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Sample records for pulsed ultrasound cavitational

  1. Noninvasive thrombolysis using pulsed ultrasound cavitation therapy - histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Duryea, Alexander P; Yuan, Lingqian; Gurm, Hitinder S; Xu, Zhen

    2009-12-01

    Clinically available thrombolysis techniques are limited by either slow reperfusion (drugs) or invasiveness (catheters) and carry significant risks of bleeding. In this study, the feasibility of using histotripsy as an efficient and noninvasive thrombolysis technique was investigated. Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue through controlled cavitation using focused, short, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. In vitro blood clots formed from fresh canine blood were treated by histotripsy. The treatment was applied using a focused 1-MHz transducer, with five-cycle pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1kHz. Acoustic pressures varying from 2 to 12MPa peak negative pressure were tested. Our results show that histotripsy can perform effective thrombolysis with ultrasound energy alone. Histotripsy thrombolysis only occurred at peak negative pressure >or=6MPa when initiation of a cavitating bubble cloud was detected using acoustic backscatter monitoring. Blood clots weighing 330mg were completely broken down by histotripsy in 1.5 to 5min. The clot was fractionated to debris with >96% weight smaller than 5mum diameter. Histotripsy thrombolysis treatment remained effective under a fast, pulsating flow (a circulatory model) as well as in static saline. Additionally, we observed that fluid flow generated by a cavitation cloud can attract, trap and further break down clot fragments. This phenomenon may provide a noninvasive method to filter and eliminate hazardous emboli during thrombolysis.

  2. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications.

  3. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p−) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p− = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p− = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p− = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  4. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, two-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (P(cav)) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p(-)) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching one when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as P(cav) = 0.5) was between p(-) = 26 and 30 MPa in all samples with high water content but varied between p(-) = 13.7 and >36 MPa in other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p(-) = 28.2 megapascals was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at various pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue.

  5. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 μs, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  6. Monitoring of transient cavitation induced by ultrasound and intense pulsed light in presence of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Shanei, Ahmad; Shanei, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in medical treatment is invention of a minimally invasive approach in order to induce lethal damages to cancer cells. Application of high intensity focused ultrasound can be beneficial to achieve this goal via the cavitation process. Existence of the particles and vapor in a liquid decreases the ultrasonic intensity threshold required for cavitation onset. In this study, synergism of intense pulsed light (IPL) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated as a means of providing nucleation sites for acoustic cavitation. Several approaches have been reported with the aim of cavitation monitoring. We conducted the experiments on the basis of sonochemiluminescence (SCL) and chemical dosimetric methods. The acoustic cavitation activity was investigated by determining the integrated SCL signal acquired over polyacrylamide gel phantoms containing luminol in the presence and absence of GNPs in the wavelength range of 400-500 nm using a spectrometer equipped with cooled charged coupled devices (CCD) during irradiation by different intensities of 1 MHz ultrasound and IPL pulses. In order to confirm these results, the terephthalic acid chemical dosimeter was utilized as well. The SCL signal recorded in the gel phantoms containing GNPs at different intensities of ultrasound in the presence of intense pulsed light was higher than the gel phantoms without GNPs. These results have been confirmed by the obtained data from the chemical dosimetry method. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of GNPs and intense pulsed light has been suggested as a new approach designed for decreasing threshold intensity of acoustic cavitation and improving targeted therapeutic effects.

  7. Stable cavitation induces increased cytoplasmic calcium in L929 fibroblasts exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Akira; Higashiyama, Satoru; Yoshida, Kenji; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furukawa, Katsuko S; Ushida, Takashi

    2011-12-01

    An increase in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(2+) increase) is a second messenger that is often observed under ultrasound irradiation. We hypothesize that cavitation is a physical mechanism that underlies the increase in Ca(2+) in these experiments. To control the presence of cavitation, the wave type was controlled in a sonication chamber. One wave type largely contained a traveling wave (wave type A) while the other wave type largely contained a standing wave (wave type B). Fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis of a sound field produced by the wave types ascertained that stable cavitation was present only under wave type A ultrasound irradiation. Under the two controlled wave types, the increase in Ca(2+) in L929 fibroblasts was observed with fluorescence imaging. Under wave type A ultrasound irradiation, an increase in Ca(2+) was observed; however, no increase in Ca(2+) was observed under wave type B ultrasound irradiation. We conclude that stable cavitation is involved in the increase of Ca(2+) in cells subjected to pulsed ultrasound.

  8. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  9. Non-Invasive Thrombolysis Using Pulsed Ultrasound Cavitation Therapy – Histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Duryea, Alexander P.; Yuan, Lingqian; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Xu, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Clinically available thrombolysis techniques are limited by either slow reperfusion (drugs) or invasiveness (catheters), and carry significant risks of bleeding. In this study, the feasibility of using histotripsy as an efficient and non-invasive thrombolysis technique was investigated. Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue through controlled cavitation using focused, short, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. In-vitro blood clots formed from fresh canine blood were treated by histotripsy. The treatment was applied using a focused 1-MHz transducer, with 5-cycle pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. Acoustic pressures varying from 2 – 12 MPa peak negative pressure were tested. Our results show that histotripsy can perform effective thrombolysis with ultrasound energy alone. Histotripsy thrombolysis only occurred at peak negative pressure ≥6 MPa when initiation of a cavitating bubble cloud was detected using acoustic backscatter monitoring. Blood clots weighing 330 mg were completely broken down by histotripsy in 1.5 – 5 minutes. The clot was fractionated to debris with >96% weight smaller than 5 μm diameter. Histotripsy thrombolysis treatment remained effective under a fast, pulsating flow (a circulatory model) as well as in static saline. Additionally, we observed that fluid flow generated by a cavitation cloud can attract, trap, and further break down clot fragments. This phenomenon may provide a non-invasive method to filter and eliminate hazardous emboli during thrombolysis. PMID:19854563

  10. Thresholds for inertial cavitation in albunex suspensions under pulsed ultrasound conditions.

    PubMed

    Chang, P P; Chen, W S; Mourad, P D; Poliachik, S L; Crum, L A

    2001-01-01

    Stabilized microbubbles used as echo-contrast agents can be destroyed by ultrasonic irradiation. We have identified two pressure thresholds at which these microbubbles undergo inertial cavitation (here, defined as the collapse of gas bubbles followed by emission of an acoustic broadband noise). The first threshold (P1) corresponds to the pressure at which all the microbubbles in a cavitation field lose their property as an effective scatterer because of fragmentation or deflation. The second threshold (P2) is associated with the acoustic reactivation of the remnants of the contrast agents and is related to the onset of more violent inertial cavitation. P1 and P2 were measured as a function of the concentration of Albunex (Molecular Biosystems Inc., San Diego, CA) contrast agent, the number of transmitting acoustic cycles, and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The ultrasound frequency used was 1.1 MHz, and the peak negative acoustic pressures ranged from 0 to 8 MPa. Our results, measured in Isoton II (Coulter Diagnostics, Miami, FL) and whole blood solutions, showed that P1 increased with increasing Albunex concentration and decreased with increasing PRF, whereas P2 decreased with increasing Albunex concentration and was independent of the PRF. Both P1 and P2 decreased with increasing number of acoustic cycles N for N < 10 and were independent of the number of cycles for N > 10. Ultrasound images of Albunex acquired by a commercial scanner showed echo enhancement not only at pressure levels below P1 but also at levels above P2. The threshold P2 was achieved at ultrasound energies above the diagnostic level. Inertial cavitation produced at P2 was associated with a higher level of hemolysis compared with P1. The results of this investigation have potential significance for both diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound applications.

  11. High speed imaging of bubble clouds generated in pulsed ultrasound cavitational therapy--histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, Mekhala; Hall, Timothy L; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-10-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical fractionation of tissue structure with sharply demarcated boundaries can be achieved using short (< 20 micros), high intensity ultrasound pulses delivered at low duty cycles. We have called this technique histotripsy. Histotripsy has potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue fractionation and/or tissue removal are desired. The primary mechanism of histotripsy is thought to be acoustic cavitation, which is supported by a temporally changing acoustic backscatter observed during the histotripsy process. In this paper, a fast-gated digital camera was used to image the hypothesized cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses. The bubble cloud was produced at a tissue-water interface and inside an optically transparent gelatin phantom which mimics bulk tissue. The imaging shows the following: (1) Initiation of a temporally changing acoustic backscatter was due to the formation of a bubble cloud; (2) The pressure threshold to generate a bubble cloud was lower at a tissue-fluid interface than inside bulk tissue; and (3) at higher pulse pressure, the bubble cloud lasted longer and grew larger. The results add further support to the hypothesis that the histotripsy process is due to a cavitating bubble cloud and may provide insight into the sharp boundaries of histotripsy lesions.

  12. Jets from pulsed-ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles near a rigid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru

    2017-06-01

    The dynamics of cavitation bubbles, generated from short (microsecond) pulses of ultrasound and situated near a rigid boundary, are investigated numerically. The temporal development of the bubble shape, bubble migration, formation of the liquid jet during bubble collapse, and the kinetic energy of the jet are investigated as a function of the distance between bubble and boundary. During collapse, the bubble migrates towards the boundary and the liquid jet reaches a maximum velocity between 80 m s-1 and 120 m s-1, depending on the distance between bubble and boundary. The conversion of bubble energy to kinetic energy of the jet ranges from 16% to 23%. When the bubble is situated in close proximity to the boundary, the liquid jet impacts the boundary with its maximum velocity, resulting in an impact pressure of the order of tens of MPa. The rapid expansion of the bubble, the impact of the liquid jet onto the nearby boundary material, and the high pressure developed inside the bubble at its minimum volume can all contribute to the boundary material damage. The high pressure developed during the impact of the liquid jet onto the biological material and the shearing forces acting on the material surface as a consequence of the radial flow of the jet outward from the impact site are the main damage mechanisms of rigid biological materials. The results are discussed with respect to cavitation damage of rigid biological materials, such as disintegration of renal stones and calcified tissue and collateral effects in pulsed ultrasound surgery.

  13. Simulation of diagnostic ultrasound image pulse sequences in cavitation bioeffects research.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Wiggins, Roger C

    2007-10-01

    Research on cavitational bioeffects of diagnostic ultrasound (DUS) typically involves a diagnostic scanner as the exposure source. However, this can limit the ranges of exposure parameters for experimentation. Anesthetized hairless rats were mounted in a water bath and their right kidneys were exposed to ultrasound. Amplitude modulation with Gaussian envelopes simulated the image pulse sequences (IPSs) produced by diagnostic scanning. A 10 mulkgmin IV dose of Definity((R)) contrast agent was given during 1-5 min exposures. Glomerular capillary hemorrhage was assessed by histology. A stationary exposure approximated the bioeffects induced by DUS within the beam area. However, the use of five closely spaced exposures more faithfully reproduced the total effect produced within a DUS scan plane. Single pulses delivered at 1 s intervals induced the same effect as the simulated DUS. Use of 100 ms triangle-wave modulations for ramp-up or ramp-down of the IPS gave no effect or a large effect, respectively. Finally, an air-backed transducer simulating DUS without contrast agent showed a zero effect even operating at twice the present DUS guideline upper limit. Relatively simple single-element laboratory exposure systems can simulate diagnostic ultrasound exposure and allow exploration of parameter ranges beyond those available on present clinical systems.

  14. Effect of acoustic parameters on the cavitation behavior of SonoVue microbubbles induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yutong; Lin, Lizhou; Cheng, Mouwen; Jin, Lifang; Du, Lianfang; Han, Tao; Xu, Lin; Yu, Alfred C H; Qin, Peng

    2017-03-01

    SonoVue microbubbles could serve as artificial nuclei for ultrasound-triggered stable and inertial cavitation, resulting in beneficial biological effects for future therapeutic applications. To optimize and control the use of the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles in therapy while ensuring safety, it is important to comprehensively understand the relationship between the acoustic parameters and the cavitation behavior of the SonoVue bubbles. An agarose-gel tissue phantom was fabricated to hold the SonoVue bubble suspension. 1-MHz transmitting transducer calibrated by a hydrophone was used to trigger the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles under different ultrasonic parameters (i.e., peak rarefactional pressure (PRP), pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and pulse duration (PD)). Another 7.5-MHz focused transducer was employed to passively receive acoustic signals from the exposed bubbles. The ultraharmonics and broadband intensities in the acoustic emission spectra were measured to quantify the extent of stable and inertial cavitation of SonoVue bubbles, respectively. We found that the onset of both stable and inertial cavitation exhibited a strong dependence on the PRP and PD and a relatively weak dependence on the PRF. Approximate 0.25MPa PRP with more than 20μs PD was considered to be necessary for ultraharmonics emission of SonoVue bubbles, and obvious broadband signals started to appear when the PRP exceeded 0.40MPa. Moreover, the doses of stable and inertial cavitation varied with the PRP. The stable cavitation dose initially increased with increasing PRP, and then decreased rapidly after 0.5MPa. By contrast, the inertial cavitation dose continuously increased with increasing PRP. Finally, the doses of both stable and inertial cavitation were positively correlated with PRF and PD. These results could provide instructive information for optimizing future therapeutic applications of SonoVue bubbles.

  15. Inertial cavitation in theranostic nanoemulsions with simultaneous pulsed laser and low frequency ultrasound excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, Bastien; Wei, Chen-Wei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan M.; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Matula, Thomas J.; Pozzo, Danilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation is a mechanical process used for site-localized therapies such as non-invasive surgery. Initiating cavitation in tissue requires very high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-frequencies. Hence, some applications like thrombolysis require targeted contrast agents to reduce peak intensities and the potential for secondary effects. A new type of theranostic nanoemulsion has been developed as a combined ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic(PA) agent for molecular imaging and therapy. It includes a nanoscale emulsion core encapsulated with a layer of gold nanospheres at the water/ oil interface. Its optical absorption exhibits a spectrum broadened up to 1100 nm, opening the possibility that 1064 nm light can excite cavitation nuclei. If optically-excited nuclei are produced at the same time that a low-frequency US wave is at peak negative pressure, then highly localized therapies based on acoustic cavitation may be enabled at very low US pressures. We have demonstrated this concept using a low-cost, low energy, portable 1064 nm fiber laser in conjunction with a 1.24 MHz US transducer for simultaneous laser/US excitation of nanoemulsions. Active cavitation detection from backscattered signals indicated that cavitation can be initiated at very low acoustic pressures (less than 1 MPa) when laser excitation coincides with the rarefaction phase of the acoustic wave, and that no cavitation is produced when light is delivered during the compressive phase. US can sustain cavitation activity during long acoustic bursts and stimulate diffusion of the emulsion, thus increasing treatment speed. An in vitro clot model has been used to demonstrate combined US and laser excitation of the nanoemulsion for efficient thrombolysis.

  16. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-21

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s(-1)) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  17. Effect of hydrodynamic cavitation in the tissue erosion by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2016-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in clinics. Besides the thermal ablation, tissue disintegration is also possible because of the interaction between the distorted HIFU bursts and either bubble cloud or boiling bubble. Hydrodynamic cavitation is another type of cavitation and has been employed widely in industry, but its role in mechanical erosion to tissue is not clearly known. In this study, the bubble dynamics immediately after the termination of HIFU exposure in the transparent gel phantom was captured by high-speed photography, from which the bubble displacement towards the transducer and the changes of bubble size was quantitatively determined. The characteristics of hydrodynamic cavitation due to the release of the acoustic radiation force and relaxation of compressed surrounding medium were found to associate with the number of pulses delivered and HIFU parameters (i.e. pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency). Because of the initial big bubble (~1 mm), large bubble expansion (up to 1.76 folds), and quick bubble motion (up to ~1 m s-1) hydrodynamic cavitation is significant after HIFU exposure and may lead to mechanical erosion. The shielding effect of residual tiny bubbles would reduce the acoustic energy delivered to the pre-existing bubble at the focus and, subsequently, the hydrodynamic cavitation effect. Tadpole shape of mechanical erosion in ex vivo porcine kidney samples was similar to the contour of bubble dynamics in the gel. Liquefied tissue was observed to emit towards the transducer through the punctured tissue after HIFU exposure in the sonography. In summary, the release of HIFU exposure-induced hydrodynamic cavitation produces significant bubble expansion and motion, which may be another important mechanism of tissue erosion. Understanding its mechanism and optimizing the outcome would broaden and enhance HIFU applications.

  18. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×106 frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications.

  19. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×10(6) frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications.

  20. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-01-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. In order to monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume and with the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced with a focused transducer (660kHz, f#=1) driven by a high power (up to 300 W) electric burst of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4–7MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Thanks to the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as soon as 330 μs after the high amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  1. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. To monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume using the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused transducer (660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high-power electric burst (up to 300 W) of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4 to 7 MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unnucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Because of the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as quickly as 330 μs after the high-amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually.

  2. The cavitation threshold of human tissue exposed to 0.2-MHz pulsed ultrasound: preliminary measurements based on a study of clinical lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Kodama, T; Choi, M J; Adams, T; Saunders, J E

    1995-01-01

    Evidence of acoustic cavitation was identified in the form of transient echoes in ultrasound B-scan images of patients receiving extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy treatment on a Storz Modulith SL20. This lithotripter generates 10-microseconds duration pulses with a centre frequency of 0.2 MHz at a pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The visual appearance of B-scan images was examined in a total of 30 patients and a quantitative analysis of echogenicity changes was carried out in six cases involving lithotripsy treatment of stones in the renal pelvis. In these patients new echoes were identified in images unaffected by movement artefacts and were found to occur in perinephric fat and adjacent muscle and kidney tissue at positions close to the axis of the shock-wave field between 1 and 2 cm in advance of the indicated beam focus of the lithotripter. The echogenicity within each region increased significantly above the background level when the output of the lithotripter was increased above a threshold value. The acoustic pressures corresponding to this threshold were measured in water using a calibrated PVDF membrane hydrophone. After correction for attenuation in tissue the cavitation thresholds, in terms of the temporal peak negative pressure, are found to lie between 1.5 MPa and 3.5 MPa in all six cases. Interpretation of the measured values in terms of the likely threshold at the higher frequencies used in diagnostic ultrasound is considered using a theoretical model.

  3. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity.

  4. Ultrasound measurements of cavitation bubble radius for femtosecond laser-induced breakdown in water.

    PubMed

    Aglyamov, Salavat R; Karpiouk, Andrei B; Bourgeois, Frederic; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2008-06-15

    A recently developed ultrasound technique is evaluated by measuring the behavior of a cavitation bubble that is induced in water by a femtosecond laser pulse. The passive acoustic emission during optical breakdown is used to estimate the location of the cavitation bubble's origin. In turn, the position of the bubble wall is defined based on the active ultrasonic pulse-echo signal. The results suggest that the developed ultrasound technique can be used for quantitative measurements of femtosecond laser-induced microbubbles.

  5. Relationship between cavitation and loss of echogenicity from ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Bader, Kenneth B.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Raymond, Jason L.; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pulse-duration-dependent pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation. Previous studies have demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs as a function of pulse duration. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the onscreen echogenicity in clinical applications. Two lipid-shelled UCAs, echogenic liposomes (ELIP) and Definity®, were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations (‘sample volumes’) in both a static system and a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a passive cavitation detection system and stable and inertial cavitation thresholds ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity® was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. A numerical model based on UCA rupture predicted the functional form of the loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity®. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were found to have a weak dependence on pulse duration. Stable cavitation thresholds were lower than inertial cavitation thresholds. The power of cavitation emissions was an exponential function of the loss of echogenicity over the investigated range of acoustic pressures. Both ELIP and Definity® lost more than 80% echogenicity before the onset of stable or inertial cavitation. Once this level of echogenicity loss occurred, both stable and inertial cavitation were detected in the physiologic flow phantom. These results imply that stable and

  6. Relationship between cavitation and loss of echogenicity from ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Raymond, Jason L; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pulse-duration dependent pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation. Previous studies have demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs as a function of pulse duration. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the on-screen echogenicity in clinical applications. Two lipid-shelled UCAs, echogenic liposomes (ELIP) and Definity®, were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations (“sample volumes”) in both a static system and a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a passive cavitation detection system and stable and inertial cavitation thresholds ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity® was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. A numerical model based on UCA rupture predicted the functional form of the loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity®. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were found to have a weak dependence on pulse duration. Stable cavitation thresholds were lower than inertial cavitation thresholds. The power of cavitation emissions was an exponential function of the loss of echogenicity over the investigated range of acoustic pressures. Both ELIP and Definity® lost more than 80% echogenicity before the onset of stable or inertial cavitation. Once this level of echogenicity loss occurred, both stable and inertial cavitation were detected in the physiologic flow phantom. These results imply that stable and

  7. Relationship between cavitation and loss of echogenicity from ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Raymond, Jason L; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2013-09-21

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pulse-duration-dependent pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation. Previous studies have demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs as a function of pulse duration. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the onscreen echogenicity in clinical applications. Two lipid-shelled UCAs, echogenic liposomes (ELIP) and Definity®, were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations ('sample volumes') in both a static system and a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a passive cavitation detection system and stable and inertial cavitation thresholds ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity® was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. A numerical model based on UCA rupture predicted the functional form of the loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity®. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were found to have a weak dependence on pulse duration. Stable cavitation thresholds were lower than inertial cavitation thresholds. The power of cavitation emissions was an exponential function of the loss of echogenicity over the investigated range of acoustic pressures. Both ELIP and Definity® lost more than 80% echogenicity before the onset of stable or inertial cavitation. Once this level of echogenicity loss occurred, both stable and inertial cavitation were detected in the physiologic flow phantom. These results imply that stable and inertial

  8. Control of inertial acoustic cavitation in pulsed sonication using a real-time feedback loop system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, Cyril; Poizat, Adrien; Gilles, Bruno; Inserra, Claude; Bera, Jean-Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Owing to the complex behavior of ultrasound-induced bubble clouds (nucleation, linear and nonlinear oscillations, collapse), acoustic cavitation remains a hardly controllable phenomenon, leading to poorly reproducible ultrasound-based therapies. A better control of the various aspects of cavitation phenomena for in vivo applications is a key requirement to improve emerging ultrasound therapies. Previous publications have reported on systems performing regulation of acoustic cavitation in continuous sonication when applied in vitro, but the main challenge today is to achieve real-time control of cavitation activity in pulsed sonication when used in vivo. The present work aims at developing a system to control acoustic cavitation in a pulsed wave condition using a real-time feedback loop. The experimental setup consists of a water bath in which is submerged a focused transducer (pulsed waves, frequency 550 kHz) used for sonication and a hydrophone used to listen to inertial cavitation. The designed regulation process allows the cavitation activity to be controlled through a 300 μs feedback loop. Without regulation, cavitation exhibits numerous bursts of intense activity and large variations of inertial cavitation level over time. In a regulated regime, the control of inertial cavitation activity within a pulse leads to consistent cavitation levels over time with an enhancement of the reproducibility.

  9. CAVITATION THRESHOLD OF MICROBUBBLES IN GEL TUNNELS BY FOCUSED ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Sassaroli, E.; Hynynen, K.

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of inertial cavitation in micro-tunnels has significant implications for the development of therapeutic applications of ultrasound such as ultrasound-mediated drug and gene delivery. The threshold for inertial cavitation was investigated using a passive cavitation detector with a center frequency of 1 MHz. Micro-tunnels of various diameters (90 to 800 μm) embedded in gel were fabricated and injected with a solution of Optison™ contrast agent of concentrations 1.2% and 0.2% diluted in water. An ultrasound pulse of duration 500 ms and center frequency 1.736 MHz was used to insonate the microbubbles. The acoustic pressure was increased at one second intervals until broadband noise emission was detected. The pressure threshold at which broadband noise emission was observed was found to be dependent on the diameter of the micro-tunnels, with an average increase of 1.2 to 1.5 between the smallest and the largest tunnels, depending on the microbubble concentration. The evaluation of inertial cavitation in gel tunnels rather than tubes provides a novel opportunity to investigate microbubble collapse in a situation that simulates in vivo blood vessels better than tubes with solid walls do. PMID:17590501

  10. Spatiotemporal evolution of cavitation dynamics exhibited by flowing microbubbles during ultrasound exposure.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasound and microbubble-based therapies utilize cavitation to generate bioeffects, yet cavitation dynamics during individual pulses and across consecutive pulses remain poorly understood under physiologically relevant flow conditions. SonoVue(®) microbubbles were made to flow (fluid velocity: 10-40 mm/s) through a vessel in a tissue-mimicking material and were exposed to ultrasound [frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 150-1200 kPa, pulse length: 1-100,000 cycles, pulse repetition frequency (PRF): 1-50 Hz, number of pulses: 10-250]. Radiated emissions were captured on a linear array, and passive acoustic mapping was used to spatiotemporally resolve cavitation events. At low PRPs, stable cavitation was maintained throughout several pulses, thus generating a steady rise in energy with low upstream spatial bias within the focal volume. At high PRPs, inertial cavitation was concentrated in the first 6.3 ± 1.3 ms of a pulse, followed by an energy reduction and high upstream bias. Multiple pulses at PRFs below a flow-dependent critical rate (PRF(crit)) produced predictable and consistent cavitation dynamics. Above the PRF(crit), energy generated was unpredictable and spatially biased. In conclusion, key parameters in microbubble-seeded flow conditions were matched with specific types, magnitudes, distributions, and durations of cavitation; this may help in understanding empirically observed in vivo phenomena and guide future pulse sequence designs.

  11. Cavitation selectively reduces the negative-pressure phase of lithotripter shock pulses

    PubMed Central

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; McAteer, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone, high-speed camera, and B-mode ultrasound showed attenuation of the trailing negative-pressure phase of a lithotripter shock pulse under conditions that favor generation of cavitation bubbles, such as in water with a high content of dissolved gas or at high pulse repetition rate where more cavitation nuclei persisted between pulses. This cavitation-mediated attenuation of the acoustic pulse was also observed to increase with increasing amplitude of source discharge potential, such that the negative-pressure phase of the pulse can remain fixed in amplitude even with increasing source discharge potential. PMID:19756170

  12. A real-time measure of cavitation induced tissue disruption by ultrasound imaging backscatter reduction.

    PubMed

    Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2007-03-01

    A feedback method for obtaining real-time information on the mechanical disruption of tissue through ultrasound cavitation is presented. This method is based on a substantial reduction in ultrasound imaging backscatter from the target volume as the tissue structure is broken down. Ex-vivo samples of porcine liver were exposed to successive high-intensity ultrasound pulses at a low duty cycle to induce mechanical disruption of tissue parenchyma through cavitation (referred to as histotripsy). At the conclusion of treatment, B-scan imaging backscatter was observed to have decreased by 22.4 +/- 2.3 dB in the target location. Treated samples of tissue were found to contain disrupted tissue corresponding to the imaged hypoechoic volume with no remaining discernable structure and a sharp boundary. The observed, substantial backscatter reduction may be an effective feedback mechanism for assessing treatment efficacy in ultrasound surgery using pulsed ultrasound to create cavitation.

  13. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    PubMed

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  14. Transient Cavitation Induced by High Amplitude Diagnostic Ultrasound.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayme, Eveline J.

    1988-07-01

    Study of the response of gaseous microbubbles to medical ultrasound is essential to apprehend the potentially dangerous effects of transient cavitation on living tissues. However, the prediction of such response is complicated by the finite -amplitude distortion associated with high amplitude acoustic fields. Through a combination of theoretical developments, computer simulations, and experiments, this dissertation investigates the consequences of the interaction between finite-amplitude distortion and transient cavitation, in the context of a diagnostic ultrasonic field. The theoretical approach is to synthesize the asymmetry between compression and rarefaction half-cycles which characterizes a typical nonlinearly distorted pulse obtained at the focus of a diagnostic transducer immersed in water. The synthetic pulse is used to drive a theoretical model for nonlinear bubble dynamics. Comparison with sinusoidal pulses "equivalent" to the distorted pulse as measured by a selection of descriptive parameters shows that: (i) the peak-positive pressure (P_{+} ) in the distorted pulse is a very poor predictor of transient cavitation, (ii) the peak-negative pressure (P_{-}) is a better indicator but underestimates the actual bubble response, (iii) the best predictor is the pressure amplitude of the fundamental (P_{F}) in a Fourier series representation of the distorted pulse. These predictions are tested experimentally on Drosophila larvae. The larvae are exposed to pulsed, symmetric, sinusoidal fields and to pulsed, asymmetric, distorted fields. The killing ratio of the larvae is plotted as a function of the same selection of descriptive parameters, namely P_{+}, P_{ -}, and P_{F}. The resulting curves are compared with the killing ratio plotted against the peak pressure in the sinusoidal, undistorted pulse (P_{A}). If the distorted pulse is described in terms of P_ {-} or P_{+} , the killing ratios are significantly different; if the distorted pulse is described in terms

  15. Loss of echogenicity and onset of cavitation from echogenic liposomes: pulse repetition frequency independence.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J; Peng, Tao; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are being developed for the early detection and treatment of atherosclerotic lesions. An 80% loss of echogenicity of ELIP has been found to be concomitant with the onset of stable and inertial cavitation. The ultrasound pressure amplitude at which this occurs is weakly dependent on pulse duration. It has been reported that the rapid fragmentation threshold of ELIP (based on changes in echogenicity) is dependent on the insonation pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The study described here evaluates the relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from ELIP insonified by duplex Doppler pulses at four PRFs (1.25, 2.5, 5 and 8.33 kHz). Loss of echogenicity was evaluated on B-mode images of ELIP. Cavitation emissions from ELIP were recorded passively on a focused single-element transducer and a linear array. Emissions recorded by the linear array were beamformed, and the spatial widths of stable and inertial cavitation emissions were compared with the calibrated azimuthal beamwidth of the Doppler pulse exceeding the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds. The inertial cavitation thresholds had a very weak dependence on PRF, and stable cavitation thresholds were independent of PRF. The spatial widths of the cavitation emissions recorded by the passive cavitation imaging system agreed with the calibrated Doppler beamwidths. The results also indicate that 64%-79% loss of echogenicity can be used to classify the presence or absence of cavitation emissions with greater than 80% accuracy.

  16. Ablation of benign prostatic hyperplasia using microbubble-mediated ultrasound cavitation.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Liu, Zheng

    2010-04-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a world-wide common disease in elderly male patients. A number of invasive physiotherapies have been used to replace prostatectomy. In this article we report our hypothesis of using microbubbles-mediated ultrasound cavitation effects to ablate prostatic tissues. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agent is widely used contrast media in ultrasonography, yet it is also found to act as cavitation nuclei or enhancer. Once excited by a high peak pressure ultrasound pulse, the mechanical effects, like shock wave and microstream, released from cavitation could produce a series of bioeffects, contributing to sonoporation, microvascular rupture and hematoma. BPH is known to have hyperplastic neovasculature and this make it possible to be disrupted by the physical effects of cavitation under existing microbubbles in circulation. Mechanical ablation of prostatic capillary or small vessels could result in pathological alterations such as thrombosis, micro-circulation blockage, prostatic necrosis and atrophia. Thereupon it could effectively treat BPH by nontraumatic ways.

  17. Relationship between loss of echogenicity and cavitation emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified by spectral Doppler ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability in the United States and worldwide. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are theragonistic ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) being developed for the early detection and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Stability of the echogenicity of ELIP in physiologic conditions is crucial to their successful translation to clinical use. The stability of ELIP echogenicity was determined in vitro under physiologic conditions of total dissolved gas concentration, temperature, and hydrodynamic pressure in porcine plasma and whole blood. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Previous studies have also demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP as a function of pulse duration and pulse repetition frequency. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of ELIP would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the on-screen echogenicity in clinical applications. ELIP were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations and four PRFs in a static fluid and in a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) system and a passive cavitation imaging (PCI) system. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. Stable cavitation thresholds were found to be lower than inertial

  18. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P.; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in-vitro and predict in-vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom’s response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue, at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-Mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High speed imaging of the optically-transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. PMID:21030142

  19. Detection of acoustic cavitation in the heart with microbubble contrast agents in vivo: a mechanism for ultrasound-induced arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rota, Claudio; Raeman, Carol H; Child, Sally Z; Dalecki, Diane

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasound fields can produce premature cardiac contractions under appropriate exposure conditions. The pressure threshold for ultrasound-induced premature contractions is significantly lowered when microbubble contrast agents are present in the vasculature. The objective of this study was to measure directly ultrasound-induced cavitation in the murine heart in vivo and correlate the occurrence of cavitation with the production of premature cardiac contractions. A passive cavitation detection technique was used to quantify cavitation activity in the heart. Experiments were performed with anesthetized, adult mice given intravenous injections of either a contrast agent (Optison) or saline. Murine hearts were exposed to ultrasound pulses (200 kHz, 1 ms, 0.1-0.25 MPa). Premature beats were produced in mice injected with Optison and the likelihood of producing a premature beat increased with increasing pressure amplitude. Similarly, cavitation was detected in mice injected with Optison and the amplitude of the passive cavitation detector signal increased with increasing exposure amplitude. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between the extent of cavitation and the likelihood of ultrasound producing a premature beat. Neither premature beats nor cavitation activity were observed in animals injected with saline and exposed to ultrasound. These results are consistent with acoustic cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect.

  20. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the ‘bubble removal pulse.’ Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 – 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  1. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event using low-amplitude ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2014-10-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 s following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, because they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high-speed photography. In each case, a 2-MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500-kHz transducer, which we term the bubble removal pulse. Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 to 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy.

  2. Ultrasound-enhanced thrombolysis using Definity as a cavitation nucleation agent.

    PubMed

    Datta, Saurabh; Coussios, Constantin-C; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Mast, T Douglas; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M; Holland, Christy K

    2008-09-01

    Ultrasound has been shown previously to act synergistically with a thrombolytic agent, such as recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) to accelerate thrombolysis. In this in vitro study, a commercial contrast agent, Definity, was used to promote and sustain the nucleation of cavitation during pulsed ultrasound exposure at 120 kHz. Ultraharmonic signals, broadband emissions and harmonics of the fundamental were measured acoustically by using a focused hydrophone as a passive cavitation detector and used to quantify the level of cavitation activity. Human whole blood clots suspended in human plasma were exposed to a combination of rt-PA, Definity and ultrasound at a range of ultrasound peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes, which were selected to expose clots to various degrees of cavitation activity. Thrombolytic efficacy was determined by measuring clot mass loss before and after the treatment and correlated with the degree of cavitation activity. The penetration depth of rt-PA and plasminogen was also evaluated in the presence of cavitating microbubbles using a dual-antibody fluorescence imaging technique. The largest mass loss (26.2%) was observed for clots treated with 120-kHz ultrasound (0.32-MPa peak-to-peak pressure amplitude), rt-PA and stable cavitation nucleated by Definity. A significant correlation was observed between mass loss and ultraharmonic signals (r = 0.85, p < 0.0001, n = 24). The largest mean penetration depth of rt-PA (222 microm) and plasminogen (241 microm) was observed in the presence of stable cavitation activity. Stable cavitation activity plays an important role in enhancement of thrombolysis and can be monitored to evaluate the efficacy of thrombolytic treatment.

  3. Cavitation Generation and Usage Without Ultrasound: Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogate, Parag R.; Pandit, Aniruddha B.

    Hydrodynamic Cavitation, which was and is still looked upon as an unavoidable nuisance in the flow systems, can be a serious contender as an alternative to acoustic cavitation for harnessing the spectacular effects of cavitation in physical and chemical processing. The present chapter covers the basics of hydrodynamic cavitation including the considerations for the bubble dynamics analysis, reactor designs and recommendations for optimum operating parameters. An overview of applications in different areas of physical, chemical and biological processing on scales ranging from few grams to several hundred kilograms has also been presented. Since hydrodynamic cavitation was initially proposed as an alternative to acoustic cavitation, it is necessary to compare the efficacy of both these modes of cavitations for a variety of applications and hence comparisons have been discussed either on the basis of energy efficiency or based on the scale of operation. Overall it appears that hydrodynamic cavitation results in conditions similar to those generated using acoustic cavitation but at comparatively much larger scale of operation and with better energy efficiencies.

  4. Stabilizing in vitro ultrasound-mediated gene transfection by regulating cavitation.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chia-Wen; Desjouy, Cyril; Chen, Shing-Ru; Lee, Jyun-Lin; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Chen, Wen-Shiang

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that acoustic cavitation can facilitate the inward transport of genetic materials across cell membranes (sonoporation). However, partially due to the unstationary behavior of the initiation and leveling of cavitation, the sonoporation effect is usually unstable, especially in low intensity conditions. A system which is able to regulate the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop is implemented and its effect on in vitro gene transfection is tested. The regulated system provided better time stability and reproducibility of the cavitation levels than the unregulated conditions. Cultured hepatoma cells (BNL) mixed with 10 μg luciferase plasmids are exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound with or without cavitation regulation, and the gene transfection efficiency and cell viability are subsequently assessed. Experimental results show that for all exposure intensities (low, medium, and high), stable and intensity dependent, although not higher, gene expression could be achieved in the regulated cavitation system than the unregulated conditions. The cavitation regulation system provides a better control of cavitation and its bioeffect which are crucial important for clinical applications of ultrasound-mediated gene transfection.

  5. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Optimization of ultrasound parameters of myocardial cavitation microlesions for therapeutic application.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Owens, Gabe E; Kripfgans, Oliver D

    2014-06-01

    Intermittent high intensity ultrasound scanning with contrast microbubbles can induce scattered cavitation microlesions in the myocardium, which may be of value for tissue reduction therapy. Anesthetized rats were treated in a heated water bath with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound pulses, guided by an 8 MHz imaging transducer. The relative efficacy with 2 or 4 MPa pulses, 1:4 or 1:8 trigger intervals and 5 or 10 cycle pulses was explored in six groups. Electrocardiogram premature complexes (PCs) induced by the triggered pulse bursts were counted, and Evans blue stained cardiomyocyte scores (SCSs) were obtained. The increase from 2 to 4 MPa produced significant increases in PCs and SCSs and eliminated an anticipated decline in the rate of PC induction with time, which might hinder therapeutic efficacy. Increased intervals and pulse durations did not yield significant increases in the effects. The results suggest that cavitation microlesion production can be refined and potentially lead to a clinically robust therapeutic method.

  7. Study on cavitation behavior during high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure by using optical and ultrasonic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Kei; Takagi, Ryo; Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to enhance the heating effect of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). In our previous study, the use of a “triggered HIFU” sequence consisting of a high-intensity pulse and a relatively low-intensity burst was proposed as an effective method to utilize the effect of cavitation bubbles. However, the duration of each component in the sequence has not been optimized. In this study, optical imaging was carried out to observe the behavior of cavitation bubbles in a gel phantom during the triggered HIFU exposure. Ultrasound imaging using the pulse inversion method was also conducted to detect the behavior of the bubbles. The results suggest that the oscillation of cavitation bubbles become inactive as the duration of HIFU burst exposure increases to the order of 10 ms. It was also suggested that ultrasonic imaging has potential use for detecting a change in the oscillation of cavitation bubbles for optimizing a triggered HIFU sequence.

  8. Effect of controlled offset of focal position in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kota; Takagi, Ryo; Miyashita, Takuya; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive treatment for tumors such as cancer. In this method, ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused to the target tissue. Therefore, physical and mental stresses on the patient are minimal. A drawback of the HIFU treatment is a long treatment time for a large tumor due to the small therapeutic volume by a single exposure. Enhancing the heating effect of ultrasound by cavitation bubbles may solve this problem. However, this is rather difficult because cavitation clouds tend to be formed backward from the focal point while ultrasonic intensity for heating is centered at the focal point. In this study, the focal points of the trigger pulses to generate cavitation were offset forward from those of the heating ultrasound to match the cavitation clouds with the heating patterns. Results suggest that the controlled offset of focal points makes the thermal coagulation more predictable.

  9. Ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation of plant cells: effects on morphology and viability.

    PubMed

    Qin, Peng; Xu, Lin; Zhong, Wenjing; Yu, Alfred C H

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between ultrasound pulses and microbubbles is known to generate acoustic cavitation that may puncture biological cells. This work presents new experimental findings on the bioeffects of ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation in plant cells with emphasis on direct observations of morphological impact and analysis of viability trends in tobacco BY-2 cells that are widely studied in higher plant physiology. The tobacco cell suspensions were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound pulses in the presence of 1% v/v microbubbles (10% duty cycle; 1 kHz pulse repetition frequency; 70 mm between probe and cells; 1-min exposure time). Few bioeffects were observed at low peak negative pressures (<0.4 MPa) where stable cavitation presumably occurred. In contrast, at 0.9 MPa peak negative pressure (with more inertial cavitation activities according to our passive cavitation detection results), random pores were found on tobacco cell wall (observed via scanning electron microscopy) and enhanced exogenous uptake into the cytoplasm was evident (noted in our fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran uptake analysis). Also, instant lysis was observed in 23.4% of cells (found using trypan blue staining) and programmed cell death was seen in 23.3% of population after 12 h (determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling [TUNEL]). These bioeffects generally correspond in trend with those for mammalian cells. This raises the possibility of developing ultrasound-microbubble mediated cavitation into a targeted gene transfection paradigm for plant cells and, conversely, adopting plant cells as experimental test-beds for sonoporation-based gene therapy in mammalian cells.

  10. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2010-12-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in vitro and predict in vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom's response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by the generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses, at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High-speed imaging of the optically transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation. Copyright © 2010 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase-shift nano-emulsions induced cavitation and ablation during high intensity focused ultrasound exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yangzi; Yin, Hui; Chang, Nan; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    Phase-shift Nano-emulsions (PSNEs) with a small initial diameter in nanoscale have the potential to leak out of the blood vessels and to accumulate at target point of tissue. At desired location, PSNEs can undergo acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) process, change into gas bubbles and enhance focused ultrasound efficiency. The aim of this work was to provide spatial and temporal information on PSNE induced cavitation and ablation effects during pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. The PSNEs were composed of perfluorohaxane (PFH) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), and then uniformly distributed in a transparent polyacrylamide phantom. The Sonoluminescence (SL) method was employed to visualize the cavitation distribution and formation process of PSNEs induced cavitation. For the phantom which was used for ablation observation, heat sensitive BSA was added. When the temperature generated by ultrasound exposure was high enough to denature BSA, the transparent phantom would turn out white lesions. The shape of the lesion and the formation process were compared with those of cavitation. Each of the pulse contained 12 cycles for a duration of 10 µs. And the duty cycle changed from 1:10 to 1:40. The total "on" time of HIFU was 2s. PSNE can evidently accelerate cavitation emitting bright SL in pre-focal region. The cavitation was generated layer by layer towards the transducer. The formed bubble wall can block acoustic waves transmitting to the distal end. And the lesion appeared to be separated into two parts. One in pre-focal region stemmed from one point and grew quickly toward the transducer. The other in focal region was formed by merging some small white dots, and grew much slower. The influence of duty cycle has also been examined. The lower duty cycle with longer pulse-off time would generate more intense cavitation, however, smaller lesion. Bubble cloud gradually developed within phantom would greatly influence the cavitation and ablation

  12. Strategy of high efficiency and refined high-intensity focused ultrasound and ultrasound monitoring imaging of thermal lesion and cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Mingxi; Zhang, Siyuan; Lu, Mingzhu; Hu, Hong; Jing, Bowen; Liu, Runna; Zhong, Hui

    2017-03-01

    We proposed that high efficiency high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) could be achieved by using a splitting transducer with various frequencies and focusing patterns, and explored the feasibility of using ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI), pulse inversion (PI) sub-harmonic cavitation imaging and bubble wavelet transform imaging for monitoring of cavitation during HIFU, as well as the ultrasonic B-mode images, differential integrated backscatter (IBS) images, Nakagami images and elastography for monitoring HIFU-induced lesion. The use of HIFU splitting transducer had the potential to increase the size of the thermal lesion in a shorter duration and may improve the ablation efficiency of HIFU and would shorten the exposure duration significantly. The spatial-temporal evolution of residual cavitation bubbles at the tissue-water interface was obtained by UACI and the results showed that the UACI had a frame rate high enough to capture the transient behavior of the cavitation bubbles. The experiments demonstrated that comparing with normal sub-harmonic and PI harmonic images, PI sub-harmonic images had higher sensitivity and CTR, which was conducive to showing cavitation bubbles. The CTR would be further improved by combining PI ultrafast plane wave transmitting with cavitation bubble wavelet transform.

  13. Effect of overpressure and pulse repetition frequency on cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Bailey, Michael R; Williams, James C; McAteer, James A; Cleveland, Robin O; Crum, Lawrence A

    2002-09-01

    Cavitation appears to contribute to tissue injury in lithotripsy. Reports have shown that increasing pulse repetition frequency [(PRF) 0.5-100 Hz] increases tissue damage and increasing static pressure (1-3 bar) reduces cell damage without decreasing stone comminution. Our hypothesis is that overpressure or slow PRF causes unstabilized bubbles produced by one shock pulse to dissolve before they nucleate cavitation by subsequent shock pulses. The effects of PRF and overpressure on bubble dynamics and lifetimes were studied experimentally with passive cavitation detection, high-speed photography, and B-mode ultrasound and theoretically. Overpressure significantly reduced calculated (100-2 s) and measured (55-0.5 s) bubble lifetimes. At 1.5 bar static pressure, a dense bubble cluster was measured with clinically high PRF (2-3 Hz) and a sparse cluster with clinically low PRF (0.5-1 Hz), indicating bubble lifetimes of 0.5-1 s, consistent with calculations. In contrast to cavitation in water, high-speed photography showed that overpressure did not suppress cavitation of bubbles stabilized on a cracked surface. These results suggest that a judicious use of overpressure and PRF in lithotripsy could reduce cavitation damage of tissue while maintaining cavitation comminution of stones.

  14. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order

  15. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  16. Cavitation in ultrasound and shockwave therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim

    2014-11-01

    Acoustic waves, especially high-intensity ultrasound and shock waves, are used for medical imaging and intra- and extra-corporeal manipulation of cells, tissue, and urinary calculi. Waves are currently used to treat kidney stone disease, plantar fasciitis, and bone nonunion, and they are being investigated as a technique to ablate cancer tumors and mediate drug delivery. In many applications, acoustic waves induce the expansion and collapse of preexisting or newly cavitating bubbles whose presence can either mediate the generation of localized stresses or lead to collateral damage, depending on how effectively they can be controlled. We describe efforts aimed at simulating the collapse of bubbles, both individually and in clusters, with the aim to characterize the induced mechanical stresses and strains. To simulate collapse of one or a few bubbles, compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes simulations of multi-component materials are performed with WENO-based shock and interface capturing schemes. Repetitive insonification generates numerous bubbles that are difficult to resolve numerically. Such clouds are also important in traditional engineering applications such as caveating hydrofoils. Models that incorporate the dynamics of an unresolved dispersed phase consisting of the bubble cloud are also developed. The results of several model problems including bubble collapse near rigid surfaces, bubble collapse near compliant surfaces and in small capillaries are analyzed. The results are processed to determine the potential for micron-sized preexisting gas bubbles to damage capillaries. The translation of the fundamental fluid dynamics into improvements in the design and clinical application of shockwave lithotripters will be discussed. NIH Grant PO1-DK043881.

  17. Effects of ultrasound frequency and tissue stiffness on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold for cavitation.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew T; Mancia, Lauren; Singh, Rahul; Putnam, Andrew J; Fowlkes, Brian; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has indicated that a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single pulse with one high-amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude directly exceeds a pressure threshold intrinsic to the medium. We hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold in water-based tissues is determined by the properties of the water inside the tissue, and changes in tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency will have a minimal impact on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold. To test this hypothesis, the histotripsy intrinsic threshold was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of cavitation was measured by subjecting tissue phantoms with adjustable mechanical properties and ex vivo tissues to a histotripsy pulse of 1-2 cycles produced by 345-kHz, 500-kHz, 1.5-MHz and 3-MHz histotripsy transducers. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured versus pressure amplitude. The results revealed that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which probability = 0.5) is independent of stiffness for Young's moduli (E) <1 MPa, with only a small increase (∼2-3 MPa) in the intrinsic threshold for tendon (E = 380 MPa). Additionally, results for all samples revealed only a small increase of ∼2-3 MPa when the frequency was increased from 345 kHz to 3 MHz. The intrinsic threshold was measured to be between 24.7 and 30.6 MPa for all samples and frequencies tested in this study. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the intrinsic threshold to initiate a histotripsy bubble cloud is not significantly affected by tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency in the hundreds of kilohertz to megahertz range.

  18. Variations of bubble cavitation and temperature elevation during lesion formation by high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2013-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as an effective therapeutic modality in both thermal ablations for solid tumor/cancer and soft-tissue fragmentation. Mechanical and thermal effects, which play an important role in the HIFU treatment simultaneously, are dependent on the operating parameters and may vary with the progress of therapy. Mechanical erosion in the shape of a "squid," a "dumbbell" lesion with both mechanical and thermal lesions, or a "tadpole" lesion with mechanical erosion at the center and thermal necrosis on the boundary in the transparent gel phantom could be produced correspondingly with the pulse duration of 5-30 ms, which is much longer than histotripsy burst but shorter than the time for tissue boiling, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.2-5 Hz. Meanwhile, variations of bubble cavitation (both inertial and stable cavitation) and temperature elevation in the focal region (i.e., z = -2.5, 0, and 2.5 mm) were measured by passive cavitation detection (PCD) and thermocouples during the therapeutic procedure, respectively. Stable cavitation increased with the pulse duration, PRF, and the number of pulses delivered. However, inertial cavitation was found to increase initially and then decrease with long pulse duration and high PRF. Temperature in the pre-focal region is always higher than those at the focal and post-focal position in all tests. Great variations of PCD signals and temperature elevation are due to the generation and persistence of large bubble, which is resistant to collapse and occurs with the increase of pulse duration and PRF. Similar lesion pattern and variations were also observed in ex vivo porcine kidneys. Hyperechoes in the B-mode ultrasound image were comparable to the shape and size of lesions in the dissected tissue. Thermal lesion volume increased with the increase of pulse duration and PRF, but mechanical erosion reached its maximum volume with the pulse duration of 20 ms and PRF of 1

  19. Size distribution estimation of cavitation bubble cloud via bubbles dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Liu, Xiaodong; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposed an acoustic technique to estimate size distribution of a cavitation bubble cloud induced by focused ultrasound (FUS) based on the dissolution of bubble cloud trapped by a wide beam of low acoustic pressure, after the acoustic exposure of FUS is turned off. Dissolution of cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with degassed saline or saturated saline has been respectively studied to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of FUS on size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  20. Passive cavitation detection during pulsed HIFU exposures of ex vivo tissues and in vivo mouse pancreatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been shown to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rare factional focal pressures (1-12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms and pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KrasLSL.G12 D/+; p53 R172 H/+; PdxCretg/+ (KPC) mice and closely re-capitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50% cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5-10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but it decreased rapidly and stopped

  1. Alternative approach for cavitation damage study utilizing repetitive laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation is a common phenomenon in fluid systems that can lead to dramatic degradation of solid materials surface in contact with the cavitating media. Study of cavitation damage has great significance in many engineering fields. Current techniques for cavitation damage study either require large scale equipments or tend to introduce damages from other mechanisms. In this project, we utilized the cavitation phenomenon induced by laser optical breakdown and developed a prototype apparatus for cavitation damage study. In our approach, cavitation was generated by the repetitive pressure waves induced by high-power laser pulses. As proof of principal study, stainless steel and aluminum samples were tested using the novel apparatus. Surface characterization via scanning electron microscopy revealed damages such as indentation and surface pitting, which were similar to those reported in literature using other state-of-the-art techniques. These preliminary results demonstrated the new device was capable of generating cavitation damages and could be used as an alternative method for cavitation damage study.

  2. Understanding Cavitation Intensity through Pitting and Pressure Pulse Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, A.; Singh, S.; Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G.

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation erosion is of interest to the designers of ship propulsion devices because of its detrimental effects. One of the difficulties of predicting cavitation erosion is that the intensity of cavitation is not well predicted or defined. In this work we attempt to define the intensity of a cavitation erosion field through analysis of cavitation induced erosion pits and pressure pulses. In the pitting tests, material samples were subjected to cavitation field for a short duration of time selected within the test sample's incubation period, so that the test sample undergoes plastic deformation only. The sample material reacts to these cavitation events by undergoing localized permanent deformation, called pits. The resulting pitted sample surfaces were then optically scanned and analyzed. The pressure signals under cavitating jets and ultrasonic horns, for different conditions, were experimentally recorded using high frequency response pressure transducers. From the analysis of the pitting data and recorded pressure signals, we propose a model that describes the statistics, which in the future can be used to define the cavitation field intensity. Support for this work was provided by Office of Naval Research (ONR) under contract number N00014-08-C-0450, monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  3. Sonoluminescence characterization of inertial cavitation inside a BSA phantom treated by pulsed HIFU.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hui; Chang, Nan; Xu, Shanshan; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inertial cavitation inside a phantom treated by pulsed HIFU (pHIFU). Basic bovine serum albumin (BSA) phantoms without any inherent ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) or phase-shift nano-emulsions (PSNEs) were used. During the treatment, sonoluminescence (SL) recordings were performed to characterize the spatial distribution of inertial cavitation adjacent to the focal region. High-speed photographs and thermal coagulations, comparing with the SL results, were also recorded and presented. A series of pulse parameters (pulse duration (PD) was between 1 and 23 cycles and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) was between 0.5kHz and 100kHz) were performed to make a systematic investigation under certain acoustic power (APW). Continuous HIFU (cHIFU) investigation was also performed to serve as control group. It was found that, when APW was 19.5W, pHIFU with short PD was much easier to form SL adjacent to the focal region inside the phantom, while it was difficult for cHIFU to generate cavitation bubbles. With appropriate PD and PRF, the residual bubbles of the previous pulses could be stimulated by the incident pulses to oscillate in a higher level and even violently collapse, resulting to enhanced physical thermogenesis. The experimental results showed that the most violent inertial cavitation occurs when PD was set to 6 cycles (5μs) and PRF to 10kHz, while the highest level of thermal coagulation was observed when PD was set to 10 cycles. The cavitational and thermal characteristics were in good correspondence, exhibiting significant potentiality regarding to inject-free cavitation bubble enhanced thermal ablation under lower APW, compared to the conventional thermotherapy.

