induced cavitation cloud. A Q-switched ruby pulse laser is used to induce cavitation nuclei in deionized water. A piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer (1.7 MHz) provides a focused ultrasound field to inspire the nucleus to cavitation cloud. A PZT probe type hydrophone is applied for measuring the HIFU sound field. It was observed that the motion of cavitation cloud located near the boundary is significantly influenced by the distance between cloud and boundary, as well as the curvature of the boundary. The curvature was defined by parameters λ and ξ. Convex boundary, concave boundary, and flat boundary correspond to ξ <1, ξ >1 and ξ = 1, respectively. Different behaviours of the cloud, including the migration of the cloud, the characteristics of oscillation, etc., were observed under different boundary curvatures by high-speed photography. Sonoluminescence of the acoustic cavitation bubble clouds were also studied to illustrate the characteristics of acoustic streaming.

  1. MATLAB/Simulink Pulse-Echo Ultrasound System Simulator Based on Experimentally Validated Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Hyongmin; Lee, Hyunsook; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Eunhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2016-02-01

    A flexible clinical ultrasound system must operate with different transducers, which have characteristic impulse responses and widely varying impedances. The impulse response determines the shape of the high-voltage pulse that is transmitted and the specifications of the front-end electronics that receive the echo; the impedance determines the specification of the matching network through which the transducer is connected. System-level optimization of these subsystems requires accurate modeling of pulse-echo (two-way) response, which in turn demands a unified simulation of the ultrasonics and electronics. In this paper, this is realized by combining MATLAB/Simulink models of the high-voltage transmitter, the transmission interface, the acoustic subsystem which includes wave propagation and reflection, the receiving interface, and the front-end receiver. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our simulator, the models are experimentally validated by comparing the simulation results with the measured data from a commercial ultrasound system. This simulator could be used to quickly provide system-level feedback for an optimized tuning of electronic design parameters.

  2. AB101. Therapeutic effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bicheng; Lei, Hongen; Guan, Ruili; Li, Huixi; Xin, Zhongcheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective Stress urinary incontinence, a major type of urinary incontinence, increases with age and is often developed after partum injury. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been investigated in the treatment of many diseases showing its ability of restoring soft tissue injury. We investigated the therapeutic effect of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in stress urinary incontinence. Methods Thirty-two Sprague Dawley rats in SUI group underwent vaginal distension (VD) and bilateral ovariectomy mimicking partum injury. Eight rats served as mock operation control. Eight rats each in SUI group was treated with low-dosage LESW (0.03 mJ/mm2), medium-dosage LESW (0.06 mJ/mm2), or high-dosage LESW (0.09 mJ/mm2). The rest eight rats served as none-treatment group. For functional study, leak point pressure test (LPP) was performed 2 weeks after the last LESW. Masson trichrome staining was performed to validate the pathological changes. Results The LPP was restored in medium-dosage LESW and high-dosage LESW groups, but not in low-dosage LESW group. More robust striated muscle regeneration was found in these two groups comparing with the none-treatment group. Conclusions LIPUS ameliorate the symptom of SUI via activating striated muscle regeneration.

  3. ULTRASOUND PULSE-ECHO IMAGING USING THE SPLIT-STEP FOURIER PROPAGATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; QUAN, YOULI

    2007-01-31

    Ultrasonic reflection imaging has the potential to produce higher image resolution than transmission tomography, but imaging resolution and quality still need to be further improved for early cancer detection and diagnosis. We present an ultrasound reflection image reconstruction method using the split-step Fourier propagator. It is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wavenumber domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the breast. We use synthetic ultrasound pulse-echo data recorded around a ring for heterogeneous, computer-generated numerical breast phantoms to study the imaging capability of the method. The phantoms are derived from an experimental breast phantom and a sound-speed tomography image of an in-vivo ultrasound breast data collected usi ng a ring array. The heterogeneous sound-speed models used for pulse-echo imaging are obtained using a computationally efficient, first-arrival-time (time-of-flight) transmission tomography method. Our studies demonstrate that reflection image reconstruction using the split-step Fourier propagator with heterogeneous sound-speed models significantly improves image quality and resolution. We also numerically verify the spatial sampling criterion of wavefields for a ring transducer array.

  4. Non-invasive controlled release from gold nanoparticle integrated photo-responsive liposomes through pulse laser induced microbubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Mathiyazhakan, Malathi; Yang, Yuanxiang; Liu, Yibo; Zhu, Caigang; Liu, Quan; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Tam, Kam Chiu; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-02-01

    Drug-carriers, capable of releasing the drug at the target sites upon external stimuli, are attractive for theranostic applications. In recent years, photo-responsive nanoparticles (NPs) have received considerable attention because of their potentials in providing spatial, temporal, and dosage control over the drug release. However, most of the relevant technologies are still in the process of development and are unprocurable by the clinics. Here, we demonstrated facile fabrication of these photo-responsive NPs by loading hydrophilic gold NPs within thermo-responsive liposomes. Calcein was used as a model drug to evaluate the encapsulation efficiency and the release kinetic profile upon heat/light stimulation. Furthermore, we characterized their size, morphology, phase transition temperature and stability. Finally, we demonstrated that this photo-triggered release might be due to the membrane disruption caused by microbubble cavitation.

  5. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrunhosa, Viviane M.; Mermelstein, Claudia S.; Costa, Manoel L.; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm2 continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm2 pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm2 pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm2 continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  6. Histotripsy-Induced Cavitation Cloud Initiation Thresholds in Tissues of Different Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation and maintenance of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. This paper studies how tissue properties impact the pressure threshold to initiate the cavitation bubble cloud. Our previous study showed that shock scattering off one or more initial bubbles, expanded to sufficient size in the focus, plays an important role in initiating a dense cavitation cloud. In this process, the shock scattering causes the positive pressure phase to be inverted, resulting in a scattered wave that has the opposite polarity of the incident shock. The inverted shock is superimposed on the incident negative pressure phase to form extremely high negative pressures, resulting in a dense cavitation cloud growing toward the transducer. We hypothesize that increased tissue stiffness impedes the expansion of initial bubbles, reducing the scattered tensile pressure, and thus requiring higher initial intensities for cloud initiation. To test this hypothesis, 5-cycle histotripsy pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) of 10, 100, or 1000 Hz were applied by a 1-MHz transducer focused inside mechanically tunable tissue-mimicking agarose phantoms and various ex vivo porcine tissues covering a range of Young’s moduli. The threshold to initiate a cavitation cloud and resulting bubble expansion were recorded using acoustic backscatter detection and optical imaging. In both phantoms and ex vivo tissue, results demonstrated a higher cavitation cloud initiation threshold for tissues of higher Young’s modulus. Results also demonstrated a decrease in bubble expansion in phantoms of higher Young’s modulus. These results support our hypothesis, improve our understanding of the effect of histotripsy in tissues with different mechanical properties, and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for fractionation of specific tissues. PMID:24474139

  7. Histotripsy-induced cavitation cloud initiation thresholds in tissues of different mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles A; Xu, Zhen

    2014-02-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation and maintenance of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. This paper studies how tissue properties impact the pressure threshold to initiate the cavitation bubble cloud. Our previous study showed that shock scattering off one or more initial bubbles, expanded to sufficient size in the focus, plays an important role in initiating a dense cavitation cloud. In this process, the shock scattering causes the positive pressure phase to be inverted, resulting in a scattered wave that has the opposite polarity of the incident shock. The inverted shock is superimposed on the incident negative pressure phase to form extremely high negative pressures, resulting in a dense cavitation cloud growing toward the transducer. We hypothesize that increased tissue stiffness impedes the expansion of initial bubbles, reducing the scattered tensile pressure, and thus requiring higher initial intensities for cloud initiation. To test this hypothesis, 5-cycle histotripsy pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) of 10, 100, or 1000 Hz were applied by a 1-MHz transducer focused inside mechanically tunable tissue-mimicking agarose phantoms and various ex vivo porcine tissues covering a range of Young's moduli. The threshold to initiate a cavitation cloud and resulting bubble expansion were recorded using acoustic backscatter detection and optical imaging. In both phantoms and ex vivo tissue, results demonstrated a higher cavitation cloud initiation threshold for tissues of higher Young's modulus. Results also demonstrated a decrease in bubble expansion in phantoms of higher Young's modulus. These results support our hypothesis, improve our understanding of the effect of histotripsy in tissues with different mechanical properties, and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for fractionation of specific tissues.

  8. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  9. Overview of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    It is well documented that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage can occur in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs, and monkeys. Our own experimental studies have focused on mice, rats, and pigs as animal models. The characteristics of the lesions produced in mice, rats and pigs were similar to those described in studies by our research group and others, suggesting a common pathogenesis for the initiation and propagation of the lesions at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Five experimental in vivo studies have been conducted to evaluate whether cavitation is responsible for ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage. The studies evaluated the dependencies of hydrostatic pressure, frequency, pulse polarity, contrast agents and lung inflation, and the results of each study appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that the mechanism for the production of a lung hemorrhage was inertial cavitation. Other dependencies evaluated included beam width, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration, exposure duration, and animal species and age. The thresholds for producing ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, in general, were less than the FDA's regulatory limit of a Mechanical Index (MI) of 1.9. Further, the MI does not appear to provide a risk-based index for lung hemorrhage. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01EB02641.

  10. Robert Apfel's contribution to clinical diagnostic ultrasound: The mechanical index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2001-05-01

    The mechanical index, MI, resulted from theoretical considerations of the short-pulse acoustic threshold for inertial cavitation in water populated with microbubbles of all sizes [R. E. Apfel and C. K. Holland, Ultrasound Med Biol. 17, 179-185 (1991)]. In this review, the onset of cavitation will be discussed with reference to Robert Apfel's legacy of theoretical and experimental data. The questions arise: Can the utility of the MI be extended to situations in which the threshold MI is exceeded, thereby allowing for some estimate of the quantification of a potential bioeffect due to microcavitation? Also, can the MI be extended to situations in which pulses are, unlike the original formulation, not short? Is there a theoretical or semi-empirical basis for the MI threshold below which cavitation is unlikely? Can the MI be used to predict gas contrast agent destruction? The possible consequences of gas body activation associated with aerated lung tissue, intestinal gas pockets or encapsulated gas contrast agents represent specific instances of cavitation considerations relevant to clinical practice. Monitoring the real-time display of the MI (mandated by the FDA) helps clinicians evaluate and minimize the potential risks in the use of diagnostic ultrasound instrumentation. [Research supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R29 HL58761.

  11. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  12. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm2, 500 mW/cm2 or 750 mW/cm2 LIPUS for 2–12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm2 significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  13. Convolutional modeling of diffraction effects in pulse-echo ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mast, T. Douglas

    2010-01-01

    A model is presented for pulse-echo imaging of three-dimensional, linear, weakly-scattering continuum media by ultrasound array transducers. The model accounts for the diffracted fields of focused array subapertures in both transmit and receive modes, multiple transmit and receive focal zones, frequency-dependent attenuation, and aberration caused by mismatched medium and beamformer sound speeds. For a given medium reflectivity function, computation of a B-scan requires evaluation of a depth-dependent transmit∕receive beam product, followed by two one-dimensional convolutions and a one-dimensional summation. Numerical results obtained using analytic expressions for transmit and receive beams agree favorably with measured B-scan images and speckle statistics. PMID:20815433

  14. Effect of therapeutic pulsed ultrasound on lipoperoxidation and fibrogenesis in an animal model of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tiago P; Gomes, Marcelo; Fraga, Daiane B; Freitas, Luciana S; Rezin, Gislaine T; Santos, Patricia M; Silveira, Paulo C; Paula, Marcos M; Pinho, Ricardo A; Streck, Emilio L

    2010-06-01

    Evidence from the literature has shown that the wound healing process is enhanced by ultrasound therapy. In the present study, we measured thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS; index of lipoperoxidation) and hydroxyproline (index of collagen synthesis) levels in wounds after therapeutic pulsed ultrasound (TPU) treatment. Male Wistar rats were submitted to skin ulceration, and three doses of TPU (0.4, 0.6, and 0.8W/cm(2)) were used. A circular area of skin was removed with a punch biopsy from the medial dorsal region. After TPU for 10 days, TBARS (Draper and Hadley [21]) and hydroxyproline (Woessner [22]) levels were measured in the tissue around the wound. Results showed that TPU improved wound healing, since the wound size was significantly smaller 5 and 10 days after ulceration in groups submitted to this treatment. Moreover, TBARS levels were decreased in the 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8W/cm(2) TPU groups, and hydroxyproline levels were increased in the 0.6 and 0.8W/cm(2) TPU groups. These findings indicate that TPU presents beneficial effects on the wound healing process, probably by speeding up the inflammatory phase and inducing collagen synthesis.

  15. Hybrid-modality ocular imaging using a clinical ultrasound system and nanosecond pulsed laser

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hoong-Ta; Matham, Murukeshan Vadakke

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Hybrid optical modality imaging is a special type of multimodality imaging significantly used in the recent past in order to harness the strengths of different imaging methods as well as to furnish complementary information beyond that provided by any individual method. We present a hybrid-modality imaging system based on a commercial clinical ultrasound imaging (USI) system using a linear array ultrasound transducer (UST) and a tunable nanosecond pulsed laser as the source. The integrated system uses photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and USI for ocular imaging to provide the complementary absorption and structural information of the eye. In this system, B-mode images from PAI and USI are acquired at 10 Hz and about 40 Hz, respectively. A linear array UST makes the system much faster compared to other ocular imaging systems using a single-element UST to form B-mode images. The results show that the proposed instrumentation is able to incorporate PAI and USI in a single setup. The feasibility and efficiency of this developed probe system was illustrated by using enucleated pig eyes as test samples. It was demonstrated that PAI could successfully capture photoacoustic signals from the iris, anterior lens surface, and posterior pole, while USI could accomplish the mapping of the eye to reveal the structures like the cornea, anterior chamber, lens, iris, and posterior pole. This system and the proposed methodology are expected to enable ocular disease diagnostic applications and can be used as a preclinical imaging system. PMID:26835487

  16. Potential contrast improvement in ultrasound pulse inversion imaging using EMD and EEMD.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Shen, Che-Chou; Li, Pai-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound nonlinear imaging using microbubble-based contrast agents has been widely investigated. Nonetheless, its contrast is often reduced by the nonlinearity of acoustic wave propagation in tissue. In this paper, we explore the use of empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) in the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) for possible contrast improvement. The HHT is designed for analyzing nonlinear and nonstationary data, whereas EMD is a method associated with the HHT that allows decomposition of data into a finite number of intrinsic modes. The hypothesis is that the nonlinear signal from microbubbles and the tissue nonlinear signal can be better differentiated with EMD and EEMD, thus making contrast improvement possible. Specifically, we tested this method on pulse-inversion nonlinear imaging, which is generally regarded as one of the most effective nonlinear imaging methods. The results show that the contrast-to-tissue ratios at the fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies were improved by 10.2 and 4.3 dB, respectively, after EEMD. Nonetheless, image artifacts also appeared, and hence further investigation is needed before EMD and EEMD can be applied in practical applications of ultrasound nonlinear imaging.

  17. Preliminary Study on the Efficacy of Low Intensity Pulsed ultrasound for Osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Makoto; Koji, Akiyama; Tokita, Akihumi; Ishijima, Muneaki; Nozawa, Masahiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2005-03-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has recently been shown to accelerate long bone fracture healing, but its effect on osteoporosis is not clear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether bone mineral density (BMD) of distal one-third radius of older woman is influenced with LIPUS. Six Japanese women who were outpatients at our hospital were recruited in this study and ranged from seventy to seventy-four years of age. In this study LIPUS exposed unilateral distal one-third of the radius for 20 min/once, 3 times and over every week for six months. The contralateral side was not exposed. The intensity of ultrasound was 30 mW/cm2 spatial-average temporal-average. Bone status was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Medication for osteoporosis were not changed. A significant increases in BMD at the treatment site were found in 3 women without alendronate and menatetrenone medication (averaged 4.5%). No significant differences were found in women on these medications. No remarkable changes were found away from the treatment site. These results suggest the possibility of effectiveness of LIPUS applied to a local area of osteoporosis and that pharmacological intervention is capable of influencing the effect of LIPUS for osteoporosis.

  18. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104-5  ×  107 microbubbles ml-1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s-1, prior to the onset of

  19. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104–5  ×  107 microbubbles ml‑1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75–366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s‑1, prior to the onset

  20. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  1. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  2. Evaluation of the increase in permeability of the blood–brain barrier during tumor progression after pulsed focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lin, Guan-Liang; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeability of the blood–brain barrier after sonication by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound and to determine if such an approach increases the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio. Materials and methods F98 glioma-bearing Fischer 344 rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue with or without blood–tumor barrier disruption induced by transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. Sonication was applied at a frequency of 1 MHz with a 5% duty cycle and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The permeability of the blood–brain barrier was assessed by the extravasation of Evans blue. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images were used to monitor the gadolinium deposition path associated with transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the influencing size and location was also investigated. In addition, whole brain histological analysis was performed. The results were compared by two-tailed unpaired t-test. Results The accumulation of Evans blue in brains and the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio of Evans blue were significantly increased after pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure. Evans blue injection followed by sonication showed an increase in the tumor:ipsilateral brain ratio of the target tumors (9.14:1) of about 2.23-fold compared with the control tumors (x4.09) on day 6 after tumor implantation. Magnetic resonance images showed that pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound locally enhances the permeability of the blood–tumor barrier in the glioma-bearing rats. Conclusion This method could allow enhanced synergistic effects with respect to other brain tumor treatment regimens. PMID:22359451

  3. Targeted therapy of animal eyes with tumors by laser-generated focused ultrasound (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehwa; Luo, Wei; Demirci, Hakan; Guo, L. Jay

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation therapy based on high-amplitude focused ultrasound (e.g., Histotripsy) has shown great promise in clinical trials. The technique realizes localized treatments of tissues and diseased cells by controlling cavitation zones, which can be even smaller than its acoustic spot sizes. Also, the short pressure pulse used in the technique can minimize the unwanted heat accumulation, which the conventional piezoelectric transducers suffer from due to low operating frequencies and relatively long acoustic pulses. However, this modality requires bulky system composed of array of piezoelectric elements and electric amplifiers in order to obtain high pressure amplitude. Moreover, especially when treating an area much smaller than the acoustic spot size, this approach may be vulnerable to nucleation sites within the focal volume, which can potentially induce cavitation and thus enlarge the total treatment area. Here, we show targeted cell-level therapy by using laser generated ultrasound. By employing a concave lens coated by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composite, high-amplitude acoustic pressure can be obtained at a tight focal spot (<100 um). The small focal spot, comparable to cavitation zone, lead to controlled cavitation treatment. Such feature can be exploited for treating intraocular tumors but without harming other parts of the eye (e.g. healthy retina and choroid) and therefore preserve the vision of the patients. We demonstrate that the localized disruption effects can be used for cell-level surgery to remove cells and to kill cells. Some experimental examples are shown using animal eyeballs.

  4. Feedback loop process for controlling inertial cavitation: experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, Claude; Sabraoui, Abbas; Reslan, Lina; Bera, Jean-Christophe; Gilles, Bruno; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2011-09-01

    Applications involving cavitation mechanisms, such as sonoporation, are irreproducible in the case of a fixed-intensity sonication, due to the non-stationary behavior of cavitation. We then propose to work at a fixed-cavitation level instead of under fixed-intensity sonication conditions. For this purpose a regulated cavitation generator has been developed in a stationary wave field configuration, which allows regulation of the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop based on acoustic cavitation measurements. The cavitation level indicator was quantified by the broadband spectrum noise level relative to inertial cavitation events. This generated inertial cavitation was characterized by both acoustic and chemical measurements, quantifying hydroxyl radicals produced by water sonolysis. While the cavitation level is obtained with a 40% standard deviation for fixed applied acoustic intensities in the range [0.01 3.44] W/cm2, the regulated generator reproduces the cavitation level with a standard deviation of 3%. The results show that the hydroxyl radical production is better correlated with the cavitation level setting than with the applied acoustic intensity, highlighting the fact that broadband noise is a good indicator of inertial cavitation, with greatest interest for cavitation monitoring. In summary, the regulated device generates a cavitation level that is reproducible, repeatable and stable in time. This system produces reproducible effects that allow consideration of biological applications such as sonoporation to be independent of the experimental ultrasound device, as confirmed by transfection efficiency and cell cytotoxicity studies. Thus, this feedback loop process presents interesting perspectives for monitoring and controlling in-vivo cavitation.

  5. Treatment of acute intravascular thrombi with diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Lof, John; Everbach, Carr; He, Anming; Bennett, Richard M; Matsunaga, Terry; Johanning, Jason; Porter, Thomas R

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether high mechanical index (MI) impulses from diagnostic ultrasound (DUS) could dissolve intravascular thrombi using intravenous microbubbles. Using a canine model, DUS was applied during a continuous intravenous infusion of microbubbles. Completely thrombosed grafts were assigned to 2 treatment regimens: low-MI (<0.5-MI) ultrasound alone; or intermittent high-MI impulses (1.9-MI) guided by low-MI ultrasound (contrast pulse sequencing). A 20-MHz cavitation detector was placed confocal to the ultrasound transducer to make intravascular cavitation measurements in 1 dog. Intravascular cavitational activity was detected when an MI of >0.5 was applied. In grafts treated with intermittent high-MI ultrasound, angiographic success was 71% at 30 min and 79% at 45 min, compared with 20% and 30% at these times in the low-MI ultrasound alone group (p < 0.05). We conclude that a commercially available DUS transducer can successfully recanalize acute intravascular thrombi during a continuous microbubble infusion. PMID:19580735

  6. Study of the inactivation of spoilage microorganisms in apple juice by pulsed light and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Mariana; Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasound (US) (600 W, 20 kHz and 95.2 μm wave amplitude; 10 or 30 min at 20, 30 or 44 ± 1 °C) and pulsed light (PL) (Xenon lamp; 3 pulses/s; 0.1 m distance; 2.4 J/cm(2)-71.6 J/cm(2); initial temperature 2, 30, 44 ± 1 °C) on the inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae KE162 inoculated in commercial (pH: 3.5; 12.5 °Brix) and natural squeezed (pH: 3.4; 11.8 °Brix) apple juices. Inactivation depended on treatment time, temperature, microorganism and matrix. Combination of these technologies led up to 3.0 log cycles of spore reduction in commercial apple juice and 2.0 log cycles in natural juice; while for S. cerevisiae, 6.4 and 5.8 log cycles of reduction were achieved in commercial and natural apple juices, respectively. In natural apple juice, the combination of US + 60 s PL at the highest temperature build-up (56 ± 1 °C) was the most effective treatment for both strains. In commercial apple juice, US did not contribute to further inactivation of spores, but significantly reduced yeast population. Certain combinations of US + PL kept on good microbial stability under refrigerated conditions for 15 days. PMID:25475338

  7. Study of the inactivation of spoilage microorganisms in apple juice by pulsed light and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Mariana; Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasound (US) (600 W, 20 kHz and 95.2 μm wave amplitude; 10 or 30 min at 20, 30 or 44 ± 1 °C) and pulsed light (PL) (Xenon lamp; 3 pulses/s; 0.1 m distance; 2.4 J/cm(2)-71.6 J/cm(2); initial temperature 2, 30, 44 ± 1 °C) on the inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae KE162 inoculated in commercial (pH: 3.5; 12.5 °Brix) and natural squeezed (pH: 3.4; 11.8 °Brix) apple juices. Inactivation depended on treatment time, temperature, microorganism and matrix. Combination of these technologies led up to 3.0 log cycles of spore reduction in commercial apple juice and 2.0 log cycles in natural juice; while for S. cerevisiae, 6.4 and 5.8 log cycles of reduction were achieved in commercial and natural apple juices, respectively. In natural apple juice, the combination of US + 60 s PL at the highest temperature build-up (56 ± 1 °C) was the most effective treatment for both strains. In commercial apple juice, US did not contribute to further inactivation of spores, but significantly reduced yeast population. Certain combinations of US + PL kept on good microbial stability under refrigerated conditions for 15 days.