  4. Ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Zhang, Siyuan; Fu, Quanyou; Xu, Zhian; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-01-01

    This paper presented an ultrasound line-by-line scanning method of spatial-temporal active cavitation mapping applicable in a liquid or liquid filled tissue cavities exposed by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Scattered signals from cavitation bubbles were obtained in a scan line immediately after one HIFU exposure, and then there was a waiting time of 2 s long enough to make the liquid back to the original state. As this pattern extended, an image was built up by sequentially measuring a series of such lines. The acquisition of the beamformed radiofrequency (RF) signals for a scan line was synchronized with HIFU exposure. The duration of HIFU exposure, as well as the delay of the interrogating pulse relative to the moment while HIFU was turned off, could vary from microseconds to seconds. The feasibility of this method was demonstrated in tap-water and a tap-water filled cavity in the tissue-mimicking gelatin-agar phantom as capable of observing temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud with temporal resolution of several microseconds, lateral and axial resolution of 0.50 mm and 0.29 mm respectively. The dissolution process of cavitation bubble cloud and spatial distribution affected by cavitation previously generated were also investigated. Although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid (e.g. tap water, etc.) that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, the technique may be a useful tool in spatial-temporal cavitation mapping for HIFU with high precision and resolution, providing a reference for clinical therapy.

  5. Sonoporation of adherent cells under regulated ultrasound cavitation conditions.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Fouqueray, Manuela; Ngo, Jacqueline; Poizat, Adrien; Inserra, Claude; Béra, Jean-Christophe

    2015-04-01

    A sonoporation device dedicated to the adherent cell monolayer has been implemented with a regulation process allowing the real-time monitoring and control of inertial cavitation activity. Use of the cavitation-regulated device revealed first that adherent cell sonoporation efficiency is related to inertial cavitation activity, without inducing additional cell mortality. Reproducibility is enhanced for the highest sonoporation rates (up to 17%); sonoporation efficiency can reach 26% when advantage is taken of the standing wave acoustic configuration by applying a frequency sweep with ultrasound frequency tuned to the modal acoustic modes of the cavity. This device allows sonoporation of adherent and suspended cells, and the use of regulation allows some environmental parameters such as the temperature of the medium to be overcome, resulting in the possibility of cell sonoporation even at ambient temperature.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation in Ultrasound Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Yoshiaki; Tsurumi, Nobuo; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    In the present paper, numerical simulation of cavitation in HIFU is proposed. The overning equations are 1) linearized acoustic wave equation (with/without attenuation) and 2) Rayleigh-Plesset equation (bubble volume motion equation). The two equations are coupled through pressure and void fraction. Pressure affects the motion of bubble and the void fraction changes the local density and the local sound speed. Some computed results are presented to show the validity of the present method.

  7. The dynamic behavior of microbubbles during long ultrasound tone-burst excitation: mechanistic insights into ultrasound-microbubble mediated therapeutics using high-speed imaging and cavitation detection

    PubMed Central

    Pacella, John J.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB) mediated therapies have been shown to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. Due to the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes utilize short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure, and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up, and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone-bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. PMID:26603628

  8. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form ICAV = Pr/f (where Pr is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  9. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2013-01-07

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form I(CAV) = P(r)/f (where P(r) is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  10. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40 μs and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2 kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further.

  11. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30-110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was -3.4 ± 2.1 mm and -0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small uncertainties in the PAM

  12. Integrated ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging for simultaneous temperature and cavitation monitoring during focused ultrasound therapies

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound can be used to noninvasively produce different bioeffects via viscous heating, acoustic cavitation, or their combination, and these effects can be exploited to develop a wide range of therapies for cancer and other disorders. In order to accurately localize and control these different effects, imaging methods are desired that can map both temperature changes and cavitation activity. To address these needs, the authors integrated an ultrasound imaging array into an MRI-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) system to simultaneously visualize thermal and mechanical effects via passive acoustic mapping (PAM) and MR temperature imaging (MRTI), respectively. Methods: The system was tested with an MRgFUS system developed for transcranial sonication for brain tumor ablation in experiments with a tissue mimicking phantom and a phantom-filled ex vivo macaque skull. In experiments on cavitation-enhanced heating, 10 s continuous wave sonications were applied at increasing power levels (30–110 W) until broadband acoustic emissions (a signature for inertial cavitation) were evident. The presence or lack of signal in the PAM, as well as its magnitude and location, were compared to the focal heating in the MRTI. Additional experiments compared PAM with standard B-mode ultrasound imaging and tested the feasibility of the system to map cavitation activity produced during low-power (5 W) burst sonications in a channel filled with a microbubble ultrasound contrast agent. Results: When inertial cavitation was evident, localized activity was present in PAM and a marked increase in heating was observed in MRTI. The location of the cavitation activity and heating agreed on average after registration of the two imaging modalities; the distance between the maximum cavitation activity and focal heating was −3.4 ± 2.1 mm and −0.1 ± 3.3 mm in the axial and transverse ultrasound array directions, respectively. Distortions and other MRI issues introduced small

  13. Optimization of Ultrasound Parameters of Myocardial Cavitation Microlesions for Therapeutic Application

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Owens, Gabe E.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent high intensity ultrasound scanning with contrast microbubbles can induce scattered cavitation microlesions in the myocardium, which may be of value for tissue reduction therapy. Anesthetized rats were treated in a heated water bath with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound pulses, guided by an 8 MHz imaging transducer. The relative efficacy with 2 or 4 MPa pulses, 1:4 or 1:8 trigger intervals and 5 or 10 cycle pulses was explored in 6 groups. ECG premature complexes (PCs) induced by the triggered pulse bursts were counted, and Evans blue stained cardiomyocyte scores (SCSs) were obtained. The increase from 2 to 4 MPa produced significant increases in PCs and SCSs, and eliminated an anticipated decline in the rate of PC induction with time, which might hinder therapeutic efficacy. Increased intervals and pulse durations did not yield significant increases in the effects. The results suggest that cavitation microlesion production can be refined and potentially lead to a clinically robust therapeutic method. PMID:24613640

  14. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  15. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  16. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Rémi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized.

  17. Spatial-temporal dynamics of cavitation bubble clouds in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Li, Xiaojing; Wan, Mingxi

    2006-09-01

    Cavitation bubbles have been recognized as being essential to many applications of ultrasound. Temporal evolution and spatial distribution of cavitation bubble clouds induced by a focused ultrasound transducer of 1.2 MHz center frequency are investigated by high-speed photography. It is revealed that at a total acoustic power of 72 W the cavitation bubble cloud first emerges in the focal region where cavitation bubbles are observed to generate, grow, merge and collapse during the initial 600 micros. The bubble cloud then grows upward to the post-focal region, and finally becomes visible in the pre-focal region. The structure of the final bubble cloud is characterized by regional distribution of cavitation bubbles in the ultrasound field. The cavitation bubble cloud structure remains stable when the acoustic power is increased from 25 W to 107 W, but it changes to a more violent form when the acoustic power is further increased to 175 W.

  18. Observation of the inception and evolution of a cavitation cloud in tissue with ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup where two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short bursts, the creation and evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. This system capable of frame rates up to 10000 frames per second provides several tens of images between consecutive bursts. A cross-correlation between consecutive images used for speckle tracking shows a decorrelation of the imaging signal due to changes induced by the cavitation cloud. This post-processed sequence of images reveals that once bubbles have been created in the tissue, they remain for a short time even when no ultrasound is applied. The evolution of the size and place of the cavitation cloud between bursts show a repeatable pattern through a burst sequence.

  19. Identifying the Inertial Cavitation Pressure Threshold and Skull Effects in a Vessel Phantom Using Focused Ultrasound and Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James J.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2010-03-01

    Using Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) has been shown promising for brain drug delivery. However, the exact mechanism behind the opening remains unknown. Here, the effects of the murine skull on the threshold of inertial cavitation were investigated. In order to investigate the pressure threshold for inertial cavitation of preformed microbubbles during sonication, passive cavitation detection in conjunction with B-mode imaging was used. A cylindrical vessel with a 610-μm diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel was generated within a polyacrylamide gel to simulate large blood vessels. Definity® (Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA) microbubbles with a 1.1-3.3 μm in diameter at 2.5×107 bubbles/mL were injected into the channel before sonication (frequency: 1.525 MHz; pulse length: 100 cycles; PRF: 10 Hz; sonication duration: 2 s) through an excised mouse skull. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, acted as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold. A 7.5 MHz linear array with the field-of-view perpendicular to the axial length of the FUS beam was also used to image the occurrence of bubble fragmentation. The broadband spectral response acquired at the passive cavitation detector (PCD) and the B-mode images identified the occurrence and location of the inertial cavitation, respectively. Findings indicated that the peak-rarefactional pressure threshold was approximately equal to 0.45 MPa at the presence or the absence of the skull. However, the skull induced 10-50% lower inertial cavitation dose. Mouse skulls did not affect the pressure threshold of inertial cavitation but resulted in a lower inertial cavitation dose. The broadband response could be captured through the murine skull, so the same PCD setup can be used in future in vivo applications.

  20. Investigations on the destruction of ultrasound contrast agents: Fragmentation thresholds, inertial cavitation, and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Shiang

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) have shown great potential in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications recently. To fully explore the possible applications and the safety concerns of using UCA, a complete understanding of the UCA responses to various acoustic fields is necessary. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments and simulations to investigate the various acoustic properties of UCA with different gases and shells. We also investigated the mechanisms of some UCA-enhanced bioeffects including thrombolysis, hemolysis and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) tumor ablation. Two pressure thresholds were found: the fragmentation threshold and continuous inertial cavitation (IC) threshold. At the fragmentation threshold, bubbles were destroyed and the released gas dissolved in the surrounding solution at a rate which depended on the bubble's initial size and type of gas. The continuous IC threshold occurred at a higher pressure, where fragments of destroyed UCA (derivative bubbles) underwent violent inertial collapse; the period of activity depending on acoustic parameters such as frequency, pressure, pulse length, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Different UCA had different threshold pressures and demonstrated different magnitudes of IC activity after destruction. The amount of derivative bubbles generated by IC was determined by several acoustic parameters including pressure, pulse length and PRE For the same acoustic energy delivered, longer pulses generated more bubbles. More IC could be induced if the derivative bubbles could survive through the 'off' period of the pulsed ultrasound waves, and served as nuclei for the subsequent IC. In therapeutic applications, evidences of IC activity were recorded during the hemolysis, thrombolysis, and the lesion-formation processes with UCA. Hemolysis and thrombolysis were highly correlated to the presence of ultrasound and UCA, and correlated well with the amount of the IC activity. Finally, the

  1. Exploiting flow to control the in vitro spatiotemporal distribution of microbubble-seeded acoustic cavitation activity in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Bonaccorsi, Simone; Choi, James J

    2014-11-21

    Focused ultrasound and microbubbles have been extensively used to generate therapeutic bioeffects. Despite encouraging in vivo results, there remains poor control of the magnitude and spatial distribution of these bioeffects due to the limited ability of conventional pulse shapes and sequences to control cavitation dynamics. Thus current techniques are restricted by an efficacy-safety trade-off. The primary aim of the present study was to incorporate the presence of flow in the design of new short pulse sequences, which can more uniformly distribute the cavitation activity. Microbubbles flowing (fluid velocity: 10 mm s(-1)) through a 300 μm tube were sonicated with a focused 0.5 MHz transducer while acoustic emissions were captured with an inserted focused 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector. The two foci were co-axially aligned and their focal points were overlapped. Whereas conventional sequences are composed of a long burst (>10,000 cycles) emitted at a low burst repetition frequency (<10 Hz), we decomposed this burst into short pulses by adding intervals to facilitate inter-pulse microbubble movement. To evaluate how this sequence influenced cavitation distribution, we emitted short pulses (peak-rarefactional pressure (PRP): 40-366 kPa, pulse length (PL): 5-25 cycles) at high pulse repetition frequencies (PRF: 0.625-10 kHz) for a burst length of 100 ms. Increased cavitation persistence, implied by the duration of the microbubble acoustic emissions, was a measure of improved distribution due to the presence of flow. Sonication at lower acoustic pressures, longer pulse intervals and lower PLs improved the spatial distribution of cavitation. Furthermore, spectral analysis of the microbubble emissions revealed that the improvement at low pressures is due to persisting stable cavitation. In conclusion, new short-pulse sequences were shown to improve spatiotemporal control of acoustic cavitation dynamics during physiologically relevant flow. This

  2. Microbubble cavitation imaging.

    PubMed

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, William T; Powers, Jeffry E; Everbach, E Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Gao, Shunji; Xie, Feng; Porter, Thomas R

    2013-04-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications such as sonothrombolysis (STL) in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (moderate oscillations, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation) and activity level in and around a treatment area. Acoustic passive cavitation detectors (PCDs) have been used to this end but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2-D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and activity level in a region of interest. Similar to PCDs, the cavitation imaging described here is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, whereas elevated noise bands indicate inertial cavitation; the absence of both indicates moderate oscillations. The prototype system is a modified commercially available ultrasound scanner with a sector imaging probe. The lateral resolution of the system is 1.5 mm at a focal depth of 3 cm, and the axial resolution is 3 cm for a therapy pulse length of 20 μs. The maximum frame rate of the prototype is 2 Hz. The system has been used for assessing and mapping the relative importance of the different cavitation states of a microbubble contrast agent. In vitro (tissue-mimicking flow phantom) and in vivo (heart, liver, and brain of two swine) results for cavitation states and their changes as a function of acoustic amplitude are presented.

  3. Promoting inertial cavitation by nonlinear frequency mixing in a bifrequency focused ultrasound beam.

    PubMed

    Saletes, Izella; Gilles, Bruno; Bera, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Enhancing cavitation activity with minimal acoustic intensities could be interesting in a variety of therapeutic applications where mechanical effects of cavitation are needed with minimal heating of surrounding tissues. The present work focuses on the relative efficiency of a signal combining two neighbouring frequencies and a one-frequency signal for initiating ultrasound inertial cavitation. Experiments were carried out in a water tank, using a 550kHz piezoelectric composite spherical transducer focused on targets with 46μm roughness. The acoustic signal scattered, either by the target or by the cavitation bubbles, is filtered using a spectral and cepstral-like method to obtain an inertial cavitation activity measurement. The ultrasound excitations consist of 1.8ms single bursts of single frequency f(0)=550kHz excitation, in the monofrequency case, and of dual frequency f(1)=535kHz and f(2)=565kHz excitation, in the bifrequency case. It is shown that depending on the value of the monofrequency cavitation threshold intensity the bifrequency excitation can increase or reduce the cavitation threshold. The analysis of the thresholds indicates that the mechanisms involved are nonlinear. The progress of the cavitation activity beyond the cavitation threshold is also studied. The slope of the cavitation activity considered as a function of the acoustic intensity is always steeper in the case of the bifrequency excitation. This means that the delimitation of the region where cavitation occurs should be cleaner than with a classical monofrequency excitation.

  4. Influence of Ultrasound Treatment on Cavitation Erosion Resistance of AlSi7 Alloy

    PubMed Central

    Pola, Annalisa; Montesano, Lorenzo; Tocci, Marialaura; La Vecchia, Giovina Marina

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound treatment of liquid aluminum alloys is known to improve mechanical properties of castings. Aluminum foundry alloys are frequently used for production of parts that undergo severe cavitation erosion phenomena during service. In this paper, the effect of the ultrasound treatment on cavitation erosion resistance of AlSi7 alloy was assessed and compared to that of conventionally cast samples. Cavitation erosion tests were performed according to ASTM G32 standard on as-cast and heat treated castings. The response of the alloy in each condition was investigated by measuring the mass loss as a function of cavitation time and by analyzing the damaged surfaces by means of optical and scanning electron microscope. It was pointed out that the ultrasound treatment increases the cavitation erosion resistance of the alloy, as a consequence of the higher chemical and microstructural homogeneity, the finer grains and primary particles and the refined structure of the eutectic induced by the treatment itself. PMID:28772617

  5. Influence of Ultrasound Treatment on Cavitation Erosion Resistance of AlSi7 Alloy.

    PubMed

    Pola, Annalisa; Montesano, Lorenzo; Tocci, Marialaura; La Vecchia, Giovina Marina

    2017-03-03

    Ultrasound treatment of liquid aluminum alloys is known to improve mechanical properties of castings. Aluminum foundry alloys are frequently used for production of parts that undergo severe cavitation erosion phenomena during service. In this paper, the effect of the ultrasound treatment on cavitation erosion resistance of AlSi7 alloy was assessed and compared to that of conventionally cast samples. Cavitation erosion tests were performed according to ASTM G32 standard on as-cast and heat treated castings. The response of the alloy in each condition was investigated by measuring the mass loss as a function of cavitation time and by analyzing the damaged surfaces by means of optical and scanning electron microscope. It was pointed out that the ultrasound treatment increases the cavitation erosion resistance of the alloy, as a consequence of the higher chemical and microstructural homogeneity, the finer grains and primary particles and the refined structure of the eutectic induced by the treatment itself.

  6. Acoustic cavitation of individual ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles confined in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaqwashi, Ali; McIntyre, David; Ammi, Azzdine

    2011-10-01

    Ultrasound targeted therapies mainly rely on the inertial cavitation of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles. Our objective is to determine the cavitation acoustic pressure threshold for the destruction of UCA microbubbles inside cellulose capillaries. Acoustic emission from individual Optison microbubbles confined inside a 200-μm diameter capillary was detected using a passive cavitation detection system. Excitation signals from a 2.25 MHz transmitter were applied to the microbubbles while their acoustic emission was detected by a broadband 15 MHz receiver. Time traces were recorded (100 MHz sampling, 12- bit), and frequency-domain analysis of the received signals was performed to characterize microbubble cavitation. The cavitation acoustic pressure threshold was found to be 1 MPa inside the capillary in comparison with ˜0.7 MPa previously reported for unconfined UCA microbubbles. This work provides a clearer understanding of the role of ultrasound contrast agent dynamics inside a capillary.

  7. Control of treatment size in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound using radio-frequency echo signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Kentaro; Takagi, Ryo; Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2017-07-01

    In high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, controlling the ultrasound dose at each focal target spot is important because it is a problem that the length of the coagulated region in front of the focal point deviates owing to the differences in absorption in each focal target spot and attenuation in the intervening tissues. In this study, the detected changes in the power spectra of HIFU echoes were used by controlling the HIFU duration in the “trigger HIFU” sequence with the aim to increase coagulation size through the enhancement of the ultrasonic heating by the cavitation induced by the preceding extremely high intensity short “trigger” pulse. The result shows that this method can be used to detect boiling bubbles and the following generated cavitation bubbles at their early stage. By automatically stopping HIFU exposure immediately after detecting the bubbles, overheating was prevented and the deviation of the length of the coagulated region was reduced.

  8. Trans-Stent B-Mode Ultrasound and Passive Cavitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Raymond, Jason L; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Moody, Melanie R; Huang, Shao-Ling; Peng, Tao; Shekhar, Himanshu; Klegerman, Melvin E; Kim, Hyunggun; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-02-01

    Angioplasty and stenting of a stenosed artery enable acute restoration of blood flow. However, restenosis or a lack of re-endothelization can subsequently occur depending on the stent type. Cavitation-mediated drug delivery is a potential therapy for these conditions, but requires that particular types of cavitation be induced by ultrasound insonation. Because of the heterogeneity of tissue and stochastic nature of cavitation, feedback mechanisms are needed to determine whether the sustained bubble activity is induced. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging through a metal stent in a flow phantom and an animal model. In this study, an endovascular stent was deployed in a flow phantom and in porcine femoral arteries. Fluorophore-labeled echogenic liposomes, a theragnostic ultrasound contrast agent, were injected proximal to the stent. Cavitation images were obtained by passively recording and beamforming the acoustic emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified with a low-frequency (500 kHz) transducer. In vitro experiments revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio for detecting stable cavitation activity through the stent was greater than 8 dB. The stent did not significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio. Trans-stent cavitation activity was also detected in vivo via passive cavitation imaging when echogenic liposomes were insonified by the 500-kHz transducer. When stable cavitation was detected, delivery of the fluorophore into the arterial wall was observed. Increased echogenicity within the stent was also observed when echogenic liposomes were administered. Thus, both B-mode ultrasound imaging and cavitation imaging are feasible in the presence of an endovascular stent in vivo. Demonstration of this capability supports future studies to monitor restenosis with contrast-enhanced ultrasound and pursue image-guided ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to inhibit restenosis.

  9. Investigation on the inertial cavitation threshold and shell properties of commercialized ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiasheng; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Dong; Tu, Juan

    2013-08-01

    The inertial cavitation (IC) activity of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) plays an important role in the development and improvement of ultrasound diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, various diagnostic and therapeutic applications have different requirements for IC characteristics. Here through IC dose quantifications based on passive cavitation detection, IC thresholds were measured for two commercialized UCAs, albumin-shelled KangRun(®) and lipid-shelled SonoVue(®) microbubbles, at varied UCA volume concentrations (viz., 0.125 and 0.25 vol. %) and acoustic pulse lengths (viz., 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 cycles). Shell elastic and viscous coefficients of UCAs were estimated by fitting measured acoustic attenuation spectra with Sarkar's model. The influences of sonication condition (viz., acoustic pulse length) and UCA shell properties on IC threshold were discussed based on numerical simulations. Both experimental measurements and numerical simulations indicate that IC thresholds of UCAs decrease with increasing UCA volume concentration and acoustic pulse length. The shell interfacial tension and dilatational viscosity estimated for SonoVue (0.7 ± 0.11 N/m, 6.5 ± 1.01 × 10(-8) kg/s) are smaller than those of KangRun (1.05 ± 0.18 N/m, 1.66 ± 0.38 × 10(-7) kg/s); this might result in lower IC threshold for SonoVue. The current results will be helpful for selecting and utilizing commercialized UCAs for specific clinical applications, while minimizing undesired IC-induced bioeffects.

  10. Cavitation-induced damage in soft tissue phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Hutchens, Shelby B.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation in soft tissues, similar to that in purely hydrodynamic configurations, is thought to cause tissue injury in therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Our goal is to generalize bubble dynamics models to represent this phenomenon, which we pursue experimentally with observations in tissue-mimicking polyacrylamide and agarose phantoms and semi-analytic generalization of Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics models. The phantoms were imaged with high-speed cameras while subjected to a series of multiple pressure wave bursts, of the kind being considered specifically for burst-wave lithotripsy (BWL). The experimental observations show bubble activation at multiple sites during the initial pulses. After multiple pulses, a further onset of cavitation is observed at some new locations suggesting material failure due to fatigue under cyclic loading. A nonlinear strain-energy with strain hardening is used to represent the elasticity of the surrounding medium. Griffith's fracture criterion is then applied in order to determine the onset of material damage. The damaged material is then represented as a Newtonian fluid. By assuming that such a decrease in the fracture toughness occurs under cyclic loading, the fatigue behavior observed in the experiments can be reproduced by our model. This work was supported by NIH grant NIDDK PO1-DK043881.

  11. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-07

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  12. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore

  13. Wavelet-transform-based active imaging of cavitation bubbles in tissues induced by high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Xu, Shanshan; Hu, Hong; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-08-01

    Cavitation detection and imaging are essential for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapies. In this paper, an active cavitation imaging method based on wavelet transform is proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The Yang-Church model, which is a combination of the Keller-Miksis equation with the Kelvin-Voigt equation for the pulsations of gas bubbles in simple linear viscoelastic solids, is utilized to construct the bubble wavelet. Experiments with porcine muscles demonstrate that image quality is associated with the initial radius of the bubble wavelet and the scale. Moreover, the Yang-Church model achieves a somewhat better performance compared with the Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model. Furthermore, the pulse inversion (PI) technique is combined with bubble wavelet transform to achieve further improvement. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio (CTR) of the best tissue bubble wavelet transform (TBWT) mode image is improved by 5.1 dB compared with that of the B-mode image, while the CTR of the best PI-based TBWT mode image is improved by 7.9 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image. This work will be useful for better monitoring of cavitation in HIFU-induced therapies.

  14. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  15. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-07

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  16. Transfection effect of microbubbles on cells in superposed ultrasound waves and behavior of cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Tomita, Yukio; Koshiyama, Ken-Ichiro; Blomley, Martin J K

    2006-06-01

    The combination of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is able to induce transient membrane permeability leading to direct delivery of exogenous molecules into cells. Cavitation bubbles are believed to be involved in the membrane permeability; however, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, the effects of ultrasound and the UCAs, Optison on transfection in vitro for different medium heights and the related dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubbles were investigated. Cultured CHO-E cells mixed with reporter genes (luciferase or beta-gal plasmid DNA) and UCAs were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound in 24-well plates. Ultrasound was applied from the bottom of the well and reflected at the free surface of the medium, resulting in the superposition of ultrasound waves within the well. Cells cultured on the bottom of 24-well plates were located near the first node (displacement node) of the incident ultrasound downstream. Transfection activity was a function determined with the height of the medium (wave traveling distance), as well as the concentration of UCAs and the exposure time was also determined with the concentration of UCAs and the exposure duration. Survival fraction was determined by MTT assay, also changes with these values in the reverse pattern compared with luciferase activity. With shallow medium height, high transfection efficacy and high survival fraction were obtained at a low concentration of UCAs. In addition, capillary waves and subsequent atomized particles became significant as the medium height decreased. These phenomena suggested cavitation bubbles were being generated in the medium. To determine the effect of UCAs on bubble generation, we repeated the experiments using crushed heat-treated Optison solution instead of the standard microbubble preparation. The transfection ratio and survival fraction showed no additional benefit when ultrasound was used. These results suggested that cavitation bubbles created by the

  17. Effects of Tissue Stiffness, Ultrasound Frequency, and Pressure on Histotripsy-induced Cavitation Bubble Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 microns. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness causes a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  18. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  19. Development of a Pulsed Pressure-Based Technique for Cavitation Damage Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Fei; Wang, Jy-An John; Liu, Yun; Wang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation occurs in many fluid systems and can lead to severe material damage. To assist the study of cavitation damage, a novel testing method utilizing pulsed pressure was developed. In this talk, the scientific background and the technical approach of this development are present and preliminary testing results are discussed. It is expected that this technique can be used to evaluate cavitation damage under various testing conditions including harsh environments such as those relevant to geothermal power generation.

  20. Compare ultrasound-mediated heating and cavitation between flowing polymer- and lipid-shelled microbubbles during focused ultrasound exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi; Yu, Xiaojun; Fu, Quanyou; Ding, Ting; Zhou, Fanyu; Wang, Supin

    2012-06-01

    This paper compares the efficiency of flowing polymer- and lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs) in the heating and cavitation during focused ultrasound exposures. Temperature and cavitation activity were simultaneously measured as the two types of shelled MBs and saline flowing through a 3 mm diameter vessel in the phantom with varying flow velocities (0-20 cm/s) at different acoustic power levels (0.6-20 W) with each exposure for 5 s. Temperature and cavitation for the lipid-shelled MBs were higher than those for the polymer-shelled MBs. Temperature rise decreased with increasing flow velocities for the two types of shelled MBs and saline at acoustic power 1.5 W. At acoustic power 11.1 W, temperature rise increased with increasing flow velocities for the lipid-shelled MBs. For the polymer-shelled MBs, the temperature rise increased with increasing flow velocities from 3-15 cm/s and decreased at 20 cm/s. Cavitation increased with increasing flow velocity for the two shelled MBs and there were no significant changes of cavitation with increasing flow velocities for saline. These results suggested that lipid-shelled MBs may have a greater efficiency than polymer-shelled MBs in heating and cavitation during focused ultrasound exposures.

  1. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2 dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  2. Single-transducer dual-frequency ultrasound generation to enhance acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hsieh, Chao-Ming

    2009-03-01

    Dual- or multiple-frequency ultrasound stimulation is capable of effectively enhancing the acoustic cavitation effect over single-frequency ultrasound. Potential application of this sonoreactor design has been widely proposed such as on sonoluminescence, sonochemistry enhancement, and transdermal drug release enhancement. All currently available sonoreactor designs employed multiple piezoelectric transducers for generating single-frequency ultrasonic waves separately and then these waves were mixed and interfered in solutions. The purpose of this research is to propose a novel design of generating dual-frequency ultrasonic waves with single piezoelectric elements, thereby enhancing acoustic cavitation. Macroscopic bubbles were detected optically, and they were quantified at either a single-frequency or for different frequency combinations for determining their efficiency for enhancing acoustic cavitation. Visible bubbles were optically detected and hydrogen peroxide was measured to quantify acoustic cavitation. Test water samples with different gas concentrations and different power levels were used to determine the efficacy of enhancing acoustic cavitation of this design. The spectrum obtained from the backscattered signals was also recorded and examined to confirm the occurrence of stable cavitation. The results confirmed that single-element dual-frequency ultrasound stimulation can enhance acoustic cavitation. Under certain testing conditions, the generation of bubbles can be enhanced up to a level of five times higher than the generation of bubbles in single-frequency stimulation, and can increase the hydrogen peroxide production up to an increase of one fold. This design may serve as a useful alternative for future sonoreactor design owing to its simplicity to produce dual- or multiple-frequency ultrasound.

  3. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J J; Graham, S; Myers, R; Carlisle, R; Stride, E; Coussios, C C

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning.

  4. Characteristics of the pulsed ultrasound field.

    PubMed Central

    Wien, K. D.; Harder, D.

    1982-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasound fields show some quantitative differences from continuous fields. In order to support the analysis of bioeffects of pulsed ultrasound fields these differences are characterized. For each observation point, the sound pulse is calculated by wavelet addition. The total pulse length has a maximum near the transducer surface, corresponding to large differences in acoustical pathlength from the surface elements. Accordingly, the spectrum varies strongly in the near field. In the far field, pulse-length and spectrum are almost constant as long as frequency-dependent absorption is negligible. The radiation field at each point is described by the time integral of sound intensity over one pulse (energy transport per unit area) and by the corresponding "dose" (absorbed energy per unit volume in one pulse). Differences between the spatial distributions of these two quantities are mainly detectable in the near field, which is also the region where differences between continuous and pulsed ultrasound (at the same centre frequency) are considerable. PMID:6950776

  5. Enhanced cavitation by using two consecutive ultrasound waves at different frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xinmai; Jo, Janggun

    2014-01-01

    Efficient and noninvasive generation of cavitation bubbles in soft tissue is a challenging task due to the lack of cavitation nuclei (i.e., pre-existing gas bubbles). In this study, we present a method to generate and enhance cavitation activity based on the utilization of two consecutive ultrasound waves at different frequencies. First, a high frequency (5 MHz) high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) wave was applied to a tissue-mimicking phantom to induce a rapid temperature rise in the ultrasound focal region. Immediately following the high frequency HIFU wave, a low frequency (1 MHz) HIFU wave was applied to the same focal region to induce acoustic cavitation. We found that cavitation activity was enhanced when the temperature in the tissue-mimicking phantom was first elevated by the high frequency HIFU wave. The enhancement was greater when a higher intensity of high frequency HIFU wave was applied. This result may be due to the temporary super-saturation of air in the initially air-saturated test samples and the reduction of surface tension at an elevated temperature. PMID:25425746

  6. Augmentation of Muscle Blood Flow by Ultrasound Cavitation Is Mediated by ATP and Purinergic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Belcik, J Todd; Davidson, Brian P; Xie, Aris; Wu, Melinda D; Yadava, Mrinal; Qi, Yue; Liang, Sherry; Chon, Chae Ryung; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Field, Joshua; Harmann, Leanne; Chilian, William M; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2017-03-28

    Augmentation of tissue blood flow by therapeutic ultrasound is thought to rely on convective shear. Microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation markedly amplify these effects. We hypothesized that purinergic signaling is responsible for shear-dependent increases in muscle perfusion during therapeutic cavitation. Unilateral exposure of the proximal hindlimb of mice (with or without ischemia produced by iliac ligation) to therapeutic ultrasound (1.3 MHz, mechanical index 1.3) was performed for 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 2×10(8) lipid microbubbles. Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by low-power contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging. In vivo muscle ATP release and in vitro ATP release from endothelial cells or erythrocytes were assessed by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Purinergic signaling pathways were assessed by studying interventions that (1) accelerated ATP degradation; (2) inhibited P2Y receptors, adenosine receptors, or KATP channels; or (3) inhibited downstream signaling pathways involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase or prostanoid production (indomethacin). Augmentation in muscle perfusion by ultrasound cavitation was assessed in a proof-of-concept clinical trial in 12 subjects with stable sickle cell disease. Therapeutic ultrasound cavitation increased muscle perfusion by 7-fold in normal mice, reversed tissue ischemia for up to 24 hours in the murine model of peripheral artery disease, and doubled muscle perfusion in patients with sickle cell disease. Augmentation in flow extended well beyond the region of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound cavitation produced an ≈40-fold focal and sustained increase in ATP, the source of which included both endothelial cells and erythrocytes. Inhibitory studies indicated that ATP was a critical mediator of flow augmentation that acts primarily through either P2Y receptors or adenosine produced by ectonucleotidase activity. Combined indomethacin and inhibition of

  7. Treatment of Breast Tumors using Pulsed HIFU for Delivery and Activation of Sonosensitizers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-14

    treated and control tumors. 15. SUBJECT TERMS high intensity focused ultrasound , sonodynamic, cavitation , free radicals, chemotherapy, targeted...vivo in combination with cavitation driven by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Applying HIFU in pulsed mode (to avoid overheating) has...synergistic effect, with the combination of compound and ultrasound cavitation killing over 95% of cells, while neither the drug nor the ultrasound alone

  8. AUGMENTATION OF LIMB PERFUSION AND REVERSAL OF TISSUE ISCHEMIA PRODUCED BY ULTRASOUND-MEDIATED MICROBUBBLE CAVITATION

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Mott, Brian H.; Xie, Aris; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Lindner, Nathan J.; Ammi, Azzdine; Linden, Joel M.; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound can increase tissue blood flow in part through the intravascular shear produced by oscillatory pressure fluctuations. We hypothesized that ultrasound-mediated increases in perfusion can be augmented by microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation, and sought to characterize the biologic mediators. Methods and Results Contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging of hindlimb skeletal muscle and femoral artery diameter measurement were performed in non-ischemic mice after unilateral 10 min exposure to intermittent ultrasound alone (mechanical index [MI] 0.6 or 1.3) or ultrasound with lipid microbubbles (2×108 I.V.). Studies were also performed after inhibiting shear- or pressure-dependent vasodilator pathways, and in mice with hindlimb ischemia. Ultrasound alone produced a 2-fold increase (p<0.05) in muscle perfusion regardless of ultrasound power. Ultrasound-mediated augmentation in flow was greater with microbubbles (3-fold and 10-fold higher than control for MI 0.6 and 1.3, respectively; p<0.05), as was femoral artery dilation. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) attenuated flow augmentation produced by ultrasound and microbubbles by 70% (p<0.01), whereas inhibition of adenosine-A2a receptors and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids had minimal effect. Limb nitric oxide (NO) production and muscle phospho-eNOS increased in a stepwise fashion by ultrasound and ultrasound with microbubbles. In mice with unilateral hindlimb ischemia (40–50% reduction in flow), ultrasound (MI 1.3) with microbubbles increased perfusion by 2-fold to a degree that was greater than the control non-ischemic limb. Conclusions Increases in muscle blood flow during high-power ultrasound are markedly amplified by the intravascular presence of microbubbles and can reverse tissue ischemia. These effects are most likely mediated by cavitation-related increases in shear and activation of eNOS. PMID:25834183

  9. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  10. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, R Glynn; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark

    2010-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 muC will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 muC by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 mus after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 muC and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber ( approximately 300 mus), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  11. Cancer treatment using an optically inert Rose Bengal derivative combined with pulsed focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Rubio, Valentina; Qi, Jianjun; Xia, Rongmin; Shi, Zheng-Zheng; Peterson, Leif; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2012-10-01

    Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) produced has been combined with a photo-insensitive Rose Bengal derivative (RB2) to provide a synergistic cytotoxicity requiring the presence of both ultrasonic cavitation and drug. In vitro tests have shown that a short treatment (less than 30 s) of pulsed HIFU with peak negative pressure >7 MPa (˜27 W acoustic power at 1.4 MHz) destroys >95 % of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in suspension with >10 μM of the compound. Neither the pulsed HIFU nor the RB2 compound was found to have any significant impact on the viability of the cells when used alone. Introducing an antioxidant (Nacetylcysteine) reduced the effectiveness of the treatment. In vivo tests using these same cells growing as a xenograft in nu/nu mice were also done. An ultrasound contrast agent (Optison) and lower frequency (1.0 MHz) was used to help initiate cavitation at the tumor site. We were able to demonstrate tumor regression with cavitation alone, however, addition of RB2 compound injected i.v. yielded a substantial synergistic improvement over either cavitation or RB2 injection alone.

  12. Dual pulses for cavitation control in lithotripsy: Shock wave-bubble interactions and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Dahlia L.

    2002-08-01

    Cavitation, the growth and collapse of gas/vapor bubbles, appears to play an important role in both stone comminution and tissue injury during shock wave lithotripsy, the clinical treatment in which focused, high amplitude shock pulses are used to comminute kidney stones. The goal of this research was to characterize in vitro cavitation activity and stone and cell damage in a novel system that uses converging dual pulses, produced by two identical, confocal lithotripters, to modify the cavitation field. The cavitation bubble dynamics were numerically calculated, and experiments were performed in a research electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter to determine bubble size, lifetime, and pit depth created in aluminum foils by cavitation collapse. Furthermore, damage to model stones and to red blood cells was measured for both single and dual-pulses. A single shock pulse creates a ˜15 x 100 mm cloud of bubbles in water. The greatest cavitation activity and stone damage from single-pulses was found to occur 2 cm proximal to the geometric focus, F2, where the stone is normally aligned. Therefore, a 2 cm shift in stone alignment may potentially improve stone comminution and reduce tissue injury in clinical treatment. The dual-pulse lithotripter, on the other hand, generates a localized and intensified cavitation field that increased stone comminution efficiency at F2 by at least three times the maximum values achieved by single-pulses. At F2, acoustic pressure approximately doubled, as did bubble size, collapse time, and pit depth on foils. A significant reduction in comminution of stones suspended in glycerol indicates that cavitation activity, not the doubling of acoustic pressure, explains the increased comminution. On either side of F2, the second delayed pulse mitigated bubble collapse, resulting in little or no pitting on foils and reduced hemolysis, even when compared with single pulses. Numerical calculations of radial dynamics agreed with experimental findings

  13. Damage mechanisms for ultrasound-induced cavitation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M.; Vlaisavljevich, E.; Xu, Z.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-03-01

    In a variety of biomedical applications, cavitation occurs in soft tissue. Although significant amounts of research have been performed on cavitation in water, bubble dynamics, and related bioeffects remain poorly understood. We use numerical simulations of spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue to assess the extent to which viscoelasticity affects "known" and introduces "new" damage mechanisms. We find that deviatoric stresses - although not an important damage mechanism in water - are significantly enhanced and could be an important bioeffect mechanism in tissue. Both the viscoelastic properties and the nonlinear, large-collapse radius contribute to stress amplification in the surroundings. In addition, temperatures in the surrounding medium increase more in the Zener tissue than in water, due to viscous heating.

  14. Cavitation-enhanced delivery of a replicating oncolytic adenovirus to tumors using focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Rifai, Bassel; Carlisle, Robert C; Choi, James; Arvanitis, Costas D; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin C

    2013-07-10

    Oncolytic viruses (OV) and ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery are powerful novel technologies. OV selectively self-amplify and kill cancer cells but their clinical use has been restricted by limited delivery from the bloodstream into the tumor. Ultrasound has been previously exploited for targeted release of OV in vivo, but its use to induce cavitation, microbubble oscillations, for enhanced OV tumor extravasation and delivery has not been previously reported. By identifying and optimizing the underlying physical mechanism, this work demonstrates that focused ultrasound significantly enhances the delivery and biodistribution of systemically administered OV co-injected with microbubbles. Up to a fiftyfold increase in tumor transgene expression was achieved, without any observable tissue damage. Ultrasound exposure parameters were optimized as a function of tumor reperfusion time to sustain inertial cavitation, a type of microbubble activity, throughout the exposure. Passive detection of acoustic emissions during treatment confirmed inertial cavitation as the mechanism responsible for enhanced delivery and enabled real-time monitoring of successful viral delivery.

  15. Time-resolved measurement of bubble cavitation by using power Doppler ultrasound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Ren; Izumi, Yosuke; Nagai, Hayato; Yamakoshi, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel measurement method for a secondary ultrasound wave irradiated by microbubble cavitation is proposed. High-intensity ultrasound (h-US, 1.0-1.5 MPa), which produces bubble cavitation, is irradiated with a fixed time delay after introducing imaging US, whose frequency is different from that of the h-US. The bubble cavitation signal (BCS) is detected by the signal-processing unit of an ultrasound power Doppler imaging instrument. By this method, both a spatially resolved bubble image (S-image) and the temporal transition of the BCS (T-image) are monitored simultaneously. A feature of the method is that the BCS is observed in situ with sub-µs time resolution. The accuracy of the method is evaluated and it is found that the maximum deviation of the amplitude of the simulated BCS is 4.80%. This method is applied to measure the BCS of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles. As a result, the dependence of the inherent temporal transition of the BCS on the sound pressure of the h-US (0.6-1.2 MPa) is observed.

  16. Dynamic Behavior of Microbubbles during Long Ultrasound Tone-Burst Excitation: Mechanistic Insights into Ultrasound-Microbubble Mediated Therapeutics Using High-Speed Imaging and Cavitation Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Pacella, John J; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB)-mediated therapies have been found to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. On the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes use short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore, we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing, acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualization and optimization of cavitation activity at a solid surface in high frequency ultrasound fields.

    PubMed

    Kauer, Markus; Belova-Magri, Valentina; Cairós, Carlos; Schreier, Hans-Jürgen; Mettin, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of high frequency ultrasound in heterogeneous reactions, knowledge about the spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles at the irradiated solid surface is still lacking. This gap hinders controllable surface sonoreactions. Here we present an optimization study of the cavitation bubble distribution at a solid sample using sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence imaging. The experiments were performed at three ultrasound frequencies, namely 580, 860 and 1142kHz. We found that position and orientation of the sample to the transducer, as well as its material properties influence the distribution of active cavitation bubbles at the sample surface in the reactor. The reason is a significant modification of the acoustic field due to reflections and absorption of the ultrasonic wave by the solid. This is retraced by numerical simulations employing the Finite Element Method, yielding reasonable agreement of luminescent zones and high acoustic pressure amplitudes in 2D simulations. A homogeneous coverage of the test sample surface with cavitation is finally reached at nearly vertical inclination with respect to the incident wave.

  18. Development of a confocal ultrasound device using an inertial cavitation control for transfection in-vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J. L.; Chettab, K.; Roux, S.; Prieur, F.; Lafond, M.; Dumontet, C.; Lafon, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sonoporation using low-frequency high-pressure ultrasound (US) is a non-viral approach for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. We developed a new sonoporation device designed for spatial and temporal control of ultrasound cavitation. This device was evaluated for the in vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid coding for Green Fluorescent Protein (peGFP- C1) in adherent and non-adherent cell lines. The frequency spectrum of the signal receive by a hydrophone is used to compute a cavitation index (CI) representative of the inertial cavitation activity. The influence of the CI on transfection efficiency, as well as reproducibility were determined. A real-time feedback loop control on CI was integrated in the process to regulate the cavitation level during sonoporation. In both adherent and non-adherent cell lines, the sonoporation device produced a highly efficient transfection of peGFP-C1 (40-80%), as determined by flow cytometry analysis of GFP expression, along with a low rate of mortality assessed by propidium iodide staining. Moreover, the sonoporation of non-adherent cell lines Jurkat and K562 was found to be equivalent to nucleofection in terms of efficiency and toxicity while these two cell lines were resistant to transfection with lipofection.

  19. Using passive cavitation images to classify high-intensity focused ultrasound lesions.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Corregan, Nicholas M; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Passive cavitation imaging provides spatially resolved monitoring of cavitation emissions. However, the diffraction limit of a linear imaging array results in relatively poor range resolution. Poor range resolution has limited prior analyses of the spatial specificity and sensitivity of passive cavitation imaging in predicting thermal lesion formation. In this study, this limitation is overcome by orienting a linear array orthogonal to the high-intensity focused ultrasound propagation direction and performing passive imaging. Fourteen lesions were formed in ex vivo bovine liver samples as a result of 1.1-MHz continuous-wave ultrasound exposure. The lesions were classified as focal, "tadpole" or pre-focal based on their shape and location. Passive cavitation images were beamformed from emissions at the fundamental, harmonic, ultraharmonic and inharmonic frequencies with an established algorithm. Using the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC), fundamental, harmonic and ultraharmonic emissions were found to be significant predictors of lesion formation for all lesion types. For both harmonic and ultraharmonic emissions, pre-focal lesions were classified most successfully (AUROC values of 0.87 and 0.88, respectively), followed by tadpole lesions (AUROC values of 0.77 and 0.64, respectively) and focal lesions (AUROC values of 0.65 and 0.60, respectively).

  20. Characterization of the shock pulse-induced cavitation bubble activities recorded by an optical fiber hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gwansuk; Cho, Sung Chan; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2014-03-01

    A shock pressure pulse used in an extracorporeal shock wave treatment has a large negative pressure (<-5 MPa) which can produce cavitation. Cavitation cannot be measured easily, but may have known therapeutic effects. This study considers the signal recorded for several hundred microseconds using an optical hydrophone submerged in water at the focus of shock pressure field. The signal is characterized by shock pulse followed by a long tail after several microseconds; this signal is regarded as a cavitation-related signal (CRS). An experimental investigation of the CRS was conducted in the shock pressure field produced in water using an optical hydrophone (FOPH2000, RP Acoustics, Germany). The CRS was found to contain characteristic information about the shock pulse-induced cavitation. The first and second collapse times (t1 and t2) were identified in the CRS. The collapse time delay (tc = t2 - t1) increased with the driving shock pressures. The signal amplitude integrated for time from t1 to t2 was highly correlated with tc (adjusted R(2) = 0.990). This finding suggests that a single optical hydrophone can be used to measure shock pulse and to characterize shock pulse-induced cavitation.

  1. Loss of gas from echogenic liposomes exposed to pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Jason L.; Luan, Ying; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-12-01

    The destruction of echogenic liposomes (ELIP) in response to pulsed ultrasound excitations has been studied acoustically previously. However, the mechanism underlying the loss of echogenicity due to cavitation nucleated by ELIP has not been fully clarified. In this study, an ultra-high speed imaging approach was employed to observe the destruction phenomena of single ELIP exposed to ultrasound bursts at a center frequency of 6 MHz. We observed a rapid size reduction during the ultrasound excitation in 139 out of 397 (35%) ultra- high-speed recordings. The shell dilation rate, which is defined as the microbubble wall velocity divided by the instantaneous radius, \\dot{{R}}  /R, was extracted from the radius versus time response of each ELIP, and was found to be correlated with the deflation. Fragmentation and surface mode vibrations were also observed and are shown to depend on the applied acoustic pressure and initial radius. Results from this study can be utilized to optimize the theranostic application of ELIP, e.g. by tuning the size distribution or the excitation frequency.

  2. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  3. Temperature and stress fields produced by ultrasound-induced cavitation in a viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancia, Lauren; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents can act as cavitation nuclei that mechanically damage surrounding tissue when they oscillate in diagnostic ultrasound. Encapsulated microbubbles have also been proposed as a means to improve the efficiency and efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound by increasing the rate of tissue heating. However, the thermal and mechanical effects of cavitation are difficult to distinguish from each other and to quantify experimentally as they often occur simultaneously. To address this challenge, we study the cavitation-induced temperature and stress fields produced by a spherical bubble oscillating in a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic medium with nonlinear elasticity using a model that also accounts for energy transport inside and outside the bubble. We find that the primary contribution to heating is viscous dissipation, which itself depends on both the material (viscosity) and the bubble dynamics. We examine the rate of viscous heating and the magnitude of stresses over a relevant range of tissue properties and waveform parameters to determine regimes where heating is expected to be dominant. A means of estimating the expected significance of viscous dissipation from given tissue properties and waveform parameters is proposed.

  4. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound.

  5. Efficient generation of cavitation bubbles and reactive oxygen species using triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound sequence for sonodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a method of treating cancer using reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by cavitation bubbles in collaboration with a sonosensitizer at a target tissue. In this treatment method, both localized ROS generation and ROS generation with high efficiency are important. In this study, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence, which consists of a short, extremely high intensity pulse immediately followed by a long, moderate-intensity burst, was employed for the efficient generation of ROS. In experiments, a solution sealed in a chamber was exposed to a triggered HIFU sequence. Then, the distribution of generated ROS was observed by the luminol reaction, and the amount of generated ROS was quantified using KI method. As a result, the localized ROS generation was demonstrated by light emission from the luminol reaction. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the triggered HIFU sequence has higher efficiency of ROS generation by both the KI method and the luminol reaction emission.

  6. Cavitation and contrast: the use of bubbles in ultrasound imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Stride, E P; Coussios, C C

    2010-01-01

    Microbubbles and cavitation are playing an increasingly significant role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have been in clinical use now for more than two decades, stimulating the development of a range of new contrast-specific imaging techniques which offer substantial benefits in echocardiography, microcirculatory imaging, and more recently, quantitative and molecular imaging. In drug delivery and gene therapy, microbubbles are being investigated/developed as vehicles which can be loaded with the required therapeutic agent, traced to the target site using diagnostic ultrasound, and then destroyed with ultrasound of higher intensity energy burst to release the material locally, thus avoiding side effects associated with systemic administration, e.g. of toxic chemotherapy. It has moreover been shown that the motion of the microbubbles increases the permeability of both individual cell membranes and the endothelium, thus enhancing therapeutic uptake, and can locally increase the activity of drugs by enhancing their transport across biologically inaccessible interfaces such as blood clots or solid tumours. In high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery and lithotripsy, controlled cavitation is being investigated as a means of increasing the speed and efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this paper is both to describe the key features of the physical behaviour of acoustically driven bubbles which underlie their effectiveness in biomedical applications and to review the current state of the art.

  7. Pulse Compression Techniques for Laser Generated Ultrasound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, R. F.; Madaras, E. I.

    1999-01-01

    Laser generated ultrasound for nondestructive evaluation has an optical power density limit due to rapid high heating that causes material damage. This damage threshold limits the generated ultrasound amplitude, which impacts nondestructive evaluation inspection capability. To increase ultrasound signal levels and improve the ultrasound signal-to-noise ratio without exceeding laser power limitations, it is possible to use pulse compression techniques. The approach illustrated here uses a 150mW laser-diode modulated with a pseudo-random sequence and signal correlation. Results demonstrate the successful generation of ultrasonic bulk waves in aluminum and graphite-epoxy composite materials using a modulated low-power laser diode and illustrate ultrasound bandwidth control.

  8. Cavitation thresholds of contrast agents in an in vitro human clot model exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Matthew J; Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) can be employed to nucleate cavitation to achieve desired bioeffects, such as thrombolysis, in therapeutic ultrasound applications. Effective methods of enhancing thrombolysis with ultrasound have been examined at low frequencies (<1 MHz) and low amplitudes (<0.5 MPa). The objective of this study was to determine cavitation thresholds for two UCAs exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. A commercial ultrasound contrast agent (Definity(®)) and echogenic liposomes were investigated to determine the acoustic pressure threshold for ultraharmonic (UH) and broadband (BB) generation using an in vitro flow model perfused with human plasma. Cavitation emissions were detected using two passive receivers over a narrow frequency bandwidth (540-900 kHz) and a broad frequency bandwidth (0.54-1.74 MHz). UH and BB cavitation thresholds occurred at the same acoustic pressure (0.3 ± 0.1 MPa, peak to peak) and were found to depend on the sensitivity of the cavitation detector but not on the nucleating contrast agent or ultrasound duty cycle.