  8. Controlled Cavitation to Augment SWL Stone Comminution: Mechanistic Insights In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been documented to result from mechanical stresses conferred directly to the stone, as well as the activity of cavitational microbubbles. Studies have demonstrated that the presence of this cavitation activity is crucial for stone subdivision; however, its exact role in the comminution process remains somewhat weakly defined, in part due to the fact that it is difficult to isolate the cavitational component from the shock waves themselves. In this study, we further explored the importance of cavitation in SWL stone comminution through the use of histotripsy ultrasound therapy. Histotripsy was utilized to target model stones designed to mimic the mid-range tensile fracture strength of naturally occurring cystine calculi with controlled cavitation at strategic time points in the SWL comminution process. All SWL was applied at a peak-positive pressure (p+) of 34 MPa and a peak-negative pressure (p−) of 8 MPa; a shock rate of 1 Hz was used. Histotripsy pulses had a p− of 33 MPa and were applied at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 100 Hz. Ten model stones were sonicated in-vitro with each of five different treatment schemes: A. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) with 0.7 seconds of histotripsy interleaved between successive shocks (totaling to 42,000 pulses); B. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) followed by 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (1 burst per second, totaling to 42,000 pulses); C. 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses) followed by 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks); D. 10 minutes SWL-only (600 shocks); E. 10 minutes histotripsy-only applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses). Following sonication, debris was collected and sieved through 8, 6, 4, and 2 mm filters. It was found that SWL-only generated a broad range of fragment sizes, with an average of 14.9 ± 24.1% of the original stone mass remaining >8 mm. Histotripsy-only eroded the surface of stones to tiny

  9. Design and implementation of a smartphone-based portable ultrasound pulsed-wave Doppler device for blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Lee, Po-Yang; Chen, Pay-Yu; Liu, Ting-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow measurement using Doppler ultrasound has become a useful tool for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases and as a physiological monitor. Recently, pocket-sized ultrasound scanners have been introduced for portable diagnosis. The present paper reports the implementation of a portable ultrasound pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler flowmeter using a smartphone. A 10-MHz ultrasonic surface transducer was designed for the dynamic monitoring of blood flow velocity. The directional baseband Doppler shift signals were obtained using a portable analog circuit system. After hardware processing, the Doppler signals were fed directly to a smartphone for Doppler spectrogram analysis and display in real time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this system for medical ultrasound Doppler signal processing. A Couette flow phantom, consisting of two parallel disks with a 2-mm gap, was used to evaluate and calibrate the device. Doppler spectrograms of porcine blood flow were measured using this stand-alone portable device under the pulsatile condition. Subsequently, in vivo portable system verification was performed by measuring the arterial blood flow of a rat and comparing the results with the measurement from a commercial ultrasound duplex scanner. All of the results demonstrated the potential for using a smartphone as a novel embedded system for portable medical ultrasound applications. PMID:22293750

  10. Gel phantom study with high-intensity focused ultrasound: influence of metallic stent containing either air or fluid.

    PubMed

    Kang, Koung Mi; Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Haeri; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn

    2014-12-01

    We aimed to investigate whether a cylindrical structure containing either air or fluid and with or without a metallic stent affects the volume and density of cavitation produced by high-intensity focused ultrasound via a gel phantom study. Sixteen tissue-mimicking phantoms based on a polyacrylamide gel mixed with bovine serum albumin with a cylindrical hole 1 cm in diameter and 7.5 cm in length were divided into four groups of four phantoms with air in the holes (group 1), four phantoms with fluid in the holes (group 2), four phantoms with air-containing metallic stents (group 3) and four phantoms with fluid-containing metallic stents (group 4). A pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound beam (50% duty cycle, 40-Hz pulse repetition frequency) at 75 W of acoustic power was directed perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the hole, with its focus at the posterior wall of the hole. The size of the cavitation on the x-, y-, and z-axes was measured, and the volumes of cavitation and coagulation were calculated using the formula for the volume of an elliptical cone. The density of cavitation was measured in the tissue phantom anterior to the hole with a 1 × 1-cm square region of interest. For statistical analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test were used. The phantoms with air-containing holes (groups 1 and 3) developed larger and denser cavitations anterior to the focus, without unnecessary coagulation posterior to the focus, compared with the phantoms with fluid-containing holes (groups 2 and 4), regardless of the presence of stents. All of the axes and volumes of the anterior cavitations were significantly larger than those of the posterior cavitations in groups 1 and 3 (all p-values <0.05). The results of this study might be applied to maximize cavitation to enhance drug delivery into tumors.

  11. Use of Ultrasound Pulses Combined with Definity for Targeted Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a method to combine an ultrasound contrast agent (USCA) with low-intensity focused ultrasound pulses combined to produce temporary blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), a potential non-invasive means for targeted drug delivery in the brain. All of our previous work used the USCA Optison. The purpose of this work was to test the feasibility of using the USCA Definity for BBBD. Thirty-six non-overlapping locations were sonicated through a craniotomy in experiments in the brains of nine rabbits (4 locations per rabbit; US frequency: 0.69MHz, burst: 10ms, PRF: 1Hz, duration: 20s; pressure amplitude: 0.2-1.5 MPa). Eleven locations were sonicated using Optison at 0.5 MPa. For both agents, the probability for BBBD was estimated to be 50% at 0.4 MPa using probit regression. In histology, small isolated areas of extravasated erythrocytes were observed in some locations. At 0.8 MPa and above, this extravasation was sometimes accompanied by tiny (dimensions of 100 μm or less) regions of damaged brain parenchyma. The magnitude of the BBBD was larger with Optison than with Definity at 0.5 MPa (P=0.04), and more areas with extravasated erythrocytes were observed (P=0.03). We conclude that BBBD is possible using Definity for the dosage of USCA and the acoustic parameters tested in this study. While the probability for BBBD as a function of pressure amplitude and the type of acute tissue effects was similar to findings with Optison, under these experimental conditions, Optison produced a larger effect.

  12. Non-invasive low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates bone healing in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Pilla, A A; Mont, M A; Nasser, P R; Khan, S A; Figueiredo, M; Kaufman, J J; Siffert, R S

    1990-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound (US) on the rate of fibula osteotomy healing in 139 mature New Zealand white rabbits was assessed in this study. Bilateral midshaft fibular osteotomies were made using a 1-mm Gigli saw. US was noninvasively applied to one limb for 20 minutes daily, while the contralateral limb served as a control. A 2.5-cm PZT transducer was applied to both limbs, with the treated limb receiving a 200-microseconds burst of 1.5-MHz sine waves repeated at 1.0 kHz. The incident intensity was approximately 30 mW/cm2. Animals were killed at intervals between 14 and 28 days. Maximum strength increases (significant to p less than or equal to 0.01) ranged from 40 to 85% from postoperative day 14 to 23. On day 28, no significant difference in ultimate strength was noted. From day 17 through day 28, all US-treated fractures were as strong as intact bones (p less than or equal to 0.005). On the other hand, the ultimate strength of the control osteotomies attained intact values only by day 28. These results indicate that biomechanical healing is accelerated by a factor of nearly 1.7. This occurs with an overall acceleration of the healing curve in this fresh fracture model. If noninvasive low-intensity pulsed sine wave ultrasound can significantly accelerate bone repair in clinical application with an in-home treatment of 20 minutes daily, then US may be a useful adjunct for fracture care with a concomitant impact on patient morbidity.

  13. Cavitation nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2001-05-01

    For his dissertation research at Harvard, Bob Apfel chose the subject of homogeneous nucleation, and conceived of some ingenious experiments to test existing theories. By selecting a small microdroplet of liquid, he could make the reasonable assumption that no inhomogeneities were present to serve as preferential sites for liquid rupture. However, Bob also studied dirty liquids, as well as very clean ones, and wrote some seminal papers on inhomogeneous nucleation, in which he developed the Golden rule: Know thy liquid! Currently, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of cavitation generation in vivo, particularly in blood, and, for this case, the nucleation conditions are much different than those for normal liquids. In this presentation, I will review some of Bob's pioneering studies and present some of our latest studies of cavitation inception, both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Photoacoustic cavitation for theranostics: mechanism, current progress and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Qin, D.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging cavitation technology, photoacoustic cavitation (PAC) means the formation of bubbles in liquids using focused laser and pre-established ultrasound synchronously. Its significant advantages include the decreased threshold of each modality and the precise location of cavitation determined by the focused laser. In this paper, a brief review of PAC is presented, including the physical mechanism description, the classic experimental technology, the representative results in variety of media, and its applications in biomedical imaging and therapy. Moreover, some preliminary results of PAC in perfluoropentane (PFP) liquid and PFP droplets investigated by passive cavitation detection (PCD) in our group are also presented.

  15. Detection of acoustic emission from cavitation in tissue during clinical extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Choi, M J; Saunders, J E

    1996-01-01

    A 1-MHz focused hydrophone has been used to search for acoustic emission expected to arise from cavitation occurring in tissue during clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The hydrophone is acoustically coupled to the patient's skin and the focus directed at depth in tissue under ultrasound guidance. The measured amplitude-time variation of the acoustic emission from tissue near the shock-wave focus of the Storz Modulith SL20 lithotripter has been examined in four patients. There is evidence of increased amplitude acoustic emission at 1 MHz from regions within tissue that also appear hyperechoic in simultaneously acquired ultrasound images. The acoustic emission from these regions decays from an initial peak to the noise level in about 500 microseconds following each shock-wave pulse. Within this period, a second peak, often of higher amplitude than the first, is typically observed about 100 microseconds after the shockwave. The time between the initial and second peaks is found to increase with increasing shock-wave amplitude. The results are similar to those previously observed from cavitation induced by shock-wave exposure in water and indicate that the 1-MHz acoustic emission arises from inertial cavitation in tissue during clinical ESWL.

  16. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  17. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  18. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound increases the mechanical properties of the healing tissues at bone-tendon junction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Huang, Qing-Hua; Lu, Hong-Bin; Qin, Ling

    2009-01-01

    The re-establishment of bone-tendon junction (BTJ) tissues is involved in many trauma and reconstructive surgeries. A direct BTJ repair requires a long period of immobilization which may be associated with a postoperative weak knee. In this study, we investigated if low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment increases the material properties of healing tissues at bone-tendon junction (BTJ) after partial patellectomy using rabbit models. Standard partial patellectomy was conducted on one knee of twenty four rabbits which were randomly divided into an ultrasound group and a control group. The bony changes of BTJ complexes around the BTJ healing interface were measured by anteroposterior x-ray radiographs; then the volumetric bone-mineral density (BMD) of the new bone was assessed using a peripheral computed tomography scanner (pQCT). The stiffness of patellar cartilage, fibrocartilage at the healing interface and the tendon were measured in situ using a novel noncontact ultrasound water jet indentation system. Not only significantly more newly formed bone at the BTJ healing interface but also increased stiffness of the junction tissues were found in the ultrasound group compared with the controls at week 18. In addition, the ultrasound group also showed significantly 44% higher BMD at week 6 than controls.

  19. Heating of tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound to stimulate enhanced HSP expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    The main aim of this work was numerical modeling of temperature fields induced in soft tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound during neurodegenerative disease treatment and experimental verification of the proposed model for a rat liver. The new therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative diseases consists of stimulation of enhanced expression of the Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) which are responsible for immunity of cells to stress. During therapy the temperature rise in tissues in vivo should not exceed 6 °C above level of the thermal norm (37 °C). First, the 3D acoustic pressure field, and the rate of heat production per unit volume due to that field, were calculated using our 3D numerical solver capable of predicting nonlinear propagation of pulsed high intensity waves generated from circular focused acoustic sources in multilayer configuration of attenuating media. The two-layer configuration of media (water—rat liver) assumed in calculations fairly well approximated both the real anatomic dimensions of rat liver and the geometric scheme of our experimental set-up. A numerical solution of the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation which accounted for the effects of heat diffusion, blood perfusion and metabolism rates, was employed to calculate the temperature fields induced in the rat liver by the ultrasonic beam. The numerical simulation results were verified experimentally using a thermocouple inserted in the liver of a rat under anesthesia at the beam focus. The quantitative analysis of the obtained results enabled estimation of the effects of several acoustic and thermal parameters of the rat liver in vivo on the temperature rise, as well as determination of exposure time for ultrasonic beams with varied acoustic power generated by a 2-MHz circular transducer of 15-mm diameter and 25-mm focal length, in order to avoid the tissue overheating that leads to cells necrosis, which would be unacceptable in neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  20. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-01

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  1. Effect of a Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Device, SX-1001, on Clinical Symptoms in Buerger Disease With Limb Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yukihito; Azuma, Nobuyoshi; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Minamino, Tohru; Kihara, Yasuki; Node, Koichi; Sata, Masataka; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Origasa, Hideki; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Naritomi, Hiroaki; Fujita, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Buerger disease is a rare disease of unknown etiology and cannot be treated by bypass surgery or percutaneous re-endovascularization. Although the need for effective limb ischemia prevention strategies is increasingly being recognized, effective preventative strategies are insufficient. The aim of this study using a new pulsed ultrasound device, SX-1001, is to determine whether treatment using SX-1001 can mitigate rest pain and improve blood supply to ischemic legs in patients with Buerger disease. This study is a multicenter, double-blinded, parallel randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy and safety of SX-1001. Treatment using SX-1001 is expected to result in reduction of the visual analog scale score for pain in Buerger disease patients who have Fontaine stage III. A total of 44 patients from 20 hospitals in Japan will be enrolled. The primary endpoint of the trial is a change in rest pain intensity on the visual analog scale score from baseline to 24 weeks. This trial will be the first to show the safety and efficacy of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound using SX-1001 for clinical symptoms in patients with Buerger disease. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound may be a new therapy for limb ischemia. Ethical approval has been obtained from each of the participating institutes. Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals and at scientific conferences.This study is registered at UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000014757).

  2. Absence of mutagenic effects of continuous and pulsed ultrasound in cultured (AL) human-hamster hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Ritenour, E R; Braaton, M; Harrison, G H; Ueno, A; Gadd, M; Manco-Johnson, M; Parker, R; Shih, S; Waldren, C A

    1991-01-01

    Mutagenic effects of continuous and pulsed ultrasound were looked for using an in vitro assay system, the AL hybrid, that is up to 100 times more sensitive for mutagens such as x-rays and neutrons than the assays used previously to evaluate ultrasound. Cells in suspension in rotated plastic test tubes were insonated with continuous wave ultrasound at 1 MHz, ISPTP = 0.62-40 W/cm2 for 0-40 min. Cells attached in the central region of culture flasks received pulsed exposures at fc = 2.5 MHz, PRF = 1 kHz, 2 and 8 cycles per pulse, with p- = 1.2 MPa (ISPTA = 31-180 mW/cm2) for 0-30 min. Although these exposures were cytotoxic (the plating efficiency was decreased to approximately 65% by the highest doses), induction of mutation, if any occurred, was less than would be expected in this test system from 10-30 cGy of x-ray. PMID:1805481

  3. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy: a potential strategy to stimulate tendon-bone junction healing.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhi-min; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shi-gui

    2012-12-01

    Incorporation of a tendon graft within the bone tunnel represents a challenging clinical problem. Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Enhancement of graft healing to bone is important to facilitate early aggressive rehabilitation and a rapid return to pre-injury activity levels. No convenient, effective or inexpensive procedures exist to enhance tendon-bone (T-B) healing after surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves local blood perfusion and angiogenesis, stimulates cartilage maturation, enhances differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, and motivates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and therefore, appears to be a potential non-invasive tool for T-B healing in early stage of rehabilitation of ACL reconstruction. It is conceivable that LIPUS could be used to stimulate T-B tunnel healing in the home, with the aim of accelerating rehabilitation and an earlier return to normal activities in the near future. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate how LIPUS stimulates T-B healing at the cellular and molecular levels, describe studies in animal models, and provide a future direction for research.

  4. Clinical and immunohistopathological aspects of venous ulcers treatment by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS).

    PubMed

    de Ávila Santana, Luísiane; Alves, José Marcos; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Kajiwara, João Kazuyuki; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Gomes, Fernanda Guzzo; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani

    2013-04-01

    The immunological mechanisms that are triggered by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) in wound healing are unknown. In the present study, experimental groups were used to assess the treatment of chronic venous ulcers with 30mW/cm(2) SATA peripheral LIPUS three times per week compared to a daily treatment of 1% silver sulfadiazine (SDZ). The ulcers of the SDZ group (n=7) (G1) and LIPUS group (n=9) (G2) were photographed five times three months, and the images were analyzed using ImageJ software to quantify the total area (S), fibrin/sphacel area (yellow) and granulation area (red). The healing process was evaluated by the wound healing rate (WHR), granulation tissue rate (GTR) and fibrin/sphacel tissue rate (FTR). The ulcers were biopsied on days 1 and 45 and stained for collagen fiber quantification (picrosirius) and CD68(+) protein and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression using HRP-streptavidin (horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin). On day 90, G2 had a mean 41% decrease in the ulcer area, while no decrease was observed in G1 (p<0.05). An increased tendency toward positive labeling of collagen fibers and VEGF (p>0.05) was observed in G2 compared to G1, and the number of CD68(+) cells was greater in G2 than in G1 (p<0.05). LIPUS presents superior activity compared to SDZ in stimulating the inflammatory and proliferative (angiogenesis and collagenesis, respectively) phases of chronic venous wound healing.

  5. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates tooth movement via activation of the BMP-2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Zheng, Jun; Cui, Ziping; Bai, Xiufeng; Li, Gang; Zhang, Caidi; He, Sanhu; Li, Weihong; Lajud, Shayanne A; Duan, Yinzhong; Zhou, Hong

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine the underlying mechanism of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) induced alveolar bone remodeling and the role of BMP-2 expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model. Orthodontic appliances were placed between the homonymy upper first molars and the upper central incisors in rats under general anesthesia, followed by daily 20-min LIPUS or sham LIPUS treatment beginning at day 0. Tooth movement distances and molecular changes were evaluated at each observation point. In vitro and in vivo studies were conducted to detect HGF (Hepatocyte growth factor)/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathways and receptor activator of NFκB ligand (RANKL) expression by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot and immunohistochemistry. At day 3, LIPUS had no effect on the rat orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2-induced alveolar bone remodeling. However, beginning at day 5 and for the following time points, LIPUS significantly increased orthodontic tooth movement distance and BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression compared with the control group. The qRT-PCR and Western blot data in vitro and in vivo to study BMP-2 expression were consistent with the immunohistochemistry observations. The present study demonstrates that LIPUS promotes alveolar bone remodeling by stimulating the HGF/Runx2/BMP-2 signaling pathway and RANKL expression in a rat orthodontic tooth movement model, and LIPUS increased BMP-2 expression via Runx2 regulation.

  6. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on orthodontically induced root resorption in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghreer, Saleh; Doschak, Michael; Sloan, Alastair J; Major, Paul W; Heo, Giseon; Scurtescu, Cristian; Tsui, Ying Y; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption in vivo. Ten beagle dogs were treated with an orthodontic appliance to move the mandibular fourth premolars bodily. The orthodontic movement was carried out for 4 wk with a continuous force of 1 N/side; using a split-mouth model, LIPUS was applied daily for 20 min. Fourth premolar and surrounding periodontal tissue were evaluated with micro-computed tomography and hematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. We calculated the number, volume and distribution of root resorption lacunae and their percentage relative to total root volume, orthodontic tooth movement and periodontal ligament space. There was no significant difference in orthodontic tooth movement between the two sides. LIPUS significantly reduced the number of orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption initiation areas by 71%, reduced their total volume by 68% and reduced their volume relative to the affected root total volume by 70%. LIPUS induced the formation of a precementum layer, thicker cementum and reparative cellular cementum.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound accelerates nerve regeneration following inferior alveolar nerve transection in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Masamichi; Iwata, Koichi; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury, which is frequently caused by orofacial surgery or trauma, induces sensory loss in orofacial regions innervated by the IAN. However, no effective treatment for orofacial sensory loss currently exists. We determined whether sensory loss in facial skin above the mental foramen following IAN transection was recovered by exposure of the transected IAN to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS). Inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX) was performed in 7-wk-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. On day 7 after IANX, the effect of daily LIPUS (from day 0) on the transected IAN, in terms of sensitivity to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, was examined. Moreover, the number of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons innervating the facial skin above the mental foramen of rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS was counted using the retrograde neurotracing technique. Daily exposure of the transected IAN to LIPUS significantly promoted recovery of the head-withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation of the facial skin above the mental foramen, and the number of TG neurons innervating the facial skin above mental foramen was significantly increased in rats with IANX treated daily with LIPUS compared with sham or LIPUS-unexposed rats. Daily treatment of stumps of the transected IAN with LIPUS facilitated morphological and functional regeneration, suggesting that LIPUS is an effective and novel therapy for IAN injury. PMID:27058986

  8. A feasibility study for measuring accurate tendon displacements using an audio-based Fourier analysis of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound signals.

    PubMed

    Stegman, K J; Podhorodeski, R P; Park, E J

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasound displacement measurements of a slow moving "tendon-like" string was investigated in this study. This was accomplished by estimating string displacements using an audio-based Fourier analysis of a Pulsed-Wave Doppler signal from a commercial ultrasound scanner. Our feasibility study showed that the proposed technique is much more accurate at estimating the actual string displacement in comparison to the scanner's onboard software. Furthermore, this study also shows that a real-time Doppler data acquisition from an ultrasound scanner is possible for the ultimate purpose of real-time biological tendon displacement monitoring.

  9. Effects of acoustic parameters on bubble cloud dynamics in ultrasound tissue erosion (histotripsy).

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-07-01

    High intensity pulsed ultrasound can produce significant mechanical tissue fractionation with sharp boundaries ("histotripsy"). At a tissue-fluid interface, histotripsy produces clearly demarcated tissue erosion and the erosion efficiency depends on pulse parameters. Acoustic cavitation is believed to be the primary mechanism for the histotripsy process. To investigate the physical basis of the dependence of tissue erosion on pulse parameters, an optical method was used to monitor the effects of pulse parameters on the cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses at a tissue-water interface. The pulse parameters studied include pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Results show that the duration of growth and collapse (collapse cycle) of the bubble cloud increased with increasing pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and PRF when the next pulse arrived after the collapse of the previous bubble cloud. When the PRF was too high such that the next pulse arrived before the collapse of the previous bubble cloud, only a portion of histotripsy pulses could effectively create and collapse the bubble cloud. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud also increased with increasing gas concentration. These results may explain previous in vitro results on effects of pulse parameters on tissue erosion.

  10. Acoustic cavitation-mediated delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acids with phase-shift nanoemulsions

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Mark T.; Porter, Tyrone M.

    2015-01-01

    Localized, targeted delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) has been the foremost hurdle in the use of siRNA for the treatment of various diseases. Major advances have been achieved in the synthesis of siRNA, which has led to greater target messenger RNA (mRNA) silencing and stability in physiological conditions. Although numerous delivery strategies have shown promise, there are still limited options for targeted delivery and release of siRNA administered systemically. In this in vitro study, phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNE) were explored as cavitation nuclei to facilitate free siRNA delivery to cancer cells via sonoporation. A cell suspension containing varying amounts of PSNE and siRNA was exposed to 5 MHz pulsed ultrasound at fixed settings (6.2 MPa peak negative pressure, 5 cycle pulses, 250 Hz pulse repetition frequency, and total exposure duration of 100 seconds). Inertial cavitation emissions were detected throughout the exposure using a passive cavitation detector. Successful siRNA delivery was achieved (i.e. > 50% cell uptake) with high viability (> 80% viability). The percentage of cells with siRNA uptake was correlated with the amount of inertial cavitation activity generated from vaporized PSNE. The siRNA remained functional after delivery, significantly reducing expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a stably transfected cell line. These results show that vaporized PSNE can facilitate siRNA entry into the cytosol of a majority of sonicated cells and may provide a non-endosomal route for siRNA delivery. PMID:25979417

  11. Treatment of hepatic tumors by thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Song; Zhou, Ping; He, Wei; Liao, Manqiong; Chen, Lili; Ma, C.-M.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment on hepatic tumors in vivo. Forty-five rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into three groups (15 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. The total HIFU energy (in situ) of 1250 J was used for each tumor for three groups. In groups I and II, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 1 Hz pulsed repetition frequency (PRF), 0.5 duty cycle (0.5 s on and 0.5 s off) and10 s duration for one spot sonication. For group II, in addition to HIFU treatment, microbubbles (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) were injected via vein before sonication acting as a synergist. In group III, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 10 Hz PRF, 0.1 duty cycle (0.1 s on and 0.9 s off) and 10 s duration for one sonication. The total treatment spots were calculated according to the tumor volume. Tumors were examined with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately prior to and post HIFU treatment. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 h after treatment. Our study showed that all animals tolerated the HIFU treatment well. Our data showed that mechanical HIFU could lead to controlled injury in rabbit hepatic tumors with different histological changes in comparison to thermal HIFU with or without microbubbles.

  12. Temporal Trends in the Histology of the Rabbit Kidney after Cavitational Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy L.; Kieran, Kathleen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2007-05-01

    Tissue can be mechanically ablated through inertial cavitation generated by high intensity pulsed ultrasound. The ablation appears acutely as a fine slurry with absent cellular structure. Long-term effects and the evolution of histologic changes in disrupted tissue remain poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize the 0-60 day histology of cavitational ablation in a rabbit model. 29 New Zealand White rabbits were anesthetized and exposed to high intensity pulses of ultrasound (60000 pulses, 20 usec duration, 750 kHz, 1 kHz PRF, 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure, lower pole, left kidney). Kidneys were harvested immediately from five rabbits. The others were recovered and the kidneys were harvested 1, 2, 7, 20, or 60 days after treatment. Grossly, kidneys from 0-2 days displayed subcapsular bruising near the exposure site and some hemorrhage in the adjacent perirenal fat; microscopically, a disrupted, acellular zone measuring 3-5 mm by 5-10 mm accompanied by local infiltration of neutrophils (acute inflammation) was seen. Kidneys harvested after 7 days displayed tubular dilatation adjacent to the targeted area and collagen deposition consistent with scar formation. Decreased collagen deposition, decreased size of the disrupted zone, and regeneration of the tubular basal cell layer of dilated tubules was evident by day 20. Kidneys harvested at 20 and 60 days had contour defects near the exposure site with an apparent volume loss. Cavitation causes orderly and predictable histologic changes. Local renal damage induced during histotripsy may be partially reversible. Further research is needed to identify the clinical correlates of the observed histologic findings.

  13. Flow rate and duty cycle effects in lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Grant; Bigelow, Timothy A; Stessman, Dan J; Spalding, Martin H; Yao, Linxing; Wang, Tong; Xu, Jin

    2014-06-01

    To consider microalgae lipid biofuel as a viable energy source, it is a necessity to maximize algal cell lysis, lipid harvest, and thus biofuel production versus the energy used to lyse the cells. Previous techniques have been to use energy consumptive ultrasound waves in the 10-40 kHz range in a stationary exposure environment. This study evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound pulses in a new flow through type chamber on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism for cell breakage. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at varied pulse repetition frequencies. First, variations in flow rate were examined at a constant duty cycle of 3.6%. After assessing flow rates, the duty cycle was varied to further explore the dependence on the tone burst parameters. Cell lysis was assessed by quantifying protein and chlorophyll release into the supernatant as well as by lipid extractability. Appropriate flow rates with higher duty cycles led to statistically significant increases in cell lysis relative to controls and other exposure conditions.

  14. Time-resolved flowmetering of gas-liquid two-phase pipe flow by ultrasound pulse Doppler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Yuichi; Tasaka, Yuji; Takeda, Yasushi

    2012-03-01

    Ultrasound pulse Doppler method is applied for componential volumetric flow rate measurement in multiphase pipe flow consisted of gas and liquid phases. The flowmetering is realized with integration of measured velocity profile over the cross section of the pipe within liquid phase. Spatio-temporal position of interface is detected also with the same ultrasound pulse, which further gives cross sectional void fraction. A series of experimental demonstration was shown by applying this principle of measurement to air-water two-phase flow in a horizontal tube of 40 mm in diameter, of which void fraction ranges from 0 to 90% at superficial velocity from 0 to 15 m/s. The measurement accuracy is verified with a volumetric type flowmeter. We also analyze the accuracy of area integration of liquid velocity distribution for many different patterns of ultrasound measurement lines assigned on the cross section of the tube. The present method is also identified to be pulsation sensor of flow rate that fluctuates with complex gas-liquid interface behavior.

  15. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  16. Detection of tissue harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force using pulse-echo ultrasound and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Shigao; Tan, Wei; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James F

    2007-02-01

    A method using pulse echo ultrasound and the Kalman filter is developed for detecting submicron harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force. The method estimates the amplitude and phase of the motion at desired locations within a tissue region with high sensitivity. The harmonic motion generated by the ultrasound radiation force is expressed as extremely small oscillatory Doppler frequency shifts in the fast time (A-line) of ultrasound echoes, which are difficult to estimate. In slow time (repetitive ultrasound echoes) of the echoes, the motion also is presented as oscillatory phase shifts, from which the amplitude and phase of the harmonic motion can be estimated with the least mean squared error by Kalman filter. This technique can be used to estimate the traveling speed of a harmonic shear wave by tracking its phase changes during propagation. The shear wave propagation speed can be used to solve for the elasticity and viscosity of tissue as reported in our earlier study. Validation and in vitro experiments indicate that the method provides excellent estimations for very small (submicron) harmonic vibrations and has potential for noninvasive and quantitative stiffness measurements of tissues such as artery.

  17. Modification of Osteoarthritis in the Guinea Pig with Pulsed Low-Intensity Ultrasound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gurkan, Ilksen; Ranganathan, Archana; Yang, Xu; Horton, Walter E.; Todman, Martin; Huckle, James; Pleshko, Nancy; Spencer, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective The Hartley guinea pig develops articular cartilage degeneration similar to that seen in idiopathic human osteoarthritis. We investigated whether the application of pulsed low-intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) to the Hartley guinea pig joint would prevent or attenuate the progression of this degenerative process. Methods Treatment of male Hartley guinea pigs was initiated at the onset of degeneration (8 weeks of age) to assess the ability of PLIUS to prevent osteoarthritis, or at a later age (12 months) to assess the degree to which PLIUS acted to attenuate the progression of established disease. PLIUS (30 mW/cm2) was applied to stifle joints for 20 minutes per day over periods ranging from three to ten months, with contralateral limbs serving as controls. Joint cartilage histology was graded according to a modified Mankin scale to evaluate treatment effect. Immunohistochemical staining for IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), MMP-3, MMP-13, and TGF-β1 was performed on the cartilage to evaluate patterns of expression of these proteins. Results PLIUS did not fully prevent cartilage degeneration in the prevention groups, but diminished the severity of the disease, with the treated joints showing markedly decreased surface irregularities and a much smaller degree of loss of matrix staining as compared to controls. PLIUS also attenuated disease progression in the groups with established disease, although to a somewhat lesser extent as compared to the prevention groups. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a markedly decreased degree of TGF-β1 production in the PLIUS-treated joints. This indicates less active endogenous repair, consistent with the marked reduction in cartilage degradation. Conclusions PLIUS exhibits the ability to attenuate the progression of cartilage degeneration in an animal model of idiopathic human OA. The effect was greater in the treatment of early, rather than established, degeneration. PMID:20175971

  18. Sonoporation-mediated transduction of siRNA ameliorated experimental arthritis using 3 MHz pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Arai, Yuji; Kishida, Tsunao; Shin-Ya, Masaharu; Terauchi, Ryu; Nakagawa, Shuji; Saito, Masazumi; Tsuchida, Shinji; Inoue, Atsuo; Shirai, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The goal of this feasibility study was to examine whether sonoporation assisted transduction of siRNA could be used to ameliorate arthritis locally. If successful, such approach could provide an alternative treatment for the patients that have or gradually develop adverse response to chemical drugs. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) produced by synovial fibroblasts has an important role in the pathology of rheumatoid arthritis, inducing inflammation and bone destruction. In this study, we injected a mixture of microbubbles and siRNA targeting TNF-α (siTNF) into the articular joints of rats, and transduced siTNF into synovial tissue by exposure to a collimated ultrasound beam, applied through a probe 6mm in diameter with an input frequency of 3.0 MHz, an output intensity of 2.0 W/cm(2) (spatial average temporary peak; SATP), a pulse duty ratio of 50%, and a duration of 1 min. Sonoporation increased skin temperature from 26.8 °C to 27.3 °C, but there were no adverse effect such as burns. The mean level of TNF-α expression in siTNF-treated knee joints was 55% of those in controls. Delivery of siTNF into the knee joints every 3 days (i.e., 7, 10, 13, and 16 days after immunization) by in vivo sonoporation significantly reduced paw swelling on days 20-23 after immunization. Radiographic scores in the siTNF group were 56% of those in the CIA group and 61% of those in the siNeg group. Histological examination showed that the number of TNF-α positive cells was significantly lower in areas of pannus invasion into the ankle joints of siTNF- than of siNeg-treated rats. These results indicate that transduction of siTNF into articular synovium using sonoporation may be an effective local therapy for arthritis. PMID:24291002

  19. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lei; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Wenchuan; Chen, Mengshi; Zhu, Zhimin

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes inhibits proliferation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes enhances differentiation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPUS stimulates MLO-Y4 cells to secrete PGE{sub 2} and NO. -- Abstract: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used as a safe and effective modality to enhance fracture healing. As the most abundant cells in bone, osteocytes orchestrate biological activities of effector cells via direct cell-to-cell contacts and by soluble factors. In this study, we have used the osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells to study the effects of conditioned medium from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Conditioned media from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells (LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM) were collected and added on MC3T3-E1 cell cultures. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM demonstrated a significant inhibition of proliferation and an increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The results of PGE{sub 2} and NO assay showed that LIPUS could enhance PGE{sub 2} and NO secretion from MLO-Y4 cells at all time points within 24 h after LIPUS stimulation. We conclude that LIPUS regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes in vitro. Increased secretion of PGE{sub 2} from osteocytes may play a role in this effect.

  20. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  1. Clinical and immunohistopathological aspects of venous ulcers treatment by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS).

    PubMed

    de Ávila Santana, Luísiane; Alves, José Marcos; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Kajiwara, João Kazuyuki; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Gomes, Fernanda Guzzo; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani

    2013-04-01

    The immunological mechanisms that are triggered by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) in wound healing are unknown. In the present study, experimental groups were used to assess the treatment of chronic venous ulcers with 30mW/cm(2) SATA peripheral LIPUS three times per week compared to a daily treatment of 1% silver sulfadiazine (SDZ). The ulcers of the SDZ group (n=7) (G1) and LIPUS group (n=9) (G2) were photographed five times three months, and the images were analyzed using ImageJ software to quantify the total area (S), fibrin/sphacel area (yellow) and granulation area (red). The healing process was evaluated by the wound healing rate (WHR), granulation tissue rate (GTR) and fibrin/sphacel tissue rate (FTR). The ulcers were biopsied on days 1 and 45 and stained for collagen fiber quantification (picrosirius) and CD68(+) protein and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression using HRP-streptavidin (horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin). On day 90, G2 had a mean 41% decrease in the ulcer area, while no decrease was observed in G1 (p<0.05). An increased tendency toward positive labeling of collagen fibers and VEGF (p>0.05) was observed in G2 compared to G1, and the number of CD68(+) cells was greater in G2 than in G1 (p<0.05). LIPUS presents superior activity compared to SDZ in stimulating the inflammatory and proliferative (angiogenesis and collagenesis, respectively) phases of chronic venous wound healing. PMID:23294989

  2. Assessment of aortic pulse wave velocity by ultrasound: a feasibility study in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Sicari, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness and could be useful for characterizing cardiovascular disease progression even in mouse models. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for assessing arterial PWV in mice using ultrasound (US) images only and test it on the evaluation of age-associated differences in abdominal aorta PWV (aaPWV). US scans were obtained from six adult (7 months) and six old (19 months) wild type male mice (strain C57BL6) under gaseous anaesthesia. For each mouse, diameter and flow velocity instantaneous values were achieved from abdominal aorta B-mode and PW-Doppler images; all measurements were obtained using edge detection and contour tracking techniques. Single-beat mean diameter and velocity were calculated and time-aligned, providing the lnD-V loop. aaPWV values were obtained from the slope of the linear part of the loop (the early systolic phase), while relative distension (relD) measurements were calculated from the mean diameter signal. aaPWV values for young mice (3.5±0.52 m/s) were lower than those obtained for older ones (5.12±0.98 m/s) while relD measurements were higher in young (25%±7%) compared with older animals evaluations (15%±3%). All measurements were significantly different between the two groups (P<0.01 both). In conclusion, the proposed image processing technique well discriminate between age groups. Since it provides PWV assessment just from US images, it could represent a simply and useful system for vascular stiffness evaluation at any arterial site in the mouse, even in preclinical small animal models.

  3. Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy enhances targeted delivery of cetuximab to colon cancer xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young-Sun; Yang, Jehoon; Sun, Woo Chul; Park, Hajan; Chae, Sun Young; Namgung, Mi-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy enhances the effect of an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted chemotherapeutic drug, cetuximab, in treating human colon cancer xenografts in a mouse model. Balb/c nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HT-29 cells were randomly categorized into control (n = 9), pulsed HIFU alone (n = 10), cetuximab monotherapy (n = 8) or combined pulsed HIFU and cetuximab therapy (n = 9) group. Cetuximab, pulsed HIFU therapy, or both were administered three times per week starting from day 8 after tumor cell injection. Based on tumor growth curves up to 34 days, the combination therapy group showed more suppressed tumor growth than all other groups (p < 0.05). The final relative tumor volumes were 5.4 ± 2.1, 5.2 ± 1.3, 4.8 ± 1.8, and 3.1 ± 0.9 for control, pulsed HIFU alone, cetuximab monotherapy, and combination therapy groups, respectively. In conclusion, pulsed HIFU therapy appears to enhance the anti-tumor effect of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted cetuximab on human colon cancer xenograft models in mice. PMID:23219035

  4. Low-Power 2-MHz Pulsed-Wave Transcranial Ultrasound Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barlinn, Kristian; Strong, Roger; Alexandrov, Anne W; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    It is largely unknown whether prolonged insonation with ultrasound impacts the ischemic brain tissue by itself. Our goal was to evaluate safety and the effect of high-frequency ultrasound on infarct volume in rats. Thirty-two Long-Evans rats with permanent middle cerebral and carotid artery occlusions received either 2-MHz ultrasound at two levels of insonation power (128 or 10 mW) or no ultrasound (controls). We measured cerebral hemorrhage, indirect and direct infarct volume as well as edema volume at 24 h. No cerebral hemorrhages were detected in all animals. Exposure to low-power (10 mW) ultrasound resulted in a significantly decreased indirect infarct volume (p = 0.0039), direct infarct volume (p = 0.0031), and brain edema volume (p = 0.01) compared with controls. High-power (128 mW) ultrasound had no significant effects. An additional experiment with India ink showed a greater intravascular penetration of dye into ischemic tissues exposed to low-power ultrasound. Insonation with high-frequency, low-power ultrasound reduces ischemic brain damage in rat. Its effect on edema reduction and possible promotion of microcirculation could be used to facilitate drug and nutrient delivery to ischemic areas.

  5. A Focused Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (FLIPUS) System for Cell Stimulation: Physical and Biological Proof of Principle.

    PubMed

    Puts, Regina; Ruschke, Karen; Ambrosi, Thomas H; Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Knaus, Petra; Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Raum, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a promising technique for bone tissue evaluation. Highly focused transducers used for QUS also have the capability to be applied for tissue-regenerative purposes and can provide spatially limited deposition of acoustic energy. We describe a focused low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (FLIPUS) system, which has been developed for the stimulation of cell monolayers in the defocused far field of the transducer through the bottom of the well plate. Tissue culture well plates, carrying the cells, were incubated in a special chamber, immersed in a temperature-controlled water tank. A stimulation frequency of 3.6 MHz provided an optimal sound transmission through the polystyrene well plate. The ultrasound was pulsed for 20 min daily at 100-Hz repetition frequency with 27.8% duty cycle. The calibrated output intensity corresponded to I(SATA) = 44.5 ± 7.1 mW/cm2, which is comparable to the most frequently reported nominal output levels in LIPUS studies. No temperature change by the ultrasound exposure was observed in the well plate. The system was used to stimulate rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs). The applied intensity had no apoptotic effect and enhanced the expression of osteogenic markers, i.e., osteopontin (OPN), collagen 1 (Col-1), the osteoblast-specific transcription factor-Runx-2 and E11 protein, an early osteocyte marker, in stimulated cells on day 5. The proposed FLIPUS setup opens new perspectives for the evaluation of the mechanistic effects of LIPUS. PMID:26552085

  6. Measurement of coronary flow using high-frequency intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler velocimetry: in vitro feasibility studies.

    PubMed

    Grayburn, P A; Willard, J E; Haagen, D R; Brickner, M E; Alvarez, L G; Eichhorn, E J

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of intravascular ultrasound imaging offers the potential to measure blood flow as the product of vessel cross-sectional area and mean velocity derived from pulsed Doppler velocimetry. To determine the feasibility of this approach for measuring coronary artery flow, we constructed a flow model of the coronary circulation that allowed flow to be varied by adjusting downstream resistance and aortic driving pressure. Assessment of intracoronary flow velocity was accomplished using a commercially available end-mounted pulsed Doppler catheter. Cross-sectional area of the coronary artery was measured using a 20 MHz mechanical imaging transducer mounted on a 4.8 F catheter. The product of mean velocity and cross-sectional area was compared with coronary flow measured by timed collection in a graduated cylinder by linear regression analysis. Excellent correlations were obtained between coronary flow calculated by the ultrasound method and measured coronary flow at both ostial (r = 0.99, standard error of the estimate [SEE] = 13.9 ml/min) and distal (r = 0.98, SEE = 23.0 ml/min) vessel locations under steady flow conditions. During pulsatile flow, calculated and measured coronary flow also correlated well for ostial (r = 0.98, SEE = 12.7 ml/min) and downstream (r = 0.99, SEE = 9.3 ml/min) locations. That the SEE was lower for pulsatile as compared with steady flow may be explained by the blunting of the flow profile across the vessel lumen by the acceleration phase of pulsatile flow. These data establish the feasibility of measuring coronary artery blood flow using intravascular ultrasound imaging and pulsed Doppler techniques. PMID:1531416

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

  8. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  9. A low-cost gate for ultrasound pulse-echo studies.

    PubMed

    Langrill, L N; Goldstein, A

    1980-01-01

    Selective gating of ultrasounds echoes usually requires an expensive piece of electronics, a stepless gate. This note presents a simple circuit utilizing low-cost components which is easily built, and gives satisfactory performance as a gate for the study of individual ultrasound echoes. The gate has been measured to have a transmission loss of - 2 dB and an isolation of - 50dB.

  10. Solving the speckle decorrelation challenge in acousto-optic sensing using tandem nanosecond pulses within the ultrasound period.

    PubMed

    Resink, Steffen; Hondebrink, Erwin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2014-11-15

    We present a novel acousto-optic (AO) method, based on a nanosecond laser system, which will enable us to obtain AO signals in liquid turbid media. By diverting part of the light in a delay line, we inject tandem pulses with 27 ns separation. The change of the speckle pattern, caused by the ultrasound phase shift, reduces the speckle contrast of the integrated speckle pattern captured in a single camera frame. With these tandem pulses, we were able to perform AO on a 2 cm liquid turbid medium in transmission mode. We show the raw signal and a spatial AO scan of a homogenous water-intralipid sample. This approach is potentially capable of AO probing in vivo, since the acquisition time (of approximately 40 ns) is four orders of magnitude less than the typical time scales of speckle decorrelation found in vivo. The method may eventually enable us to obtain fluence compensated photoacoustic signals generated by the same laser. PMID:25490500

  11. Performance assessment of Pulse Wave Imaging using conventional ultrasound in canine aortas ex vivo and normal human arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ronny X.; Qaqish, William; Konofagou, Elisa. E.

    2015-01-01

    The propagation behavior of the arterial pulse wave may provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique capable of mapping multiple wall motion waveforms along a short arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle, allowing for the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation uniformity to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to improve the clinical utility of PWI using a conventional ultrasound system. The tradeoff between PWI spatial and temporal resolution was evaluated using an ex vivo canine aorta (n = 2) setup to assess the effects of varying image acquisition and signal processing parameters on the measurement of the PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity r2. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of 10 healthy volunteers (24.8 ± 3.3 y.o.) to determine the waveform tracking feature that would yield the most precise PWV measurements and highest r2 values in vivo. The ex vivo results indicated that the highest precision for measuring PWVs ~ 2.5 – 3.5 m/s was achieved using 24–48 scan lines within a 38 mm image plane width (i.e. 0.63 – 1.26 lines/mm). The in vivo results indicated that tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveform would consistently yield the most precise PWV measurements and minimize the error in the propagation uniformity measurement. Such findings may help establish the optimal image acquisition and signal processing parameters that may improve the reliability of PWI as a clinical measurement tool. PMID:26640603

  12. Free radical generation by ultrasound in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Riesz, P; Berdahl, D; Christman, C L

    1985-01-01

    The physical principles underlying the oscillatory behavior of minute gas bubbles in liquids exposed to ultrasound are reviewed. Results from mathematical analyses suggest that these oscillations sometimes become unstable leading to transient cavitation in which a bubble violently collapses during a single acoustic half-cycle producing high temperatures and pressures. The role that micronuclei, resonant bubble size, and rectified diffusion play in the initiation of transient cavitation is explained. Evidence to support these theoretical predictions is presented with particular emphasis on sonoluminescence which provides some non-chemical evidence for the formation of free radicals. Acoustic methods for conducting sonochemical investigations are discussed. In aqueous solutions transient cavitation initially generates hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals which may recombine to form hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide or may react with solutes in the gas phase, at the gas-liquid boundary or in the bulk of the solution. The analogies and differences between sonochemistry and ionizing radiation chemistry are explored. The use of spin trapping and electron spin resonance to identify hydrogen atoms and hydroxyl radicals conclusively and to detect transient cavitation produced by continuous wave and by pulsed ultrasound is described in detail. The study of the chemical effects of cavitation in organic liquids is a relatively unexplored area which has recently become the subject of renewed interest. Examples of the decomposition of solvent and solute, of ultrasonically initiated free-radical polymerization and polymer degradation are presented. Spin trapping has been used to identify radicals in organic liquids, in polymer degradation and in the decomposition of organometallic compounds. PMID:3007091

  13. Application of Hydrodynamic Cavitation for Food and Bioprocessing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogate, Parag R.