  9. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Choi, James J; Deffieux, Thomas; Selert, Kirsten; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-10-21

    The in vivo cavitation response associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying mechanism in its noninvasive application. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold of inertial cavitation (IC) in the presence of Definity® microbubbles (mean diameter range: 1.1-3.3 µm, Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA). A vessel phantom was first used to determine the reliability of the PCD prior to in vivo use. A cerebral blood vessel was simulated by generating a cylindrical channel of 610 µm in diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel and by saturating its volume with microbubbles. The microbubbles were sonicated through an excised mouse skull. Second, the same PCD setup was employed for in vivo noninvasive (i.e. transdermal and transcranial) cavitation detection during BBB opening. After the intravenous administration of Definity® microbubbles, pulsed FUS was applied (frequency: 1.525 or 1.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 0.15-0.60 MPa, duty cycle: 20%, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 1 min with a 30 s interval) to the right hippocampus of twenty-six (n = 26) mice in vivo through intact scalp and skull. T1 and T2-weighted MR images were used to verify the BBB opening. A spectrogram was generated at each pressure in order to detect the IC onset and duration. The threshold of BBB opening was found to be at a 0.30 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in vivo. Both the phantom and in vivo studies indicated that the IC pressure threshold had a peak-rarefactional amplitude of 0.45 MPa. This indicated that BBB opening may not require IC at or near the threshold. Histological analysis showed that BBB opening could be induced without any cellular damage at 0.30 and 0.45 MPa. In conclusion, the cavitation response could be detected without craniotomy in mice

  10. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Choi, James J.; Deffieux, Thomas; Selert, Kirsten; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2010-10-01

    The in vivo cavitation response associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying mechanism in its noninvasive application. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold of inertial cavitation (IC) in the presence of Definity® microbubbles (mean diameter range: 1.1-3.3 µm, Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA). A vessel phantom was first used to determine the reliability of the PCD prior to in vivo use. A cerebral blood vessel was simulated by generating a cylindrical channel of 610 µm in diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel and by saturating its volume with microbubbles. The microbubbles were sonicated through an excised mouse skull. Second, the same PCD setup was employed for in vivo noninvasive (i.e. transdermal and transcranial) cavitation detection during BBB opening. After the intravenous administration of Definity® microbubbles, pulsed FUS was applied (frequency: 1.525 or 1.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 0.15-0.60 MPa, duty cycle: 20%, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 1 min with a 30 s interval) to the right hippocampus of twenty-six (n = 26) mice in vivo through intact scalp and skull. T1 and T2-weighted MR images were used to verify the BBB opening. A spectrogram was generated at each pressure in order to detect the IC onset and duration. The threshold of BBB opening was found to be at a 0.30 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in vivo. Both the phantom and in vivo studies indicated that the IC pressure threshold had a peak-rarefactional amplitude of 0.45 MPa. This indicated that BBB opening may not require IC at or near the threshold. Histological analysis showed that BBB opening could be induced without any cellular damage at 0.30 and 0.45 MPa. In conclusion, the cavitation response could be detected without craniotomy in mice

  11. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  12. Controlling the acoustic streaming by pulsed ultrasounds.

    PubMed

    Hoyos, Mauricio; Castro, Angélica

    2013-01-01

    We propose a technique based on pulsed ultrasounds for controlling, reducing to a minimum observable value the acoustic streaming in closed ultrasonic standing wave fluidic resonators. By modifying the number of pulses and the repetition time it is possible to reduce the velocity of the acoustic streaming with respect to the velocity generated by the continuous ultrasound mode of operation. The acoustic streaming is observed at the nodal plane where a suspension of 800nm latex particles was focused by primary radiation force. A mixture of 800nm and 15μm latex particles has been also used for showing that the acoustic streaming is hardly reduced while primary and secondary forces continue to operate. The parameter we call "pulse mode factor" i.e. the time of applied ultrasound divided by the duty cycle, is found to be the adequate parameter that controls the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulsed ultrasound is more efficient for controlling the acoustic streaming than the variation of the amplitude of the standing waves.

  13. Effects of cavitation-enhanced heating in high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment on shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Nagaoka, Ryo; Takagi, Ryo; Goto, Kota; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a less invasive method of cancer treatment, in which ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused at the tumor tissue to be thermally coagulated. To enhance the safety, accuracy, and efficiency of HIFU therapy, “multiple-triggered HIFU” has been proposed as a method of cavitation-enhanced heating to shorten treatment time. In this study, we also propose shear wave elastography (SWE) to noninvasively monitor the cavitation-enhanced heating. Results show that the increase in shear wave velocity was observed in the coagulation area, but it was significantly slower when cavitation occurred. This suggests that the cavitation-enhanced heating requires a significantly longer cooling time before the accurate measurement of shear modulus than heating without generating bubbles.

  14. Histotripsy in focused ultrasound surgery: Mechanical ablation of tissue using controlled acoustic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Jessica Erin

    This research has investigated non-invasive tissue ablation techniques in ultrasonic surgery that are mediated primarily by the mechanical effects of controlled acoustic cavitation, thereby de-emphasizing the role of thermal coagulation during treatment of diseased tissues. This approach is referred to as "histotripsy," in which soft tissues are broken apart by mechanical agitation, in analogy to established lithotripsy procedures whereby renal stones are similarly comminuted. During histotripsy, cavitation microbubbles are formed endogenously in the treatment volume due to the intense rarefactional pressures (> 20 MPa) incurred. The actions of these microbubbles can impart severe yet highly localized mechanical damage to surrounding cellular architecture. The primary goal of this research was to investigate acoustic methods to control these powerful cavitation effects in order to produce therapeutic soft tissue lesions with minimal thermal invasiveness to surrounding collateral structures. Toward this end, an acoustic pulsing scheme was developed to actively sustain cavitation activity through the use of short-duration (e.g., 15 mus), high-intensity (e.g., 40 kW/cm2 ISPPA) pulses delivered at low repetition frequencies (e.g., 0.17 kHz). This approach maintained the microbubble population during treatment without producing significant temperature elevations (e.g., DeltaT = 5°C). Cavitation-mediated damage morphology in porcine myocardium and renal parenchyma consisted of well-circumscribed, 0.5-1 cm3 voids containing homogenized tissue slurry. Standard histological staining revealed extremely fine pulverization that often bisected single cells. This type of damage morphology offers particular advantages over thermal ablation in applications where diseased or impeding tissue must be physically removed, not merely treated and left in situ. In general, the ability to sustain effective cavitation during histotripsy was strongly influenced by acoustic pulse conditions

  15. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation.

  16. Cavitating ultrasound hydrogenation of water-soluble olefins employing inert dopants: Studies of activity, selectivity and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Chajkowski, Sarah M.; Boyles, Kelly R.; Hart, Todd R.; Peden, Charles HF

    2006-12-07

    Here we discuss results obtained as part of a three-year investigation at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory of ultrasound processing to effect selectivity and activity in the hydrogenation of water-soluble olefins on transition metal catalysts. We have shown previously that of the two regimes for ultrasound processing, high-power cavitating and high-power non-cavitating, only the former can effect product selectivity dramatically (> 1000%) whereas the selectivity of the latter was comparable with those obtained in stirred/silent control experiments [R.S. Disselkamp, Y.-H. Chin, C.H.F. Peden, J. Catal., 227, 552 (2005)]. As a means of ensuring the benefits of cavitating ultrasound processing, we introduced the concept of employing inert dopants into the reacting solution. These inert dopants do not partake in solution chemistry but enable a more facile transition from high-power non-cavitating to cavitating conditions during sonication treatment. With cavitation processing conditions ensured, we discuss here results of isotopic H/D substitution for a variety of substrates and illustrate how such isotope dependent chemistries during substrate hydrogenation elucidate detailed mechanistic information about these reaction systems.

  17. Bifurcation of ensemble oscillations and acoustic emissions from early stage cavitation clouds in focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Rachmilevitch, Itay; Prentice, Paul

    2013-03-01

    The acoustic emissions from single cavitation clouds at an early stage of development in 0.521 MHz focused ultrasound of varying intensity, are detected and directly correlated to high-speed microscopic observations, recorded at 1 × 106 frames per second. At lower intensities, a stable regime of cloud response is identified whereby bubble-ensembles exhibit oscillations at half the driving frequency, which is also detected in the acoustic emission spectra. Higher intensities generate clouds that develop more rapidly, with increased nonlinearity evidenced by a bifurcation in the frequency of ensemble response, and in the acoustic emissions. A single bubble oscillation model is subject to equivalent ultrasound conditions and fitted to features in the hydrophone and high-speed spectral data, allowing an effective quiescent radius to be inferred for the clouds that evolve at each intensity. The approach indicates that the acoustic emissions originate from the ensemble dynamics and that the cloud acts as a single bubble of equivalent radius in terms of the scattered field. Jetting from component cavities on the periphery of clouds is regularly observed at higher intensities. The results may be of relevance for monitoring and controlling cavitation in therapeutic applications of focused ultrasound, where the phenomenon has the potential to mediate drug delivery from vasculature.

  18. In Vitro Investigation of the Individual Contributions of Ultrasound-Induced Stable and Inertial Cavitation in Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gourevich, Dana; Volovick, Alexander; Dogadkin, Osnat; Wang, Lijun; Mulvana, Helen; Medan, Yoav; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery is a therapeutic modality under development with the potential to treat cancer. Its ability to produce local hyperthermia and cell poration through cavitation non-invasively makes it a candidate to trigger drug delivery. Hyperthermia offers greater potential for control, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging temperature measurement. However, cavitation may offer reduced treatment times, with real-time measurement of ultrasonic spectra indicating drug dose and treatment success. Here, a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery system was used to study ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery in vitro. Drug uptake into breast cancer cells in the vicinity of ultrasound contrast agent was correlated with occurrence and quantity of stable and inertial cavitation, classified according to subharmonic spectra. During stable cavitation, intracellular drug uptake increased by a factor up to 3.2 compared with the control. Reported here are the value of cavitation monitoring with a clinical system and its subsequent employment for dose optimization.

  19. Intramembrane cavitation as a unifying mechanism for ultrasound-induced bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Krasovitski, Boris; Frenkel, Victor; Shoham, Shy; Kimmel, Eitan

    2011-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to develop a unified model capable of explaining the mechanisms of interaction of ultrasound and biological tissue at both the diagnostic nonthermal, noncavitational (<100 mW · cm(-2)) and therapeutic, potentially cavitational (>100 mW · cm(-2)) spatial peak temporal average intensity levels. The cellular-level model (termed "bilayer sonophore") combines the physics of bubble dynamics with cell biomechanics to determine the dynamic behavior of the two lipid bilayer membrane leaflets. The existence of such a unified model could potentially pave the way to a number of controlled ultrasound-assisted applications, including CNS modulation and blood-brain barrier permeabilization. The model predicts that the cellular membrane is intrinsically capable of absorbing mechanical energy from the ultrasound field and transforming it into expansions and contractions of the intramembrane space. It further predicts that the maximum area strain is proportional to the acoustic pressure amplitude and inversely proportional to the square root of the frequency (ε A,max ∝ P(A)(0.8f - 0.5) and is intensified by proximity to free surfaces, the presence of nearby microbubbles in free medium, and the flexibility of the surrounding tissue. Model predictions were experimentally supported using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of multilayered live-cell goldfish epidermis exposed in vivo to continuous wave (CW) ultrasound at cavitational (1 MHz) and noncavitational (3 MHz) conditions. Our results support the hypothesis that ultrasonically induced bilayer membrane motion, which does not require preexistence of air voids in the tissue, may account for a variety of bioeffects and could elucidate mechanisms of ultrasound interaction with biological tissue that are currently not fully understood.

  20. Precise spatial control of cavitation erosion in a vessel phantom by using an ultrasonic standing wave.

    PubMed

    Shi, Aiwei; Huang, Peixuan; Guo, Shifang; Zhao, Lu; Jia, Yingjie; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    In atherosclerotic inducement in animal models, the conventionally used balloon injury is invasive, produces excessive vessel injuries at unpredictable locations and is inconvenient in arterioles. Fortunately, cavitation erosion, which plays an important role in therapeutic ultrasound in blood vessels, has the potential to induce atherosclerosis noninvasively at predictable sites. In this study, precise spatial control of cavitation erosion for superficial lesions in a vessel phantom was realised by using an ultrasonic standing wave (USW) with the participation of cavitation nuclei and medium-intensity ultrasound pulses. The superficial vessel erosions were restricted between adjacent pressure nodes, which were 0.87 mm apart in the USW field of 1 MHz. The erosion positions could be shifted along the vessel by nodal modulation under a submillimetre-scale accuracy without moving the ultrasound transducers. Moreover, the cavitation erosion of the proximal or distal wall could be determined by the types of cavitation nuclei and their corresponding cavitation pulses, i.e., phase-change microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 5 MHz and SonoVue microbubbles with cavitation pulses of 1 MHz. Effects of acoustic parameters of the cavitation pulses on the cavitation erosions were investigated. The flow conditions in the experiments were considered and discussed. Compared to only using travelling waves, the proposed method in this paper improves the controllability of the cavitation erosion and reduces the erosion depth, providing a more suitable approach for vessel endothelial injury while avoiding haemorrhage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effective cancer cell killing by hydrophobic nanovoid-enhanced cavitation under safe low-energy ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Zhu, Yingchun; Fu, Jingke; Wang, Lianzhou

    2014-03-01

    β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD)-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles with hydrophobic internal nanovoids were prepared and used for effective cancer cell killing in synergistic combination with low-energy ultrasound (≤1.0 W cm(-2) , 1 MHz). The water-dispersible nanoparticles with hydrophobic internal nanovoids can be taken up by cancer cells and subsequently evoke a remarkable cavitation effect under irradiation with mild low-energy ultrasound (≤1.0 W cm(-2) , 1 MHz). A significant cancer cell killing effect was observed in cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft tumor model treated with the nanoagents together with the low-energy ultrasound, showing a distinct dependence on the concentration of nanoagents and ultrasound intensity. By contrast, an antitumor effect was not observed when either low-energy ultrasound or nanoagents were applied alone. These findings are significant as the technique promises a safe, low-cost, and effective treatment for cancer therapy.

  2. Cavitation-based third ventriculostomy using MRI-guided focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Alkins, Ryan; Huang, Yuexi; Pajek, Dan; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    Object Transcranial focused ultrasound is increasingly being investigated as a minimally invasive treatment for a range of intracranial pathologies. At higher peak rarefaction pressures than those used for thermal ablation, focused ultrasound can initiate inertial cavitation and create holes in the brain by fractionation of the tissue elements. The authors investigated the technical feasibility of using MRI-guided focused ultrasound to perform a third ventriculostomy as a possible noninvasive alternative to endoscopic third ventriculostomy for hydrocephalus. Methods A craniectomy was performed in male pigs weighing 13–19 kg to expose the supratentorial brain, leaving the dura mater intact. Seven pigs were treated through the craniectomy, while 2 pigs were treated through ex vivo human skulls placed in the beam path. Registration and targeting was done using T2-weighted MRI sequences. For transcranial treatments a CT scan was used to correct the beam from aberrations due to the skull and maintain a small, high-intensity focus. Sonications were performed at both 650 kHz and 230 kHz at a range of intensities, and the in situ pressures were estimated both from simulations and experimental data to establish a threshold for tissue fractionation in the brain. Results In craniectomized animals at 650 kHz, a peak pressure ≥ 22.7 MPa for 1 second was needed to reliably create a ventriculostomy. Transcranially at this frequency the ExAblate 4000 was unable to generate the required intensity to fractionate tissue, although cavitation was initiated. At 230 kHz, ventriculostomy was successful through the skull with a peak pressure of 8.8 MPa. Conclusions This is the first study to suggest that it is possible to perform a completely noninvasive third ventriculostomy using ultrasound. This may pave the way for future studies and eventually provide an alternative means for the creation of CSF communications in the brain, including perforation of the septum pellucidum or

  3. Shock wave and cavitation bubble measurements of ultrashort-pulse laser-induced breakdown in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Daniel X.; Thomas, Robert J.; Frenz, Martin; Jansen, E. Duco; Noojin, Gary D.; Diggs, Sarah J.; Noack, Joachim; Vogel, Alfred; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    1996-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) has long been used in ophthalmic microsurgery as a mechanism for disruption of tissue. The goal of this surgery has been precise tissue cutting by plasma formation and a minimization of collateral damage due to shock wave and cavitation bubble formation. We investigate the strength of the shock wave emission, the size of the cavitation bubble, and the amount of plasma shielding to determine the efficacy of using femtosecond pulses in surgery to reduce collateral photoacoustic damage. A pump-probe technique is used to image the time-resolved evolution of the cavitation bubble produced by focused laser pulses with pulsewidths of 130 fs, 300 fs, 3 ps, and 60 ps. Simultaneously, a hydrophone is used to measure the pressure response generated by the initial plasma shock wave and subsequent shock waves generated by the collapse and rebound of the cavitation bubbles. In addition, transmission measurements are made which indicate the amount of energy shielded beyond the focus by the plasma. These measurements give a good indication of the degree to which collateral damage may be reduced as the pulsewidths is decreased from the picosecond to the femtosecond time regime.

  4. Ultrasound-Mediated Vascular Gene Transfection by Cavitation of Endothelial-Targeted Cationic Microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Aris; Belcik, Todd; Qi, Yue; Morgan, Terry K.; Champaneri, Shivam A.; Taylor, Sarah; Davidson, Brian P.; Zhao, Yan; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Kuliszewski, Michael A.; Leong-Poi, Howard; Ammi, Azzdine; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Ultrasound-mediated gene delivery can be amplified by acoustic disruption of microbubble carriers that undergo cavitation. We hypothesized that endothelial targeting of microbubbles bearing cDNA is feasible and, through optimizing proximity to the vessel wall, increases the efficacy of gene transfection. BACKGROUND Contrast ultrasound-mediated gene delivery is a promising approach for site-specific gene therapy, although there are concerns with the reproducibility of this technique and the safety when using high-power ultrasound. METHODS Cationic lipid-shelled decafluorobutane microbubbles bearing a targeting moiety were prepared and compared with nontargeted microbubbles. Microbubble targeting efficiency to endothelial adhesion molecules (P-selectin or intercellular adhesion molecule [ICAM]-1) was tested using in vitro flow chamber studies, intravital microscopy of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)–stimulated murine cremaster muscle, and targeted contrast ultrasound imaging of P-selectin in a model of murine limb ischemia. Ultrasound-mediated transfection of luciferase reporter plasmid charge coupled to microbubbles in the post-ischemic hindlimb muscle was assessed by in vivo optical imaging. RESULTS Charge coupling of cDNA to the microbubble surface was not influenced by the presence of targeting ligand, and did not alter the cavitation properties of cationic microbubbles. In flow chamber studies, surface conjugation of cDNA did not affect attachment of targeted microbubbles at microvascular shear stresses (0.6 and 1.5 dyne/cm2). Attachment in vivo was also not affected by cDNA according to intravital microscopy observations of venular adhesion of ICAM-1–targeted microbubbles and by ultrasound molecular imaging of P-selectin–targeted microbubbles in the post-ischemic hindlimb in mice. Transfection at the site of high acoustic pressures (1.0 and 1.8 MPa) was similar for control and P-selectin–targeted microbubbles but was associated with

  5. Spatial-temporal three-dimensional ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping for high-intensity focused ultrasound in free field and pulsatile flow.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ting; Hu, Hong; Bai, Chen; Guo, Shifang; Yang, Miao; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation plays important roles in almost all high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications. However, current two-dimensional (2D) cavitation mapping could only provide cavitation activity in one plane. This study proposed a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound plane-by-plane active cavitation mapping (3D-UPACM) for HIFU in free field and pulsatile flow. The acquisition of channel-domain raw radio-frequency (RF) data in 3D space was performed by sequential plane-by-plane 2D ultrafast active cavitation mapping. Between two adjacent unit locations, there was a waiting time to make cavitation nuclei distribution of the liquid back to the original state. The 3D cavitation map equivalent to the one detected at one time and over the entire volume could be reconstructed by Marching Cube algorithm. Minimum variance (MV) adaptive beamforming was combined with coherence factor (CF) weighting (MVCF) or compressive sensing (CS) method (MVCS) to process the raw RF data for improved beamforming or more rapid data processing. The feasibility of 3D-UPACM was demonstrated in tap-water and a phantom vessel with pulsatile flow. The time interval between temporal evolutions of cavitation bubble cloud could be several microseconds. MVCF beamformer had a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at 14.17dB higher, lateral and axial resolution at 2.88times and 1.88times, respectively, which were compared with those of B-mode active cavitation mapping. MVCS beamformer had only 14.94% time penalty of that of MVCF beamformer. This 3D-UPACM technique employs the linear array of a current ultrasound diagnosis system rather than a 2D array transducer to decrease the cost of the instrument. Moreover, although the application is limited by the requirement for a gassy fluid medium or a constant supply of new cavitation nuclei that allows replenishment of nuclei between HIFU exposures, this technique may exhibit a useful tool in 3D cavitation mapping for HIFU with high speed, precision and resolution

  6. Effect of pulse repetition frequency of high-intensity focused ultrasound on in vitro thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenjing; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Vascular occlusion by the thrombi is the main reason for ischemic stroke and deep vein thrombosis. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and histotripsy or microtripsy pulses can effectively dissolve the blood clot with no use of thrombolytic agent and ultrasound contrast agent (microbubbles). In this study, HIFU bursts at the same duty cycle (2%) but varied pulse repetition frequency (PRF) from 1Hz to 1000Hz were delivered to in vitro porcine blood clot for 30s. Thrombolysis efficiency initially increases slightly with the PRF, 86.4±10.3%, 89.9±11.9, and 92.9±12.8% at the PRF of 1Hz, 10Hz, and 100Hz, respectively, without significant difference (p>0.05), but then drops dramatically to 37.9±6.9% at the PRF of 1000Hz (p<0.05). The particle size in the supernatant of dissolution is 547.1±129.5nm, which suggests the disruption of thrombi into the subcellular level. Thrombi motion during HIFU exposure shows violent motion and significant curling at the low PRF, rotation about its axis with occasional curling at the moderate PRF, and localized vibration at the high PRF due to the generation of acoustic radiation force and streaming. Quantitative analysis of recorded motion shows the axial displacement decreases with the PRF of delivered HIFU bursts, from 3.9±1.5mm at 1Hz to 0.7±0.4mm at 1000Hz. Bubble cavitation during HIFU exposure to the blood clot was also monitored. The increase of PRF led to the increase of inertial cavitation but the decrease of stable cavitation. In summary, the PRF of delivered HIFU bursts at the same output energy has a significant effect on the thrombi motion, bubble cavitation activities, and subsequently thrombolysis efficiencies.

  7. Cavitation effect of holmium laser pulse applied to ablation of hard tissue underwater.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Xia, Danqing; Ruan, Kai; Li, Zhengjia

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the inconsecutive drawback of shadow and schlieren photography, the complete dynamics of cavitation bubble oscillation or ablation products induced by a single holmium laser pulse [2.12 microm, 300 micros (FWHM)] transmitted in different core diameter (200, 400, and 600 microm) fibers is recorded by means of high-speed photography. Consecutive images from high-speed cameras can stand for the true and complete process of laser-water or laser-tissue interaction. Both laser pulse energy and fiber diameter determine cavitation bubble size, which further determines acoustic transient amplitudes. Based on the pictures taken by high-speed camera and scanned by an optical coherent microscopy (OCM) system, it is easily seen that the liquid layer at the distal end of the fiber plays an important role during the process of laser-tissue interaction, which can increase ablation efficiency, decrease heat side effects, and reduce cost.

  8. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E. A.; Ikeda, T.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, γ, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at γ = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at γ = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at γ = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at γ = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s-1, at γ = 1, to 36 m s-1, at γ = 1.55. For γ < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  9. Multifunctional pulse generator for high-intensity focused ultrasound system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamano, Satoshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can achieve high spatial resolution for the treatment of diseases. A major technical challenge in implementing a HIFU therapeutic system is to generate high-voltage high-current signals for effectively exciting a multichannel HIFU transducer at high efficiencies. In this paper, we present the development of a multifunctional multichannel generator/driver. The generator can produce a long burst as well as an extremely high-voltage short pulse of pseudosinusoidal waves (trigger HIFU) and second-harmonic superimposed waves for HIFU transmission. The transmission timing, waveform, and frequency can be controlled using a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) via a universal serial bus (USB) microcontroller. The hardware is implemented in a compact printed circuit board. The test results of trigger HIFU reveal that the power consumption and the temperature rise of metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors were reduced by 19.9% and 38.2 °C, respectively, from the previous design. The highly flexible performance of the novel generator/driver is demonstrated in the generation of second-harmonic superimposed waves, which is useful for cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment, although the previous design exhibited difficulty in generating it.

  10. Characterization of the dynamic activities of a population of microbubbles driven by pulsed ultrasound exposures in sonoporation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Z.; Chen, D.; Deng, C.X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound driven microbubble activities have been exploited to transiently disrupt the cell membrane (sonoporation) for non-viral intracellular drug delivery and gene transfection both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the dynamic behaviors of a population of microbubbles subjected to pulsed ultrasound exposures and their impact on adherent cells in terms of intracellular delivery and cell viability. By systematically analyzing the bubble activities at time scales relevant to pulsed ultrasound exposures, we identified two quantification parameters that categorized the diverse bubble activities subjected to various ultrasound conditions into three characteristic behaviors, i.e., stable cavitation/aggregation (Type I), growth/coalescence and translation (Type II), and localized inertial cavitation/collapse (Type III). Correlation of the bubble activities with sonoporation outcome suggested that Type III behavior resulted in intracellular delivery, while Type II behavior caused death of a large number of cells. These results provide useful insights for rational selection of ultrasound parameters to optimize outcomes of sonoporation and other applications that exploit the use of ultrasound-driven bubble activities. PMID:24486236

  11. Safety of Pulsed High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Enhanced Drug and Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kam, Anthony W.; Wang, Honghui; Farahani, Keyvan; Thomasson, David; O'Neill, Brian; Angstadt, Mary; Jesson, Johnny; Li, King C. P.

    2007-05-01

    For a limited range of exposure parameters, pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been shown to increase the delivery of certain systemically administered macromolecular diagnostic and therapeutic agents in mice. The mechanism for the enhanced delivery has not been demonstrated definitively and, in principle, can include thermal, cavitational, and non-cavitation mechanical effects. The sonicated tissue has no damage on histology. As a step towards clinical translation, the safety of this technique needs to be assessed in a clinically relevant manner. In this study, the safety of pulsed HIFU is evaluated with near real-time phase shift magnetic resonance (MR) thermometry and anatomic MR imaging using rabbits as subjects. MR guidance enables pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery to be implemented safely from a thermal standpoint. Although the effects of pulsed HIFU are not seen on anatomic MR images, they may be detected on MR sequences sensitive to permeability, diffusion, and elasticity. Such work that may optimize pulsed HIFU enhanced delivery is in progress.

  12. Advantage of annular focus generation by sector-vortex array in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimbo, Hayato; Takagi, Ryo; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive method for cancer treatment. One of the disadvantages of this method is that it has a long total treatment time because of the smallness of the treatment volume by a single exposure. To solve this problem, we have proposed a method of cavitation-enhanced heating, which utilized the heat generated by oscillating the cavitation bubbles, in combination with the method of lateral enlargement of a HIFU focal zone to minimize the surface volume ratio. In a previous study, focal spot scanning at multiple points was employed for the enlargement. This method involves nonlinear propagation and absorption due to the high spatial-peak temporal-peak (SPTP) intensity in addition to the cavitation-enhanced heating. However, it is difficult to predict the size and position of the coagulation volume because they are significantly affected by the nonlinear parameters of the tissue. In this study, a sector vortex method was employed to directly synthesize an annular focal pattern. Since this method can keep the SPTP intensity at a manageably low level, nonlinear propagation and absorption can be minimized. Experimental results demonstrate that the coagulation was generated only in the region where both the cavitation cloud and the heating ultrasound were matched. The proposed method will make the cavitation-enhanced HIFU treatment more accurate and predictable.

  13. An Investigation of Acoustic Cavitation Produced by Pulsed Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    minor contribution of the vapor pressure has been neglected). Assuming that the liquid undergoes an incremental change in hydrostatic pressure to a new...shear viscosity of the liquid, and Pv is its vapor pressure . Differentiating (2.18) and substituting (2.19) for PL and P. = Po + P(t). we find that 3...viscosity is ignored; 6. The liquid is incompressible; 7. Gas content of the bubble is constant- no diffusion occurs; 8. Vapor pressure . Pv, is constant

  14. Use of Dual-Pulse Lithotripter to Generate a Localized Intensified Cavitation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Dihlia L.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2001-09-01

    Localizing cavitation to the kidney stone in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy may be desirable since cavitation appears to play a major role in both stone comminution and renal tissue damage. A method has been developed to localize and intensify cavitation damage in vitro. Cavitation fields in water were filmed with a high-speed digital video camera. In a conventional lithotripter (CL), the shock wave produced by a single source creates a 2 x 10 cm cylindrical cloud of bubbles in water. Bubbles in the CL field collapse simultaneously along the focal axis to produce a nearly uniform 1-mm x 8-cm line of pits in 25- mm-thick aluminum foil. Our dual-pulse lithotripter (DPL) uses two shock wave sources, facing each other, confocal, and triggered simultaneously to create a 4 x 5 cm cylindrical cloud of bubbles that collapse over a range of times and strengths such that the greatest pit damage on foils is contained within a few square millimeters of the focus. The time for bubbles to grow and collapse was measured with a focused hydrophone and compared with calculations based on the Gilmore equation. Pressure doubling due to synchronous arrival of the two pulses at the focus created increased bubble growth and increased foil pit depth. Asynchronous timing between the two pulses elsewhere in the DPL field resulted in disruption of radial dynamics and negligible pitting to foils. Translation of bubbles was also investigated, both numerically and experimentally. While net translation was calculated to be ,0.3 mm in all cases, the rapid

  15. Inverse effects of flowing phase-shift nanodroplets and lipid-shelled microbubbles on subsequent cavitation during focused ultrasound exposures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Cui, Zhiwei; Xu, Tianqi; Liu, Pan; Li, Dapeng; Shang, Shaoqiang; Xu, Ranxiang; Zong, Yujin; Niu, Gang; Wang, Supin; He, Xijing; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-01-01

    This paper compared the effects of flowing phase-shift nanodroplets (NDs) and lipid-shelled microbubbles (MBs) on subsequent cavitation during focused ultrasound (FUS) exposures. The cavitation activity was monitored using a passive cavitation detection method as solutions of either phase-shift NDs or lipid-shelled MBs flowed at varying velocities through a 5-mm diameter wall-less vessel in a transparent tissue-mimicking phantom when exposed to FUS. The intensity of cavitation for the phase-shift NDs showed an upward trend with time and cavitation for the lipid-shelled MBs grew to a maximum at the outset of the FUS exposure followed by a trend of decreases when they were static in the vessel. Meanwhile, the increase of cavitation for the phase-shift NDs and decrease of cavitation for the lipid-shelled MBs had slowed down when they flowed through the vessel. During two discrete identical FUS exposures, while the normalized inertial cavitation dose (ICD) value for the lipid-shelled MB solution was higher than that for the saline in the first exposure (p-value <0.05), it decreased to almost the same level in the second exposure. For the phase-shift NDs, the normalized ICD was 0.71 in the first exposure and increased to 0.97 in the second exposure. At a low acoustic power, the normalized ICD values for the lipid-shelled MBs tended to increase with increasing velocities from 5 to 30cm/s (r>0.95). Meanwhile, the normalized ICD value for the phase-shift NDs was 0.182 at a flow velocity of 5cm/s and increased to 0.188 at a flow velocity of 15cm/s. As the flow velocity increased to 20cm/s, the normalized ICD was 0.185 and decreased to 0.178 at a flow velocity of 30cm/s. At high acoustic power, the normalized ICD values for both the lipid-shelled MBs and the phase-shift NDs increased with increasing flow velocities from 5 to 30cm/s (r>0.95). The effects of the flowing phase-shift NDs vaporized into gas bubbles as cavitation nuclei on the subsequent cavitation were inverse to

  16. Jet atomization and cavitation induced by interactions between focused ultrasound and a water surfacea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Atomization of a jet produced by the interaction of 1 MHz focused ultrasound with a water surface was investigated using high-speed photography. Viewing various aspects of jet behavior, threshold conditions were obtained necessary for water surface elevation and jet breakup, including drop separation and spray formation. In addition, the position of drop atomization, where a single drop separates from the tip of a jet without spraying, showed good correlation with the jet Weber number. For a set of specified conditions, multiple beaded water masses were formed, moving upwards to produce a vigorous jet. Cavitation phenomena occurred near the center of the primary drop-shaped water mass produced at the leading part of the jet; this was accompanied by fine droplets at the neck between the primary and secondary drop-shaped water masses, due to the collapse of capillary waves.

  17. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, Δt, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P−/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as Δt increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer Δts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for Δt ≥ 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  18. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers.

  19. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  20. Mechanical bioeffects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound on a simple neural model.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Radia Abdul; Choi, Mina; Liu, Yunbo; Krauthamer, Victor; Zderic, Vesna; Myers, Matthew R

    2012-07-01

    To study how pressure pulses affect nerves through mechanisms that are neither thermal nor cavitational, and investigate how the effects are related to cumulative radiation-force impulse (CRFI). Applications include traumatic brain injury and acoustic neuromodulation. A simple neural model consisting of the giant axon of a live earthworm was exposed to trains of pressure pulses produced by an 825 kHz focused ultrasound transducer. The peak negative pressure of the pulses and duty cycle of the pulse train were controlled so that neither cavitation nor significant temperature rise occurred. The amplitude and conduction velocity of action-potentials triggered in the worm were measured as the magnitude of the pulses and number of pulses in the pulse trains were varied. The functionality of the axons decreased when sufficient pulse energy was applied. The level of CRFI at which the observed effects occur is consistent with the lower levels of injury observed in this study relative to blast tubes. The relevant CRFI values are also comparable to CRFI values in other studies showing measureable changes in action-potential amplitudes and velocities. Plotting the measured action-potential amplitudes and conduction velocities from different experiments with widely varying exposure regimens against the single parameter of CRFI yielded values that agreed within 21% in terms of amplitude and 5% in velocity. A predictive model based on the assumption that the temporal rate of decay of action-potential amplitude and velocity is linearly proportional the radiation force experienced by the axon predicted the experimental amplitudes and conduction velocities to within about 20% agreement. The functionality of axons decreased due to noncavitational mechanical effects. The radiation force, possibly by inducing changes in ion-channel permeability, appears to be a possible mechanism for explaining the observed degradation. The CRFI is also a promising parameter for quantifying neural

  1. Mechanical bioeffects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound on a simple neural model.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Radia Abdul; Choi, Mina; Liu, Yunbo; Krauthamer, Victor; Zderic, Vesna; Myers, Matthew R

    2012-07-01

    To study how pressure pulses affect nerves through mechanisms that are neither thermal nor cavitational, and investigate how the effects are related to cumulative radiation-force impulse (CRFI). Applications include traumatic brain injury and acoustic neuromodulation. A simple neural model consisting of the giant axon of a live earthworm was exposed to trains of pressure pulses produced by an 825 kHz focused ultrasound transducer. The peak negative pressure of the pulses and duty cycle of the pulse train were controlled so that neither cavitation nor significant temperature rise occurred. The amplitude and conduction velocity of action-potentials triggered in the worm were measured as the magnitude of the pulses and number of pulses in the pulse trains were varied. The functionality of the axons decreased when sufficient pulse energy was applied. The level of CRFI at which the observed effects occur is consistent with the lower levels of injury observed in this study relative to blast tubes. The relevant CRFI values are also comparable to CRFI values in other studies showing measureable changes in action-potential amplitudes and velocities. Plotting the measured action-potential amplitudes and conduction velocities from different experiments with widely varying exposure regimens against the single parameter of CRFI yielded values that agreed within 21% in terms of amplitude and 5% in velocity. A predictive model based on the assumption that the temporal rate of decay of action-potential amplitude and velocity is linearly proportional the radiation force experienced by the axon predicted the experimental amplitudes and conduction velocities to within about 20% agreement. The functionality of axons decreased due to noncavitational mechanical effects. The radiation force, possibly by inducing changes in ion-channel permeability, appears to be a possible mechanism for explaining the observed degradation. The CRFI is also a promising parameter for quantifying neural

  2. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 μm in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (∼200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (∼20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 μm), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is much larger than that by a 3 μm bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 μm bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 μm bubbles.

  3. Formulation development and optimization of a novel Cremophore EL-based nanoemulsion using ultrasound cavitation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Siah Ying; Manickam, Sivakumar; Wei, Tan Khang; Nashiru, Billa

    2012-03-01

    In the present study, response surface methodology (RSM) based on central composite design (CCD) was employed to investigate the influence of main emulsion composition variables, namely drug loading, oil content, emulsifier content as well as the effect of the ultrasonic operating parameters such as pre-mixing time, ultrasonic amplitude, and irradiation time on the properties of aspirin-loaded nanoemulsions. The two main emulsion properties studied as response variables were: mean droplet size and polydispersity index. The ultimate goal of the present work was to determine the optimum level of the six independent variables in which an optimal aspirin nanoemulsion with desirable properties could be produced. The response surface analysis results clearly showed that the variability of two responses could be depicted as a linear function of the content of main emulsion compositions and ultrasonic processing variables. In the present investigation, it is evidently shown that ultrasound cavitation is a powerful yet promising approach in the controlled production of aspirin nanoemulsions with smaller average droplet size in a range of 200-300 nm and with a polydispersity index (PDI) of about 0.30. This study proved that the use of low frequency ultrasound is of considerable importance in the controlled production of pharmaceutical nanoemulsions in the drug delivery system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Noninvasive Ureterocele Puncture Using Pulsed Focused Ultrasound: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsi, Ryan S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Casale, Pasquale; Lendvay, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of performing noninvasive puncture of pediatric ureteroceles with cavitation-based focused ultrasound (US) (histotripsy). Materials and Methods: A model for the ureterocele wall was developed from an excised bovine bladder wall. The model was exposed to focused US pulses in a water bath under three different US parameter sets for up to 300 seconds to create localized perforations in the wall. B-mode US imaging was used to monitor the treatment and assess potential imaging guidance and feedback. Results: Punctures were formed between 46–300 seconds, depending on the focused US exposure parameters and model wall thickness. Puncture diameter was controllable through choice of exposure parameters and could be varied between 0.8–2.8 mm mean diameter. US-induced cavitation was visible on B-mode imaging, which provided targeting and treatment feedback. Conclusions: Cavitation-based focused US can create punctures in a model that mimics the tissue properties of a ureterocele wall, under guidance from US imaging. PMID:24171441

  5. Nano Air Seeds Trapped in Mesoporous Janus Nanoparticles Facilitate Cavitation and Enhance Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tamarov, Konstantin; Sviridov, Andrey; Xu, Wujun; Malo, Markus; Andreev, Valery; Timoshenko, Victor; Lehto, Vesa-Pekka

    2017-09-28

    The current contrast agents utilized in ultrasound (US) imaging are based on microbubbles which suffer from a short lifetime in systemic circulation. The present study introduces a new type of contrast agent for US imaging based on bioresorbable Janus nanoparticles (NPs) that are able to generate microbubbles in situ under US radiation for extended time. The Janus NPs are based on porous silicon (PSi) that was modified via a nanostopper technique. The technique was exploited to prepare PSi NPs which had hydrophobic pore walls (inner face), while the external surfaces of the NPs (outer face) were hydrophilic. As a consequence, when dispersed in an aqueous solution, the Janus NPs contained a substantial amount of air trapped in their nanopores. The specific experimental setup was developed to prove that these nano air seeds were indeed acting as nuclei for microbubble growth during US radiation. Using the setup, the cavitation thresholds of the Janus NPs were compared to their completely hydrophilic counterparts by detecting the subharmonic signals from the microbubbles. These experiments and the numerical simulations of the bubble dynamics demonstrated that the Janus NPs generated microbubbles with a radii of 1.1 μm. Furthermore, the microbubbles generated by the NPs were detected with a conventional medical ultrasound imaging device. Long systemic circulation time was ensured by grafting the NPs with two different PEG polymers, which did not affect adversely the microbubble generation. The present findings represent an important landmark in the development of ultrasound contrast agents which possess the properties for both diagnostics and therapy.

  6. Cavitation and spallation in liquid metal droplets produced by subpicosecond pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivokorytov, M. S.; Vinokhodov, A. Yu.; Sidelnikov, Yu. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Kompanets, V. O.; Lash, A. A.; Koshelev, K. N.; Medvedev, V. V.

    2017-03-01

    The deformation and fragmentation of liquid metal microdroplets by intense subpicosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses is experimentally studied with stroboscopic shadow photography. The experiments are performed at a peak intensity of 1014W /c m2 at the target's surface, which produces shock waves with pressures in the Mbar range. As a result of such a strong impact, the droplet is transformed into a complex-shaped hollow structure that undergoes asymmetrical expansion and eventually fragments. The hollow structure of the expanding target is explained by the effects of cavitation and spallation that follow the propagation of the laser-induced shock wave.

  7. MR-Guided Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of Gene Therapy Combined With Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    ultrasound . J. Acoust. Soc.Am. 72 1926-1932, (1982) (7) Neppiras E A. Acoustic cavitation . Physics reports 61(3): 159-251, (1980) (8) ter Haar G R, Daniels...Guided Pulsed High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Enhancement of 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0469 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...failing to This work is aimed to study MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) enhancement of gene therapy for Prostate Cancer. The

  8. Spatial distribution of sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence generated by cavitation bubbles in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi; Qiao, Yangzi; Zhang, Shusheng; Li, Ruixue

    2012-03-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera was used to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound (FU) field in order to investigate the mechanisms of acoustic cavitation under different sonication conditions for FU therapeutic applications. It was found that SL emissions were located in the post-focal region. When the intensity of SL and SCL increased as the power rose, the growth of SCL was much higher than that of SL. In the post-focal region, the SCL emissions moved along specific paths and formed branch-like streamers. At the beginning of the ultrasound irradiation, cavitation bubbles generated SCL in both the pre-focal and the post-focal region. When the electrical power or the sonication time increased, the SCL in the post-focal region increased and became higher than that in the pre-focal region. The intensity of SCL in the focal region is usually the weakest because of "oversaturation". The spatial distribution of SCL near a tissue boundary differed from that obtained in free fields. It organized into special structures under different acoustic amplitudes. When the electrical power was relatively low, the SCL emission was conical shape which suggested a standing wave formation at the tissue-fluid boundary. When the electrical power exceeded a certain threshold, only a bright spot could be captured in the focus. The cavitation bubbles which centralized in the focus concentrated energy and hindered the formation of standing waves. With rising electrical power at high levels, besides a bright spot in the focus, there were some irregular light spots in pre-focal region, which indicated some cavitation bubbles or small bubble clusters achieved the threshold of SCL and induced the reaction with the luminol solution.

  9. Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Fixed-Beam Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2015-08-01

    The induction of pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) by pulsed ultrasound was discovered 25 y ago, but early research used fixed-beam systems rather than actual diagnostic ultrasound machines. In this study, results of exposure of rats to fixed-beam focused ultrasound for 5 min at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz were compared with recent research on diagnostic ultrasound. One exposure condition at each frequency used 10-μs pulses delivered at 25-ms intervals. Three conditions involved Gaussian modulation of the pulse amplitudes at 25-ms intervals to simulate diagnostic scanning: 7.5 MHz with 0.3- and 1.5-μs pulses at 100- and 500-μs pulse repetition periods, respectively, and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses at 500-μs repetition periods. Four groups were tested for each condition to assess PCH areas at different exposure levels and to determine occurrence thresholds. The conditions with identical pulse timing resulted in smaller PCH areas for the smaller 7.5-MHz beam, but both had thresholds of 0.69-0.75 MPa in situ peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. The Gaussian modulation conditions for both 7.5 MHz with 0.3-μs pulses and 1.5 MHz with 1.7-μs pulses had thresholds of 1.12-1.20 MPa peak rarefactional pressure amplitude, although the relatively long 1.5-μs pulses at 7.5 MHz yielded a threshold of 0.75 MPa. The fixed-beam pulsed ultrasound exposures produced lower thresholds than diagnostic ultrasound. There was no clear tendency for thresholds to increase with increasing ultrasonic frequency when pulse timing conditions were similar.

  10. Ultrasound vibrometry using orthogonal- frequency-based vibration pulses.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Siping

    2013-11-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals, the amplitudes of which increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses.

  11. Ultrasound Vibrometry Using Orthogonal Frequency Based Vibration Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yi; Yao, Aiping; Chen, Shigao; Urban, Matthew W.; Lin, Haoming; Chen, Xin; Guo, Yanrong; Chen, Ke; Wang, Tianfu; Chen, Shiping

    2014-01-01

    New vibration pulses are developed for shear wave generation in a tissue region with preferred spectral distributions for ultrasound vibrometry applications. The primary objective of this work is to increase the frequency range of detectable harmonics of the shear wave. The secondary objective is to reduce the required peak intensity of transmitted pulses that induce the vibrations and shear waves. Unlike the periodic binary vibration pulses, the new vibration pulses have multiple pulses in one fundamental period of the vibration. The pulses are generated from an orthogonal-frequency wave composed of several sinusoidal signals of which the amplitudes increase with frequency to compensate for higher loss at higher frequency in tissues. The new method has been evaluated by studying the shear wave propagation in in vitro chicken and swine liver. The experimental results show that the new vibration pulses significantly increase tissue vibration with a reduced peak ultrasound intensity, compared with the binary vibration pulses. PMID:24158291

  12. Pulsed Magneto-motive Ultrasound Imaging Using Ultrasmall Magnetic Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Oh, Junghwan; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2011-01-01

    Nano-sized particles are widely regarded as a tool to study biologic events at the cellular and molecular levels. However, only some imaging modalities can visualize interaction between nanoparticles and living cells. We present a new technique, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging, which is capable of in vivo imaging of magnetic nanoparticles in real time and at sufficient depth. In pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging, an external high-strength pulsed magnetic field is applied to induce the motion within the magnetically labeled tissue and ultrasound is used to detect the induced internal tissue motion. Our experiments demonstrated a sufficient contrast between normal and iron-laden cells labeled with ultrasmall magnetic nanoparticles. Therefore, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging could become an imaging tool capable of detecting magnetic nanoparticles and characterizing the cellular and molecular composition of deep-lying structures. PMID:21439255

  13. Exploitation of sub-micron cavitation nuclei to enhance ultrasound-mediated transdermal transport and penetration of vaccines.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Sunali; Kwan, James J; Shah, Apurva R; Coussios, Constantin-C; Carlisle, Robert C

    2016-09-28

    Inertial cavitation mediated by ultrasound has been previously shown to enable skin permeabilisation for transdermal drug and vaccine delivery, by sequentially applying the ultrasound then the therapeutic in liquid form on the skin surface. Using a novel hydrogel dosage form, we demonstrate that the use of sub-micron gas-stabilising polymeric nanoparticles (nanocups) to sustain and promote cavitation activity during simultaneous application of both drug and vaccine results in a significant enhancement of both the dose and penetration of a model vaccine, Ovalbumin (OVA), to depths of 500μm into porcine skin. The nanocups themselves exceeded the penetration depth of the vaccine (up to 700μm) due to their small size and capacity to 'self-propel'. In vivo murine studies indicated that nanocup-assisted ultrasound transdermal vaccination achieved significantly (p<0.05) higher delivery doses without visible skin damage compared to the use of a chemical penetration enhancer. Transdermal OVA doses of up to 1μg were achieved in a single 90-second treatment, which was sufficient to trigger an antigen-specific immune response. Furthermore, ultrasound-assisted vaccine delivery in the presence of nanocups demonstrated substantially higher specific anti-OVA IgG antibody levels compared to other transdermal methods. Further optimisation can lead to a viable, safe and non-invasive delivery platform for vaccines with potential use in a primary care setting or personalized self-vaccination at home.

  14. Enhancement of Sonochemical Reaction by Dual-Pulse Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zheng; Yasuda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to apply sonochemistry in wastewater treatment, enhancement of sonochemical reaction is necessary. Oxidation of potassium iodide and the degradation of acid orange 7 in aqueous solution using ultrasound irradiation were performed at 490 kHz. Power-modulated pulsed waves were employed and the enhancement of reaction amount was observed compared with using continuous wave. The enhancement ratio for irradiation to rigid wall was larger than that for irradiation to free surface. Moreover, the best modulated pulsed on time was experimentally determined and the effect of the superposition of pulsed waves (dual-pulse) was studied. Enhancement was also observed and calculated separately when using dual-pulse ultrasound. The enhancement upon the use of the dual-transducer was ascribed to the enlargement of sonochemical reaction field. The enhancement upon the incorporating pulsed waves was ascribed to both the reduction of reaction threshold effect and the residual acoustical pressure at the pulsed off time.

  15. A Low Cost Compact 512 Channel Therapeutic Ultrasound System For Transcutaneous Ultrasound Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Tim; Cain, Charles

    2006-05-01

    A low cost 512 channel therapeutic ultrasound system was designed and tested with a 2D array transducer. The system was optimized for high energy, low duty cycle pulsing applications (cavitation mediated therapy), but is also folly compatible with continuous wave applications. The effective steering range was measured to be 40 mm FWHM over a 3D volume. Well defined volumes of liver tissue were disrupted with high energy cavitation generating ultrasound pulses in ex-vivo liver experiments.

  16. Sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence study of cavitation field in a 1.2MHz focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hui; Qiao, Yangzi; Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    An intensified CCD (ICCD) and an electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) were employed to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2MHz HIFU field. Various sonication conditions, which are free field and focal region near a water-parenchyma interface, were studied. In addition, the differences of two shells coated UCAs were also investigated. In this study, an acoustic radiation force (ARF) counterbalance appliance was added to reduce bubble displacement. Cavitation mapping in this situation was also operated through SCL recording. SCL was also employed to measure cavitation does and map the spatial distribution of cavitation near a boundary of parenchyma.

  17. The Effect of Pulsing on Transverse Ultrasound Efficiency and Chatter.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alex J; Bohner, Austin D; Bernhisel, Ashlie A; Zaugg, Brian; Barlow, William R; Pettey, Jeff H; Olson, Randall J

    2017-08-28

    To evaluate the effects of micropulse, long pulse and continuous ultrasound on transverse ultrasound using Abbott Medical Optics' (AMO) WhiteStar Signature Pro with the Ellips FX handpiece. In vitro laboratory study METHODS: This study was conducted at the John A. Moran Eye Center Laboratory, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. Porcine lenses were hardened in formalin for 2 hours and equilibrated in BSS over a 24-hour period. The lenses were then cubed in 2.0mm by 2.0mm pieces. These pieces were stored in BSS until the time of experimentation. The AMO WhiteStar Signature Pro machine with the Ellips FX handpiece and a 0.9mm bent dewey tip with a 30-degree bevel were used for phacoemulsification. Three runs of 20 lenses each were performed, measuring efficiency and chatter. Transverse ultrasound varied in the three runs and included continuous, 6ms on/off micropulse, and 50ms on/off long pulse. Micropulse was more efficient than long pulse by 43% (P = .00003) and continuous by 42% (P = .000387). There were also less chatter events with micropulse than with long pulse and continuous ultrasound. However, this difference did not reach significance. 6ms on and 6ms off micropulse transverse three-dimensional ultrasound is more efficient and produces less chatter events than both long pulse and continuous ultrasound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comments on the possibility of cavitation in liquid metal targets for pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter J.M.

    1996-06-01

    When short pulses of protons strike the volume of a liquid target, the rapid heating produces a pressurized region which relaxes as the pressure wave propagates outward. Skala and Bauer have modeled the effects of the pressure wave impinging on the container walls of a liquid mercury target under ESS conditions. They find that high pressures and high wall stresses result if the medium is uniform, nearly incompressible liquid. The pressure and the stresses are much reduced if the liquid contains bubbles of helium, due to their high compressibility. However, according to the calculation, the pressure still reaches an atmosphere or so at the surface, which reflects the compressive wave as a rarefaction wave of the same magnitude. Even such modest underpressures can lead to the growth of bubbles (cavitation) at or near the surface, which can collapse violently and erode the container surface. It is necessary to avoid this. Leighton provides a wide ranging discussion of pressure waves in bubbly media, which may provide insights into the nature and control of cavitation phenomena. The paper surveys some of the relevant information from that source.

  19. Enhanced cavitation and heating of flowing polymer- and lipid-shelled microbubbles and phase-shift nanodroplets during focused ultrasound exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Cui, Zhiwei; Li, Chong; Zhou, Fanyu; Zong, Yujin; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    Cavitation and heating are the primary mechanisms of numerous therapeutic applications of ultrasound. Various encapsulated microbubbles (MBs) and phase-shift nanodroplets (NDs) have been used to enhance local cavitation and heating, creating interests in developing ultrasound therapy using these encapsulated MBs and NDs. This work compared the efficiency of flowing polymer- and lipid-shelled MBs and phase-shift NDs in cavitation and heating during focused ultrasound (FUS) exposures. Cavitation activity and temperature were investigated when the solution of polymer- and lipid-shelled MBs and NDs flowed through the vessel in a tissue-mimicking phantom with varying flow velocities when exposed to FUS at various acoustic power levels. The inertial cavitation dose (ICD) for the encapsulated MBs and NDs were higher than those for the saline. Temperature initially increased with increasing flow velocities of the encapsulated MBs, followed by a decrease of the temperature with increasing flow velocities when the velocity was much higher. Meanwhile, ICD showed a trend of increases with increasing flow velocity. For the phase-shift NDs, ICD after the first FUS exposure was lower than those after the second FUS exposure. For the encapsulated MBs, ICD after the first FUS exposure was higher than those after the second FUS exposure. Further studies are necessary to investigate the treatment efficiency of different encapsulated MBs and phase-shift NDs in cavitation and heating.

  20. [Enhancement of reversing drug resistance of K562/A02 cells to adriamycin by ultrasound-induced cavitation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-An; Meng, Qing-Qi; Wu, Wei; Gao, Feng; Shao, Ze-Ye; Ding, Jia-Hua; Gao, Chong; Sun, Xin-Chen; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Sun, Yun-Yu; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Jian; Zhao, Gang; Song, Hui-Hui; Bao, Wen; Ma, Yan; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2008-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of low frequency and power ultrasound combined with adriamycin on apoptosis of drug-resistant leukemia cell line K562/A02 in vitro, to find out the parameters of optimal exposure, and to explore the possible mechanism reversing drug-resistance of K562/A02 cells. The K562/A02 cells in logarithmic growth phase were used in experiments. The experiments were divided into 4 groups: group control, group adriamycin (A02) alone, group ultrasound (US) alone and group A02+US. The trypan blue dye exclusion test and MTT assay were used to determine the cell viability; Wright's staining was used to detect the apoptosis; the flow cytometry was used to analyze the drug concentration, and the scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the changes of cell surface. The results showed that the significant differences in cell viability, intracellular adriamycin concentration and changes of cell membrane were found between ultrasound-treated and untreated cells in the presence of various concentration of adriamycin. The exposure to ultrasound at 20 kHZ, 0.25 W/cm2 for 60 seconds could obviously decrease LC50 of adriamycin to K562/A02 cells, while the exposure to ultrasound at 20 kHZ, 0.05 W/cm2 for 60 seconds could kill K562/A02 cells at once. After being treated by low frequency ultrasound, the small holes with diameter about 1-2 microm in the cell surface appeared. The ultrasound increased the adriamycin concentration in the cells, accelerated the formation of apoptotic bodies, and promoted apoptosis of adriamycin-resistant cells. It is concluded that the ultrasound at optimal parameters enhances inhibitory effect of adriamycin on drug-resistant cell line, thereby reverses drug-resistance of drug-resistant cell line through sound-hole effect in tumor cells resulting from ultrasound induced cavitation.