    Hydrodynamic cavitation can be simply generated by the alterations in the flow field in high speed/high pressure devices and also by passage of the liquid through a constriction such as orifice plate, venturi, or throttling valve. Hydrodynamic cavitation results in the formation of local hot spots, release of highly reactive free radicals, and enhanced mass transfer rates due to turbulence generated as a result of liquid circulation currents. These conditions can be suitably applied for intensification of different bioprocessing applications in an energy-efficient manner as compared to conventionally used ultrasound-based reactors. The current chapter aims at highlighting different aspects related to hydrodynamic cavitation, including the theoretical aspects for optimization of operating parameters, reactor designs, and overview of applications relevant to food and bioprocessing. Some case studies highlighting the comparison of hydrodynamic cavitation and acoustic cavitation reactors will also be discussed.

  14. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  15. Bubble size distribution in acoustic droplet vaporization via dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Li, Wusong; Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-05-01

    Performance and efficiency of numerous cavitation enhanced applications in a wide range of areas depend on the cavitation bubble size distribution. Therefore, cavitation bubble size estimation would be beneficial for biological and industrial applications that rely on cavitation. In this study, an acoustic method using a wide beam with low pressure is proposed to acquire the time intensity curve of the dissolution process for the cavitation bubble population and then determine the bubble size distribution. Dissolution of the cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with undegassed or degassed saline was obtained to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of focused ultrasound on the size distribution of induced cavitation bubbles. It was found that an increase of PD will induce large bubbles while AP had only a little effect on the mean bubble size in saline. It was also recognized that longer PD and higher PNP increases the proportions of large and small bubbles, respectively, in suspensions of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsions. Moreover, degassing of the suspension tended to bring about smaller mean bubble size than the undegassed suspension. In addition, condensation of cavitation bubble produced in diluted suspension of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion was involved in the calculation to discuss the effect of bubble condensation in the bubble size estimation in acoustic droplet vaporization. It was shown that calculation without considering the condensation might underestimate the mean bubble size and the calculation with considering the condensation might have more influence over the size distribution of small bubbles, but less effect on that of large bubbles. Without or with considering bubble condensation, the accessible minimum bubble radius was 0.4 or 1.7 μm and the step size was 0.3 μm. This acoustic technique provides an approach to estimate the size

  16. Applications of ultrasound in food and bioprocessing.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2015-07-01

    Improving the quality and nutritional aspects of food is one of the key issues for healthy life of human beings. The stability during storage is an important parameter in quality assurance of food products. Various processing techniques such as high pressure, thermal, pulsed electric field and microwave have been used to prolong the shelf-life of food products. In recent years, ultrasound technology has been found to be a potential food processing technique. The passage of ultrasound in a liquid matrix generates mechanical agitation and other physical effects due to acoustic cavitation. Owing to its importance, a number of review articles and book chapters on the applications of ultrasound in food processing have been published in recent years. This article provides an overview of recent developments in ultrasonic processing of food and dairy systems with a particular focus on functionality of food and dairy ingredients. More specifically, the use of high frequency ultrasound in fat separation from milk and viscosity modification in starch systems and the use of low frequency ultrasound in generating nutritional food emulsions, viscosity modification and encapsulation of nutrients have been highlighted. The issues associated with the development of large scale ultrasonic food processing equipment have also been briefly discussed.

  17. Enhancement of Focused Ultrasound Treatment by Acoustically Generated Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Takagi, Ryo; Inaba, Yuta; Yasuda, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Microbubbles, whether introduced from outside the body or ultrasonically generated in situ, are known to significantly enhance the biological effects of ultrasound, including the mechanical, thermal, and sonochemical effects. Phase-change nanodroplets, which selectively accumulate in tumor tissue and whose phase changes to microbubbles can be induced by ultrasonic stimulation, have been proposed for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) tumor treatment with enhanced selectivity and efficiency. In this paper, a purely acoustic approach to generate microbubble clouds in the tissue to be treated is proposed. Short pulses of focused ultrasound with extremely high intensity, named trigger pulses, are used for exposure. They are immediately followed by focused ultrasound for heating with an intensity similar to or less than that of normal HIFU treatment. The localized generation of microbubble clouds by the trigger pulses is observed in a polyarylamide gel by a high-speed camera, and the effectiveness of the generated clouds in accelerating ultrasonically induced thermal coagulation is confirmed in excised chicken breast tissue. The use of second-harmonic superimposed waves as the trigger pulses is also proposed. The highly reproducible initiation of cavitation by waves with the negative peak pressure emphasized and the efficient expansion of the generated microbubble clouds by waves with the positive peak pressure emphasized are also observed by a high-speed camera in partially degassed water.

  18. Transcranial Cavitation Detection in Primates during Blood-Brain Barrier Opening – A Performance Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Downs, Matthew Eric; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Chen, Cherry Chen; Ferrera, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been shown promise in treating the brain locally and noninvasively. Transcranial passive cavitation detection (PCD) provides methodology of monitoring the treatment in real time, while the skull effects remain a major challenge for its translation to the clinic. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity, reliability, and limitations of PCD through primate (macaque and human) skulls in vitro. The results were further correlated with the in vivo macaque studies including the transcranial PCD calibration and real-time monitoring of BBB opening, with magnetic resonance imaging assessing the opening and safety. The stable cavitation doses using harmonics (SCDh) and ultraharmonics (SCDu), the inertial cavitation dose (ICD), and the cavitation signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were quantified based on the PCD signals. Results showed that through the macaque skull the pressure threshold for detecting the SCDh remained the same as without the skull in place, while it increased for the SCDu and ICD; through the human skull, it increased for all cavitation doses. The transcranial PCD was found reliable both in vitro and in vivo when the transcranial cavitation SNR exceeded the 1-dB detection limit through the in vitro macaque (attenuation: 4.92 dB/mm) and human (attenuation: 7.33 dB/mm) skull. In addition, using long pulses enabled reliable PCD monitoring and facilitate BBB opening at low pressures. The in vivo results showed that the SCDh became detectable at pressures as low as 100 kPa; the ICD, at 250 kPa while it could occur at lower pressures; the SCDu, at 700 kPa and was less reliable at lower pressures. Real-time monitoring of PCD was further implemented during BBB opening, with successful and safe opening achieved at 250–600 kPa in both the thalamus and the putamen. In conclusion, this study shows that transcranial PCD in macaques in vitro and in vivo as well as humans in vitro is reliable by improving the cavitation SNR beyond the 1-d

  19. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Plaksin, Michael; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control.

  20. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Plaksin, Michael; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control. PMID:27390775

  1. Characterization of Macrolesions Induced by Myocardial Cavitation-Enabled Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yiying I.; Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent high intensity ultrasound pulses with circulating contrast agent microbubbles can induce scattered cavitation myocardial microlesions of potential value for tissue reduction therapy. Here, computer-aided histological evaluation of the effective treated volume was implemented to optimize ultrasound pulse parameters, exposure duration, and contrast agent dose. Rats were treated with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound bursts and Evans blue staining indicates lethal cardiomyocytic injury. Each heart was sectioned to provide samples covering the entire exposed myocardial volume. Both brightfield and fluorescence images were taken for up to 40 tissue sections. Tissue identification and microlesion detection were first done based on 2D images to form microlesion masks containing the outline of the heart and the stained cell regions. Image registration was then performed on the microlesion masks to reconstruct a volume-based model according to the morphology of the heart. The therapeutic beam path was estimated from the 3D stacked microlesions, and finally the total microlesion volume, here termed macrolesion, was characterized along the therapeutic beam axis. Radially symmetric fractional macrolesions were characterized via stepping disks of variable radius determined by the local distribution of microlesions. Treated groups showed significant macrolesions of a median volume of 87.3 μL, 2.7 mm radius, 4.8 mm length, and 14.0% lesion density compared to zero radius, length, and lesion density for sham. The proposed radially symmetric lesion model is a robust evaluation for Myocardial Contrast Enabled Therapy (MCET). Future work will include validating the proposed method with varying acoustic exposures and optimizing involved parameters to provide macrolesion characterization. PMID:25347871

  2. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound assis...

  3. Continuous and pulsed ultrasound-assisted extractions of antioxidants from pomegranate peel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a great demand for developing efficient extraction methods in order to reduce extraction time and increase the yield and activity of functional antioxidants. The yields, activities, and extraction kinetics of antioxidants from dry peel of pomegranate marc were studied using ultrasound-assis...

  4. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2 = 0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc = 0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location.

  5. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L; Cain, Charles A; Grotberg, James B; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R(2) = 0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc = 0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location.

  6. Trapping of Embolic Particles in a Vessel Phantom by Cavitation-Enhanced Acoustic Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2=0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc=0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location. PMID:25109407

  7. Effects of Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound and Cryotherapy on Recovery of Joint Function and C-reactive Protein Levels in Patients after Total Knee Replacement Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong Il; Kim, Yong-Nam; Choi, Hyun

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and cryotherapy on joint function recovery and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels of patients with total knee replacement. [Subjects] Forty-six patients with total knee replacement were recruited and allocated to either low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy (n=15), cryotherapy (n=15), or a combination of both (n=16). Therapy was administered once a day, 5 times a week for 3 weeks. To determine functional joint recovery and reduction of inflammation, changes in the Korean Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (K-WOMAC), range of motion (ROM), and CRP were assessed postsurgically and four times over a 3-week period. Using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), homogeneity tests were performed based on participants' general characteristics. To recognize changes in time-variant K-WOMAC, ROM, and CRP values between groups, repeated measures ANOVA was performed, and Tukey's test was used for post-test analysis. Values at α=0.05 were considered significant. [Results] We found a difference between groups and times, and the group that received the combined therapies showed greater changes in outcomes than the group that received low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy alone. [Conclusion] Applying both low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and cryotherapy can relieve inflammation and enhance joint function in patients who undergo total knee replacement.

  8. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the

  9. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on new trabecular bone during bone-tendon junction healing in a rabbit model: a synchrotron radiation micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Zheng, Cheng; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Can; Chen, Huabin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on bone regeneration during the bone-tendon junction healing process and to explore the application of synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography in three dimensional visualization of the bone-tendon junction to evaluate the microarchitecture of new trabecular bone. Twenty four mature New Zealand rabbits underwent partial patellectomy to establish a bone-tendon junction injury model at the patella-patellar tendon complex. Animals were then divided into low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment (20 min/day, 7 times/week) and placebo control groups, and were euthanized at week 8 and 16 postoperatively (n = 6 for each group and time point). The patella-patellar tendon specimens were harvested for radiographic, histological and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography detection. The area of the newly formed bone in the ultrasound group was significantly greater than that of control group at postoperative week 8 and 16. The high resolution three dimensional visualization images of the bone-tendon junction were acquired by synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment promoted dense and irregular woven bone formation at week 8 with greater bone volume fraction, number and thickness of new trabecular bone but with lower separation. At week 16, ultrasound group specimens contained mature lamellar bone with higher bone volume fraction and thicker trabeculae than that of control group; however, there was no significant difference in separation and number of the new trabecular bone. This study confirms that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment is able to promote bone formation and remodeling of new trabecular bone during the bone-tendon junction healing process in a rabbit model, and the synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography could be applied for three dimensional visualization to quantitatively evaluate the

  10. Effect of non-acoustic parameters on heterogeneous sonoporation mediated by single-pulse ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Xu, Lin; Han, Tao; Du, Lianfang; Yu, Alfred C H

    2016-07-01

    Sonoporation-transient plasma membrane perforation elicited by the interaction of ultrasound waves with microbubbles--has shown great potential for drug delivery and gene therapy. However, the heterogeneity of sonoporation introduces complexities and challenges in the realization of controllable and predictable drug delivery. The aim of this investigation was to understand how non-acoustic parameters (bubble related and bubble-cell interaction parameters) affect sonoporation. Using a customized ultrasound-exposure and fluorescence-imaging platform, we observed sonoporation dynamics at the single-cell level and quantified exogenous molecular uptake levels to characterize the degree of sonoporation. Sonovue microbubbles were introduced to passively regulate microbubble-to-cell distance and number, and bubble size. 1 MHz ultrasound with 10-cycle pulse duration and 0.6 MPa peak negative pressure were applied to trigger the inertial collapse of microbubbles. Our data revealed the impact of non-acoustic parameters on the heterogeneity of sonoporation. (i) The localized collapse of relatively small bubbles (diameter, D<5.5 μm) led to predictable sonoporation, the degree of which depended on the bubble-to-cell distance (d). No sonoporation was observed when d/D>1, whereas reversible sonoporation occurred when d/D<1. (ii) Large bubbles (D>5.5 μm) exhibited translational movement over large distances, resulting in unpredictable sonoporation. Translation towards the cell surface led to variable reversible sonoporation or irreversible sonoporation, and translation away from the cell caused either no or reversible sonoporation. (iii) The number of bubbles correlated positively with the degree of sonoporation when D<5.5 μm and d/D<1. Localized collapse of two to three bubbles mainly resulted in reversible sonoporation, whereas irreversible sonoporation was more likely following the collapse of four or more bubbles. These findings offer useful insight into the relationship

  11. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B.; Lin, Maofan; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS. PMID:27376284

  12. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve for treatment of intractable orchalgia

    PubMed Central

    Terkawi, Abdullah Sulieman; Romdhane, Kamel

    2014-01-01

    Chronic orchalgia is a frustrating clinical problem for both the patient and the physician. We present a 17-year-old boy with a bilateral idiopathic chronic intractable orchalgia with failed conservative treatment. For 2 years, he suffered from severe attacks of scrotal pain that affected his daily activities and caused frequent absence from school. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation (PRF) of the genital branches of the genitofemoral nerve performed after local anesthetic nerve block confirmed the diagnosis and yielded 6 weeks of symptom relief. Seven-month follow-up revealed complete satisfactory analgesia. The use of PRF is an effective and non-invasive approach to treat intractable chronic orchalgia. PMID:24843352

  13. Directivity patterns and pulse profiles of ultrasound emitted by laser action on interface between transparent and opaque solids: Analytical theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, Sergey M. E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Tournat, Vincent; Chigarev, Nikolay; Castagnede, Bernard; Gusev, Vitalyi E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Bulou, Alain; Zerr, Andreas

    2014-01-28

    The analytical theory for the directivity patterns of ultrasounds emitted from laser-irradiated interface between two isotropic solids is developed. It is valid for arbitrary combinations of transparent and opaque materials. The directivity patterns are derived both in two-dimensional and in three-dimensional geometries, by accounting for the specific features of the sound generation by the photo-induced mechanical stresses distributed in the volume, essential in the laser ultrasonics. In particular, the theory accounts for the contribution to the emitted propagating acoustic fields from the converted by the interface evanescent photo-generated compression-dilatation waves. The precise analytical solutions for the profiles of longitudinal and shear acoustic pulses emitted in different directions are proposed. The developed theory can be applied for dimensional scaling, optimization, and interpretation of the high-pressure laser ultrasonics experiments in diamond anvil cell.

  14. High-Frequency, Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Alveolar Bone Healing of Extraction Sockets in Rats: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Lhi; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Joon Bong; Heo, Jung Sun; Choi, Yumi

    2016-02-01

    Most studies of the beneficial effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on bone healing have used frequencies between 1.0 and 1.5 MHz. However, after consideration of ultrasound wave characteristics and depth of target tissue, higher-frequency LIPUS may have been more effective on superficially positioned alveolar bone. We investigated this hypothesis by applying LIPUS (frequency, 3.0 MHz; intensity, 30 mW/cm(2)) on shaved right cheeks over alveolar bones of tooth extraction sockets in rats for 10 min/d for 2 wk after tooth extraction; the control group (left cheek of the same rats) did not receive LIPUS treatment. Compared with the control group, the LIPUS group manifested more new bone growth inside the sockets on histomorphometric analysis (maximal difference = 2.5-fold on the seventh day after extraction) and higher expressions of osteogenesis-related mRNAs and proteins than the control group did. These findings indicate that 3.0-MHz LIPUS could enhance alveolar bone formation and calcification in rats.

  15. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold. PMID:25543661

  16. Accuracy of velocity and shear rate measurements using pulsed Doppler ultrasound: a comparison of signal analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Markou, C P; Ku, D N

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was instituted to evaluate the performance of Doppler ultrasound signal processing techniques for measuring fluid velocity under well-defined flow conditions using a 10-MHz multigated pulsed ultrasound instrument. Conditions of fully developed flow in a rigid, circular tube were varied over a Reynolds number range between 500 and 8000. The velocity across the tube was determined using analog and digital zero crossing detectors and three digital spectrum estimators. Determination of the Doppler frequency from analog or digital zero crossing detectors gave accurate velocity values for laminar and moderately turbulent flow away from the wall (0.969 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.986). Three digital spectrum estimators, Fast Fourier Transform, Burg autoregressive method, and minimum variance method, were slightly more accurate than the zero crossing detector (0.984 less than or equal to r less than or equal to 0.994), especially at points close to the walls and with higher levels of turbulence. Steep velocity gradients and transit-time-effects from high velocities produced significantly larger errors in velocity measurement. Wall shear rate estimates were most precise when calculated using the position of the wall and two velocity points. The calculated wall shears were within 20%-30% of theoretically predicted values. PMID:1808798

  17. Controllable permeability of blood-brain barrier and reduced brain injury through low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sin-Luo; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be locally disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MB) while sustaining little damage to the brain tissue. Thus, the safety issue associated with FUS-induced BBB disruption (BBBD) needs to be investigated for future clinical applications. This study demonstrated the neuroprotective effects induced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) against brain injury in the sonicated brain. Rats subjected to a BBB disruption injury received LIPUS exposure for 5 min after FUS/MB application. Measurements of BBB permeability, brain water content, and histological analysis were then carried out to evaluate the effects of LIPUS. The permeability and time window of FUS-induced BBBD can be effectively modulated with LIPUS. LIPUS also significantly reduced brain edema, neuronal death, and apoptosis in the sonicated brain. Our results show that brain injury in the FUS-induced BBBD model could be ameliorated by LIPUS and that LIPUS may be proposed as a novel treatment modality for controllable release of drugs into the brain. PMID:26517350

  18. The potential of pulsed low intensity ultrasound to stimulate chondrocytes matrix synthesis in agarose and monolayer cultures.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Natalie M; Grainger, James; Bader, Dan L; Knight, Martin M

    2010-12-01

    Pulsed low intensity ultrasound (PLIUS) has been used successfully for bone fracture repair and has therefore been suggested for cartilage regeneration. However, previous in vitro studies with chondrocytes show conflicting results as to the effect of PLIUS on the elaboration of extracellular matrix. This study tests the hypothesis that PLIUS, applied for 20 min/day, stimulates the synthesis of sulphated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) by adult bovine articular chondrocytes cultured in either monolayer or agarose constructs. For both culture models, PLIUS at either 30 or 100 mW/cm(2) intensity had no net effect on the total sGAG content. Although PLIUS at 100 mW/cm(2) did induce a 20% increase in sGAG content at day 2 of culture in agarose, this response was lost by day 5. Intensities of 200 and 300 mW/cm(2) resulted in cell death probably due to heating from the ultrasound transducers. The lack of a sustained up-regulation of sGAG synthesis may reflect the suggestion that PLIUS only induces a stimulatory effect in the presence of a tissue injury response. These results suggest that PLIUS has a limited potential to provide an effective method of stimulating matrix production as part of a tissue engineering strategy for cartilage repair. PMID:20938751

  19. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J.; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm2 intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  20. Targeted Long-Term Venous Occlusion Using Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Combined with a Pro-Inflammatory Agent

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Zia, Jasmine; Warren, Cinderella; Starr, Frank L.; Brayman, Andrew A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric varices are associated with significant morbidity and mortality for cirrhotic patients. The current modalities available for treating bleeding esophageal and gastric varices, namely endoscopic band ligation and sclerotherapy, require frequent sessions to obtain effective thrombosis and are associated with significant adverse effects. A more effective therapy that results in long-term vascular occlusion has the potential to improve patient outcomes. In this study, we investigated a new potential method for inducing long-term vascular occlusion by targeting segments of a rabbit’s auricular vein in vivo with low duty cycle, high peak rarefaction pressure (9 MPa) pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound in the presence of intravenously administered ultrasound microbubbles followed by local injection of fibrinogen and a pro-inflammatory agent (ethanol, cyanoacrylate or morrhuate sodium). The novel method introduced in this study resulted in acute and long-term complete vascular occlusions when injecting a pro-inflammatory agent with fibrinogen. Future investigation and translational studies are needed to assess its clinical applicability. PMID:21821352

  1. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application. PMID:27597635

  2. MR-guided pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound enhancement of docetaxel combined with radiotherapy for prostate cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Zhaomei; Ma, C.-M.; Chen, Xiaoming; Cvetkovic, Dusica; Pollack, Alan; Chen, Lili

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the enhancement of docetaxel by pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) in combination with radiotherapy (RT) for treatment of prostate cancer in vivo. LNCaP cells were grown in the prostates of male nude mice. When the tumors reached a designated volume by MRI, tumor bearing mice were randomly divided into seven groups (n = 5): (1) pFUS alone; (2) RT alone; (3) docetaxel alone; (4) docetaxel + pFUS (5) docetaxel + RT (6) docetaxel + pFUS + RT, and (7) control. MR-guided pFUS treatment was performed using a focused ultrasound treatment system (InSightec ExAblate 2000) with a 1.5T GE MR scanner. Animals were treated once with pFUS, docetaxel, RT or their combinations. Docetaxel was given by i.v. injection at 5 mg kg-1 before pFUS. RT was given 2 Gy after pFUS. Animals were euthanized 4 weeks after treatment. Tumor volumes were measured on MRI at 1 and 4 weeks post-treatment. Results showed that triple combination therapies of docetaxel, pFUS and RT provided the most significant tumor growth inhibition among all groups, which may have potential for the treatment of prostate cancer due to an improved therapeutic ratio.

  3. Low intensity pulse ultrasound stimulate chondrocytes growth in a 3-D alginate scaffold through improved porosity and permeability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Gepu; Lu, Lu; Ji, Hongfei; Ma, Yong; Dong, Rui; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Wu, Junru; Zhang, Dong

    2015-04-01

    A 3-D scaffold culture system has been used to promote in producing functional chondrocytes for repairing damaged cartilage. In the present study, the low intensity pulse ultrasound (LIPUS) (P(-)=0, 0.055, 0.085 and 0.11 MPa) was applied to improve the porosity and permeability of a 3-D alginate scaffold which was beneficial for the nutrition supply and metabolism during cell growth in 3-D alginate scaffold. The porosity and permeability of the scaffold was quantitatively analyzed based on scanning electron microscopy examination and fluorescence image observation. The results suggest that, for the scaffold exposed to LIPUS, its porosity and permeability could be significantly enhanced by the increasing LIPUS amplitude, which might be induced by the microstreaming shear stress generated by ultrasound-driven microbubble oscillations. Furthermore, the assessments of cell proliferation and collagen II expression confirmed that chondrocytes growth could be effectively promoted in 3-D alginate scaffolds treated by LIPUS, because of the improved scaffold porosity and permeability might benefit cell growth space and nutrition supply. It should also be noticed that appropriate LIPUS driving parameters should be adapted to achieve optimized chondrocytes culture effect in 3-D alginate scaffold.