  1. Correlation between microbubble-induced acoustic cavitation and hemolysis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Bing; Liu, Zheng; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Zhang, Dong

    2011-02-01

    Microbubbles promise to enhance the efficiency of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery and gene therapy by taking advantage of artificial cavitation nuclei. The purpose of this study is to examine the ultrasound-induced hemolysis in the application of drug delivery in the presence of microbubbles. To achieve this goal, human red blood cells mixed with microbubbles were exposed to 1-MHz pulsed ultrasound. The hemolysis level was measured by a flow cytometry, and the cavitation dose was detected by a passive cavitation detecting system. The results demonstrate that larger cavitation dose would be generated with the increase of acoustic pressure, which might give rise to the enhancement of hemolysis. Besides the experimental observations, the acoustic pressure dependence of the radial oscillation of microbubble was theoretically estimated. The comparison between the experimental and calculation results indicates that the hemolysis should be highly correlated to the acoustic cavitation.

  2. Imaging monitored loosening of dense fibrous tissues using high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Chia-Lun; Li, Pai-Chi; Shih, Wen-Pin; Huang, Pei-Shin; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2013-10-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is proposed as a new alternative treatment for contracture of dense fibrous tissue. It is hypothesized that the pulsed-HIFU can release the contracted tissues by attenuating tensile stiffness along the fiber axis, and that the stiffness reduction can be quantitatively monitored by change of B-mode images. Fresh porcine tendons and ligaments were adapted to an ex vivo model and insonated with pulsed-HIFU for durations ranging from 5 to 30 min. The pulse length was 91 µs with a repetition frequency of 500 Hz, and the peak rarefactional pressure was 6.36 MPa. The corresponding average intensities were kept around 1606 W cm-2 for ISPPA and 72.3 W cm-2 for ISPTA. B-mode images of the tissues were acquired before and after pulsed-HIFU exposure, and the changes in speckle intensity and organization were analyzed. The tensile stiffness of the HIFU-exposed tissues along the longitudinal axis was examined using a stretching machine. Histology examinations were performed by optical and transmission electron microscopy. Pulsed-HIFU exposure significantly decreased the tensile stiffness of the ligaments and tendons. The intensity and organization of tissue speckles in the exposed region were also decreased. The speckle changes correlated well with the degree of stiffness alteration. Histology examinations revealed that pulsed-HIFU exposure probably damages tissues via a cavitation-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that pulsed-HIFU with a low duty factor is a promising tool for developing new treatment strategies for orthopedic disorders.

  3. Evaluation of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound exposures on metastasis in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Hilary; Dreher, Matthew R.; Crawford, Nigel; Pollock, Claire B.; Shih, Jennifer; Wood, Bradford J.; Hunter, Kent; Frenkel, Victor

    2014-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) may be employed in two ways: continuous exposures for thermal ablation of tissue (>60°C), and pulsed-exposures for non-ablative effects, including low temperature hyperthermia (37–45°C), and non thermal effects (e.g. acoustic cavitation and radiation forces). Pulsed-HIFU effects may enhance the tissue's permeability for improved delivery of drugs and genes, for example, by opening up gaps between cells in the vasculature and parenchyma. Inducing these effects may improve local targeting of therapeutic agents, however; concerns exist that pulsed exposures could theoretically also facilitate dissemination of tumor cells and exacerbate metastases. In the present study, the influence of pulsed-HIFU exposures on increasing metastatic burden was evaluated in a murine model with metastatic breast cancer. A preliminary study was carried out to validate the model and determine optimal timing for treatment and growth of lung metastases. Next, the effect of pulsed-HIFU on the metastatic burden was evaluated using quantitative image processing of whole-lung histological sections. Compared to untreated controls (2/15), a greater number of mice treated with pulsed-HIFU were found to have lungs “overgrown” with metastases (7/15), where individual metastases grew together such that they could not accurately be counted. Furthermore, area fraction of lung metastases (area of metastases/area of lungs) was ~30% greater in mice treated with pulsed-HIFU; however, these differences were not statistically significant. The present study details the development of an animal model for investigating the influence of interventional techniques or exposures (such as pulsed HIFU) on metastatic burden. PMID:19517258

  4. Oxidative DNA damage caused by pulsed discharge with cavitation on the bactericidal function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Ken-ichi; Ito, Hironori; Ihara, Satoshi; Terato, Hiroaki

    2015-09-01

    Plasma-based techniques are expected to have practical use for wastewater purification with a potential for killing contaminated microorganisms and degrading recalcitrant materials. In the present study, we analysed oxidative DNA damage in bacterial cells treated by the plasma to unveil its mechanisms in the bactericidal process. Escherichia coli cell suspension was exposed to the plasma induced by applying an alternating-current voltage of about 1 kV with bubbling formed by water-cavitation, termed pulsed discharge with cavitation. Chromosomal DNA damage, such as double strand break (DSB) and oxidative base lesions, increased proportionally with the applied energy, as determined by electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses. Among the base lesions identified, the yields of 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-G) and 5-hydroxycytosine (5-OH-C) in chromosomal DNA increased by up to 4- and 15-fold, respectively, compared to untreated samples. The progeny DNA sequences, derived from plasmid DNA exposed to the plasma, indicated that the production rate of 5-OH-C exceeded that of 8-OH-G, as G:C to A:T transitions accounted for 65% of all base changes, but only a few G:C to T:A transversions were observed. The cell viabilities of E. coli cells decreased in direct proportion to increases in the applied energy. Therefore, the plasma-induced bactericidal mechanism appears to relate to oxidative damage caused to bacterial DNA. These results were confirmed by observing the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide molecules following the plasma exposure. We also compared our results with the plasma to those obtained with 137Cs γ-rays, as a well-known ROS generator to confirm the DNA-damaging mechanism involved.

  5. Investigation of spatial distribution of sound field parameters in ultrasound cleaning baths under the influence of cavitation.

    PubMed

    Jenderka, Klaus-Vitold; Koch, Christian

    2006-12-22

    Ultrasound cleaning baths fitting the full range from micromechanical components up to large machine parts, are regularly used in industry and in the lab. Despite the large number of applications, generally approved principles and objective criteria for parameter settings which allow an efficient operation are non-existent. The empirical selections of the running parameters often impede an optimization in terms of produce and reproducibility. One proposal for an objective description of the processes is the characterization of the sound field in the cleaning bath, which causes cavities, and subsequently, the cleaning process. Sound field measurements in the appropriate frequency range from 20kHz up to more then 1MHz incorporate a number of problems, such as large sensors disturbing the sound field, a lack of accuracy and the risk of being destroyed by cavitation bubbles. Measurement systems based on optical fiber tips and piezo-electrical hydrophones will be presented, which fulfil the accuracy requirements and withstand ultrasound fields with high power and cavitation. The spatial distribution of sound field parameters such as positive and negative peak pressure, amplitudes of fundamentals, harmonics and sub-harmonics as well as the energy density and spectral density in several frequency ranges are determined in experiments. Finally, the determined field parameters are related to the cavitation effects by means of photometric analysis of perforated aluminium foil. Perforations as well as intentions are analyzed and quantified from scanner images of the exposed foil samples using special image processing software. The experiments indicate clear differences in the structure of the sound fields and the spectral properties between the several types of cleaning baths, transducer arrangements and excitations.

  6. Detecting cavitation in vivo from shock-wave therapy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Yu, Jinfei; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been used as a treatment for plantar faciitis, lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendonitis, non-unions, and other indications where conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. However, in many areas, the efficacy of SW treatment has not been well established, and the mechanism of action, particularly the role of cavitation, is not well understood. Research indicates cavitation plays an important role in other ultrasound therapies, such as lithotripsy and focused ultrasound surgery, and in some instances, cavitation has been used as a means to monitor or detect a biological effect. Although ESWT can generate cavitation easily in vitro, it is unknown whether or not cavitation is a significant factor in vivo. The purpose of this investigation is to use diagnostic ultrasound to detect and monitor cavitation generated by ESWT devices in vivo. Diagnostic images are collected at various times during and after treatment. The images are then post-processed with image-processing algorithms to enhance the contrast between bubbles and surrounding tissue. The ultimate goal of this research is to utilize cavitation as a means for optimizing shock wave parameters such as amplitude and pulse repetition frequency. [Work supported by APL internal funds and NIH DK43881 and DK55674.

  7. Pulse sequences for uniform perfluorocarbon droplet vaporization and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Puett, C; Sheeran, P S; Rojas, J D; Dayton, P A

    2014-09-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) consist of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles by pulsed ultrasound waves at diagnostic pressures and frequencies. These activatable contrast agents provide benefits of longer circulating times and smaller sizes relative to conventional microbubble contrast agents. However, optimizing ultrasound-induced activation of these agents requires coordinated pulse sequences not found on current clinical systems, in order to both initiate droplet vaporization and image the resulting microbubble population. Specifically, the activation process must provide a spatially uniform distribution of microbubbles and needs to occur quickly enough to image the vaporized agents before they migrate out of the imaging field of view. The development and evaluation of protocols for PCCA-enhanced ultrasound imaging using a commercial array transducer are described. The developed pulse sequences consist of three states: (1) initial imaging at sub-activation pressures, (2) activating droplets within a selected region of interest, and (3) imaging the resulting microbubbles. Bubble clouds produced by the vaporization of decafluorobutane and octafluoropropane droplets were characterized as a function of focused pulse parameters and acoustic field location. Pulse sequences were designed to manipulate the geometries of discrete microbubble clouds using electronic steering, and cloud spacing was tailored to build a uniform vaporization field. The complete pulse sequence was demonstrated in the water bath and then in vivo in a rodent kidney. The resulting contrast provided a significant increase (>15 dB) in signal intensity.

  8. The role of positive and negative pressure on cavitation nucleation in nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Aydin, Omer; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Durmaz, Yasemin Yuksel; Fowlkes, Brian; ElSayed, Mohamed; Xu, Zhen

    2016-01-21

    Nanodroplet-mediated histotripsy (NMH) is an ultrasound ablation technique combining histotripsy with acoustically sensitive perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets that can be selectively delivered to tumor cells for targeted tumor ablation. NMH takes advantage of the significantly reduced cavitation threshold of the nanodroplets, allowing for cavitation to be selectively generated only in regions containing nanodroplets. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying the nanodroplet cavitation process is essential to the development of NMH. In this study, we hypothesize that cavitation nucleation is caused by the negative pressure (p-) exposed to the PFC, and the NMH cavitation threshold is therefore determined by the incident p-  of the single-cycle pulses commonly used in NMH. This paper reports the first study that separately investigates the effects of negative and positive pressure on the NMH cavitation threshold using near half-cycle ultrasound pulses with dominant negative (negative-polarity pulses) or positive (positive-polarity pulses) pressure phases. Tissue phantoms containing perfluorohexane (PFH) nanodroplets were exposed to negative-polarity and positive-polarity pulses generated by a frequency compounding transducer recently developed in our lab, and the probability of generating cavitation was measured as a function of peak negative (p-) and peak positive (p+) pressure. The results showed close agreement in the p- cavitation threshold for PFH phantoms exposed to negative-polarity (11.4 ± 0.1 MPa) and positive-polarity (11.7 ± 0.2 MPa) pulses. The p+ at the cavitation threshold, in contrast, was measured to be sign ficantly different for the negative-polarity (4.0 ± 0.1 MPa) and positive-polarity (42.6 ± 0.2 MPa) pulses. In the final part of this study, the experimental results were compared to the cavitation threshold predicted by classical nucleation theory (CNT), with results showing close agreement between simulations and experiments

  9. Acoustic methods for cavitation mapping in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Xu, S.; Ding, T.; Hu, H.; Liu, R.; Bai, C.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, cavitation is increasingly utilized in a wide range of applications in biomedical field. Monitoring the spatial-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles is of great significance for efficiency and safety in biomedical applications. In this paper, several acoustic methods for cavitation mapping proposed or modified on the basis of existing work will be presented. The proposed novel ultrasound line-by-line/plane-by-plane method can depict cavitation bubbles distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution and may be developed as a potential standard 2D/3D cavitation field mapping method. The modified ultrafast active cavitation mapping based upon plane wave transmission and reception as well as bubble wavelet and pulse inversion technique can apparently enhance the cavitation to tissue ratio in tissue and further assist in monitoring the cavitation mediated therapy with good spatial and temporal resolution. The methods presented in this paper will be a foundation to promote the research and development of cavitation imaging in non-transparent medium.

  10. Improving the cardio protective effect of aFGF in ischemic myocardium with ultrasound-mediated cavitation of heparin modified microbubbles: preliminary experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Lu, Cui-Tao; Li, Xiao-Kun; Tang, Qin-Qin; Tian, Xin-Qiao; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Ji-Lai; Yang, Wei; Ge, Shuping; Nair, Chandra K; Shen, Xuedong

    2012-08-01

    Ultrasound (US)-mediated cavitation of microbubbles has evolved into a new tool for organ-specific gene and drug delivery. This paper was to investigate the feasibility of acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) intravenous delivery to the ischemic myocardium of rats by ultrasonic microbubbles modified with heparin. Heparin modified microbubbles (HMB) were prepared by the freeze-dried method. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was established and the cardio protective effect of the aFGF combing with HMB (aFGF-HMB) under US-mediated cavitation technique was investigated. aFGF-HMB combined with US-mediated cavitation technique was examined by ECG. Ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening (FS) and left ventricular diastolic diameter (LVDd) were measured to monitor the improvement of global myocardial contractile function. Myocardial tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosine (HE) to evaluate the elaborate general morphology of the ischemic myocardium. From morphologic observation and echocardiography in rat heart, aFGF-HMB had suitable size distribution, physical stability and good acoustic resonance function. From AMI rat experiments, aFGF-HMB under US-mediated cavitation technique exerted aFGF cardio protective effect in ischemic myocardium. From histological evaluation, US-mediated cavitation of aFGF-HMB showed improvement of myocardial ischemia. With the visual imaging and US-triggered drug release advantages, US-mediated cavitation of aFGF-HMB might be developed as a novel technique for targeting delivery of aFGF into ischemic myocardium.

  11. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of Ultrasound Cavitation and Its Effect on Solidification Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, Jiawei; Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik

    2014-12-11

    Considerable progress has been made in studying the mechanism and effectiveness of using ultrasound waves to manipulate the solidification microstructures of metallic alloys. However, uncertainties remain in both the underlying physics of how microstructures evolve under ultrasonic waves, and the best technological approach to control the final microstructures and properties. We used the ultrafast synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging facility housed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US to study in situ the highly transient and dynamic interactions between the liquid metal and ultrasonic waves/bubbles. The dynamics of ultrasonic bubbles in liquid metal and their interactions with the solidifying phases in a transparent alloy were captured in situ. The experiments were complemented by the simulations of the acoustic pressure field, the pulsing of the bubbles, and the associated forces acting onto the solidifying dendrites. The study provides more quantitative understanding on how ultrasonic waves/bubbles influence the growth of dendritic grains and promote the grain multiplication effect for grain refinement.

  12. In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of Ultrasound Cavitation and Its Effect on Solidification Microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Jiawei; Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik

    2015-08-01

    Considerable progress has been made in studying the mechanism and effectiveness of using ultrasound waves to manipulate the solidification microstructures of metallic alloys. However, uncertainties remain in both the underlying physics of how microstructures evolve under ultrasonic waves, and the best technological approach to control the final microstructures and properties. We used the ultrafast synchrotron X-ray phase contrast imaging facility housed at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US to study in situ the highly transient and dynamic interactions between the liquid metal and ultrasonic waves/bubbles. The dynamics of ultrasonic bubbles in liquid metal and their interactions with the solidifying phases in a transparent alloy were captured in situ. The experiments were complemented by the simulations of the acoustic pressure field, the pulsing of the bubbles, and the associated forces acting onto the solidifying dendrites. The study provides more quantitative understanding on how ultrasonic waves/bubbles influence the growth of dendritic grains and promote the grain multiplication effect for grain refinement.

  13. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery. PMID:27630037

  14. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  15. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-15

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  16. Surface vibration and nearby cavitation of an ex vivo bovine femur exposed to high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Chong; Yin, Hui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2013-08-01

    The acoustic pressure distribution, thermal ablation, and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation near the surface of an ex vivo bovine femur were investigated at normal and oblique incidences of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), as were the characteristics of bone surface vibrations. The acoustic pressure at the HIFU focus, the width of thermal ablation, and the SCL intensity in the pre-focal region were 1.3 MPa, 7 mm, and 454 electrons, respectively, in the control group at normal incidence, and they respectively increased to 1.5 MPa, 12 mm and 968 electrons in the presence of the bone. At oblique incidence from the left, the acoustic pressure at 3 mm to the right of the HIFU focus was 0.6 MPa and decreased to 0.4 MPa at 3 mm to the left of the focus. The thermal ablation was 20 mm in width and extended along the front surface of the bone to the right of the HIFU focus. The SCL intensity on the right of the HIFU focus was 394 electrons and was 362 electrons on the left. The presence of bone would directionally change the spatial distribution of acoustic pressure, thermal and cavitation effects for oblique incidence of HIFU.

  17. New coding concept for fast ultrasound imaging using pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misaridis, Thanasis; Jensen, Joergen A.

    2002-04-01

    Frame rate in ultrasound imaging can be increased by simultaneous transmission of multiple beams using coded waveforms. However, the achievable degree of orthogonality among coded waveforms is limited in ultrasound, and the image quality degrades unacceptably due to interbeam interference. In this paper, an alternative combined time-space coding approach is undertaken. In the new method all transducer elements are excited with short pulses and the high time-bandwidth (TB) product waveforms are generated acoustically. Each element transmits a short pulse spherical wave with a constant transmit delay from element to element, long enough to assure no pulse overlapping for all depths in the image. Frequency shift keying is used for per element coding. The received signals from a point scatterer are staggered pulse trains which are beamformed for all beam directions and further processed with a bank of matched filters (one for each beam direction). Filtering compresses the pulse train to a single pulse at the scatterer position with a number of spike axial sidelobes. Cancellation of the ambiguity spikes is done by applying additional phase modulation from one emission to the next and summing every two successive images. Simulation results presented for QLFM and Costas spatial encoding schemes show that the proposed method can yield images with range sidelobes down to -45 dB using only two emissions.

  18. Cavitation dynamics and directional microbubble ejection induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses in liquids.

    PubMed

    Faccio, D; Tamošauskas, G; Rubino, E; Darginavičius, J; Papazoglou, D G; Tzortzakis, S; Couairon, A; Dubietis, A

    2012-09-01

    We study cavitation dynamics when focusing ring-shaped femtosecond laser beams in water. This focusing geometry reduces detrimental nonlinear beam distortions and enhances energy deposition within the medium, localized at the focal spot. We observe remarkable postcollapse dynamics of elongated cavitation bubbles with high-speed ejection of microbubbles out of the laser focal region. Bubbles are ejected along the laser axis in both directions (away and towards the laser). The initial shape of the cavitation bubble is also seen to either enhance or completely suppress jet formation during collapse. In the absence of jetting, microbubble ejection occurs orthogonal to the laser propagation axis.

  19. Pulsed ultrasound assisted dehydration of waste oil.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Li, Rui; Lu, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    A method to aid the separation of the oil phase from waste oil emulsion of refineries had been developed by using a pulsed ultrasonic irradiation technology. Compared with conventional continuous ultrasonic irradiation, it is found that pulsed ultrasonic irradiation is much better to make water drop coalescence and hence dehydration of waste oil. The effects of ultrasonic irradiation parameters on waste oil dehydration are further discussed. The orthogonal experiment is also designed to investigate the degrees of influence of ultrasonic parameters and the optimal technological conditions. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the water content of waste oil is decreased from 65% to 8%, which thereby satisfies the requirements of refineries on the water content of waste oil after treatment (<10%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A.; Jones, Ryan M.; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-12-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612, and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning (-40, 40) and (-30, 50) mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi-foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning (-25, 25) mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in vivo experiments demonstrated the system’s ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non

  1. A multi-frequency sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lulu; O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Jones, Ryan M; An, Ran; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-12-21

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) phased arrays show promise for non-invasive brain therapy. However, the majority of them are limited to a single transmit/receive frequency and therefore lack the versatility to expose and monitor the treatment volume. Multi-frequency arrays could offer variable transmit focal sizes under a fixed aperture, and detect different spectral content on receive for imaging purposes. Here, a three-frequency (306, 612, and 1224 kHz) sparse hemispherical ultrasound phased array (31.8 cm aperture; 128 transducer modules) was constructed and evaluated for microbubble-mediated transcranial therapy and simultaneous cavitation mapping. The array is able to perform effective electronic beam steering over a volume spanning (-40, 40) and (-30, 50) mm in the lateral and axial directions, respectively. The focal size at the geometric center is approximately 0.9 (2.1) mm, 1.7 (3.9) mm, and 3.1 (6.5) mm in lateral (axial) pressure full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 1224, 612, and 306 kHz, respectively. The array was also found capable of dual-frequency excitation and simultaneous multi-foci sonication, which enables the future exploration of more complex exposure strategies. Passive acoustic mapping of dilute microbubble clouds demonstrated that the point spread function of the receive array has a lateral (axial) intensity FWHM between 0.8-3.5 mm (1.7-11.7 mm) over a volume spanning (-25, 25) mm in both the lateral and axial directions, depending on the transmit/receive frequency combination and the imaging location. The device enabled both half and second harmonic imaging through the intact skull, which may be useful for improving the contrast-to-tissue ratio or imaging resolution, respectively. Preliminary in vivo experiments demonstrated the system's ability to induce blood-brain barrier opening and simultaneously spatially map microbubble cavitation activity in a rat model. This work presents a tool to investigate optimal strategies for non

  2. Inertial cavitation threshold of nested microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Wallace, N; Dicker, S; Lewin, Peter; Wrenn, S P

    2015-04-01

    Cavitation of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) promotes both beneficial and detrimental bioeffects in vivo (Radhakrishnan et al., 2013) [1]. The ability to determine the inertial cavitation threshold of UCA microbubbles has potential application in contrast imaging, development of therapeutic agents, and evaluation of localized effects on the body (Ammi et al., 2006) [2]. This study evaluates a novel UCA and its inertial cavitation behavior as determined by a home built cavitation detection system. Two 2.25 MHz transducers are placed at a 90° angle to one another where one transducer is driven by a high voltage pulser and the other transducer receives the signal from the oscillating microbubble. The sample chamber is placed in the overlap of the focal region of the two transducers where the microbubbles are exposed to a pulser signal consisting of 600 pulse trains per experiment at a pulse repetition frequency of 5 Hz where each train has four pulses of four cycles. The formulation being analyzed is comprised of an SF6 microbubble coated by a DSPC PEG-3000 monolayer nested within a poly-lactic acid (PLA) spherical shell. The effect of varying shell diameters and microbubble concentration on cavitation threshold profile for peak negative pressures ranging from 50 kPa to 2 MPa are presented and discussed in this paper. The nesting shell decreases inertial cavitation events from 97.96% for an un-nested microbubble to 19.09% for the same microbubbles nested within a 2.53 μm shell. As shell diameter decreases, the percentage of inertially cavitating microbubbles also decreases. For nesting formulations with average outer capsule diameters of 20.52, 14.95, 9.95, 5.55, 2.53, and 1.95 μm, the percentage of sample destroyed at 1 MPa was 51.02, 38.94, 33.25, 25.27, 19.09, and 5.37% respectively.

  3. Synchrotron quantification of ultrasound cavitation and bubble dynamics in Al-10Cu melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Tzanakis, I; Srirangam, P; Mirihanage, W U; Eskin, D G; Bodey, A J; Lee, P D

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics of gas bubble formation and evolution under cavitation conditions in molten alloys is important for the control casting defects such as porosity and dissolved hydrogen. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography, we studied the dynamic behaviour of ultrasonic cavitation gas bubbles in a molten Al-10 wt%Cu alloy. The size distribution, average radius and growth rate of cavitation gas bubbles were quantified under an acoustic intensity of 800 W/cm(2) and a maximum acoustic pressure of 4.5 MPa (45 atm). Bubbles exhibited a log-normal size distribution with an average radius of 15.3 ± 0.5 μm. Under applied sonication conditions the growth rate of bubble radius, R(t), followed a power law with a form of R(t)=αt(β), and α=0.0021 &β=0.89. The observed tendencies were discussed in relation to bubble growth mechanisms of Al alloy melts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Two-dimensional Temperature Imaging Using Pulse-Echo Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebbini, Emad S.

    2006-05-01

    A review of the basic principles of 2D temperature estimation using pulse-echo ultrasound is given. Some of the limitations of this technique are addressed and new solutions are described. In particular, temperature imaging artifacts due to the thermoacoustic lens effects are described. A reconstructive imaging method employing a physics-based 2D filter and a projection method is presented. Results from phantom and tissue heating experiments employing different energy sources are shown.

  5. The role of cavitation in the induction of cellular DNA damage by ultrasound and lithotripter shock waves in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Thomas, R M

    1996-01-01

    The induction of DNA strand breaks in Chinese hamster ovary cells was measured with the comet assay after continuous wave ultrasound or lithotripter shock wave exposure. Cell lysis and hydrogen peroxide production were measured to gauge the level of inertial cavitation activity. Significant DNA damage was found after 2.17-MHz ultrasound exposure at 37 degrees C to 0.82 MPa for 2 min or 4 min, and to 0.58 MPs for 4 min. A significant portion of the damage induced at the 0.82-MPa level was repaired by the cells when warmed. Neither exposure to 500 or 1000 shock waves at 37 degrees C in a thin-walled tube, nor exposure to 1000, 1500 or 2000 shock waves at 25 degrees C in a polyethylene pipette bulb produced a significant effect, when the flash of light from the spark-gap discharge was blocked. This finding was consistent with the generally lower lysis and hydrogen peroxide production by the shock wave exposure.

  6. Optimization of parameters for photodisruptively nucleated ultrasonic cavitation in water and tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Greg J. R.; Marre, Gabrielle; Miller, Doug L.; Williams, A. R.

    2000-06-01

    Laser induced optical breakdown (LIOB) in fluids produces a localized plasma, an expanding radial shock wave front, heat transfer from the plasma to the fluid, and the formation of cavitation bubbles. Collectively these phenomena are referred to as photodisruption. Subjecting photodisruptively produced cavitation bubble nuclei to an ultrasonic field can result in strong cavitation and local cellular destruction. The ability of ultrafast lasers to produce spatially localized photodisruptions with microJoule pulse energies in combination with the possibility of larger scale tissue destruction using ultrasound presents an attractive and novel technique for selective and non-invasive tissue modification, referred to as photodisruptively nucleated ultrasonic cavitation (PNUC). Optimization of PNUC parameters in a confocal laser and ultrasound geometry is presented. The cavitation signal as measured with an ultrasound receiver was maximized to determine optimal laser and ultrasound spatial overlap in water. A flow chamber was used to evaluate the effect of the laser and ultrasound parameters on the lysis of whole canine red blood cells in saline. Parameters evaluated included laser pulse energy and ultrasound pressure amplitude.

  7. Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances Nanoparticle Penetration into Breast Cancer Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Stephanie J.; Serna, Juliana Valencia; Sunny, Steffi; Zhou, Yun; Deng, Cheri X.; El-Sayed, Mohamed E.H.

    2010-01-01

    Effective treatment of solid tumors requires homogenous distribution of anticancer drugs within the entire tumor volume to deliver lethal concentrations to resistant cancer cells and tumor-initiating cancer stem cells. However, penetration of small molecular weight chemotherapeutic agents and drug-loaded polymeric and lipid particles into the hypoxic and necrotic regions of solid tumors remains a significant challenge. This article reports the results of pulsed ultrasound enhanced penetration of nano-sized fluorescent particles into MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids (300-350 μm diameter) as a function of particle size and charge. With pulsed ultrasound application in the presence of microbubbles, small (20 nm) particles achieve 6-20 folds higher penetration and concentration in the spheroid's core compared to those not exposed to ultrasound. Increase in particle size to 40 nm and 100 nm results in their effective penetration into the spheroid's core to 9 and 3 folds, respectively. In addition, anionic carboxylate particles achieved higher penetration (2.3, 3.7, and 4.7 folds) into the core (0.25r) of MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids compared to neutral (2.2, 1.9, and 2.4 folds) and cationic particles (1.5, 1.4 and 1.9 folds) upon US exposure for 30, 60, and 90 seconds under the same experimental conditions. These results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing pulsed ultrasound to increase the penetration of nano-sized particles into MCF-7 spheroids mimicking tumor tissue. The effects of particle properties on the penetration enhancement were also illustrated. PMID:20957996

  8. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  9. Unmyelinated Peripheral Nerves Can Be Stimulated in Vitro Using Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher J; Haqshenas, Seyyed R; Rothwell, John; Saffari, Nader

    2017-10-01

    Appreciation for the medical and research potential of ultrasound neuromodulation is growing rapidly, with potential applications in non-invasive treatment of neurodegenerative disease and functional brain mapping spurring recent progress. However, little progress has been made in our understanding of the ultrasound-tissue interaction. The current study tackles this issue by measuring compound action potentials (CAPs) from an ex vivo crab walking leg nerve bundle and analysing the acoustic nature of successful stimuli using a passive cavitation detector (PCD). An unimpeded ultrasound path, new acoustic analysis techniques and simple biological targets are used to detect different modes of cavitation and narrow down the candidate biological effectors with high sensitivity. In the present case, the constituents of unmyelinated axonal tissue alone are found to be sufficient to generate de novo action potentials under ultrasound, the stimulation of which is significantly correlated to the presence of inertial cavitation and is never observed in its absence. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R. T.; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip. PMID:23964308

  11. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes with inertial cavitation generated by confocal ultrasound in AT2 Dunning rat tumour model.

    PubMed

    Mestas, Jean-Louis; Fowler, R Andrew; Evjen, Tove J; Somaglino, Lucie; Moussatov, Alexei; Ngo, Jacqueline; Chesnais, Sabrina; Røgnvaldsson, Sibylla; Fossheim, Sigrid L; Nilssen, Esben A; Lafon, Cyril

    2014-09-01

    The combination of liposomal doxorubicin (DXR) and confocal ultrasound (US) was investigated for the enhancement of drug delivery in a rat tumour model. The liposomes, based on the unsaturated phospholipid dierucoylphosphocholine, were designed to be stable during blood circulation in order to maximize accumulation in tumour tissue and to release drug content upon US stimulation. A confocal US setup was developed for delivering inertial cavitation to tumours in a well-controlled and reproducible manner. In vitro studies confirm drug release from liposomes as a function of inertial cavitation dose, while in vivo pharmacokinetic studies show long blood circulation times and peak tumour accumulation at 24-48 h post intravenous administration. Animals injected 6 mg kg(-1) liposomal DXR exposed to US treatment 48 h after administration show significant tumour growth delay compared to control groups. A liposomal DXR dose of 3 mg kg(-1), however, did not induce any significant therapeutic response. This study demonstrates that inertial cavitation can be generated in such a fashion as to disrupt drug carrying liposomes which have accumulated in the tumour, and thereby increase therapeutic effect with a minimum direct effect on the tissue. Such an approach is an important step towards a therapeutic application of cavitation-induced drug delivery and reduced chemotherapy toxicity.

  12. Temporal effect of inertial cavitation with and without microbubbles on surface deformation of agarose S gel in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Y; Matsuura, T; Kodama, T

    2015-01-01

    Sonoporation has the potential to deliver extraneous molecules into a target tissue non-invasively. There have been numerous investigations of cell membrane permeabilization induced by microbubbles, but very few studies have been carried out to investigate sonoporation by inertial cavitation, especially from a temporal perspective. In the present paper, we show the temporal variations in nano/micro-pit formations following the collapse of inertial cavitation bubbles, with and without Sonazoid® microbubbles. Using agarose S gel as a target material, erosion experiments were conducted in the presence of 1-MHz focused ultrasound applied for various exposure times, Tex (0.002-60 s). Conventional microscopy was used to measure temporal variations in micrometer-scale pit numbers, and atomic force microscopy utilized to detect surface roughness on a nanometer scale. The results demonstrated that nanometer-scale erosion was predominantly caused by Sonazoid® microbubbles and C4F10 gas bubbles for 0.002 scavitation bubbles such as C4F10 gas bubbles and vapor bubbles, increased exponentially with increasing Tex in the range 0.1 scavitation-induced sonoporation can produce various pore sizes in membranes, enabling the delivery of external molecules of differing sizes into cells or tissues.

  13. The Effect of Cavitating Ultrasound on the Aqueous Phase Hydrogenation of Cis-2-buten-1-ol and Cis-2-penten-1-ol on Pd-black

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Hart, Todd R.; White, James F.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2005-07-15

    We have studied the effect of cavitating ultrasound on the heterogeneous aqueous hydrogenation of cis-2-buten-1-ol (C4 olefin) and cis-2-penten-1-ol (C5 olefin) on Pd-black to form the trans-olefins (trans-2-buten-1-ol and trans-2-penten-1-ol) and saturated alcohols (1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively). Silent (and magnetically stirred) experiments served as control experiments. As described in an earlier publication by our group, we have added an inert dopant, 1-propanol, in the reaction mixture to ensure the rapid onset of cavitation in the ultrasound-assisted reactions that can lead to altered selectivity compared to silent reaction systems [Disselkamp et al., J. Catal., 227 (2004) 552]. The motivation for this study is to examine whether cavitating ultrasound can reduce the [trans-olefin/saturated alcohol] molar ratio during the course of the reaction. This could have practical application in that it may offer an alternative processing methodology of synthesizing healthier edible seed oils by reducing trans-fat content. We have observed that cavitating ultrasound results in a [(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)ultrasound/(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)silent] ratio quantity less than 0.5 at the reaction mid-point for both the C4 and C5 olefin systems. This indicates that ultrasound reduces trans-olefin production compared to the silent control experiment. Furthermore, there is an added 30% reduction for the C5 versus C4 olefin compounds again at reaction mid-point. We attribute differences in the ratio quantity as a moment of inertia effect. In principle, the C4 versus C5 olefins has a {approx}52% increase in moment of inertia about C2=C3 double bond slowing isomerization. Since seed oils are C18 multiple cis olefins and have an moment of inertia even greater than our C5 olefin here, our study suggests that even a greater reduction in trans-olefin content may occur for partial hydrogenation of C18 seed oils.

  14. The effect of cavitating ultrasound on the aqueous phase hydrogenation of cis-2-buten-1-ol and cis-2-penten-1-ol on Pd-black

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Hart, Todd R.; White, James F.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2005-07-15

    We have studied the effect of cavitating ultrasound on the heterogeneous aqueous hydrogenation of cis-2-buten-1-ol (C4 olefin) and cis-2-penten-1-ol (C5 olefin) on Pd-black to form the trans-olefins (trans-2-buten-1-ol and trans-2-penten-1-ol) and saturated alcohols (1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively). Silent (and magnetically stirred) experiments served as control experiments. As described in an earlier publication by our group, we have added an inert dopant, 1-propanol, in the reaction mixture to ensure the rapid onset of cavitation in the ultrasound-assisted reactions that can lead to altered selectivity compared to silent reaction systems [R.S. Disselkamp, Ya-Huei Chin, C.H.F. Peden, J. Catal. 227 (2004) 552]. The motivation for this study is to examine whether cavitating ultrasound can reduce the [trans-olefin/saturated alcohol] molar ratio during the course of the reaction. This could have practical application in that it may offer an alternative processing methodology of synthesizing healthier edible seed oils by reducing trans-fat content.We have observed that cavitating ultrasound results in a [(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)ultrasound/(trans-olefin/saturated alcohol)silent] ratio quantity less than 0.5 at the reaction mid-point for both the C4 and C5 olefin systems. This indicates that ultrasound reduces trans-olefin production compared to the silent control experiment. Furthermore, there is an added 30% reduction for the C5 versus C4 olefin compounds again at reaction mid-point. We attribute differences in the ratio quantity as a moment of inertia effect. In principle, the C4 versus C5 olefins has a {approx}52% increase in moment of inertia about C2 C3 double bond slowing isomerization. Since seed oils are C18 multiple cis-olefins and have a moment of inertia even greater than our C5 olefin here, our study suggests that even a greater reduction in trans-olefin content may occur for partial hydrogenation of C18 seed oils.

  15. Investigation of Cellular and Molecular Responses to Pulsed Focused Ultrasound in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Burks, Scott R.; Ziadloo, Ali; Hancock, Hilary A.; Chaudhry, Aneeka; Dean, Dana D.; Lewis, Bobbi K.; Frenkel, Victor; Frank, Joseph A.

    2011-01-01

    Continuous focused ultrasound (cFUS) has been widely used for thermal ablation of tissues, relying on continuous exposures to generate temperatures necessary to induce coagulative necrosis. Pulsed FUS (pFUS) employs non-continuous exposures that lower the rate of energy deposition and allow cooling to occur between pulses, thereby minimizing thermal effects and emphasizing effects created by non-thermal mechanisms of FUS (i.e., acoustic radiation forces and acoustic cavitation). pFUS has shown promise for a variety of applications including drug and nanoparticle delivery; however, little is understood about the effects these exposures have on tissue, especially with regard to cellular pro-homing factors (growth factors, cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules). We examined changes in murine hamstring muscle following pFUS or cFUS and demonstrate that pFUS, unlike cFUS, has little effect on the histological integrity of muscle and does not induce cell death. Infiltration of macrophages was observed 3 and 8 days following pFUS or cFUS exposures. pFUS increased expression of several cytokines (e.g., IL-1α, IL-1β, TNFα, INFγ, MIP-1α, MCP-1, and GMCSF) creating a local cytokine gradient on days 0 and 1 post-pFUS that returns to baseline levels by day 3 post-pFUS. pFUS exposures induced upregulation of other signaling molecules (e.g., VEGF, FGF, PlGF, HGF, and SDF-1α) and cell adhesion molecules (e.g., ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) on muscle vasculature. The observed molecular changes in muscle following pFUS may be utilized to target cellular therapies by increasing homing to areas of pathology. PMID:21931834

  16. Pre-breakdown cavitation nanopores in the dielectric fluid in the inhomogeneous, pulsed electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, Mikhail; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2015-10-01

    This paper discusses the nanopores emerging and developing in a liquid dielectric under the action of the ponderomotive electrostrictive forces in a nonuniform electric field. It is shown that the gradient of the electric field in the vicinity of the rupture (cavitation nanopore) substantially increases and determines whether the rupture grows or collapses. The cavitation rupture in the liquid (nanopore) tends to stretch along the lines of the original field. The mechanism of the breakdown associated with the generation of secondary ruptures in the vicinity of the poles of the nanopore is proposed. The estimations of the extension time for nanopore in water and oil (polar and nonpolar liquids, respectively) are presented. A new mechanism of nano- and subnanosecond breakdown in the insulating (transformer) oil that can be realized in the vicinity of water microdroplets in nanosecond high-voltage devices is considered.

  17. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Yang, K; Cui, J; Ye, J Y; Deng, C X

    2012-01-10

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustical, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency ultrasound (7.44MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40μs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d=0.75. The maximum mean

  18. Development of Targeted Nanobubbles for Ultrasound Imaging and Ablation of Metastatic Prostate Cancer Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    the ultrasound pulses to vaporize the nanodroplets delivered to the surface of the tumor nodules and form gas bubbles. Using the resulting gas...of 1 Hz. The camera was externally triggered from the FPGA board with each ultrasound pulse . The camera recorded 20 images after each pulse . In...different samples at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.5 Hz. The PRF was kept very low to minimize the possibility that cavitation from 1

  19. Antitumor effect of microbubbles enhanced by low frequency ultrasound cavitation on prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YU; HU, BING; DIAO, XUEHONG; ZHANG, JIZHEN

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect induced by low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound (US) radiation combined with intravenous injection of microbubbles (Mbs) on prostate carcinoma Du145 xenografts in nude mice. Du145 prostate tumors were percutaneously implanted in 40 nude mice, which were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 each): US+Mbs, US, Mbs and control groups. The mice in the US+Mbs group were treated with 20 kHz, 200 mW/cm2 US radiation and with 0.2 ml Mbs injected intravenously. Mice in the US and Mbs groups were only treated with US radiation and injection of Mbs, respectively. Tumors were measured with sonography, and the ratio of antitumor growth was calculated. The mice were sacrificed 14 days after treatment. Specimens of the tumor tissues were observed pathologically using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor were compared among groups by immunohistochemistry. The average gross tumor volume of the US+Mbs group was significantly reduced compared with the other groups following treatment (P<0.05). The ratio of the antitumor growth in the US+Mbs group was significantly greater than that of the US and Mbs group (P<0.05). Histological examination showed signs of tumor cell injury in the US+Mbs group. Examination by electron microscopy revealed vessel injury in the endothelium in the tumors treated with US+Mbs. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor in the US+Mbs group were significantly less than that of other groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, low frequency US of 20 kHz radiation combined with Mbs may be used to inhibit the growth of human prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice, and the effect is likely realized through microvessel destruction caused by cavitation. PMID:22969866

  20. Antitumor effect of microbubbles enhanced by low frequency ultrasound cavitation on prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Hu, Bing; Diao, Xuehong; Zhang, Jizhen

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antitumor effect induced by low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound (US) radiation combined with intravenous injection of microbubbles (Mbs) on prostate carcinoma Du145 xenografts in nude mice. Du145 prostate tumors were percutaneously implanted in 40 nude mice, which were randomly divided into 4 groups (n=10 each): US+Mbs, US, Mbs and control groups. The mice in the US+Mbs group were treated with 20 kHz, 200 mW/cm(2) US radiation and with 0.2 ml Mbs injected intravenously. Mice in the US and Mbs groups were only treated with US radiation and injection of Mbs, respectively. Tumors were measured with sonography, and the ratio of antitumor growth was calculated. The mice were sacrificed 14 days after treatment. Specimens of the tumor tissues were observed pathologically using light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor were compared among groups by immunohistochemistry. The average gross tumor volume of the US+Mbs group was significantly reduced compared with the other groups following treatment (P<0.05). The ratio of the antitumor growth in the US+Mbs group was significantly greater than that of the US and Mbs group (P<0.05). Histological examination showed signs of tumor cell injury in the US+Mbs group. Examination by electron microscopy revealed vessel injury in the endothelium in the tumors treated with US+Mbs. Microvessel density and the average optical density of vascular endothelial growth factor in the US+Mbs group were significantly less than that of other groups (P<0.05). In conclusion, low frequency US of 20 kHz radiation combined with Mbs may be used to inhibit the growth of human prostate carcinoma xenografts in nude mice, and the effect is likely realized through microvessel destruction caused by cavitation.

  1. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Yang, K.; Cui, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2011-01-01

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustic, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency (7.44 MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5 MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40 µs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d = 0.75. The maximum mean radius of the

  2. Relations between acoustic cavitation and skin resistance during intermediate- and high-frequency sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Rich, Kyle T; Hoerig, Cameron L; Rao, Marepalli B; Mast, T Douglas

    2014-11-28

    Enhanced skin permeability is known to be achieved during sonophoresis due to ultrasound-induced cavitation. However, the mechanistic role of cavitation during sonophoresis has been extensively investigated only for low-frequency (LFS, <100 kHz) applications. Here, mechanisms of permeability-enhancing stable and inertial cavitation were investigated by passively monitoring subharmonic and broadband emissions arising from cavitation isolated within or external to porcine skin in vitro during intermediate- (IFS, 100-700 kHz) and high-frequency sonophoresis (HFS, >1 MHz). The electrical resistance of skin, a surrogate measure of the permeability of skin to a variety of compounds, was measured to quantify the reduction and subsequent recovery of the skin barrier during and after exposure to pulsed (1 second pulse, 20% duty cycle) 0.41 and 2.0 MHz ultrasound over a range of acoustic powers (0-21.7 W) for 30 min. During IFS, significant skin resistance reductions and acoustic emissions from cavitation were measured exclusively when cavitation was isolated outside of the skin. Time-dependent skin resistance reductions measured during IFS correlated significantly with subharmonic and broadband emission levels. During HFS, significant skin resistance reductions were accompanied by significant acoustic emissions from cavitation measured during trials that isolated cavitation activity either outside of skin or within skin. Time-dependent skin resistance reductions measured during HFS correlated significantly greater with subharmonic than with broadband emission levels. The reduction of the skin barrier due to sonophoresis was reversible in all trials; however, effects incurred during IFS recovered more slowly and persisted over a longer period of time than HFS. These results quantitatively demonstrate the significance of cavitation during sonophoresis and suggest that the mechanisms and post-treatment longevity of permeability enhancement due to IFS and HFS treatments are

  3. Pulsed Ultrasound Enhances the Killing of Escherichia coli Biofilms by Aminoglycoside Antibiotics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rediske, Andrea M.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Nelson, Jared L.; Robison, Rachel L.; Schaalje, G. Bruce; Robison, Richard A.; Pitt, William G.

    2000-01-01

    Escherichia coli biofilms on two polyethylene disks were implanted subcutaneously into rabbits receiving systemic gentamicin. Ultrasound was applied for 24 h to one disk. Both disks were removed, and viable bacteria were counted. Pulsed ultrasound significantly reduced bacterial viability below that of nontreated biofilms without damage to the skin. PMID:10681355

  4. Study of the onset of the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators with pulse ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Castro, Angelica; Hoyos, Mauricio

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, we introduced pulse mode ultrasound as a new method for reducing and controlling the acoustic streaming in parallel plate resonators (Hoyos and Castro, 2013). Here, by modifying other parameters such as the resonator geometry and the particle size, we have found a threshold for particle manipulation with ultrasonic standing waves in confined resonators without the influence of the acoustic streaming. We demonstrate that pulse mode ultrasound open the possibility of manipulating particles smaller than 1 μm size.

  5. Pulsed ultrasound expands the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, David S.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Dancy, Jimena G.; Adapa, Arjun R.; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Kim, Anthony J.; Frenkel, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain plays an important role in biological processes, therapeutic delivery, and clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system. Recently, ultrasound has been used to enhance the dispersion of locally administered molecules and particles within the brain, but ultrasound-mediated effects on the brain parenchyma remain poorly understood. We combined an electron microscopy-based ultrastructural analysis with high-resolution tracking of non-adhesive nanoparticles in order to probe changes in the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain following a non-destructive pulsed ultrasound regimen known to alter diffusivity in other tissues. Freshly obtained rat brain neocortical slices underwent sham treatment or pulsed, low intensity ultrasound for 5 minutes at 1 MHz. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intact cells and blood vessels and evidence of enlarged spaces, particularly adjacent to blood vessels, in ultrasound-treated brain slices. Additionally, ultrasound significantly increased the diffusion rate of 100 nm, 200 nm, and 500 nm nanoparticles that were injected into the brain slices, while 2000 nm particles were unaffected. In ultrasound-treated slices, 91.6% of the 100 nm particles, 20.7% of the 200 nm particles, 13.8% of the 500 nm particles, and 0% of the 2000 nm particles exhibited diffusive motion. Thus, pulsed ultrasound can have meaningful structural effects on the brain extracellular and perivascular spaces without evidence of tissue disruption.Keywords: Ultrasound, Extracellular space, Nanoparticle, Diffusion PMID:27369449

  6. Pulsed ultrasound expands the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain.

    PubMed

    Hersh, David S; Nguyen, Ben A; Dancy, Jimena G; Adapa, Arjun R; Winkles, Jeffrey A; Woodworth, Graeme F; Kim, Anthony J; Frenkel, Victor

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion within the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain plays an important role in biological processes, therapeutic delivery, and clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system. Recently, ultrasound has been used to enhance the dispersion of locally administered molecules and particles within the brain, but ultrasound-mediated effects on the brain parenchyma remain poorly understood. We combined an electron microscopy-based ultrastructural analysis with high-resolution tracking of non-adhesive nanoparticles in order to probe changes in the extracellular and perivascular spaces of the brain following a non-destructive pulsed ultrasound regimen known to alter diffusivity in other tissues. Freshly obtained rat brain neocortical slices underwent sham treatment or pulsed, low intensity ultrasound for 5min at 1MHz. Transmission electron microscopy revealed intact cells and blood vessels and evidence of enlarged spaces, particularly adjacent to blood vessels, in ultrasound-treated brain slices. Additionally, ultrasound significantly increased the diffusion rate of 100nm, 200nm, and 500nm nanoparticles that were injected into the brain slices, while 2000nm particles were unaffected. In ultrasound-treated slices, 91.6% of the 100nm particles, 20.7% of the 200nm particles, 13.8% of the 500nm particles, and 0% of the 2000nm particles exhibited diffusive motion. Thus, pulsed ultrasound can have meaningful structural effects on the brain extracellular and perivascular spaces without evidence of tissue disruption.

  7. Application of ultrasound in periodontics: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Vive K.; Mohan, Ranjana; Bains, Rhythm

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic is a branch of acoustics concerned with sound vibrations in frequency ranges above audible level. Ultrasound uses the transmission and reflection of acoustic energy. A pulse is propagated and its reflection is received, both by the transducer. For clinical purposes ultrasound is generated by transducers, which converts electrical energy into ultrasonic waves. This is usually achieved by magnetostriction or piezoelectricity. Primary effects of ultrasound are thermal, mechanical (cavitation and microstreaming), and chemical (sonochemicals). Knowledge of the basic and other secondary effects of ultrasound is essential for the development of techniques of application. PMID:20142941

  8. High-speed droplet generation on demand driven by pulse laser-induced cavitation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Yong; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chen, Yue; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2011-03-21

    We report on a pulse laser-driven droplet generation (PLDG) mechanism that enables on-demand droplet generation at rates up to 10,000 droplets per second in a single-layer PDMS-based microfluidic device. Injected droplet volumes can be continuously tuned between 1 pL and 150 pL with less than 1% volume variation. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  9. All-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colchester, Richard J.; Noimark, Sacha; Mosse, Charles A.; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Parkin, Ivan P.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-02-01

    High frequency ultrasound probes such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters can be invaluable for guiding minimally invasive medical procedures in cardiology such as coronary stent placement and ablation. With current-generation ultrasound probes, ultrasound is generated and received electrically. The complexities involved with fabricating these electrical probes can result in high costs that limit their clinical applicability. Additionally, it can be challenging to achieve wide transmission bandwidths and adequate wideband reception sensitivity with small piezoelectric elements. Optical methods for transmitting and receiving ultrasound are emerging as alternatives to their electrical counterparts. They offer several distinguishing advantages, including the potential to generate and detect the broadband ultrasound fields (tens of MHz) required for high resolution imaging. In this study, we developed a miniature, side-looking, pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging, with fibre-optic transmission and reception. The axial resolution was better than 70 microns, and the imaging depth in tissue was greater than 1 cm. Ultrasound transmission was performed by photoacoustic excitation of a carbon nanotube/polydimethylsiloxane composite material; ultrasound reception, with a fibre-optic Fabry-Perot cavity. Ex vivo tissue studies, which included healthy swine tissue and diseased human tissue, demonstrated the strong potential of this technique. To our knowledge, this is the first study to achieve an all-optical pulse-echo ultrasound probe for intravascular imaging. The potential for performing all-optical B-mode imaging (2D and 3D) with virtual arrays of transmit/receive elements, and hybrid imaging with pulse-echo ultrasound and photoacoustic sensing are discussed.

  10. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm2) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers. PMID:26379793

  11. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm(2)) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers.

  12. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in dentofacial tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Kuroda, Shingo; Horiuchi, Shinya; Tabata, Akira; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2015-04-01

    Oral and maxillofacial diseases affect millions of people worldwide and hence tissue engineering can be considered an interesting and clinically relevant approach to regenerate orofacial tissues after being affected by different diseases. Among several innovations for tissue regeneration, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used extensively in medicine as a therapeutic, operative, and diagnostic tool. LIPUS is accepted to promote bone fracture repair and regeneration. Furthermore, the effect of LIPUS on soft tissues regeneration has been paid much attention, and many studies have performed to evaluate the potential use of LIPUS to tissue engineering soft tissues. The present article provides an overview about the status of LIPUS stimulation as a tool to be used to enhance regeneration/tissue engineering. This review consists of five parts. Part 1 is a brief introduction of the acoustic description of LIPUS and mechanical action. In Part 2, biological problems in dentofacial tissue engineering are proposed. Part 3 explores biologic mechanisms of LIPUS to cells and tissues in living body. In Part 4, the effectiveness of LIPUS on cell metabolism and tissue regeneration in dentistry are summarized. Finally, Part 5 relates the possibility of clinical application of LIPUS in orthodontics. The present review brings out better understanding of the bioeffect of LIPUS therapy on orofacial tissues which is essential to the successful integration of management remedies for tissue regeneration/engineering. To develop an evidence-based approach to clinical management and treatment of orofacial degenerative diseases using LIPUS, we would like to be in full pursuit of LIPUS biotherapy. Still, there are many challenges for this relatively new strategy, but the up to date achievements using it promises to go far beyond the present possibilities.

  13. GPU simulation of nonlinear propagation of dual band ultrasound pulse complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Kvam, Johannes Angelsen, Bjørn A. J.; Elster, Anne C.

    2015-10-28

    In a new method of ultrasound imaging, called SURF imaging, dual band pulse complexes composed of overlapping low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) pulses are transmitted, where the frequency ratio LF:HF ∼ 1 : 20, and the relative bandwidth of both pulses are ∼ 50 − 70%. The LF pulse length is hence ∼ 20 times the HF pulse length. The LF pulse is used to nonlinearly manipulate the material elasticity observed by the co-propagating HF pulse. This produces nonlinear interaction effects that give more information on the propagation of the pulse complex. Due to the large difference in frequency and pulse length between the LF and the HF pulses, we have developed a dual level simulation where the LF pulse propagation is first simulated independent of the HF pulse, using a temporal sampling frequency matched to the LF pulse. A separate equation for the HF pulse is developed, where the the presimulated LF pulse modifies the propagation velocity. The equations are adapted to parallel processing in a GPU, where nonlinear simulations of a typical HF beam of 10 MHz down to 40 mm is done in ∼ 2 secs in a standard GPU. This simulation is hence very useful for studying the manipulation effect of the LF pulse on the HF pulse.

  14. Arterial pulse wave propagation velocity in healthy dogs by pulse wave Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Rodrigo B; Pereira, Lucas A; Basso, Alice F; da Fonseca, Ingrid S; Alves, Lorena A

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) values in healthy dogs using pulse wave Doppler ultrasound. A secondary aim was to determine the feasibility of this method and to report the intra- and interobserver reproducibilities of the PWV in conscious dogs. The data were studied in 30 healthy, adult, male (n = 15) and female (n = 15) dogs. The time interval marked between the R wave peak of the electrocardiogram and the intersection of the blood flow wave upstroke of the Doppler spectrum with the baseline of zero frequency was determined for the carotid (T1) and for the femoral (T2) arteries. The distance covered by the pulse wave (L) was determined. The PWV was then calculated using the following formula: L/T2 - T1. The mean values of PWV calculated from the total sample (n = 30) evaluated were 13.41 ± 2.20 m/s. No significant statistical difference was observed for the PWV measurements between males (14.82 ± 3.18 m/s) and females (12.64 ± 2.45 m/s). The analysis revealed no intra nor interobserver differences. A reasonable reproducibility of the PWV measurements was showed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), and the coefficients of variation (CV). These data demonstrate that noninvasive vascular Doppler analysis is a feasible and reproducible method to determine the carotid-femoral PWV in dogs.

  15. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    SciTech Connect

    Takahira, Hiroyuki Ogasawara, Toshiyuki Mori, Naoto Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-28

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t{sub 0} to a characteristic time of wave propagation t{sub S}, η = t{sub 0}/t{sub s}, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  16. Variations of bubble cavitation and temperature elevation during acculysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yufeng; Gao, Xiaobin Wilson

    2017-03-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is effective in both thermal ablations and soft-tissue fragmentation. Mechanical and thermal effects depend on the operating parameters and vary with the progress of therapy. Different types of lesions could be produced with the pulse duration of 5-30 ms, much longer than histotripsy burst but shorter than the time for tissue boiling, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.2-5 Hz. Meanwhile, bubble cavitation and temperature elevation in the focal region were measured by passive cavitation detection (PCD) and thermocouples, respectively. Temperature in the pre-focal region is always higher than those at the focal and post-focal position in all tests. Overall, it is suggested that appropriate synergy and monitoring of mechanical and thermal effects would broaden the HIFU application and enhance its efficiency as well as safety.

  17. Alternate pulses of ultrasound and electricity enhanced electrochemical process for p-nitrophenol degradation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fengchun; Xu, Yun; Xia, Kunyuan; Jia, Caixia; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    A novel alternated ultrasonic and electric pulse enhanced electrochemical process was developed and used for investigating its effectiveness on the degradation of p-nitrophenol (PNP) in an aqueous solution. The impacts of pulse mode, pH, cell voltage, supporting electrolyte concentration, ultrasonic power and the initial concentration of PNP on the performance of PNP degradation were evaluated. Possible pathway of PNP degradation in this system was proposed based on the intermediates identified by GC-MS. Experimental results showed that 94.1% of PNP could be removed at 2h in the dual-pulse ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (dual-pulse US-EC) process at mild operating conditions (i.e., pulse mode of electrochemical pulse time (TEC)=50 ms and ultrasonic pulse time (T US)=100 ms, initial pH of 3.0, cell voltage of 10 V, Na2SO4 concentration of 0.05 M, ultrasonic powder of 48.8 W and initial concentration of PNP of 100mg/L), compared with 89.0%, 58.9%, 2.4% in simultaneous ultrasound enhanced electrochemical (US-EC) process, pulsed electrochemical (EC) process and pulsed ultrasound (US), respectively. Moreover, energy used in the dual-pulse US-EC process was reduced by 50.4% as compared to the US-EC process. The degradation of PNP in the pulsed EC process, US-EC process and dual-pulse process followed pseudo-first-order kinetics. Therefore, the dual-pulse US-EC process was found to be a more effective technique for the degradation of PNP and would have a promising application in wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  19. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  20. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on l929 fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Franco de Oliveira, Rodrigo; Pires Oliveira, Deise A. A.; Soares, Cristina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ultrasound has proven to be an important therapeutic resource regarding musculoskeletal disease and is routinely used in physical therapy and medicine both therapeutically and diagnostically. The aim of the present study was to analyse the effects with different ultrasound intensities in order to establish the ideal radiation level in cell cultures. Material and methods Fibroblast cell cultures were divided into five groups: group I – control (did not receive irradiation); group II – 0.2 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle); group III – 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle); group IV – 0.2 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle); and group V – 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle). Each group was irradiated with 24-h intervals, observing the following post-irradiation incubation times: 24, 48, 72 and 96 h; after 24 h of each irradiation, cultures were analysed using the MTT method. Results Analysis of the results following ultrasound irradiation demonstrated that the effect of ultrasound with 0.6 W/cm2 in pulsed mode at 10% (1 : 9 duty cycle) was statistically significant in relation to ultrasonic irradiation in pulsed mode at 20% (2 : 8 duty cycle) (p < 0.05). Conclusions According to parameters used in the irradiation of cultivated fibroblasts, the pulse mode regime and the control of intensity are of fundamental importance for the optimal use of therapeutic ultrasound. Furthermore, low and medium intensities decreased cell damage, which establishes that acoustic pulsed energy induces the proliferation of fibroblast cells. PMID:22291760

  1. Effects of Temperature on the Histotripsy Intrinsic Threshold for Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Xu, Zhen; Maxwell, Adam; Mancia, Lauren; Zhang, Xi; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Duryea, Alexander; Sukovich, Jonathan; Hall, Tim; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles

    2016-05-10

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a dense cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has demonstrated that a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single acoustic pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude exceeds a threshold intrinsic to the medium. The intrinsic thresholds in soft tissues and tissue phantoms that are water-based are similar to the intrinsic threshold of water over an experimentally verified frequency range of 0.3-3 MHz. Previous work studying the histotripsy intrinsic threshold has been limited to experiments performed at room temperature (~20°C). In this study, we investigate the effects of temperature on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold in water, which is essential to accurately predict the intrinsic thresholds expected over the full range of in vivo therapeutic temperatures. Based on previous work studying the histotripsy intrinsic threshold and classical nucleation theory, we hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold will decrease with increasing temperature. To test this hypothesis, the intrinsic threshold in water was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of generating cavitation bubbles was measured by applying a single pulse with one high amplitude negative cycle at 1 MHz to distilled, degassed water at temperatures ranging from 10°C-90°C. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured vs. pressure amplitude. The results indicate that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which the cavitation probability=0.5) significantly decreases with increasing temperature, showing a nearly linear decreasing trend from 29.8±0.4 MPa at 10˚C to 14.9±1.4 MPa at 90˚C. Overall, the results of this study support our hypothesis that the intrinsic threshold is highly dependent upon the temperature

  2. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1-4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5-12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound.

  3. Influence of shock wave pressure amplitude and pulse repetition frequency on the lifespan, size and number of transient cavities in the field of an electromagnetic lithotripter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Peter; Jöchle, Knut; Debus, Jürgen

    1998-10-01

    Monitoring the generation of cavitation is of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic use of ultrasound in medicine, since cavitation is considered to play a major role in nonthermal ultrasound interactions with tissue. Important parameters are the number of cavitation events and the energy released during the bubble collapse. This energy is correlated to the maximum bubble radius which is related to the cavitation lifespan. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the influence of the acoustic pressure amplitude and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in the field of a lithotripter (Lithostar, Siemens) on the number, size and lifespan of transient cavitation bubbles in water. We used scattered laser light recorded by a photodiode and stroboscopic photographs to monitor the cavitation activity. We found that PRF (range 0.5-5 Hz) had no influence on the cavitation bubble lifespan and size, whereas lifespan and size increased with the acoustic pressure amplitude. In contrast, the number of cavitation events strongly increased with PRF, whereas the pressure amplitude had no significant influence on the number of cavitation events. Thus, by varying the pressure amplitude and PRF, it might be possible to deliver a defined relative number of cavitations at a defined relative energy level in a defined volume. This seems to be relevant to further studies that address the biological effects of transient cavitation occurring in the fields of lithotripters.

  4. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A; Fowlkes, J Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Bailey, Michael R; Xu, Zhen

    2011-10-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5-20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  5. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Xu, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5−20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis. PMID:21973343

  6. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-01-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  7. Simultaneous Real-time Monitoring of Thermal and Mechanical Tissue Responses to Pulsed HIFU Using Pulse-Echo Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dalong; Ebbini, Emad S.

    2009-04-01

    Pulsed HIFU beams are being increasingly used in a number of therapeutic applications, including thermal therapy, drug and gene delivery, and hemostasis. This wide range of applications is based on a range of HIFU-tissue interactions from purely thermal to purely mechanical to produce the desired therapeutic effects. We have developed a real-time system for monitoring tissue displacements in response to pulsed HIFU beams at high PRFs. The imaging component of the system comprises an FPGA-based signal processing unit for real-time filtering of M-mode pulse-echo data followed by real-time speckle tracking for tissue displacements before, during, and after exposure to pulsed HIFU. The latter can be used in evaluating temperature and/or viscoelastic response to the applied HIFU beam. The high acquisition rate of the M-mode system, together with the real-time displacement tracking are necessary for simultaneous estimation and separation of the thermal and viscoelastic tissue responses. In addition, the system provides a real-time link to MATLAB-based nonlinear spectral estimation routines for cavitation detection. The system has been tested in vitro bovine heart tissue and the results show that the displacement tracking captures the full dynamics of tissue displacements for the full range of HIFU exposures of interest.

  8. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Fractionation of Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Remnant bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy soft tissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect—referred to as cavitation memory—manifests in inefficient lesion formation, as certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated while others remain undertreated. While the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remnant nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remnant bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubble removal sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real-time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz in order to provide a point of comparison when cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble removal sequences identified for the single-focal-spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 × 10

  9. Double pulse laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of a solid in water: Effect of hydrostatic pressure on laser induced plasma, cavitation bubble and emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Claros, M.; Dell'Aglio, M.; Gaudiuso, R.; Santagata, A.; De Giacomo, A.; Fortes, F. J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the development of sensors use in exploration of the deep ocean. Techniques for the chemical analysis of submerged solids are of special interest, as they show promise for subsea mining applications where a rapid sorting of materials found in the sea bottom would improve efficiency. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) has demonstrated potential for this application thanks to its unique capability of providing the atomic composition of submerged solids. Here we present a study on the parameters that affect the spectral response of metallic targets in an oceanic pressure environment. Following laser excitation of the solid, the plasma persistence and the cavitation bubble size are considerably reduced as the hydrostatic pressure increases. These effects are of particular concern in dual pulse excitation as reported here, where a careful choice of the interpulse timing is required. Shadowgraphic images of the plasma demonstrate that cavitation bubbles are formed early after the plasma onset and that the effect of hydrostatic pressure is negligible during the early stage of plasma expansion. Contrarily to what is observed at atmospheric pressure, emission spectra observed at high pressures are characterized by self-absorbed atomic lines on continuum radiation resulting from strong radiative recombination in the electron-rich confined environment. This effect is much less evident with ionic lines due to the much higher energy of the levels involved and ionization energy of ions, as well as to the lower extent of absorption effects occurring in the inner part of the plasma, where ionized species are more abundant. As a result of the smaller shorter-lived cavitation bubble, the LIBS intensity enhancement resulting from dual pulse excitation is reduced when the applied pressure increases.

  10. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  11. Hadamard-Encoded Multi-Pulses for Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gong, Ping; Song, Pengfei; Chen, Shigao

    2017-08-30

    The development of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging offers great opportunities for new ultrasound clinical applications such as myocardial perfusion imaging and abdominal lesion characterization. In CEUS imaging, the contrast agents (i.e., microbubbles) are utilized to improve the contrast between blood and tissue based on their high nonlinearity under low ultrasound pressure. In this paper, we propose a new CEUS pulse sequence by combining Hadamard-encoded multi-pulses (HEM) with fundamental frequency bandpass filter (i.e., filter centered on transmit frequency). HEM consecutively emits multi-pulses encoded by a second-order Hadamard matrix in each of the two transmission events (i.e., pulse-echo events), as opposed to conventional CEUS methods which emit individual pulses in two separate transmission events (i.e., pulse inversion, amplitude modulation, and pulse inversion amplitude modulation combined). In HEM imaging, the microbubble responses can be improved by the longer transmit pulse, and the tissue harmonics can be suppressed by the fundamental frequency filter, leading to significantly improved contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In addition, the fast polarity change between consecutive coded pulse emissions excites strong nonlinear microbubble echoes, further enhancing the CEUS image quality. The spatial resolution of HEM image is compromised as compared to other microbubble imaging methods due to the longer transmit pulses and the lower imaging frequency (i.e., fundamental frequency). However, the resolution loss was shown to be negligible and could be offset by the significantly enhanced CTR, SNR and penetration depth. These properties of HEM can potentially facilitate robust CEUS imaging for a many clinical applications, especially for deep abdominal organs and heart.

  12. Pulsed Ultrasound Fails To Diminish Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Stay, Jeffrey C.; Richard, Mark D.; Draper, David O.; Schulthies, Shane S.; Durrant, Earlene

    1998-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the effects of pulsed ultrasound on swelling, muscle soreness perception, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and muscular strength. Design and Setting: Eight sets of concentric and eccentric actions induced delayed-onset muscle soreness of the elbow flexors. Group 1 received 20% pulsed ultrasound treatments (1-MHz, 7 minutes, 1.5 W/ cm2 temporal peak intensity) twice a day immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3, 24, 27, 48, 51, 72, and 75 hours postexercise. Group 2 received sham treatments immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3,27, 51, and 75 hours postexercise and true treatments of pulsed ultrasound at 24, 48, and 72 hours postexercise. Group 3 received sham treatments of no ultrasonic output immediately after postexercise assessments and at 3, 24, 27, 48, 51, 72, and 75 hours postexercise. Subjects: Thirty-six college-age females. Measurements: We recorded upper-arm circumference, perceived soreness, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and elbow-flexion strength before (pretest), immediately postexercise, and at 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours postexercise. Results: We noted differences over time but no treatment effect between groups or interactions between time and group for upper-arm circumference, perceived soreness, relaxed-elbow extension angle, or elbow-flexion strength. Conclusions: Pulsed ultrasound as used in this study did not significantly diminish the effects of delayed-onset muscle soreness on soreness perception, swelling, relaxed-elbow extension angle, and strength. PMID:16558532

  13. Direct Measurement of Basilar Membrane Motion Using Pulsed-Wave Doppler High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbatian, Z.; Garland, P.; Adamson, R. B. A.; Bance, M.; Brown, J. A.

    2011-11-01

    We present a preliminary report on the use of a new technique for measuring the motion of the basilar membrane, high-frequency ultrasound Doppler vibrometry. Using a custom-built, 1 mm diameter probe, we collected ultrasonic reflections from intracochlear structures and applied pulsed-wave Doppler vibrometry to measure the basilar membrane response to pressure applied in the ear canal.

  14. Observation and correction of transient cavitation-induced PRFS thermometry artifacts during radiofrequency ablation, using simultaneous ultrasound/MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Magalie; Terraz, Sylvain; Roland, Joerg; Dumont, Erik; Becker, Christoph D; Salomir, Rares

    2010-04-01

    MR thermometry based on the proton resonance frequency shift (PRFS) is the most commonly used method for the monitoring of thermal therapies. As the chemical shift of water protons is temperature dependent, the local temperature variation (relative to an initial baseline) may be calculated from time-dependent phase changes in gradient-echo (GRE) MR images. Dynamic phase shift in GRE images is also produced by time-dependent changes in the magnetic bulk susceptibility of tissue. Gas bubbles (known as "white cavitation") are frequently visualized near the RF electrode in ultrasonography-guided radio frequency ablation (RFA). This study aimed to investigate RFA-induced cavitation's effects by using simultaneous ultrasonography and MRI, to both visualize the cavitation and quantify the subsequent magnetic susceptibility-mediated errors in concurrent PRFS MR-thermometry (MRT) as well as to propose a first-order correction for the latter errors. RF heating in saline gels and in ex vivo tissues was performed with MR-compatible bipolar and monopolar electrodes inside a 1.5 T MR clinical scanner. Ultrasonography simultaneous to PRFS MRT was achieved using a MR-compatible phased-array ultrasonic transducer. PRFS MRT was performed interleaved in three orthogonal planes and compared to measurements from fluoroptic sensors, under low and, respectively, high RFA power levels. Control experiments were performed to isolate the main source of errors in standard PRFS thermometry. Ultrasonography, MRI and digital camera pictures clearly demonstrated generation of bubbles every time when operating the radio frequency equipment at therapeutic powers (> or = 30 W). Simultaneous bimodal (ultrasonography and MRI) monitoring of high power RF heating demonstrated a correlation between the onset of the PRFS-thermometry errors and the appearance of bubbles around the applicator. In an ex vivo study using a bipolar RF electrode under low power level (5 W), the MR measured temperature curves

  15. Cavitational Hydrothermal Oxidation: A New Remediation Process - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K. S.

    2001-07-05

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions.

  16. Characterization and Ultrasound-Pulse Mediated Destruction of Ultrasound Contrast Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik; Jain, Pankaj; Chatterjee, Dhiman

    2006-05-01

    Intravenously injected encapsulated microbubbles improve the contrast of an ultrasound image. Their destruction is used in measuring blood flow, stimulating arteriogenesis, and drug delivery. We measure attenuation and scattering of ultrasound through solution of commercial contrast agents such as Sonazoid and Definity. We have developed a number of different interfacial rheology models for the encapsulation of such microbubbles. By matching with experimentally measured attenuation, we obtain the characteristic rheological parameters. We compare model predictions with measured subharmonic responses. We also investigate microbubble destruction under acoustic excitation by measuring time-varying attenuation data.

  17. Clinical applications of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound and its potential role in urology

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Lei, Hongen; Lue, Tom F.; Guo, Yinglu

    2016-01-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a form of ultrasound that delivered at a much lower intensity (<3 W/cm2) than traditional ultrasound energy and output in the mode of pulse wave, and it is typically used for therapeutic purpose in rehabilitation medicine. LIPUS has minimal thermal effects due to its low intensity and pulsed output mode, and its non-thermal effects which is normally claimed to induce therapeutic changes in tissues attract most researchers’ attentions. LIPUS have been demonstrated to have a rage of biological effects on tissues, including promoting bone-fracture healing, accelerating soft-tissue regeneration, inhibiting inflammatory responses and so on. Recent studies showed that biological effects of LIPUS in healing morbid body tissues may be mainly associated with the upregulation of cell proliferation through activation of integrin receptors and Rho/ROCK/Src/ERK signaling pathway, and with promoting multilineage differentiation of mesenchyme stem/progenitor cell lines through ROCK-Cot/Tpl2-MEK-ERK signaling pathway. Hopefully, LIPUS may become an effective clinical procedure for the treatment of urological diseases, such as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), erectile dysfunction (ED), and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in the field of urology. It still needs an intense effort for basic-science and clinical investigators to explore the biomedical applications of ultrasound. PMID:27141455

  18. Application of MR-guided focused pulsed ultrasound for destroying clots in vitro using thrombolytic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjisavvas, V.; Ioannides, K.; Damianou, C.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper an MR-guided focused pulsed ultrasound system for the treatment of stroke using thrombolytic drugs in a model in vitro is presented. A single element spherically focused transducer of 5 cm diameter; focusing at 10 cm and operating at 0.5 MHz or 1 MHz was used. The transducer was mounted in an MR compatible robot. The artery was modelled using a silicone tube. Tissue was modelled using polyaclylimide gel. Coagulated blood was used to model thrombus. A thermocouple was placed in the thrombus in order to measure the thrombus temperature. The effect of power, beam, and frequency was investigated. The goal was to maintain a temperature increase of less than 1 °C during the application of pulse ultrasound (called safe temperature). With the application of ultrasound alone there was no notable destruction of the thrombus. With the combination of ultrasound and thrombolytic drugs destruction occurred after 60 mins of pulse exposure (PRF = 1 s, duty factor = 10%, and with thrombus placed at 1 cm deep in the tissue). This simple in vitro model was proven very successful for evaluating MRgFUS as a modality for treating stroke. In the future we plan to apply this treatment protocol in live animals and humans.

  19. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Treatment for Scaphoid Fracture Nonunions in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Erik J.; Save, Ameya V.; Slade, Joseph F.; Dodds, Seth D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of scaphoid nonunion is challenging, leading clinicians to pursue innovation in surgical technique and adjunctive therapies to improve union rates. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound as an adjunctive treatment modality following surgical treatment of scaphoid nonunion in adolescent patients, for whom this therapy has not yet been FDA-approved. Patients and Methods We performed a retrospective review of adolescent patients with scaphoid nonunion treated surgically followed by adjunctive low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy. All patients underwent 20 minutes of daily ultrasound therapy postoperatively until there was evidence of bony healing, based on both clinical and radiographic criteria. Final healing was confirmed by > 50% bone bridging on CT scan. Results Thirteen of fourteen (93%) patients healed at a mean interval of 113 days (range 61–217 days). There were no surgical or postoperative complications. One patient developed heterotopic bone formation about the scaphoid. Conclusions Our study suggests that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy can safely be utilized as an adjunctive modality in adolescents to augment scaphoid healing following surgical intervention. Level of Evidence Level IV, Case series PMID:25945296

  20. Non-invasive and real-time passive acoustic mapping of ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Carlisle, Robert C.; Coviello, Christian; Seymour, Len; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2014-09-01

    New classes of biologically active materials, such as viruses, siRNA, antibodies and a wide range of engineered nanoparticles have emerged as potent agents for diagnosing and treating diseases, yet many of these agents fail because there is no effective route of delivery to their intended targets. Focused ultrasound and its ability to drive microbubble-seeded cavitation have been shown to facilitate drug delivery. However, cavitation is difficult to control temporally and spatially, making prediction of therapeutic outcomes deep in the body difficult. Here, we utilized passive acoustic mapping in vivo to understand how ultrasound parameters influence cavitation dynamics and to correlate spatial maps of cavitation to drug delivery. Focused ultrasound (center frequency: 0.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 1.2 MPa, pulse length: 25 cycles or 50,000 cycles, pulse repetition interval: 0.02, 0.2, 1 or 3 s, number of pulses: 80 pulses) was applied to murine xenograft-model tumors in vivo during systemic injection of microbubbles with and without cavitation-sensitive liposomes or type 5 adenoviruses. Analysis of in vivo cavitation dynamics through several pulses revealed that cavitation was more efficiently produced at a lower pulse repetition frequency of 1 Hz than at 50 Hz. Within a pulse, inertial cavitation activity was shown to persist but reduced to 50% and 25% of its initial magnitude in 4.3 and 29.3 ms, respectively. Both through several pulses and within a pulse, the spatial distribution of cavitation was shown to change in time due to variations in microbubble distribution present in tumors. Finally, we demonstrated that the centroid of the mapped cavitation activity was within 1.33  ±  0.6 mm and 0.36 mm from the centroid location of drug release from liposomes and expression of the reporter gene encoded by the adenovirus, respectively. Thus passive acoustic mapping not only unraveled key mechanisms whereby a successful outcome is achieved

  1. Review on Lithotripsy and Cavitation in Urinary Stone Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Morteza; Oral, Ozlem; Ekici, Sinan; Gozuacik, Devrim; Kosar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation is the sudden formation of vapor bubbles or voids in liquid media and occurs after rapid changes in pressure as a consequence of mechanical forces. It is mostly an undesirable phenomenon. Although the elimination of cavitation is a major topic in the study of fluid dynamics, its destructive nature could be exploited for therapeutic applications. Ultrasonic and hydrodynamic sources are two main origins for generating cavitation. The purpose of this review is to give the reader a general idea about the formation of cavitation phenomenon and existing biomedical applications of ultrasonic and hydrodynamic cavitation. Because of the high number of the studies on ultrasound cavitation in the literature, the main focus of this review is placed on the lithotripsy techniques, which have been widely used for the treatment of urinary stones. Accordingly, cavitation phenomenon and its basic concepts are presented in Section II. The significance of the ultrasound cavitation in the urinary stone treatment is discussed in Section III in detail and hydrodynamic cavitation as an important alternative for the ultrasound cavitation is included in Section IV. Finally, side effects of using both ultrasound and hydrodynamic cavitation in biomedical applications are presented in Section V.

  2. Cavitation-controlled ultrasonic agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Raptis, A.C.

    1989-10-01

    High-intensity ultrasound generally produces nonlinear acoustic cavitation and streaming in liquids. The ultrasonic energy required to cause cavitation and streaming in a liquid depends on the physical properties of the liquid, e.g., surface tension, viscosity, and entrained gases. Both cavitation and streaming generate acoustic noise whose signatures may be used to distinguish the stage of agitation and thus allow the process to be controlled. An ultrasonic agitator has been designed for application in a confined area with a high-temperature, high-pressure, and corrosive environment. Control of this agitator is based on the detection of noise levels and subharmonics produced during cavitation and streaming. Noise signatures of agitation in different liquids and in liquids with particles have been determined, and discussed. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Pulsed-ultrasound tagging of light in living tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lev, Aner; Rubanov, E.; Pomerantz, Ami; Sfez, Bruno G.

    2004-07-01

    Ultrasound can be used in order to locally modulate, or tag, light in a turbid medium. This tagging process is made possible due to the extreme sensitivity of laser speckle distribution to minute changes within the medium. This hybrid technique presents several advantages compared to all-optical tomographic techniques, in that the image resolution is fixed by the ultrasound focus diameter. To our best knowledge, only in vitro experiments have been performed, either on tissue-like phantoms or meat. However a strong difference exists between these sample and living tissues. In living tissues, different kind of liquids flow through the capillaries, strongly reducing the sspeckle autocorrelation time. We have performed experiments on both mice and humans, showing that the autocorrelation time is much shorter than what was previously thought. We show however that it is possible to obtain signal with acceptable signal to noise ratio down to a few cm depth. We will also discuss the origin and characteristics of the speckle noise.

  4. The Role of Cavitation in Liposome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Eric S.; Pitt, William G.; Woodbury, Dixon J.

    2007-01-01

    Liposome size is a vital parameter of many quantitative biophysical studies. Sonication, or exposure to ultrasound, is used widely to manufacture artificial liposomes, yet little is known about the mechanism by which liposomes are affected by ultrasound. Cavitation, or the oscillation of small gas bubbles in a pressure-varying field, has been shown to be responsible for many biophysical effects of ultrasound on cells. In this study, we correlate the presence and type of cavitation with a decrease in liposome size. Aqueous lipid suspensions surrounding a hydrophone were exposed to various intensities of ultrasound and hydrostatic pressures before measuring their size distribution with dynamic light scattering. As expected, increasing ultrasound intensity at atmospheric pressure decreased the average liposome diameter. The presence of collapse cavitation was manifested in the acoustic spectrum at high ultrasonic intensities. Increasing hydrostatic pressure was shown to inhibit the presence of collapse cavitation. Collapse cavitation, however, did not correlate with decreases in liposome size, as changes in size still occurred when collapse cavitation was inhibited either by lowering ultrasound intensity or by increasing static pressure. We propose a mechanism whereby stable cavitation, another type of cavitation present in sound fields, causes fluid shearing of liposomes and reduction of liposome size. A mathematical model was developed based on the Rayleigh-Plesset equation of bubble dynamics and principles of acoustic microstreaming to estimate the shear field magnitude around an oscillating bubble. This model predicts the ultrasound intensities and pressures needed to create shear fields sufficient to cause liposome size change, and correlates well with our experimental data. PMID:17766335

  5. Surfactant shedding and gas diffusion during pulsed ultrasound through a microbubble contrast agent suspension.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jean-Pierre; Stride, Eleanor; Ovenden, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    Interest in coated microbubbles as agents for therapeutic and quantitative imaging applications in biomedical ultrasound has increased the need for their accurate theoretical characterization. Effects such as gas diffusion, variation in the properties of the coating and the resulting changes in bubble behavior under repeated exposure to ultrasound pulses are, however, still not well understood. In this study, a revised equation for microbubble motion is proposed that includes the effects of gas diffusion, as well as adsorption, desorption and shedding of a surfactant from the bubble surface. This is incorporated into a nonlinear wave propagation model to account for these additional time dependent effects in the response of microbubble populations. The results from the model indicate there can be significant changes in both bubble behavior and the propagated pulse over time. This is in agreement with existing experimental data but is not predicted by existing propagation models. The analysis indicates that changes in bubble dynamics are dominated by surfactant shedding on the timescale of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse and gas diffusion over the timescale of the pulse repetition frequency. The implications of these results for the development of more accurate algorithms for quantitative imaging and for therapeutic applications are discussed.

  6. Role of H2O2 in the fluctuating patterns of COD (chemical oxygen demand) during the treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using pilot scale triple frequency ultrasound cavitation reactor.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Sivakumar; Abidin, Norhaida binti Zainal; Parthasarathy, Shridharan; Alzorqi, Ibrahim; Ng, Ern Huay; Tiong, Timm Joyce; Gomes, Rachel L; Ali, Asgar

    2014-07-01

    Palm oil mill effluent (POME) is a highly contaminating wastewater due to its high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Conventional treatment methods require longer residence time (10-15 days) and higher operating cost. Owing to this, finding a suitable and efficient method for the treatment of POME is crucial. In this investigation, ultrasound cavitation technology has been used as an alternative technique to treat POME. Cavitation is the phenomenon of formation, growth and collapse of bubbles in a liquid. The end process of collapse leads to intense conditions of temperature and pressure and shock waves which assist various physical and chemical transformations. Two different ultrasound systems i.e. ultrasonic bath (37 kHz) and a hexagonal triple frequency ultrasonic reactor (28, 40 and 70 kHz) of 15 L have been used. The results showed a fluctuating COD pattern (in between 45,000 and 60,000 mg/L) while using ultrasound bath alone, whereas a non-fluctuating COD pattern with a final COD of 27,000 mg/L was achieved when hydrogen peroxide was introduced. Similarly for the triple frequency ultrasound reactor, coupling all the three frequencies resulted into a final COD of 41,300 mg/L compared to any other individual or combination of two frequencies. With the possibility of larger and continuous ultrasonic cavitational reactors, it is believed that this could be a promising and a fruitful green process engineering technique for the treatment of POME. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparing microbubble cavitation at 500 kHz and 70 kHz related to micellar drug delivery using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Diaz de la Rosa, Mario A; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Pitt, William G

    2013-02-01

    We have previously reported that ultrasonic drug release at 70kHz was found to correlate with the presence of subharmonic emissions. No evidence of drug release or of the subharmonic emissions were detected in experiments at 500kHz. In an attempt to understand the difference in drug release behavior between low- and mid-frequency ultrasound, a mathematical model of a bubble oscillator was developed to explore the difference in the behavior of a single 10-μm bubble under 500- and 70-kHz ultrasound. The dynamics were found to be fundamentally different; the 500-kHz bubble follows a period-doubling route to chaos while a 70-kHz bubble follows an intermittent route to chaos. We propose that this type of "intermittent subharmonic" oscillation behavior is associated with the drug release observed experimentally.

  8. Understanding ultrasound induced sonoporation: definitions and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lentacker, I; De Cock, I; Deckers, R; De Smedt, S C; Moonen, C T W

    2014-06-01

    In the past two decades, research has underlined the potential of ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance drug delivery. However, there is less consensus on the biophysical and biological mechanisms leading to this enhanced delivery. Sonoporation, i.e. the formation of temporary pores in the cell membrane, as well as enhanced endocytosis is reported. Because of the variety of ultrasound settings used and corresponding microbubble behavior, a clear overview is missing. Therefore, in this review, the mechanisms contributing to sonoporation are categorized according to three ultrasound settings: i) low intensity ultrasound leading to stable cavitation of microbubbles, ii) high intensity ultrasound leading to inertial cavitation with microbubble collapse, and iii) ultrasound application in the absence of microbubbles. Using low intensity ultrasound, the endocytotic uptake of several drugs could be stimulated, while short but intense ultrasound pulses can be applied to induce pore formation and the direct cytoplasmic uptake of drugs. Ultrasound intensities may be adapted to create pore sizes correlating with drug size. Small molecules are able to diffuse passively through small pores created by low intensity ultrasound treatment. However, delivery of larger drugs such as nanoparticles and gene complexes, will require higher ultrasound intensities in order to allow direct cytoplasmic entry.

  9. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Erosion of Model Urinary Stones

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy with pulses applied at low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison to those applied at high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. While the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 µs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 second—inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei—effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill-effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through

  10. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy erosion of model urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Roberts, William W; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-05-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy, with pulses applied at a low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison with those applied at a high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. Although the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 μs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 s, inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei, effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High-speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through

  11. Effect of pulsed and continuous therapeutic ultrasound on healthy skeletal muscle in rats

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez, Bélgica; Navarrete, Javiera; Farfán, Emilio; Cantín, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound therapy is used to treat injuries in joints, nerves and tendons. Part of the radiation generated is absorbed by nearby undamaged tissues, such as muscles. The aim was to evaluate histomorphological changes in the healthy gastrocnemius muscle in rats irradiated with continuous ultrasound (CUS) and pulsed ultrasound (PUS). Healthy adult rats were used, separated into two groups: CUS and PUS. Both were irradiated in the gastrocnemius muscle for 10 days: the CUS group in continuous mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 1 min/session) and the PUS group in pulsed mode (3 MHz, 1.0 W/cm2, 100 Hz, 50% duty cycle, 1 min/session). The contralateral muscles were used as a control. Their histological characteristics were analyzed, and the area and perimeter of the muscle fibers were measured. The connective tissue showed no histological changes. The area of muscle fibers of the irradiated groups was significantly greater (CUS 1325.2±182.1 μm2, p=0.0278 and PUS 1019.4±125.3 μm2, p=0.0398) than the control, and the CUS area was greater than the PUS (p=0.0383). The perimeter of muscle fibers showed significant differences between the irradiated groups (CUS 148±11.12 μm, p=0.0178 and PUS 129.3±8.83 μm, p=0.0236) compared to the control, as well as differences between CUS and PUS (p=0.0319). The application of ultrasound on healthy muscle produces hypertrophy of the muscle fibers, greater when continuous mode is used. It is advisable to apply pulsed, focused ultrasound therapies with sound heads sufficient for the tissue or zone to be treated, thereby reducing the risk of altering the adjacent healthy tissue. PMID:24551303

  12. Pulsed ultrasound modulated optical tomography with harmonic lock-in holography detection.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Haowen; Mather, Melissa L; Morgan, Stephen P

    2013-07-01

    A method that uses digital heterodyne holography reconstruction to extract scattered light modulated by a single-cycle ultrasound (US) burst is demonstrated and analyzed. An US burst is used to shift the pulsed laser frequency by a series of discrete harmonic frequencies which are then locked on a CCD. The analysis demonstrates that the unmodulated light's contribution to the detected signal can be canceled by appropriate selection of the pulse repetition frequency. It is also shown that the modulated signal can be maximized by selecting a pulse sequence which consists of a pulse followed by its inverted counterpart. The system is used to image a 12 mm thick chicken breast with 2 mm wide optically absorbing objects embedded at the midplane. Furthermore, the method can be revised to detect the nonlinear US modulated signal by locking at the second harmonic US frequency.

  13. Pulsed radiofrequency on radial nerve under ultrasound guidance for treatment of intractable lateral epicondylitis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dae Seok; Kang, Tae Hyung; Kim, Hyae Jin

    2016-06-01

    Lateral epicondylitis is a painful and functionally limiting disorder. Although lateral elbow pain is generally self-limiting, in a minority of people symptoms persist for a long time. When various conservative treatments fail, surgical approach is recommended. Surgical denervation of several nerves that innervate the lateral humeral epicondyle could be considered in patients with refractory pain because it denervates the region of pain. Pulsed radiofrequency is a minimally invasive procedure that improves chronic pain when applied to various neural tissues without causing any significant destruction and painful complication. This procedure is safe, minimally invasive, and has less risk of complications relatively compared to the surgical approach. The radial nerve can be identified as a target for pulsed radiofrequency lesioning in lateral epicondylitis. This innovative method of pulsed radiofrequency applied to the radial nerve has not been reported before. We reported on two patients with intractable lateral epicondylitis suffering from elbow pain who did not respond to nonoperative treatments, but in whom the ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency neuromodulation of the radial nerve induced symptom improvement. After a successful diagnostic nerve block, radiofrequency probe adjustment around the radial nerve was performed on the lateral aspect of the distal upper arm under ultrasound guidance and multiple pulsed treatments were applied. A significant reduction in pain was reported over the follow-up period of 12 weeks.

  14. Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging to detect intracellular trafficking of magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohamamdi, Mohammad; Qu, Min; Ma, Li L.; Romanovicz, Dwight K.; Johnston, Keith P.; Sokolov, Konstantin V.; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2012-01-01

    As applications of nanoparticles in medical imaging and biomedicine rapidly expand, the interactions of nanoparticles with living cells have become an area of active interest. For example, intracellular trafficking of nanoparticles – an important part of cell-nanoparticle interaction, has been well studied using plasmonic nanoparticles and optical or optics-based techniques due to the change in optical properties of the nanoparticle aggregates. However, magnetic nanoparticles, despite their wide range of clinical applications, do not exhibit plasmonic-resonant properties and therefore their intracellular aggregation cannot be detected by optics-based imaging techniques. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a novel imaging technique – pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS), to identify intracellular trafficking of endocytosed magnetic nanoparticles. In pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging a focused, high intensity, pulsed magnetic field is used to excite the cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, and ultrasound imaging is then used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue. We demonstrated previously that clusters of magnetic nanoparticles amplify the pMMUS signal in comparison to signal from individual nanoparticles. Here we further demonstrate that pMMUS imaging can identify interaction between magnetic nanoparticles and living cells, i.e. intracellular aggregation of nanoparticles within the cells. The results of our study suggest that pMMUS imaging can not only detect the presence of magnetic nanoparticles but also provides information about their intracellular trafficking non-invasively and in real-time. PMID:21926454

  15. The effects of power on-off durations of pulsed ultrasound on the destruction of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, H Y; Tsai, K C; Cheng, W H; Shieh, M J; Lou, P J; Lin, W L; Chen, W S

    2007-06-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound irradiation is a potential method for suppressing cancer cell proliferation, inducing apoptosis and delivering specific cytotoxic genes or drugs into tumors topographically in future cancer therapies. However, ultrasound attenuates rapidly in tissue and produces heat. Pulsed ultrasound is frequently used to minimize pain and possible thermal damage to the surrounding normal tissue during therapy, since it results in smaller temperature increases. This study compared three pulsed-ultrasound strategies for destroying cancer cells, measuring their induced temperature increases to determine the optimal pulsing parameters. We performed three types of experiment, involving ultrasound with (1) a fixed duty cycle of 50% with variable on- and off-times, (2) a fixed off-time with variable on-times, and (3) a fixed on-time with variable off-times. The results show that for different types of cultured cells (HeLa, HT-29, Ca9-22 and fibroblast) exposed to ultrasound of the same frequency (1 MHz) and energy, long pulses combined with off-times that are 5-10 times longer (on-/-off-times pairs of 5/25, 25/250, or 250/2500 ms/ms) cause significant cell destruction whilst avoiding temperature increases of more than 1.5 degrees C. Furthermore, the correlation between the temperature increase and the percentage of surviving cells is low. Pulsed ultrasound with a long on-time and an even longer off-time exerts a high cytotoxic effect but a smaller temperature increase compared with non-pulsed ultrasound. This indicates that the cytotoxic effects observed in the current study were not purely due to the thermal effects of the ultrasound.

  16. Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging using a photorefractive interferometer and a powerful long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2009-02-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides the optical spectroscopic signature and the spatial localization of an optically absorbing object embedded in a strongly scattering medium. The transverse resolution of the technique is determined by the lateral extent of ultrasound beam focal zone while the axial resolution is obtained by using short ultrasound pulses. The practical application of this technique is presently limited by its poor sensitivity. Moreover, any method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio must satisfy the biomedical safety limits. In this paper, we propose to use a pulsed single-frequency laser source to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and to collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Such a laser source allows illuminating the tissues mainly during the transit time of the ultrasonic wave. A single-frequency Nd:YAG laser emitting 500-μs pulses with a peak power superior to 100 W was used. Tagged photons were detected with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer characterized by a large optical etendue. When pumped by high intensity laser pulses, such an interferometer provides the fast response time essential to obtain an apparatus insensitive to the speckle decorrelation encountered in biomedical applications. Consequently, the combination of a large-etendue photorefractive interferometer with a high-power pulsed laser could allow obtaining both the sensitivity and the fast response time necessary for biomedical applications. Measurements performed in 30- and 60-mm thick optical phantoms made of titanium dioxide particles dispersed in sunflower oil are presented. Results obtained in 30- and 60-mm thick chicken breast samples are also reported.

  17. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of novel oral aspirin-loaded nanoemulsion and nano multiple emulsion formulations generated using ultrasound cavitation.

    PubMed

    Tang, Siah Ying; Sivakumar, Manickam; Ng, Angela Min-Hwei; Shridharan, Parthasarathy

    2012-07-01

    The present study investigated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of novel aspirin oil-in-water (O/W) nanoemulsion and water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) nano multiple emulsion formulations generated using ultrasound cavitation techniques. The anti-inflammatory activities of nanoemulsion and nano multiple emulsion were determined using the λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema model. The analgesic activities of both nanoformulations were determined using acetic acid-induced writhing response and hot plate assay. For comparison, the effect of pretreatment with blank nanoemulsion and reference aspirin suspension were also studied for their anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. The results showed that oral administration of nanoemulsion and nano multiple emulsion containing aspirin (60 mg/kg) significantly reduced paw edema induced by λ-carrageenan injection. Both nanoformulations decreased the number of abdominal constriction in acetic acid-induced writhing model. Pretreatment with nanoformulations led to a significant increase in reaction time in hot plate assay. Nanoemulsion demonstrated an enhanced anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects compared to reference suspension while nano multiple emulsion exhibited a mild inhibitory effects in the three experimental animal model tests. The results obtained for nano multiple emulsion were relatively lower than reference. However, administration of blank nanoemulsion did not alter the nociceptive response significantly though it showed slight anti-inflammatory effect. These experimental studies suggest that nanoemulsion and nano multiple emulsion produced a pronounced anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects in rats and may be candidates as new nanocarriers for pharmacological NSAIDs in the treatment of inflammatory disorders and alleviating pains. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Post hoc analysis of passive cavitation imaging for classification of histotripsy-induced liquefaction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Maxwell, Adam D; Holland, Christy K

    2017-08-02

    Histotripsy utilizes focused ultrasound to generate bubble clouds for transcutaneous tissue liquefaction. Image guidance of histotripsy pulses is required to provide spatially resolved monitoring of treatment progress. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of plane wave B-mode and passive cavitation images to be used as binary classifiers of histotripsy-induced liquefaction. Prostate tissue phantoms were exposed to mechanically ablative histotripsy pulses over a range of pulse durations (5 - 20 μs) and peak negative pressures (12 - 23 MPa). Acoustic emissions were recorded during the insonation and beamformed to form passive cavitation images. Plane wave B-mode images were acquired following the insonation to detect the hyperechoic bubble cloud. Phantom samples were sectioned and stained to delineate the liquefaction zone. Correlation between passive cavitation and plane wave B-mode images and the liquefaction zone was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Liquefaction of the phantom was observed for all insonation conditions. The area under the ROC (0.94 vs. 0.82), accuracy (0.90 vs. 0.83), and sensitivity (0.81 vs. 0.49) was greater for passive cavitation images relative to B-mode images (p < 0.05) along the azimuth of the liquefaction zone. The specificity was greater than 0.9 for both imaging modalities. These results demonstrate here denote a stronger correlation between histotripsy-induced liquefaction and passive cavitation imaging compared to plane wave B-mode imaging, albeit with limited passive cavitation image range resolution.

  19. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as hock-wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 to 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index(MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested.Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): 1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remanent cavitation nuclei; 2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; and 3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high-magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal.

  20. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event: A Parametric Study

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 – 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index (MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested. Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): (1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remnant cavitation nuclei; (2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; (3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  1. Real-time two-dimensional imaging of microbubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, W. T.; Powers, J. E.; Liu, J.; Drvol, L.; Lof, J.; Everbach, C.; Gao, S.; Xie, F.; Porter, T.

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications, including sonothrombolysis in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (e.g. stable versus inertial forms of cavitation) and intensity in and around a treatment area. Acoustic Passive Cavitation Detectors (PCDs) have been used but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and intensity in a region of interest at a frame rate of 0.6Hz. The system is based on a modified ultrasound scanner (iE33, Philips) with a sector imaging probe (S5-1). Cavitation imaging is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, while noise bands indicate inertial cavitation. The system demonstrates the capability to robustly identify stable and inertial cavitation thresholds of Definity microbubbles (Lantheus) in a vessel phantom through 3 ex-vivo human temporal bones, as well as to spatially map cavitation activities.

  2. An efficient pulse compression method of chirp-coded excitation in medical ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Changhan; Lee, Wooyoul; Chang, Jin; Song, Tai-kyong; Yoo, Yangmo

    2013-10-01

    Coded excitation can improve the SNR in medical ultrasound imaging. In coded excitation, pulse compression is applied to compress the elongated coded signals into a short pulse, which typically requires high computational complexity, i.e., a compression filter with a few hundred coefficients. In this paper, we propose an efficient pulse compression method of chirp-coded excitation, in which the pulse compression is conducted with complex baseband data after downsampling, to lower the computational complexity. In the proposed method, although compression is conducted with the complex data, the L-fold downsampling is applied for reducing both data rates and the number of compression filter coefficients; thus, total computational complexity is reduced to the order of 1/L(2). The proposed method was evaluated with simulation and phantom experiments. From the simulation and experiment results, the proposed pulse compression method produced similar axial resolution compared with the conventional pulse compression method with negligible errors, i.e., ≫36 dB in signal-to-error ratio (SER). These results indicate that the proposed method can maintain the performance of pulse compression of chirp-coded excitation while substantially reducing computational complexity.

  3. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  4. Distinct anabolic response of osteoblast to low-intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Naruse, Kouji; Miyauchi, Akimitsu; Itoman, Moritoshi; Mikuni-Takagaki, Yuko

    2003-02-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound, a form of mechanical energy transmitted as high-frequency acoustical pressure waves, provides noninvasive therapeutic treatment for accelerating fracture repair and distraction osteogenesis. Relatively young osteoblasts respond to ultrasound by transiently upregulating message levels of immediate-early genes as well as that of osteocalcin and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Osteocytes derived from newborn rat tibia and calvaria responded to a lesser extent only in c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) messages. Compared with the stretched osteocytes, which use stretch-activated and parathyroid hormone (PTH)-potentiated Ca2+ influx as an entry route to the protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathways, there was no evidence of Ca2+ internalization by any of the cells tested on exposure to the ultrasound. On the other hand, inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and upstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) blocked COX-2 and osteocalcin upregulation by the ultrasound-exposed ST2, murine bone marrow-derived cells. This is distinct from the aforementioned osteocytic response to low-frequency stretching and implies the involvement of integrins. Our findings suggested that accelerated fracture repair and distraction osteogenesis by the low-intensity pulsed ultrasound depend, at least in part, on the stimulation of osteoblastic cells at relatively early stages of osteogenic lineage. Bone is under control of multiple regulatory mechanisms so that diverse physical forces can be reflected to the microenvironment of each cell, in turn, to the entire bone.

  5. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  6. Cavitations Development In a Liquid Behind Strong Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, D. V.; Teslenko, V. S.

    2008-06-01

    The generation of bubbles behind an acoustic pulse is theoretically and experimentally investigated in the paper. It was found out that at growth of the amplitude of falling wave two different modes of cavitations development occur: "chain" mechanism of duplication of cavitations germs is replaced by mechanism of "real" liquid cavitations, when the liquid is initially filled with a set of cavitations nuclei and apparent bubble occurrence is caused by different periods of nucleus growth from them.

  7. High speed observation of HIFU-induced cavitation cloud near curved rigid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Z. G.; Wang, F. B.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental study of the influence of surface curvature to the behaviour of HIFU-induced cavitation cloud. A Q-switched ruby pulse laser is used to induce cavitation nuclei in deionized water. A piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer (1.7 MHz) provides a focused ultrasound field to inspire the nucleus to cavitation cloud. A PZT probe type hydrophone is applied for measuring the HIFU sound field. It was observed that the motion of cavitation cloud located near the boundary is significantly influenced by the distance between cloud and boundary, as well as the curvature of the boundary. The curvature was defined by parameters λ and ξ. Convex boundary, concave boundary, and flat boundary correspond to ξ <1, ξ >1 and ξ = 1, respectively. Different behaviours of the cloud, including the migration of the cloud, the characteristics of oscillation, etc., were observed under different boundary curvatures by high-speed photography. Sonoluminescence of the acoustic cavitation bubble clouds were also studied to illustrate the characteristics of acoustic streaming.

  8. A simulation model for predicting the temperature during the application of MR-guided focused ultrasound for stroke treatment using pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjisavvas, V.; Damianou, C.

    2011-09-01

    In this paper a simulation model for predicting the temperature during the application of MR-guided focused ultrasound for stroke treatment using pulsed ultrasound is presented. A single element spherically focused transducer of 5 cm diameter, focusing at 10 cm and operating at either 0.5 MHz or 1 MHz was considered. The power field was estimated using the KZK model. The temperature was estimated using the bioheat equation. The goal was to extract the acoustic parameters (power, pulse duration, duty factor and pulse repetition frequency) that maintain a temperature increase of less than 1 °C during the application of a pulse ultrasound protocol. It was found that the temperature change increases linearly with duty factor. The higher the power, the lower the duty factor needed to keep the temperature change to the safe limit of 1 °C. The higher the frequency the lower the duty factor needed to keep the temperature change to the safe limit of 1 °C. Finally, the deeper the target, the higher the duty factor needed to keep the temperature change to the safe limit of 1 °C. The simulation model was tested in brain tissue during the application of pulse ultrasound and the measured temperature was in close agreement with the simulated temperature. This simulation model is considered to be very useful tool for providing acoustic parameters (frequency, power, duty factor, pulse repetition frequency) during the application of pulsed ultrasound at various depths in tissue so that a safe temperature is maintained during the treatment. This model could be tested soon during stroke clinical trials.

  9. Effects of Pulsed Ultrasound Therapy on Sensory Nerve Conduction Parameters and the Pain Threshold Perceptions in Humans.