  4. Improved Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis in 3D Bioprinted Tissue Scaffolds with Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Castro, Nathan J; Zhu, Wei; Cui, Haitao; Aliabouzar, Mitra; Sarkar, Kausik; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-09-06

    3D printing and ultrasound techniques are showing great promise in the evolution of human musculoskeletal tissue repair and regeneration medicine. The uniqueness of the present study was to combine low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and advanced 3D printing techniques to synergistically improve growth and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Specifically, polyethylene glycol diacrylate bioinks containing cell adhesive Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic acid-Serene (RGDS) peptide and/or nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) were used to fabricate 3D scaffolds with different geometric patterns via novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer. The resultant scaffolds provide a highly porous and interconnected 3D environment to support cell proliferation. Scaffolds with small square pores were determined to be the optimal geometric pattern for MSC attachment and growth. The optimal LIPUS working parameters were determined to be 1.5 MHz, 20% duty cycle with 150 mW/cm(2) intensity. Results demonstrated that RGDS peptide and nHA containing 3D printed scaffolds under LIPUS treatment can greatly promote MSC proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium deposition and total protein content. These results illustrate the effectiveness of the combination of LIPUS and biomimetic 3D printing scaffolds as a valuable combinatorial tool for improved MSC function, thus make them promising for future clinical and various regenerative medicine application.

  5. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.

  6. The Use of Theranostic Strategies in Myocardial Cavitation-Enabled Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Lu, Xiaofang; Zhu, Yiying I.; Fabiilli, Mario L.; Owens, Gabe E.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of microlesions induced by ultrasound interaction with contrast microbubbles in the myocardium potentially represents a new method of tissue reduction therapy. Anesthetized rats were treated in a heated water bath with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound pulses triggered once every 4 heartbeats from the electrocardiogram (ECG) during infusion of microbubble contrast agent. Treatment was guided by an 8 MHz B-mode imaging transducer, which also was used to provide estimates of the left ventricular echogenicity (LVE) as a possible predictor of efficacy during treatment. Strategies to reduce prospective clinical treatment durations were tested, including pulse modulation to simulate a theranostic scanning strategy, and an increased agent infusion rate over shorter durations. Sources of variability, including ultrasound path variation and venous catheter placement, also were investigated. ECG premature complexes (PCs) were monitored and Evans-blue stained cardiomyocyte scores (SCSs) were obtained from frozen sections. The LVE reflected variations in the infused microbubble concentration, but failed to predict efficacy. Comparing suspensions of varied microbubble sizes revealed that LVE was dominated by larger bubbles, while efficacy appeared to be dependent on smaller sizes. Simulated scanning was as effective as the normal fixed-beam treatment, and high agent infusion allowed reduced treatment duration. The success of these theranostic strategies may increase the prospects for realistic clinical translation of myocardial cavitation enabled therapy. PMID:25890888

  7. CONTRAST-ENHANCED INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND PULSE SEQUENCES FOR BANDWIDTH-LIMITED TRANSDUCERS

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, David; Renaud, Guillaume; van Soest, Gijs; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate two methods for vasa vasorum imaging using contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound, which can be performed using commercial catheters. Plaque neovascularization was recognized as an independent marker of coronary artery plaque vulnerability. IVUS-based methods to image the microvessels available to date require high bandwidth (−6 dB relative frequency bandwidth >70%), which are not routinely available commercially. We explored the potential of ultraharmonic imaging and chirp reversal imaging for vasa vasorum imaging. In vitro recordings were performed on a tissue-mimicking phantom using a commercial ultrasound contrast agent and a transducer with a center frequency of 34 MHz and a −6 dB relative bandwidth of 56%. Acoustic peak pressures <500 kPa were used. A tissue-mimicking phantom with channels down to 200 μm in diameter was successfully imaged by the two contrast detection sequences while the smallest channel stayed invisible in conventional intravascular ultrasound images. Ultraharmonic imaging provided the best contrast agent detection. PMID:23384459

  8. Analysis of ultrasound pulse-echo images for characterization of muscle disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, Sidney; Heckmatt, John Z.

    1996-04-01

    This study aims to extract quantifiable indices characterizing ultrasound propagation and scattering in skeletal muscle, from data acquired using a real-time linear array scanner in a paediatric muscle clinic, in order to establish early diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in young children, as well as to chart the progressive severity of the disease. Approximately 40 patients with gait disorders, aged between 1 and 11 years, were scanned with a real-time linear array ultrasound scanner, at 5 MHz. A control group consisted of approximately 50 boys, in the same age range, with no evidence or history of muscle disease. Results show that ultrasound quantitative methods can provide a tight clustering of normal data, and also provide a basis for charting the degree of change in diseased muscle. The most significant (quantitative) parameters derive from the frequency of the attenuation and the muscle echogenicity. The approach provides a discrimination method that is more sensitive than visual assessment of the corresponding image by even an experienced observer. There are also indications that the need for traumatic muscle biopsy may be obviated in some cases.

  9. A theoretical study of inertial cavitation from acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and implications for the mechanical index

    PubMed Central

    Church, Charles C.; Labuda, Cecille; Nightingale, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) attempts to quantify the likelihood that exposure to diagnostic ultrasound will produce an adverse biological effect by a nonthermal mechanism. The current formulation of the MI implicitly assumes that the acoustic field is generated using the short pulse durations appropriate to B-mode imaging. However, acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging employs high-intensity pulses up to several hundred acoustic periods long. The effect of increased pulse durations on the thresholds for inertial cavitation was studied computationally in water, urine, blood, cardiac and skeletal muscle, brain, kidney, liver and skin. The results show that while the effect of pulse duration on cavitation thresholds in the three liquids can be considerable, reducing them by, e.g., 6% – 24% at 1 MHz, the effect in tissue is minor. More importantly, the frequency dependence of the MI appears to be unnecessarily conservative, i.e., that the magnitude of the exponent on frequency could be increased to 0.75. Comparison of these theoretical results with experimental measurements suggests that some tissues do not contain the pre-existing, optimally sized bubbles assumed for the MI. This means that in these tissues the MI is not necessarily a strong predictor of the probability for an adverse biological effect. PMID:25592457

  10. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  11. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  12. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kazuki; Colonius, Tim; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A combined modeling and experimental study of acoustic cavitation bubbles that are initiated by focused ultrasound waves is reported. Focused ultrasound waves of frequency 335 kHz and peak negative pressure 8 MPa are generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The resulting pressure field is obtained by direct numerical simulation (DNS) and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by high-speed photography qualitatively agree withs the simulation result. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works in synchronization with high-speed photography. PMID:27087826

  13. Ultrasound-guided Delivery of microRNA Loaded Nanoparticles into Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Choe, Jung Woo; Pu, Kanyi; Devulapally, Rammohan; Bachawal, Sunitha; Machtaler, Steven; Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Luong, Richard; Tian, Lu; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus; Rao, Jianghong; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound induced microbubble cavitation can cause enhanced permeability across natural barriers of tumors such as vessel walls or cellular membranes, allowing for enhanced therapeutic delivery into the target tissues. While enhanced delivery of small (<1 nm) molecules has been shown at acoustic pressures below 1MPa both in vitro and in vivo, the delivery efficiency of larger (>100 nm) therapeutic carriers into cancer remains unclear and may require a higher pressure for sufficient delivery. Enhanced delivery of larger therapeutic carriers such as FDA approved pegylated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA-PEG-NP) has significant clinical value because these nanoparticles have been shown to protect encapsulated drugs from degradation in the blood circulation and allow for slow and prolonged release of encapsulated drugs at the target location. In this study, various acoustic parameters were investigated to facilitate the successful delivery of two nanocarriers, a fluorescent semiconducting polymer model drug nanoparticle as well as PLGA-PEG-NP into human colon cancer xenografts in mice. We first measured the cavitation dose produced by various acoustic parameters (pressure, pulse length, and pulse repetition frequency) and microbubble concentration in a tissue mimicking phantom. Next, in vivo studies were performed to evaluate the penetration depth of nanocarriers using various acoustic pressures, ranging between 1.7 and 6.9 MPa. Finally, a therapeutic microRNA, miR-122, was loaded into PLGA-PEG-NP and the amount of delivered miR-122 was assessed using quantitative RT-PCR. Our results show that acoustic pressures had the strongest effect on cavitation. An increase of the pressure from 0.8 to 6.9 MPa resulted in a nearly 50-fold increase in cavitation in phantom experiments. In vivo, as the pressures increased from 1.7 to 6.9 MPa, the amount of nanoparticles deposited in cancer xenografts was increased from 4- to 14-fold, and the median penetration

  14. Control of broadband optically generated ultrasound pulses using binary amplitude holograms.

    PubMed

    Brown, Michael D; Jaros, Jiri; Cox, Ben T; Treeby, Bradley E

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the use of binary amplitude holography is investigated as a mechanism to focus broadband acoustic pulses generated by high peak-power pulsed lasers. Two algorithms are described for the calculation of the binary holograms; one using ray-tracing, and one using an optimization based on direct binary search. It is shown using numerical simulations that when a binary amplitude hologram is excited by a train of laser pulses at its design frequency, the acoustic field can be focused at a pre-determined distribution of points, including single and multiple focal points, and line and square foci. The numerical results are validated by acoustic field measurements from binary amplitude holograms, excited by a high peak-power laser. PMID:27106311

  15. Use of hydrodynamic cavitation in (waste)water treatment.

    PubMed

    Dular, Matevž; Griessler-Bulc, Tjaša; Gutierrez-Aguirre, Ion; Heath, Ester; Kosjek, Tina; Krivograd Klemenčič, Aleksandra; Oder, Martina; Petkovšek, Martin; Rački, Nejc; Ravnikar, Maja; Šarc, Andrej; Širok, Brane; Zupanc, Mojca; Žitnik, Miha; Kompare, Boris

    2016-03-01

    The use of acoustic cavitation for water and wastewater treatment (cleaning) is a well known procedure. Yet, the use of hydrodynamic cavitation as a sole technique or in combination with other techniques such as ultrasound has only recently been suggested and employed. In the first part of this paper a general overview of techniques that employ hydrodynamic cavitation for cleaning of water and wastewater is presented. In the second part of the paper the focus is on our own most recent work using hydrodynamic cavitation for removal of pharmaceuticals (clofibric acid, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, diclofenac, carbamazepine), toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), green microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), bacteria (Legionella pneumophila) and viruses (Rotavirus) from water and wastewater. As will be shown, hydrodynamic cavitation, like acoustic, can manifest itself in many different forms each having its own distinctive properties and mechanisms. This was until now neglected, which eventually led to poor performance of the technique. We will show that a different type of hydrodynamic cavitation (different removal mechanism) is required for successful removal of different pollutants. The path to use hydrodynamic cavitation as a routine water cleaning method is still long, but recent results have already shown great potential for optimisation, which could lead to a low energy tool for water and wastewater cleaning.

  16. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound induces apoptosis in osteoclasts: Fish scales are a suitable model for the analysis of bone metabolism by ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuo; Hanmoto, Taizo; Yano, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Ikegame, Mika; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Kitamura, Kei-ichiro; Endo, Masato; Yamamoto, Toshio; Sekiguchi, Toshio; Urata, Makoto; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko; Hattori, Atsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    Using fish scales in which osteoclasts and osteoblasts coexist on the calcified bone matrix, we examined the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. At 3h of incubation after LIPUS treatment, osteoclastic markers such as tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K mRNA expressions decreased significantly while mRNA expressions of osteoblastic markers, osteocalcin, distal-less homeobox 5, runt-related transcription factor 2a, and runt-related transcription factor 2b, increased significantly. At 6 and 18h of incubation, however, both osteoclastic and osteoblastic marker mRNA expression did not change at least present conditions. Using GeneChip analysis of zebrafish scales treated with LIPUS, we found that cell death-related genes were upregulated with LIPUS treatment. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that the expression of apoptosis-related genes also increased significantly. To confirm the involvement of apoptosis in osteoclasts with LIPUS, osteoclasts were induced by autotransplanting scales in goldfish. Thereafter, the DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis was detected in osteoclasts using the TUNEL (TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) method. The multi-nuclei of TRAP-stained osteoclasts in the scales were labeled with TUNEL. TUNEL staining showed that the number of apoptotic osteoclasts in goldfish scales was significantly elevated by treatment with LIPUS at 3h of incubation. Thus, we are the first to demonstrate that LIPUS directly functions to osteoclasts and to conclude that LIPUS directly causes apoptosis in osteoclasts shortly after exposure. PMID:26850473

  17. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  18. Cell mechanics in biomedical cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the deformation behaviours of cellular entities, such as coated microbubbles and liposomes subject to a cavitation flow, become increasingly important for the advancement of ultrasonic imaging and drug delivery. Numerical simulations for bubble dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents based on the boundary integral method are presented in this work. The effects of the encapsulating shell are estimated by adapting Hoff's model used for thin-shell contrast agents. The viscosity effects are estimated by including the normal viscous stress in the boundary condition. In parallel, mechanical models of cell membranes and liposomes as well as state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative measurement of viscoelasticity for a single cell or coated microbubbles are reviewed. The future developments regarding modelling and measurement of the material properties of the cellular entities for cutting-edge biomedical applications are also discussed. PMID:26442142

  19. A piezoelectric polymer cavitation sensor installed in an emulsion generation microchannel device and an evaluation of cavitation state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Takefumi; Yabumoto, Masaki; Suzumori, Koichi

    2016-07-01

    In previous works, ultrasonic emulsification was realized using small microchannel devices oscillated by piezoelectric transducers. By using the devices, the emulsification in the flow process was also realized. In these devices, the driving frequency was higher than 2 MHz. This value is higher than the maximum audible field. On the other hand, the frequency is too high to utilize the cavitation effect. This is because the cavitation threshold depends on the frequency. The aim of this study is to confirm the cavitation state in the microchannel device using a piezoelectric polymer sensor. A micropatterned cavitation detection sensor has been fabricated by a photolithography technique and evaluated in a high-intensity ultrasound field. The emulsification state in the microchannel device has been evaluated using the fabricated sensor.

  20. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; Placenta previa - ultrasound; Multiple ...

  1. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  2. Cavitation bubble generation and control for HIFU transcranial adaptive focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gâteau, J.; Marsac, L.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-04-01

    Brain treatment with High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be achieved by multichannel arrays through the skull using time-reversal focusing. Such a method requires a reference signal either sent by a real source embedded in brain tissues or computed from a virtual source, using the acoustic properties of the skull deduced from CT images. This noninvasive computational method allows precise focusing, but is time consuming and suffers from unavoidable modeling errors which reduce the accessible acoustic pressure at the focus in comparison with real experimental time-reversal using an implanted hydrophone. Ex vivo simulations with a half skull immersed in a water tank allow us to reach at low amplitude levels a pressure ratio of 83% of the reference pressure (real time reversal) at 1MHz. Using this method to transcranially focus a pulse signal in an agar gel (model for in vivo bubble formation), we induced a cavitation bubble that generated an ultrasonic wave received by the array. Selecting the 1MHz component, the signal was time reversed and re-emitted, allowing 97%±1.1% of pressure ratio to be restored. To target points in the vicinity of the geometrical focus, electronic steering from the reference signal has been achieved. Skull aberrations severely degrade the accessible pressure while moving away from the focus ( ˜90% at 10mm in the focal plane). Nevertheless, inducing cavitation bubbles close to the limit of the primary accessible zone allowed us to acquire multiple references signal to increase the electronic steering area by 50%.

  3. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation123

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control. PMID:27390775

  4. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  5. Reduction in mechanical allodynia in complex regional pain syndrome patients with ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the superficial peroneal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Won Soek; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Mi Sun

    2016-01-01

    The superficial peroneal nerve is vulnerable to damage from ankle sprain injuries and fractures as well as surgery to this region. And it is also one of the most commonly involved nerves in complex regional pain syndrome type II in the foot and ankle region. We report two cases of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of superficial peroneal nerve for reduction of allodynia in CRPS patients. PMID:27738506

  6. Enhanced gene transfection using calcium phosphate co-precipitates and low-intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mariame A; Ahmed, Iman S; Campbell, Paul; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-11-20

    The capability to controllably disrupt the cell membrane by ultrasound (US), thus facilitating entry of exogenous species, has now reached a state of some maturity. However, a compelling question asks whether there is a residual role for US in enhancing transfection: that is, once the genetic material has been delivered to the cytosol, can US assist in its transport into the nucleus? The present experiment was designed with a view to addressing this question. As such, our experimental setup discriminates between: (i) the precursor cell membrane permealization step, and (ii) any subsequent intracellular trafficking into the nucleus. In this study, calcium phosphate co-precipitates (CaP) were used to internalize plasmid DNA encoding for luciferase (pDNA-Luc) (>90%) in HeLa cells. After 2h incubation with the CaP-pDNA-Luc, cells were washed and insonated for varying durations. The results showed that US can indeed enhance the intracellular trafficking of previously internalized genes when longer insonation periods are implemented, culminating with an increased probability for successful nuclear localization, as inferred from an enhanced luciferase expression. Moreover, the results suggest that the intracellular role of US might be mediated through a pathway that appears not to be limited to destabilizing the endosomal vesicles. The study thus provides new information regarding the intracellular effects of US, and in effect represents a new modality combining US and CaP carriers for improved efficiency in gene delivery.

  7. Three-dimensional noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar pulses: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Renhuan; Li, Xu; Song, Aiguo; He, Bin; Yan, Ruqiang

    2012-11-21

    Electrical properties of biological tissues are highly sensitive to their physiological and pathological status. Thus it is of importance to image electrical properties of biological tissues. However, spatial resolution of conventional electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is generally poor. Recently, hybrid imaging modalities combining electric conductivity contrast and ultrasonic resolution based on the acousto-electric effect has attracted considerable attention. In this study, we propose a novel three-dimensional (3D) noninvasive ultrasound Joule heat tomography (UJHT) approach based on the acousto-electric effect using unipolar ultrasound pulses. As the Joule heat density distribution is highly dependent on the conductivity distribution, an accurate and high-resolution mapping of the Joule heat density distribution is expected to give important information that is closely related to the conductivity contrast. The advantages of the proposed ultrasound Joule heat tomography using unipolar pulses include its simple inverse solution, better performance than UJHT using common bipolar pulses and its independence of a priori knowledge of the conductivity distribution of the imaging object. Computer simulation results show that using the proposed method, it is feasible to perform a high spatial resolution Joule heat imaging in an inhomogeneous conductive media. Application of this technique on tumor scanning is also investigated by a series of computer simulations. PMID:23123757

  8. Effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on healing of mandibular bone defects: an experimental study in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bronoosh, P; Tanideh, N; Noorafshan, A; Andisheh Tadbir, A; Aalipanah, M; Kamali, F; Abbasnia, K; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, O

    2015-02-01

    Research evidence suggests that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPU) produces significant osteoinductive effects, accelerating the healing of bone defects. The authors investigated the effects of LIPU on mandibular bone defects in a rabbit model. Fifty-six adult Dutch rabbits were divided randomly into control, LIPU-1 (1MHz), and LIPU-3 (3MHz) groups. A mandibular defect was created in all rabbits. The effect of LIPU on mandibular defects was assessed by frequency (1 or 3MHz) and timing (2 and 4 weeks). Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured and stereology and histology performed; results were compared at the end of 2 and 4 weeks. LIPU-3 resulted in significantly higher bone formation compared to the control group at the end of week 4 on histological assessment (P=0.008). BMD was significantly higher at 4 weeks than at 2 weeks (P=0.03). LIPU-3 increased the numerical density of osteoblasts and osteocytes at the end of week 4 (P=0.05 and P=0.001, respectively). The results of this study are in favour of using LIPU 3MHz to accelerate mandibular bone healing. However, this study suggests that a frequency of 3MHz and the longer application of LIPU 3MHz for 4 weeks can only promote 8% mandibular bone healing in rabbits. Therefore, the use of LIPU has no really convincing, consistent clinical effects on maxillofacial bone healing.

  9. Assessing the application and downstream effects of pulsed mode ultrasound as a pre-treatment for alum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Yusaf, Talal; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    The application of pulsed mode ultrasound (PMU) as a pre-treatment for alum coagulation was investigated at various alum dosages and pH levels. The effects of the treatments on turbidity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and residual Al were evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized to optimize the operating conditions of the applied treatments. The results showed that PMU pre-treatment increased turbidity and DOC removal percentages from maximum of 96.6% and 43% to 98.8% and 52%, respectively. It also helped decrease the minimum residual Al from 0.100 to 0.094 ppm. The multiple response optimization was carried out using the desirability function. A desirability value of >0.97 estimated respective turbidity removal, DOC removal and Al residual of 89.24%, 45.66% and ∼ 0.1 ppm for coagulation (control) and 90.61%, >55% and ∼ 0 for coagulation preceded by PMU. These figures were validated via confirmatory experiments. PMU pre-treatment increased total coliform removal from 80% to >98% and decreased trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP) from 250 to 200 ppb CH3Cl. Additionally, PMU application prior to coagulation improved the settleability of sludge due to the degassing effects. The results of this study confirms that PMU pre-treatment can significantly improve coagulation performance. PMID:26964919

  10. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound produced an increase of osteogenic genes expression during the process of bone healing in rats.