    PubMed

    Schuhfried, Othmar; Vukanovic, Damir; Kollmann, Christian; Pieber, Karin; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana

    2017-08-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is an often-used clinical modality in the nonsurgical treatment of entrapment neuropathies. To date, the possible mechanism of action of pulsed ultrasound therapy on the peripheral nerve in the treatment of entrapment neuropathies is unclear. To examine the effects of pulsed ultrasound therapy on peripheral nerve conduction parameters. A prospective, randomized, single blind, crossover study. Outpatient clinic of a university department of physical medicine and rehabilitation. Twelve healthy volunteers between 22 and 38 years of age (8 male, 4 female). Each patient (blinded) received ultrasound therapy (1W/cm(2), pulsed: 1:5; over the course of the superficial branch of the radial nerve of the nondominant arm) and placebo (intensity: zero). The interval between the individual interventions was 1 week. The sensory nerve conduction velocity, sensory nerve action potential, supramaximal stimulation intensity of the sensory fibers of the radial nerve, and the pressure pain threshold in the sensory area of the radial nerve before and after an ultrasound-therapy and placebo intervention. To compare the results of the intervention with placebo, a paired-samples t test was applied. Compared with placebo, a significant increase after pulsed ultrasound therapy was found for the supramaximal stimulation intensity (P = .02). For the other primary outcome parameters, a significant difference was not found. The immediate effect of pulsed ultrasound therapy on a sensory nerve is minimal. Therefore, the previously reported benefit of pulsed ultrasound therapy in entrapment neuropathies might be not due to its effect on the sensory nerve. I. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation of Hemorrhage Near Developing Opossum Skull With Pulsed Ultrasound Exposure Parameters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Viksit; Bigelow, Timothy A; Mullin, Kathleen; Sakaguchi, Donald S

    2015-08-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has been used noninvasively for therapeutic applications. Before HIFU can be used therapeutically on a human fetus, the bioeffects related to HIFU must be studied, and the mechanism causing the bioeffects should be understood. Previous studies have shown that HIFU, when targeted on fetal rat and mice bones. resulted in hemorrhage. However, the mechanism responsible has not been identified. In this study, we looked at ultrasound parameters related to hemorrhage in an effort to better understand the mechanism. Brazilian opossum pups (7-8 postnatal days) were exposed to a 1.1-MHz f/1 spherically focused transducer (6.3 cm focal length). Four treatment groups of n = 14 and a control group of n = 14 were exposed to rarefactional pressures of 3.6 to 6 MPa with spatial-peak temporal average intensity values of 5.4 to 10.8 W/cm(2). The pulse repetition frequency was varied from 500 to 1000 Hz with exposure durations of 1 to 4 minutes. Four groups with sample sizes of 14 had hemorrhage percentages of 43%, 36%, 29%, and 36%, respectively. Hemorrhage occurrence and size were found to correlate strongly with the nonlinear product of energy density and number of pulses, with correlation values of 0.92 and 0.97, respectively. The dependence of hemorrhage on energy density and the number of pulses suggests that the hemorrhage may be due to high-stress, low-cycle mechanical fatigue damage. Hence, for therapeutic applications, the product of energy density and number of pulses should not exceed a certain predetermined limit. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Ultrasound generation through a fiber optic delivery system using pulsed laser energy

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Short duration laser pulses can generate high frequency, broadband ultrasound in a material without contacting the surface. For these noncontacting techniques to be useful on the shop floor, in remote applications, and in harsh environments, a dependable delivery system must be developed. Fiber optic techniques have been used to deliver either moderate laser energy for a large number of pulses or a large laser energy for a few pulses for the purpose of generating acoustic waves. However, transmitting high energy pulses continuously through a fiber is required for practical sensing systems. Fiber optics systems are currently used for a long duration pulses (of the order of milliseconds) in laser welding applications; e.g. a welding systems developed for manufacture of headlamps uses a fiber optic delivery system. The key to the success of this welding systems is the coupling technique used to deliver laser power to the fiber. Because the pulse duration is on the order of several milliseconds, the power density in the fiber is several orders of magnitude below the power densities required for ultrasonic applications. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  12. In vivo Pulsed Magneto-motive Ultrasound Imaging Using High-performance Magnetoactive Contrast Nanoagents

    PubMed Central

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Shin, Tae-Hyun; Qu, Min; Kruizinga, Pieter; Truby, Ryan L.; Lee, Jae-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Previously, pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS) imaging has been introduced as a contrast-agent-assisted ultrasound-based imaging modality capable of visualizing biological events at the cellular and molecular level. In pMMUS imaging, a high intensity pulsed magnetic field is used to excite cells or tissue labeled with magnetic nanoparticles. Then, ultrasound (US) imaging is used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue to an externally applied magnetic field (i.e., tissue displacement). Signal to noise ratio (SNR) in pMMUS imaging can be improved by using superparamagnetic nanoparticles with larger saturation magnetization. Metal-doped magnetic nanoparticles with enhanced tunable nanomagnetism are suitable candidates to improve the SNR and, therefore, sensitivity of pMMUS imaging, which is essential for in vivo pMMUS imaging. In this study, we demonstrate the capability of pMMUS imaging to identify the presence and distribution of zinc-doped iron oxide nanoparticles in live nude mice bearing A431 (human epithelial carcinoma) xenograft tumors. PMID:24080913

  13. Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiulian; You, Qinghong; Ma, Haile; Dai, Chunhua; Zhang, Henan; Li, Kexin; Li, Yunliang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production from soybean oil deodorizer distillate enhanced by counter-current pulsed ultrasound was studied. Effect of static probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (SPUE) and counter-current probe ultrasonic enhanced transesterification (CCPUE) on the biodiesel conversion were compared. The results indicated that CCPUE was a better method for enhancing transesterification. The working conditions of CCPUE were studied by single-factor experiment design and the results showed that the optimal conditions were: initial temperature 25 °C, methanol to triglyceride molar ratio 10:1, flow rate 200 mL/min, catalyst content 1.8%, ultrasound working on-time 4 s, off-time 2 s, total working time 50 min. Under these conditions, the average biodiesel conversion of three experiments was 96.1%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultrasound-guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Lesioning of the Phrenic Nerve in a Patient with Intractable Hiccup

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Keum Nae; Park, In Kyung; Suh, Jeong Hun; Leem, Jeong Gill

    2010-01-01

    Persistent and intractable hiccups (with respective durations of more than 48 hours and 1 month) can result in depression, fatigue, impaired sleep, dehydration, weight loss, malnutrition, and aspiration syndromes. The conventional treatments for hiccups are either non-pharmacological, pharmacological or a nerve block treatment. Pulsed radiofrequency lesioning (PRFL) has been proposed for the modulation of the excited nervous system pathway of pain as a safe and nondestructive treatment method. As placement of the electrode in close proximity to the targeted nerve is very important for the success of PRFL, ultrasound appears to be well suited for this technique. A 74-year-old man suffering from intractable hiccups that had developed after a coronary artery bypass graft and had continued for 7 years was referred to our pain clinic. He had not been treated with conventional methods or medications. We performed PRFL of the phrenic nerve guided by ultrasound and the hiccups disappeared. PMID:20830266

  15. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  16. Doppler ultrasound in the measurement of pulse wave velocity: agreement with the Complior method

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Aortic stiffness is an independent predictor factor for cardiovascular risk. Different methods for determining pulse wave velocity (PWV) are used, among which the most common are mechanical methods such as SphygmoCor or Complior, which require specific devices and are limited by technical difficulty in obtaining measurements. Doppler guided by 2D ultrasound is a good alternative to these methods. We studied 40 patients (29 male, aged 21 to 82 years) comparing the Complior method with Doppler. Agreement of both devices was high (R = 0.91, 0.84-0.95, 95% CI). The reproducibility analysis revealed no intra-nor interobserver differences. Based on these results, we conclude that Doppler ultrasound is a reliable and reproducible alternative to other established methods for the measurement of aortic PWV. PMID:21496271

  17. Harmonic responses and cavitation activity of encapsulated microbubbles coupled with magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yuyang; Chen, Chuyi; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Wu, Hongyi; Zhang, Dong

    2016-03-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles coupled with magnetic nanoparticles, one kind of hybrid agents that can integrate both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/therapy functions, have attracted increasing interests in both research and clinic communities. However, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of their dynamic behaviors generated in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In the present work, a hybrid agent was synthesized by integrating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) into albumin-shelled microbubbles (named as SPIO-albumin microbubbles). Then, both the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds of this hybrid agent were measured at varied SPIO concentrations and ultrasound parameters (e.g., frequency, pressure amplitude, and pulse length). The results show that, at a fixed acoustic driving frequency, both the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds of SPIO-albumin microbubble should decrease with the increasing SPIO concentration and acoustic driving pulse length. The inertial cavitation threshold of SPIO-albumin microbubbles also decreases with the raised driving frequency, while the minimum sub- and ultra-harmonic thresholds appear at twice and two thirds resonance frequency, respectively. It is also noticed that both the stable and inertial cavitation thresholds of SonoVue microbubbles are similar to those measured for hybrid microbubbles with a SPIO concentration of 114.7 μg/ml. The current work could provide better understanding on the impact of the integrated SPIOs on the dynamic responses (especially the cavitation activities) of hybrid microbubbles, and suggest the shell composition of hybrid agents should be appropriately designed to improve their clinical diagnostic and therapeutic performances of hybrid microbubble agents.

  18. Pulsed laser generation of ultrasound in a metal plate between the melting and ablation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2015-03-31

    The generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation, is treated. Consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the evolution of the melt pool, and thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place over a few nanoseconds, and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. Because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be represented as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response at the opposite surface to these forces is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green’s functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method, and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported of the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold. Comparison is made between results obtained using available temperature dependent thermophysical data, and room temperature materials constants except near the melting point.

  19. Effect of frequency characteristic of excitation pulse on lateral spatial resolution in coded ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Hideyuki

    2017-07-01

    Recently, portable ultrasonic diagnostic equipment has frequently been used in clinical situations. The use of portable ultrasonic diagnostic equipment expands various diagnosis areas, such as remote medical diagnosis, and emergent diagnosis at disaster. It is expected that portable ultrasonic diagnostic equipment will be used more frequently in the future. To make ultrasonic diagnostic equipment portable, the number of transducer elements in an ultrasonic probe should be reduced significantly. Therefore, the transmit-receive sensitivity of the ultrasonic probe is degraded. For the improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received ultrasonic echo, coded excitation was introduced in ultrasonic imaging. Owing to pulse compression applied to the received echo signal, its SNR significantly improved without the degradation of the range spatial resolution. However, the lateral spatial resolution in coded ultrasound imaging has not been investigated in previous studies. The present study showed that the lateral resolution in coded ultrasound imaging using a typical code, 5-bit Barker code, was worse than that using a conventional short pulse. Such degradation was discussed in terms of the frequency characteristics of the impulse response of the ultrasonic transducer and the excitation pulse. Also, the Gaussian phase coherence factor was introduced as one of the methods to overcome such degradation in lateral spatial resolution.

  20. Investigations into pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound enhanced delivery: Preliminary evidence for a novel mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Hilary A.; Smith, Lauren H.; Cuesta, Julian; Durrani, Amir K.; Angstadt, Mary; Palmeri, Mark L.; Kimmel, Eitan; Frenkel, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Pulsed-high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposures without ultrasound contrast agents have been used for non-invasively enhancing the delivery of various agents to improve their therapeutic efficacy in a variety of tissue models in a non-destructive manner. Despite the versatility of these exposures, little is known about the mechanisms by which their effects are produced. In this study pulsed-HIFU exposures were given in the flank muscle of mice, followed by the administration a variety of fluorophores, both soluble and particulate, by local or systemic injection. In vivo imaging (whole animal and microscopic) was used to quantify observations of increased extravasation and interstitial transport of the fluorophores as a result of the exposures. Histological analysis indicated that the exposures caused some structural alterations such as enlarged gaps between muscle fibers. These effects were consistent with increasing the permeability of the tissues; however they were found to be transient and reversed themselves gradually within 72 hrs. Simulations of radiation force induced displacements and the resulting local shear strain they produced were carried out to potentially explain the manner by which these effects occurred. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved with pulsed-HIFU exposures for non-invasively enhancing delivery will facilitate the process for optimizing their use. PMID:19616368

  1. A new method for evaluating the degeneration of articular cartilage using pulse-echo ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Sun, Anyu; Bai, Xiaolong; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel nondestructive ultrasonic technique for measuring the sound speed and acoustic impedance of articular cartilage using the pulsed Vz,t technique. Vz,t data include a series of pulsed ultrasonic echoes collected using different distances between the ultrasonic transducer and the specimen. The 2D Fourier transform is applied to the Vz,t data to reconstruct the 2D reflection spectrum Rθ,ω. To obtain the reflection coefficient of articular cartilage, the Vz,t data from a reference specimen with a well-known reflection coefficient are obtained to eliminate the dependence on the general system transfer function. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus (Ha) is computed based on the measured reflection coefficient and the sound speed. In the experiment, 32 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from bovine articular cartilage, and 16 samples were digested using 0.25% trypsin solution. The sound speed and Ha of these cartilage samples were evaluated before and after degeneration. The magnitude of the sound speed decreased with trypsin digestion (from 1663 ± 5.6 m/s to 1613 ± 5.3 m/s). Moreover, the Young's modulus in the corresponding degenerative state was measured and was correlated with the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus was determined to be highly correlated with the Young's modulus (n = 16, r>0.895, p<0.003, Pearson correlation test for each measurement). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed method to assess the changes in sound speed and the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus of cartilage after degeneration.

  2. Pulsed Focused Ultrasound Induced Displacements in Confined In Vitro Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cameron C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound has been shown to potentiate the effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to improve clot lysis in a range of in vitro and in vivo studies as well as in clinical trials. One possible mechanism of action is acoustic radiation force induced clot displacements. In this study we investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of clot displacements and strain initiated by focused ultrasound pulses. Displacements were produced by a 1.51 MHz f-number 1 transducer over a range of acoustic powers (1–85 W) in clots constrained within an agar vessel phantom channel. Displacements were tracked during and after a 5.45 ms therapy pulse using a 20 MHz high frequency ultrasound imaging probe. Peak thrombus displacements were found to be linear as a function of acoustic power up to 60 W before leveling off near 128 μm for the highest transmit powers. The time to peak displacement and recovery time of blood clots were largely independent of acoustic powers with measured values near 2 ms. A linear relationship between peak axial strain and transmit power was observed, reaching a peak value of 11% at 35 W. The peak strain occurred ~0.75 mm from the focal zone for all powers investigated in both lateral and axial directions. These results indicate that substantial displacements can be induced by focused ultrasound in confined blood clots, and that the spatial and temporal displacement patterns are complex and highly dependant on exposure conditions, which has implications for future work investigating their link to clot lysis and for developing approaches to exploit these effects. PMID:22194235

  3. Pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy: A comparison of experimental measurement and simulation prediction.

    PubMed

    Wille, Marie-Luise; Almualimi, Majdi A; Langton, Christian M

    2016-01-01

    Considering ultrasound propagation through complex composite media as an array of parallel sonic rays, a comparison of computer-simulated prediction with experimental data has previously been reported for transmission mode (where one transducer serves as transmitter, the other as receiver) in a series of 10 acrylic step-wedge samples, immersed in water, exhibiting varying degrees of transit time inhomogeneity. In this study, the same samples were used but in pulse-echo mode, where the same ultrasound transducer served as both transmitter and receiver, detecting both 'primary' (internal sample interface) and 'secondary' (external sample interface) echoes. A transit time spectrum was derived, describing the proportion of sonic rays with a particular transit time. A computer simulation was performed to predict the transit time and amplitude of various echoes created, and compared with experimental data. Applying an amplitude-tolerance analysis, 91.7% ± 3.7% of the simulated data were within ±1 standard deviation of the experimentally measured amplitude-time data. Correlation of predicted and experimental transit time spectra provided coefficients of determination (R(2)%) ranging from 100.0% to 96.8% for the various samples tested. The results acquired from this study provide good evidence for the concept of parallel sonic rays. Furthermore, deconvolution of experimental input and output signals has been shown to provide an effective method to identify echoes otherwise lost due to phase cancellation. Potential applications of pulse-echo ultrasound transit time spectroscopy include improvement of ultrasound image fidelity by improving spatial resolution and reducing phase interference artefacts.

  4. A new method for evaluating the degeneration of articular cartilage using pulse-echo ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Anyu; Bai, Xiaolong; Ju, Bing-Feng

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a novel nondestructive ultrasonic technique for measuring the sound speed and acoustic impedance of articular cartilage using the pulsed V(z,t) technique. V(z,t) data include a series of pulsed ultrasonic echoes collected using different distances between the ultrasonic transducer and the specimen. The 2D Fourier transform is applied to the V(z,t) data to reconstruct the 2D reflection spectrum R(θ,ω). To obtain the reflection coefficient of articular cartilage, the V(z,t) data from a reference specimen with a well-known reflection coefficient are obtained to eliminate the dependence on the general system transfer function. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus (Ha) is computed based on the measured reflection coefficient and the sound speed. In the experiment, 32 cartilage-bone samples were prepared from bovine articular cartilage, and 16 samples were digested using 0.25% trypsin solution. The sound speed and Ha of these cartilage samples were evaluated before and after degeneration. The magnitude of the sound speed decreased with trypsin digestion (from 1663 ± 5.6 m/s to 1613 ± 5.3 m/s). Moreover, the Young's modulus in the corresponding degenerative state was measured and was correlated with the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus. The ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus was determined to be highly correlated with the Young's modulus (n = 16, r>0.895, p<0.003, Pearson correlation test for each measurement). The results demonstrate the effectiveness of using the proposed method to assess the changes in sound speed and the ultrasound-derived aggregate modulus of cartilage after degeneration.

  5. Heat Distribution in the Lower Leg from Pulsed Short-Wave Diathermy and Ultrasound Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Candi L.; Draper, David O.; Knight, Kenneth L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To compare tissue temperature rise and decay after 20-minute diathermy and ultrasound treatments. Design and Setting: We inserted 3 26-gauge thermistor microprobes into the medial aspect of the anesthetized triceps surae muscle at a depth of 3 cm and spaced 5 cm apart. Eight subjects received the diathermy treatment first, followed by the ultrasound treatment. This sequence was reversed for the remaining 8 subjects. The diathermy was applied at a frequency of 27.12 MHz at the following settings: 800 bursts per second, 400-microsecond burst duration, 850-microsecond interburst interval, peak root mean square amplitude of 150 W per burst, and an average root mean square output of 48 W per burst. The ultrasound was delivered at a frequency of 1 MHz and an intensity of 1.5 W/cm2 in the continuous mode for 20 minutes over an area of 40 times the effective radiating area. The study was performed in a ventilated research laboratory. Subjects: Sixteen (11 men, 5 women) healthy subjects (mean age = 23.56 ± 4.73 years) volunteered to participate in this study. Measurements: We recorded baseline, final, and decay temperatures for each of the 3 sites. Results: The average temperature increases over baseline temperature after pulsed short-wave diathermy were 3.02°C ± 1.02°C in site 1, 4.58°C ± 0.87°C in site 2, and 3.28°C ± 1.64°C in site 3. The average temperature increases over baseline temperature after ultrasound were only 0.17°C ± 0.40°C, 0.09°C ± 0.56°C, and -0.43°C ± 0.41°C in sites 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The temperature dropped only 1°C in 7.65 ± 4.96 minutes after pulsed short-wave diathermy. Conclusions: We conclude that pulsed short-wave diathermy was more effective than 1-MHz ultrasound in heating a large muscle mass and resulted in the muscles' retaining heat longer. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:16558608

  6. Histotripsy-Induced Cavitation Cloud Initiation Thresholds in Tissues of Different Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation and maintenance of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. This paper studies how tissue properties impact the pressure threshold to initiate the cavitation bubble cloud. Our previous study showed that shock scattering off one or more initial bubbles, expanded to sufficient size in the focus, plays an important role in initiating a dense cavitation cloud. In this process, the shock scattering causes the positive pressure phase to be inverted, resulting in a scattered wave that has the opposite polarity of the incident shock. The inverted shock is superimposed on the incident negative pressure phase to form extremely high negative pressures, resulting in a dense cavitation cloud growing toward the transducer. We hypothesize that increased tissue stiffness impedes the expansion of initial bubbles, reducing the scattered tensile pressure, and thus requiring higher initial intensities for cloud initiation. To test this hypothesis, 5-cycle histotripsy pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) of 10, 100, or 1000 Hz were applied by a 1-MHz transducer focused inside mechanically tunable tissue-mimicking agarose phantoms and various ex vivo porcine tissues covering a range of Young’s moduli. The threshold to initiate a cavitation cloud and resulting bubble expansion were recorded using acoustic backscatter detection and optical imaging. In both phantoms and ex vivo tissue, results demonstrated a higher cavitation cloud initiation threshold for tissues of higher Young’s modulus. Results also demonstrated a decrease in bubble expansion in phantoms of higher Young’s modulus. These results support our hypothesis, improve our understanding of the effect of histotripsy in tissues with different mechanical properties, and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for fractionation of specific tissues. PMID:24474139

  7. Ultrasound contrast imaging: influence of scatterer motion in multi-pulse techniques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fanglue; Cachard, Christian; Mori, Riccardo; Varray, Francois; Guidi, Francesco; Basset, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    In ultrasound contrast imaging, many techniques based on multiple transmissions have been proposed to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR). They are generally based on the response of static scatterers inside the imaged region. However, scatterer motion, for example in blood vessels, has an inevitable influence on multi-pulse techniques, which can either enhance or degrade the technique involved. This paper investigates the response of static nonlinear media insonated by multi-pulses with various phase shifts, and the influence of scatterer motion on multi-pulse techniques. Simulations and experimental results from a single bubble and clouds of bubbles show that the phase shift of the echoes backscattered from bubbles is dependent on the transmissions' phase shift, and that the bubble motion influences the efficiency of multi-pulse techniques: fundamental and second-harmonic amplitudes of the processed signal change periodically, exhibiting maximum or minimum values, according to scatterer motion. Furthermore, experimental results based on the second-harmonic inversion (SHI) technique reveal that bubble motion can be taken into account to regulate the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). With the optimal PRF, the CTR of SHI images can be improved by about 12 dB compared with second-harmonic images.

  8. Cost-effective design of a concurrent photoacoustic-ultrasound microscope using single laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen-Shao; Liu, Wei-Wen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2016-03-01

    A method for concurrent photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) imaging with single laser pulses was previously demonstrated. An optical-absorbing multilayer film that can generate a US pulse based on the thermoelastic effect is used. With such a film, the generated US can be adjusted so that it does not overlap with the spectrum of the PA signal generated by the light transmitting through the layer. Thus, the US signal and the PA signal can be generated and separated by using a single laser pulse with spectral filtering. In this study, we continue with the same concurrent imaging approach and propose a cost-effective and portable design. The design consists of a pulsed laser diode with the repetition rate up to 25 kHz and energy of 2 μJ/pulse. A multilayer film is employed to generate narrow band US signals under laser excitation for US imaging. With simple spectral filtering, the PA signals and the US signals can be separated. With optical resolution, the system has a theoretical lateral resolution of 2 μm in PA imaging and 200 μm in US imaging. One of the applications of the proposed microscope is for tumor biology, where angiogenesis is an essential topic for understanding tumor growth and tumor metastasis. We will demonstrate performance of the proposed system by imaging vasculature networks.

  9. Cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.; Colonius, Tim; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A case is presented for the important role of cavitation in stone comminution and tissue injury in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Confocal hydrophones and a coincidence algorithm were used to detect cavitation in kidney parenchyma. Elevated hydrostatic pressure dissolved cavitation nuclei and suppressed cell injury and stone comminution in vitro. A low-insertion-loss, thin, mylar film nearly eliminated stone erosion and crack formation only when in direct contact with the stone. This result indicates not only that cavitation is important in both cracking and erosion but also that bubbles act at the surface. Time inversion of the shock wave by use of a pressure-release reflector reduced the calculated pressure at bubble collapse and the measured depth of bubble-induced pits in aluminum. Correspondingly tissue injury in vivo was nearly eliminated. Cavitation was localized and intensified by the use of synchronously triggered, facing lithotripters. This dual pulse lithotripter enhanced comminution at its focus and reduced lysis in surrounding blood samples. The enhancement of comminution was lost when stones were placed in glycerol, which retarded bubble implosion. Thus, cavitation is important in comminution and injury and can be controlled to optimize efficacy and safety. [Work supported by NIH DK43381, DK55674, and FIRCA.

  10. Study of the Effect of Water Pressure on Plasma and Cavitation Bubble Induced by Pulsed Laser Ablation in Liquid of Silver and Missed Variations of Observable Nanoparticle Features.

    PubMed

    Dell'Aglio, Marcella; Santagata, Antonio; Valenza, Gabriele; De Stradis, Angelo; De Giacomo, Alessandro

    2017-05-05

    In this work the effects of the pressure between 1-150 Bar on pulsed laser ablation in liquids (PLAL) during the production of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in water was investigated. The produced NPs are the results of two different well-known stages which are the plasma and the bubble evolution occurring until the generated material is released into the solution. The main aim of this work is to show which roles is played by the variation of water pressure on the laser induced plasma and the cavitation bubble dynamics during the NPs formation. Their implication on the comprehension of the as-produced NPs formation mechanisms is treated. The typical timescales of the different stages occurring in water at different pressures have been studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), imaging and shadowgraph experiments. Finally surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for characterization of the material released in solution, have been used. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. An ultrasound-based method for determining pulse wave velocity in superficial arteries.

    PubMed

    Rabben, Stein Inge; Stergiopulos, Nikos; Hellevik, Leif Rune; Smiseth, Otto A; Slørdahl, Stig; Urheim, Stig; Angelsen, Bjørn

    2004-10-01

    In this paper, we present a method for estimating local pulse wave velocity (PWV) solely from ultrasound measurements: the area-flow (QA) method. With the QA method, PWV is estimated as the ratio between change in flow and change in cross-sectional area (PWV = dQ/dA) during the reflection-free period of the cardiac cycle. In four anaesthetized dogs and 21 human subjects (age 23-74) we measured the carotid flow and cross-sectional area non-invasively by ultrasound. As a reference method we used the Bramwell-Hill (BH) equation which estimates PWV from pulse pressure and cross-sectional area. Additionally, we therefore measured brachial pulse pressure by oscillometry in the human subjects, and central aortic pulse pressure by micro-manometry in the dogs. As predicted by the pressure dependency of arterial stiffness, the estimated PWV decreased when the aortic pressure was lowered in two of the dogs. For the human subjects, the QA and BH estimates were correlated (R=0.43, p<0.05) and agreed on average (mean difference of -0.14 m/s). The PWV by the BH method increased with age (p<0.01) whereas the PWV by the QA method tended to increase with age (p<0.1). This corresponded to a larger residual variance (residual = deviation of the estimated PWV from the regression line) for the QA method than for the BH method, indicating different precisions for the two methods. This study illustrates that the simple equation PWV = dQ/dA gives estimates correlated to the PWV of the reference method. However, improvements in the basic measurements seem necessary to increase the precision of the method.

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Genicular Nerve Pulsed Radiofrequency Treatment For Painful Knee Osteoarthritis: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Kesikburun, Serdar; Yaşar, Evren; Uran, Ayça; Adigüzel, Emre; Yilmaz, Bilge

    2016-07-01

    Genicular nerve ablation with radiofrequency (RF) has recently emerged as a promising treatment in the management of osteoarthritis related knee pain. To date, genicular nerve injections have been performed under fluoroscopic guidance. To evaluate the effect of ultrasound-guided genicular nerve pulsed RF treatment on chronic knee pain and function in patients with knee osteoarthritis. Single-arm prospective study. University hospital and rehabilitation center in Turkey. A review was made of 29 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis who had undergone genicular nerve block in the previous 6 months. Patients with at least 50% reduction in the visual analog scale (VAS) score after genicular nerve block and with no on-going pain relief were selected for the study. Ultrasound-guided genicular nerve pulsed RF was applied to 15 knees of 9 patients. Pain and knee function were assessed with 100-mm VAS and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities (WOMAC) index throughout 3 months. A significant reduction in VAS scores was detected over time after the pulsed RF procedure (f: 69.24, P < 0.01). There was a significant improvement in the WOMAC scores (f: 539.68 , P < 0.01). The small number of participants, the lack of a control group, and short follow-up period were limitations of the study. Genicular nerve pulsed RF treatment has been found to be safe and beneficial in osteoarthritis related knee pain. Further studies with a larger population and randomized controlled study design are warranted to confirm the positive findings of this preliminary report.

  13. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments affect degeneration of cultured articular cartilage explants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lijun; Ren, Yijin; van Kooten, Theo G; Grijpma, Dirk W; Kuijer, Roel

    2015-03-01

    Articular cartilage has some capacity for self-repair. Clinically used low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatments were compared in their potency to prevent degeneration using an explant model of porcine cartilage. Explants of porcine cartilage and human osteoarthritic cartilage were cultured for four weeks and subjected to daily LIPUS or PEMF treatments. At one, two, three and four weeks follow-up explants were prepared for histological assessment or gene expression (porcine only). Non-treated porcine explants showed signs of atrophy of the superficial zone starting at one week. Treated explants did not. In LIPUS-treated explants cell clusters were observed. In PEMF-treated explants more hypertrophic-like changes were observed at later follow up. Newly synthesized tissue was present in treated explants. Gene expression profiles did indicate differences between the two methods. Both methods reduced expression of the aggrecan and collagen type II gene compared to the control. LIPUS treatment of human cartilage samples resulted in a reduction of degeneration according to Mankin scoring. PEMF treatment did not. LIPUS or PEMF prevented degenerative changes in pig knee cartilage explants. LIPUS reduced degeneration in human cartilage samples. LIPUS treatment seems to have more potency in the treatment of osteoarthritis than PEMF treatment.

  14. Ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the cervical sympathetic chain for complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Don; Yoo, Woo Joo; Kim, Yoo Na; Park, Hue Jung

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The stellate ganglion is a common target to manage neuropathic pain in the upper extremities. However, the effect duration of a single stellate ganglion block is often temporary. To overcome the short-term effects of a single sympathetic block, pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) can be applied. The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of PRF on the cervical sympathetic chain under ultrasound guidance for complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Twelve CRPS patients who underwent PRF on the cervical sympathetic chain were enrolled in this retrospective analysis. Under ultrasound guidance, PRF was performed for 420 seconds at 42°C on the C6- and C7-level sympathetic chain. The pain intensity decreased significantly at 1 week after the procedure. Overall, 91.7% of patients experienced at least moderate improvement. A positive correlation was observed between the extent of pain reduction at 1 week after PRF and the degree of overall benefit (r = 0.605, P = 0.037). This reduction in symptoms was maintained for a mean of 31.41 ± 26.07 days after PRF. There were no complications associated with this procedure. PRF on the cervical sympathetic chain, which can be performed easily and safely under ultrasound guidance, should be considered an option for managing CRPS of the upper extremities. PMID:28072749

  15. Pulsed radiofrequency under ultrasound guidance for the tarsal tunnel syndrome: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Chon, Jin Young; Hahn, Yun Jin; Sung, Choon Ho; Jung, Sung Hoon; Moon, Ho Sik

    2014-12-01

    Tarsal tunnel syndrome (TTS) is a compression neuropathy that results from entrapment of the posterior tibial nerve or its branches. TTS may be treated either by conservative measures, including physical therapy, medications, and steroid injections, or by surgical decompression. Despite a variety of treatments, a few cases of TTS will relapse, and many cases of recurrent TTS will require re-operation. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) is known to have a number of advantages for pain management, particularly as this technique does not cause neural compromise such as motor weakness. Here, we report a new application of ultrasound-guided PRF in two cases of intractable TTS. Both patients had a long duration of severe foot pain and had been treated with various therapeutic modalities without lasting relief. We applied ultrasound-guided PRF to the affected posterior tibial nerve in each patient, and both had significantly reduced pain intensity scores and analgesic requirements without any complications. Ultrasound-guided PRF for intractable TTS relieved severe foot pain. It may supersede surgery as a reliable treatment for intractable TTS.

  16. Ultrasound-assisted pulse electrodeposition and characterization of Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Fenghua; Liu, Cansen; Huang, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Co-W/MWCNTs nanocomposite coatings were synthesized by pulse electrodeposition with help of ultrasound agitation. Effect of agitation techniques of electrolyte on the microstructure and morphology of the nanocomposite coatings were evaluated. The Co-W/MWCNTs composite coating produced by mechanical agitation shows rough surface and has large and poorly dispersed CNT agglomerates in its layer and surface, resulting in this coating displaying low hardness and inferior wear resistance and friction reduction. Ultrasound agitation is much better than mechanical stirring to evenly distribute MWCNTs in the layer and surface of the composite coatings. The nanocomposite coatings produced with ultrasound agitation exhibits smoother surface, higher hardness and better tribological properties than the one produced with mechanical agitation. In addition, the ultrasonic power greatly affects the morphology and properties of the as-prepared composite coatings. As the ultrasonic power of 400 W was applied, a large number of MWCNTs are successfully incorporated and evenly distributed in the as-prepared composite coating, which result in this composite coating exhibiting the highest hardness and the best friction-reducing and anti-wear ability. In general, the differences of the friction and wear behaviors and the corresponding mechanisms of these coatings produced under different conditions are attributed to their different hardness and microstructures.

  17. Research on the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation condition in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, J. X.; Yuan, S. Q.; Yuan, J. P.; Ren, X. D.; Pei, J.; Si, Q. R.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to research the noise induced by cavitation under the asymmetric cavitation (AC) condition in a centrifugal pump. The acoustic pressure signals at the pump inlet and outlet were measured respectively during the development of cavitation in a closed hydraulic test rig. It could be found that both the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressures changed obviously with the development of cavitation. The time domain and the power spectrum density of the pump inlet and outlet acoustic pressure pulsations were analyzed. The broadband pulses of the acoustic pressure pulsations were found and the reasons for the phenomenon were given.

  18. Pulsed focused ultrasound changes nerve conduction of earthworm giant axonal fibers.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sarah H; Croce, Phillip; Margolin, Ryan W; Lee, Stephanie D; Lee, Wonhye

    2017-03-01

    This study examined the effects of pulsed focused ultrasound (FUS) in disrupting nerve conduction. FUS operating at a 210 kHz fundamental frequency was administered to the medial and lateral giant axonal nerve fibers of earthworms in a burst of pulses (1 ms tone burst duration, 20 Hz pulse repetition frequency). The magnitude and latencies of the nerve potentials induced by electrical stimulation were measured under three experimental conditions - (I) no sonication, (II) sonication at 600 mW/cm spatial-peak temporal-average intensity (Ispta), and (III) sonication at 200 mW/cm Ispta. The sonication at 600 mW/cm temporarily decreased the magnitude of the action potential peak (~16%), whereas the baseline peak level was quickly restored in postsonication sessions. Sonication administered at a lower intensity (i.e. 200 mW/cm) did not alter the peak magnitude. The sonication did not alter the nerve conduction velocity. The acoustic intensities used in the experiment did not increase the temperature of the sonicated tissue. The results indicate that axonal neurotransmission can be disrupted temporarily by the application of pulsed FUS, suggesting its potential utility in modulating the functional connectivity established by white matter tracts in the brain.

  19. Identification of genes responsive to low intensity pulsed ultrasound in a human leukemia cell line Molt-4.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Ando, Hidetaka; Takasaki, Ichiro; Feril, Loreto B; Zhao, Qing-Li; Ogawa, Ryohei; Kudo, Nobuki; Tachibana, Katsuro; Kondo, Takashi

    2007-02-08

    We examined the gene expression of human leukemia Molt-4 cells treated with non-thermal low intensity pulsed ultrasound. Six hours after 0.3W/cm(2) pulsed ultrasound treatment, apoptosis (24+/-3.3%, mean+/-SD) with minimal cell lysis was observed. Of approximately 16,600 genes analyzed, BCL2-associated athanogene 3 (BAG3), DnaJ (Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 1 (DNAJB1), heat shock 70 kDa protein 1B (HSPA1B), and heat shock 70 kDa protein 6 (HSPA6) showed increased levels of expression while isopentenyl-diphosphate delta isomerase (IDI1) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase 1 (HMGCS1) showed decreased levels in the cells 3h after the ultrasound treatment. The expression levels of these six genes were confirmed by a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DNA microarray analysis of genes that are differentially expressed in response to apoptosis induced by non-thermal low intensity pulsed ultrasound in human leukemia cells. The present results will provide a basis for further understanding of the molecular mechanisms of effects of not only low intensity pulsed ultrasound but also that of mechanical shear stress in the cells.

  20. Pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound imaging to detect intracellular trafficking of magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Qu, Min; Ma, Li L; Romanovicz, Dwight K; Johnston, Keith P; Sokolov, Konstantin V; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2011-10-14

    As applications of nanoparticles in medical imaging and biomedicine rapidly expand, the interactions of nanoparticles with living cells have become an area of active interest. For example, intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles-an important part of cell-nanoparticle interaction-has been well studied using plasmonic nanoparticles and optical or optics-based techniques due to the change in optical properties of the nanoparticle aggregates. However, magnetic nanoparticles, despite their wide range of clinical applications, do not exhibit plasmonic-resonant properties and therefore their intracellular aggregation cannot be detected by optics-based imaging techniques. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a novel imaging technique-pulsed magneto-motive ultrasound (pMMUS)-to identify intracellular accumulation of endocytosed magnetic nanoparticles. In pMMUS imaging a focused, high intensity, pulsed magnetic field is used to excite the cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles, and ultrasound imaging is then used to monitor the mechanical response of the tissue. We demonstrated previously that clusters of magnetic nanoparticles amplify the pMMUS signal in comparison to the signal from individual nanoparticles. Here we further demonstrate that pMMUS imaging can identify interaction between magnetic nanoparticles and living cells, i.e. intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles within the cells. The results of our study suggest that pMMUS imaging can not only detect the presence of magnetic nanoparticles but also provides information about their intracellular accumulation non-invasively and in real-time.

  1. Formation of Single Bubbles from a Submerged Orifice Using Pulsed Ultrasound Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirota, Minori; Imamura, Tomohiro; Kameda, Masaharu

    A new experimental method is presented in which single small gas bubbles are generated in a liquid from a submerged orifice using pulsed ultrasound waves. Pulsed ultrasound waves having a frequency of 15 kHz and a maximum pressure amplitude of approximately 10 kPa are irradiated to a bubble growing from an orifice. Single air bubbles ranging from approximately 0.05 to 0.2 mm in radius are obtained in silicone oil (kinematic viscosity: 1 mm2/s) by using two orifices (0.02 and 0.04 mm in diameter) and by shifting the onset of the detachment-assistance pressure wave. The bubble deformation and detaching processes were visualized and analyzed using high-speed video imaging and direct numerical simulation. Consequently, it is revealed that the bubbles are forced to elongate upward due to the fast oscillatory flow of gas through the orifice, and the elongation causes the bubbles to detach from the orifice. The size of the bubbles at detachment is well estimated by employing a common spherical bubble formation model.

  2. Histologic evaluation of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound effects on bone regeneration in sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hun; Hong, Ki Seok

    2010-12-01

    Many techniques have been described for achieving vertical augmentation of the maxillary sinus. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) to enhance bone regeneration after sinus floor elevation. The sinus lifting technique was performed through a lateral approach on 8 different sites of 5 patients (3 males and 2 females) and their mean age was 45.7 years old. The sites were randomly assigned to the control or test groups. The control group had 4 sites that received lateral sinus lifting procedure only, while the test group had 4 sites that received LIPUS application after the lateral sinus lifting procedure. 24-32 weeks (an average of 29 weeks) postoperatively, new bone formation in the augmented sinus sites was evaluated through histologic and histomorphometric analyses of the biopsy specimens obtained during implant placement. In the test group, the mean percentage of newly formed bone was 19.0±2.8%. In the control group, the mean percentage of newly formed bone was 15.2±3.1%. The percentage of newly formed bone was approximately 4% higher in those cases where the sinus was treated by LIPUS than the percentage in those cases where it was not used. The difference was statistically significant. Within the scope of this study, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound application after sinus lifting appeared to have a significant effect on the development of new bone formation.

  3. MATLAB/Simulink Pulse-Echo Ultrasound System Simulator Based on Experimentally Validated Models.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taehoon; Shin, Sangmin; Lee, Hyongmin; Lee, Hyunsook; Kim, Heewon; Shin, Eunhee; Kim, Suhwan

    2016-02-01

    A flexible clinical ultrasound system must operate with different transducers, which have characteristic impulse responses and widely varying impedances. The impulse response determines the shape of the high-voltage pulse that is transmitted and the specifications of the front-end electronics that receive the echo; the impedance determines the specification of the matching network through which the transducer is connected. System-level optimization of these subsystems requires accurate modeling of pulse-echo (two-way) response, which in turn demands a unified simulation of the ultrasonics and electronics. In this paper, this is realized by combining MATLAB/Simulink models of the high-voltage transmitter, the transmission interface, the acoustic subsystem which includes wave propagation and reflection, the receiving interface, and the front-end receiver. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our simulator, the models are experimentally validated by comparing the simulation results with the measured data from a commercial ultrasound system. This simulator could be used to quickly provide system-level feedback for an optimized tuning of electronic design parameters.

  4. Cavitation bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, Eitan

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation takes place when tiny gas bubbles oscillate, grow, and collapse in liquid under the influence of ultrasonic field. This study reviews cavitation bioeffects that are found both in vivo and in vitro when exposed to either low- or high-power acoustics. Proposed mechanisms are discussed here as well based on theoretical studies, simulations and test bench experiments. Bioeffects are induced in living tissue once the gas bubble is, for instance, within a blood vessel in close vicinity to the endothelium or to the red blood cells. Conditions for inducing various bioeffects are discussed - from severe damage, such as cell necrosis, to delicate alterations, such as increased permeability of cell membrane. Present and potential applications for therapeutic purpose from stone pulverization and tissue ablation to gene transfection and transdermal delivery are reviewed including the growing use of artificial microbubbles.

  5. ULTRASOUND PULSE-ECHO IMAGING USING THE SPLIT-STEP FOURIER PROPAGATOR

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG, LIANJIE; QUAN, YOULI

    2007-01-31

    Ultrasonic reflection imaging has the potential to produce higher image resolution than transmission tomography, but imaging resolution and quality still need to be further improved for early cancer detection and diagnosis. We present an ultrasound reflection image reconstruction method using the split-step Fourier propagator. It is based on recursive inward continuation of ultrasonic wavefields in the frequency-space and frequency-wavenumber domains. The inward continuation within each extrapolation interval consists of two steps. In the first step, a phase-shift term is applied to the data in the frequency-wavenumber domain for propagation in a reference medium. The second step consists of applying another phase-shift term to data in the frequency-space domain to approximately compensate for ultrasonic scattering effects of heterogeneities within the breast. We use synthetic ultrasound pulse-echo data recorded around a ring for heterogeneous, computer-generated numerical breast phantoms to study the imaging capability of the method. The phantoms are derived from an experimental breast phantom and a sound-speed tomography image of an in-vivo ultrasound breast data collected usi ng a ring array. The heterogeneous sound-speed models used for pulse-echo imaging are obtained using a computationally efficient, first-arrival-time (time-of-flight) transmission tomography method. Our studies demonstrate that reflection image reconstruction using the split-step Fourier propagator with heterogeneous sound-speed models significantly improves image quality and resolution. We also numerically verify the spatial sampling criterion of wavefields for a ring transducer array.

  6. Controlled Cavitation to Augment SWL Stone Comminution: Mechanistic Insights In-Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Stone comminution in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) has been documented to result from mechanical stresses conferred directly to the stone, as well as the activity of cavitational microbubbles. Studies have demonstrated that the presence of this cavitation activity is crucial for stone subdivision; however, its exact role in the comminution process remains somewhat weakly defined, in part due to the fact that it is difficult to isolate the cavitational component from the shock waves themselves. In this study, we further explored the importance of cavitation in SWL stone comminution through the use of histotripsy ultrasound therapy. Histotripsy was utilized to target model stones designed to mimic the mid-range tensile fracture strength of naturally occurring cystine calculi with controlled cavitation at strategic time points in the SWL comminution process. All SWL was applied at a peak-positive pressure (p+) of 34 MPa and a peak-negative pressure (p−) of 8 MPa; a shock rate of 1 Hz was used. Histotripsy pulses had a p− of 33 MPa and were applied at a pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 100 Hz. Ten model stones were sonicated in-vitro with each of five different treatment schemes: A. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) with 0.7 seconds of histotripsy interleaved between successive shocks (totaling to 42,000 pulses); B. 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks) followed by 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (1 burst per second, totaling to 42,000 pulses); C. 10 minutes histotripsy applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses) followed by 10 minutes SWL (600 shocks); D. 10 minutes SWL-only (600 shocks); E. 10 minutes histotripsy-only applied in 0.7 second bursts (42,000 pulses). Following sonication, debris was collected and sieved through 8, 6, 4, and 2 mm filters. It was found that SWL-only generated a broad range of fragment sizes, with an average of 14.9 ± 24.1% of the original stone mass remaining >8 mm. Histotripsy-only eroded the surface of stones to tiny

  7. Effect of pulsed ultrasound on the physicochemical characteristics and emulsifying properties of squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle proteins.

    PubMed

    Higuera-Barraza, O A; Torres-Arreola, W; Ezquerra-Brauer, J M; Cinco-Moroyoqui, F J; Rodríguez Figueroa, J C; Marquez-Ríos, E

    2017-09-01

    Food technologists are always looking to improve the functional properties of proteins. In this sense, in last years ultrasound has been used to improve some functional properties. For this reason, and considering that jumbo squid is an important fishery in northwest Mexico, the purpose of this research was to determine the effect of pulsed ultrasound on the physicochemical characteristics and emulsifying properties of squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle proteins. Pulsed ultrasound (20kHz, 20, and 40% amplitude) was applied for 30, 60, and 90s to a protein extract prepared from giant squid mantle causing an increase (p<0.05) in surface hydrophobicity (So) from 108.4±1.4 to 239.1±2.4 after application of pulsed ultrasound at 40% of amplitude for 90s. The electrophoretic profile and the total and reactive sulfhydryl contents were not affected (p⩾0.05) by the ultrasound treatment. The emulsifying ability of the protein solution was improved (p<0.05), whereas the Emulsifier Activity Index (EAI) varied from123.67±5.52m(2)/g for the control and increased up to 217.7±3.8m(2)/g after application of the ultrasound. The Stability Emulsifier Index (EEI) was improved at 40% of amplitude by 60 and 90s. The results suggested that pulsed ultrasound used as pretreatment induced conformational changes in giant squid proteins, which improved the interfacial association between protein-oil phases, thus contributing to the improvement of their emulsifient properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Cavitation and non-cavitation regime for large-scale ultrasonic standing wave particle separation systems--In situ gentle cavitation threshold determination and free radical related oxidation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Singh, Tanoj; Leong, Thomas; Mawson, Raymond; McArthur, Sally; Manasseh, Richard; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We here suggest a novel and straightforward approach for liter-scale ultrasound particle manipulation standing wave systems to guide system design in terms of frequency and acoustic power for operating in either cavitation or non-cavitation regimes for ultrasound standing wave systems, using the sonochemiluminescent chemical luminol. We show that this method offers a simple way of in situ determination of the cavitation threshold for selected separation vessel geometry. Since the pressure field is system specific the cavitation threshold is system specific (for the threshold parameter range). In this study we discuss cavitation effects and also measure one implication of cavitation for the application of milk fat separation, the degree of milk fat lipid oxidation by headspace volatile measurements. For the evaluated vessel, 2 MHz as opposed to 1 MHz operation enabled operation in non-cavitation or low cavitation conditions as measured by the luminol intensity threshold method. In all cases the lipid oxidation derived volatiles were below the human sensory detection level. Ultrasound treatment did not significantly influence the oxidative changes in milk for either 1 MHz (dose of 46 kJ/L and 464 kJ/L) or 2 MHz (dose of 37 kJ/L and 373 kJ/L) operation.

  9. Pulsed application of focused ultrasound to the LI4 elicits deqi sensations: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Seung-Schik; Lee, Wonhye; Kim, Hyungmin

    2014-08-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) techniques enable the delivery of acoustic pressure waves to a localized, specific region of anatomy, and mechanically stimulate the sonicated region when given in a train of pulses. The present pilot study examines if the pulsed application of acoustic waves focused to an acupuncture point (LI4, Hegu), i.e. FUS acupuncture, can elicit deqi sensations. The FUS was generated by a single-element ultrasound transducer, and delivered to the LI4 of acupuncture-naïve participants (n=10) for a duration of 1s using 2 ms tone-burst-duration and 50 Hz pulse repetition frequency. The subjective ratings of deqi descriptors were obtained across different conditions, i.e. FUS acupuncture using acoustic intensities of 1 and 3 W/cm(2) (spatial-peak temporal-averaged intensity, Ispta), sham sonication condition, tactile stimulation using a von Frey monofilament, and needle-based real and sham acupuncture. We also measured the presence of sharp pain, unpleasantness, and anxiety level during each condition. The FUS acupuncture given at 3 W/cm(2) elicited deqi sensation ratings similar to those acquired during the needle-based acupuncture condition across the subjects, with significantly reduced levels of non-deqi related sensations, such as sharp pain, anxiety and unpleasantness. The lower acoustic intensity also generated deqi sensations, but at a lesser degree than the ones acquired using the higher acoustic intensity. Neither the sham conditions nor the tactile stimulation elicited deqi sensations. The present data on acoustic acupuncture, with its exquisite spatial and depth control, along with the ability to electronically adjust its intensity, may suggest its potential utilization as an alternative mode of acupuncture, although further study is needed to probe its clinical efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Localized Tissue Surrogate Deformation due to Controlled Single Bubble Cavitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-27

    dissolved gasses, and cavitation can be induced within CSF or other fluid compartments within the brain when exposed to relatively low blast...particulate surfaces. However, pre-existing gas nuclei can act as another source 5. Previous hyperbaric decompression and ultrasound studies suggest that...studies using ultrasound shock waves also support cavitation induced damage, e.g. hemorrhage and cellular membrane poration 26-28. In addition

  11. Biological response in vitro of skeletal muscle cells treated with different intensity continuous and pulsed ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrunhosa, Viviane M.; Mermelstein, Claudia S.; Costa, Manoel L.; Costa-Felix, Rodrigo P. B.

    2011-02-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound has been used in physiotherapy to accelerate tissue healing. Although the ultrasonic wave is widely used in clinical practice, not much is known about the biological effects of ultrasound on cells and tissues. This study aims to evaluate the biological response of ultrasound in primary cultures of chick myogenic cells. To ensure the metrological reliability of whole measurement process, the ultrasound equipment was calibrated in accordance with IEC 61689:2007. The skeletal muscle cells were divided in four samples. One sample was used as a control group and the others were submitted to different time and intensity and operation mode of ultrasound: 1) 0.5 W/cm2 continuous for 5 minutes, 2) 0.5 W/cm2 pulsed for 5 minutes, 3) 1.0 W/cm2 pulsed for 10 minutes. The samples were analyzed with phase contrast optical microscopy before and after the treatment. The results showed alignment of myogenic cells in the sample treated with 0.5 W/cm2 continuous during 5 minutes when compared with the control group and the other samples. This study is a first step towards a metrological and scientific based protocol to cells and tissues treatment under different ultrasound field exposures.

  12. Robert Apfel's contribution to clinical diagnostic ultrasound: The mechanical index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy K.

    2004-05-01

    The mechanical index, MI, resulted from theoretical considerations of the short-pulse acoustic threshold for inertial cavitation in water populated with microbubbles of all sizes [R. E. Apfel and C. K. Holland, Ultrasound Med Biol. 17, 179-185 (1991)]. In this review, the onset of cavitation will be discussed with reference to Robert Apfel's legacy of theoretical and experimental data. The questions arise: Can the utility of the MI be extended to situations in which the threshold MI is exceeded, thereby allowing for some estimate of the quantification of a potential bioeffect due to microcavitation? Also, can the MI be extended to situations in which pulses are, unlike the original formulation, not short? Is there a theoretical or semi-empirical basis for the MI threshold below which cavitation is unlikely? Can the MI be used to predict gas contrast agent destruction? The possible consequences of gas body activation associated with aerated lung tissue, intestinal gas pockets or encapsulated gas contrast agents represent specific instances of cavitation considerations relevant to clinical practice. Monitoring the real-time display of the MI (mandated by the FDA) helps clinicians evaluate and minimize the potential risks in the use of diagnostic ultrasound instrumentation. [Research supported by National Institutes of Health Grant R29 HL58761.

  13. Inertial cavitation dose produced ex vivo in rabbit ear arteries with optison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Juan; Brayman, Andrew; Matula, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation (IC) effects were studied ex vivo in rabbit ear arteries with the addition of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). Ears were removed from New Zealand white rabbits immediately after being euthanized under a protocol approved by the University of Washington IACUC. The auricular arteries were perfused with varying concentration of UCA (Optison) in saline and exposed to 1.155-MHz pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) with constant PRF (10 Hz), pulse length (20 cycles), and total treatment time (20 s). Experiments were performed for variable peak negative acoustic pressure (P-) (from 0.19 to 3.31 Mpa) and Optison volume concentration (0% [saline only], 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.5%, and 1%). Cavitation activity was quantified by IC Dose (cumulated root-mean-squared [rms] broadband noise amplitude in a particular band in the frequency domain). The results showed that (1) IC activity was induced much more easily with the addition of Optison, even at low volume concentration, such as 0.1%. (2) IC dose increased significantly with the increasing acoustic pressure and Optison concentration. (3) Higher concentrations of Optison decreased the IC threshold. [Work supported by NIH 8RO1 EB00350-2.

  14. Photoacoustic cavitation for theranostics: mechanism, current progress and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Qin, D.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging cavitation technology, photoacoustic cavitation (PAC) means the formation of bubbles in liquids using focused laser and pre-established ultrasound synchronously. Its significant advantages include the decreased threshold of each modality and the precise location of cavitation determined by the focused laser. In this paper, a brief review of PAC is presented, including the physical mechanism description, the classic experimental technology, the representative results in variety of media, and its applications in biomedical imaging and therapy. Moreover, some preliminary results of PAC in perfluoropentane (PFP) liquid and PFP droplets investigated by passive cavitation detection (PCD) in our group are also presented.

  15. THE ROLE OF INERTIAL CAVITATION IN ACOUSTIC DROPLET VAPORIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Fakhri, Nasir H.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2011-01-01

    The vaporization of a superheated droplet emulsion into gas bubbles using ultrasound – termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) – has potential therapeutic applications in embolotherapy and drug delivery. The optimization of ADV for therapeutic applications can be enhanced by understanding the physical mechanisms underlying ADV, which are currently not clearly elucidated. Acoustic cavitation is one possible mechanism. This paper investigates the relationship between the ADV and inertial cavitation (IC) thresholds (measured as peak rarefactional pressures) by studying parameters that are known to influence the IC threshold. These parameters include bulk fluid properties such as gas saturation, temperature, viscosity, and surface tension; droplet parameters such as degree of superheat, surfactant type, and size; and acoustic properties such as pulse repetition frequency and pulse width. In all cases the ADV threshold occurred at a lower rarefactional pressure than the IC threshold indicating that the phase-transition occurs before IC events. The viscosity and temperature of the bulk fluid are shown to influence both thresholds directly and inversely, respectively. An inverse trend is observed between threshold and diameter for droplets in the 1 to 2.5 μ range. Based on a choice of experimental parameters, it is possible to achieve ADV with or without IC. PMID:19473917

  16. In vitro comparative study of vibro-acoustography versus pulse-echo ultrasound in imaging permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, F.G.; Davis, B.J.; Greenleaf, J.F.; Fatemi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) is a common treatment for early stage prostate cancer. While the modern approach using trans-rectal ultrasound guidance has demonstrated excellent outcome, the efficacy of PPB depends on achieving complete radiation dose coverage of the prostate by obtaining a proper radiation source (seed) distribution. Currently, brachytherapy seed placement is guided by trans-rectal ultrasound imaging and fluoroscopy. A significant percentage of seeds are not detected by trans-rectal ultrasound because certain seed orientations are invisible making accurate intra-operative feedback of radiation dosimetry very difficult, if not impossible. Therefore, intra-operative correction of suboptimal seed distributions cannot easily be done with current methods. Vibro-acoustography (VA) is an imaging modality that is capable of imaging solids at any orientation, and the resulting images are speckle free. Objective and methods The purpose of this study is to compare the capabilities of VA and pulse-echo ultrasound in imaging PPB seeds at various angles and show the sensitivity of detection to seed orientation. In the VA experiment, two intersecting ultrasound beams driven at f1 = 3.00 MHz and f2 = 3.020 MHz respectively were focused on the seeds attached to a latex membrane while the amplitude of the acoustic emission produced at the difference frequency 20 kHz was detected by a low frequency hydrophone. Results Finite element simulations and results of experiments conducted under well-controlled conditions in a water tank on a series of seeds indicate that the seeds can be detected at any orientation with VA, whereas pulse-echo ultrasound is very sensitive to the seed orientation. Conclusion It is concluded that vibro-acoustography is superior to pulse-echo ultrasound for detection of PPB seeds. PMID:18538365

  17. Targeted therapy of animal eyes with tumors by laser-generated focused ultrasound (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehwa; Luo, Wei; Demirci, Hakan; Guo, L. Jay

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation therapy based on high-amplitude focused ultrasound (e.g., Histotripsy) has shown great promise in clinical trials. The technique realizes localized treatments of tissues and diseased cells by controlling cavitation zones, which can be even smaller than its acoustic spot sizes. Also, the short pressure pulse used in the technique can minimize the unwanted heat accumulation, which the conventional piezoelectric transducers suffer from due to low operating frequencies and relatively long acoustic pulses. However, this modality requires bulky system composed of array of piezoelectric elements and electric amplifiers in order to obtain high pressure amplitude. Moreover, especially when treating an area much smaller than the acoustic spot size, this approach may be vulnerable to nucleation sites within the focal volume, which can potentially induce cavitation and thus enlarge the total treatment area. Here, we show targeted cell-level therapy by using laser generated ultrasound. By employing a concave lens coated by a carbon nanotube (CNT)-polymer composite, high-amplitude acoustic pressure can be obtained at a tight focal spot (<100 um). The small focal spot, comparable to cavitation zone, lead to controlled cavitation treatment. Such feature can be exploited for treating intraocular tumors but without harming other parts of the eye (e.g. healthy retina and choroid) and therefore preserve the vision of the patients. We demonstrate that the localized disruption effects can be used for cell-level surgery to remove cells and to kill cells. Some experimental examples are shown using animal eyeballs.

  18. Engineering design method for cavitational reactors: I. Sonochemical reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Gogate, P.R.; Pandit, A.B.

    2000-02-01

    High pressures and temperatures generated during the cavitation process are now considered responsible for the observed physical and chemical transformations using ultrasound irradiation. Effects of various operating parameters reported here include the frequency, the intensity of ultrasound, and the initial nuclei sizes on the bubble dynamics, and hence the magnitude of pressure generated. Rigorous solutions of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation require considerable numerical skills and the results obtained depend on various assumptions. The Rayleigh-Plesset equation was solved numerically, and the results have been empirically correlated using easily measurable global parameters in a sonochemical reactor. Liquid-phase compressibility effects were also considered. These considerations resulted in a criterion for critical ultrasound intensity, which if not considered properly can lead to overdesign or underdesign. A sound heuristic correlation, developed for the prediction of the pressure pulse generated as a function of initial nuclei sizes, frequency, and intensity of ultrasound, is valid not only over the entire range of operating parameters commonly used but also in the design procedure of sonochemical reactors with great confidence.

  19. The impact of pulsed electric fields and ultrasound on water distribution and loss in mushrooms stalks.

    PubMed

    Dellarosa, Nicolò; Frontuto, Daniele; Laghi, Luca; Dalla Rosa, Marco; Lyng, James G

    2017-12-01

    Pulsed electric fields (PEF) and ultrasound (US) are promising innovative technologies with the potential to increase mass transfer when combined with further processes which in turn can provide potential benefits in the recovery of valuable compounds from food by-products. To provide evidence of the mechanism of mass transfer enhancement, the present study assessed the impact of PEF and US treatments, applied individually and in combination, at low and high temperatures, on the tissue microstructure of mushroom stalks. Different indices such as quantitative water redistribution, water loss and qualitative release of compounds were evaluated. The combination of these physical methods demonstrated that PEF redistributed a greater proportion of intracellular water into extracellular spaces than US. However, the application of high temperature treatments alone showed an even greater proportion of intracellular water migration compared to PEF. When PEF was combined with US at low temperatures the difference was not significant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment improved the rate of autograft peripheral nerve regeneration in rat

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenli; Wang, Yuexiang; Tang, Jie; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Guo, Quanyi; Guo, Zhiyuan; Li, Pan; Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been widely used in clinic for the treatment of repairing pseudarthrosis, bone fractures and of healing in various soft tissues. Some reports indicated that LIPUS accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration including Schwann cells (SCs) and injured nerves. But little is known about its appropriate intensities on autograft nerves. This study was to investigate which intensity of LIPUS improved the regeneration of gold standard postsurgical nerves in experimental rat model. Sprague-Dawley rats were made into 10 mm right side sciatic nerve reversed autologous nerve transplantation and randomly treated with 250 mW/cm2, 500 mW/cm2 or 750 mW/cm2 LIPUS for 2–12 weeks after operation. Functional and pathological results showed that LIPUS of 250 mW/cm2 significantly induced faster rate of axonal regeneration. This suggested that autograft nerve regeneration was improved. PMID:27102358

  1. Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging using a powerful long pulse laser.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-08-18

    Ultrasound-modulated optical imaging (or tomography) is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides the optical spectroscopic signature and the localization of an absorbing object embedded in a strongly scattering medium. We propose to improve the sensitivity of the technique by using a pulsed single-frequency laser to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and thereby collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Moreover, when the detection of tagged photons is done with a photorefractive interferometer, the high optical peak power reduces the response time of the photorefractive crystal below the speckle field decorrelation time. Results obtained with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer are presented for 30- and 60-mm thick scattering media.

  2. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Cheng; Ho, Cheng-Wen; Sun, Chia-Hung; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Li, Tsung-Ying; Shih, Feng-Mei; Wu, Yung-Tsan

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04-17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293.

  3. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Single-Blinded Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective We assessed the therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) treatment of the median nerve in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Methods We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled, single-blinded study. Forty-four patients with CTS were randomized into intervention or control groups. Patients in the intervention group were treated with PRF and night splint, and the control group was prescribed night splint alone. Primary outcome was the onset time of significant pain relief assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS), and secondary outcomes included evaluation of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Questionnaire (BCTQ) results, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the median nerve, sensory nerve conduction velocity (SNCV) of the median nerve, and finger pinch strength. All outcome measurements were performed at 1, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after treatment. Results Thirty-six patients completed the study. The onset time of pain relief in the intervention group was significantly shorter (median onset time of 2 days vs. 14 days; hazard ratio = 7.37; 95% CI, 3.04–17.87) compared to the control group (p < 0.001). Significant improvement in VAS and BCTQ scores (p < 0.05) was detected in the intervention group at all follow-up periods compared to the controls (except for the severity subscale of BCTQ at week 1). Ultrasound-guided PRF treatment resulted in a lower VAS score and stronger finger pinch compared to the control group over the entire study. Conclusions Our study shows that ultrasound-guided PRF serves as a better approach for pain relief in patients with CTS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02217293 PMID:26067628

  4. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104-5  ×  107 microbubbles ml-1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s-1, prior to the onset of

  5. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  6. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104–5  ×  107 microbubbles ml−1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75–366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s−1, prior to

  7. Low Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) for the treatment of intervertebral disc degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horne, Devante; Jones, Peter; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Adams, Matt; Ozilgen, B. Arda; Zahos, Peter; Tang, Xinyan; Liebenberg, Ellen; Coughlin, Dezba; Lotz, Jeffrey; Diederich, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Discogenic back pain presents a major public health issue, with current therapeutic interventions limited to short-term symptom relief without providing regenerative remedies for diseased intervertebral discs (IVD). Many of these interventions are invasive and can diminish the biomechanical integrity of the IVDs. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a potential treatment option that is both non-invasive and regenerative. LIPUS has been shown to be a clinically effective method for the enhancement of wound and fracture healing. Recent in vitro studies have shown that LIPUS stimulation induces an upregulation functional matrix proteins and downregulation of inflammatory factors in cultured IVD cells. However, we do not know the effects of LIPUS on an in vivo model for intervertebral disc degeneration. The objective of this study was to show technical feasibility of building a LIPUS system that can target the rat tail IVD and apply this setup to a model for acute IVD degeneration. A LIPUS exposimetry system was built using a 1.0 MHz planar transducer and custom housing. Ex vivo intensity measurements demonstrated LIPUS delivery to the center of the rat tail IVD. Using an established stab-incision model for disc degeneration, LIPUS was applied for 20 minutes daily for five days. For rats that displayed a significant injury response, LIPUS treatment caused significant upregulation of Collagen II and downregulation of Tumor Necrosis Factor - α gene expression. Our preliminary studies indicate technical feasibility of targeted delivery of ultrasound to a rat tail IVD for studies of LIPUS biological effects.

  8. The Role of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Cartilage Healing in Knee Osteoarthritis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Joshua B; Jayaram, Prathap; Naqvi, Usker; Gober, Joslyn; Malanga, Gerard A

    2017-06-09

    Ultrasound (US) is a therapeutic modality that has been used in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions for decades. In recent years, there have been technological advancements using low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) as a clinical modality. The purpose of this review was to critically examine the medical literature to determine the effects of LIPUS on the chondrogenic properties of knee osteoarthritis. A literature search of 3 major databases (PubMed, Scopus, and EMBASE) was performed. Two independent physician reviewers screened titles and abstracts, yielding a total of 18 relevant articles after the inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied. Results favored that LIPUS has a promising effect on the cellular elements in articular cartilage, specifically on chondrocytes in knee osteoarthritis. Although the use of LIPUS is encouraging based on basic science and preclinical data, there is a paucity of evidence with respect to humans. Consequently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend for or against LIPUS in clinical OA populations. We suggest future directions for research centered on LIPUS in both human and animal models to delineate the effect on the biologic properties of cartilage in knee osteoarthritis. To be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary Study on the Efficacy of Low Intensity Pulsed ultrasound for Osteoporosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Makoto; Koji, Akiyama; Tokita, Akihumi; Ishijima, Muneaki; Nozawa, Masahiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi

    2005-03-01

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has recently been shown to accelerate long bone fracture healing, but its effect on osteoporosis is not clear. The aim of this study is to investigate whether bone mineral density (BMD) of distal one-third radius of older woman is influenced with LIPUS. Six Japanese women who were outpatients at our hospital were recruited in this study and ranged from seventy to seventy-four years of age. In this study LIPUS exposed unilateral distal one-third of the radius for 20 min/once, 3 times and over every week for six months. The contralateral side was not exposed. The intensity of ultrasound was 30 mW/cm2 spatial-average temporal-average. Bone status was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Medication for osteoporosis were not changed. A significant increases in BMD at the treatment site were found in 3 women without alendronate and menatetrenone medication (averaged 4.5%). No significant differences were found in women on these medications. No remarkable changes were found away from the treatment site. These results suggest the possibility of effectiveness of LIPUS applied to a local area of osteoporosis and that pharmacological intervention is capable of influencing the effect of LIPUS for osteoporosis.

  10. Measurement of the contrast agent intrinsic and native harmonic response with single transducer pulse waved ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Brands, P J; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents, i.e., small gas filled microbubbles, enhance the echogenicity of blood and have the potential to be used for tissue perfusion assessment. The contrast agents scatter ultrasound in a nonlinear manner and thereby introduce harmonics in the ultrasound signal. This property is exploited in new ultrasound techniques like harmonic imaging, which aims to display only the contrast agent presence. Much attention has already been given to the physical properties of the contrast agent. The present study focuses on practical aspects of the measurement of the intrinsic harmonic response of ultrasound contrast agents with single transducer pulse waved ultrasound systems. Furthermore, the consequences of two other sources of harmonics are discussed. These sources are the nonlinear distortion of ultrasound in a medium generating native harmonics, and the emitted signal itself which might contain contaminating harmonics. It is demonstrated conceptually and by experiments that optimization of the contrast agent harmonic response measured with a single transducer is governed by the transducer spectral sensitivity distribution rather than the resonance properties of the contrast agent. Both native and contaminating harmonics may be of considerable strength and can be misinterpreted as intrinsic harmonics of the contrast agent. Practical difficulties to filter out the harmonic component selectively, without deteriorating the image, may cause misinterpretation of the fundamental as a harmonic.

  11. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in lower limb bone stress injuries: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gan, Thomas Y; Kuah, Donald E; Graham, Kenneth S; Markson, Gregory

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) for the improvement of lower limb bone stress injuries in a civilian population. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to compare LIPUS with placebo. Civilian private practice population in Sydney, Australia. Subjects were recruited if a grade II-IV bone stress injury was diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of either the postero-medial tibia, fibula or second, third, or fourth metatarsal. Subjects of all levels of sporting activity were included. Thirty subjects were initially recruited, and 23 subjects were included in the final analysis. Subjects were randomized into either the treatment or placebo arm and matched to the site of injury (tibia, fibula, or metatarsal). Subjects in both arms used either treatment or placebo devices for 20 minutes daily for 4 weeks. Six clinical parameters (night pain, pain at rest, pain on walking, pain with running, tenderness, and pain with single leg hop) were compared before and after intervention. The changes in MRI grade and bone marrow edema size were also compared. There were no significant differences between the treatment and placebo conditions for changes in MRI grading (2.2 vs 2.4, P = 0.776) or bone marrow edema size (3 vs 4.1, P = 0.271). There were no significant differences between the treatment and placebo conditions for the 6 clinical parameters. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound was found not to be an effective treatment for the healing of lower limb bone stress injuries in this study. However, this was measured over a relatively short duration of 4 weeks in a small, mostly female population. This double-blinded, randomized, placebo-controlled trial has shown that LIPUS is not an effective treatment for lower limb bone stress injuries.

  12. Evaluation of the increase in permeability of the blood-brain barrier during tumor progression after pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Lin, Guan-Liang; Lin, Hui-Hsien; Wong, Tai-Tong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the permeability of the blood-brain barrier after sonication by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound and to determine if such an approach increases the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio. F98 glioma-bearing Fischer 344 rats were injected intravenously with Evans blue with or without blood-tumor barrier disruption induced by transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. Sonication was applied at a frequency of 1 MHz with a 5% duty cycle and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The permeability of the blood-brain barrier was assessed by the extravasation of Evans blue. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images were used to monitor the gadolinium deposition path associated with transcranial pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound, and the influencing size and location was also investigated. In addition, whole brain histological analysis was performed. The results were compared by two-tailed unpaired t-test. The accumulation of Evans blue in brains and the tumor:ipsilateral brain permeability ratio of Evans blue were significantly increased after pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure. Evans blue injection followed by sonication showed an increase in the tumor:ipsilateral brain ratio of the target tumors (9.14:1) of about 2.23-fold compared with the control tumors (x4.09) on day 6 after tumor implantation. Magnetic resonance images showed that pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound locally enhances the permeability of the blood-tumor barrier in the glioma-bearing rats. This method could allow enhanced synergistic effects with respect to other brain tumor treatment regimens.

  13. Detection of acoustic emission from cavitation in tissue during clinical extracorporeal lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A J; Choi, M J; Saunders, J E

    1996-01-01

    A 1-MHz focused hydrophone has been used to search for acoustic emission expected to arise from cavitation occurring in tissue during clinical extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL). The hydrophone is acoustically coupled to the patient's skin and the focus directed at depth in tissue under ultrasound guidance. The measured amplitude-time variation of the acoustic emission from tissue near the shock-wave focus of the Storz Modulith SL20 lithotripter has been examined in four patients. There is evidence of increased amplitude acoustic emission at 1 MHz from regions within tissue that also appear hyperechoic in simultaneously acquired ultrasound images. The acoustic emission from these regions decays from an initial peak to the noise level in about 500 microseconds following each shock-wave pulse. Within this period, a second peak, often of higher amplitude than the first, is typically observed about 100 microseconds after the shockwave. The time between the initial and second peaks is found to increase with increasing shock-wave amplitude. The results are similar to those previously observed from cavitation induced by shock-wave exposure in water and indicate that the 1-MHz acoustic emission arises from inertial cavitation in tissue during clinical ESWL.

  14. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification.

  15. Enhancement of cardiomyogenesis in stem cells by low intensity pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ailing; Morshedi, Amir; Wang, Jen-Chieh; Lim, Mayasari; Zhou, Yufeng

    2017-03-01

    Low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been shown to enhance bone and cartilage regeneration from stem cells. Gene expression of angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor can be increased in LIPUS-treated osteoblasts. The AT1 receptor is a known mechanoreceptor in cardiomyocytes. It suggests that LIPUS may enhance cardiomyogenesis via mechanotransduction by increasing AT1 expression. Murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) were treated daily by 10-min 1MHz LIPUS at spatial-average temporal-peak acoustic intensities of 30 mW/cm2 and 300 mW/cm2 in both continuous and pulsed wave (20% duty cycle) for 10 days. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunocytochemistry, and beating rate were used to evaluate the cardiac viability quantitatively. After the treatment of LIPUS, beating rate of contractile areas and cardiac gene expression, such as α- and β-myosin heavy chain, were improved. Furthermore, no deleterious effects to the development of cardiac proteins were observed. All results suggest that LIPUS stimulation has the capacity of enhancing cardiomyogenesis from embryonic stem cells. With the benefit and the ease in incorporating LIPUS into various culture platforms, LIPUS has the potential to produce cardiomyocytes for clinical use in the future.

  16. Study of the inactivation of spoilage microorganisms in apple juice by pulsed light and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Mariana; Alzamora, Stella Maris; Guerrero, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasound (US) (600 W, 20 kHz and 95.2 μm wave amplitude; 10 or 30 min at 20, 30 or 44 ± 1 °C) and pulsed light (PL) (Xenon lamp; 3 pulses/s; 0.1 m distance; 2.4 J/cm(2)-71.6 J/cm(2); initial temperature 2, 30, 44 ± 1 °C) on the inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores and Saccharomyces cerevisiae KE162 inoculated in commercial (pH: 3.5; 12.5 °Brix) and natural squeezed (pH: 3.4; 11.8 °Brix) apple juices. Inactivation depended on treatment time, temperature, microorganism and matrix. Combination of these technologies led up to 3.0 log cycles of spore reduction in commercial apple juice and 2.0 log cycles in natural juice; while for S. cerevisiae, 6.4 and 5.8 log cycles of reduction were achieved in commercial and natural apple juices, respectively. In natural apple juice, the combination of US + 60 s PL at the highest temperature build-up (56 ± 1 °C) was the most effective treatment for both strains. In commercial apple juice, US did not contribute to further inactivation of spores, but significantly reduced yeast population. Certain combinations of US + PL kept on good microbial stability under refrigerated conditions for 15 days.

  17. Does Pulsed Low Intensity Ultrasound Allow Early Return to Normal Activities When Treating Stress Fractures?

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jeff C; Brindle, Tim; Nyland, John; Caborn, David NM; Johnson, Darren L

    1999-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the efficacy of daily pulsed low intensity ultrasound (LIUS) with early return to activities for the treatment of lower extremity stress fractures. Eight patients (2 males, 6 females) with radiographic and bone scan confirmed tibial stress fractures participated in this study. Additionally, a case report of a tarsal navicular stress fracture is described. All patients except one were involved in athletics. Prior to the study, subjects completed a 5 question, 10 cm visual analog scale (VAS) regarding pain level (10 = extreme pain, 1 = no pain) and were assessed for functional performance. Subjects received 20-minute LIUS treatments 5 times a week for 4 weeks. Subjects maintained all functional activities during the treatment period. Seven patients with posterior-medial stress fractures participated without a brace. Subjects were re-tested after 4 weeks of treatment. Mann-Whitney U tests (VAS data) and paired t-tests (functional tests) assessed statistical significance (p<0.05). Although the intensity of practice was diminished in some instances, no time off from competitive sports was prescribed for the patients with the tibial stress fractures. The patient with the anterior tibial stress fracture underwent tibial intramedullary nailing at the conclusion of a season of play. In this uncontrolled experience, treatment of tibial stress fractures with daily pulsed LIUS was effective in pain relief and early return to vigorous activity without bracing for the patients with posterior-medial stress fractures. PMID:10847513

  18. Computed ultrasound tomography in echo mode for imaging speed of sound using pulse-echo sonography: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Michael; Held, Gerrit; Peeters, Sara; Preisser, Stefan; Grünig, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of diagnostic echo ultrasound have motivated research into novel modalities that complement ultrasound in a multimodal device. One promising candidate is speed of sound imaging, which has been found to reveal structural changes in diseased tissue. Transmission ultrasound tomography shows speed of sound spatially resolved, but is limited to the acoustically transparent breast. We present a novel method by which speed-of-sound imaging is possible using classic pulse-echo equipment, facilitating new clinical applications and the combination with state-of-the art diagnostic ultrasound. Pulse-echo images are reconstructed while scanning the tissue under various angles using transmit beam steering. Differences in average sound speed along different transmit directions are reflected in the local echo phase, which allows a 2-D reconstruction of the sound speed. In the present proof-of-principle study, we describe a contrast resolution of 0.6% of average sound speed and a spatial resolution of 1 mm (laterally) × 3 mm (axially), suitable for diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Excitation of cavitation bubbles in low-temperature liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Koichi; Harada, Shingo

    2017-06-01

    We excited a cavitation bubble by irradiating a Nd:YAG laser pulse onto a titanium target that was installed in liquid nitrogen at a temperature below the boiling point. To our knowledge, this is the first experiment in which a cavitation bubble has been successfully excited in liquid nitrogen. We compared the cavitation bubble in liquid nitrogen with that in water on the basis of an equation reported by Florschuetz and Chao [J. Heat Transfer 87, 209 (1965)].

  20. Treatment of acute intravascular thrombi with diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Lof, John; Everbach, Carr; He, Anming; Bennett, Richard M; Matsunaga, Terry; Johanning, Jason; Porter, Thomas R

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether high mechanical index (MI) impulses from diagnostic ultrasound (DUS) could dissolve intravascular thrombi using intravenous microbubbles. Using a canine model, DUS was applied during a continuous intravenous infusion of microbubbles. Completely thrombosed grafts were assigned to 2 treatment regimens: low-MI (<0.5-MI) ultrasound alone; or intermittent high-MI impulses (1.9-MI) guided by low-MI ultrasound (contrast pulse sequencing). A 20-MHz cavitation detector was placed confocal to the ultrasound transducer to make intravascular cavitation measurements in 1 dog. Intravascular cavitational activity was detected when an MI of >0.5 was applied. In grafts treated with intermittent high-MI ultrasound, angiographic success was 71% at 30 min and 79% at 45 min, compared with 20% and 30% at these times in the low-MI ultrasound alone group (p < 0.05). We conclude that a commercially available DUS transducer can successfully recanalize acute intravascular thrombi during a continuous microbubble infusion.

  1. Interactions of inertial cavitation bubbles with stratum corneum lipid bilayers during low-frequency sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tezel, Ahmet; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-12-01

    Interactions of acoustic cavitation bubbles with biological tissues play an important role in biomedical applications of ultrasound. Acoustic cavitation plays a particularly important role in enhancing transdermal transport of macromolecules, thereby offering a noninvasive mode of drug delivery (sonophoresis). Ultrasound-enhanced transdermal transport is mediated by inertial cavitation, where collapses of cavitation bubbles microscopically disrupt the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum. In this study, we describe a theoretical analysis of the interactions of cavitation bubbles with the stratum corneum lipid bilayers. Three modes of bubble-stratum corneum interactions including shock wave emission, microjet penetration into the stratum corneum, and impact of microjet on the stratum corneum are considered. By relating the mechanical effects of these events on the stratum corneum structure, the relationship between the number of cavitation events and collapse pressures with experimentally measured increase in skin permeability was established. Theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally measured parameters of cavitation events.

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  3. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  4. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pregnant woman and assess her fetus Diagnose gallbladder disease Evaluate flow in blood vessels Guide a ... For some ultrasound exams, such as of the gallbladder, your doctor may ask that you not eat ...

  5. Use of Ultrasound Pulses Combined with Definity for Targeted Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2007-05-01

    We have developed a method to combine an ultrasound contrast agent (USCA) with low-intensity focused ultrasound pulses combined to produce temporary blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD), a potential non-invasive means for targeted drug delivery in the brain. All of our previous work used the USCA Optison. The purpose of this work was to test the feasibility of using the USCA Definity for BBBD. Thirty-six non-overlapping locations were sonicated through a craniotomy in experiments in the brains of nine rabbits (4 locations per rabbit; US frequency: 0.69MHz, burst: 10ms, PRF: 1Hz, duration: 20s; pressure amplitude: 0.2-1.5 MPa). Eleven locations were sonicated using Optison at 0.5 MPa. For both agents, the probability for BBBD was estimated to be 50% at 0.4 MPa using probit regression. In histology, small isolated areas of extravasated erythrocytes were observed in some locations. At 0.8 MPa and above, this extravasation was sometimes accompanied by tiny (dimensions of 100 μm or less) regions of damaged brain parenchyma. The magnitude of the BBBD was larger with Optison than with Definity at 0.5 MPa (P=0.04), and more areas with extravasated erythrocytes were observed (P=0.03). We conclude that BBBD is possible using Definity for the dosage of USCA and the acoustic parameters tested in this study. While the probability for BBBD as a function of pressure amplitude and the type of acute tissue effects was similar to findings with Optison, under these experimental conditions, Optison produced a larger effect.

  6. Apoptosis Induced by Microbubble-Assisted Acoustic Cavitation in K562 Cells: The Predominant Role of the Cyclosporin A-Dependent Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lu; Feng, Yi; Shi, Aiwei; Zong, Yujin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been described as inducing tumor cell apoptosis that is partly associated with mitochondrial dysfunction; however, the exact mechanisms have not been fully characterized. Here, low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (1 MHz, 0.3-MPa peak negative pressure, 10% duty cycle and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency) was applied to K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells for 1 min with 10% (v/v) SonoVue microbubbles. After ultrasound exposure, the apoptotic index was determined by flow cytometry with annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide. In addition, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was determined with the JC-1 assay. Translocation of apoptosis-associated protein cytochrome c was evaluated by Western blotting. We found that microbubble-assisted acoustic cavitation can increase the cellular apoptotic index, mitochondrial depolarization and cytochrome c release in K562 cells, compared with ultrasound treatment alone. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis were significantly inhibited by cyclosporin A, a classic inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore; however, the inhibitor of Bax protein, Bax-inhibiting peptide, could not suppress these effects. Our results suggest that mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening is involved in mitochondrial dysfunction after exposure to microbubble-assisted acoustic cavitation. Moreover, the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria is dependent on cyclosporin A-sensitive mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening, but not formation of the Bax-voltage dependent anion channel complex or Bax oligomeric pores. These data provide more insight into the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction induced by acoustic cavitation and can be used as a basis for therapy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Temporal Trends in the Histology of the Rabbit Kidney after Cavitational Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy L.; Kieran, Kathleen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.

    2007-05-01

    Tissue can be mechanically ablated through inertial cavitation generated by high intensity pulsed ultrasound. The ablation appears acutely as a fine slurry with absent cellular structure. Long-term effects and the evolution of histologic changes in disrupted tissue remain poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize the 0-60 day histology of cavitational ablation in a rabbit model. 29 New Zealand White rabbits were anesthetized and exposed to high intensity pulses of ultrasound (60000 pulses, 20 usec duration, 750 kHz, 1 kHz PRF, 18 MPa peak rarefactional pressure, lower pole, left kidney). Kidneys were harvested immediately from five rabbits. The others were recovered and the kidneys were harvested 1, 2, 7, 20, or 60 days after treatment. Grossly, kidneys from 0-2 days displayed subcapsular bruising near the exposure site and some hemorrhage in the adjacent perirenal fat; microscopically, a disrupted, acellular zone measuring 3-5 mm by 5-10 mm accompanied by local infiltration of neutrophils (acute inflammation) was seen. Kidneys harvested after 7 days displayed tubular dilatation adjacent to the targeted area and collagen deposition consistent with scar formation. Decreased collagen deposition, decreased size of the disrupted zone, and regeneration of the tubular basal cell layer of dilated tubules was evident by day 20. Kidneys harvested at 20 and 60 days had contour defects near the exposure site with an apparent volume loss. Cavitation causes orderly and predictable histologic changes. Local renal damage induced during histotripsy may be partially reversible. Further research is needed to identify the clinical correlates of the observed histologic findings.

  8. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  9. Gold nanoparticle targeted photoacoustic cavitation for potential deep tissue imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hengyi; Roy, Ronald A.; Murray, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    The laser generation of vapor bubbles around plasmonic nanoparticles can be enhanced through the application of an ultrasound field; a technique referred to as photoacoustic cavitation. The combination of light and ultrasound allows for bubble formation at lower laser fluence and peak negative ultrasound pressure than can be achieved using either modality alone. The growth and collapse of these bubbles leads to local mechanical disruption and acoustic emission, and can potentially be used to induce and monitor tissue therapy. Photoacoustic cavitation is investigated for a broad range of ultrasound pressures and nanoparticle concentrations for gold nanorods and nanospheres. The cavitation threshold fluences for both nanoparticle types are found to drastically reduce in the presence of an ultrasound field. The results indicate that photoacoustic cavitation can potentially be produced at depth in biological tissue without exceeding the safety limits for ultrasound or laser radiation at the tissue surface. PMID:23304648

  10. Nonlinear propagation acoustics of dual-frequency wide-band excitation pulses in a focused ultrasound system.

    PubMed

    Måsøy, Svein-Erik; Standal, Øyvind; Deibele, Jochen M; Näsholm, Sven Peter; Angelsen, Bjørn; Johansen, Tonni F; Tangen, Thor Andreas; Hansen, Rune

    2010-11-01

    In this article, acoustic propagation effects of dual-frequency wide-band excitation pulses in a focused ultrasound system are demonstrated in vitro. A designed and manufactured dual-frequency band annular array capable of transmitting 0.9/7.5 MHz center frequency wide-band pulses was used for this purpose. The dual-frequency band annular array, has been designed using a bi-layer piezo-electric stack. Water tank measurements demonstrate the function of the array by activating the low- and high-frequency layers individually and simultaneously. The results show that the array works as intended. Activating the low- and high-frequency layers individually, results in less than -50 dB signal level from the high- and low-frequency layers respectively. Activating both layers simultaneously, produce a well defined dual-frequency pulse. The presence of the low-frequency pulse leads to compression, expansion, and a time delay of the high-frequency pulse. There is a phase shift between the low- and high-frequency pulse as it propagates from the array to the focus. This makes the latter described effects also dependent on the array configuration. By varying the low-frequency pressure, a shift of up to 0.5 MHz in center frequency of a 8.0 MHz transmitted high-frequency pulse is observed at the array focus. The results demonstrate the high propagation complexity of dual-frequency pulses.

  11. Enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein with single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound-assisted processing.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ye; Ding, Yangyang; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Li, Qian; Chen, Yao; Wu, Huiyu; Wang, Xintong; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-01-01

    The present work investigated the enzymolysis kinetics, thermodynamics and model of porcine cerebral protein (PCP) which was pretreated by single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound. The kinetic constants for ultrasonic pretreated and traditional enzymolysis have been determined. Results showed that the value of KM in ultrasonic PCP (UPCP) enzymolysis decreased by 9% over that in the traditional enzymolysis. The values of reaction rate constant (k) for UPCP enzymolysis increased by 207%, 121%, 62%, and 45% at 293, 303, 313 and 323 K, respectively. For the thermodynamic parameters, ultrasound decreased activation energy (Ea), change in enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS) by 76%, 82% and 31% in PCP, respectively. However, ultrasound had little change in Gibbs free energy (ΔG) value in the temperature range of 293-323 K. Therefore, a general kinetic equation for the enzymolysis model of UPCP by a simple empirical equation was suggested. The experimental values fits with the enzymolysis kinetic model with a low average relative error (4%) confirmed that the kinetic model was accurate to reflect the enzymolysis process. The positive effect of single-frequency countercurrent and pulsed ultrasound in this study and application of the kinetic model may be useful for the release of bioactive peptides from meat processing by-products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound: a new salvage procedure for delayed unions and nonunions after leg lengthening in children.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Dieter; Correll, Johannes

    2005-01-01

    From 1998 to 2001, 112 lengthening procedures with or without deformity correction were performed in 108 children by external fixation with the Ilizarov method. Of these cases, 16.9% did not lead to a solid bone consolidation. Two children were operated the second time, mainly because of the parent's decision. Seventeen delayed unions or nonunions in 13 children were treated with low-intensity pulsed ultrasound. All 17 cases healed within 3 to 12 months without any risk of surgical intervention.

  13. Heating of tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound to stimulate enhanced HSP expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawska, Tamara; Wójcik, Janusz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2011-09-01

    The main aim of this work was numerical modeling of temperature fields induced in soft tissues in vivo by pulsed focused ultrasound during neurodegenerative disease treatment and experimental verification of the proposed model for a rat liver. The new therapeutic approach to neurodegenerative diseases consists of stimulation of enhanced expression of the Heat Shock Proteins (HSP) which are responsible for immunity of cells to stress. During therapy the temperature rise in tissues in vivo should not exceed 6 °C above level of the thermal norm (37 °C). First, the 3D acoustic pressure field, and the rate of heat production per unit volume due to that field, were calculated using our 3D numerical solver capable of predicting nonlinear propagation of pulsed high intensity waves generated from circular focused acoustic sources in multilayer configuration of attenuating media. The two-layer configuration of media (water—rat liver) assumed in calculations fairly well approximated both the real anatomic dimensions of rat liver and the geometric scheme of our experimental set-up. A numerical solution of the Pennes bio-heat transfer equation which accounted for the effects of heat diffusion, blood perfusion and metabolism rates, was employed to calculate the temperature fields induced in the rat liver by the ultrasonic beam. The numerical simulation results were verified experimentally using a thermocouple inserted in the liver of a rat under anesthesia at the beam focus. The quantitative analysis of the obtained results enabled estimation of the effects of several acoustic and thermal parameters of the rat liver in vivo on the temperature rise, as well as determination of exposure time for ultrasonic beams with varied acoustic power generated by a 2-MHz circular transducer of 15-mm diameter and 25-mm focal length, in order to avoid the tissue overheating that leads to cells necrosis, which would be unacceptable in neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  14. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy on a rat knee joint contracture model.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanori; Kojima, Satoshi; Hoso, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    [Purpose] Histopathological investigation of the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on joint components using a rat knee joint contracture model. [Subjects and Methods] Nineteen, 9-week-old Wistar male rats were divided into a control group (n=6) and an experimental group. Rats in the experimental group underwent cast immobilization of the right rear limb for 8 weeks. They were then randomly divided into a non-treatment group (n=6), which was raised under normal conditions for 4 weeks, and a treatment group (n=7), which underwent LIPUS for 4 weeks. LIPUS irradiation was performed at a frequency of 3 MHz, an intensity of 30 mW/cm(2), and a pulse rate of 20% duty cycle. Irradiation was performed once daily for 10 min, 5 days per week. At the end of this period, tissue specimens in which the knee sagittal plane could be observed were prepared and observed using an optical microscope. [Results] The extension-limiting angle of the knee joint was significantly less in the treatment group compared with the non-treatment group. The posterior joint capsule was significantly thicker only in the non-treatment group, and the density was 53.5 ± 7.5% for the control group, 77.2 ± 5.7% for the non-treatment group, and 69.2 ± 2.9% for the treatment group, with significant differences existing across all groups. [Conclusion] LIPUS may widen the space between collagen fiber bundles of the joint capsule, thereby improving the range of motion.

  15. Evaluation of correlation between chemical dosimetry and subharmonic spectrum analysis to examine the acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Bathaie, S Zahra; Hassan, Zuhair M

    2010-06-01

    Currently several therapeutic applications of ultrasound in cancer treatment are under progress which uses cavitation phenomena to deliver their effects. There are several methods to evaluate cavitation activity such as chemical dosimetry and measurement of subharmonic signals. In this study, the cavitation activity induced by the ultrasound irradiation on exposure parameters has been measured by terephthalic acid chemical dosimetry and subharmonic analysis. Experiments were performed in the near 1 MHz fields in the progressive wave mode and effect of duty cycles changes with 2 W/cm(2) intensity (I(SATA)) and acoustic intensity changes in continuous mode on both fluorescence intensity and subharmonic intensity were measured. The dependence between fluorescence intensity of terephthalic acid chemical dosimetry and subharmonic intensity analysis were analyzed by Pearson correlation (p-value <0.05). It has been shown that the subharmonic intensity and the fluorescence intensity for continuous mode is higher than for pulsing mode (p-value <0.05). Also results show that there is a significant difference between the subharmonic intensity and the fluorescence intensity with sonication intensity (p-value <0.05). A significant correlation between the fluorescence intensity and subharmonic intensity at different duty cycles (R=0.997, p-value <0.05) and different intensities (R=0.985, p-value <0.05) were shown. The subharmonic intensity (microW/cm(2)) significantly correlated with the fluorescence intensity (count) (R=0.901; p<0.05) and the fluorescence intensity due to chemical dosimetry could be estimated with subharmonic intensity due to subharmonic spectrum analysis. It is concluded that there is dependence between terephthalic acid chemical dosimetry and subharmonic spectrum analysis to examine the acoustic cavitation activity. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-07

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  17. Design evolution enhances patient compliance for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound device usage

    PubMed Central

    Pounder, Neill M; Jones, John T; Tanis, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Poor patient compliance or nonadherence with prescribed treatments can have a significant unfavorable impact on medical costs and clinical outcomes. In the current study, voice-of-the-customer research was conducted to aid in the development of a next-generation low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) bone healing product. An opportunity to improve patient compliance reporting was identified, resulting in the incorporation into the next-generation device of a visual calendar that provides direct feedback to the patient, indicating days for which they successfully completed treatment. Further investigation was done on whether inclusion of the visual calendar improved patient adherence to the prescribed therapy (20 minutes of daily treatment) over a 6-month period. Thus, 12,984 data files were analyzed from patients prescribed either the earlier- or the next-generation LIPUS device. Over the 6-month period, overall patient compliance was 83.8% with the next-generation LIPUS device, compared with 74.2% for the previous version (p<0.0001). Incorporation of the calendar feature resulted in compliance never decreasing below 76% over the analysis period, whereas compliance with the earlier-generation product fell to 51%. A literature review on the LIPUS device shows a correlation between clinical effectiveness and compliance rates more than 70%. Incorporation of stakeholder feedback throughout the design and innovation process of a next-generation LIPUS device resulted in a measurable improvement in patient adherence, which may help to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27942237

  18. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy: a potential strategy to stimulate tendon-bone junction healing*

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhi-min; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shi-gui

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of a tendon graft within the bone tunnel represents a challenging clinical problem. Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Enhancement of graft healing to bone is important to facilitate early aggressive rehabilitation and a rapid return to pre-injury activity levels. No convenient, effective or inexpensive procedures exist to enhance tendon-bone (T-B) healing after surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves local blood perfusion and angiogenesis, stimulates cartilage maturation, enhances differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, and motivates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and therefore, appears to be a potential non-invasive tool for T-B healing in early stage of rehabilitation of ACL reconstruction. It is conceivable that LIPUS could be used to stimulate T-B tunnel healing in the home, with the aim of accelerating rehabilitation and an earlier return to normal activities in the near future. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate how LIPUS stimulates T-B healing at the cellular and molecular levels, describe studies in animal models, and provide a future direction for research. PMID:23225850

  19. Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound therapy for chronic lateral epicondylitis: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    D'Vaz, A P; Ostor, A J K; Speed, C A; Jenner, J R; Bradley, M; Prevost, A T; Hazleman, B L

    2006-05-01

    Pulsed low-intensity ultrasound therapy (LIUS) has been found to be beneficial in accelerating fracture healing and has produced positive results in animal tendon repair. In the light of this we undertook a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of LIUS vs placebo therapy daily for 12 weeks in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis (LE). Patients with LE of at least 6 weeks' duration were recruited from general practice, physiotherapy and rheumatology clinics, and had to have failed at least one first-line treatment including non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and corticosteroid injection. Participants were assigned either active LIUS or placebo. Treatment was self-administered daily for 20 min over a 12-week period. The primary end-point was a 50% improvement from baseline in elbow pain measured at 12 weeks using a patient-completed visual analogue scale. Fifty-five subjects aged 18-80 were recruited over a 9-month period. In the active group 64% (16/25) achieved at least 50% improvement from baseline in elbow pain at 12 weeks compared with 57% (13/23) in the placebo group (difference of 7%; 95% confidence interval -20 to 35%). However, this was not statistically significant (chi(2) = 0.28, P = 0.60). In this study LIUS was no more effective for a large treatment effect than placebo for recalcitrant LE. This is in keeping with other interventional studies for the condition.

  20. Effect of Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Postorthognathic Surgery Healing Process

    PubMed Central

    Tehranchi, Azita; Badiee, Mohamadreza; Younessian, Farnaz; Badiei, Mohamadreza; Haddadpour, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Orthognathic surgery can cause discomforts such as pain, inflammation, and edema. One of the challenges is bone regeneration at surgery area. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) therapy on bone regeneration and pain relief after surgery. Materials and Methods: Following mandibular surgery of nine patients, LIPUS treatment was applied to the left or right side for 3 weeks and 20 min/day. The other side was treated with sham-LIPUS as the control group. Digital panoramic radiographies were obtained immediately after surgery and 3 weeks later. Bone density at surgery site was assessed using Digora version 2.8 software. The data were analyzed with one-sample Kolmogorov–Smirnov and t-paired test. Postoperation pain was evaluated by means of visual analog scale. Results: Increase in bone density at border and medulla was 23 and 28.33 for experimental group and 13 and 13.55 units in control group, respectively. The differences are statistically significant (P < 0.01). Variance analysis showed that decrease in experienced pain during 3 weeks after surgery was significantly different between groups (P < 0.01). Conclusion: LIPUS can be an effective way to increase bone modeling and decrease pain following orthognathic surgeries. PMID:28713732

  1. Clinical and immunohistopathological aspects of venous ulcers treatment by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS).

    PubMed

    de Ávila Santana, Luísiane; Alves, José Marcos; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Kajiwara, João Kazuyuki; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Gomes, Fernanda Guzzo; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani

    2013-04-01

    The immunological mechanisms that are triggered by Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound (LIPUS) in wound healing are unknown. In the present study, experimental groups were used to assess the treatment of chronic venous ulcers with 30mW/cm(2) SATA peripheral LIPUS three times per week compared to a daily treatment of 1% silver sulfadiazine (SDZ). The ulcers of the SDZ group (n=7) (G1) and LIPUS group (n=9) (G2) were photographed five times three months, and the images were analyzed using ImageJ software to quantify the total area (S), fibrin/sphacel area (yellow) and granulation area (red). The healing process was evaluated by the wound healing rate (WHR), granulation tissue rate (GTR) and fibrin/sphacel tissue rate (FTR). The ulcers were biopsied on days 1 and 45 and stained for collagen fiber quantification (picrosirius) and CD68(+) protein and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression using HRP-streptavidin (horseradish peroxidase-streptavidin). On day 90, G2 had a mean 41% decrease in the ulcer area, while no decrease was observed in G1 (p<0.05). An increased tendency toward positive labeling of collagen fibers and VEGF (p>0.05) was observed in G2 compared to G1, and the number of CD68(+) cells was greater in G2 than in G1 (p<0.05). LIPUS presents superior activity compared to SDZ in stimulating the inflammatory and proliferative (angiogenesis and collagenesis, respectively) phases of chronic venous wound healing.

  2. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound therapy: a potential strategy to stimulate tendon-bone junction healing.

    PubMed

    Ying, Zhi-min; Lin, Tiao; Yan, Shi-gui

    2012-12-01

    Incorporation of a tendon graft within the bone tunnel represents a challenging clinical problem. Successful anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction requires solid healing of the tendon graft in the bone tunnel. Enhancement of graft healing to bone is important to facilitate early aggressive rehabilitation and a rapid return to pre-injury activity levels. No convenient, effective or inexpensive procedures exist to enhance tendon-bone (T-B) healing after surgery. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) improves local blood perfusion and angiogenesis, stimulates cartilage maturation, enhances differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts, and motivates osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and therefore, appears to be a potential non-invasive tool for T-B healing in early stage of rehabilitation of ACL reconstruction. It is conceivable that LIPUS could be used to stimulate T-B tunnel healing in the home, with the aim of accelerating rehabilitation and an earlier return to normal activities in the near future. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate how LIPUS stimulates T-B healing at the cellular and molecular levels, describe studies in animal models, and provide a future direction for research.

  3. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Improves the Functional Properties of Cardiac Mesoangioblasts.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Aurora; Pérez, Laura M; De Lucas, Beatriz; Martín, Nuria San; Kadow-Romacker, Anke; Plaza, Gustavo; Raum, Kay; Gálvez, Beatriz G

    2015-12-01

    Cell-based therapy is a promising approach for many diseases, including ischemic heart disease. Cardiac mesoangioblasts are committed vessel-associated progenitors that can restore to a significant, although partial, extent, heart structure and function in a murine model of myocardial infarction. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) is a non-invasive form of mechanical energy that can be delivered into biological tissues as acoustic pressure waves, and is widely used for clinical applications including bone fracture healing. We hypothesized that the positive effects of LIPUS on bone and soft tissue, such as increased cell differentiation and cytoskeleton reorganization, could be applied to increase the therapeutic potential of mesoangioblasts for heart repair. In this work, we show that LIPUS stimulation of cardiac mesoangioblasts isolated from mouse and human heart results in significant cellular modifications that provide beneficial effects to the cells, including increased malleability and improved motility. Additionally, LIPUS stimulation increased the number of binucleated cells and induced cardiac differentiation to an extent comparable with 5'-azacytidine treatment. Mechanistically, LIPUS stimulation activated the BMP-Smad signalling pathway and increased the expression of myosin light chain-2 together with upregulation of β1 integrin and RhoA, highlighting a potentially important role for cytoskeleton reorganization. Taken together, these results provide functional evidence that LIPUS might be a useful tool to explore in the field of heart cell therapy.

  4. Therapeutic ultrasound plus pulsed electromagnetic field improves recovery from peripheral arterial disease in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhao-Yang; Zhou, Hong-Sheng; Su, Zhi-Xiao; Qi, Jia; Zhang, Jian; Xue, Guan-Hua; Li, Yue; Hao, Chang-Ning; Shi, Yi-Qin; Duan, Jun-Li

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the therapy effect of combined therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) treatment and pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy on angiogenesis in hypertension-related hindlimb ischemia. After subjecting excision of the left femoral artery, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were randomly distributed to one of four groups: SHR; TUS treated SHR (SHR-TUS); PEMF treated SHR (PEMF-TUS); and TUS plus PEMF treated SHR (SHR-TUS-PEMF). Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKYs) with femoral artery excision were regarded as a control group. At day 14 after surgery, the TUS plus PEMF united administration had the greatest blood perfusion accompanied by elevated capillary density and the lowest TUNEL index. Interestingly, the united administration up-regulated the angiogenic factors expression of phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), anti-apoptotic protein of Bcl-2 and down-regulated pro-apoptotic protein levels of Bax and Cleaved caspase-3 in vivo. Our results demonstrated that the united administration could significantly rescue hypertension-related inhibition of ischemia-induced neovascularization partly by promoting angiogenesis and inhibiting apoptosis.

  5. Pulsed magnetic field induced fast drug release from magneto liposomes via ultrasound generation.

    PubMed

    Podaru, George; Ogden, Saralyn; Baxter, Amanda; Shrestha, Tej; Ren, Shenqiang; Thapa, Prem; Dani, Raj Kumar; Wang, Hongwang; Basel, Matthew T; Prakash, Punit; Bossmann, Stefan H; Chikan, Viktor

    2014-10-09

    Fast drug delivery is very important to utilize drug molecules that are short-lived under physiological conditions. Techniques that can release model molecules under physiological conditions could play an important role to discover the pharmacokinetics of short-lived substances in the body. Here an experimental method is developed for the fast release of the liposomes' payload without a significant increase in (local) temperatures. This goal is achieved by using short magnetic pulses to disrupt the lipid bilayer of liposomes loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. The drug release has been tested by two independent assays. The first assay relies on the AC impedance measurements of MgSO4 released from the magnetic liposomes. The second standard release assay is based on the increase of the fluorescence signal from 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein dye when the dye is released from the magneto liposomes. The efficiency of drug release ranges from a few percent to up to 40% in the case of the MgSO4. The experiments also indicate that the magnetic nanoparticles generate ultrasound, which is assumed to have a role in the release of the model drugs from the magneto liposomes.

  6. Inhibitory effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound sonication on the proliferation of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiro; Sato, Keiji; Matsui, Takuya; Sawada, Shigeyuki; Muramatsu, Yoshitaka; Kawanami, Katsuhisa; Deie, Masataka

    2017-09-01

    To date, there is limited data on the biological effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on primary malignant bone tumors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the antitumor effects of LIPUS on osteosarcoma cells. The effects of LIPUS on cell viability, induction of apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular signaling molecules in the LM8 osteosarcoma cell line were investigated. LIPUS inhibited cell viability (P=0.0022) and mitochondrial membrane potential (P=0.0019) in LM8 cells. Flow cytometry analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining revealed significantly higher numbers of apoptotic (P<0.0001) and necrotic cells (P=0.0091) compared with cells without treatment. LIPUS treatment significantly increased phosphorylated Akt (P<0.0001) and IκBα (P=0.0001) levels, and reduced phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinase 7 (P<0.0001) and phosphorylated checkpoint kinase 1 (P=0.0008) levels. These results suggest that LIPUS is a non-invasive adjuvant therapy that is able to inhibit cellular proliferation in osteosarcoma cells.

  7. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation promotes osteoblast differentiation through hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenichi; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Kurio, Naito; Okui, Tatsuo; Ibaragi, Soichiro; Kunisada, Yuki; Obata, Kyoichi; Masui, Masanori; Pai, Pang; Horikiri, Yuu; Yamanaka, Nobuyuki; Takigawa, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira

    2017-10-05

    Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used as an adjunct to fracture healing therapies, but the mechanisms underlying its action are not known. We reported that sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling was activated in osteoblasts at the dynamic remodeling site of a bone fracture. Mechanical stimulation is a crucial factor in bone remodeling, and it is related to the primary cilia as a sensor of hedgehog signaling. Here we observed that LIPUS promoted callus formation in accord with Gli2-positive cells after 14 days at the mouse femur fractured site compared with a control group. An immunofluorescence analysis showed that the numbers of primary cilia and cilia/osterix double-positive osteoblasts were increased at the fracture site by LIPUS. LIPUS stimulated not only the number and the length of primary cilia, but also the levels of ciliated protein, Ift88 mRNA, and SHH, Gli1 and Gli2 in MC3T3-E1 cells. Further experiments revealed that LIPUS stimulated osteogenic differentiation in the presence of smoothened agonist (SAG) treatment. These results indicate that LIPUS stimulates osteogenic differentiation and the maturation of osteoblasts by a primary cilium-mediated activation of hedgehog signaling. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Low-intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation for Tendon-Bone Healing: A Dose-dependent Study.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbin; Liu, Fei; Chen, Can; Wang, Zhanwen; Chen, Huabin; Qu, Jin; Zhang, Tao; Xu, Daqi; Hu, Jianzhong

    2017-10-07

    This study aimed to evaluate the dosage effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound stimulation (LIPUS) on tendon-bone (T-B) healing. Standard partial patellectomies were performed on 120 mature New Zealand rabbits randomly assigned into three groups: a control group (daily mock sonication, 20 min), a qd group (daily ultra-sonication, 20 min), and a bid group (ultra-sonication twice a day, 20 min each time). The rabbits were sacrificed 8 or 16 weeks postoperatively, and the microarchitectural, histological, and mechanical properties of the patella-patellar tendon (PPT) interface were evaluated. Micro-computed tomography analysis showed that the bid group exhibited more new bone formation and mineralization than the other groups in the T-B healing position at both 8 and 16 weeks postoperatively. Histological assessments confirmed the bid group exhibited a significantly better PPT interface than the other groups, as shown by the increased formation and remodeling of newly formed bone and a fibrocartilage layer. The biomechanical properties of the regenerated PPT interface significantly improved in the bid group. LIPUS treatment twice a day was more effective than the once-a-day treatment on tendon-bone healing.

  9. Effects of beam steering in pulsed-wave ultrasound velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Aaron H; Yu, Alfred C H; Johnston, K Wayne; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2005-08-01

    Experimental and computer simulation methods have been used to investigate the significance of beam steering as a potential source of error in pulsed-wave flow velocity estimation. By simulating a typical linear-array transducer system as used for spectral flow estimation, it is shown that beam steering can cause an angle offset resulting in a change in the effective beam-flow angle. This offset primarily depends on the F-number and the nominal steering angle. For example, at an F-number of 3 and a beam-flow angle of 70 degrees , the velocity error changed from -5% to + 5% when the steering angle changed from -20 degrees to + 20 degrees . Much higher errors can occur at higher beam-flow angles, with smaller F-numbers and greater steering. Our experimental study used a clinical ultrasound system, a tissue-mimicking phantom and a pulsatile waveform to determine peak flow velocity errors for various steering and beam-flow angles. These errors were found to be consistent with our simulation results.

  10. Design evolution enhances patient compliance for low-intensity pulsed ultrasound device usage.

    PubMed

    Pounder, Neill M; Jones, John T; Tanis, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Poor patient compliance or nonadherence with prescribed treatments can have a significant unfavorable impact on medical costs and clinical outcomes. In the current study, voice-of-the-customer research was conducted to aid in the development of a next-generation low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) bone healing product. An opportunity to improve patient compliance reporting was identified, resulting in the incorporation into the next-generation device of a visual calendar that provides direct feedback to the patient, indicating days for which they successfully completed treatment. Further investigation was done on whether inclusion of the visual calendar improved patient adherence to the prescribed therapy (20 minutes of daily treatment) over a 6-month period. Thus, 12,984 data files were analyzed from patients prescribed either the earlier- or the next-generation LIPUS device. Over the 6-month period, overall patient compliance was 83.8% with the next-generation LIPUS device, compared with 74.2% for the previous version (p<0.0001). Incorporation of the calendar feature resulted in compliance never decreasing below 76% over the analysis period, whereas compliance with the earlier-generation product fell to 51%. A literature review on the LIPUS device shows a correlation between clinical effectiveness and compliance rates more than 70%. Incorporation of stakeholder feedback throughout the design and innovation process of a next-generation LIPUS device resulted in a measurable improvement in patient adherence, which may help to optimize clinical outcomes.

  11. Effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound on orthodontically induced root resorption in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Al-Daghreer, Saleh; Doschak, Michael; Sloan, Alastair J; Major, Paul W; Heo, Giseon; Scurtescu, Cristian; Tsui, Ying Y; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption in vivo. Ten beagle dogs were treated with an orthodontic appliance to move the mandibular fourth premolars bodily. The orthodontic movement was carried out for 4 wk with a continuous force of 1 N/side; using a split-mouth model, LIPUS was applied daily for 20 min. Fourth premolar and surrounding periodontal tissue were evaluated with micro-computed tomography and hematoxylin and eosin and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. We calculated the number, volume and distribution of root resorption lacunae and their percentage relative to total root volume, orthodontic tooth movement and periodontal ligament space. There was no significant difference in orthodontic tooth movement between the two sides. LIPUS significantly reduced the number of orthodontically induced inflammatory root resorption initiation areas by 71%, reduced their total volume by 68% and reduced their volume relative to the affected root total volume by 70%. LIPUS induced the formation of a precementum layer, thicker cementum and reparative cellular cementum.

  12. Low intensity pulsed ultrasound increases the mechanical properties of the healing tissues at bone-tendon junction.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min-Hua; Zheng, Yong-Ping; Huang, Qing-Hua; Lu, Hong-Bin; Qin, Ling

    2009-01-01

    The re-establishment of bone-tendon junction (BTJ) tissues is involved in many trauma and reconstructive surgeries. A direct BTJ repair requires a long period of immobilization which may be associated with a postoperative weak knee. In this study, we investigated if low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment increases the material properties of healing tissues at bone-tendon junction (BTJ) after partial patellectomy using rabbit models. Standard partial patellectomy was conducted on one knee of twenty four rabbits which were randomly divided into an ultrasound group and a control group. The bony changes of BTJ complexes around the BTJ healing interface were measured by anteroposterior x-ray radiographs; then the volumetric bone-mineral density (BMD) of the new bone was assessed using a peripheral computed tomography scanner (pQCT). The stiffness of patellar cartilage, fibrocartilage at the healing interface and the tendon were measured in situ using a novel noncontact ultrasound water jet indentation system. Not only significantly more newly formed bone at the BTJ healing interface but also increased stiffness of the junction tissues were found in the ultrasound group compared with the controls at week 18. In addition, the ultrasound group also showed significantly 44% higher BMD at week 6 than controls.

  13. Efficacy of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound in the prevention of osteoporosis following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Warden, S J; Bennell, K L; Matthews, B; Brown, D J; McMeeken, J M; Wark, J D

    2001-11-01

    Ultrasound (US), a high-frequency acoustic energy traveling in the form of a mechanical wave, represents a potential site-specific intervention for osteoporosis. Bone is a dynamic tissue that remodels in response to applied mechanical stimuli. As a form of mechanical stimulation, US is anticipated to produce a similar remodeling response. This theory is supported by growing in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrating an osteogenic effect of pulsed-wave US at low spatial-averaged temporal-averaged intensities. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-intensity pulsed US could prevent calcaneal osteoporosis in individuals following spinal cord injury (SCI). Fifteen patients with a 1-6 month history of SCI were recruited. Active US was introduced to one heel for 20 min/day, 5 days/week, over 6 weeks. The contralateral heel was simultaneously treated with inactive US. Patients were blind to which heel was being actively treated. Active US pulsed with a 10 microsec burst of 1.0 MHz sine waves repeating at 3.3 kHz. The spatial-averaged temporal-averaged intensity was set at 30 mW/cm(2). Bone status was assessed at baseline and following the intervention period by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and quantitative US. SCI resulted in significant bone loss. Bone mineral content decreased by 7.5 +/- 3.0% in inactive US-treated calcanei (p < 0.001). Broadband US attenuation and speed of sound decreased by 8.5 +/- 6.9% (p < 0.001) and 1.5 +/- 1.3% (p < 0.001), respectively. There were no differences between active and inactive US-treated calcanei for any skeletal measure (p > 0.05). These findings confirm the negative skeletal impact of SCI, and demonstrate that US at the dose and mode administered was not a beneficial intervention for SCI-induced osteoporosis. This latter finding may primarily relate to the inability of US to effectively penetrate the outer cortex of bone due to its acoustic properties.

  14. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound increases penetration and therapeutic efficacy of monoclonal antibodies in murine xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shutao; Shin, In Soo; Hancock, Hilary; Jang, Beom-su; Kim, Hyung-sub; Lee, Sang Myung; Zderic, Vesna; Frenkel, Victor; Pastan, Ira; Paik, Chang H.; Dreher, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    The success of radioimmunotherapy for solid tumors remains elusive due to poor biodistribution and insufficient tumor accumulation, in part, due to the unique tumor microenvironment resulting in heterogeneous tumor antibody distribution. Pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (pulsed-HIFU) has previously been shown to increase the accumulation of 111In labeled B3 antibody (recognizes Lewisy antigen). The objective of this study was to investigate the tumor penetration and therapeutic efficacy of pulsed-HIFU exposures combined with 90Y labeled B3 mAb in an A431 solid tumor model. The ability of pulsed-HIFU (1 MHz, spatial averaged temporal peak intensity = 2685 Wcm−2; pulse repetition frequency = 1 Hz; duty cycle = 5%) to improve the tumor penetration and therapeutic efficacy of 90Y labeled B3 mAb (90Y-B3) was evaluated in Ley-positive A431 tumors. Antibody penetration from the tumor surface and blood vessel surface was evaluated with fluorescently labeled B3, epi-fluorescent microscopy, and custom image analysis. Tumor size was monitored to determine treatment efficacy, indicated by survival, following various treatments with pulsed-HIFU and/or 90Y-B3. The pulsed-HIFU exposures did not affect the vascular parameters including microvascular density, vascular size, and vascular architecture; although 1.6-fold more antibody was delivered to the solid tumors when combined with pulsed-HIFU. The distribution and penetration of the antibodies were significantly improved (p-value < 0.05) when combined with pulsed-HIFU, only in the tumor periphery. Pretreatment with pulsed-HIFU significantly improved (p-value < 0.05) survival over control treatments. PMID:22732476

  15. Fundamental studies on cavitation melt processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Hodnett, M.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.

    2016-05-01

    The application of ultrasound to industrial casting processes has attracted research interest during the last 50 years. However, the transfer and scale-up of this advanced and promising technology to industry has been hindered by difficulties in treating large volumes of liquid metal due to the lack of understanding of certain fundamentals. In the current study experimental results on ultrasonic processing in deionised water and in liquid aluminium (Al) are reported. Cavitation activity was determined in both liquid environments and acoustic pressures were successfully measured using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer sensor. Results showed that highest cavitation intensity in the liquid bulk is achieved at lower amplitudes of the sonotrode tip than the maximum available, suggesting nonlinearity in energy transfer to the liquid, while the location of the sonotrode is seen to substantially affect cavitation activity within the liquid. Estimation of real-time acoustic pressures distributed inside a crucible with liquid Al was performed for the first time.

  16. Effects of varying duty cycle and pulse width on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced transcranial thrombolysis.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thilo; Raman, Rema; Fisher, David J; Ahadi, Golnaz; Zadicario, Eyal; Voie, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The goal was to test the effects of various combinations of pulse widths (PW) and duty cycles (DC) on high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced sonothrombolysis efficacy using an in vitro flow model. An ExAblate™ 4000 HIFU headsystem (InSightec, Inc., Israel) was used. Artificial blood clots were placed into test tubes inside a human calvarium and exposed to pulsatile flow. Four different duty cycles were tested against four different pulse widths. For all study groups, an increase in thrombolysis efficacy could be seen in association with increasing DC and/or PW (p < 0.0001). Using transcranial HIFU, significant thrombolysis can be achieved within seconds and without the use of lytic drugs in vitro. Longer duty cycles in combination with longer pulse widths seem to have the highest potential to optimize clot lysis efficacy.

  17. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D.; Canney, Michael S.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound. PMID:22088025

  18. Controlled tissue emulsification produced by high intensity focused ultrasound shock waves and millisecond boiling.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Tatiana D; Canney, Michael S; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R

    2011-11-01

    In high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applications, tissue may be thermally necrosed by heating, emulsified by cavitation, or, as was recently discovered, emulsified using repetitive millisecond boiling caused by shock wave heating. Here, this last approach was further investigated. Experiments were performed in transparent gels and ex vivo bovine heart tissue using 1, 2, and 3 MHz focused transducers and different pulsing schemes in which the pressure, duty factor, and pulse duration were varied. A previously developed derating procedure to determine in situ shock amplitudes and the time-to-boil was refined. Treatments were monitored using B-mode ultrasound. Both inertial cavitation and boiling were observed during exposures, but emulsification occurred only when shocks and boiling were present. Emulsified lesions without thermal denaturation were produced with shock amplitudes sufficient to induce boiling in less than 20 ms, duty factors of less than 0.02, and pulse lengths shorter than 30 ms. Higher duty factors or longer pulses produced varying degrees of thermal denaturation combined with mechanical emulsification. Larger lesions were obtained using lower ultrasound frequencies. The results show that shock wave heating and millisecond boiling is an effective and reliable way to emulsify tissue while monitoring the treatment with ultrasound.

  19. Control of acoustic cavitation with application to lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael Rollins

    Control of acoustic cavitation, which is sound-induced growth and collapse of bubbles, is the subject of this dissertation. Application is to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), used to treat kidney stones. Cavitation is thought to help comminute stones yet may damage tissue. Can cavitation be controlled? The acoustic source in a widely used clinical lithotripter is an electrical spark at the near focus of an underwater ellipsoidal reflector. To control cavitation, we used rigid reflectors, pressure release reflectors, and pairs of reflectors aligned to have a common focus and a controlled delay between sparks. Cavitation was measured with aluminum foil, which was placed along the axis at the far focus of the reflector(s). Collapsing bubbles pitted the foil. Pit depth measured with a profilometer provided a relative measure of cavitation intensity. Cavitation was also measured with a focused hydrophone, which detected the pressure pulse radiated in bubble collapse. Acoustic pressure signals produced by the reflectors were measured with a PVdF membrane hydrophone, digitally recorded, and input into a numerical version of the Gilmore equation (F. R. Gilmore, 'The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid,' Rep#26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (1952), pp.1-40.). Maximum pressure produced in a spherical bubble was calculated and employed as a relative measure of collapse intensity. Experimental and numerical results demonstrate cavitation can be controlled by an appropriately delayed auxiliary pressure pulse. When two rigid-reflector pulses are used, a long interpulse delay (150-200 μs) of the second pulse 'kicks' the collapsing bubble and intensifies cavitation. Foil pit depth and computed pressure three times single pulse values were obtained. Conversely, a short delay (<90 μs) 'stifles' bubble growth and weakens cavitation. A single pressure release reflector time- reverses the rigid-reflector waveform

  20. Effect of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound on Distraction Osteogenesis Treatment Time: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Raza, Hasnain; Saltaji, Humam; Kaur, Harmanpreet; Flores-Mir, Carlos; El-Bialy, Tarek

    2016-02-01

    The objectives of this systematic review with a meta-analysis were to critically analyze the available scientific literature regarding the effects of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (US) on stimulating bone regeneration and bone maturation during distraction osteogenesis in humans and to determine whether the stimulatory effect of low-intensity pulsed US can effectively reduce the associated treatment time. Studies were considered for inclusion if they were randomized clinical trials that examined the effect of low-intensity pulsed US on distraction osteogenesis compared to conventional distraction osteogenesis. The primary outcome was reduced treatment time. Study selection, risk of bias assessment, and data extraction were performed in duplicate. A random-effects meta-analysis model was used when more than 3 trials were eligible for a quantitative analysis and considering the expected differences in interventions and measurement tools. Five randomized clinical trials, with a moderate to high risk of bias, met the eligibility criteria. Four trials examining tibial distraction osteogenesis in 118 patients were combined in a meta-analysis. A statistically significant difference for reduced treatment time between distraction osteogenesis with low-intensity pulsed US and standard distraction osteogenesis was evident (mean difference, -15.236 d/cm; random-effects 95% confidence interval, -19.902 to -10.569 d/cm; P < .0001). As for the mandible, only 1 clinical trial was available, which showed no significant effect of low-intensity pulsed US therapy on distraction osteogenesis. Current available evidence suggests that low-intensity pulsed US therapy may provide a reduction in the overall treatment time for tibial distraction osteogenesis. However, this conclusion should be considered with caution, given the moderate to high risk of bias in the included randomized clinical trials. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  1. Treatment of hepatic tumors by thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Song; Zhou, Ping; He, Wei; Liao, Manqiong; Chen, Lili; Ma, C.-M.

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to comparatively assess the thermal versus mechanical effects of pulsed high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment on hepatic tumors in vivo. Forty-five rabbits with hepatic VX2 tumors were randomly separated into three groups (15 animals per group) before HIFU ablation. The total HIFU energy (in situ) of 1250 J was used for each tumor for three groups. In groups I and II, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 1 Hz pulsed repetition frequency (PRF), 0.5 duty cycle (0.5 s on and 0.5 s off) and10 s duration for one spot sonication. For group II, in addition to HIFU treatment, microbubbles (SonoVue, Bracco, Milan, Italy) were injected via vein before sonication acting as a synergist. In group III, animals were treated with 1 MHz pulsed ultrasound at 10 Hz PRF, 0.1 duty cycle (0.1 s on and 0.9 s off) and 10 s duration for one sonication. The total treatment spots were calculated according to the tumor volume. Tumors were examined with contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) immediately prior to and post HIFU treatment. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 h after treatment. Our study showed that all animals tolerated the HIFU treatment well. Our data showed that mechanical HIFU could lead to controlled injury in rabbit hepatic tumors with different histological changes in comparison to thermal HIFU with or without microbubbles.

  2. Flow rate and duty cycle effects in lysis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using high-energy pulsed focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Riesberg, Grant; Bigelow, Timothy A; Stessman, Dan J; Spalding, Martin H; Yao, Linxing; Wang, Tong; Xu, Jin

    2014-06-01

    To consider microalgae lipid biofuel as a viable energy source, it is a necessity to maximize algal cell lysis, lipid harvest, and thus biofuel production versus the energy used to lyse the cells. Previous techniques have been to use energy consumptive ultrasound waves in the 10-40 kHz range in a stationary exposure environment. This study evaluated the potential of using 1.1 MHz ultrasound pulses in a new flow through type chamber on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model organism for cell breakage. The ultrasound was generated using a spherically focused transducer with a focal length of 6.34 cm and an active diameter of 6.36 cm driven by 20 cycle sine-wave tone bursts at varied pulse repetition frequencies. First, variations in flow rate were examined at a constant duty cycle of 3.6%. After assessing flow rates, the duty cycle was varied to further explore the dependence on the tone burst parameters. Cell lysis was assessed by quantifying protein and chlorophyll release into the supernatant as well as by lipid extractability. Appropriate flow rates with higher duty cycles led to statistically significant increases in cell lysis relative to controls and other exposure conditions.

  3. Why Current Doppler Ultrasound Methodology Is Inaccurate in Assessing Cerebral Venous Return: The Alternative of the Ultrasonic Jugular Venous Pulse

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of cerebral venous return is growing interest for potential application in clinical practice. Doppler ultrasound (DUS) was used as a screening tool. However, three meta-analyses of qualitative DUS protocol demonstrate a big heterogeneity among studies. In an attempt to improve accuracy, several authors alternatively measured the flow rate, based on the product of the time average velocity with the cross-sectional area (CSA). However, also the quantification protocols lacked of the necessary accuracy. The reasons are as follows: (a) automatic measurement of the CSA assimilates the jugular to a circle, while it is elliptical; (b) the use of just a single CSA value in a pulsatile vessel is inaccurate; (c) time average velocity assessment can be applied only in laminar flow. Finally, the tutorial describes alternative ultrasound calculation of flow based on the Womersley method, which takes into account the variation of the jugular CSA overtime. In the near future, it will be possible to synchronize the electrocardiogram with the brain inflow (carotid distension wave) and with the outflow (jugular venous pulse) in order to nicely have a noninvasive ultrasound picture of the brain-heart axis. US jugular venous pulse may have potential use in neurovascular, neurocognitive, neurosensorial, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27006525

  4. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lei; Yang, Zheng; Zhang, Hai; Chen, Wenchuan; Chen, Mengshi; Zhu, Zhimin

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes inhibits proliferation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CM from LIPUS-stimulated osteocytes enhances differentiation of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LIPUS stimulates MLO-Y4 cells to secrete PGE{sub 2} and NO. -- Abstract: Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been used as a safe and effective modality to enhance fracture healing. As the most abundant cells in bone, osteocytes orchestrate biological activities of effector cells via direct cell-to-cell contacts and by soluble factors. In this study, we have used the osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells to study the effects of conditioned medium from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells on proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Conditioned media from LIPUS-stimulated MLO-Y4 cells (LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM) were collected and added on MC3T3-E1 cell cultures. MC3T3-E1 cells cultured in LIPUS-Osteocyte-CM demonstrated a significant inhibition of proliferation and an increased alkaline phosphatase activity. The results of PGE{sub 2} and NO assay showed that LIPUS could enhance PGE{sub 2} and NO secretion from MLO-Y4 cells at all time points within 24 h after LIPUS stimulation. We conclude that LIPUS regulates proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts through osteocytes in vitro. Increased secretion of PGE{sub 2} from osteocytes may play a role in this effect.

  5. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound reduces periodontal atrophy in occlusal hypofunctional teeth.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Yuki; Usumi-Fujita, Risa; Hosomichi, Jun; Kaneko, Sawa; Ishida, Yuji; Shibutani, Naoki; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Okito, Asuka; Oishi, Shuji; Kuma, Yoichiro; Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Ono, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    To clarify whether low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) exposure has recovery effects on the hypofunctional periodontal ligament (PDL) and interradicular alveolar bone (IRAB). Twelve-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups (n = 5 each): a normal occlusion (C) group, an occlusal hypofunction (H) group, and an occlusal hypofunction group subjected to LIPUS (HL) treatment. Hypofunctional occlusion of the maxillary first molar (M1) of the H and HL groups was induced by the bite-raising technique. Only the HL group was irradiated with LIPUS for 5 days. The IRAB and PDL of M1 were examined by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. To quantify mRNA expression of cytokines involved in PDL proliferation and development, real-time reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed for twist family bHLH transcription factor 1 (Twist1), periostin, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the PDL samples. Micro-CT analysis showed that the PDL volume was decreased in the H group compared with that of the C and HL groups. Both bone volume per tissue volume (BV/TV) of IRAB was decreased in the H group compared with that in the C group. LIPUS exposure restored BV/TV in the IRAB of the HL group. qRT-PCR analysis showed that Twist1, periostin, and CTGF mRNA levels were decreased in the H group and increased in the HL group. LIPUS exposure reduced the atrophic changes of alveolar bone by inducing the upregulation of periostin and CTGF expression to promote PDL healing after induction of occlusal hypofunction.

  6. An ultrasound automated method for non-invasive assessment of carotid artery pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Zardi, Enrico Maria; Di Geso, Luca; Afeltra, Antonella; Zardi, Domenico Maria; Giorgi, Chiara; Salaffi, Fausto; Carotti, Marina; Gutierrez, Marwin; Filippucci, Emilio; Grassi, Walter

    2017-09-02

    To validate the clinical applicability and feasibility of an automated ultrasound (US) method in measuring the arterial stiffness of patients with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, comparing automated measurements performed by a rheumatologist without experience in vascular sonography with those obtained by a sonographer experienced in vascular US, using a standardized manual method.Twenty subjects affected by different chronic inflammatory rheumatic disorders were consecutively recruited. For each patient, the arterial stiffness of both common carotids was manually calculated. Subsequently, the measure of the pulse wave velocity (PWV) was obtained using an US device called Radio Frequency - Quality Arterial Stiffness (RF-QAS), provided by the same US system (ie, My Lab 70 XVG, Esaote SpA, Genoa, Italy) equipped with a 4-13 MHz linear probe. The reliability comparison between the two US methods was calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). ICC between the values obtained with the two methods for calculating the arterial stiffness resulted 0.789. A significant positive correlation between the two methods was also established with Pearson's (r=0.62, p<0.0001) and Spearman's analysis (r=0.66, p=0.001). A significant performance comparison was seen using Bland-Altman plot. The acquisition of the arterial stiffness parameter with the automated method required about 2 min for each patient. Clinical applicability of this US automated method to assess PWV at common carotid level by a rheumatologist is reliable and feasible in comparison with a conventional manual method. © American Federation for Medical Research (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Does Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment repair articular cartilage injury? A rabbit model study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) regiment has been used to treat fractures with non-union and to promote bone union in general. The effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage metabolism has been characterized. Yet, the effect of LIPUS to repair articular cartilage injury remains unclear in vivo. Methods We designed a study to investigate the effect of LIPUS on articular cartilage repairing in a rabbit severe cartilage injury model. Eighteen rabbits were divided into three groups: Sham-operated group, operated group without-LIPUS-treatment, operated group with-LIPUS-treatment (a daily 20-minute treatment for 3 months). Full-thickness cartilage defects were surgically created on the right side distal femoral condyle without intending to penetrate into the subchondral bone, which mimicked severe chondral injury. MR images for experimental joints, morphology grading scale, and histopathological Mankin score were evaluated. Results The preliminary results showed that the operated groups with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment had significantly higher Mankin score and morphological grading scale compared with the sham-operated group. However, there was no significant difference between the with-LIPUS-treatment and without-LIPUS-treatment groups. Cartilage defects filled with proliferative tissue were observed in the with-LIPUS-treatment group grossly and under MR images, however which presented less up-take under Alcian blue stain. Furthermore, no new deposition of type II collagen or proliferation of chondrocyte was observed over the cartilage defect after LIPUS treatment. Conclusion LIPUS has no significant therapeutic potential in treating severe articular cartilage injury in our animal study. PMID:24507771

  8. Assessment of aortic pulse wave velocity by ultrasound: a feasibility study in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Sicari, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness and could be useful for characterizing cardiovascular disease progression even in mouse models. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for assessing arterial PWV in mice using ultrasound (US) images only and test it on the evaluation of age-associated differences in abdominal aorta PWV (aaPWV). US scans were obtained from six adult (7 months) and six old (19 months) wild type male mice (strain C57BL6) under gaseous anaesthesia. For each mouse, diameter and flow velocity instantaneous values were achieved from abdominal aorta B-mode and PW-Doppler images; all measurements were obtained using edge detection and contour tracking techniques. Single-beat mean diameter and velocity were calculated and time-aligned, providing the lnD-V loop. aaPWV values were obtained from the slope of the linear part of the loop (the early systolic phase), while relative distension (relD) measurements were calculated from the mean diameter signal. aaPWV values for young mice (3.5±0.52 m/s) were lower than those obtained for older ones (5.12±0.98 m/s) while relD measurements were higher in young (25%±7%) compared with older animals evaluations (15%±3%). All measurements were significantly different between the two groups (P<0.01 both). In conclusion, the proposed image processing technique well discriminate between age groups. Since it provides PWV assessment just from US images, it could represent a simply and useful system for vascular stiffness evaluation at any arterial site in the mouse, even in preclinical small animal models.

  9. Preliminary Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy Using Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Andrew R; Holmes, George B

    2016-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative process of the tendon associated with diminished vascularity, microtrauma, and aging. Nonoperative treatments such as activity modification, immobilization, night splints, and physical therapy have good outcomes for the majority of patients. However, there are cohorts of patients that remain symptomatic despite use of all nonoperative measures that eventually require surgical intervention. The present study reports the preliminary short-term clinical outcomes of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) for treatment for Achilles tendinopathy. Fourteen patients with clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy who failed previous nonoperative treatments underwent LIPUS stimulation directly over the area of maximum tendon tenderness for 20 min/d for 8 weeks total. No other treatment modalities were used during the period of LIPUS stimulation. All patients had serial clinical exams and evaluations with an average follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-50 months). Excellent clinical outcomes with complete resolution of pain and other symptoms were obtained in 7 patients (50%). Two patients (14%) had good outcomes with mild tendon irritation and stiffness not requiring further intervention. Five patients (36%) had minimal benefit with continued pain, swelling, and tenderness over the Achilles and functional deficits. No patients had worsening pain or progression of disability requiring surgery. LIPUS is an additional noninvasive treatment modality for chronic Achilles tendinopathy that may potentially help improve clinical symptoms and delay and/or prevent the need for surgical intervention. While LIPUS is easy to use, well-tolerated, and has promising early clinical results, further research is needed to determine the long-term benefits, disadvantages, and cost-effectiveness of this alternative treatment for tendinopathy. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Section 4--bioeffects in tissues with gas bodies. American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    Several animal models have exhibited thresholds for petechial hemorrhage in lung within the current output of diagnostic ultrasound systems. In addition, thresholds for damage in the mouse intestine due to diagnostic pulses of ultrasound have been explored. The implications for human lung and intestinal exposure to clinical diagnostic ultrasound have not yet been determined. In this section, the data supporting the thresholds of petechial hemorrhage in these organ systems and the morphological observations will be reviewed. The potential mechanical mechanisms of damage to these organs due to diagnostic ultrasound also will be reviewed. Special attention will be given to the occurrence of inertial cavitation both in vitro and in vivo. The effects of ultrasound parameters, age, and species on the threshold for damage in animal models will be explored.

  11. Detection of tissue harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force using pulse-echo ultrasound and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Chen, Shigao; Tan, Wei; Kinnick, Randall; Greenleaf, James F

    2007-02-01

    A method using pulse echo ultrasound and the Kalman filter is developed for detecting submicron harmonic motion induced by ultrasonic radiation force. The method estimates the amplitude and phase of the motion at desired locations within a tissue region with high sensitivity. The harmonic motion generated by the ultrasound radiation force is expressed as extremely small oscillatory Doppler frequency shifts in the fast time (A-line) of ultrasound echoes, which are difficult to estimate. In slow time (repetitive ultrasound echoes) of the echoes, the motion also is presented as oscillatory phase shifts, from which the amplitude and phase of the harmonic motion can be estimated with the least mean squared error by Kalman filter. This technique can be used to estimate the traveling speed of a harmonic shear wave by tracking its phase changes during propagation. The shear wave propagation speed can be used to solve for the elasticity and viscosity of tissue as reported in our earlier study. Validation and in vitro experiments indicate that the method provides excellent estimations for very small (submicron) harmonic vibrations and has potential for noninvasive and quantitative stiffness measurements of tissues such as artery.

  12. Transcranial Cavitation Detection in Primates during Blood-Brain Barrier Opening – A Performance Assessment Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Downs, Matthew Eric; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Chen, Cherry Chen; Ferrera, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been shown promise in treating the brain locally and noninvasively. Transcranial passive cavitation detection (PCD) provides methodology of monitoring the treatment in real time, while the skull effects remain a major challenge for its translation to the clinic. In this study, we investigated the sensitivity, reliability, and limitations of PCD through primate (macaque and human) skulls in vitro. The results were further correlated with the in vivo macaque studies including the transcranial PCD calibration and real-time monitoring of BBB opening, with magnetic resonance imaging assessing the opening and safety. The stable cavitation doses using harmonics (SCDh) and ultraharmonics (SCDu), the inertial cavitation dose (ICD), and the cavitation signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were quantified based on the PCD signals. Results showed that through the macaque skull the pressure threshold for detecting the SCDh remained the same as without the skull in place, while it increased for the SCDu and ICD; through the human skull, it increased for all cavitation doses. The transcranial PCD was found reliable both in vitro and in vivo when the transcranial cavitation SNR exceeded the 1-dB detection limit through the in vitro macaque (attenuation: 4.92 dB/mm) and human (attenuation: 7.33 dB/mm) skull. In addition, using long pulses enabled reliable PCD monitoring and facilitate BBB opening at low pressures. The in vivo results showed that the SCDh became detectable at pressures as low as 100 kPa; the ICD, at 250 kPa while it could occur at lower pressures; the SCDu, at 700 kPa and was less reliable at lower pressures. Real-time monitoring of PCD was further implemented during BBB opening, with successful and safe opening achieved at 250–600 kPa in both the thalamus and the putamen. In conclusion, this study shows that transcranial PCD in macaques in vitro and in vivo as well as humans in vitro is reliable by improving the cavitation SNR beyond the 1-d

  13. Porous resins as a cavitation enhancer for low-frequency sonophoresis.

    PubMed

    Terahara, Takaaki; Mitragotri, Samir; Langer, Robert

    2002-03-01

    The application of low-frequency ultrasound enhances drug transport through the skin, a phenomenon referred to as low-frequency sonophoresis. This enhancement is mediated through cavitation, the formation and collapse of gaseous bubbles. We hypothesized that the efficacy of low-frequency sonophoresis can be significantly enhanced by provision of nuclei for cavitation. In this study, we used two porous resins, Diaion HP20 and Diaion HP2MG (2MG), as cavitation nuclei. We measured the effect of these resins on cavitation using pitting of aluminum foil. 2MG showed a higher efficacy in enhancing cavitation compared with Diaion HP20. 2MG was also effective in enhancing transdermal mannitol transport. These results confirm that the addition of cavitation nuclei such as porous resins further increases the effect of low-frequency ultrasound on skin permeability.

  14. Cavitation-induced drug delivery in tumors for cancer chemotherapy: phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larina, Irina V.; Bartels, Christian; Larin, Kirill V.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2001-07-01

    One of the major problems of cancer chemotherapy is slow diffusion of anti-cancer drugs in the interstitium and their poor penetration from blood through tumor capillary wall and cancer cell membrane. To enhance delivery of the drugs in cancer cells we proposed to use interaction of exogenous microparticles with laser or ultrasonic radiation. This interaction results in cavitation near the particles upon certain irradiation conditions. Our previous pilot studies demonstrated feasibility of enhanced delivery of model and real anti-cancer conditions. Our previous pilot studies demonstrated feasibility of enhanced delivery of model and real anti-cancer drugs in tissues in vitro and in vivo if laser pulsed or ultrasonic radiation is applied. In this work we performed studies in tissue phantoms in order to find optimal parameters that can be used for safe and efficient delivery of anti-cancer drugs in tumors. Water solutions and gelatin were used as tissue phantoms with well-controlled parameters. Cavitation in the phantoms was studied by using optical dn ultrasound techniques. Results of our studies indicate that efficient cavitation-driven drug delivery can be achieved with no or minimal damage to normal tissues.

  15. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f♯ = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  16. Sonoluminescence and acoustic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Pak-Kon

    2017-07-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL) is light emission under high-temperature and high-pressure conditions of a cavitating bubble under intense ultrasound in liquid. In this review, the fundamentals of the interactions between the sound field and the bubble, and between bubbles are explained. Experimental results on high-speed shadowgraphy of bubble dynamics and multibubble SL are shown, demonstrating that the SL intensity is closely related to the bubble dynamics. SL studies of alkali-metal atom (Na and K) emission are summarized. The spectral measurements in solutions with different noble-gas dissolutions and in surfactant solutions, and the results of spatiotemporal separation of SL distribution strongly suggested that the site of alkali-metal atom emission is the gas phase inside bubbles. The spectral studies indicated that alkali-metal atom lines are composed of two kinds of lines: a component that is broadened and shifted from the original D lines arises from van der Waals molecules formed between alkali-metal atoms and noble-gas atoms under extreme conditions at bubble collapse. The other spectral component exhibiting no broadening and no shift was suggested to originate from higher temperature bubbles than those producing the broadened component.

  17. Hot spot conditions during cavitation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Y.T.; McNamara, W.B. III; Suslick, K.S.

    1999-06-23

    Liquids irradiated with high-intensity ultrasound undergo acoustic cavitation--the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles. The energy stored during the growth of the bubble in the rarefaction phase of the acoustic field is released when the bubble violently collapses in the compression phase of the acoustic field, as acoustic noise, shock waves, chemical reactions, and the emission of light (sonoluminescence, SL). This violent collapse is predicted to generate a hot spot of thousands of Kelvin within the bubble, but, to date, there have been only a limited number of experimental measurements of the temperature of this hot spot. Although the SL of water has been studied for more than 50 years, the effective hot spot temperature during aqueous cavitation remains unresolved. Given the importance of aqueous cavitation (sonography and bioeffects of ultrasound, sonochemical remediation of aqueous pollutants, synthetic applications of sonochemistry, etc.), the authors decided to apply previous spectroscopic analysis of SL of nonaqueous liquids to aqueous solutions doped with small amounts of hydrocarbons. The authors have collected and analyzed excited-state C{sub 2} NBSL (multi-bubble sonoluminescence, light emission from the clouds of cavitating bubbles) spectra from mixtures of organic liquids in water at 20 kHz and find an effective emission temperature of 4,300 {+-} 200 K.

  18. Cell-Type-Selective Effects of Intramembrane Cavitation as a Unifying Theoretical Framework for Ultrasonic Neuromodulation.

    PubMed

    Plaksin, Michael; Kimmel, Eitan; Shoham, Shy

    2016-01-01

    Diverse translational and research applications could benefit from the noninvasive ability to reversibly modulate (excite or suppress) CNS activity using ultrasound pulses, however, without clarifying the underlying mechanism, advanced design-based ultrasonic neuromodulation remains elusive. Recently, intramembrane cavitation within the bilayer membrane was proposed to underlie both the biomechanics and the biophysics of acoustic bio-effects, potentially explaining cortical stimulation results through a neuronal intramembrane cavitation excitation (NICE) model. Here, NICE theory is shown to provide a detailed predictive explanation for the ability of ultrasonic (US) pulses to also suppress neural circuits through cell-type-selective mechanisms: according to the predicted mechanism T-type calcium channels boost charge accumulation between short US pulses selectively in low threshold spiking interneurons, promoting net cortical network inhibition. The theoretical results fit and clarify a wide array of earlier empirical observations in both the cortex and thalamus regarding the dependence of ultrasonic neuromodulation outcomes (excitation-suppression) on stimulation and network parameters. These results further support a unifying hypothesis for ultrasonic neuromodulation, highlighting the potential of advanced waveform design for obtaining cell-type-selective network control.

  19. A 3D time reversal cavity for the focusing of high-intensity ultrasound pulses over a large volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, J.; Arnal, B.; Tanter, M.; Pernot, M.

    2017-02-01

    Shock wave ultrasound therapy techniques, increasingly used for non-invasive surgery, require extremely high pressure amplitudes in precise focal spots, and large high-power transducers arranged on a spherical shell are usually used to achieve that. This solution allows limited steering of the beam around the geometrical focus of the device at the cost of a large number of transducer elements, and the treatment of large and moving organs like the heart is challenging or impossible. This paper validates numerically and experimentally the possibility of using a time reversal cavity (TRC) for the same purpose. A 128-element, 1 MHz power transducer combined with different multiple scattering media in a TRC was used. We were able to focus high-power ultrasound pulses over a large volume in a controlled manner, with a limited number of transducer elements. We reached sufficiently high pressure amplitudes to erode an Ultracal® target over a 10 cm2 area.

  20. Low-Power 2-MHz Pulsed-Wave Transcranial Ultrasound Reduces Ischemic Brain Damage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barlinn, Kristian; Strong, Roger; Alexandrov, Anne W; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2011-09-01

    It is largely unknown whether prolonged insonation with ultrasound impacts the ischemic brain tissue by itself. Our goal was to evaluate safety and the effect of high-frequency ultrasound on infarct volume in rats. Thirty-two Long-Evans rats with permanent middle cerebral and carotid artery occlusions received either 2-MHz ultrasound at two levels of insonation power (128 or 10 mW) or no ultrasound (controls). We measured cerebral hemorrhage, indirect and direct infarct volume as well as edema volume at 24 h. No cerebral hemorrhages were detected in all animals. Exposure to low-power (10 mW) ultrasound resulted in a significantly decreased indirect infarct volume (p = 0.0039), direct infarct volume (p = 0.0031), and brain edema volume (p = 0.01) compared with controls. High-power (128 mW) ultrasound had no significant effects. An additional experiment with India ink showed a greater intravascular penetration of dye into ischemic tissues exposed to low-power ultrasound. Insonation with high-frequency, low-power ultrasound reduces ischemic brain damage in rat. Its effect on edema reduction and possible promotion of microcirculation could be used to facilitate drug and nutrient delivery to ischemic areas.

  1. Treatment of meralgia paresthetica with ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency ablation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Ian M; Tucker, Anthony A; Mendez, Robert J

    2012-06-01

    A 23-year-old female with an 18-month history of left anterolateral thigh paresthesias and burning pain consistent with meralgia paresthetica was referred to our clinic after failing trials of physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, gabapentin, and amitriptyline. We performed 3 lateral femoral cutaneous nerve blocks with corticosteroid over a 4-month period; however, each block provided only temporary relief. As this pain was limiting the patient's ability to perform her functions as an active duty service member, we elected to perform a pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve with ultrasound guidance and nerve stimulation. After locating the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve with ultrasound and reproducing the patient's dysthesia with stimulation, pulsed radiofrequency treatment was performed at 42°C for 120 seconds. The needle was then rotated 180° and an additional cycle of pulsed radiofrequency treatment was performed followed by injection of 0.25% ropivacaine with 4 mg of dexamethasone. At 1.5 and 3 month follow-up visits, the patient reported excellent pain relief with activity and improved ability to perform her duties as an active duty service member. ▪ Published 2011. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Pain Practice © 2011 World Institute of Pain.

  2. Cavitation-based hydro-fracturing simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Ren, Fei; Cox, Thomas S.

    2016-11-22

    An apparatus 300 for simulating a pulsed pressure induced cavitation technique (PPCT) from a pressurized working fluid (F) provides laboratory research and development for enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), oil, and gas wells. A pump 304 is configured to deliver a pressurized working fluid (F) to a control valve 306, which produces a pulsed pressure wave in a test chamber 308. The pulsed pressure wave parameters are defined by the pump 304 pressure and control valve 306 cycle rate. When a working fluid (F) and a rock specimen 312 are included in the apparatus, the pulsed pressure wave causes cavitation to occur at the surface of the specimen 312, thus initiating an extensive network of fracturing surfaces and micro fissures, which are examined by researchers.

  3. Characterizing the cavitation development and acoustic spectrum in various liquids.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Lebon, G S B; Eskin, D G; Pericleous, K A

    2017-01-01

    A bespoke cavitometer that measures acoustic spectrum and is capable of operating in a range of temperatures (up to 750°C) was used to study the cavitation behaviour in three transparent liquids and in molten aluminium. To relate these acoustic measurements to cavitation development, the dynamics of the cavitation bubble structures was observed in three Newtonian, optically transparent liquids with significantly different physical properties: water, ethanol, and glycerine. Each liquid was treated at 20kHz with a piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer coupled to a titanium sonotrode with a tip diameter of 40mm. Two different transducer power levels were deployed: 50% and 100%, with the maximum power corresponding to a peak-to-peak amplitude of 17μm. The cavitation structures and the flow patterns were filmed with a digital camera. To investigate the effect of distance from the ultrasound source on the cavitation intensity, acoustic emissions were measured with the cavitometer at two points: below the sonotrode and near the edge of the experimental vessel. The behaviour of the three tested liquids was very different, implying that their physical parameters played a decisive role in the establishment of the cavitation regime. Non dimensional analysis revealed that water shares the closest cavitation behaviour with liquid aluminium and can therefore be used as its physical analogue in cavitation studies; this similarity was also confirmed when comparing the measured acoustic spectra of water and liquid aluminium.

  4. The combination of pulsed acousto-optic imaging and B-mode diagnostic ultrasound for three-dimensional imaging in ex vivo biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Lei; Murray, Todd W.; Roy, Ronald A.

    2006-02-01

    A multimode imaging system, producing conventional ultrasound (US) and acousto-optic (AO) images, has been developed and used to detect optical absorbers buried in excised biological tissue. A commercially-available diagnostic ultrasound imaging transducer is used to both generate B-mode ultrasound images and as a pump for AO imaging. Due to the fact that the steered and focused beam used for US imaging and the US source for pumping the AO image are generated from the same ultrasound probe, the acoustical and optical images are intrinsically co-registered. AO imaging is performed using short ultrasound pulse trains at a frequency of 5 MHz. The phase-modulated light emitted from the interaction region is detected using a photorefractive-crystal based interferometry system. Experimental results have previously been presented for the two-dimensional imaging in tissue-mimicking phantoms. In this paper, we report further experimental developments demonstrating three-dimensional fusion of B-mode ultrasound imaging and pulsed acousto-optic imaging in excised biological tissue (~2 cm thick). By mechanically scanning the ultrasound transducer array in a direction perpendicular to its imaging plane, both the acoustical and optical properties of an embedded target are obtained in three dimensions. The results suggest that AO imaging could be used to supplement conventional B-mode ultrasound imaging with optical contrast, and the multimode imaging system may find application in the detection and diagnosis of cancer.

  5. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

  6. Photo-mediated ultrasound therapy (PUT): a novel method of selectively treating neovascularization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haonan; Hu, Zi Zhong; Li, Jia; Mordovanakis, Aghapi G.; Yang, Xinmai; Paulus, Yannis M.; Wang, Xueding

    2017-02-01

    Retinal and choroidal neovascularization play a pivotal role in the leading causes of blindness including macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy (DR). Current therapy by focal laser photocoagulation can damage the normal surrounding cells, such as the photoreceptor inner and outer segments which are adjacent to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), due to the use of high laser energy and millisecond pulse duration. Therapies with pharmaceutical agents involve systemic administration of drugs, which can cause adverse effects and patients may become drug-resistant. We have developed a noninvasive photo-mediated ultrasound therapy (PUT) technique as a localized antivascular method, and applied it to remove micro blood vessels in the retina. PUT takes advantage of the high native optical contrast among biological tissues, and has the unique capability to self-target microvessels without causing unwanted damages to the surrounding tissues. This technique promotes cavitation activity in blood vessels by synergistically applying nanosecond laser pulses and ultrasound bursts. Through the interaction between cavitation and blood vessel wall, blood clots in microvessels and vasoconstriction can be induced. As a result, microvessels can be occluded. In comparison with other techniques that involves cavitation, both laser and ultrasound energy needed in PUT is significantly lower, and hence improves the safety in therapy.

  7. Comparison of the Effects of Ultrasound-Guided Interfascial Pulsed Radiofrequency and Ultrasound-Guided Interfascial Injection on Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Gastrocnemius.

    PubMed

    Park, So Min; Cho, Yun Woo; Ahn, Sang Ho; Lee, Dong Gyu; Cho, Hee Kyung; Kim, Sung Yup

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the comparative treatment effects of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment (UG-PRF) in the gastrocnemius interfascial space and ultrasound-guided interfascial injection (UG-INJ) on myofascial pain syndrome. Forty consecutive patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the gastrocnemius were enrolled and were allocated to one of the two groups. Twenty patients were treated by UG-PRF delivered to the gastrocnemius interfascial space (UG-PRF group) and the other 20 patients were treated by interfascial injection (UG-INJ group). The primary outcome measure was the numeric rating score (NRS) for pain on pressing the tender point in the gastrocnemius, and the secondary outcome measure was health-related quality of life as determined by the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36). NRSs were obtained at the first visit, immediately after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment, and physical component summary scores (PCS) and mental component summary scores (MCS) of the SF-36 questionnaire were measured at the first visit and at 4 weeks post-treatment. Immediately after treatments, mean NRS in the UG-PRF group was significantly higher than that in the UG-INJ group (p<0.0001). However, at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment, the mean NRS was significantly lower in the UG-PRF group (both p<0.0001). Similarly, at 4 weeks post-treatment, mean PCS and MCS were significantly higher in the UG-PRF group (p<0.0001 and p=0.002, respectively). Based on these results, the authors conclude that ultrasound-guided gastrocnemius interfascial PRF provides an attractive treatment for myofascial pain syndrome of the gastrocnemius.

  8. Comparison of the Effects of Ultrasound-Guided Interfascial Pulsed Radiofrequency and Ultrasound-Guided Interfascial Injection on Myofascial Pain Syndrome of the Gastrocnemius

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the comparative treatment effects of ultrasound-guided pulsed radiofrequency treatment (UG-PRF) in the gastrocnemius interfascial space and ultrasound-guided interfascial injection (UG-INJ) on myofascial pain syndrome. Methods Forty consecutive patients with myofascial pain syndrome of the gastrocnemius were enrolled and were allocated to one of the two groups. Twenty patients were treated by UG-PRF delivered to the gastrocnemius interfascial space (UG-PRF group) and the other 20 patients were treated by interfascial injection (UG-INJ group). The primary outcome measure was the numeric rating score (NRS) for pain on pressing the tender point in the gastrocnemius, and the secondary outcome measure was health-related quality of life as determined by the Short Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36). NRSs were obtained at the first visit, immediately after treatment, and at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment, and physical component summary scores (PCS) and mental component summary scores (MCS) of the SF-36 questionnaire were measured at the first visit and at 4 weeks post-treatment. Results Immediately after treatments, mean NRS in the UG-PRF group was significantly higher than that in the UG-INJ group (p<0.0001). However, at 2 and 4 weeks post-treatment, the mean NRS was significantly lower in the UG-PRF group (both p<0.0001). Similarly, at 4 weeks post-treatment, mean PCS and MCS were significantly higher in the UG-PRF group (p<0.0001 and p=0.002, respectively). Conclusion Based on these results, the authors conclude that ultrasound-guided gastrocnemius interfascial PRF provides an attractive treatment for myofascial pain syndrome of the gastrocnemius. PMID:27847719

  9. Synchrotron x-ray imaging of acoustic cavitation bubbles induced by acoustic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sung Yong; Park, Han Wook; Park, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-04-01

    The cavitation induced by acoustic excitation has been widely applied in various biomedical applications because cavitation bubbles can enhance the exchanges of mass and energy. In order to minimize the hazardous effects of the induced cavitation, it is essential to understand the spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles. The spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles visualized by the synchrotron x-ray imaging technique is compared to that obtained with a conventional x-ray tube. Cavitation bubbles with high density in the region close to the tip of the probe are visualized using the synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, however, the spatial distribution of cavitation bubbles in the whole ultrasound field is not detected. In this study, the effects of the ultrasound power of acoustic excitation and working medium on the shape and density of the induced cavitation bubbles are examined. As a result, the synchrotron x-ray imaging technique is useful for visualizing spatial distributions of cavitation bubbles, and it could be used for optimizing the operation conditions of acoustic cavitation.

  10. Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound Stimulation Facilitates Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Periodontal Ligament Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Bo; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Jie; Li, Jing; Deng, Feng; Wang, Zhibiao; Song, Jinlin

    2014-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) possess stem cell properties, which play a key role in periodontal regeneration. Physical stimulation at appropriate intensities such as low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesechymal stem cells. However, the impacts of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs in vitro and its molecular mechanism are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of LIPUS on osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. HPDLCs were isolated from premolars of adolescents for orthodontic reasons, and exposed to LIPUS at different intensities to determine an optimal LIPUS treatment dosage. Dynamic changes of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities in the cultured cells and supernatants, and osteocalcin production in the supernatants after treatment were analyzed. Runx2 and integrin β1 mRNA levels were assessed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis after LIPUS stimulation. Blocking antibody against integrinβ1 was used to assess the effects of integrinβ1 inhibitor on LIPUS-induced ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium deposition. Our data showed that LIPUS at the intensity of 90 mW/cm2 with 20 min/day was more effective. The ALP activities in lysates and supernatants of LIPUS-treated cells started to increase at days 3 and 7, respectively, and peaked at day 11. LIPUS treatment significantly augmented the production of osteocalcin after day 5. LIPUS caused a significant increase in the mRNA expression of Runx2 and integrin β1, while a significant decline when the integrinβ1 inhibitor was used. Moreover, ALP activity, osteocalcin production as well as calcium nodules of cells treated with both daily LIPUS stimulation and integrinβ1 antibody were less than those in the LIPUS-treated group. In conclusion, LIPUS promotes osteogenic differentiation of hPDLCs, which is associated with upregulation of Runx2 and integrin β1, which

  11. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound treatment for postoperative delayed union or nonunion of long bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Jingushi, Seiya; Mizuno, Kosaku; Matsushita, Takashi; Itoman, Moritoshi

    2007-01-01

    Postoperative delayed union and nonunion is the most common complication in fracture treatment. Recent studies have shown an accelerating effect of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) on fracture repair. However, the indications for delayed union and nonunion are not clear. To clarify the factors which influence the effects of LIPUS, the data from a previous prospective multicenter study on LIPUS treatment for postoperative delayed union and nonunion of long bone fractures were reanalyzed. Seventy-two cases of long bone fracture, including those of the femur, tibia, humerus, radius, and ulna, were analyzed. The mean time from the most recent operation to the beginning of LIPUS treatment was 11.5 (3-68) months. The relationship between the background factors and the union rate was analyzed using a logistic regression method. In addition, long bone fractures in an upper extremity or in a lower extremity were analyzed separately. The union rate was 75% in all the cases of long bone fracture. There was a significant relationship between the union rate and the period from the most recent operation to the beginning of LIPUS treatment in all cases and in those that had long bone fracture of an upper extremity. There was also a significant relationship between the union rate and the time when a radiological improvement was first observed after the beginning of the treatment in all cases and in those with fractures in a lower extremity. When LIPUS treatment was started within 6 months of the most recent operation, 89.7% of all fractures healed. When an improvement in the radiological changes at the fracture site was observed after 4 months in those cases, then the sensitivity and specificity for union were more than 90%. LIPUS treatment should be started within 6 months of the most recent operation. Because LIPUS has been shown to be effective without causing either serious invasiveness or any undue risk to the patient, it may be considered the treatment of first choice

  12. Comparison of Conventional Transcrestal Sinus Lift and Ultrasound-Enhanced Transcrestal Hydrodynamic Cavitational Sinus Lift for the Filling of Subantral Space: A Human Cadaver Study.

    PubMed

    Catros, Sylvain; Montaudon, Michel; Bou, Christophe; Da Costa Noble, Reynald; Fricain, Jean Christophe; Ella, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    The implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation of the posterior maxilla may require sinus-grafting procedures due to poor quality and low volume of bone. This can be accomplished using a "lateral window" sinus augmentation or with an osteotome sinus floor elevation (OSFE). The hydrodynamic ultrasonic cavitational sinus lift (HUCSL) (Intralift) is derived from the osteotome technique and allows the reduction of some of the traumatic effects of the osteotome technique. The aim of this study was to compare OSFE and the HUCSL procedures on fresh human cadaver heads. Primary outcomes were the height and width of the grafting area in the sinus floor area. Eighty-four maxillary sinuses were selected. On each fresh cadaver head, 2 sinus lifts were done using OSFE and HUCSL in the maxillary sinuses. Computerized tomography scans were performed on each head before and after the surgeries. Measurements were done on radiologic pictures using dedicated software, and the integrity of the sinus membrane was observed after dissecting the maxillae. The use of HUCSL resulted in a significantly higher sinus floor augmentation in the mesio-distal and bucco-palatal direction compared with the osteotome technique (P < .001). There was no correlation between mesio-distal and bucco-palatal diameters of sinus floor augmentation when only the osteotome protocol was considered (r = 0.27 and P = .08). In contrast, the mesio-distal and bucco-palatal diameters of floor augmentation were correlated when the HUCSL protocol was considered (r = 0.79, P < .001). HUCSL represents a good alternative method for sinus floor elevation.

  13. Trapping of Embolic Particles in a Vessel Phantom by Cavitation-Enhanced Acoustic Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R2=0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc=0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location. PMID:25109407

  14. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L; Cain, Charles A; Grotberg, James B; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-07

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid streaming patterns generated by ultrasound in a vessel phantom with and without crossflow of blood-mimicking fluid. Cavitation enhanced streaming, which generated fluid vortices adjacent to the focus. The focal streaming velocity, uf, was as high as 120 cm/s, while mean crossflow velocities, uc, were imposed up to 14 cm/s. When a solid particle 3-4 mm diameter was introduced into crossflow, it was trapped near the focus. Increasing uf promoted particle trapping while increasing uc promoted particle escape. The maximum crossflow Reynolds number at which particles could be trapped, Rec, was approximately linear with focal streaming number, Ref, i.e. Rec = 0.25Ref + 67.44 (R(2) = 0.76) corresponding to dimensional velocities uc = 0.084uf + 3.122 for 20 < uf < 120 cm/s. The fluidic pressure map was estimated from PIV and indicated a negative pressure gradient towards the focus, trapping the embolus near this location.

  15. Trapping of embolic particles in a vessel phantom by cavitation-enhanced acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Vaughan, Benjamin L.; Cain, Charles A.; Grotberg, James B.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-09-01

    Cavitation clouds generated by short, high-amplitude, focused ultrasound pulses were previously observed to attract, trap, and erode thrombus fragments in a vessel phantom. This phenomenon may offer a noninvasive method to capture and eliminate embolic fragments flowing through the bloodstream during a cardiovascular intervention. In this article, the mechanism of embolus trapping was explored by particle image velocimetry (PIV). PIV was used to examine the fluid str