    PubMed

    Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Bossini, Paulo; de Oliveira, Poliani; Ribeiro, Juliana Uema; Tim, Carla; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Alves, Jose Marcos; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Selistre de Araújo, Heloísa Sobreiro; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the temporal expression of osteogenic genes during the process of bone healing in low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) treated bone defects by means of histopathologic and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. Animals were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 30): control group (bone defect without treatment) and LIPUS treated (bone defect treated with LIPUS). On days 7, 13 and 25 postinjury, 10 rats per group were sacrificed. Rats were treated with a 30 mW/cm(2) LIPUS. The results pointed out intense new bone formation surrounded by highly vascularized connective tissue presenting a slight osteogenic activity, with primary bone deposition was observed in the group exposed to LIPUS in the intermediary (13 days) and late stages of repair (25 days) in the treated animals. In addition, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) showed an upregulation of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), osteocalcin and Runx2 genes 7 days after the surgery. In the intermediary period, there was no increase in the expression. The expression of alkaline phosphatase, BMP4 and Runx2 was significantly increased at the last period. Our results indicate that LIPUS therapy improves bone repair in rats and upregulated osteogenic genes, mainly at the late stages of recovery. PMID:20950932

  11. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-15

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  12. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on biocompatibility and cellular uptake of chitosan-tripolyphosphate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Junyi; Liu, Gaojun; Qin, Yi-Xian; Meng, Yizhi

    2014-01-01

    Using low molecular weight chitosan nanoparticles (CNPs) prepared by an ionic gelation method, the authors report the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) on cell viability and nanoparticle uptake in cultured murine preosteoblasts. Particle size and zeta potential are measured using dynamic light scattering, and cell viability is evaluated using the of [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] assay. Results show that 30 min delivery of CNPs at 0.5 mg/mL is able to prevent loss of cell viability due to either serum starvation or subsequent exposure to US (1 W/cm2 or 2 W/cm2, up to 1 min). Additionally, flow cytometry data suggest that there is a close association between cellular membrane integrity and the presence of CNPs when US at 2 W/cm2 is administered. PMID:25280857

  13. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on mandibular condyle growth in rats analyzed with micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kyozo; Motoyoshi, Mitsuru; Horinuki, Eri; Arai, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a bite-jumping appliance combined with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation on the mandibular condyle of growing rats using micro CT (mCT) and histological examinations. Twelve Wistar rats were divided into three groups of four individuals each: Group 1 was an untreated control group, Group 2 received bite-jumping appliances, and Group 3 received bite-jumping appliances and LIPUS stimulation (15 min/day, 2 weeks) to the temporomandibular region. We measured the length and three-dimensional bone volume of each rat's mandibular condyle using mCT. The condylar cartilage was observed after the rats had been sacrificed. There was no significant difference in condylar sagittal width among the groups. The bite-jumping appliance combined with LIPUS stimulation increased the condylar major axis, mandibular sagittal length and condylar bone volume to a greater degree than use of the bite-jumping appliance alone. Histological examination demonstrated hypertrophy of the condylar cartilage layers, the fibrous layer and hypertrophic cell layer of the rats treated with bite-jumping appliances combined with LIPUS stimulation in comparison to rats treated with bite-jumping appliances alone. (J Oral Sci 58, 415-422, 2016). PMID:27665982

  14. Treatment of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound: Report of 2 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Yang; Niikura, Takahiro; Iwakura, Takashi; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures remains a difficult clinical problem for orthopaedic surgeons. In the physiologically young patient, every effort should be made to preserve the native hip joint. We present two cases of ununited femoral neck fractures in young adults who were successfully treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and showed satisfactory results. Presentation of case 1 A 41-year-old woman was involved in a motor vehicle crash and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Eleven months after internal fixation, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the presence of non-union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After eight months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Presentation of case 2 A 39-year-old man was involved in a cycling accident and was diagnosed with displaced femoral neck fracture. Thirteen weeks after internal fixation, a CT scan revealed delayed union of the femoral neck. LIPUS treatment was therefore initiated. After six months, the fracture was completely consolidated. Conclusion We suggest use of LIPUS as a possible treatment approach for delayed union and non-union of displaced femoral neck fractures in young patients before considering further surgical intervention. PMID:26942332

  15. Protective effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Chen, Ran-Chou; Lu, Wen-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Feng-Yi

    2015-04-01

    The protein expressions of neurotrophic factors can be enhanced by low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) stimulation in the brain. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the protective effect of LIPUS stimulation against aluminum-induced cerebral damage in Alzheimer's disease rat model. LIPUS was administered 7 days before each aluminum chloride (AlCl3) administration, and concomitantly given with AlCl3 daily for a period of 6 weeks. Neurotrophic factors in hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. Behavioral changes in the Morris water maze and elevated plus maze were examined in rats after administration of AlCl3. Various biochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the extent of brain damages. LIPUS is capable of prompting levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat brain. AlCl3 administration resulted in a significant increase in the aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity and beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in AlCl3 treated rats. LIPUS stimulation significantly attenuated aluminum concentration, acetylcholinesterase activity, Aβ deposition and karyopyknosis in AlCl3 treated rats. Furthermore, LIPUS significantly improved memory retention in AlCl3-induced memory impairment. These experimental results indicate that LIPUS has neuroprotective effects against AlCl3-induced cerebral damages and cognitive dysfunction.

  16. 11. Bactericidal Activity of Photocatalytic TiO2 Excited by Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS): An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chieko; Koseki, Hironobu

    2016-08-01

    Photocatalysis with anatase-type titanium dioxide (TiO2) under ultraviolet has a well-recognized bactericidal effect. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the photocatalytic bactericidal effects of TiO2 on Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC35984) caused by Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) associated with bio-implant-related infections. The photocatalytic properties of the TiO2 films were confirmed by the degradation of an aqueous solution of methylene blue. The disks were seeded with cultured Staphylococcus epidermidis and irradiated by LIPUS. The bactericidal effect of the TiO2 films was evaluated by counting the surviving colonies. The viability of the bacteria on the photocatalytic TiO2 film coated titanium was suppressed significantly to 63% after 2 hours of LIPUS treatment (P < 0.05). The photocatalytic bactericidal effect of TiO2 under LIPUS is useful for sterilizing the contaminated and infected surfaces of metal bio-implants. PMID:27441772

  17. The pulsed Doppler ultrasound flowmeter: experimental evaluation of velocity accuracy and range resolution.

    PubMed

    Griffith, J M; McLeod, F D; Leroy, A F

    1977-01-01

    Accurate quantitation of blood flow patterns, particularly in the physiological state, is important to the successful study of several problems in biomedical research. The pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter offers promise of overcoming some of the difficulties present in other methods. This flowmeter can be either implantable or noninvasive. Although a number of papers describe important design criteria, the design or selection of a Doppler system for a given task remains a complex matter involving many compromises based on theoretical considerations and very limited data. Experimental data from well-defined flows are needed to help identify those areas in which ultrasonic flowmeters can be most useful. This paper defines and evaluates two important parameters for the pulsed Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter by comparing experimental results with those predicted theorectically. The first parameter is velocity accuracy; the second parameter is range resolution. Findings show that centerline flow velocities in circular tubes can be estimated to within a few percent of the correct value, and that a 1.5-mm range resolution can be realized with the system tested.

  18. Photoacoustic measurement for glucose solution concentration based on tunable pulsed laser induced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Dengji

    2012-12-01

    Noninvasive measurement of blood glucose concentration (BGC) has become a research hotspot. BGC measurement based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) was employed to detect the photoacoustic (PA) signal of blood glucose due to the advantages of avoiding the disturbance of optical scattering. In this paper, a set of custom-built BGC measurement system based on tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pulsed laser and ultrasonic transducer was established to test the PA response effect of the glucose solution. In the experiments, we successfully acquired the time resolved PA signals of distilled water and glucose aqueous solution, and the PA peak-to-peak values(PPV) were gotten under the condition of excitated pulsed laser with changed wavelength from 1340nm to 2200nm by increasing interval of 10nm, the optimal characteristic wavelengths of distilled water and glucose solution were determined. Finally, to get the concentration prediction error, we used the linear fitting of ordinary least square (OLS) algorithm to fit the PPV of 1510nm, and we got the predicted concentration error was about 0.69mmol/L via the fitted linear equation. So, this system and scheme have some values in the research of noninvasive BGC measurement.

  19. High-harmonic generation in cavitated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Comier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-05-15

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using ultraintense lasers interacting with highly stripped ions in cavitated plasmas. This method relies on plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense drive beam (laser or electron beam) to produce an ion cavity. An ultrashort pulse laser propagating in the plasma-electron-free ion cavity generates laser harmonics. The longitudinal electron motion, which inhibits high-harmonic generation at high laser intensities, can be suppressed by the space-charge field in the ion cavity or by using a counterpropagating laser pulse. Periodic suppression of the longitudinal electron motion may also be used to quasi-phase-match. This method enables harmonic generation to be extended to the sub-A regime.

  20. Fetal Echocardiography and Pulsed-wave Doppler Ultrasound in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Ryan; Endo, Masayuki; La Gerche, Andre; Eixarch, Elisenda; DeKoninck, Philip; Ferferieva, Vessilina; D'hooge, Jan; Wallace, Euan M.; Deprest, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in abnormal cardiac function that is apparent antenatally due to advances in fetoplacental Doppler ultrasound and fetal echocardiography. Increasingly, these imaging modalities are being employed clinically to examine cardiac function and assess wellbeing in utero, thereby guiding timing of birth decisions. Here, we used a rabbit model of IUGR that allows analysis of cardiac function in a clinically relevant way. Using isoflurane induced anesthesia, IUGR is surgically created at gestational age day 25 by performing a laparotomy, exposing the bicornuate uterus and then ligating 40-50% of uteroplacental vessels supplying each gestational sac in a single uterine horn. The other horn in the rabbit bicornuate uterus serves as internal control fetuses. Then, after recovery at gestational age day 30 (full term), the same rabbit undergoes examination of fetal cardiac function. Anesthesia is induced with ketamine and xylazine intramuscularly, then maintained by a continuous intravenous infusion of ketamine and xylazine to minimize iatrogenic effects on fetal cardiac function. A repeat laparotomy is performed to expose each gestational sac and a microultrasound examination (VisualSonics VEVO 2100) of fetal cardiac function is performed. Placental insufficiency is evident by a raised pulsatility index or an absent or reversed end diastolic flow of the umbilical artery Doppler waveform. The ductus venosus and middle cerebral artery Doppler is then examined. Fetal echocardiography is performed by recording B mode, M mode and flow velocity waveforms in lateral and apical views. Offline calculations determine standard M-mode cardiac variables, tricuspid and mitral annular plane systolic excursion, speckle tracking and strain analysis, modified myocardial performance index and vascular flow velocity waveforms of interest. This small animal model of IUGR therefore affords examination of in utero cardiac function that is

  1. Elastic modulus in young diabetic patients (ultrasound measurements of pulse wave velocity).

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Gessaroli, M; Cifiello, B I; Salardi, S; Reggiani, A; Cacciari, E; D'Addato, M

    1984-11-01

    Aim of this study is to confirm the validity of non-invasive evaluation with Doppler C.W. in the study of arterial diseases and in the identification of pre-clinical arterial lesions. We studied twenty-eight children suffering from diabetes mellitus, and dependent on insulin and a control group composed of twenty-eight healthy persons. All subjects were studied using the methodology of the transit time for the determination of the elastic modulus of the lower limb arterial wall and results were analysed according to a statistical method. Although the groups were small, an increase in pulse wave velocity was noted in diabetic children and a significative correlation was found between the elastic modulus and duration of diabetes.

  2. Detection of cracks in metal sheets using pulsed laser generated ultrasound and EMAT detection.

    PubMed

    Dixon, S; Burrows, S E; Dutton, B; Fan, Y

    2011-01-01

    A pulsed Nd:YAG laser with an approximately Gaussian beam shape is directed onto the surface of an aluminium sheet at an energy density below which damage by laser ablation occurs, generating Lamb waves in the sheet. The laser beam is raster scanned across the surface of the sample. The Lamb waves travel radially outwards from the generation point and are detected some distance away by an electromagnetic acoustic transducer with sensitivity to in-plane displacements of the sheet. A number of static EMATs are located around the edges of the sheet, some distance from the generation point. The presence of a crack-like defect on the sheet can be detected by either a sudden change in the ultrasonic waveform or by an enhancement in the frequency content of the waveform when the laser beam illuminates directly onto the crack.

  3. Towards use of MRI-guided ultrasound for treating cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert H; Silber, John R; Enzmann, Dieter R; Beauchamp, Norman J; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Mourad, Pierre D

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), causing delayed neurological deficits in as many as one third of cases. Existing therapy targets induction of cerebral vasodilation through use of various drugs and mechanical means, with a range of observed efficacy. Here, we perform a literature review supporting our hypothesis that transcranially delivered ultrasound may have the ability to induce therapeutic cerebral vasodilation and, thus, may one day be used therapeutically in the context of SAH. Prior studies demonstrate that ultrasound can induce vasodilation in both normal and vasoconstricted blood vessels in peripheral tissues, leading to reduced ischemia and cell damage. Among the proposed mechanisms is alteration of several nitric oxide (NO) pathways, where NO is a known vasodilator. While in vivo studies do not point to a specific physical mechanism, results of in vitro studies favor cavitation induction by ultrasound, where the associated shear stresses likely induce NO production. Two papers discussed the effects of ultrasound on the cerebral vasculature. One study applied clinical transcranial Doppler ultrasound to a rodent complete middle cerebral artery occlusion model and found reduced infarct size. A second involved the application of pulsed ultrasound in vitro to murine brain endothelial cells and showed production of a variety of vasodilatory chemicals, including by-products of arachidonic acid metabolism. In sum, nine reviewed studies demonstrated evidence of either cerebrovascular dilation or elaboration of vasodilatory compounds. Of particular interest, all of the reviewed studies used ultrasound capable of transcranial application: pulsed ultrasound, with carrier frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 MHz, and intensities not substantially above FDA-approved intensity values. We close by discussing potential specific treatment paradigms of SAH and other cerebral ischemic

  4. Pulsed counter-current ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of polysaccharides from Boletus edulis.

    PubMed

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Ji, Chaowen

    2014-01-30

    Four methods for extracting polysaccharides from Boletus edulis, namely, hot-water extraction, ultrasonic clearer extraction, static probe ultrasonic extraction, and pulsed counter-current probe ultrasonic extraction (CCPUE), were studied. Results showed that CCPUE has the highest extraction efficiency among the methods studied. Under optimal CCPUE conditions, a B. edulis polysaccharide (BEP) yield of 8.21% was obtained. Three purified fractions, BEP-I, BEP-II, and BEP-III, were obtained through sequential purification by DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The average molecular weights of BEP-I, BEP-II, and BEP-III were 10,278, 23,761, and 42,736 Da, respectively. The polysaccharides were mainly composed of xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose; of these, mannose contents were the highest. The antioxidant activities of the BEPs were further investigated by measurement of their ability to scavenge DPPH and hydroxyl radicals as well as their reducing power. The results indicated that the BEPs have good antioxidant activity. PMID:24299786

  5. Exploration and Practice in Photoacoustic Measurement for Glucose Concentration Based on Tunable Pulsed Laser Induced Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhong; Liu, Guodong; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Dengji; Xiong, Zhihua

    2015-07-01

    In this article, a tunable pulsed laser induced photoacoustic measurement setup of monitoring glucose concentration was established in the forward mode. In experiments, the time-resolved photoacoustic signal of glucose aqueous solution with different concentrations of 0-300 mg/dl were captured and averaged 512 times, and the photoacoustic peak-to-peak values were recorded using the wavelength scan in NIR region of 1300-2300 nm. The optimal characteristic wavelengths of glucose were determined via the difference spectral and the first derivative spectral algorithm, and correction models between peak-to-peak values of optimal wavelengths and concentration gradients were established using multivariate linear regression algorithm. Experimental results demonstrated that the profile and logarithm shape of time-resolved photoacoustic signal for glucose solutions were in good agreement with photoacoustic theories. The prediction effect of optimal wavelength of 1510 nm was best, its root-mean-square errors of correction and prediction were 12.14 and 8.45 mg/dl, respectively, the correlation coefficient reached 0.9856.

  6. Cavitation guide for control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  7. Active cavitation detection of asymmetrical inertial cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2001-05-01

    The active cavitation detector (ACD) developed in Bob Apfel's laboratory has often been employed to quantify pressure thresholds for inception of symmetrical inertial cavitation of microbubbles. In the current application, however, a 30-MHz ACD interrogates individual echo-contrast agent bubbles adhering to a Mylar(TM) sheet that are driven into asymmetrical (jet-producing) collapse by a 1-MHz toneburst (>1 MPa pp). The resulting ACD output suggests that asymmetrical bubble collapse is slower than symmetrical collapse, producing less total radiated acoustic power. ACD output mixed with reference sinusoids at 30 MHz and low pass filtered yields Doppler signals that may be useful in quantifying asymmetrical collapses under biomedically relevant conditions, such as on endothelial walls.

  8. Computed Ultrasound Tomography in Echo mode (CUTE) of speed of sound for diagnosis and for aberration correction in pulse-echo sonography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Michael; Held, Gerrit; Preisser, Stefan; Peeters, Sara; Grünig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2014-03-01

    Sound speed as a diagnostic marker for various diseases of human tissue has been of interest for a while. Up to now, mostly transmission ultrasound computed tomography (UCT) was able to detect spatially resolved sound speed, and its promise as a diagnostic tool has been demonstrated. However, UCT is limited to acoustically transparent samples such as the breast. We present a novel technique where spatially resolved detection of sound speed can be achieved using conventional pulse-echo equipment in reflection mode. For this purpose, pulse-echo images are acquired under various transmit beam directions and a two-dimensional map of the sound speed is reconstructed from the changing phase of local echoes using a direct reconstruction method. Phantom results demonstrate that a high spatial resolution (1 mm) and contrast (0.5 % of average sound speed) can be achieved suitable for diagnostic purposes. In comparison to previous reflection-mode based methods, CUTE works also in a situation with only diffuse echoes, and its direct reconstruction algorithm enables real-time application. This makes it suitable as an addition to conventional clinical ultrasound where it has the potential to benefit diagnosis in a multimodal approach. In addition, knowledge of the spatial distribution of sound speed allows full aberration correction and thus improved spatial resolution and contrast of conventional B-mode ultrasound.

  9. Enhancement of Cell Ingrowth, Proliferation, and Early Differentiation in a Three-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Scaffold Using Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Concerns over the use of autografts or allografts have necessitated the development of biomaterials for bone regeneration. Various studies have been performed to optimize the cultivation of osteogenic cells using osteoconductive porous scaffolds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the osteogenic efficiency of bone cell ingrowth, proliferation, and early differentiation in a silicon carbide (SiC) porous ceramic scaffold promoted with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. MC3T3-E1 mouse preosteoblasts were seeded onto scaffolds and cultured for 4 and 7 days with daily of 20-min ultrasound treatment. The cells were evaluated for cell attachment, morphology, viability, ingrowth depth, volumetric proliferation, and early differentiation. After 4 and 7 days of culture and ultrasound exposure, the cell density was higher in the ultrasound-treated group compared with the sham-treated group on SiC scaffolds. The cell ingrowth depths inside the SiC scaffolds were 149.2±27.3 μm at 1 day, 310.1±12.6 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 248.0±19.7 μm for the sham control at 4 days, and 359.6±18.5 μm for the ultrasound-treated group and 280.0±17.7 μm for the sham control at 7 days. They were significantly increased, that is, 25% (p=0.0029) and 28% (p=0.0008) increase, respectively, with ultrasound radiation force as compared with those in sham control at 4 and 7 days postseeding. The dsDNA contents were 583.5±19.1 ng/scaffold at 1 day, 2749.9±99.9 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2514.9±114.7 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 4 days, and 3582.3±325.3 ng/scaffold for the ultrasound-treated group and 2825.7±134.3 ng/scaffold for the sham control at 7 days. There was a significant difference in the dsDNA content between the ultrasound- and sham-treated groups at 4 and 7 days. The ultrasound-treated group with the SiC construct showed a 9% (p=0.00029) and 27% (p=0.00017) increase in the average dsDNA content at 4 and 7 days over

  10. Cavitation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  11. Cavitation in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-01-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  12. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  13. Applications of Acoustics and Cavitation to Noninvasive Therapy and Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coussios, Constantin C.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2008-01-01

    Biomedical acoustics is rapidly evolving from a diagnostic modality into a therapeutic tool, and acoustic cavitation is often the common denominator in a wide range of new therapeutic applications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) waves generated outside the body can be used to deposit heat deep within the body. Through a quantitative analysis of heat deposition by ultrasound, it is shown that inertial cavitation can help address some of the major challenges of HIFU therapy by providing a means of enhancing and monitoring treatment noninvasively. In the context of drug delivery, both inertial and stable cavitation play roles in enhancing drug activity and uptake. In particular, shape oscillations arising during stable cavitation provide an effective micropumping mechanism for enhanced mass transport across inaccessible interfaces.

  14. Prediction of pump cavitation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method for predicting pump cavitation performance with various liquids, liquid temperatures, and rotative speeds is presented. Use of the method requires that two sets of test data be available for the pump of interest. Good agreement between predicted and experimental results of cavitation performance was obtained for several pumps operated in liquids which exhibit a wide range of properties. Two cavitation parameters which qualitatively evaluate pump cavitation performance are also presented.

  15. Detecting Cavitation Pitting Without Disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for detecting cavitation pitting in pumps, turbines, and other machinery uses low-level nuclear irradiation. Isotopes concentrated below surface emit gamma radiation, a portion of which is attenuated by overlying material. Where there are cavitation pits, output of gamma-ray detector fluctuates as detector is scanned near pits. Important to detect cavitation pits because nozzle, turbine blade, or other pump component weakened by cavitation could fail catastrophically and cause machine to explode.

  16. Nonlinear bubble dynamics of cavitation.

    PubMed

    An, Yu

    2012-01-01

    For cavitation clouds generated in a standing sound wave driven by an ultrasonic horn, the nonlinear acoustic wave equation governing cavitation dynamics is numerically solved together with the bubble motion equation under an approximation. This conceptual calculation can qualitatively reproduce the observed characteristics of cavitation.

  17. In vitro effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation on the osteogenic differentiation of human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells for tooth tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kitaek; Kim, Jangho; Seonwoo, Hoon; Park, Soo Hyun; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound stimulation produces significant multifunctional effects that are directly relevant to alveolar bone formation, which is necessary for periodontal healing and regeneration. We focused to find out effects of specific duty cycles and the percentage of time that ultrasound is being generated over one on/off pulse period, under ultrasound stimulation. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound ((LIPUS) 1 MHz) with duty cycles of 20% and 50% was used in this study, and human alveolar bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hABMSCs) were treated with an intensity of 50 mW/cm(2) and exposure time of 10 min/day. hABMSCs exposed at duty cycles of 20% and 50% had similar cell viability (O.D.), which was higher (*P < 0.05) than that of control cells. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was significantly enhanced at 1 week with LIPUS treatment in osteogenic cultures as compared to control. Gene expressions showed significantly higher expression levels of CD29, CD44, COL1, and OCN in the hABMSCs under LIPUS treatment when compared to control after two weeks of treatment. The effects were partially controlled by LIPUS treatment, indicating that modulation of osteogenesis in hABMSCs was related to the specific stimulation. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was markedly increased after LIPUS treatment than that seen in untreated cells. Through simple staining methods such as Alizarin red and von Kossa staining, calcium deposits generated their highest levels at about 3 weeks. These results suggest that LIPUS could enhance the cell viability and osteogenic differentiation of hABMSCs, and could be part of effective treatment methods for clinical applications.

  18. Cavitations induced by plasmas, plasmas induced by cavitations, and plasmas produced in cavitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation bubbles are not static bubbles but have dynamics of expansion, shrinkage, and collapse. Since the collapse of a cavitation bubble is roughly an adiabatic process, the inside of the bubble at the collapse has a high temperature and a high pressure, resulting in the production of a plasma. This talk will be focused on cavitation-related plasma phenomena and the role of the cavitation bubble in the synthesis of nanoparticles. A method for inducing a cavitation bubble is laser ablation in liquid. After the disappearance of laser-produced plasma with optical emission, we have observed the formation of a cavitation bubble. We have found that the inside of the cavitation bubble is the reaction field for the synthesis of nanoparticles. The atomic and molecular species ejected from the ablation target toward the liquid are transported into the cavitation bubble, and they condense into nanoparticles inside it. It is important to note that nanoparticles are stored inside the cavitation bubble until its collapse. We have shown that the size and the structure of nanoparticles are controlled by controlling the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles. Another method for inducing cavitation bubbles is to use ultrasonic power. We have found a simple method for the efficient production of standing cavitation bubbles. The method is just inserting a punching metal plate into water irradiated by ultrasonic wave. The depth of water and the position of the punching plate should be tuned precisely. We have proposed the mechanism of the efficient production of cavitation bubbles by this method. Currently, we try to have electric discharges in cavitation bubbles with the intention of realizing nonequilibrium sonochemistry. In particular, the electric discharge in a laser-induced cavitation bubble shows interesting distortion of the bubble shape, which suggests the electrostatic characteristics of the cavitation bubble.

  19. Mapping of cavitational activity in a pilot plant dyeing equipment.

    PubMed

    Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Pezzin, A; Rovero, G; Sicardi, S

    2015-11-01

    A large number of papers of the literature quote dyeing intensification based on the application of ultrasound (US) in the dyeing liquor. Mass transfer mechanisms are described and quantified, nevertheless these experimental results in general refer to small laboratory apparatuses with a capacity of a few hundred millilitres and extremely high volumetric energy intensity. With the strategy of overcoming the scale-up inaccuracy consequent to the technological application of ultrasounds, a dyeing pilot-plant prototype of suitable liquor capacity (about 40 L) and properly simulating several liquor to textile hydraulic relationships was designed by including US transducers with different geometries. Optimal dyeing may be obtained by optimising the distance between transducer and textile material, the liquid height being a non-negligible operating parameter. Hence, mapping the cavitation energy in the machinery is expected to provide basic data on the intensity and distribution of the ultrasonic field in the aqueous liquor. A flat ultrasonic transducer (absorbed electrical power of 600 W), equipped with eight devices emitting at 25 kHz, was mounted horizontally at the equipment bottom. Considering industrial scale dyeing, liquor and textile substrate are reciprocally displaced to achieve a uniform colouration. In this technology a non uniform US field could affect the dyeing evenness to a large extent; hence, mapping the cavitation energy distribution in the machinery is expected to provide fundamental data and define optimal operating conditions. Local values of the cavitation intensity were recorded by using a carefully calibrated Ultrasonic Energy Meter, which is able to measure the power per unit surface generated by the cavitation implosion of bubbles. More than 200 measurements were recorded to define the map at each horizontal plane positioned at a different distance from the US transducer; tap water was heated at the same temperature used for dyeing tests (60

  20. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on injured muscle repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz; Toma, Renata Luri; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Fernandes, Kelly; de Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, N.; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-03-01

    Muscle tissue is one of the most frequently affected by injury, whether during sports activities, or work activities. In this context, biochemical and biophysical resources have been studied to minimize the time of muscle regeneration. Among these, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) may be highlighted. Despite a series of evidences about the positive effects of these resources in the process of tissue regeneration, the cellular and morphological changes triggered by LLLT and U.S. are still largely unknown. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of US and LLLT on muscle repair after cryolesion by means of histopathological analysis and immunohistochemistry for COX-2. A total of thirty five male Wistar rats were randomly distributed into 4 groups: intact control group; injured control group: muscle injured animals without any treatment; laser treated group: muscle injured animals treated with 830 nm laser and ultra-sound treated group: muscle injured animals treated with US. The treatments started 24 hours post-surgery and were performed during 6 sessions. The animals exposed to lasertherapy pointed out minor degenerative changes of muscle tissue. In the same way, exposure to ultrasound was able to reduce tissue injuries induced by cryolesion, but less intense than laser therapy. Strong COX-2 positive cells were found in rats submitted to cryolesion only, whereas COX-2 immunoexpression was lower in laser treated or ultrasound treated groups. In summary, this study reveals that both lasertherapy and ultrasound have positive effects on muscle repair in rats.

  1. Acoustic cavitation movies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2003-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation is a phenomenon that occurs on microsecond time scales and micron length scales, yet, it has many macroscopic manifestations. Accordingly, it is often difficult, at least for the author, to form realistic physical descriptions of the specific mechanisms through which it expresses itself in our macroscopic world. For example, there are still many who believe that cavitation erosion is due to the shock wave that is emitted by bubble implosion, rather than the liquid jet created on asymmetric collapse...and they may be right. Over the years, the author has accumulated a number of movies and high-speed photographs of cavitation activity, which he uses to form his own visual references. In the time allotted, he will show a number of these movies and photographs and discuss their relevance to existing technological problems. A limited number of CDs containing the presented materials will be available to interested individuals. [Work supported in part by the NIH, USAMRMC, and the ONR.

  2. Influence of Diffraction Effects on the Result of Measuring the Absorption Coefficient of Ultrasound in Weakly Absorbing Liquids by the Pulse Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatsky, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the problem of the influence of diffraction effects on the result of measuring the absorption coefficient of ultrasound in weakly absorbing liquids by the pulse method. Diffraction attenuation of an ultrasonic signal in a measuring cell using solid-state delay lines is calculated. It is shown that the use of delay lines of the ultrasonic signal leads to a considerable distortion of the measured absorption coefficient in the low-frequency range from the true value and can either overestimate or underestimate the results.

  3. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-07-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  4. Ultrasound-Propelled Nanocups for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, James J; Myers, Rachel; Coviello, Christian M; Graham, Susan M; Shah, Apurva R; Stride, Eleanor; Carlisle, Robert C; Coussios, Constantin C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound-induced bubble activity (cavitation) has been recently shown to actively transport and improve the distribution of therapeutic agents in tumors. However, existing cavitation-promoting agents are micron-sized and cannot sustain cavitation activity over prolonged time periods because they are rapidly destroyed upon ultrasound exposure. A novel ultrasound-responsive single-cavity polymeric nanoparticle (nanocup) capable of trapping and stabilizing gas against dissolution in the bloodstream is reported. Upon ultrasound exposure at frequencies and intensities achievable with existing diagnostic and therapeutic systems, nanocups initiate and sustain readily detectable cavitation activity for at least four times longer than existing microbubble constructs in an in vivo tumor model. As a proof-of-concept of their ability to enhance the delivery of unmodified therapeutics, intravenously injected nanocups are also found to improve the distribution of a freely circulating IgG mouse antibody when the tumor is exposed to ultrasound. Quantification of the delivery distance and concentration of both the nanocups and coadministered model therapeutic in an in vitro flow phantom shows that the ultrasound-propelled nanocups travel further than the model therapeutic, which is itself delivered to hundreds of microns from the vessel wall. Thus nanocups offer considerable potential for enhanced drug delivery and treatment monitoring in oncological and other biomedical applications. PMID:26296985

  5. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Induces Angiogenesis and Ameliorates Left Ventricular Dysfunction in a Porcine Model of Chronic Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Hanawa, Kenichiro; Ito, Kenta; Aizawa, Kentaro; Shindo, Tomohiko; Nishimiya, Kensuke; Hasebe, Yuhi; Tuburaya, Ryuji; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kanai, Hiroshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Although a significant progress has been made in the management of ischemic heart disease (IHD), the number of severe IHD patients is increasing. Thus, it is crucial to develop new, non-invasive therapeutic strategies. In the present study, we aimed to develop low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) therapy for the treatment of IHD. Methods and Results We first confirmed that in cultured human endothelial cells, LIPUS significantly up-regulated mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) with a peak at 32-cycle (P<0.05). Then, we examined the in vivo effects of LIPUS in a porcine model of chronic myocardial ischemia with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) (n = 28). The heart was treated with either sham (n = 14) or LIPUS (32-cycle with 193 mW/cm2 for 20 min, n = 14) at 3 different short axis levels. Four weeks after the treatment, LVEF was significantly improved in the LIPUS group (46±4 to 57±5%, P<0.05) without any adverse effects, whereas it remained unchanged in the sham group (46±5 to 47±6%, P = 0.33). Capillary density in the ischemic region was significantly increased in the LIPUS group compared with the control group (1084±175 vs. 858±151/mm2, P<0.05). Regional myocardial blood flow was also significantly improved in the LIPUS group (0.78±0.2 to 1.39±0.4 ml/min/g, P<0.05), but not in the control group (0.84±0.3 to 0.97±0.4 ml/min/g). Western blot analysis showed that VEGF, eNOS and bFGF were all significantly up-regulated only in the LIPUS group. Conclusions These results suggest that the LIPUS therapy is promising as a new, non-invasive therapy for IHD. PMID:25111309

  6. Cavitation damage prediction for the JSNS mercury target vessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Wakui, Takashi; Haga, Katsuhiro; Teshigawara, Makoto; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Takada, Hiroshi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The liquid mercury target system for the Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) at the Materials and Life science experimental Facility (MLF) in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) is designed to produce pulsed neutrons. The mercury target vessel in this system, which is made of type 316L stainless steel, is damaged by pressure wave-induced cavitation due to proton beam bombardment. Currently, cavitation damage is considered to be the dominant factor influencing the service life of the target vessel rather than radiation damage. In this study, cavitation damage to the interior surface of the target vessel was predicted on the basis of accumulated damage data from off-beam and on-beam experiments. The predicted damage was compared with the damage observed in a used target vessel. Furthermore, the effect of injecting gas microbubbles on cavitation damage was predicted through the measurement of the acoustic vibration of the target vessel. It was shown that the predicted depth of cavitation damage is reasonably coincident with the observed results. Moreover, it was confirmed that the injection of gas microbubbles had an effect on cavitation damage.

  7. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  8. Using acoustic cavitation to enhance chemotherapy of DOX liposomes: experiment in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Dai, Dan-Dan; Lu, Cui-Tao; Lv, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xing; Li, Wen-Feng; Wu, Yan; Jiang, Lei; Li, Xiao-Kun; Huang, Pin-Tong; Chen, Li-Juan; Lin, Min

    2012-09-01

    Experiments in vitro and in vivo were designed to investigate tumor growth inhibition of chemotherapeutics-loaded liposomes enhanced by acoustic cavitation. Doxorubicin-loaded liposomes (DOX liposomes) were used in experiments to investigate acoustic cavitation mediated effects on cell viability and chemotherapeutic function. The influence of lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation on tumor inhibition was also investigated. Animal experiment was carried out to verify the practicability of this technique in vivo. From experiment results, blank phospholipid-based microbubbles (PBM) combined with ultrasound (US) at intensity below 0.3 W/cm² could produce acoustic cavitation which maintained cell viability at high level. Compared with DOX solution, DOX liposomes combined with acoustic cavitation exerted effective tumor inhibition in vitro and in vivo. The lingering sensitive period after acoustic cavitation could also enhance the susceptibility of tumor to chemotherapeutic drugs. DOX liposomes could also exert certain tumor inhibition under preliminary acoustic cavitation. Acoustic cavitation could enhance the absorption efficiency of DOX liposomes, which could be used to reduce DOX adverse effect on normal organs in clinical chemotherapy.

  9. Gene delivery using ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Unger, E C; Hersh, E; Vannan, M; McCreery, T

    2001-05-01

    With the human genome product and continuing advances in molecular biology many therapeutic genes have been discovered. In the cardiovascular system, gene therapy has the potential to improve myocardial vascularization and ameliorate congestive heart failure. For successful development of clinical gene therapy, however, effective gene delivery vectors are needed. Ultrasound contrast agents can be used to develop new, more effective vectors for gene delivery. Ultrasound contrast agents lower the threshold for cavitation by ultrasound energy. Using physical properties of microbubbles and coating materials, genetic drugs have been incorporated into ultrasound contrast agents. Gene-bearing microbubbles can be injected IV and ultrasound energy applied to the target region. As the microbubbles enter the region of insonation, the microbubbles cavitate, locally releasing DNA. Cavitation also likely causes a local shockwave that improves cellular uptake of DNA. With transthoracic ultrasound, using commercially available diagnostic ultrasound system and an IV injection of gene-bearing microbubbles, high levels of transgene expression are observed in the insonated region of the myocardium. This new technology using microbubbles and ultrasound for gene delivery merits further study and development.

  10. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model, we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecting bubble is very high when hit by a positive pulse.

  11. Comparative study of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and low-level laser therapy on bone defects in tibias of rats.

    PubMed

    Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Feitosa, Suellen Maurin; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Bossini, Paulo; Oliveira, Poliani; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Renno, Ana Claudia Muniz

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and to compare the effects of low intensity ultra-sound (LIPUS) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) during the process of bone healing by means of histopathological and morphometric analysis. The animals were randomly distributed into three groups of 30 animals each: the control group (bone defect without treatment); the laser-treated group: (bone defect treated with laser), and the LIPUS-treated (bone defect treated with ultrasound). Each group was further divided into three different subgroups (n = 10) and on days 7, 13, and 25 post-injury, rats were killed with an intra-peritoneal injection of general anesthetic. The rats were treated with a 30-mW/cm(2) low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and a 830-nm laser at 50 J/cm(2). The results showed intense new bone formation surrounded by highly vascularized connective tissue presenting a slight osteogenic activity, with primary bone deposition being observed in the group exposed to laser in the intermediary (13 days) and late stages of repair (25 days). This was confirmed by morphometric analysis in which significant statistical differences (p < 0.05) were noticed when compared to the control. No remarkable differences were noticed in the specimens treated with ultrasound with regard to the amount of newly formed bone in comparison to the control group. Taken together, our results indicate that laser therapy improves bone repair in rats as depicted by histopathological and morphometric analysis, mainly at the late stages of recovery. Moreover, it seems that this therapy was more effective than US to accelerate bone healing. PMID:20521077

  12. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... resting for at least 10 minutes. Take the exercise heart rate while you are exercising. ... pulse rate can help determine if the patient's heart is pumping. ... rate gives information about your fitness level and health.

  13. Influence of mixing and ultrasound frequency on antisolvent crystallisation of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Kentish, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to promote nucleation of crystals and produce a narrower size distribution in a controlled and reproducible manner for the crystallisation process. Although there are various theories that suggest cavitation bubbles are responsible for sonocrystallisation, most studies use power ultrasonic horns that generate both intense shear and cavitation and this can mask the role that cavitation bubbles play. High frequency ultrasound from a plate transducer can be used to examine the effect of cavitation bubbles without the intense shear effect. This study reports the crystal size and morphology with various mixing speeds and ultrasound frequencies. The results show high frequency ultrasound produced sodium chloride crystals of similar size distribution as an ultrasonic horn. In addition, ultrasound generated sodium chloride crystals having a more symmetrical cubic structure compared to crystals produced by a high shear mixer.

  14. Influence of mixing and ultrasound frequency on antisolvent crystallisation of sodium chloride.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Kentish, Sandra E

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound is known to promote nucleation of crystals and produce a narrower size distribution in a controlled and reproducible manner for the crystallisation process. Although there are various theories that suggest cavitation bubbles are responsible for sonocrystallisation, most studies use power ultrasonic horns that generate both intense shear and cavitation and this can mask the role that cavitation bubbles play. High frequency ultrasound from a plate transducer can be used to examine the effect of cavitation bubbles without the intense shear effect. This study reports the crystal size and morphology with various mixing speeds and ultrasound frequencies. The results show high frequency ultrasound produced sodium chloride crystals of similar size distribution as an ultrasonic horn. In addition, ultrasound generated sodium chloride crystals having a more symmetrical cubic structure compared to crystals produced by a high shear mixer. PMID:23948494

  15. Investigation of therapy improvement using real-time photoacoustic imaging guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huizhong

    There are a lot of risks in cancer treatment by invasive surgery, such as bleeding, wound infection, and long recovery time, etc. Therefore, there is great need for minimally- or non-invasive treatment. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a rapidly growing and truly non-invasive technology. It has been widely used in therapeutic applications, such as rapid tissue heating and tissue ablation. With proper imaging guidance, HIFU treatment can be performed totally noninvasively. Currently, ultrasound imaging-guided HIFU has been extensively studied. However, ultrasound imaging guidance is less precise because of the relatively low imaging contrast, sensitivity, and specificity for noninvasive detection. In this study, we employed photoacoustic imaging (PAI) technique, which has been developed a novel promising imaging technique for early cancer detection, to guide HIFU treatment. The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of PAI to guide, monitor in real time and enhance the HIFU therapy. In this dissertation, as the first step, the integrated PAI and HIFU system had been shown to have the feasibility to guide HIFU both ex vivo and in vivo. Then, the system was improved and developed to a real-time PAI-guided HIFU system. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of PA detection for HIFU lesion is very high and the saturation of PA signals can be used as the indicator for tissue coagulation. During the temperature measurement using this system, laser-enhanced HIFU heating was found. Thus, we further investigated the laser enhanced technique in both HIFU heating and pulsed HIFU thrombolysis. In the HIFU therapy, laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. We demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potential to significantly enhance HIFU by reducing cavitation threshold.

  16. Generation and Quantitative Analysis of Pulsed Low Frequency Ultrasound to Determine the Sonic Sensitivity of Untreated and Treated Neoplastic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Trendowski, Matthew; Christen, Timothy D.; Zoino, Joseph N.; Acquafondata, Christopher; Fondy, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency ultrasound in the 20 to 60 kHz range is a novel physical modality by which to induce selective cell lysis and death in neoplastic cells. In addition, this method can be used in combination with specialized agents known as sonosensitizers to increase the extent of preferential damage exerted by ultrasound against neoplastic cells, an approach referred to as sonodynamic therapy (SDT). The methodology for generating and applying low frequency ultrasound in a preclinical in vitro setting is presented to demonstrate that reproducible cell destruction can be attained in order to examine and compare the effects of sonication on neoplastic and normal cells. This offers a means by which to reliably sonicate neoplastic cells at a level of consistency required for preclinical therapeutic assessment. In addition, the effects of cholesterol-depleting and cytoskeletal-directed agents on potentiating ultrasonic sensitivity in neoplastic cells are discussed in order to elaborate on mechanisms of action conducive to sonochemotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26274053

  17. Dynamics of Isolated Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, Pepijn; Bosschers, Johan; van Terwisga, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Performance of ship propellers and comfort levels in the surroundings are limited by various forms of cavitation. Amongst these forms tip vortex cavitation is one of the first appearing forms and is expected to be mainly responsible for the emission of broadband pressure fluctuations typically occurring between the 4th to the 7th blade passing frequency (approx. 40--70 Hz). These radiated pressure pulses are likely to excite parts of the hull structure resulting in a design compromise between efficiency and comfort. Insight is needed in the mechanism of acoustic emission from the oscillations by a tip vortex cavity. In the current experimental study the tip vortex cavity from a blade with an elliptic planform and sections based on NACA 662 - 415 with meanline a = 0 . 8 is observed using high speed shadowgraphy in combination with blade force and acoustic measurements. An analytic model describing three main cavity deformation modes is verified and used to explain the origin of a cavity eigenfrequency or ``vortex singing'' phenomenon observed by Maines and Arndt (1997) on the tip vortex cavity originating from the same blade. As no hydrodynamic sound originating from the tip vortex cavity was observed it is posed that a tip flow instability is essential for ``vortex singing.'' This research was funded by the Lloyd's Register Foundation as part of the International Institute for Cavitation Research.

  18. Comparison of electrohydraulic lithotripters with rigid and pressure-release ellipsoidal reflectors. II. Cavitation fields.

    PubMed

    Bailey, M R; Blackstock, D T; Cleveland, R O; Crum, L A

    1999-08-01

    Dramatically different cavitation was produced by two separate acoustic pulses that had different shapes but similar duration, frequency content, and peak positive and negative pressure. Both pulses were produced by a Dornier HM-3 style lithotripter: one pulse when the ellipsoidal reflector was rigid, the other when the reflector was pressure release. The cavitation, or bubble action, generated by the conventional rigid-reflector pulse was nearly 50 times longer lived and 3-13 times stronger than that produced by the pressure-release-reflector pulse. Cavitation durations measured by passive acoustic detection and high-speed video agreed with calculations based on the Gilmore equation. Cavitation intensity, or destructive potential, was judged (1) experimentally by the size of pits in aluminum foil detectors and (2) numerically by the calculated amplitude of the shock wave emitted by a collapsing bubble. The results indicate that the trailing positive spike in the pressure-release-reflector waveform stifles bubble growth and mitigates the collapse, whereas the trough after the positive spike in the rigid-reflector waveform triggers inertially driven growth and collapse. The two reflectors therefore provide a tool to compare effects in weakly and strongly cavitating fields and thereby help assess cavitation's role in lithotripsy.

  19. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin.

    PubMed

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2015-03-21

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure-PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery. PMID:25716689

  20. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure—PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  1. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of insulin in agar and porcine models of human skin.

    PubMed

    Feiszthuber, Helga; Bhatnagar, Sunali; Gyöngy, Miklós; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2015-03-21

    Ultrasound-assisted transdermal insulin delivery offers a less painful and less invasive alternative to subcutaneous insulin injections. However, ultrasound-based drug delivery, otherwise known as sonophoresis, is a highly variable phenomenon, in part dependent on cavitation. The aim of the current work is to investigate the role of cavitation in transdermal insulin delivery. Fluorescently stained, soluble Actrapid insulin was placed on the surface of human skin-mimicking materials subjected to 265 kHz, 10% duty cycle focused ultrasound. A confocally and coaxially aligned 5 MHz broadband ultrasound transducer was used to detect cavitation. Two different skin models were used. The first model, 3% agar hydrogel, was insonated with a range of pressures (0.25-1.40 MPa peak rarefactional focal pressure-PRFP), with and without cavitation nuclei embedded within the agar at a concentration of 0.05% w/v. The second, porcine skin was insonated at 1.00 and 1.40 MPa PRFP. In both models, fluorescence measurements were used to determine penetration depth and concentration of delivered insulin. Results show that in agar gel, both insulin penetration depth and concentration only increased significantly in the presence of inertial cavitation, with up to a 40% enhancement. In porcine skin the amount of fluorescent insulin was higher in the epidermis of those samples that were exposed to ultrasound compared to the control samples, but there was no significant increase in penetration distance. The results underline the importance of instigating and monitoring inertial cavitation during transdermal insulin delivery.

  2. An ultrasound tomography system with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) moldings for coupling: in vivo results for 3-D pulse-echo imaging of the female breast.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andreas; Stiller, Florian; Lerch, Reinhard; Ermert, Helmut

    2015-02-01

    Full-angle spatial compounding (FASC) is a concept for pulse-echo imaging using an ultrasound tomography (UST) system. With FASC, resolution is increased and speckles are suppressed by averaging pulse-echo data from 360°. In vivo investigations have already shown a great potential for 2-D FASC in the female breast as well as for finger-joint imaging. However, providing a small number of images of parallel cross-sectional planes with enhanced image quality is not sufficient for diagnosis. Therefore, volume data (3-D) is needed. For this purpose, we further developed our UST add-on system to automatically rotate a motorized array (3-D probe) around the object of investigation. Full integration of external motor and ultrasound electronics control in a custom-made program allows acquisition of 3-D pulse-echo RF datasets within 10 min. In case of breast cancer imaging, this concept also enables imaging of near-thorax tissue regions which cannot be achieved by 2-D FASC. Furthermore, moldings made of polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel (PVA-H) have been developed as a new acoustic coupling concept. It has a great potential to replace the water bath technique in UST, which is a critical concept with respect to clinical investigations. In this contribution, we present in vivo results for 3-D FASC applied to imaging a female breast which has been placed in a PVA-H molding during data acquisition. An algorithm is described to compensate time-of-flight and consider refraction at the water-PVA-H molding and molding-tissue interfaces. Therefore, the mean speed of sound (SOS) for the breast tissue is estimated with an image-based method. Our results show that the PVA-H molding concept is applicable and feasible and delivers good results. 3-D FASC is superior to 2-D FASC and provides 3-D volume data at increased image quality.

  3. Re-evaluation of low intensity pulsed ultrasound in treatment of tibial fractures (TRUST): randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Mohit; Einhorn, Thomas A; Schemitsch, Emil; Heckman, James D; Tornetta, Paul; Leung, Kwok-Sui; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Makosso-Kallyth, Sun; Della Rocca, Gregory J; Jones, Clifford B; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine whether low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS), compared with sham treatment, accelerates functional recovery and radiographic healing in patients with operatively managed tibial fractures. Design A concealed, randomized, blinded, sham controlled clinical trial with a parallel group design of 501 patients, enrolled between October 2008 and September 2012, and followed for one year. Setting 43 North American academic trauma centers. Participants Skeletally mature men or women with an open or closed tibial fracture amenable to intramedullary nail fixation. Exclusions comprised pilon fractures, tibial shaft fractures that extended into the joint and required reduction, pathological fractures, bilateral tibial fractures, segmental fractures, spiral fractures >7.5 cm in length, concomitant injuries that were likely to impair function for at least as long as the patient’s tibial fracture, and tibial fractures that showed <25% cortical contact and >1 cm gap after surgical fixation. 3105 consecutive patients who underwent intramedullary nailing for tibial fracture were assessed, 599 were eligible and 501 provided informed consent and were enrolled. Interventions Patients were allocated centrally to self administer daily LIPUS (n=250) or use a sham device (n=251) until their tibial fracture showed radiographic healing or until one year after intramedullary fixation. Main outcome measures Primary registry specified outcome was time to radiographic healing within one year of fixation; secondary outcome was rate of non-union. Additional protocol specified outcomes included short form-36 (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) scores, return to work, return to household activities, return to ≥80% of function before injury, return to leisure activities, time to full weight bearing, scores on the health utilities index (mark 3), and adverse events related to the device. Results SF-36 PCS data were acquired from 481/501 (96%) patients, for whom

  4. Experimenting cavitation measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulouse, G.

    1988-09-01

    A calibrating method for measuring the volume of cavitation bubbles is presented and the results of open air experiments are given. The bubbles appearing on the surface of a marine rotating propeller are measured using CCD cameras and optical procedures. Square bubble section first approximations is used. The performance of cameras equipped with light amplifiers is studied in order to use them for real bubble cross section measurements.

  5. Effects of acoustic streaming from moderate-intensity pulsed ultrasound for enhancing biofilm mitigation effectiveness of drug-loaded liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dong; Green, Adam M; Willsey, Graham G; Marshall, Jeffrey S; Wargo, Matthew J; Wu, Junru

    2015-08-01

    Because biofilms have resistance to antibiotics, their control using minimum amounts of chemicals and energy becomes a critical issue particularly for resource-constrained long-term space and deep-sea explorations. This preliminary study investigates how ultrasound promoting penetration of antibiotic-loaded liposomes into alginate-based bacterial biofilms, resulting in enhanced bacterial (Ralstonia insidiosa) killing. Nano-sized liposomes are used as a delivery vehicle for the antibiotic gentamicin. Alginate-based synthetic biofilms, which are widely acknowledged as biofilm phantoms, filled with liposome solution are formed at the bottoms of six-well Petri dishes and exposed to ultrasound (frequency = 2.25 MHz, 10% duty cycle, and spatially and temporally averaged intensity ISAPA = 4.4 W/cm(2)). Gentamicin is released from liposomes after they are lysed using detergent solution (0.05% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 1.0% Triton X-100) and incubated for 20 min. The alginate biofilm is dissolved and diluted, counting of colony-forming units shows about 80% of the bacteria are killed. It has also been shown the liposome-capture density by the alginate film increases linearly with the ultrasound intensity up to ISAPA = 6.2 W/cm(2) reaching approximately threefold that without ultrasound. Measurement by using particle-image velocimetry has demonstrated the acoustic streaming with modification by thermal convection controls the enhancement of the liposome capture rate.

  6. Cavitation and Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringham, Roger S.

    2005-12-01

    Natural cavitation phenomena in D2O using piezo devices, is now amplified initiating DD fusion events that produce heat and helium. The transient cavitation bubble produces micro accelerators in the form of jets containing high densities of deuterons, 1024-25/cc from the cavitating D2O. An electrically driven piezo device in a reactor filled with D2O produces jets that implant deuterons into a target foil producing 4He and T plus heat. There is no long range radiation associated with this process. We are moving in the direction of utilizing smaller systems by gaining faster and less expensive technology growth moving from successes at 0.2 and 0.4 MHz to 1.7 MHz. One of the results of our low frequency studies is a 1 to 3 MHz induced standing wave in our target foils. We are using sonoluminescence intensity as a tool to guide us in finding highest plasma density in the adiabatic bubble collapse process in the jet plasma formation. The generation of these sonoluminescence photons relates to conditions for the target implantation process. These experiments and the analytical methods have concentrated on the mass spectroscopy of reactor gases, calorimetry of the reactor and power supply, and the scanning electron microscope photographs of target foils. This work provides a path for an ecological and hydrocarbon-free energy source for all energy applications.

  7. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. PMID:26773791

  8. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall.

  9. Noninvasive and localized neuronal delivery using short ultrasonic pulses and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Selert, Kirsten; Vlachos, Fotios; Wong, Anna; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-10-01

    Focused ultrasound activation of systemically administered microbubbles is a noninvasive and localized drug delivery method that can increase vascular permeability to large molecular agents. Yet the range of acoustic parameters responsible for drug delivery remains unknown, and, thus, enhancing the delivery characteristics without compromising safety has proven to be difficult. We propose a new basis for ultrasonic pulse design in drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that uses principles of probability of occurrence and spatial distribution of cavitation in contrast to the conventionally applied magnitude of cavitation. The efficacy of using extremely short (2.3 μs) pulses was evaluated in 27 distinct acoustic parameter sets at low peak-rarefactional pressures (0.51 MPa or lower). The left hippocampus and lateral thalamus were noninvasively sonicated after administration of Definity microbubbles. Disruption of the BBB was confirmed by delivery of fluorescently tagged 3-, 10-, or 70-kDa dextrans. Under some conditions, dextrans were distributed homogeneously throughout the targeted region and accumulated at specific hippocampal landmarks and neuronal cells and axons. No histological damage was observed at the most effective parameter set. Our results have broadened the design space of parameters toward a wider safety window that may also increase vascular permeability. The study also uncovered a set of parameters that enhances the dose and distribution of molecular delivery, overcoming standard trade-offs in avoiding associated damage. Given the short pulses used similar to diagnostic ultrasound, new critical parameters were also elucidated to clearly separate therapeutic ultrasound from disruption-free diagnostic ultrasound.

  10. Primary pulmonary cavitating carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, M. Ray

    1973-01-01

    A primary lung cancer can produce a cavity in three ways. The first is `cavitary necrosis' due to breakdown of the growth itself. The second is `stenotic abscess' due to infection and breakdown of the lung parenchyma distal to bronchial obstruction caused by the growth. The third type is `spill-over abscess'. In the present series, necrosis and cavitation were observed in 100 cases out of a total of 632 primary bronchial carcinomas seen at the London Chest Hospital from July 1967 to June 1970. There were 91 males and nine females with an average age of 58·45 years. All except one smoked very heavily and had considerable symptoms. The size of the cavities ranged from 1 to 10 cm and their wall thickness from 0·5 to 3 cm. They were single in 92 cases and multiple (up to four) in eight. In 42 cases, the cancerous cavitation was central, in 38 intermediate, and in 20 peripheral. The segments most frequently affected were the apicoposterior segment of the left upper lobe and the superior segment of the left lower lobe. For descriptive purposes, these cavitating carcinomas were also divided into six broad groups on the basis of radiological and pathological correlations. Neoplastic cells in the sputum were found in 64 cases. Bronchoscopy revealed growth in 42 cases and biopsy was positive in 48. The main microscopic feature was vascular invasion of medium-sized muscular arteries and veins found in the vicinity of every cavitating bronchial carcinoma. Invasion along with tumour plugging of the vessels was observed in 75 cases and thrombosis alone in 55 cases. There were 82 squamous-cell carcinomas, 11 undifferentiated carcinomas of large polygonal-cell type, and seven adeno-alveolar cell carcinomas. The single most important and noteworthy feature in the present series was that oat-cell carcinoma hardly ever undergoes necrosis. Out of a total of 95 cases observed, only three showed necrosis, and this was minimal and characteristically devoid of cavitation. In oat

  11. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  12. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion

  13. Acceleration of lithotripsy using cavitation bubbles induced by second-harmonic superimposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osuga, Masamizu; Yasuda, Jun; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Shock wave lithotripsy potentially produces residual stone fragments too large to pass through ureters and significant injury to the normal tissue surrounding the stone. Previous works have shown that the collapse of cavitation bubbles induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound can produce small stone fragments via cavitation erosion. However, the erosion rate is hypothesized to be reduced by ultrasound attenuation by excessively generated bubble clouds. If so, it is important to generate the bubbles only on the stone surface. The effects of peak-negative-enhanced (PNE) and peak-positive-enhanced (PPE) waves obtained by second-harmonic superimposition were investigated to control cavitation bubbles. With the PNE waves, the bubbles were generated only on the stone surface and the maximum erosion rate was 232 ± 32 mg/min. All the fragments were smaller than 2 mm, which makes them pass through ureters naturally. The proposed method shows the potential to significantly improve the speed of lithotripsy.

  14. Unseeded Inertial Cavitation for Enhancing the Delivery of Chemotherapies: A Safety Study.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Maxime; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Prieur, Fabrice; Chettab, Kamel; Geraci, Sandra; Clézardin, Philippe; Lafon, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation can improve local drug delivery in tumors. Without injected external nucleation agents, initiating inertial cavitation requires high negative pressures, which can lead to biological damage. In the present study, unseeded inertial cavitation was obtained in vivo using confocal beams, and the effect of these exposure conditions was assessed on drug structure and activity, shallow tissues and growth of breast tumors. No change was observed in the structure and cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. Experiments were conducted on healthy rats, exposing the thigh and abdomen. Histologic analyses at 72 h and 2 weeks post-treatment demonstrated a modest impact on tissues. Syngeneic 4 T1 breast tumors in mice were sonicated. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that ultrasound did not impact vascular density, proliferation and apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, ultrasound did not negatively modify cancer cell spreading to the lungs and bone marrow. This provides evidence that these particular parameters can be used safely in vivo. PMID:26478278

  15. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect).

  16. Hydrodynamic cavitation in microsystems. II. Simulations and optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, M.; Pellone, C.; Zermatten, P. J.; Ayela, F.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical calculations in the single liquid phase and optical observations in the two-phase cavitating flow regime have been performed on microdiaphragms and microventuris fed with deionized water. Simulations have confirmed the influence of the shape of the shrinkage upon the contraction of the jet, and so on the localisation of possible cavitating area downstream. Observations of cavitating flow patterns through hybrid silicon-pyrex microdevices have been performed either via a laser excitation with a pulse duration of 6 ns, or with the help of a high-speed camera. Recorded snapshots and movies are presented. Concerning microdiaphragms, it is confirmed that very high shear rates downstream the diaphragms are the cause of bubbly flows. Concerning microventuris, a gaseous cavity forms on a boundary downstream the throat. As a consequence of a microsystem instability, the cavity displays a high frequency pulsation. Low values Strouhal numbers are associated to such a sheet cavitation. Moreover, when the intensity of the cavitating flow is reduced, there is a mismatch between the frequency of the pulsation of the cavity and the frequency of shedded clouds downstream the channel. That may be the consequence of viscous effects limiting the impingement of a re-entrant liquid jet on the attached cavity.

  17. Cavitation bubble dynamics during thulium fiber laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Wilson, Christopher R.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    The Thulium fiber laser (TFL) is being explored for lithotripsy. TFL parameters differ from standard Holmium:YAG laser in several ways, including smaller fiber delivery, more strongly absorbed wavelength, low pulse energy/high pulse rate operation, and more uniform temporal pulse structure. High speed imaging of cavitation bubbles was performed at 105,000 fps and 10 μm spatial resolution to determine influence of these laser parameters on bubble formation. TFL was operated at 1908 nm with pulse energies of 5-75 mJ, and pulse durations of 200-1000 μs, delivered through 100-μm-core fiber. Cavitation bubble dynamics using Holmium laser at 2100 nm with pulse energies of 200-1000 mJ and pulse duration of 350 μs was studied, for comparison. A single, 500 μs TFL pulse produced a bubble stream extending 1090 +/- 110 μm from fiber tip, and maximum bubble diameters averaged 590 +/- 20 μm (n=4). These observations are consistent with previous studies which reported TFL ablation stallout at working distances < 1.0 mm. TFL bubble dimensions were five times smaller than for Holmium laser due to lower pulse energy, higher water absorption coefficient, and smaller fiber diameter used.

  18. Ultrasonic cavitation for disruption of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Greenly, Justin M; Tester, Jefferson W

    2015-05-01

    Challenges with mid-stream fractionation steps in proposed microalgae biofuel pathways arise from the typically dilute cell density in growth media, micron scale cell sizes, and often durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation by some method will be necessary. This study evaluates ultrasonic cell disruption as a processing step that fractionates microalgae. A range of species types with different sizes and cell wall compositions were treated. The initial seconds of sonication offered the most significant disruption, even for the more durable Nannochloropsis cells. Following this initial period, diminishing effectiveness was attributed, by acoustic measurements, to attenuation of the ultrasound in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. At longer exposure times, differences between species were more pronounced. Processing higher concentrations of Isochrysis slowed cell disintegration only marginally, making the expenditure of energy more worthwhile.

  19. Integrated processing of contrast pulse sequencing ultrasound imaging for enhanced active contrast of hollow gas filled silica nanoshells and microshells.

    PubMed

    Ta, Casey N; Liberman, Alexander; Paul Martinez, H; Barback, Christopher V; Mattrey, Robert F; Blair, Sarah L; Trogler, William C; Kummel, Andrew C; Wu, Zhe

    2012-03-01

    In recent years, there have been increasing developments in the field of contrast-enhanced ultrasound both in the creation of new contrast agents and in imaging modalities. These contrast agents have been employed to study tumor vasculature in order to improve cancer detection and diagnosis. An in vivo study is presented of ultrasound imaging of gas filled hollow silica microshells and nanoshells which have been delivered intraperitoneally to an IGROV-1 tumor bearing mouse. In contrast to microbubbles, this formulation of microshells provided strong ultrasound imaging signals by shell disruption and release of gas. Imaging of the microshells in an animal model was facilitated by novel image processing. Although the particle signal could be identified by eye under live imaging, high background obfuscated the particle signal in still images and near the borders of the tumor with live images. Image processing techniques were developed that employed the transient nature of the particle signal to selectively filter out the background signal. By applying image registration, high-pass, median, threshold, and motion filtering, a short video clip of the particle signal was compressed into a single image, thereby resolving the silica shells within the tumor. © 2012 American Vacuum Society.

  20. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  1. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet.

  2. Bubble dynamics in high-amplitude ultrasound therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsen, Eric; Mancia, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation plays an important role in certain therapeutic ultrasound procedures, such as histotripsy in which megahertz pressure pulses are used to destroy tissue. The large tensions (> 25 MPa) nucleate bubbles in the tissue, which rapidly grow to radii on the order of hundreds of microns and subsequently collapse. To better understand potential cavitation-induced damage, we developed a numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue that includes liquid compressibility and full thermal effects, as well as a comprehensive viscoelastic model with elasticity, relaxation, viscosity and various nonlinearities. This framework has enabled us to understand the effects of the viscoelastic and thermal properties of the tissue on the bubble dynamics, and compute stress and temperature fields in the surroundings. Results indicate that different viscoelastic properties affect the bubble dynamics differently, but that overall the viscoelastic nature of tissue produces larger stresses and increased heating on the surroundings, compared to bubble dynamics in purely viscous liquids. This work was supported by NSF grant number CBET 1253157 and NIH grant number 1R01HL110990-01A1.

  3. Activating Molecules, Ions, and Solid Particles with Acoustic Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  4. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  5. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton; Subbaraman, Maria R.

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  6. What is ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Leighton, Timothy G

    2007-01-01

    This paper is based on material presented at the start of a Health Protection Agency meeting on ultrasound and infrasound. In answering the question 'what is ultrasound?', it shows that the simple description of a wave which transports mechanical energy through the local vibration of particles at frequencies of 20 kHz or more, with no net transport of the particles themselves, can in every respect be misleading or even incorrect. To explain the complexities responsible for this, the description of ultrasound is first built up from the fundamental properties of these local particle vibrations. This progresses through an exposition of the characteristics of linear waves, in order to explain the propensity for, and properties of, the nonlinear propagation which occurs in many practical ultrasonic fields. Given the Health Protection environment which framed the original presentation, explanation and examples are given of how these complexities affect issues of practical importance. These issues include the measurement and description of fields and exposures, and the ability of ultrasound to affect tissue (through microstreaming, streaming, cavitation, heating, etc.). It is noted that there are two very distinct regimes, in terms of wave characteristics and potential for bioeffect. The first concerns the use of ultrasound in liquids/solids, for measurement or material processing. For biomedical applications (where these two processes are termed diagnosis and therapy, respectively), the issue of hazard has been studied in depth, although this has not been done to such a degree for industrial uses of ultrasound in liquids/solids (sonar, non-destructive testing, ultrasonic processing etc.). However, in the second regime, that of the use of ultrasound in air, although the waves in question tend to be of much lower intensities than those used in liquids/solids, there is a greater mismatch between the extent to which hazard has been studied, and the growth in commercial

  7. Therapeutic Ultrasound to Non-Invasively Create Intra-Cardiac Communications in an Intact Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gabe E.; Miller, Ryan M.; Ensing, Greg; Ives, Kimberly; Gordon, David; Ludomirsky, Achi; Xu, Zhen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine if pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy (histotripsy) can accurately and safely generate ventricular septal defects (VSDs) through the intact chest of a neonatal animal, with the eventual goal of developing a non-invasive technique of creating intra-cardiac communications in patients with congenital heart disease. Background Histotripsy is an innovative ultrasonic technique that generates demarcated, mechanical tissue fractionation utilizing high intensity ultrasound pulses. Previous work has shown that histotripsy can create atrial septal defects in a beating heart in an open-chest canine model. Methods Nine neonatal pigs were treated with transcutaneous histotripsy targeting the ventricular septum. Ultrasound pulses of 5μs duration at a peak negative pressure of 13 MPa and a pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz were generated by a 1 MHz focused transducer. The procedure was guided by real-time ultrasound imaging. Results VSDs were created in all pigs with diameters ranging from 2–6.5mm. Six pigs were euthanized within 2 hrs of treatment, while 3 were recovered and maintained for 2–3 days to evaluate lesion maturation and clinical side effects. There were only transient clinical effects and pathology revealed mild collateral damage around the VSD with no significant damage to other cardiac or extra-cardiac structures. Conclusions Histotripsy can accurately and safely generate VSDs through the intact chest in a neonatal animal model. These results suggest that with further advances, histotripsy can be a useful, non-invasive technique to create intra-cardiac communications, which currently require invasive catheter-based or surgical procedures, to clinically stabilize newborn infants with complex congenital heart disease. PMID:20853366

  8. VASCULAR LESIONS AND S-THROMBOMODULIN CONCENTRATIONS FROM AURICULAR ARTERIES OF RABBITS INFUSED WITH MICROBUBBLE CONTRAST AGENT AND EXPOSED TO PULSED ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, James F.; Blue, James P.; Miller, Rita J.; O’Brien, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial injury resulting from the interaction of contrast agent (CA) with ultrasound (US) was studied in rabbit auricular arteries and assessed by histopathologic evaluation and s-thrombomodulin concentrations. Three sites on each artery were exposed (2.8 MHz, 5-min exposure duration, 10-Hz pulse repetition frequency, 1.4-μs pulse duration) using one of three in situ peak rarefactional pressures (0.85, 3.9 or 9.5 MPa). Saline, saline/CA, and saline/US infusion groups (n = 28) did not have histopathologic damage. The saline/CA/US infusion group (n = 10) at exposure conditions below the FDA mechanical index limit of 1.9 did not have histopathologic damage, whereas the saline/CA/US infusion group (n = 9) at exposure conditions above the FDA limit did have damage (5 of 9 arteries). Lesions were characteristic of acute coagulative necrosis. Mean s-thrombomodulin concentrations, a marker for endothelial cell injury, were highest in rabbits exposed to US at 0.85 and 3.9 MPa, suggesting that vascular injury may be physiological and not accompanied by irreversible cellular injury. PMID:17112964

  9. Does pulsed low intensity ultrasound allow early return to normal activities when treating stress fractures? A review of one tarsal navicular and eight tibial stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Brand, J C; Brindle, T; Nyland, J; Caborn, D N; Johnson, D L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures.

  10. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  11. Current status in cavitation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-07-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  12. Nuclei and propeller cavitation inception

    SciTech Connect

    Gindroz, B.; Billet, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Propeller cavitation inception tests were conducted in the Grand Tunnel Hydrodynamique (GTH) of the Bassin d`Essaid des Carenes. Both acoustic and visual cavitation inception were determined for leading-edge sheet, travelling bubble, and tip vortex. These data were obtained for specific water quality conditions. The water quality was determined from cavitation susceptibility meter measurements for degassed water (maximum liquid tension, few nuclei), low injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, low nuclei concentration), medium injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, high nuclei concentration) and high injection rate of microbubbles (minimum liquid tension, high nuclei concentration). Results clearly demonstrate a different influence of water quality for each type of cavitation. Little variation in cavitation inception index for a significant increase in liquid tension and microbubble size distribution was found for leading-edge sheet; however, tip vortex cavitation inception index decreased significantly for an increase in liquid tension. In addition, a dependency on event rate was determined for tip vortex cavitation inception.

  13. Anticipatory model of cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Dress, William B.; Hylton, James O.

    1999-03-01

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  14. Study of cavitation bubble dynamics during Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy by high-speed camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yu, Honggang; Devincentis, Dennis

    2016-02-01

    Although laser lithotripsy is now the preferred treatment option for urolithiasis, the mechanism of laser pulse induced calculus damage is still not fully understood. This is because the process of laser pulse induced calculus damage involves quite a few physical and chemical processes and their time-scales are very short (down to sub micro second level). For laser lithotripsy, the laser pulse induced impact by energy flow can be summarized as: Photon energy in the laser pulse --> photon absorption generated heat in the water liquid and vapor (super heat water or plasma effect) --> shock wave (Bow shock, acoustic wave) --> cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation, and center of bubble movement , super heat water at collapse, sonoluminscence) --> calculus damage and motion (calculus heat up, spallation/melt of stone, breaking of mechanical/chemical bond, debris ejection, and retropulsion of remaining calculus body). Cavitation bubble dynamics is the center piece of the physical processes that links the whole energy flow chain from laser pulse to calculus damage. In this study, cavitation bubble dynamics was investigated by a high-speed camera and a needle hydrophone. A commercialized, pulsed Ho:YAG laser at 2.1 mu;m, StoneLightTM 30, with pulse energy from 0.5J up to 3.0 J, and pulse width from 150 mu;s up to 800 μs, was used as laser pulse source. The fiber used in the investigation is SureFlexTM fiber, Model S-LLF365, a 365 um core diameter fiber. A high-speed camera with frame rate up to 1 million fps was used in this study. The results revealed the cavitation bubble dynamics (oscillation and center of bubble movement) by laser pulse at different energy level and pulse width. More detailed investigation on bubble dynamics by different type of laser, the relationship between cavitation bubble dynamics and calculus damage (fragmentation/dusting) will be conducted as a future study.

  15. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  16. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  17. Emerging non-cancer applications of therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo