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Sample records for pulsed-laser weld pool

  1. Study on weld pool behaviors and ripple formation in dissimilar welding under pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Rong; Luo, Yu

    2017-08-01

    A three-transient numerical model is developed to study the dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser. The melting, resolidification and vaporization inducing recoil pressure are considered in this model. Their effects on molten pool dynamic and the weld bead formation are studied. The similar metal welding and dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser are respectively simulated by using this model. It is found that surface ripples are caused mainly by the periodical laser and molten pool solidification. In the first, this model is validated by the weld bead geometry comparison between the simulated and experimental results in similar metal welding. Then, this model is applied to simulate the dissimilar metal welding under pulsed laser. The results show that the distributions of the temperature, melt-flow velocity and surface ripples are asymmetric due to the differences in physical properties of the materials. The higher pulse overlapping factor decreases the solidification rate, leading to the more uniform penetration depths and the finer ripples. Good agreements between the experimental observations and simulation results are obtained by the proposed model.

  2. Neural Network Modeling of Weld Pool Shape in Pulsed-Laser Aluminum Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Vitek, J.M.

    1998-11-16

    A neural network model was developed to predict the weld pool shape for pulsed-laser aluminum welds. Several different network architectures were examined and the optimum architecture was identified. The neural network was then trained and, in spite of the small size of the training data set, the network accurately predicted the weld pool shape profiles. The neural network output was in the form of four weld pool shape parameters (depth, width, half-width, and area) and these were converted into predicted weld pool profiles with the use of the actual experimental poo1 profiles as templates. It was also shown that the neural network model could reliably predict the change from conduction-mode type shapes to keyhole-mode shapes.

  3. Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Smartt, H.B.; Pace, D.P. Tolle, C.R.

    1998-11-01

    A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: penetration, width, width at half-penetration, and cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, the best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

  4. Neural network modeling of pulsed-laser weld pool shapes in aluminum alloy welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; Iskander, Y.S.; Oblow, E.M.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.; Fuerschbach, P.W.; Smartt, H.B.

    1998-09-01

    A model was developed to predict the weld pool shape in pulsed Nd:YAG laser welds of aluminum alloy 5754. The model utilized neural network analysis to relate the weld process conditions to four pool shape parameters: (1) penetration width, (2) width at half-penetration, and (3) cross-sectional area. The model development involved the identification of the input (process) variables, the desired output (shape) variables, and the optimal neural network architecture. The latter was influenced by the number of defined inputs and outputs as well as the amount of data that was available for training the network. After appropriate training, die best network was identified and was used to predict the weld shape. A routine to convert the shape parameters into predicted weld profiles was also developed. This routine was based on the actual experimental weld profiles and did not impose an artificial analytical function to describe the weld profile. The neural network model was tested on experimental welds. The model predictions were excellent. It was found that the predicted shapes were within the experimental variations that were found along the length of the welds (due to the pulsed nature of the weld power) and the reproducibility of welds made under nominally identical conditions.

  5. Optical penetration sensor for pulsed laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Essien, Marcelino; Keicher, David M.; Schlienger, M. Eric; Jellison, James L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the penetration of the weld pool created from pulsed laser welding and more particularly to an apparatus and method of utilizing an optical technique to monitor the weld vaporization plume velocity to determine the depth of penetration. A light source directs a beam through a vaporization plume above a weld pool, wherein the plume changes the intensity of the beam, allowing determination of the velocity of the plume. From the velocity of the plume, the depth of the weld is determined.

  6. Visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc Weld Pools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    flow visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night~vision...visualization of Gas Tungsten Arc weld pools for HY-80 steel is presented using a pulsed laser light source and a conventional night-vision image-intensifier...effects of electromagnetic stirring on GTA welds in austenitic stainless steel . Changes in shape and solidification structure of welds observed

  7. Surface separation investigation of ultrafast pulsed laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianyong; Carter, Richard M.; Thomson, Robert R.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    Techniques for joining materials, especially optical materials such as glass to structural materials such as metals, or to other optical materials, while maintaining their surface and optical properties are essential for a wide range of industrial applications. Adhesive bonding is commonly used but leads to many issues including optical surface contamination and outgassing. It is possible to generate welds using an ultra-short pulsed laser process, whereby two flat material surfaces are brought into close contact and the laser is focused through the optical material onto the interface. Highly localised melting and rapid resolidification form a strong bond between the two surfaces whilst avoiding significant heating of the surrounding material, which is important for joining materials with different thermal expansion coefficients. Previous reports on ultrafast laser welding have identified a requirement for the surface separation gap to be less than 500nm in order to avoid cracking or ablation at the interface. We have investigated techniques for increasing this gap (to reduce weld fit-up problems), and tested by bonding two surfaces with a weld-controlled gap. These gaps were generated either by a series of etched grooves on the surface of one of the substrates, or by using a cylindrical lens as a substrate. By careful optimisation of parameters such as laser power, process speed and focal position, we were able to demonstrate successful welding with a gap of up to 3μm.

  8. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  9. Ultrashort pulse laser welding of glasses without optical contacting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Sutter, Dirk; Budnicki, Aleksander; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    We report on ultrashort pulse induced welding of fused silica without previously optical contacting of the samples. We used a TruMicro 2020 by TRUMPF delivering bursts of intense ultrashort laser pulses with an individual pulse energy of up to 10 μJ, an intraburst pulse separation of 20 ns and a burst repetition rate of 200 kHz. With this setup we could realize a large pool of molten material with a length of up to 450 μm and a diameter of around 160 μm. If the laser focus is placed near the surface of a glass sample the low viscosity of the hot material induces bulging of the surface and ejection of the molten material. This molten material can be used to fill a gap of up to 3 μm between fused silica samples. We also determined the breaking strength with a three-point bending test. The determined maximal value of 73 MPa is equivalent to 85% of the stability of the pristine bulk material.

  10. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  11. Skin welding using pulsed laser radiation and a dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fried, Nathaniel M.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1998-07-01

    Previous skin welding studies have used continuous wave (CW) delivery of radiation. However, heat diffusion during irradiation prevents strong welds from being achieved without creating large zones of thermal damage to surrounding tissue. This damage may prevent normal wound healing. Strong welds and minimal thermal damage can be achieved by introducing a dye and delivering the radiation in a pulsed mode. Two-cm-long, full-thickness incisions were made in guinea pig skin. India ink was used as an absorber, and egg white albumin was used as an adhesive. A 5-mm-diameter spot of CW, 1.06-micrometer Nd:YAG laser radiation was scanned over the weld site, producing 100 millisecond pulses. The cooling time between scans and number of scans was varied. Thermal damage zones were measured using a transmission polarizing microscope to identify birefringence changes in tissue. Tensile strengths were measured using a tensiometer. For pulsed welding and long cooling times, weld strengths of 2.4 kg/cm2 were measured, and thermal damage to the epidermis was limited to approximately 500 micrometers. With CW welding, comparable weld strengths resulted in approximately 2700 micrometer of thermal damage. CW laser radiation weld strengths were only 0.6 kg/cm2 when thermal damage in the epidermis was limited to approximately 500 micrometers.

  12. Microstructure evolution and mechanical property of pulsed laser welded Ni-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guangyi; Wu, Dongjiang; Niu, Fangyong; Zou, Helin

    2015-09-01

    For evaluating the microstructure evolution and mechanical property of Ni-based Hastelloy C-276 weld joint by the pulsed laser welding, the influence of pulsed laser welding on the microstructure and mechanical property of the weld joint is investigated by the analysis of the microstructure morphology, microhardness, phase structure and tensile property. The results indicate that, in the fusion zone three sections are divided on the basis of the patterns of grain structures. In the weld joint, the element segregation is found, but the trend of brittle phase's formation is weakened. The weld microhardness presents just a little higher than that of base metal, and there is no obvious the softened heat affected zone. Meanwhile in the weld joint, the phase structure is still the face-center cubic with the tiny shift of peak positions and widened Full Width at Half-Maximum. The yield strength of weld joint is the same as that of base metal, and the tensile strength is nearly 90% of that of base metal. The decreased tensile strength is mainly attributed to the dislocation piling-up.

  13. Experimental verification of physical model of pulsed laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Whereas most experimental and theoretical studies of the role of convection in fusion welding have been concerned with continuous heat sources, a pulsed heat source is the focus of this study. This is primarily an experimental study of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of austenitic stainless steels. 12 refs., 9 figs.

  14. Weld Bead Size, Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of Zirconium Alloys Joints Welded by Pulsed Laser Spot Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Chuang; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang; Peng, Genchen; Wang, Xian

    2016-09-01

    Pulsed laser spot welding of intersection points of zirconium alloys straps was performed. Weld bead size, microstructure and the corrosion behavior of weld bead were investigated. With the increasing laser peak power or number of shots, the weld width of the beads increased, the protrusion decreased and the dimple increased with further increase in heat input. The fusion zone consisted of a mixture of αZr and residual βZr phases. After annealing treatment, βNb and Zr(Fe, Nb)2 second phase particles were precipitated inter- and intragranular of αZr grains adequately. The oxide thickness of annealed weld bead was about 3.90 μm, decreased by about 18.1% relative to the 4.76 μm of as-welded specimen corroded at 400 °C and 10.3 MPa for 20 days. The corrosion resistance of annealed specimen was better than that of as-welded specimen, since the second phase particles exerted better corrosion resistance, and the content of Nb in βZr and the fraction of βZr decreased after the annealing treatment.

  15. Experimental and numerical studies on three dimensional GTA weld pool convection: Non-axisymmetric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Y.; Dutta, P.; Schupp, P.E.; Espinosa, D.

    1995-12-31

    Observations of surface flow patterns of steel and aluminum GTAW pools have been made using a pulsed laser visualization system. The weld pool convection is found to be three dimensional, with the azimuthal circulation depending on the location of the clamp with respect to the torch. Oscillation of steel pools and undulating motion in aluminum weld pools are also observed even with steady process parameters. Current axisymmetric numerical models are unable to explain such phenomena. A three dimensional computational study is carried out in this study to explain the rotational flow in aluminum weld pools.

  16. Thin plate gap bridging study for Nd:YAG pulsed laser lap welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Robert Allen; Fuerschbach, Phillip William; Bernal, John E.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2006-01-01

    In an on going study of gap bridging for thin plate Nd:YAG laser lap welds, empirical data, high speed imaging, and computer modeling were utilized to better understand surface physics attributed to the formation and solidification of a weld pool. Experimental data indicates better gap bridging can be achieved through optimized laser parameters such as pulse length, duration, and energy. Long pulse durations at low energies generating low peak powers were found to create the highest percent of gap bridging ability. At constant peak power, gap-bridging ability was further improved by using a smaller spot diameter resulting in higher irradiances. Hence, welding in focus is preferable for bridging gaps. Gas shielding was also found to greatly impact gap-bridging ability. Gapped lap welds that could not be bridged with UHP Argon gas shielding, were easily bridged when left unshielded and exposed to only air. Incident weld angle and joint offset were also investigated for their ability to improve gap bridging. Optical filters and brightlight surface illumination enabled high-speed imaging to capture the fluid dynamics of a forming and solidifying weld pool. The effects of various laser parameters and the weld pool's interaction with the laser beam could also be observed utilizing the high-speed imaging. The work described is used to develop and validate a computer model with improved weld pool physics. Finite element models have been used to derive insight into the physics of gap bridging. The dynamics of the fluid motion within the weld pool in conjunction with the free surface physics have been the primary focus of the modeling efforts. Surface tension has been found to be a more significant factor in determining final weld pool shape than expected.

  17. Building A Simulation Model For The Prediction Of Temperature Distribution In Pulsed Laser Spot Welding Of Dissimilar Low Carbon Steel 1020 To Aluminum Alloy 6061

    SciTech Connect

    Yousef, Adel K. M.; Taha, Ziad A.; Shehab, Abeer A.

    2011-01-17

    This paper describes the development of a computer model used to analyze the heat flow during pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot welding of dissimilar metal; low carbon steel (1020) to aluminum alloy (6061). The model is built using ANSYS FLUENT 3.6 software where almost all the environments simulated to be similar to the experimental environments. A simulation analysis was implemented based on conduction heat transfer out of the key hole where no melting occurs. The effect of laser power and pulse duration was studied.Three peak powers 1, 1.66 and 2.5 kW were varied during pulsed laser spot welding (keeping the energy constant), also the effect of two pulse durations 4 and 8 ms (with constant peak power), on the transient temperature distribution and weld pool dimension were predicated using the present simulation. It was found that the present simulation model can give an indication for choosing the suitable laser parameters (i.e. pulse durations, peak power and interaction time required) during pulsed laser spot welding of dissimilar metals.

  18. Building A Simulation Model For The Prediction Of Temperature Distribution In Pulsed Laser Spot Welding Of Dissimilar Low Carbon Steel 1020 To Aluminum Alloy 6061

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Adel K. M.; Taha, Ziad. A.; Shehab, Abeer A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computer model used to analyze the heat flow during pulsed Nd: YAG laser spot welding of dissimilar metal; low carbon steel (1020) to aluminum alloy (6061). The model is built using ANSYS FLUENT 3.6 software where almost all the environments simulated to be similar to the experimental environments. A simulation analysis was implemented based on conduction heat transfer out of the key hole where no melting occurs. The effect of laser power and pulse duration was studied. Three peak powers 1, 1.66 and 2.5 kW were varied during pulsed laser spot welding (keeping the energy constant), also the effect of two pulse durations 4 and 8 ms (with constant peak power), on the transient temperature distribution and weld pool dimension were predicated using the present simulation. It was found that the present simulation model can give an indication for choosing the suitable laser parameters (i.e. pulse durations, peak power and interaction time required) during pulsed laser spot welding of dissimilar metals.

  19. Study on laser welding of austenitic stainless steel by varying incident angle of pulsed laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nikhil; Mukherjee, Manidipto; Bandyopadhyay, Asish

    2017-09-01

    In the present work, AISI 304 stainless steel sheets are laser welded in butt joint configuration using a robotic control 600 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser system. The objective of the work is of twofold. Firstly, the study aims to find out the effect of incident angle on the weld pool geometry, microstructure and tensile property of the welded joints. Secondly, a set of experiments are conducted, according to response surface design, to investigate the effects of process parameters, namely, incident angle of laser beam, laser power and welding speed, on ultimate tensile strength by developing a second order polynomial equation. Study with three different incident angle of laser beam 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg has been presented in this work. It is observed that the weld pool geometry has been significantly altered with the deviation in incident angle. The weld pool shape at the top surface has been altered from semispherical or nearly spherical shape to tear drop shape with decrease in incident angle. Simultaneously, planer, fine columnar dendritic and coarse columnar dendritic structures have been observed at 89.7 deg, 85.5 deg and 83 deg incident angle respectively. Weld metals with 85.5 deg incident angle has higher fraction of carbide and δ-ferrite precipitation in the austenitic matrix compared to other weld conditions. Hence, weld metal of 85.5 deg incident angle achieved higher micro-hardness of ∼280 HV and tensile strength of 579.26 MPa followed by 89.7 deg and 83 deg incident angle welds. Furthermore, the predicted maximum value of ultimate tensile strength of 580.50 MPa has been achieved for 85.95 deg incident angle using the developed equation where other two optimum parameter settings have been obtained as laser power of 455.52 W and welding speed of 4.95 mm/s. This observation has been satisfactorily validated by three confirmatory tests.

  20. Camera Would Monitor Weld-Pool Contours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.; Gutow, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Weld pool illuminated and viewed coaxially along welding torch. Proposed monitoring subsystem for arc welder provides image in which horizontal portions of surface of weld pool highlighted. Monitoring and analyzing subsystems integrated into overall control system of robotic welder. Control system sets welding parameters to adapt to changing conditions, maintaining surface contour giving desired pattern of reflections.

  1. Effect of Heat Input on the Tensile Damage Evolution in Pulsed Laser Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2016-11-01

    The present paper is focused on studying the effect of heat input on the tensile damage evolution of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy under monotonic loading. To analyze the reasons that the tensile fracture site of the pulsed-laser-welded Ti6Al4V sheet joints changes with the heat input under monotonic loading, the microstructure of the sample with different nominal strain values was investigated by in situ observation. Experiment results show that the tensile ductility and fatigue life of welded joints with low heat input are higher than that of welded joints with high heat input. Under tensile loads, the critical engineering strain for crack initiation is much lower in the welded joint with high heat input than in the welded joints with low and medium heat input. And the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the fusion zone than in the base metal for the welded joints with high input, whereas the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the base metal than in the fusion zone for the welded joints with low input. Consequently, the welded joints fractured in the fusion zone for the welds with high heat input, whereas the welded joints ruptured in the base metal for the welds with low heat input. It is proved that the fine grain microstructure produced by low heat input can improve the critical nominal strain for crack initiation and the resistance ability of microstructural damage.

  2. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  3. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Pulsed Laser Beam Welded Ti-2Al-1.5Mn Titanium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiuyang; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties in the pulsed laser beam welded joints of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy thin sheet were investigated in this study. The results show that the original α + β-phases and the transformed α + α'-phases are found in the partially transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) together with the remaining β-phase, and the microhardness gradually enhances in the region as the result of the increase of α'-phase. The martensitic α'-phase and the remaining β-phase are detected in the fully transformed HAZ and the fusion zone (FZ), and the highest microhardness is found in these regions in virtue of the dominant α'-phase structure. The fine α'-phase appeared in the FZ results in higher average microhardness at high welding speed. Moreover, similar to the results of microhardness test, the tensile test results mean that the HAZ and FZ are stronger than the base metal (BM). Therefore, pulsed laser beam welding is feasible for joining thin sheet of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy.

  4. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOEpatents

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  5. Effect of keyhole characteristics on porosity formation during pulsed laser-GTA hybrid welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghua; Xu, Jiannan; Xin, Lijun; Zhao, Zuofu; Wu, Fufa; Ma, Shengnan; Zhang, Yue

    2017-06-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the relationship between laser keyhole characteristics on the porosity formation during pulsed laser-GTA welding of magnesium alloy. Based on direct observations during welding process, the influences of laser keyhole state on the porosity formation were studied. Results show that the porosities in the joint are always at the bottom of fusion zone of the joint, which is closely related to the keyhole behavior. A large depth to wide ratio always leads to the increase of porosity generation chance. Keeping the keyhole outlet open for a longer time benefits the porosity restriction. Overlap of adjacent laser keyhole can effectively decrease the porosity generation, due to the cutting effect between adjacent laser keyholes. There are threshold overlap rate values for laser keyholes in different state.

  6. Ultrashort pulse laser micro-welding of cyclo-olefin copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Gian-Luca; Rung, Stefan; Hellmann, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    We report on the joining of transparent thermoplastic polymers using infrared femtosecond laser pulses. Due to nonlinear absorption, the developed micro-welding process for cyclo-olefin copolymers does not require any intermediate absorbing layers or any surface pre-processing of the welding partners. In view of an optimized and stable micro-welding process, the influence of the welding speed and focal position on both, the quality and shear force strength are investigated. We highlight that welding seam widths of down to 65 μm are feasible for welding speeds of up to 75 mm/s. However, a variation of the welding speed affects the required focal position for a successful joining process. The shear force strength of the welding seam is determined to 37 MPa, which corresponds to 64% of the shear strength of the bulk material and is not affected by the welding speed.

  7. Weld Pool Stability in the Flat Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Coan, B.

    1999-01-01

    The Soft Plasma Arc (SPA) process was devised to avoid interactions between backshield and full penetration mode plasma jet in welding 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy. Occasional sudden and mysterious losses in penetration were encountered in flat position SPA welding. To understand what was happening a model of the dynamics of the molten metal meniscus at the root of the weld was worked out. When the power input to the weld P(sub in) exceeds the power leakage P(sub out) the difference in power is absorbed by an increase in the molten weld pool volume V, Rho X L(SUB m) X (d(V)/dt)) = P(sub in) - P(sub out) where rho is the density and L(sub m) the specific heat of the weld metal.

  8. Weld Pool Stability in the Flat Position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Coan, B.

    1999-01-01

    The Soft Plasma Arc (SPA) process was devised to avoid interactions between backshield and full penetration mode plasma jet in welding 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy. Occasional sudden and mysterious losses in penetration were encountered in flat position SPA welding. To understand what was happening a model of the dynamics of the molten metal meniscus at the root of the weld was worked out. When the power input to the weld P(sub in) exceeds the power leakage P(sub out) the difference in power is absorbed by an increase in the molten weld pool volume V, Rho X L(SUB m) X (d(V)/dt)) = P(sub in) - P(sub out) where rho is the density and L(sub m) the specific heat of the weld metal.

  9. Numerical Study for Gta Weld Shape Variation by Coupling Welding Arc and Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    A numerical modeling of the welding arc and weld pool is studied for moving GTA welding to investigate the effect of the surface active element oxygen and the plasma drag force on the weld shape. Based on the 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux, current density and plasma drag force are obtained under different welding currents. Numerical calculations to the weld pool development are carried out for moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen contents 30 ppm and 220 ppm, respectively. The results show that the plasma drag force is another dominating driving force affecting the liquid pool flow pattern, except for the Marangoni force. The different welding currents will change the temperature distribution and plasma drag force on the pool surface, and affect the strength of Marangoni convection and the weld shape. The weld D/W ratio initially increases, followed by a constant value around 0.5 with the increasing welding current under high oxygen content. The weld D/W ratio under the low oxygen content slightly decreases with the increasing welding current. The predicted weld shape by simulation agrees well with experimental results.

  10. Control of back weld pool shape in MIG welding by using switch back method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, B.; Kaneko, Yasuyoshi; Soeda, Masahiro; Ohshima, Kenji

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with the problem concerning the sensing and controlling of weld pool shape in MIG welding of plate. In the robotic one side MIG welding process without backing plate, for obtaining the good quality of the weld, it is important to control the weld pool shape so as to prevent the melting metal from burning through. The method of controlling the weld pool shape is discussed. The moving torch is repeat switch change, which is named switch back method. The primary welding experimental results have proved that the switch back method is effective and satisfactory for controlling the back weld pool shape in one side MIG welding process without backing plate.

  11. Numerical simulation of transient development and diminution of weld pool in gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuan Song; Yan, Fengjie

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the transient heat and fluid flow fields in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). The transient development and diminution of the weld pool at two periods after the arc ignites and extinguishes are analysed quantitatively. The data for the weld pool configurations under different welding conditions from the transient state to the quasi-steady state are obtained. The time for the weld pool shape to reach the quasi-steady state and the time for the weld pool to solidify completely are predicted. GTAW experiments show that the predictions of the weld pool shape based on the model are in agreement with the measured values. The numerical results of the dynamic development and diminution of weld pool configurations could be used to correlate the transient characteristics of weld pool behaviour with the occurrence of weld formation defects.

  12. The effects of short pulse laser surface cleaning on porosity formation and reduction in laser welding of aluminium alloy for automotive component manufacture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AlShaer, A. W.; Li, L.; Mistry, A.

    2014-12-01

    Laser welding of aluminium alloys typically results in porosity in the fusion zones, leading to poor mechanical and corrosion performances. Mechanical and chemical cleaning of surfaces has been used previously to remove contaminants for weld joint preparations. However, these methods are slow, ineffective (e.g. due to hydrogen trapping) or lead to environmental hazards. This paper reports the effects of short pulsed laser surface cleaning on porosity formation and reduction in laser welding of AC-170PX (AA6014) aluminium sheets (coated with Ti/Zr and lubricated using a dry lubricant AlO70) with two types of joints: fillet edge and flange couch, using an AA4043 filler wire for automotive component assembly. The effect of laser cleaning on porosity reduction during laser welding using a filler wire has not been reported before. In this work, porosity and weld fusion zone geometry were examined prior to and after laser cleaning. The nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser cleaning was found to reduce porosity significantly in the weld fusion zones. For the fillet edge welds, porosity was reduced to less than 0.5% compared with 10-80% without laser cleaning. For flange couch welds, porosity was reduced to 0.23-0.8% with laser cleaning from 0.7% to 4.3% without laser cleaning. This has been found to be due to the elimination of contaminations and oxide layers that contribute to the porosity formation. The laser cleaning is based on thermal ablation. This research focuses on porosity reduction in laser welding of aluminium alloy. Weld quality was investigated for two joints, fillet edge and flange couch joints. The effect of laser cleaning on porosity reduction after welding was investigated. It was found that laser cleaning reduced porosity less than 1% in both joints. Weld dimensions and strength were evaluated and discussed for both types of joints.

  13. Vision detection of weld pool shape parameters and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Youzhi; Liu, Nansheng; Wang, Yanfeng; Luo, Wei; Liu, Xiaorui

    2008-12-01

    An active vision sensing system which established by low power laser and common CCD is used to shoot GTAW welding pool images. Based on choose the appropriate LASER and filters, projected angle of laser and shoot angle of CCD, we avoid the disturbance of arc effectively and obtain clear images of the welding pool. The shape parameters of welding pool can obtain by demarcated and calculated. And then a three-dimentional numerical model of GTAW welding pool is established based on the theories of fluid dynamics and heat transfer. It considered the convection heat transfer of liquid metal and heat conduction of solid metal. And FLUENT software is used for simulate the GTAW welding pool. Extract the weld pool shape parameters and done comparative study with the vision detection of pool. This will be beneficial to avoid repeat experiments and improve work efficiency.

  14. A unified model of coupled arc plasma and weld pool for double electrodes TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinxin; Fan, Ding; Huang, Jiankang; Huang, Yong

    2014-07-01

    A three-dimensional model containing tungsten electrodes, arc plasma and a weld pool is presented for double electrodes tungsten inert gas welding. The model is validated by available experimental data. The distributions of temperature, velocity and pressure of the coupled arc plasma are investigated. The current density, heat flux and shear stress over the weld pool are highlighted. The weld pool dynamic is described by taking into account buoyance, Lorentz force, surface tension and plasma drag force. The turbulent effect in the weld pool is also considered. It is found that the temperature and velocity distributions of the coupled arc are not rotationally symmetrical. A similar property is also shown by the arc pressure, current density and heat flux at the anode surface. The surface tension gradient is much larger than the plasma drag force and dominates the convective pattern in the weld pool, thus determining the weld penetration. The anodic heat flux and plasma drag force, as well as the surface tension gradient over the weld pool, determine the weld shape and size. In addition, provided the welding current through one electrode increases and that through the other decreases, keeping the total current unchanged, the coupled arc behaviour and weld pool dynamic change significantly, while the weld shape and size show little change. The results demonstrate the necessity of a unified model in the study of the arc plasma and weld pool.

  15. An insight to the mechanism of weld penetration in dissimilar pulsed laser welding of niobium and Ti-6Al-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkamany, M. J.; Malek Ghaini, F.; Poursalehi, R.

    2016-05-01

    In laser welding of Ti-6Al-4V to niobium, the interaction of laser with the two metals is such that at the investigated laser conditions there will be conduction mode on the Nb side and keyhole on the Ti side. Thus the weld pool is not developed symmetrically as there will not be sufficient penetration in the higher melting point higher conductivity niobium side. The mechanisms of energy absorption and effective melting in dissimilar laser welding are analyzed. It is shown that more penetration into niobium is obtained when the laser energy is absorbed by Ti-6Al-4V and then the molten Ti-6Al-4V dissolves the niobium metal.

  16. Computerized radiographic weld penetration control with feedback on weld pool depression

    SciTech Connect

    Guu, A.C.; Rokhlin, S.I. )

    1989-10-01

    Welding pool depression depends on plasma pressure and heat input to the pool and therefore is related to weld penetration. On the basis of information on pool depression received from radiographic images in real time during welding, the possibility of using automated weld penetration control to maintain the required weld penetration has been studied. The experimental system developed includes an arc welding unit, a welding manipulator, a real-time x-ray system, an image processing unit, and a system controller. By analyzing the radiographic information together with metallographs of the appropriate weld cross section, the depth of the liquid metal in the pool has been determined at different levels of current and weld penetration.

  17. 3D finite element simulation of TIG weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, X.; Asserin, O.; Gounand, S.; Gilles, P.; Bergheau, J. M.; Medale, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a three-dimensional weld pool model for the moving gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, in order to understand the main factors that limit the weld quality and improve the productivity, especially with respect to the welding speed. Simulation is a very powerful tool to help in understanding the physical phenomena in the weld process. A 3D finite element model of heat and fluid flow in weld pool considering free surface of the pool and traveling speed has been developed for the GTAW process. Cast3M software is used to compute all the governing equations. The free surface of the weld pool is calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. The combined effects of surface tension gradient, buoyancy force, arc pressure, arc drag force to drive the fluid flow is included in our model. The deformation of the weld pool surface and the welding speed affect fluid flow, heat flow and thus temperature gradients and molten pool dimensions. Welding trials study is presented to compare our numerical results with macrograph of the molten pool.

  18. Modeling of the Weld Shape Development During the Autogenous Welding Process by Coupling Welding Arc with Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2010-10-01

    A numerical model of the welding arc is coupled to a model for the heat transfer and fluid flow in the weld pool of a SUS304 stainless steel during a moving GTA welding process. The described model avoids the use of the assumption of the empirical Gaussian boundary conditions, and at the same time, provides reliable boundary conditions to analyze the weld pool. Based on the two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux to workpiece, the input current density, and the plasma drag stress are obtained. The arc temperature contours, the distributions of heat flux, and current density at the anode are in fair agreement with the reported experimental results. Numerical simulation and experimental studies to the weld pool development are carried out for a moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen content from 30 to 220 ppm. The calculated result show that the oxygen can change the Marangoni convection from outward to inward direction on the liquid pool surface and make the wide shallow weld shape become narrow deep one. The calculated result for the weld shape and weld D/W ratio agrees well with the experimental one.

  19. Influence of the arc plasma parameters on the weld pool profile in TIG welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toropchin, A.; Frolov, V.; Pipa, A. V.; Kozakov, R.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of the arc and fluid simulations of the weld pool can be beneficial in the analysis and further development of arc welding processes and welding machines. However, the appropriate coupling of arc and weld pool simulations needs further improvement. The tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process is investigated by simulations including the weld pool. Experiments with optical diagnostics are used for the validation. A coupled computational model of the arc and the weld pool is developed using the software ANSYS CFX. The weld pool model considers the forces acting on the motion of the melt inside and on the surface of the pool, such as Marangoni, drag, electromagnetic forces and buoyancy. The experimental work includes analysis of cross-sections of the workpieces, highspeed video images and spectroscopic measurements. Experiments and calculations have been performed for various currents, distances between electrode and workpiece and nozzle diameters. The studies show the significant impact of material properties like surface tension dependence on temperature as well as of the arc structure on the weld pool behaviour and finally the weld seam depth. The experimental weld pool profiles and plasma temperatures are in good agreement with computational results.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Predictions of weld pool profiles using plasma physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Lowke, J. J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives a review of recent papers which have led to the capability of the prediction of weld depths for gas tungsten arc welding, for any given arc current, electrode shape or separation and welding gas. The methodology is given for deriving plasma composition as a function of temperature and pressure from basic atomic and molecular properties. Transport coefficients of density, specific heat, enthalpy, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, viscosity and radiation emission coefficients can then be derived as a function of temperature. The conservation equations of fluid dynamics are then used to derive weld profiles for stainless steel for welding gases such as argon, helium, carbon dioxide and a 10% mixture of hydrogen in argon. The markedly different weld depths which are obtained are related to basic material functions such as specific heat, electrical and thermal conductivity. The temperature dependence of the surface tension coefficient has a marked effect on weld depth and profiles because it can influence the direction of circulatory flow in the weld pool. Electric arcs in helium and carbon dioxide are more constricted than arcs in argon and as a consequence the magnetic pinch pressure of the arc, transmitted to the weld pool, can force strong downward flows in the weld pool and thus lead to a deep weld. It is found that because of the interactions of the arc and the weld pool through effects such as viscous drag forces of the plasma on the weld pool, it is necessary to treat the arc, the electrode and the weld pool in a unified system.

  1. Flow visualization of Marangoni convection in simulated weld pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit

    Many computational models and experiments have demonstrated that Marangoni convection dominates other forces in weld pools under the practical gas tungsten arc welding conditions. The Marangoni convection in the weld pools is important because it has a decisive effect on the reproducibility of weld geometry and is responsible for other welding problems, including arc wander, humped beads, and porosity. A flow visualization technique was developed to observe the Marangoni convection in simulated weld pool of sodium nitrate (NaNO3) subject to a defocused CO2 laser beam. The intent was to provide a better understanding of Marangoni convection in weld pools, which is impossible to conduct in opaque metal pools, and to understand the effect of the power and diameter of the heat source on the Marangoni convection. The study of the effect of the Marangoni convection on the weld pool shape was conducted in stationary welds of NaNO3 and gallium (Ga), a high and low Prandtl number material, respectively. It is proposed that, in the absence of a surface-active agent and a significant electromagnetic force, pool bottom convexity increases with increasing value of Peclet number. It was shown that for a given material composition and welding process, the weld shape often reveals a good deal about the nature of weld pool convection. Finally, a transparent pool of NaNO3 with potassium propionate (C2H5COOK) as a surface-active agent was used for the flow visualization. The reversed Marangoni convection was clearly observed. The stationary laser weldings showed deeper weld pools in NaNO3 containing 1 mole % C2H5COOK than in pure NaNO 3. This is consistent with the effect Of C2H5COOK on the convection pattern observed in flow visualization. It is believed that the results of this dissertation are the valuable tools to explain the significance of the Marangoni convection in weld pools and to explain why small differences in some specific chemical composition have such a profound

  2. Numerical and experimental studies of molten pool formation during an interaction of a pulse laser (Nd:YAG) with a magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abderrazak, Kamel; Kriaa, Wassim; Ben Salem, Wacef; Mhiri, Hatem; Lepalec, Georges; Autric, Michel

    2009-06-01

    A pulse laser (Nd:YAG) interaction with an AZ91 magnesium alloy has been experimentally and numerically studied. A two-dimensional (2D) axisymmetric model of a molten pool created by a laser heat source has been developed. The elaborated model solves the coupled equations of a laminar fluid flow and heat transfer to demonstrate the flow behavior in the pool. This model takes into account the coupled effects of buoyancy and Marangoni forces, the thermophysic variation properties with temperature, and the radiation and convection heat losses. Concerning numerical results, the molten temperature distribution, velocity field and molten shape were discussed. It was noted that the Marangoni flow significantly alters the characteristics of the thawing and solidifying processes, and makes the molten pool wider and shallower. On the other hand, the experimental results showed that the material thermal properties have significant effects on the transport phenomena which takes place in the molten pool, and consequently on the formation as well as the shape of the pool. Finally, a comparison between the numerical and experimental results exhibited a good agreement.

  3. Molten pool characterization of laser lap welded copper and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Zhiqing; Hu, Shengsun; Zuo, Di; Cai, Wayne; Lee, Dongkyun; Elijah, Kannatey-Asibu, Jr.

    2013-12-01

    A 3D finite volume simulation model for laser welding of a Cu-Al lap joint was developed using ANSYS FLUENT to predict the weld pool temperature distribution, velocity field, geometry, alloying element distribution and transition layer thickness—all key attributes and performance characteristics for a laser-welded joint. Melting and solidification of the weld pool was simulated with an enthalpy-porosity formulation. Laser welding experiments and metallographic examination by SEM and EDX were performed to investigate the weld pool features and validate the simulated results. A bowl-shaped temperature field and molten pool, and a unique maximum fusion zone width were observed near the Cu-Al interface. Both the numerical simulation and experimental results indicate an arch-shaped intermediate layer of Cu and Al, and a gradual transition of Cu concentration from the aluminum plate to the copper plate with high composition gradient. For the conditions used, welding with Cu on top was found to result in a better weld joint.

  4. Modeling of inclusion growth and dissolution in the weld pool

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, T.; Debroy, T.; Babu, S.S.; David, S.A.

    2000-02-01

    The composition, size distribution, and number density of oxide inclusions in weld metal are critical factors in determining weldment properties. A computational model has been developed to understand these factors, considering fluid flow and the temperature field in the weld pool during submerged arc (SA) welding of low-alloy steels. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are solved in three dimensions to calculate the velocity and temperature fields in the weld pool. The loci and corresponding thermal cycles of thousands of oxide inclusions are numerically calculated in the weld pool. The inclusions undergo considerable recirculatory motion and experience strong temperature gyrations. The temperature-time history and the computed time-temperature-transformation (TTT) behavior of inclusions were then used to understand the growth and dissolution of oxide inclusions in the weld pool. The statistically meaningful characteristics of inclusion behavior in the weld pool, such as the residence time, number of temperature peaks, etc., were calculated for several thousand inclusions. The calculated trends agree with experimental observations and indicate that the inclusion formation can be described by combining thermodynamics and kinetics with the fundamentals of transport phenomena.

  5. Effects of surface active elements on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in gas metal arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Tsai, H. L.

    2001-06-01

    This article presents a mathematical model simulating the effects of surface tension (Maragoni effect) on weld pool fluid flow and weld penetration in spot gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Filler droplets driven by gravity, electromagnetic force, and plasma arc drag force, carrying mass, thermal energy, and momentum, periodically impinge onto the weld pool. Complicated fluid flow in the weld pool is influenced by the droplet impinging momentum, electromagnetic force, and natural convection due to temperature and concentration gradients, and by surface tension, which is a function of both temperature and concentration of a surface active element (sulfur in the present study). Although the droplet impinging momentum creates a complex fluid flow near the weld pool surface, the momentum is damped out by an “up-and-down” fluid motion. A numerical study has shown that, depending upon the droplet’s sulfur content, which is different from that in the base metal, an inward or outward surface flow of the weld pool may be created, leading to deep or shallow weld penetration. In other words, it is primarily the Marangoni effect that contributes to weld penetration in spot GMAW.

  6. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  7. High-power CW and long-pulse lasers in the green wavelength regime for copper welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricking, Sebastian; Huber, Rudolf; Klausmann, Konrad; Kaiser, Elke; Stolzenburg, Christian; Killi, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on industrial high-power lasers in the green wavelength regime. By means of a thin disk oscillator and a resonator-internal nonlinear crystal for second harmonic generation we are able to extract up to 8 kW pulse power in the few-millisecond range at a wavelength of 515 nm with a duty cycle of 10%. Careful shaping and stabilization of the polarization and spectral properties leads to a high optical-to-optical efficiency larger than 55%. The beam parameter product is designed and measured to be below 5 mm·mrad which allows the transport by a fiber with a 100 μm core diameter. The fiber and beam guidance optics are adapted to the green wavelength, enabling low transmission losses and stable operation. Application tests show that this laser is perfectly suited for copper welding due to the superior absorption of the green wavelength compared to IR, which allows us to produce weld spots with an unprecedented reproducibility in diameter and welding depth. With an optimized set of parameters we could achieve a splatter-free welding process of copper, which is crucial for welding electronic components. Furthermore, the surface condition does not influence the welding process when the green wavelength is used, which allows to skip any expensive preprocessing steps like tin-coating. With minor changes we could operate the laser in cw mode and achieved up to 1.7 kW of cw power at 515 nm with a beam parameter product of 2.5 mm·mrad. These parameters make the laser perfectly suitable for additional applications such as selective laser melting of copper.

  8. Effect of Electromagnetic Stirring on Weld Pools.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    Cminue an reverse sde If neceewer mE identity b block nmber) GTAW Electromagnetic Agitation Titanium Thermal Gradient 20. A RACT (Continue en revers... GTAW Gas Tungsten Arc Welding V Voltage iv -- ’ -’y - -’ e - a + . - - . - CONVERSION FACTORS 1 -1/sin - 2.12 cfh I J - 5 (9F - 32) 1 cm - 0.394 in...carefully controlled and monitored conditions. The set of welds made to determine the effect of stirring frequency on grain size employed automated GTAW

  9. Stability of Full Penetration, Flat Position Weld Pools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Coan, Al. B.

    1999-01-01

    The dynamics of the dropthrough distance of a full penetration, flat position weld pool is described. Close to incipient root side penetration the dropthrough is metastable, so that a small drop in power can cause a loss of penetration if not followed soon enough by a compensating rise in power. The SPA (Soft Plasma Arc) process with higher pressure on top of the weld pool loses penetration more quickly than the GTA (Gas Tungsten Arc) process. 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy with a lower surface tension loses penetration more quickly than 2219 aluminum alloy. An instance of loss of penetration of a SPA weld in 2195 aluminum-lithium alloy is discussed in the light of the model.

  10. Welding pool measurement using thermal array sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chia-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Chen; Chen, Hsin-Yi

    2015-08-01

    Selective laser melting (SLM) is an additive manufacturing (AM) technology that uses a high-power laser beam to melt metal powder in chamber of inert gas. The process starts by slicing the 3D CAD data as a digital information source into layers to create a 2D image of each layer. Melting pool was formed by using laser irradiation on metal powders which then solidified to consolidated structure. In a selective laser melting process, the variation of melt pool affects the yield of a printed three-dimensional product. For three dimensional parts, the border conditions of the conductive heat transport have a very large influence on the melt pool dimensions. Therefore, melting pool is an important behavior that affects the final quality of the 3D object. To meet the temperature and geometry of the melting pool for monitoring in additive manufacturing technology. In this paper, we proposed the temperature sensing system which is composed of infrared photodiode, high speed camera, band-pass filter, dichroic beam splitter and focus lens. Since the infrared photodiode and high speed camera look at the process through the 2D galvanometer scanner and f-theta lens, the temperature sensing system can be used to observe the melting pool at any time, regardless of the movement of the laser spot. In order to obtain a wide temperature detecting range, 500 °C to 2500 °C, the radiation from the melting pool to be measured is filtered into a plurality of radiation portions, and since the intensity ratio distribution of the radiation portions is calculated by using black-body radiation. The experimental result shows that the system is suitable for melting pool to measure temperature.

  11. Reflection of illumination laser from gas metal arc weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaoji; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2009-11-01

    The weld pool is the core of the welding process where complex welding phenomena originate. Skilled welders acquire their process feedback primarily from the weld pool. Observation and measurement of the three-dimensional weld pool surface thus play a fundamental role in understanding and future control of complex welding processes. To this end, a laser line is projected onto the weld pool surface in pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and an imaging plane is used to intercept its reflection from the weld pool surface. Resultant images of the reflected laser are analyzed and it is found that the weld pool surface in GMAW does specularly reflect the projected laser as in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Hence, the weld pool surface in GMAW is also specular and it is in principle possible that it may be observed and measured by projecting a laser pattern and then intercepting and imaging the reflection from it. Due to high frequencies of surface fluctuations, GMAW requires a relatively short time to image the reflected laser.

  12. Automatic Welding System of Aluminum Pipe by Monitoring Backside Image of Molten Pool Using Vision Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    An automatic welding system using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding with vision sensor for welding of aluminum pipe was constructed. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position and moving welding torch with the AC welding machine. The monitoring system consists of a vision sensor using a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Neural network model for welding speed control were constructed to perform the process automatically. From the experimental results it shows the effectiveness of the control system confirmed by good detection of molten pool and sound weld of experimental result.

  13. Detectability of penetration depth based on weld pool geometry and process emission spectrum in laser welding of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özmert, Alp; Neisser-Deiters, Paul; Drenker, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Laser welding is a promising joining process for copper interconnections. A key criterion of quality for these welds is the penetration depth. The penetration depth is subject to intrinsic variation, i.e. by the nature of the welding process. Online detection of penetration depth enables quality assurance and furthermore welding of joint configurations with tighter tolerances via closed-loop control. Weld pool geometry and keyhole optical emission in the wavelength interval of 400-1100 nm are investigated with regard to how suitable they are for the detection of penetration depth in laser welding of copper Cu-ETP. Different penetration depths were induced by stepwise modulation of laser power in bead-on-plate welds. The welds have been monitored with illuminated high-speed videography of the work piece surface and spectrometry. Increase of the weld pool length (in direction of travel) corresponding to increase in penetration depth has been observed while no noticeable change was observed of the weld pool width (transverse to the direction of travel). No significant lines were observed in the spectrum. The radiant power in VIS-spectrum was observed to increase with increasing penetration depth as well. As future work, with increasing understanding and experimental data, online monitoring by indirectly measuring the penetration depth would be possible. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no 260153 (QCOALA: Quality Control for Aluminium Laser-Welded Assemblies).

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction of specular surface for a gas tungsten arc weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong Sheng; Zhang, Yu Ming

    2007-12-01

    Observing the weld pool and measuring its geometrical parameters are key issues for developing the next generation intelligent welding machine and modeling the complex welding process. In the past few years, different techniques have been applied, but the dynamic specular weld pool surface and the strong weld arc complicate these approaches and make observation difficult. To resolve the problem, a new three-dimensional sensing system using structured light is proposed for a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. In the system, a dot-matrix laser pattern is projected on the specular weld pool surface, which can reflect light onto an imaging plane. The reflected images are captured by a high-speed camera and can successfully be processed by image processing algorithms developed. With the acquired information, a three-dimensional reconstruction scheme is proposed and discussed in this paper. A surface reconstruction method with several slope-based algorithms is first developed to rebuild the region of weld pool surface which reflects the laser pattern. Then a two-dimensional piecewise model is provided to calculate weld pool boundary by utilizing the edge condition. Finally the optimal estimate of the three-dimensional weld pool surface is synthesized. The acceptable accuracy of the results verified the effectiveness of the reconstruction scheme.

  15. Development and application of weld pool oscillation sensing for front-face penetration control of gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Barborak, D.; Yapp, D.

    1994-12-31

    Control of penetration in welding has received considerable attention from researchers over the last few years. Ideally, a penetration control system should be robust and reliable, capable of operating with a variety of materials over a wide range of welding parameters, require access only from the front face of the weld, and should not need extensive additional equipment in the vacinity of the welding torch. The system which at present seems to come closest to meeting these requirements is the generation and detection of oscillations in the weld pool. Weld pool oscillations were shown to be related to weld pool size more than 10 years ago and since then a number of researchers have utilized the pool oscillation phenomenon to monitor the state of penetration during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). The technique involves inducing oscillations in the weld pool by pulsing the welding current to a higher level for a few milliseconds. A series of experiments were conducted on stainless steel sheet from 0.015{emdash}0.120 in. thickness and two methods of detecting oscillations were compared. Arc voltage can be used to monitor oscillations which cause changes in arc length and hence in arc voltage. However, monitoring of arc light has been shown in this work to give better signal-to-noise ratios: the length of the plasma column changes as the pool oscillates and provides a sensitive technique to detect oscillations. Recent efforts at EWI have concentrated on the development of penetration control for practical applications. A computer control system has been developed which allows simultaneous monitoring of the voltage, light, and sound signals. possible mechanisms for changes in signal-to-noise ratio in the three detection systems are discussed.

  16. Pulsed Laser Propulsion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    afforded by a pulsed laser propulsion system over a CW laser propulsion system are 1) simplicity in engine design as a result of permitting the laser...to engineering and weight considerations. The lower boundary of the corridor is set by propellant feed considerations. To the right of this boundary...example, a OOJ -5 per pulse laser operating at 7 x 10 sec between pulses (14, 285 pps) is capable of powering a 30 lb (135 Nt)thrust rocket engine that has

  17. Driving Force Variation in Weld Pool Affected by Current Density and Flow Velocity of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Tadashi; Taki, Hiroyuki; Iwao, Toru; Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Yumoto, Motoshige

    In arc welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is suitable when good quality and a good surface are required. However, the weld shape is shallow and wide. Furthermore, GTAW welding is slow and inefficient. A deep weld shape is necessary to increase the welding speed. The heat input from the arc and convection flow of the weld pool in formation of weld pool are important. The convection flow varies along with the driving force. Past research has indicated some relation between the driving force and arc characteristics. In this study, the driving force in the weld pool changes with the current density. Flow velocity is simulated, and this relativity is elucidated. The Lorentz force, drag force, and Marangoni effect are focused in driving forces. Consequently, the Lorentz force of the axial direction decreases in direct relation to the -0.60th power of current density near the cathode in the maximum force. This force in the center of the axial direction decreases in relation to the -0.62th power of the current density. In addition, the drag force increases in relation to the 1.70th power of the maximum flow velocity, and the Marangoni effect decreases in direct relation to the -0.20th power of the maximum flow velocity in the maximum force. The driving force is apparently dependent on the arc current density and flow velocity.

  18. Analytical real-time measurement of a three-dimensional weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, WeiJie; Wang, XueWu; Zhang, YuMing

    2013-11-01

    The ability to observe and measure weld pool surfaces in real-time is the core of the foundation for next generation intelligent welding that can partially imitate skilled welders who observe the weld pool to acquire information on the welding process. This study aims at the real-time measurement of the specular three-dimensional (3D) weld pool surface under a strong arc in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). An innovative vision system is utilized in this study to project a dot-matrix laser pattern on the specular weld pool surface. Its reflection from the surface is intercepted at a distance from the arc by a diffuse plane. The intercepted laser dots illuminate this plane producing an image showing the reflection pattern. The deformation of this reflection pattern from the projected pattern (e.g. the dot matrix) is used to derive the 3D shape of the reflection surface, i.e., the weld pool surface. Based on careful analysis, the underlying reconstruction problem is formulated mathematically. An analytic solution is proposed to solve this formulated problem resulting in the weld pool surface being reconstructed on average in 3.04 ms during welding experiments. A vision-based monitoring system is thus established to measure the weld pool surface in GTAW in real-time. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed reconstruction algorithm, first numerical simulation is conducted. The proposed algorithm is then tested on a spherical convex mirror with a priori knowledge of its geometry. The detailed analysis of the measurement error validates the accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Results from the real-time experiments verify the robustness of the proposed reconstruction algorithm.

  19. Experimental characterization of the weld pool flow in a TIG configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadler, M.; Masquère, M.; Freton, P.; Franceries, X.; Gonzalez, J. J.

    2014-11-01

    Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process relies on heat transfer between plasma and work piece leading to a metallic weld pool. Combination of different forces produces movements on the molten pool surface. One of our aims is to determine the velocity on the weld pool surface. This provides a set of data that leads to a deeper comprehension of the flow behavior and allows us to validate numerical models used to study TIG parameters. In this paper, two diagnostic methods developed with high speed imaging for the determination of velocity of an AISI 304L stainless steel molten pool are presented. Application of the two methods to a metallic weld pool under helium with a current intensity of 100 A provides velocity values around 0.70 m/s which are in good agreement with literature works.

  20. Use of Aria to simulate laser weld pool dynamics for neutron generator production.

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, David R.; Notz, Patrick K.; Martinez, Mario J.; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-09-01

    This report documents the results for the FY07 ASC Integrated Codes Level 2 Milestone number 2354. The description for this milestone is, 'Demonstrate level set free surface tracking capabilities in ARIA to simulate the dynamics of the formation and time evolution of a weld pool in laser welding applications for neutron generator production'. The specialized boundary conditions and material properties for the laser welding application were implemented and verified by comparison with existing, two-dimensional applications. Analyses of stationary spot welds and traveling line welds were performed and the accuracy of the three-dimensional (3D) level set algorithm is assessed by comparison with 3D moving mesh calculations.

  1. Welding deviation detection algorithm based on extremum of molten pool image contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Yong; Jiang, Lipei; Li, Yunhua; Xue, Long; Huang, Junfen; Huang, Jiqiang

    2016-01-01

    The welding deviation detection is the basis of robotic tracking welding, but the on-line real-time measurement of welding deviation is still not well solved by the existing methods. There is plenty of information in the gas metal arc welding(GMAW) molten pool images that is very important for the control of welding seam tracking. The physical meaning for the curvature extremum of molten pool contour is revealed by researching the molten pool images, that is, the deviation information points of welding wire center and the molten tip center are the maxima and the local maxima of the contour curvature, and the horizontal welding deviation is the position difference of these two extremum points. A new method of weld deviation detection is presented, including the process of preprocessing molten pool images, extracting and segmenting the contours, obtaining the contour extremum points, and calculating the welding deviation, etc. Extracting the contours is the premise, segmenting the contour lines is the foundation, and obtaining the contour extremum points is the key. The contour images can be extracted with the method of discrete dyadic wavelet transform, which is divided into two sub contours including welding wire and molten tip separately. The curvature value of each point of the two sub contour lines is calculated based on the approximate curvature formula of multi-points for plane curve, and the two points of the curvature extremum are the characteristics needed for the welding deviation calculation. The results of the tests and analyses show that the maximum error of the obtained on-line welding deviation is 2 pixels(0.16 mm), and the algorithm is stable enough to meet the requirements of the pipeline in real-time control at a speed of less than 500 mm/min. The method can be applied to the on-line automatic welding deviation detection.

  2. Experimental measurement of thin plate SS 304 GTAW weld pool surface temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kraus, H.G.

    1987-01-01

    The optical spectral radiometric/laser reflectance method was used to noninvasively measure arc-side GTAW weld pool surface temperatures for 1.5 mm thick plate SS 304. Weld pool surface temperature isothermal contour and topology plots, as well as lengthwise centerline temperature profiles, were generated for welder currents of 38, 50, and 70 A; welder voltages of 7.5, 8.0 and 8.5 V, respectively; and welding speeds of 0.423, 1.270, and 2.540 mm/s (1, 3, and 6 in/min), respectively. Purpose of the work was to investigate the possibility of constitutional supercooling in the tail region of the weld pools. The peak weld pool temperatures in the range of 2000 to 2800/sup 0/K were often found to lead the electrode instead of lag it. These results were compared to those for experimental measurements of electron beam welds and predictions based on vaporization theory. Under most conditions, no two weld pools are alike and that the concept of quasi-steady-state pools does not represent reality. They are instead dynamically (stochastically) varying about mean value representative characteristics. No evidence of tail region constitutional supercooling was found.

  3. Weld pool surface depth measurement using a calibrated camera and structured light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, G.; Zhang, Y. M.

    2007-08-01

    Automated monitoring and control of the weld pool surface has been one of the goals of the welding industry. This paper presents a technique which uses a calibrated charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor and structured light to extract the surface information as depth of pool from captured images. It projects a laser line from a pre-determined position onto the specular weld pool surface. A reflected laser beam from the specular surface is captured by a calibrated CCD sensor to form the image. The image is then processed based on the ray-tracing technique to calculate the depth of the weld pool surface using the position of the laser and its fan angle along with the intrinsic parameters and extrinsic parameters of the CCD sensor.

  4. Determination of a temperature sensor location for monitoring weld pool size in GMAW

    SciTech Connect

    Boo, K.S.; Cho, H.S. . Dept. of Precision Engineering and Mechatronics)

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes a method of determining the optimal sensor location to measure weldment surface temperature, which has a close correlation with weld pool size in the gas metal arc (GMA) welding process. Due to the inherent complexity and nonlinearity in the GMA welding process, the relationship between the weldment surface temperature and the weld pool size varies with the point of measurement. This necessitates an optimal selection of the measurement point to minimize the process nonlinearity effect in estimating the weld pool size from the measured temperature. To determine the optimal sensor location on the top surface of the weldment, the correlation between the measured temperature and the weld pool size is analyzed. The analysis is done by calculating the correlation function, which is based upon an analytical temperature distribution model. To validate the optimal sensor location, a series of GMA bead-on-plate welds are performed on a medium-carbon steel under various welding conditions. A comparison study is given in detail based upon the simulation and experimental results.

  5. Gravitational effects on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding of 304 stainless steel and Al-4 wt% Cu alloy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Namhyun; Singh, Jogender; Kulkarni, Anil K

    2004-11-01

    Effects of gravitational acceleration were investigated on the weld pool shape and microstructural evolution for 304 stainless steel and Al-4wt% Cu alloy. Effects of welding heat source were investigated by using laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). As the gravitational level was increased from low gravity (LG approximately 1.2 g) to high gravity (HG approximately 1.8 g) using a NASA KC-135 aircraft, the weld pool shape for 304 stainless steel was influenced considerably during GTAW. However, insignificant change in the microstructure and solute distribution was observed at gravitational levels between LG and HG. The GTAW on Al-4 wt% Cu alloy was used to investigate the effect of gravitational orientation on the weld solidification behavior. Gravitational orientation was manipulated by varying the welding direction with respect to gravity vector; that is, by welding upward opposing gravity ( ||-U) and downward with gravity ( ||-D) on a vertical weld piece and welding perpendicular to gravity (perpendicular) on a horizontal weld piece. Under the same welding conditions, a larger primary dendrite spacing in the ||-U weld was observed near the weld pool surface and the fusion boundary than in the case of perpendicular or ||-D welds. The ||-D weld exhibited different solidification morphology and abnormal S shape of solidification rate curve during its growth. For 304 stainless steel GTAW, significant effects of gravitational orientation were observed on the weld pool shape that was associated with weld surface morphology and convection flow. However, the weld pool shape for LBW was mostly constant with respect to the gravitational orientation.

  6. Numerical study of arc plasmas and weld pools for GTAW with applied axial magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xianqing; Gou, Jianjun; Zhang, Jianxun; Sun, Jiangtao

    2012-07-01

    A 3D numerical model containing the welding arc and the weld pool for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with applied axial magnetic fields is established. The model is validated by comparing the calculated arc temperature with the measured ones. The influence of the magnetic field on the welding process is studied by changing the magnetic inductions, from 0 T to 0.06 T. For welding arcs, a radial spread is discovered, and a reverse flow appears over the anode. The distribution of temperature, heat flux, current density and pressure on the anode surface becomes double-peaked, while the voltage distributes in a double-valley type. For weld pools, the fluid flow cycle brings about a wide and shallow pool. In the circumferential direction, the fluid in the centre areas rotates in an opposite direction to that in the outer regions; in the axial direction, the fluid flows upwards at the centre while downwards in the edge area of the weld pool. All the driving forces including the surface tension, the shear stress from the arc plasma, the electromagnetic force and the buoyancy force that influence the fluid flow are analysed to explain these phenomena. The mechanism of how the applied axial magnetic field regulates the GTAW process is thus clarified.

  7. Influence of Adapted Wavelengths on Temperature Fields and Melt Pool Geometry in Laser Transmission Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkutow, A.; Frick, T.

    Laser transmission welding is an established joining technology for the creation of strong, hermetic and aesthetic weld seams between thermoplastic parts. However, weld seam properties are strongly dependent on the optical properties of the materials involved. This paper investigates the wavelength-dependent absorption properties of polymeric materials and carbon black, their influence on temperature field generation and the resulting melt pool geometry in laser transmission welding. A FE simulation model is developed to examine the possibilities of influencing the temperature fields during contour and quasi-simultaneous laser transmission welding by adapting the wavelengths under consideration of the absorption and scattering properties. The application of laser wavelengths in the spectral range of 1400 nm to 2000 nm leads to modified temperature fields and melt pool geometries, which are expected to feature a better load-bearing capacity and a much improved gap-bridging capability.

  8. A three-dimensional sharp interface model for self-consistent keyhole and weld pool dynamics in deep penetration laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Liliang; Zhou, Jianxin; Yin, Yajun; Chen, Tao

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional sharp interface model is proposed to investigate the self-consistent keyhole and weld pool dynamics in deep penetration laser welding. The coupling of three-dimensional heat transfer, fluid flow and keyhole free surface evolutions in the welding process is simulated. It is theoretically confirmed that under certain low heat input welding conditions deep penetration laser welding with a collapsing free keyhole could be obtained and the flow directions near the keyhole wall are upwards and approximately parallel to the keyhole wall. However, significantly different weld pool dynamics in a welding process with an unstable keyhole are numerically found. Many flow patterns in the welding process with an unstable keyhole, verified by x-ray transmission experiments, were successfully simulated and analysed. Periodical keyhole collapsing and bubble formation processes are also successfully simulated and believed to be in good agreement with experiments. The mechanisms of keyhole instability are found to be closely associated with the behaviour of humps on the keyhole wall, and it is found that the welding speed and surface tension are closely related to the formation of humps on the keyhole wall. It is also shown that the weld pool dynamics in laser welding with an unstable keyhole are closely associated with the transient keyhole instability and therefore modelling keyhole and weld pool in a self-consistent way is significant to understand the physics of laser welding.

  9. Effect of adhesive on molten pool structure and penetration in laser weld bonding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L. M.; Ren, D. X.

    2010-09-01

    Laser weld bonding (LWB) is a new hybrid technique that combines adhesive bonding with laser seam welding together, and can achieve higher joint strength than adhesive bonding or laser welding individually. Some new physical phenomena have been observed in this welding method, and the phenomena are different from the normal laser welding process, such as a remarkable deeper penetration in LWB than that in laser welding direct (LWD). The adhesive-induced gas can influence the molten pool structure in front of the keyhole, so that less energy is required for laser keyhole through the upper sheet; thus, higher laser power density can interact with the lower sheet, leading to deeper penetration. Simulation comparison experiments are set to indirectly verify these conclusions above.

  10. Nanofabrication with Pulsed Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser–matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics. PMID:20672069

  11. Nanofabrication with pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Kabashin, Av; Delaporte, Ph; Pereira, A; Grojo, D; Torres, R; Sarnet, Th; Sentis, M

    2010-02-24

    An overview of pulsed laser-assisted methods for nanofabrication, which are currently developed in our Institute (LP3), is presented. The methods compass a variety of possibilities for material nanostructuring offered by laser-matter interactions and imply either the nanostructuring of the laser-illuminated surface itself, as in cases of direct laser ablation or laser plasma-assisted treatment of semiconductors to form light-absorbing and light-emitting nano-architectures, as well as periodic nanoarrays, or laser-assisted production of nanoclusters and their controlled growth in gaseous or liquid medium to form nanostructured films or colloidal nanoparticles. Nanomaterials synthesized by laser-assisted methods have a variety of unique properties, not reproducible by any other route, and are of importance for photovoltaics, optoelectronics, biological sensing, imaging and therapeutics.

  12. Effect of laser beam offset on microstructure and mechanical properties of pulsed laser welded BTi-6431S/TA15 dissimilar titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Li, Dalong; Bu, Xianzheng

    2015-11-01

    Laser beam welding was used to weld dissimilar joints in BTi-6431S/TA15 titanium alloys. The effect of laser beam offset on microstructural characterizations and mechanical properties of the joints were investigated. Microstructural evolution of the joints was characterized by optical microscopy (OM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Tensile testing was conducted at room temperature and at 550 °C. The results demonstrated that with the exception of some porosity, a good quality joint could be achieved. Martensite α' and acicular α structures were present in the fusion zone (FZ). The amount of martensite α' present with the -0.2 mm beam offset was less than that with the 0.2 mm beam offset. Acicular α and martensite α' transformations occurred in the high temperature heat-affected zone (HT-HAZ) of both the BTi-6431S and TA15 alloys. In the low-temperature heat-affected zone (LT-HAZ), the BTi-6431S and TA15 alloy microstructures exhibited a mixture of secondary α, primary α, and prior β phases. The microhardness values in the FZ followed the order: -0.2 mm> 0 mm> 0.2 mm. Tensile testing at room temperature and at 550 °C resulted in fracture of the TA15 alloy base metal. The fracture morphology exhibited a ductile dimple feature.

  13. Monitoring of high-power fiber laser welding based on principal component analysis of a molten pool configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangdong, Gao; Qian, Wen

    2013-12-01

    There exists plenty of welding quality information on a molten pool during high-power fiber laser welding. An approach for monitoring the high-power fiber laser welding status based on the principal component analysis (PCA) of a molten pool configuration is investigated. An infrared-sensitive high-speed camera was used to capture the molten pool images during laser butt-joint welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates with a high-power (10 kW) continuous wave fiber laser. In order to study the relationship between the molten pool configuration and the welding status, a new method based on PCA is proposed to analyze the welding stability by comparing the situation when the laser beam spot moves along, and when it deviates from the weld seam. Image processing techniques were applied to process the molten pool images and extract five characteristic parameters. Moreover, the PCA method was used to extract a composite indicator which is the linear combination of the five original characteristics to analyze the different status during welding. Experimental results showed that the extracted composite indicator had a close relationship with the actual welding results and it could be used to evaluate the status of the high-power fiber laser welding, providing a theoretical basis for the monitoring of laser welding quality.

  14. Simulation of time-dependent pool shape during laser spot welding: Transient effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlen, Georg; Ludwig, Andreas; Sahm, Peter R.

    2003-12-01

    The shape and depth of the area molten during a welding process is of immense technical importance. This study investigates how the melt pool shape during laser welding is influenced by Marangoni convection and tries to establish general qualitative rules of melt pool dynamics. A parameter study shows how different welding powers lead to extremely different pool shapes. Special attention is paid to transient effects that occur during the melting process as well as after switching off the laser source. It is shown that the final pool shape can depend strongly on the welding duration. The authors use an axisymmetric two-dimensional (2-D) control-volume-method (CVM) code based on the volume-averaged two-phase model of alloy solidification by Ni and Beckermann[1] and the SIMPLER algorithm by Patankar.[2] They calculate the transient distribution of temperatures, phase fractions, flow velocities, pressures, and concentrations of alloying elements in the melt and two solid phases (peritectic solidification) for a stationary laser welding process. Marangoni flow is described using a semiempirical model for the temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. The software was parallelized using the shared memory standard OpenMP.

  15. 3D transient multiphase model for keyhole, vapor plume, and weld pool dynamics in laser welding including the ambient pressure effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shengyong; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Jianxin; Shao, Xinyu; Wang, Chunming

    2015-11-01

    The physical process of deep penetration laser welding involves complex, self-consistent multiphase keyhole, metallic vapor plume, and weld pool dynamics. Currently, efforts are still needed to understand these multiphase dynamics. In this paper, a novel 3D transient multiphase model capable of describing a self-consistent keyhole, metallic vapor plume in the keyhole, and weld pool dynamics in deep penetration fiber laser welding is proposed. Major physical factors of the welding process, such as recoil pressure, surface tension, Marangoni shear stress, Fresnel absorptions mechanisms, heat transfer, and fluid flow in weld pool, keyhole free surface evolutions and solid-liquid-vapor three phase transformations are coupling considered. The effect of ambient pressure in laser welding is rigorously treated using an improved recoil pressure model. The predicated weld bead dimensions, transient keyhole instability, weld pool dynamics, and vapor plume dynamics are compared with experimental and literature results, and good agreements are obtained. The predicted results are investigated by not considering the effects of the ambient pressure. It is found that by not considering the effects of ambient pressure, the average keyhole wall temperature is underestimated about 500 K; besides, the average speed of metallic vapor will be significantly overestimated. The ambient pressure is an essential physical factor for a comprehensive understanding the dynamics of deep penetration laser welding.

  16. Onset of the initial instability during the solidification of welding pool of aluminum alloy under transient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjian; Dong, Zhibo; Wei, Yanhong; Song, Kuijing

    2014-09-01

    Onset of initial morphological instability is predicted by using a new analytic model and quantitative phase field model during the solidification of the welding pool of Al-Cu alloy under transient conditions. In the linear growth stage of the welding pool, the dynamic evolution of the interface instability is analyzed, and the interface behaviors under infinitesimal fluctuations are also investigated. The results show that the mean wavelength at the crossover time evaluated from this analytic model is in good agreement with those obtained by the quantitative phase field simulations and the experiments. The linear growth stage takes up quite a long time of the whole solidification of welding pool and thus it should be primarily considered in investigating the transient growth of welding pool. This study establishes a valid numerical framework for studying the dendrite growth under transient solidification conditions and provides a new approach for studying the transient solidification of welding pool.

  17. Sensing of weld pool surface using non-transferred plasma charge sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Zhang, Y. M.; Emmerson, John

    2004-05-01

    Gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) is the primary process for precision joining of metals due to its capability for accurate control of heat input. As a close relative and modification of GTAW, plasma arc welding (PAW) has higher energy density and can penetrate thicker workpieces while maintaining the desired capability for accurate control of heat input. In order to produce quality welds consistently using PAW, in addition to accurate control of heat input, the sensing and control of the weld pool surface are also critical. It has been found that the non-transferred plasma arc, in the absence of the transferred arc or the main plasma arc for welding, can establish a plasma charge potential which is indicative of the arc length. In order to take good advantage of this intrinsic characteristic of the non-transferred arc and eliminate the influence of the transferred arc in a normal PAW process, a power module is used to cut off the main arc current periodically for a very short period of time to acquire accurate information for monitoring the weld pool surface. A non-transferred plasma charge sensor is proposed based on this mechanism and experiments verified its effectiveness.

  18. [Impact of introduction of O2 on the welding arc of gas pool coupled activating TIG].

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Wang, Yan-Lei; Zhang, Zhi-Guo

    2014-05-01

    In the present paper, Boltzmann plot method was applied to analyze the temperature distributions of the are plasma when the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding was at different coupling degrees with the outer gas being O2. Based on this study of temperature distributions, the changing regularities of are voltage and are appearance were studied. The result shows that compared with traditional TIG welding, the introduction of O2 makes the welding arc constricted slightly, the temperature of the are center build up, and the are voltage increase. When argon being the inner gas, oxygen serving as the outer gas instead of argon makes the are constricted more obviously. When the coupling degree increases from 0 to 2, the temperature of the are center and the are voltage both increase slightly. In the gas pool coupled activating TIG welding the are is constricted not obviously, and the reason why the weld penetration is improved dramatically in the welding of stainless steel is not are constriction.

  19. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  20. A stereo vision method for tracking particle flow on the weld pool surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, C. X.; Richardson, I. M.; Kenjeres, S.; Kleijn, C. R.; Saldi, Z.

    2009-06-01

    The oscillation of a weld pool surface makes the fluid flow motion quite complex. Two-dimensional results cannot reflect enough information to quantitatively describe the fluid flow in the weld pool; however, there are few direct three-dimensional results available. In this paper, we describe a three-dimensional reconstruction method to measure weld pool surface features based on a single high-speed camera. A stereo adapter was added in front of the high-speed camera lens to obtain two images in the same frame from different view points at the same time. According to machine vision theory, three-dimensional parameters can be reconstructed based on two such images. In this work, three-dimensional velocity fields have been obtained using this method. Based on the calibration technique employed, the associated error is estimated to be less than 11.4%. Quantitative experimental results are useful for understanding the flow pattern, and possibly for controlling the flow of liquid in the weld pool.

  1. Surface temperature distribution of GTA weld pools on thin-plate 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Kraus, H.G.

    1995-11-01

    A transient multidimensional computational model was utilized to study gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of thin-plate 304 stainless steel (SS). The model eliminates several of the earlier restrictive assumptions including temperature-independent thermal-physical properties. Consequently, all important thermal-physical properties were considered as temperature dependent throughout the range of temperatures experienced by the weld metal. The computational model was used to predict surface temperature distribution of the GTA weld pools in 1.5-mm-thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond with an earlier experimental study that produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. One of the motivations of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate excellent agreement, thereby verifying the model.

  2. Predicting the backside width of weld pool during pulsed GTAW process based on a neural network model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guangjun; Chen, Shanben; Liu, Xiaodong; Wu, Lin

    2001-10-01

    Modeling of welding process is the base of process control. Because welding process is a multivariable, strong coupling, time-varying and nonlinear system, traditional modeling methods are not suitable. In this paper, the dynamic neural network model for predicting backside width of pulsed GTAW weld pool by welding parameters and topside shape parameters was constructed. Orthogonal method was applied to design the sampling experiments. Experiments were carried on low carbon steel with 2mm thickness during pulsed gas tungsten arc butt-welding with gap. Based on self-developed vision sensor, double-side images of weld pool were captured simultaneously in a frame. By image processing the topside dimension and shape of weld pool, such as length, maximum width, gap width and the half-length ratio, and the backside dimension such as area, length and maximum width were calculated. Artificial neural network was applied to establish the model for predicting backside width of weld pool. The inputs of the model were the topside dimension, shape of weld pool and welding parameters such as pulse current, pulse duty ratio, and welding speed. The output of the model was the backside width of weld pool. The algorithm was the extended delta-bar-delta (EDD), and the learning ratio automatically determined by the algorithm. Threshold function was sigmoid function. The training cycle was selected to be 50000. The final EMS error of backside width was 5.2 percent. The simulation experiments were carried out to test the accuracy of the ANN model. From the results of the test, the output of ANN model can predict the backside width precisely.

  3. Theoretical analysis of weld pool behavior in the pulsed current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.L. ); Hou, C.A. )

    1988-02-01

    A general three-dimensional, closed-form welding heat-flow solution, which is capable of analyzing thermal behavior of the weldment in its transient state and/or under time-dependent power change during welding, is presented. The analytical model utilizes the finite heat source theory with a Gaussian distribution and also considers the effects of finite plate thickness. The numerical values of the solution are calculated using the computational schemes on a minicomputer. In this paper the welding parameters of the pulsed current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) were studied using the solution. Two sets of pulsation parameters were analyzed and their sensitivity to the heat input control were evaluated.

  4. Gravitational effects on the GTA weld pool size of a pure metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domey, Jeffrey John

    Understanding the physical phenomena involved in the welding process is of substantial value to improving the weldability of materials. The nature of arc welding restricts direct observation during the welding process to surface phenomena, and physical observation of the weld is limited to solidified welds. Thus, accurate computational simulations are needed to provide a better understanding of the transient phenomena that are present during the welding process. One of the major factors affecting the motion within the molten weld pool is the gravity-driven buoyancy force. This force opposes the electromagnetic force induced flow for the straight polarity (direct-current electrode negative) GTA weld. The buoyancy force can also act to oppose or enhance the Marangoni convective flow within the weld pool depending on the sign of the surface tension temperature coefficient. An extensive study involving both numerical as well as physical experiments of the GTA welding process covering a variety of gravitational fields has been performed. Numerical experiments, utilizing the WELDER code, were conducted for stationary GTA welds onto an aluminum alloy. It was found that at a g-level of 0.1g, the convective flow was dominated by the electromagnetic force, while at higher g-levels, 1.0g and 2.0g, the convective flow was dominated by the buoyancy force. It was also found that the depth-to-width (d/w) ratio decreased as the g-level increased for 0.1g to 2.0g. Numerical experiments were also performed in the 1.0g to 10.0g range for stationary GTA welds onto commercially pure nickel. It was found that the electro-magnetic force dominated all of the simulations, although as the g-level increased, the buoyancy force increased causing a decrease in the depth of the fusion zone. This decrease in depth caused a decrease in the d/w ratio of the fusion zone as the g-level increased. Physical experiments for GTA welding of commercially pure nickel in the high-g range (up to 10.0g) were

  5. Study on removal of phase lines in welding pool surface shape sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yiqing; Liu, Nansheng; Hu, Xian; Ai, Xiaopu; Wei, Sheng; Liu, Xiaorui

    2009-11-01

    In recent years, arc welding pool surface shape sensing becomes a hot spot in the field of welding automation. In order to restore the pool surface shape, we first need to photograph the pool surface, and then extract useful information from the acquired images. In arc welding surface shape sensing system based on structured light projection, the raster images obtained by charge-coupled device (CCD) are seriously affected by strong arc and spatter, etc. resulting in errors of phase unwrapping, and thus seriously affecting the surface shape recovery. To address phase lines of unwrapping errors, this paper presents a two-neighborhood method. First we analyzed the characteristics of phase lines in the phase diagram, then by comparison of phase diagrams or phase difference diagrams processed before and after, the effectiveness of two-neighborhood method was confirmed, finally this method was applied to the actual pool phase diagram processing, experimental results also confirmed this two-neighborhood method is feasible in removal of phase lines.

  6. On the calculation of the free surface temperature of gas-tungsten-arc weld pools from first principles; Part 1. Modeling the welding arc

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, R.T.C. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science); Szekely, J.; Westhoff, R.C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-06-01

    In this paper a mathematical formulation is developed and computed results are presented describing the temperature profiles in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) arcs and, hence, the net heat flux from the welding arc to the weld pool. The formulation consists of the statement of Maxwell's equations, coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations and the differential thermal energy balance equation. The theoretical predictions for the heat flux to the workpiece are in good agreement with experimental measurements-for long arcs. The results of this work provide a fundamental basis for predicting the behavior of arc welding systems from first principles.

  7. Investigation of Weld Pool Structure and Property Control in Pulsed Arc Welding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-04

    Ripple Formation in 12 Pulsed-Current GTAW PART II - Heat-Flow Simulation of Pulsed Current Gas 45 Tungsten Arc Welding PART III - Grain Structure and Hot...Cracking in Pulsed 74 Current GTAW of AISI 321 Stainless Steel .]~ S~~ust if lar l _ .Distribution/ .Availabilitv Codes Ava ~1jnd/or D; Special r R&D...Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Ptir: III - G(rain Structure and Hot Cracking in Pulsed Cur-i * GTAW of AISI 321 Stainless Steel A coinplt’te

  8. Effect of Convection on Weld Pool Shape and Microstructure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    as tracers to provide contrast. Microfocus x - ray is used to produce a focused x - ray beam. This x - ray beam is directed through the test section. An...119 Figure 3.4.2 Schematic Diagram of the Experimental Set Up - X - ray Shadow Graph .......................... 120 Figure 3.4.3 Mlcrograph of the Cross...section of the Laser Melted Pool, Laser Power = 8.0 kW, Beam Radius = 0.5 mm, Scanning Speed = 50 mm/sec ..... 121 Figure 3.4.4 X - ray Shadow Graph of

  9. Ultra-fast in-situ X-ray studies of evolving columnar dendrites in solidifying steel weld pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirihanage, W. U.; Di Michiel, M.; Mathiesen, R. H.

    2015-06-01

    High-brilliance polychromatic synchrotron radiation has been used to conduct in-situ studies of the solidification microstructure evolution during simulated welding. The welding simulations were realized by rapidly fusing ∼ 5 mm spot in Fe-Cr-Ni steel. During the solid- liquid-solid phase transformations, a section of the weld pool was placed in an incident 50-150 keV polychromatic synchrotron X-ray beam, in a near-horizontal position at a very low inclination angle. Multiple high-resolution 2D detectors with very high frame rates were utilized to capture time resolved X-ray diffraction data from suitably oriented solid dendrites evolving in the weld pool. Comprehensive analysis of the diffraction data revealed individual and overall dendritic growth characteristics and relevant melt and solid flow dynamics during weld pool solidification, which was completed within 1.5 s. Columnar dendrite tip velocities were estimated from the experimental data and during early stages of solidification were exceeded 4 mm/s. The most remarkable observation revealed through the time-resolved reciprocal space observations are correlated to significant tilting of columnar type dendrites at their root during solidification, presumably caused by convective currents in the weld pool. When the columnar dendrite tilting are transformed to respective metric linear tilting velocities at the dendrite tip; tilting velocities are found to be in the same order of magnitude as the columnar tip growth velocities, suggesting a highly transient nature of growth conditions.

  10. Gravitational effects on the development of weld-pool and solidification microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.; Workman, G.

    1994-09-01

    This research effort has as its objective the development of a quantitative understanding of the effects of both low- and high-g environments on the solidification microstructures and morphologies that are produced in alloy single crystals during a variety of melting and solidification processes. The overall goal of the effort is to delineate the nature of the roles played by natural convection, surface-tension-driven convection, and mass transport effects due to interactions associated with various heating methods that are used to form melt pools in practical, commercially important alloy systems. The experimental and theoretical investigations comprising this effort encompass the study of configurations in which stationary heat sources are employed as well as melt pools formed by moving heat sources like those frequently used in fusion-welding processes.

  11. Laser-induced plasma as a source for an intensive current to produce electromagnetic forces in the weld pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosy, Günter; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Berger, Peter; Hügel, Helmuth

    2007-05-01

    Laser beam welding performed with a CO II laser by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the welding direction influences the weld pool dynamics, which changes the seam properties significantly. From these results it was concluded that an intensive current density must exist in the melt. In repeating those welding experiments with a Nd:YAG laser, however, no significant effects could be observed. To explain this discrepancy, detailed trials with both CO II and Nd:YAG lasers were carried out and led to an explanation which is presented in this paper. Looking at the welding process with radiation of 10.6 μm and 1.06 μm, the only significant difference is the presence of a laser-induced plasma plume above the workpiece in the case of the longer wavelength. Therefore, the investigations were concentrated on its possible role in establishing a current flow through the weld pool. This current was directly measured during the welding process (bead on plate): Two aluminum plates separated by an insulated gap of 0.85 mm were moved under the focused beam (3 kW; 5 m/min) and the signal was recorded as function of the gap's position. From these measurements were deduced values of current that amounted to approximately 0.3 A with CO II and more then one order of magnitude less with Nd:YAG lasers.

  12. Plasma-weld pool interaction in tungsten inert-gas configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougenot, J.; Gonzalez, J.-J.; Freton, P.; Masquère, M.

    2013-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) transient model of a transferred argon arc in interaction with an anode material is presented and the results discussed. The model based on a finite volume method is developed using the open software @Saturne distributed by Electricité de France. The 3D model includes the characterization of the plasma gas and of the work piece with a current continuity resolution in the whole domain. Transport and thermodynamic properties are dependent on the local temperature and on the vapours emitted by the eroded material due to the heat flux transferred by the plasma. Drag force, Marangoni force, Laplace and gravity forces are taken into account on the weld pool description. The plasma and the weld pool characteristics are presented and compared with experimental and theoretical results from the literature. For a distance between the two electrodes of d = 5 mm and an applied current intensity of I = 200 A, the vapour concentration is weak. The influence of the parameters used in the Marangoni formulation is highlighted. Finally, in agreement with some authors, we show with this global transient 3D model that it is not necessary to include the voltage drop in the energy balance.

  13. Pulsed laser beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Cason, C.M.; Jones, R.W.

    1982-07-13

    A pulsed laser beam intensity monitor measures the peak power within a selectable cross section of a test laser beam and measures integrated energy of the beam during the pulse period of a test laser. A continuous wave laser and a pulsed ruby laser are coaxially arranged for simultaneously transmitting optical output energy through a crystal flat during the time a test laser pulse is transmitted through the flat. Due to stress birefringence in the crystal, the ruby laser pulse transmitted through the flat is recorded and analyzed to provide peak power information about the test laser output pulse, and the continuous wave laser output reflected from the crystal flat provides a measurement of energy during the test laser pulse.

  14. Analysis of Picosecond Pulsed Laser Melted Graphite

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Steinbeck, J.; Braunstein, G.; Speck, J.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Huang, C. Y.; Malvezzi, A. M.; Bloembergen, N.

    1986-12-01

    A Raman microprobe and high resolution TEM have been used to analyze the resolidified region of liquid carbon generated by picosecond pulse laser radiation. From the relative intensities of the zone center Raman-allowed mode for graphite at 1582 cm{sup -1} and the disorder-induced mode at 1360 cm{sup -1}, the average graphite crystallite size in the resolidified region is determined as a function of position. By comparison with Rutherford backscattering spectra and Raman spectra from nanosecond pulsed laser melting experiments, the disorder depth for picosecond pulsed laser melted graphite is determined as a function of irradiating energy density. Comparisons of TEM micrographs for nanosecond and picosecond pulsed laser melting experiments show that the structure of the laser disordered regions in graphite are similar and exhibit similar behavior with increasing laser pulse fluence.

  15. Pulsed laser nitriding of uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yongbin; Meng, Daqiao; Xu, Qinying; Zhang, Youshou

    2010-02-01

    Pulsed laser nitriding offers several advantages such as high nitrogen concentration, low matrix temperature, fast treatment, simple vacuum chamber and precise position control compare to ion implantation, which is favorable for radioactive material passivation. In this work, uranium metal was nitrided using an excimer laser for the first time. The nitrided layers are characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The nitride layer is composed mainly of UN and U 2N 3 and depends on nitriding process. The amount of nitride increases with energy density and pressure. The irradiated area has a wavy structure which increases the roughness, while scratches and asperities caused by sand paper polishing were eliminated. Scan speed has a profound influence on the nitride layer, at low speed U 2N 3 is more likely to form and the nitride layer tends to crack. XPS analysis shows that nitrogen has diffused into interior, while oxygen is only present on the surface. Ambient and humid-hot corrosion tests show the nitrided sample has good anticorrosion property.

  16. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  17. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  18. X-Ray and Optical Videography for 3D Measurement of Capillary and Melt Pool Geometry in Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boley, M.; Abt, F.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.

    This paper describes a method to reconstruct the 3D shape of the melt pool and the capillary of a laser keyhole welding process. Three different diagnostic methods, including X-Ray and optical videography as well as metallographic cross sections are combined to gain the three dimensional data of the solidus-liquidus-surface. A detailed description of the experimental setup and a discussion of different methods to combine the 2D data sets of the three different diagnostic methods to a 3D-model will be given. The result will be a static 3D description of the welding process.

  19. Towards and FVE-FAC Method for Determining Thermocapillary Effects on Weld Pool Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, David; Henson, Van Emden

    1996-01-01

    Several practical materials processes, e.g., welding, float-zone purification, and Czochralski crystal growth, involve a pool of molten metal with a free surface, with strong temperature gradients along the surface. In some cases, the resulting thermocapillary flow is vigorous enough to convect heat toward the edges of the pool, increasing the driving force in a sort of positive feedback. In this work we examine this mechanism and its effect on the solid-liquid interface through a model problem: a half space of pure substance with concentrated axisymmetric surface heating, where surface tension is strong enough to keep the liquid free surface flat. The numerical method proposed for this problem utilizes a finite volume element (FVE) discretization in cylindrical coordinates. Because of the axisymmetric nature of the model problem, the control volumes used are torroidal prisms, formed by taking a polygonal cross-section in the (r, z) plane and sweeping it completely around the z-axis. Conservation of energy (in the solid), and conservation of energy, momentum, and mass (in the liquid) are enforced globally by integrating these quantities and enforcing conservation over each control volume. Judicious application of the Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem, combined with a Crank-Nicolson time-stepping scheme leads to an implicit algebraic system to be solved at each time step. It is known that near the boundary of the pool, that is, near the solid-liquid interface, the full conduction-convection solution will require extremely fine length scales to resolve the physical behavior of the system. Furthermore, this boundary moves as a function of time. Accordingly, we develop the foundation of an adaptive refinement scheme based on the principles of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid methods (FAC). Implementation of the method and numerical results will appear in a later report.

  20. Towards and FVE-FAC Method for Determining Thermocapillary Effects on Weld Pool Shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canright, David; Henson, Van Emden

    1996-01-01

    Several practical materials processes, e.g., welding, float-zone purification, and Czochralski crystal growth, involve a pool of molten metal with a free surface, with strong temperature gradients along the surface. In some cases, the resulting thermocapillary flow is vigorous enough to convect heat toward the edges of the pool, increasing the driving force in a sort of positive feedback. In this work we examine this mechanism and its effect on the solid-liquid interface through a model problem: a half space of pure substance with concentrated axisymmetric surface heating, where surface tension is strong enough to keep the liquid free surface flat. The numerical method proposed for this problem utilizes a finite volume element (FVE) discretization in cylindrical coordinates. Because of the axisymmetric nature of the model problem, the control volumes used are torroidal prisms, formed by taking a polygonal cross-section in the (r, z) plane and sweeping it completely around the z-axis. Conservation of energy (in the solid), and conservation of energy, momentum, and mass (in the liquid) are enforced globally by integrating these quantities and enforcing conservation over each control volume. Judicious application of the Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem, combined with a Crank-Nicolson time-stepping scheme leads to an implicit algebraic system to be solved at each time step. It is known that near the boundary of the pool, that is, near the solid-liquid interface, the full conduction-convection solution will require extremely fine length scales to resolve the physical behavior of the system. Furthermore, this boundary moves as a function of time. Accordingly, we develop the foundation of an adaptive refinement scheme based on the principles of Fast Adaptive Composite Grid methods (FAC). Implementation of the method and numerical results will appear in a later report.

  1. Pulsed Laser Cladding of Ni Based Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascu, A.; Stanciu, E. M.; Croitoru, C.; Roata, I. C.; Tierean, M. H.

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the operational parameters and quality of one step Metco Inconel 718 atomized powder laser cladded tracks, deposited on AISI 316 stainless steel substrate by means of a 1064 nm high power pulsed laser, together with a Precitec cladding head manipulated by a CLOOS 7 axes robot. The optimization of parameters and cladding quality has been assessed through Taguchi interaction matrix and graphical output. The study demonstrates that very good cladded layers with low dilution and increased mechanical proprieties could be fabricated using low laser energy density by involving a pulsed laser.

  2. Ultrashort-pulsed laser microstructuring of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirk, Michael D.; Molian, Pal; Wang, Cai; Ho, Kai M.; Malshe, Ajay P.

    2000-11-01

    Precision microfabrication of diamond has many applications in the fields of microelectronics and cutting tools. In this work, and ultra-short pulsed Ti: Sapphire laser was used to perform patterning, hold drilling, and scribing of synthetic and CVD diamonds. Scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, profilometry, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to characterize the microstructures. A tight-binding molecular dynamics (TBMD) model was used to investigate atomic movements during ablation and predict thresholds for ablation. The ultra- short pulsed laser generated holes and grooves that were nearly perfect with smooth edges, little collateral thermal damage and recast layer. The most exciting observation was the absence of graphite residue that always occurs in the longer-pulsed laser machining. The ablation threshold for ultra-short pulsed laser was two orders of magnitude lower than that of longer-pulsed laser. Finite-difference thermal modeling showed that ultra-short pulses raised the electron temperatures of diamond in excess of 100,ooo K due to multiphoton absorption, absence of hydrodynamic motion, and lack of time for energy transfer from electrons to the lattice during the pulse duration. TBMD simulations, carried out on (111) and (100) diamond surfaces, revealed that ultra-short pulses peel carbon atoms layer-by -layer from the surface, leaving a smooth surface after ablation. However, longer pulses cause thermal melting resulting in graphite residue that anchors to the diamond surface following ablation.

  3. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  4. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  5. Optimization of hybrid laser - TIG welding of 316LN steel using response surface methodology (RSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragavendran, M.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Ravikumar, R.; Saxena, Rajesh; Vasudevan, M.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    In the present study, the hybrid laser - TIG welding parameters for welding of 316LN austenitic stainless steel have been investigated by combining a pulsed laser beam with a TIG welding heat source at the weld pool. Laser power, pulse frequency, pulse duration, TIG current were presumed as the welding process parameters whereas weld bead width, weld cross-sectional area and depth of penetration (DOP) were considered as the process responses. Central composite design was used to complete the design matrix and welding experiments were conducted based on the design matrix. Weld bead measurements were then carried out to generate the dataset. Multiple regression models correlating the process parameters with the responses have been developed. The accuracy of the models were found to be good. Then, the desirability approach optimization technique was employed for determining the optimum process parameters to obtain the desired weld bead profile. Validation experiments were then carried out from the determined optimum process parameters. There was good agreement between the predicted and measured values.

  6. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  7. Laser Spot Welding of Copper-aluminum Joints Using a Pulsed Dual Wavelength Laser at 532 and 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stritt, Peter; Hagenlocher, Christian; Kizler, Christine; Weber, Rudolf; Rüttimann, Christoph; Graf, Thomas

    A modulated pulsed laser source emitting green and infrared laser light is used to join the dissimilar metals copper and aluminum. The resultant dynamic welding process is analyzed using the back reflected laser light and high speed video observations of the interaction zone. Different pulse shapes are applied to influence the melt pool dynamics and thereby the forming grain structure and intermetallic phases. The results of high-speed images and back-reflections prove that a modulation of the pulse shape is transferred to oscillations of the melt pool at the applied frequency. The outcome of the melt pool oscillation is shown by the metallurgically prepared cross-section, which indicates different solidification lines and grain shapes. An energy-dispersivex-ray analysis shows the mixture and the resultant distribution of the two metals, copper and aluminum, within the spot weld. It can be seen that the mixture is homogenized the observed melt pool oscillations.

  8. Pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) with long-duration pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-07-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulse laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers with a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulse laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulse laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We investigate the effect of pulse laser assistance with changing pulse duration of the laser. We report optimum pulse duration of 100 ns to 200 ns deduced from motion analysis of a particle in a beam spot. Our goal is to realize in-vivo manipulation and operation of a cell. For this purpose we need to reduce light energy of pulse laser beam and to avoid laser induced breakdown caused by strong light field. So we have developed a pulse laser with 160-ns pulse duration and have confirmed that availability on manipulation of living cells.

  9. Molten Pool Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Pulsed Current Double-Sided Synchronization GTA Welded Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wei; Wang, Kehong; Feng, Yuehai; Chen, Jiahe

    2017-02-01

    Double-sided synchronization vertical gas tungsten arc welding (DSSVW) procedure was used to weld high-nitrogen low-nickel stainless steel Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N without groove and filler wire. First, the molten pool behaviors and appearances of pulsed current DSSVW (PC-DSSVW) and constant current DSSVW (CC-DSSVW) were comparatively analyzed. The periodic variation occurs in the width of both the anode region of the arc and the molten pool tail during PC-DSSVW, while the contact angle first increases and then decreases, and both the width of the anode region and the length of arc plume increase progressively in CC-DSSVW. It is found that the weld appearance of PC-DSSVW is superior to that of CC-DSSVW. Second, the forces of the DSSVW molten pool were analyzed. The result indicates that the molten pool of the DSSVW procedure is in a state of unstable equilibrium, and it will easily lose balance after being disturbed, resulting in the asymmetrical weld or hump bead. Third, the PC-DSSVW experiments at various welding speeds were conducted to study the influence of welding speed on the weld profile, microstructure, tensile strength and impact toughness. Furthermore, the solidification mode of Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N was predicted to help determine the microstructure of the welded joint. Results indicate that the weld width, weld reinforcement and melting area all increase with decreasing welding speed, and Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N solidifies as A mode. The microstructure of the base metal (BM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) is equiaxed austenite and that of the fusion zone (FZ) is austenite dendrite with some chromium carbides dispersed in the grain boundary; with decreasing welding speed, grains become coarse. The maximum tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of PC-DSSVW joint are 860 MPa and 8.1%, and the elongation decreases dramatically with decreasing welding speed. The impact toughness decreases substantially compared to the BM, achieving 48.2% of the BM.

  10. Molten Pool Behavior and Mechanical Properties of Pulsed Current Double-Sided Synchronization GTA Welded Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wei; Wang, Kehong; Feng, Yuehai; Chen, Jiahe

    2016-12-01

    Double-sided synchronization vertical gas tungsten arc welding (DSSVW) procedure was used to weld high-nitrogen low-nickel stainless steel Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N without groove and filler wire. First, the molten pool behaviors and appearances of pulsed current DSSVW (PC-DSSVW) and constant current DSSVW (CC-DSSVW) were comparatively analyzed. The periodic variation occurs in the width of both the anode region of the arc and the molten pool tail during PC-DSSVW, while the contact angle first increases and then decreases, and both the width of the anode region and the length of arc plume increase progressively in CC-DSSVW. It is found that the weld appearance of PC-DSSVW is superior to that of CC-DSSVW. Second, the forces of the DSSVW molten pool were analyzed. The result indicates that the molten pool of the DSSVW procedure is in a state of unstable equilibrium, and it will easily lose balance after being disturbed, resulting in the asymmetrical weld or hump bead. Third, the PC-DSSVW experiments at various welding speeds were conducted to study the influence of welding speed on the weld profile, microstructure, tensile strength and impact toughness. Furthermore, the solidification mode of Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N was predicted to help determine the microstructure of the welded joint. Results indicate that the weld width, weld reinforcement and melting area all increase with decreasing welding speed, and Fe-18Cr-17Mn-Ni-N solidifies as A mode. The microstructure of the base metal (BM) and heat-affected zone (HAZ) is equiaxed austenite and that of the fusion zone (FZ) is austenite dendrite with some chromium carbides dispersed in the grain boundary; with decreasing welding speed, grains become coarse. The maximum tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of PC-DSSVW joint are 860 MPa and 8.1%, and the elongation decreases dramatically with decreasing welding speed. The impact toughness decreases substantially compared to the BM, achieving 48.2% of the BM.

  11. Effects of temperature-dependent material properties and shielding gas on molten pool formation during continuous laser welding of AZ91 magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannour, Sana; Abderrazak, Kamel; Mhiri, Hatem; Le Palec, Georges

    2012-11-01

    Laser welding processes are widely used for fabrications in many engineering applications such as aerospace and automotives. In this paper, a moving distributed heat source model based on Goldak's method [1] has been implemented into finite volume thermal simulations in order to predict temperature distributions during the welding process of a magnesium alloy and to study the effects of variations in thermal properties, absorption coefficient and gas shielding on the computed temperature distributions and weld pool dimensions. The main conclusion is the significant effects of varying the thermal conductivity and absorption coefficient of magnesium. Also, it has been seen that the shielding gas, besides its main role of protection against oxidation, has a significant effect on the width of the weld pool. Finally, the obtained results have been compared to the experimental ones and a satisfactory correlation has been observed, indicating the reliability of the model developed in this study.

  12. Modeling Pulsed Laser Melting of Embedded Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, Carolyn Anne

    A model of pulsed laser melting of embedded nanoparticles is introduced. Pulsed laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in nanoparticles; this model enables a better understanding of the influence of PLM on the size distribution of nanoparticles, which is crucial for studying or using their size-dependent properties. The model includes laser absorption according to the Mie theory, a full heat transport model, and rate equations for nucleation, growth, coarsening, and melting and freezing of nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix. The effects of varying the laser parameters and sample properties are studied, as well as combining PLM and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) processing steps on the same sample. A general theory for achieving narrow size distributions of nanoparticles is presented, and widths as narrow as 12% are achieved using PLM and RTA.

  13. RF synchronized short pulse laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Fuwa, Yasuhiro Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Tongu, Hiromu; Inoue, Shunsuke; Hashida, Masaki; Sakabe, Shuji; Okamura, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi

    2016-02-15

    A laser ion source that produces shortly bunched ion beam is proposed. In this ion source, ions are extracted immediately after the generation of laser plasma by an ultra-short pulse laser before its diffusion. The ions can be injected into radio frequency (RF) accelerating bucket of a subsequent accelerator. As a proof-of-principle experiment of the ion source, a RF resonator is prepared and H{sub 2} gas was ionized by a short pulse laser in the RF electric field in the resonator. As a result, bunched ions with 1.2 mA peak current and 5 ns pulse length were observed at the exit of RF resonator by a probe.

  14. Compact pulsed laser having improved heat conductance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A highly efficient, compact pulsed laser having high energy to weight and volume ratios is provided. The laser utilizes a cavity reflector that operates as a heat sink and is essentially characterized by having a high heat conductivity, by being a good electrical insulator and by being substantially immune to the deleterious effects of ultra-violet radiation. Manual portability is accomplished by eliminating entirely any need for a conventional circulating fluid cooling system.

  15. Magnetron Sputtered Pulsed Laser Deposition Scale Up

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-08-14

    2:721-726 34 S. J. P. Laube and E. F. Stark, “ Artificial Intellegence in Process Control of Pulsed Laser Deposition”, Proceedings of...The model would be based on mathematical simulation of real process data, neural-networks, or other artificial intelligence methods based on in situ...Laube and E. F. Stark, Proc. Symp. Artificial Intel. Real Time Control, Valencia, Spain, 3-5 Oct. ,1994, p.159-163. International Federation of

  16. Ultrashort pulsed laser technology development program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manke, Gerald C.

    2014-10-01

    The Department of Navy has been pursuing a technology development program for advanced, all-fiber, Ultra Short Pulsed Laser (USPL) systems via Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs. Multiple topics have been published to promote and fund research that encompasses every critical component of a standard USPL system and enable the demonstration of mJ/pulse class systems with an all fiber architecture. This presentation will summarize published topics and funded programs.

  17. Low-Temperature Sensitization Behavior of Base, Heat-Affected Zone, and Weld Pool in AISI 304LN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Raghuvir; Das, Gautam; Singh, P. K.; Chattoraj, I.

    2009-05-01

    Present investigations were focused on low-temperature sensitization (LTS) behavior of 304LN stainless steels considered from pipes of two different thicknesses. The specimens for the present study were taken from solution-annealed pipes (of varying thicknesses) and welded pipes (including the heat-affected zone (HAZ)). The specimens were subjected to thermal aging at 400 °C and 450 °C for different durations ranging from 125 to 8000 hours, to evaluate their sensitization susceptibility. The aging durations were worked out to simulate the 30-to-100-year life of the studied stainless steel at 300 °C using the Arrheneous equation and considering the activation energy of 150 kJ/mol. The thermally aged specimens were characterized for their degree of sensitization (DOS) and susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) by double-loop (DL) electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) and by methods given in the ASTM A262 practices A and E. It has been clearly shown that the weld pool is more sensitive to IGC than are the base and the HAZ at both the aging temperatures (LTS), because they showed IGC cracks during the bending subsequent to the boiling in H2SO4-CuSO4 solution. Both the base and the HAZ of the thicker pipe material showed susceptibility to sensitization, as indicated by the increasing DOS and “dual-type” microstructure during electrolytic oxalic acid (EOA) etching; however, they were found safe from IGC for the studied sensitization times. The susceptibility to sensitization and IGC in the weld pool is related to the presence of copious delta ferrite with chromium diffusivity that is accelerated compared to the austenite phase. The time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) curves were prepared accordingly, based on these results.

  18. Welding and lung cancer in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Van Gelder, Rainer; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Consonni, Dario; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Marcus, Michael; Fabianova, Eleonora; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boffetta, Paolo; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-11-15

    Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.

  19. Welding and Lung Cancer in a Pooled Analysis of Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Siemiatycki, Jack; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Peters, Susan; Van Gelder, Rainer; Olsson, Ann; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Tardón, Adonina; Merletti, Franco; Mirabelli, Dario; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Consonni, Dario; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Gustavsson, Per; Marcus, Michael; Fabianova, Eleonora; ‘t Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-sun; Rudnai, Peter; Bencko, Vladimir; Janout, Vladimir; Mates, Dana; Foretova, Lenka; Forastiere, Francesco; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boffetta, Paolo; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Several epidemiologic studies have indicated an increased risk of lung cancer among welders. We used the SYNERGY project database to assess welding as a risk factor for developing lung cancer. The database includes data on 15,483 male lung cancer cases and 18,388 male controls from 16 studies in Europe, Canada, China, and New Zealand conducted between 1985 and 2010. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals between regular or occasional welding and lung cancer were estimated, with adjustment for smoking, age, study center, and employment in other occupations associated with lung cancer risk. Overall, 568 cases and 427 controls had ever worked as welders and had an odds ratio of developing lung cancer of 1.44 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 1.67) with the odds ratio increasing for longer duration of welding. In never and light smokers, the odds ratio was 1.96 (95% confidence interval: 1.37, 2.79). The odds ratios were somewhat higher for squamous and small cell lung cancers than for adenocarcinoma. Another 1,994 cases and 1,930 controls had ever worked in occupations with occasional welding. Work in any of these occupations was associated with some elevation of risk, though not as much as observed in regular welders. Our findings lend further support to the hypothesis that welding is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. PMID:24052544

  20. Investigation on the Mechanism and Failure Mode of Laser Transmission Spot Welding Using PMMA Material for the Automotive Industry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Liu, Baoguang; Liu, Wei; Zhong, Xuejiao; Jiang, Yingjie; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the need of polymer connection in lightweight automobiles, a study on laser transmission spot welding using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is conducted by using an Nd:YAG pulse laser. The influence of three variables, namely peak voltages, defocusing distances and the welding type (type I (pulse frequency and the duration is 25 Hz, 0.6 s) and type II (pulse frequency and the duration is 5 Hz, 3 s)) to the welding quality was investigated. The result showed that, in the case of the same peak voltages and defocusing distances, the number of bubbles for type I was obviously more than type II. The failure mode of type I was the base plate fracture along the solder joint, and the connection strength of type I was greater than type II. The weld pool diameter:depth ratio for type I was significantly greater than type II. It could be seen that there was a certain relationship between the weld pool diameter:depth ratio and the welding strength. By the finite element simulation, the weld pool for type I was more slender than type II, which was approximately the same as the experimental results.

  1. Investigation on the Mechanism and Failure Mode of Laser Transmission Spot Welding Using PMMA Material for the Automotive Industry

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Liu, Baoguang; Liu, Wei; Zhong, Xuejiao; Jiang, Yingjie; Liu, Huixia

    2017-01-01

    To satisfy the need of polymer connection in lightweight automobiles, a study on laser transmission spot welding using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is conducted by using an Nd:YAG pulse laser. The influence of three variables, namely peak voltages, defocusing distances and the welding type (type I (pulse frequency and the duration is 25 Hz, 0.6 s) and type II (pulse frequency and the duration is 5 Hz, 3 s)) to the welding quality was investigated. The result showed that, in the case of the same peak voltages and defocusing distances, the number of bubbles for type I was obviously more than type II. The failure mode of type I was the base plate fracture along the solder joint, and the connection strength of type I was greater than type II. The weld pool diameter:depth ratio for type I was significantly greater than type II. It could be seen that there was a certain relationship between the weld pool diameter:depth ratio and the welding strength. By the finite element simulation, the weld pool for type I was more slender than type II, which was approximately the same as the experimental results. PMID:28772383

  2. Pulsed laser deposition: Prospects for commercial deposition of epitaxial films

    SciTech Connect

    Muenchausen, R.E.

    1999-03-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique for the deposition of thin films. The vapor source is induced by the flash evaporation that occurs when a laser pulse of sufficient intensity (about 100 MW/cm{sup 2}) is absorbed by a target. In this paper the author briefly defines pulsed laser deposition, current applications, research directed at gaining a better understanding of the pulsed laser deposition process, and suggests some future directions to enable commercial applications.

  3. Pulsed laser irradiation of metal multilayers.

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, David Price; McDonald, Joel Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Vapor-deposited, exothermic metal-metal multilayer foils are an ideal class of materials for detailed investigations of pulsed laser-ignited chemical reactions. Created in a pristine vacuum environment by sputter deposition, these high purity materials have well-defined reactant layer thicknesses between 1 and 1000 nm, minimal void density and intimate contact between layers. Provided that layer thicknesses are made small, some reactive metal-metal multilayer foils can be ignited at a point by laser irradiation and exhibit subsequent high-temperature, self-propagating synthesis. With this presentation, we describe the pulsed laser-induced ignition characteristics of a single multilayer system (equiatomic Al/Pt) that exhibits self-propagating synthesis. We show that the thresholds for ignition are dependent on (i) multilayer design and (ii) laser pulse duration. With regard to multilayer design effects on ignition, there is a large range of multilayer periodicity over which ignition threshold decreases as layer thicknesses are made small. We attribute this trend of decreased ignition threshold to reduced mass transport diffusion lengths required for rapid exothermic mixing. With regard to pulse duration effects, we have determined how ignition threshold of a single Al/Pt multilayer varies with pulse duration from 10{sup -2} to {approx} 10{sup -13} sec (wavelength and spot size are held constant). A higher laser fluence is required for ignition when using a single laser pulse {approx} 100 fs or 1 ps compared with nanosecond or microsecond exposure, and we attribute this, in part, to the effects of reactive material being ablated when using the shorter pulse durations. To further understand these trends and other pulsed laser-based processes, our discussion concludes with an analysis of the heat-affected depths in multilayers as a function of pulse duration.

  4. Nonequilibrium Interlayer Transport in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Tischler, Jonathan Zachary; Eres, Gyula; Larson, Ben C; Rouleau, Christopher M; Zschack, P.; Lowndes, Douglas H

    2006-01-01

    We use time-resolved surface x-ray diffraction measurements with microsecond range resolution to study the growth kinetics of pulsed laser deposited SrTiO3. Time-dependent surface coverages corresponding to single laser shots were determined directly from crystal truncation rod intensity transients. Analysis of surface coverage evolution shows that extremely fast nonequilibrium interlayer transport, which occurs concurrently with the arrival of the laser plume, dominates the deposition process. A much smaller fraction of material, which is governed by the dwell time between successive laser shots, is transferred by slow, thermally driven interlayer transport processes.

  5. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-01

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition—invention or discovery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, T.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of pulsed laser deposition had been an exciting process of invention and discovery, with the development of high Tc superconducting films as the main driver. It has become the method of choice in research and development for rapid prototyping of multicomponent inorganic materials for preparing a variety of thin films, heterostructures and atomically sharp interfaces, and has become an indispensable tool for advancing oxide electronics. In this paper I will give a personal account of the invention and development of this process at Bellcore/Rutgers, the opportunity, challenges and mostly the extraordinary excitement that was generated, typical of any disruptive technology.

  7. Nanosecond pulsed laser blackening of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guang; Hourd, Andrew C.; Abdolvand, Amin

    2012-12-01

    Nanosecond (12 ns) pulsed laser processing of copper at 532 nm resulted in the formation of homogenously distributed, highly organized microstructures. This led to the fabrication of large area black copper substrates with absorbance of over 97% in the spectral range from 250 nm to 750 nm, and a broadband absorbance of over 80% between 750 nm and 2500 nm. Optical and chemical analyses of the fabricated black metal are presented and discussed. The employed laser is an industrially adaptable source and the presented technique for fabrication of black copper could find applications in broadband thermal radiation sources, solar energy absorbers, irradiative heat transfer devices, and thermophotovoltaics.

  8. Chemically-Assisted Pulsed Laser-Ramjet

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kaneko, Tomoki; Tamada, Kazunobu

    2010-10-13

    A preliminary study of a chemically-assisted pulsed laser-ramjet was conducted, in which chemical propellant such as a gaseous hydrogen/air mixture was utilized and detonated with a focused laser beam in order to obtain a higher impulse compared to the case only using lasers. CFD analysis of internal conical-nozzle flows and experimental measurements including impulse measurement were conducted to evaluate effects of chemical reaction on thrust performance improvement. From the results, a significant improvement in the thrust performances was confirmed with addition of a small amount of hydrogen to propellant air, or in chemically-augmented operation.

  9. Quantifying pulsed laser induced damage to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Marc; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Robinson, Jeremy; Anderson, Travis; Chun, Hayden; Tadjer, Marko

    2011-11-21

    As an emerging optical material, graphene's ultrafast dynamics are often probed using pulsed lasers yet the region in which optical damage takes place is largely uncharted. Here, femtosecond laser pulses induced localized damage in single-layer graphene on sapphire. Raman spatial mapping, SEM, and AFM microscopy quantified the damage. The resulting size of the damaged area has a linear correlation with the optical fluence. These results demonstrate local modification of sp{sup 2}-carbon bonding structures with optical pulse fluences as low as 14 mJ/cm{sup 2}, an order-of-magnitude lower than measured and theoretical ablation thresholds.

  10. Alloying element losses in pulsed Nd : YAG laser welding of stainless steel 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandaghi, M.; Parvin, P.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2008-12-01

    Experimental studies of pulsed laser welding of stainless steel 316 in keyhole mode were done to examine a vaporization model based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. Undesirable loss of volatile elements affects the weld metal composition and properties. The profile of the keyhole was simulated as a function of time from a 'hydrodynamic' physical model. The power density and pulse duration were the main investigated variables. The model predicts that loss of alloying elements increases at higher peak powers and longer pulse durations. Accordingly, the concentrations of iron, chromium, nickel and manganese were determined in the weld pool by means of the proton-induced x-ray emission and energy dispersive x-ray/wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis. It was shown that the composition alteration, predicted by the model due to varying laser parameters, accords well with the corresponding experimental data.

  11. Reshaping, Fragmentation, and Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles Assisted by Pulse Lasers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    tool for the controlled welding of plasmonic gold nanostructures by electromagnetic field enhancement at the hot spots of assembled Au NPs. The combination of such nanostructures with pulse lasers promises significant chemical and biochemical advances, including the structural determination of organic reaction intermediates, the investigation of phase transitions in inorganic nanomaterials at mild reaction conditions, or the efficient photothermal destruction of cancer cells avoiding damage of surrounding tissue. PMID:27035211

  12. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  13. Pulsed Laser Illumination of Photovoltaic Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland; Jenkins, Philip; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. The induction FEL and the radio-frequency (RF) FEL both produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work, we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format, producing 50 ps pulses at a frequency of 78 MHz. A variety of Si, GaAs, CaSb and CdInSe2 (CIS) solar cells are tested at average incident powers between 4 mW/sq cm and 425 mW/sq cm. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced by using a pulsed laser source compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. Because the pulse separation is less than or approximately equal to the minority carrier lifetime, the illumination conditions are effectively those of a continuous wave laser. The time dependence of the voltage and current response of the cells are also measured using a sampling oscilloscope equipped with a high frequency voltage probe and current transformer. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments shows that the RF FEL pulse format yields much more efficient photovoltaic conversion of light than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  14. Pulsed laser deposition vs. matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation for growth of biodegradable polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercado, A. L.; Allmond, C. E.; Hoekstra, J. G.; Fitz-Gerald, J. M.

    2005-08-01

    Thin films of poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), a biodegradable polymer, were deposited on Si wafers by both conventional pulsed laser deposition (PLD) and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) using chloroform (CHCl3) as a matrix solvent. This research represents an initial study to investigate the deposition characteristics of each technique at comparable conditions to gain insight into the transport and degradation mechanisms of each approach. The deposited materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) with refractive index (RI) detection. While FTIR and NMR results do not show a measurable departure from the native, in sharp contrast GPC results show a significant change (up to 95%) in molecular weight for both deposition methods. This result makes it clear that it is possible to overlook substantial degradation when incomplete chemical analysis is conducted.

  15. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-05

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  16. Pulsed laser radiation therapy of skin tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, A.P.; Moskalik, K.G.

    1980-11-15

    Radiation from a neodymium laser was used to treat 846 patients with 687 precancerous lesions or benign tumors of the skin, 516 cutaneous carcinomas, 33 recurrences of cancer, 51 melanomas, and 508 metastatic melanomas in the skin. The patients have been followed for three months to 6.5 years. No relapses have been observed during this period. Metastases to regional lymph nodes were found in five patients with skin melanoma. Pulsed laser radiation may be successfully used in the treatment of precancerous lesions and benign tumors as well as for skin carcinoma and its recurrences, and for skin melanoma. Laser radiation is more effective in the treatment of tumors inaccessible to radiation therapy and better in those cases in which surgery may have a bad cosmetic or even mutilating effect. Laser beams can be employed in conjunction with chemo- or immunotherapy.

  17. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  18. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1994-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic array receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL provide FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL pulse format.

  19. Pulsed laser illumination of photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yater, Jane A.; Lowe, Roland A.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    In future space missions, free electron lasers (FEL) may be used to illuminate photovoltaic receivers to provide remote power. Both the radio-frequency (RF) and induction FEL produce pulsed rather than continuous output. In this work we investigate cell response to pulsed laser light which simulates the RF FEL format. The results indicate that if the pulse repetition is high, cell efficiencies are only slightly reduced compared to constant illumination at the same wavelength. The frequency response of the cells is weak, with both voltage and current outputs essentially dc in nature. Comparison with previous experiments indicates that the RF FEL pulse format yields more efficient photovoltaic conversion than does an induction FEL format.

  20. Enhanced Photoacoustic Beam Profiling of Pulsed Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, M.; Santiago, G.; Paz, M.; Slezak, V.; Peuriot, A.

    2013-09-01

    An improved version of a photoacoustic beam profiler of pulsed lasers is presented. The new model resorts to high-bandwidth condenser microphones to register higher-order, excited acoustic modes, thus enabling more accurate profiling. In addition, Xe was used as a buffer gas since its high atomic weight further reduces the eigenfrequencies. Furthermore, a new gas-handling system makes up for some deficiencies found in the first model. The system was calibrated using the Airy pattern generated with a pinhole illuminated by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser that excited traces. Once calibrated, the beam profile of a TEA laser was obtained, using ethylene as the absorbing species. This profiler returns more accurate profiles than thermal paper.

  1. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  2. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  3. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  4. 25 years of pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Michael; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    It is our pleasure to introduce this special issue appearing on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is today one of the most versatile growth techniques for oxide thin films and nanostructures. Ever since its invention, PLD has revolutionized the research on advanced functional oxides due to its ability to yield high-quality thin films, multilayers and heterostructures of a variety of multi-element material systems with rather simple technical means. We appreciate that the use of lasers to deposit films via ablation (now termed PLD) has been known since the 1960s after the invention of the first ruby laser. However, in the first two decades, PLD was something of a 'sleeping beauty' with only a few publications per year, as shown below. This state of hibernation ended abruptly with the advent of high T c superconductor research when scientists needed to grow high-quality thin films of multi-component high T c oxide systems. When most of the conventional growth techniques failed, the invention of PLD by T (Venky) Venkatesan clearly demonstrated that the newly discovered high-T c superconductor, YBa2Cu3O7-δ , could be stoichiometrically deposited as a high-quality nm-thin film with PLD [1]. As a remarkable highlight of this special issue, Venkatesan gives us his very personal reminiscence on these particularly innovative years of PLD beginning in 1986 [2]. After Venky's first paper [1], the importance of this invention was realized worldwide and the number of publications on PLD increased exponentially, as shown in figure 1. Figure 1. Figure 1. Published items per year with title or topic PLD. Data from Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge in September 2013. After publication of Venky's famous paper in 1987 [1], the story of PLD's success began with a sudden jump in the number of publications, about 25 years ago. A first PLD textbook covering its basic understanding was soon published, in 1994, by Chrisey and Hubler [3]. Within a

  5. Analysis of melt ejection during long pulsed laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting-Zhong, Zhang; Zhi-Chao, Jia; Hai-Chao, Cui; De-Hua, Zhu; Xiao-Wu, Ni; Jian, Lu

    2016-05-01

    In pulsed laser drilling, melt ejection greatly influences the keyhole shape and its quality as well, but its mechanism has not been well understood. In this paper, numerical simulation and experimental investigations based on 304 stainless steel and aluminum targets are performed to study the effects of material parameters on melt ejection. The numerical method is employed to predict the temperatures, velocity fields in the solid, liquid, and vapour front, and melt pool dynamics of targets as well. The experimental methods include the shadow-graphic technique, weight method, and optical microscope imaging, which are applied to real-time observations of melt ejection phenomena, measurements of collected melt and changes of target mass, observations of surface morphology and the cross-section of the keyhole, respectively. Numerical and experimental results show that the metallic material with high thermal diffusivity like aluminum is prone to have a thick liquid zone and a large quantity of melt ejection. Additionally, to the best of our knowledge, the liquid zone is used to illustrate the relations between melt ejection and material thermal diffusivity for the first time. The research result in this paper is useful for manufacturing optimization and quality control in laser-material interaction. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX_0341) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405147).

  6. Mathematical modelling of convective processes in a weld pool under electric arc surfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarychev, V. D.; Granovskii, A. Yu; Nevskii, S. A.; Konovalov, S. V.

    2017-01-01

    The authors develop the mathematical model of convective processes in a molten pool under electric arc surfacing with flux-cored wire. The model is based on the ideas of how convective flows appear due to temperature gradient and action of electromagnetic forces. Influence of alloying elements in the molten metal was modeled as a non-linear dependence of surface tension upon temperature. Surface tension and its temperature coefficient were calculated according to the electron density functional method with consideration to asymmetric electron distribution at the interface “molten metal / shielding gas”. Simultaneous solution of Navier-Stokes and Maxwell equations according to finite elements method with consideration to the moving heat source at the interface showed that there is a multi-vortex structure in the molten metal. This structure gives rise to a downward heat flux which, at the stage of heating, moves from the centre of the pool and stirs it full width. At the cooling stage this flux moves towards the centre of the pool and a single vortex is formed near the symmetry centre. This flux penetration is ∼ 10 mm. Formation of the downward heat flux is determined by sign reversal of the temperature coefficient of surface tension due to the presence of alloying elements.

  7. Alloying elemental change of SS-316 and Al-5754 during laser welding using real time laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) accompanied by EDX and PIXE microanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jandaghi, M.; Parvin, P.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    Experimental studies of pulsed laser welding of stainless steel 316 in keyhole mode was done to examine a vaporization model based on the kinetic theory of gases and the thermodynamic laws. A long pulsed Nd:YAG laser with variable duration of 1-12 ms and 9-17 Gw/cm2 was employed. The undesirable loss of volatile elements affects on the weld metal compositions and the alloy properties. The model predicts that the loss of alloying elements strongly takes place at higher peak powers and longer pulse durations. On the other hand, the model shows the rapid migration of Mn and Cr based on the pressure and concentration gradients from the molten pool. Accordingly, the concentrations of iron, chromium, nickel and manganese were determined in the weld pool by means of the energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) and proton induced X ray characteristics (PIXE) microanalysis. The change of weld metal composition of aluminium alloy 5754 in keyhole mode laser welding, was investigated using the model and was supported by the successive measurements. The model predicts that the concentration of magnesium in the weld metal decreases, while the aluminium concentration increases. Moreover, the real time concentrations of aluminium and magnesium elements in the weld metal were determined by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) at different conditions. We conclude that variation of the Al to Mg concentration ratio is negligible with various laser power densities while it is strongly correlated to the pulse duration.

  8. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  9. Short-pulse laser interactions with disordered materials and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, L.M.; Goldman, C.H.; Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    High-power, short-pulse lasers in the picosecond and subpicosecond range are utilized in an increasing number of technologies, including materials processing and diagnostics, micro-electronics and devices, and medicine. In these applications, the short-pulse radiation interacts with a wide range of media encompassing disordered materials and liquids. Examples of disordered materials include porous media, polymers, organic tissues, and amorphous forms of silicon, silicon nitride, and silicon dioxide. In order to accurately model, efficiently control, and optimize short-pulse, laser-material interactions, a thorough understanding of the energy transport mechanisms is necessary. Thus, fractals and percolation theory are used to analyze the anomalous diffusion regime in random media. In liquids, the thermal aspects of saturable and multiphoton absorption are examined. Finally, a novel application of short-pulse laser radiation to reduce surface adhesion forces in microstructures through short-pulse laser-induced water desorption is presented.

  10. Pulsed laser fluorometry for environmental monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, G. C.; Martin, J. C.; Jett, J. H.; Wilder, M. E.; Martinez, A.; Bentley, B. F.; Lopez, J.; Hutson, L.

    1990-01-01

    A compact pulsed laser fluorometer has been incorporated into a continuous flow system developed to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors and/or primary amine compounds in air and water. A pulsed nitrogen laser pumped dye laser excites fluorescent reactants which flow continuously through a quartz flow cell. Data are collected, analyzed, and displayed using a Macintosh II personal computer. For detection of cholinesterase inhibitors the fluorogenic substrate N methylindoxyl acetate is used to monitor the activity of immobilized enzyme. Presence of inhibitors results in a decrease of steady state fluorescence. Detection of compounds containing primary amines is based on their reaction with fluorescamine to rapidly produce intensely fluorescent products. Compounds of interest to our research were amino acids, peptides, and proteins. An increase in steady state fluorescence could be cause to evaluate the reasons for the change. The detection limit of the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) in water is 10 ppT. Nebulized BSA concentrated by the LANL air sampler can be detected at sub ppT original air concentration. 16 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of pepsin thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecskeméti, G.; Kresz, N.; Smausz, T.; Hopp, B.; Nógrádi, A.

    2005-07-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of organic and biological thin films has been extensively studied due to its importance in medical applications among others. Our investigations and results on PLD of a digestion catalyzing enzyme, pepsin, are presented. Targets pressed from pepsin powder were ablated with pulses of an ArF excimer laser ( λ = 193 nm, FWHM = 30 ns), the applied fluence was varied between 0.24 and 5.1 J/cm 2. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 2.7 × 10 -3 Pa. The thin layers were deposited onto glass and KBr substrates. Our IR spectroscopic measurements proved that the chemical composition of deposited thin films is similar to that of the target material deposited at 0.5 and 1.3 J/cm 2. The protein digesting capacity of the transferred pepsin was tested by adapting a modified "protein cube" method. Dissolution of the ovalbumin sections proved that the deposited layers consisted of catalytically active pepsin.

  12. Pulsed laser deposition of ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Somnath; McKnight, Steven H.; Sengupta, Louise C.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that in bulk ceramic form, the barium to strontium ratio in barium strontium titanium oxide (Ba1- xSrxTiO3, BSTO) affects the voltage tunability and electronic dissipation factor in an inverse fashion; increasing the strontium content reduces the dissipation factor at the expense of lower voltage tunability. However, the oxide composites of BSTO developed at the Army Research Laboratory still maintain low electronic loss factors for all compositions examined. The intent of this study is to determine whether such effects can be observed in the thin film form of the oxide composites. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method has been used to deposit the thin films. The different compositions of the compound (with 1 wt% of the oxide additive) chosen were: Ba0.3Sr0.7TiO3, Ba0.4Sr0.6TiO3, Ba0.5Sr0.5TiO3, Ba0.6Sr0.4TiO3, and Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3. The electronic properties investigated in this study were the dielectric constant and the voltage tunability. The morphology of the thin films were examined using the atomic force microscopy. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was also utilized for optical characterization of the thin films. The electronic and optical properties of the thin films and the bulk ceramics were compared. The results of these investigations are discussed.

  13. Nanosecond pulsed laser texturing of optical diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alqurashi, Tawfiq; Sabouri, Aydin; Yetisen, Ali K.; Butt, Haider

    2017-02-01

    High-quality optical glass diffusers have applications in aerospace, displays, imaging systems, medical devices, and optical sensors. The development of rapid and accurate fabrication techniques is highly desirable for their production. Here, a micropatterning method for the fast fabrication of optical diffusers by means of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation is demonstrated (λ=1064 nm, power=7.02, 9.36 and 11.7 W and scanning speed=200 and 800 mm s-1). The experiments were carried out by point-to-point texturing of a glass surface in spiral shape. The laser machining parameters, the number of pulses and their power had significant effect on surface features. The optical characteristics of the diffusers were characterized at different scattering angles. The features of the microscale structures influenced average roughness from 0.8 μm to 1.97 μm. The glass diffusers scattered light at angles up to 20° and their transmission efficiency were measured up to ˜97% across the visible spectrum. The produced optical devices diffuse light less but do so with less scattering and energy losses as compared to opal diffusing glass. The presented fabrication method can be applied to any other transparent material to create optical diffusers. It is anticipated that the optical diffusers presented in this work will have applications in the production of LED spotlights and imaging devices.

  14. Hemocompatible, pulsed laser deposited coatings on polymers.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Roman; Major, Boguslaw; Bruckert, Franz

    2010-02-01

    State-of-the-art non-thrombogenic blood contacting surfaces are based on heparin and struggle with the problem of bleeding. However, appropriate blood flow characteristics are essential for clinical application. Thus, there is increasing demand to develop new coating materials for improved human body acceptance. Materials deposited by vacuum coating techniques would be an excellent alternative if the coating temperatures can be kept low because of the applied substrate materials of low temperature resistance (polymers). Most of the recently used plasma-based deposition techniques cannot fulfill this demand. However, adequate film structure and high adhesion can be reached by the pulsed laser deposition at room temperature, which was developed to an industrial-scaled process at Laser Center Leoben. Here, this process is described in detail and the resulting structural film properties are shown for titanium, titanium nitride, titanium carbonitride, and diamond-like carbon on polyurethane, titanium and silicon substrates. Additionally, we present the biological response of blood cells and the kinetic mechanism of eukaryote cell attachment. In conclusion, high biological acceptance and distinct differences for the critical delamination shear stress were found for the coatings, indicating higher adhesion at higher carbon contents.

  15. Short-pulse Laser Processing of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Rudolf; Freitag, Christian; Kononenko, Taras V.; Hafner, Margit; Onuseit, Volkher; Berger, Peter; Graf, Thomas

    Short-pulse lasers allow processing of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) with very high quality, i.e. showing thermal damage in the range of only a few micrometers. Due to the usually high intensities and the short interaction times of such short pulses, only a small fraction of the incident laser energy is converted to residual heat which does not contribute to the ablation process. However, if the next pulse arrives before the material had time to cool down, i.e. this residual thermal energy did not sufficiently flow out of the interaction region, it encounters material which is still hot. This remaining energy and temperature is summing up during the sequence of pulses and is commonly referred to as "heat accumulation". Thermal damage in addition to the damage created by the process itself is induced, if the resulting temperature sum exceeds the damage temperatures of either the fibre or the plastic. The current paper presents the influence of the laser parameters such as pulse energy and repetition rate on this heat accumulation. An analytical model was used to describe the heat accumulation for different laser parameters. It describes the heat accumulation process and allows estimating the maximum number of pulses allowed at the same place before a detrimental temperature increase occurs.

  16. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: Scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, D.; Jansen, M.; Fuente, G. F. de la

    2012-04-15

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 deg. C.

  17. A new pulsed laser deposition technique: scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition method.

    PubMed

    Fischer, D; de la Fuente, G F; Jansen, M

    2012-04-01

    The scanning multi-component pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method realizes uniform depositions of desired coatings by a modified pulsed laser deposition process, preferably with a femto-second laser-system. Multi-component coatings (single or multilayered) are thus deposited onto substrates via laser induced ablation of segmented targets. This is achieved via horizontal line-scanning of a focused laser beam over a uniformly moving target's surface. This process allows to deposit the desired composition of the coating simultaneously, starting from the different segments of the target and adjusting the scan line as a function of target geometry. The sequence and thickness of multilayers can easily be adjusted by target architecture and motion, enabling inter/intra layer concentration gradients and thus functional gradient coatings. This new, simple PLD method enables the achievement of uniform, large-area coatings. Case studies were performed with segmented targets containing aluminum, titanium, and niobium. Under the laser irradiation conditions applied, all three metals were uniformly ablated. The elemental composition within the rough coatings obtained was fixed by the scanned area to Ti-Al-Nb = 1:1:1. Crystalline aluminum, titanium, and niobium were found to coexist side by side at room temperature within the substrate, without alloy formation up to 600 °C.

  18. Hydroxyapatite thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition and matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation: Comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu-Pelin, G.; Sima, F.; Sima, L. E.; Mihailescu, C. N.; Luculescu, C.; Iordache, I.; Socol, M.; Socol, G.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2017-10-01

    Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) techniques were applied for growing hydroxyapatite (HA) thin films on titanium substrates. All experiments were conducted in a reaction chamber using a KrF* excimer laser source (λ = 248 nm, τFWHM ≈ 25 ns). Half of the samples were post-deposition thermally treated at 500 °C in a flux of water vapours in order to restore crystallinity and improve adherence. Coating surface morphologies and topographies specific to the deposition method were evidenced by scanning electron, atomic force microscopy investigations and profilometry. They were shown to depend on deposition technique and also on the post-deposition treatment. Crystalline structure of the coatings evaluated by X-ray diffraction was improved after thermal treatment. Biocompatibility of coatings, cellular adhesion, proliferation and differentiation tests were conducted using human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Results showed that annealed MAPLE deposited HA coatings were supporting MSCs proliferation, while annealed PLD obtained films were stimulating osteogenic differentiation.

  19. Penetration in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The size and shape of the weld bead produced in GTA welding depends on the magnitude and distribution of the energy incident on the workpiece surfaces as well as the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece. The input energy is largely controllable through the welding parameters selected, however the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece is less subject to control. Changes in energy dissipation can produce large changes in weld shape or penetration. Heat transport away from the weld pool is almost entirely by conduction, but heat transport in the weld pool is more complicated. Heat conduction through the liquid is an important component, but heat transport by convection (mass transport) is often the dominant mechanism. Convective heat transport is directional and changes the weld pool shape from that produced by conduction alone. Surface tension gradients are often the dominant forces driving fluid flow in GTA weld pools. These gradients are sensitive functions of weld pool chemistry and the energy input distribution to the weld. Experimental and theoretical work conducted primarily in the past decade has greatly enhanced our understanding of weld pool fluid flow, the forces which drive it, and its effects on weld pool shape. This work is reviewed here. While less common, changes in energy dissipation through the unmelted portion of the workpiece can also affect fusion zone shape or penetration. These effects are also described. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Gallium Arsenide.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, Valerie Jean

    Recent applications of pulsed laser deposition to the growth of various types of thin films suggest that it may be successfully used for III-V semiconductors. The goal of this work is to characterize the growth of GaAs using PLD and to determine the scope of the technique for this material. Therefore, laser ablation of GaAs is characterized here using spectroscopic analysis of the optical emission lines from the laser plasma plume. Additionally, the influence of growth conditions on GaAs films grown on a range of substrates is examined. In-situ analysis of the GaAs plume revealed that atomic, rather than molecular, arsenic is a major constituent of the GaAs plume. This may explain why no arsenic overpressure was needed to grow stoichiometric material. Nonlinear behavior of Ga emission intensity with laser power density indicated that several ablation mechanisms may be at work. EDAX studies indicate that deposited material is stoichiometric. Single crystal GaAs was grown on GaAs, Si and InP using PLD. A deposition rate of 0.65 mu m/hr was obtained. Defects consisting of dislocations, twinning and stacking faults were observed. An increase in laser power density decreased the minimum temperature for good film growth. Films were smooth overall, but suffered from an occasional inclusion of macroparticulates. Methods for screening particles were examined. The optimum growth temperature for GaAs/GaAs growth was 470^circC, but good films could be obtained as low as 335^circ C. GaAs/Si underwent a transition from a (110) oriented film to single crystal (100) film at 470 ^circC. Photoluminescence was obtained for the GaAs/GaAs and GaAs/InP systems. Well oriented films of GaAs (110) on an amorphous substrate (fused silica) were obtained for the first time using PLD at temperatures as low as 288^ circC. The effects of deposition temperature, deposition time, background gas, annealing, MOCVD overlayer and shadow masking were examined.

  1. High speed sampling circuit design for pulse laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Rui-hai; Gao, Xuan-yi; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Guo, Xiao-kang; He, Shi-jie

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, with the rapid development of digital chip, high speed sampling rate analog to digital conversion chip can be used to sample narrow laser pulse echo. Moreover, high speed processor is widely applied to achieve digital laser echo signal processing algorithm. The development of digital chip greatly improved the laser ranging detection accuracy. High speed sampling and processing circuit used in the laser ranging detection system has gradually been a research hotspot. In this paper, a pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system is studied based on the high speed sampling. This circuit consists of two parts: the pulse laser echo data processing circuit and the data transmission circuit. The pulse laser echo data processing circuit includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The data transmission circuit receives the processed data from the pulse laser echo data processing circuit. The sample data is transmitted to the computer through USB2.0 interface. Finally, a PC interface is designed using C# language, in which the sampling laser pulse echo signal is demonstrated and the processed laser pulse is plotted. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the pulse laser echo data logging and digital signal processing circuit system. The experiment result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system achieved high speed data logging, high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission.

  2. Mid-ultraviolet pulsed laser micromachining of SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Litao; Li, Mingxing; Lin, Haipeng; Hu, Jinping; Tang, Qingju; Liu, Chunsheng

    2014-11-01

    This paper provides an investigation of the ablation behavior of single crystal 4H-SiC and 6H-SiC wafer to improve the manufacturability and high-temperature performance of SiC using laser applications. 266nm pulsed laser micromachining of SiC was investigated. The purpose is to establish suitable laser parametric regime for the fabrication of high accuracy, high spatial resolution and thin diaphragms for high-temperature MEMS pressure sensor applications. Etch rate, ablation threshold and quality of micromachined features were evaluated. The governing ablation mechanisms, such as thermal vaporization, phase explosion, and photomechanical fragmentation, were correlated with the effects of pulse energy. The ablation threshold is obtained with ultraviolet pulsed laser ablation. The results suggested ultraviolet pulsed laser's potential for rapid manufacturing. Excellent quality of machined features with little collateral thermal damage was obtained in the lower pulse energy range. The leading material removal mechanisms under these conditions were discussed.

  3. Velocity measurement using frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Mori, Y.; Hanayama, R.; Kitagawa, Y.; Sekine, T.; Sato, N.; Kurita, T.; Kawashima, T.; Sunahara, A.; Sentoku, Y.; Miura, E.; Iwamoto, A.; Sakagami, H.

    2017-02-01

    An ultra-intense short pulse laser induces a shock wave in material. The pressure of shock compression is stronger than a few tens GPa. To characterize shock waves, time-resolved velocity measurement in nano- or pico-second time scale is needed. Frequency domain interferometer and chirped pulse laser provide single-shot time-resolved measurement. We have developed a laser-driven shock compression system and frequency domain interferometer with CPA laser. In this paper, we show the principle of velocity measurement using a frequency domain interferometer and a chirped pulse laser. Next, we numerically calculated spectral interferograms and show the time-resolved velocity measurement can be done from the phase analysis of spectral interferograms. Moreover we conduct the laser driven shock generation and shock velocity measurement. From the spectral fringes, we analyze the velocities of the sample and shockwaves.

  4. Medical applications of ultra-short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B M; Marion, J E

    1999-06-08

    The medical applications for ultra short pulse lasers (USPLs) and their associated commercial potential are reviewed. Short pulse lasers offer the surgeon the possibility of precision cutting or disruption of tissue with virtually no thermal or mechanical damage to the surrounding areas. Therefore the USPL offers potential improvement to numerous existing medical procedures. Secondly, when USPLs are combined with advanced tissue diagnostics, there are possibilities for tissue-selective precision ablation that may allow for new surgeries that cannot at present be performed. Here we briefly review the advantages of short pulse lasers, examine the potential markets both from an investment community perspective, and from the view. of the technology provider. Finally nominal performance and cost requirements for the lasers, delivery systems and diagnostics and the present state of development will be addressed.

  5. Additive Manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V Using a Pulsed Laser Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Abdalla R.; Reutzel, Edward W.

    2015-06-01

    Microstructural development in directed-energy additive manufacturing of metal components is a complex process that produces parts with materials whose microstructure and properties are influenced by multiple heating and cooling cycles. Much work has been undertaken to correlate microstructural development with processing conditions, such as laser power and processing speed. Here, the microstructure and indentation hardness of a Ti-6Al-4V component processed with a pulsing laser beam and a continuous wave (CW) laser beam are investigated. It is found that the pulsed-beam build showed no statistically significant variation in lath width or indentation hardness with build height while the build deposited with the CW beam showed a statistically significant decrease in hardness and an increase in lath width near the middle of the build. The reduction in variability with beam pulsing is attributed to rapid cooling rates within the melt pool, a greater degree of melt pool stirring, and reduced aging during part build-up.

  6. Development of pulse laser processing for mounting fiber Bragg grating

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Aikihko; Shimada, Yukihiro; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ishibashi, Hisayoshi

    2012-07-11

    Pulse laser processing has been developed for the application of industrial plants in monitoring and maintenance. Surface cleaning by nano-second laser ablation was demonstrated for decontamination of oxide layers of Cr contained steel. Direct writing by femtosecond processing induced a Bragg grating in optical fiber to make it a seismic sensor for structural health monitoring. Adhesive cement was used to fix the seismic sensor on the surface of reactor coolant pipe material. Pulse laser processing and its related technologies were presented to overcome the severe accidents of nuclear power plants.

  7. Pulse laser machining and particulate separation from high impact polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arif, Saira; Kautek, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Opaque high impact polystyrene (HIPS) contaminated with graphite particles and poly(styrene-co-divinyl benzene) spheres can only be removed efficiently with nanosecond-pulsed laser radiation of 532 nm while the substrate is preserved. The destruction thresholds are 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than that of other common technical polymers. The inhomogeneously distributed polybutadiene composite component led to enhanced light scattering in the polystyrene matrix so that increased light absorption and energy density causes a comparatively low ablation threshold. Due to this fact there is advantageous potential for pulse laser machining at comparatively low fluences.

  8. Local immunity in treating skin melanoma by neodymium pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskalik, Konstantin G.

    1997-06-01

    The number and correlation of skin stroma cells was studied on mice C57B1 with the subcutaneously transplanted melanoma B16 which was exposed to neodymium pulsed laser radiation. Within 1-5 days after the exposure the total number of the free skin stroma cells was found to increase in the periphery from the radiation epicenter and the number of lymphocytes, macrophages and leucocytes tended to grow. Lymphoid infiltration was also revealed in the preparations of the epithelized wound and cicatrix on the skin melanoma sites in the patients who had undergone pulsed laser radiation therapy.

  9. Development of pulse laser processing for mounting fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Aikihko; Shimada, Yukihiro; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Hirokazu; Ishibashi, Hisayoshi

    2012-07-01

    Pulse laser processing has been developed for the application of industrial plants in monitoring and maintenance. Surface cleaning by nano-second laser ablation was demonstrated for decontamination of oxide layers of Cr contained steel. Direct writing by femtosecond processing induced a Bragg grating in optical fiber to make it a seismic sensor for structural health monitoring. Adhesive cement was used to fix the seismic sensor on the surface of reactor coolant pipe material. Pulse laser processing and its related technologies were presented to overcome the severe accidents of nuclear power plants.

  10. Pulsed lasers in dentistry: sense or nonsense?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1991-05-01

    The great interest in the field of laser applications in dentistry provokes the question, if all these new techniques may really fulfill advantages, which are expected after initial in-vitro studies. Whereas laser surgery of soft oral tissues has been developed to a standard method, laser treatment of dental hard tissues and the bone are attended with many unsolved problems. Different laser types, especially pulsed lasers in a wide spectrum of wavelengths have been proofed for dental use. Today neither the excimer lasers, emitting in the far uv-range from 193 to 351 nm, nor the mid-infrared lasers like Nd:YAG (1,064 μm), Ho:YAG (2,1 μm) and Er:YAG (2,96 μm) or the C02-laser (10,6 μm) show mechanism of interaction more carefully and faster than a preparation of teeth with diamond drillers. The laser type with the most precise and considerate treatment effects in the moment is the short pulsed (15 ns) ArF-excimer laser with a wavelength of 193 nm. However this laser type has not yet the effectivity of mechanical instruments and it needs a mirror system to deliver the radiation. Histological results point out, that this laser shows no significant pathological alterations in the adjacent tissues. Another interesting excimer laser, filled with XeCI and emitting at a wavelength of 308 nm has the advantage to be good to deliver through quartz fibers. A little more thermal influence is to be seen according to the longer wavelength. Yet the energy density, necessary to cut dental hard tissues will not be reached with the laser systems available now. Both the pulsed Er:YAG- (2,94 μm, pulse duration 250 s) and the Ho:YAG -laser (2,1 μm, pulse duration 250 μs) have an effective coupling of the laser energy to hydrogeneous tissues, but they do not work sufficient on healthy enamel and dentine. The influence to adjacent healthy tissue is not tolerable, especially in regard of the thermal damage dentine and pulp tissues. Moreover, like the 193 nm ArF-excimer laser

  11. Fusion Welding Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    alloy for a variety of Navy systems. The fracture toughness of thick plate submerged arc welds is of particular interesc. This project is an...research S on welding processes. Studies include metal vapors in the arc , development of a high speed infrared temperature monitor, digital signal...analysis as a weld process monitor, convection in arc weld pools, droplet transfer and contact tip wear in gas metal arc welding of titanium, and fractd’re

  12. Polycrystalline ZnTe thin film on silicon synthesized by pulsed laser deposition and subsequent pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Menglei; Gao, Kun; Wu, Jiada; Cai, Hua; Yuan, Ye; Prucnal, S.; Hübner, R.; Skorupa, W.; Helm, M.; Zhou, Shengqiang

    2016-03-01

    ZnTe thin films on Si substrates have been prepared by pulsed laser deposition and subsequent pulsed laser melting (PLM) treatment. The crystallization during PLM is confirmed by Raman scattering, x-ray diffraction and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The PL results show a broad peak at 574 nm (2.16 eV), which can be assigned to the transitions from the conduction band to the acceptor level located at 0.145 eV above the valence band induced by zinc-vacancy ionization. Our work provides an applicable approach to low temperature preparation of crystalline ZnTe thin films.

  13. In-process monitoring and adaptive control for gap in micro butt welding with pulsed YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahito, Yousuke; Kito, Masayuki; Katayama, Seiji

    2007-05-01

    A gap is one of the most important issues to be solved in laser welding of a micro butt joint, because the gap results in welding defects such as underfilling or a non-bonded joint. In-process monitoring and adaptive control has been expected as one of the useful procedures for the stable production of sound laser welds without defects. The objective of this research is to evaluate the availability of in-process monitoring and adaptive control in micro butt welding of pure titanium rods with a pulsed neodymium : yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd : YAG) laser beam of a 150 µm spot diameter. It was revealed that a 45 µm narrow gap was detected by the remarkable jump in a reflected light intensity due to the formation of the molten pool which could bridge the gap. Heat radiation signal levels increased in proportion to the sizes of molten pools or penetration depths for the respective laser powers. As for adaptive control, the laser peak power was controlled on the basis of the reflected light or the heat radiation signals to stably produce a sound deeply penetrated weld reduced underfilling. In the case of a 100 µm gap, the underfilling was greatly reduced by half smaller than those made with a conventional rectangular pulse shape in seam welding as well as spot welding with a pulsed Nd : YAG laser beam. Consequently, the adaptive control of the laser peak power on the basis of in-process monitoring could reduce the harmful effects due to a gap in micro butt laser welding with a pulsed laser beam.

  14. Laser welding in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Workman, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Autogenous welds in 304 stainless steel were performed by Nd-YAG laser heating in a simulated space environment. Simulation consists of welding on the NASA KC-135 aircraft to produce the microgravity and by containing the specimen in a vacuum chamber. Experimental results show that the microgravity welds are stronger, harder in the fusion zone, have deeper penetration and have a rougher surface rippling of the weld pool than one-g welds. To perform laser welding in space, a solar-pumped laser concept that significantly increases the laser conversion efficiency and makes welding viable despite the limited power availability of spacecraft is proposed.

  15. Free space optical communication based on pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Tadeusz; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Zygmunt, Marek; Wojtanowski, Jacek

    2016-12-01

    Most of the current optical data transmission systems are based on continuous wave (cw) lasers. It results from the tendency to increase data transmission speed, and from the simplicity in implementation (straightforward modulation). Pulsed lasers, which find many applications in a variety of industrial, medical and military systems, in this field are not common. Depending on the type, pulsed lasers can generate instantaneous power which is many times greater when compared with cw lasers. As such, they seem to be very attractive to be used in data transmission technology, especially due to the potentially larger ranges of transmission, or in adverse atmospheric conditions where low power cw-lasersbased transmission is no longer feasible. It is also a very practical idea to implement data transmission capability in the pulsed laser devices that have been around and already used, increasing the functionality of this type of equipment. At the Institute of Optoelectronics at Military University of Technology, a unique method of data transmission based on pulsed laser radiation has been developed. This method is discussed in the paper in terms of both data transmission speed and transmission range. Additionally, in order to verify the theoretical assumptions, modules for voice and data transmission were developed and practically tested which is also reported, including the measurements of Bit Error Rate (BER) and performance vs. range analysis.

  16. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  17. Bismuth thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Teresa; Arronte, Miguel; Rodriguez, Eugenio; Ponce, Luis; Alonso, J. C.; Garcia, C.; Fernandez, M.; Haro, E.

    1999-07-01

    In the present work Bi thin films were obtained by Pulsed Laser Deposition, using Nd:YAG lasers. The films were characterized by optical microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and X-rays diffraction. It was accomplished the real time spectral emission characterization of the plasma generated during the laser evaporation process. Highly oriented thin films were obtained.

  18. Pulsed-Laser Irradiation Space Weathering Of A Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, M. S.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Grains on the surfaces of airless bodies experience irradiation from solar energetic particles and melting, vaporization and recondensation processes associated with micrometeorite impacts. Collectively, these processes are known as space weathering and they affect the spectral properties, composition, and microstructure of material on the surfaces of airless bodies, e.g. Recent efforts have focused on space weathering of carbonaceous materials which will be critical for interpreting results from the OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa2 missions targeting primitive, organic-rich asteroids. In addition to returned sample analyses, space weathering processes are quantified through laboratory experiments. For example, the short-duration thermal pulse from hypervelocity micrometeorite impacts have been simulated using pulsed-laser irradiation of target material e.g. Recent work however, has shown that pulsed-laser irradiation has variable effects on the spectral properties and microstructure of carbonaceous chondrite samples. Here we investigate the spectral characteristics of pulsed-laser irradiated CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, Murchison, including the vaporized component. We also report the chemical and structural characteristics of specific mineral phases within the meteorite as a result of pulsed-laser irradiation.

  19. Ultrashort-pulse laser generated nanoparticles of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Welle, Eric J.; Tappan, Alexander S.; Palmer, Jeremy A.

    2010-08-03

    A process for generating nanoscale particles of energetic materials, such as explosive materials, using ultrashort-pulse laser irradiation. The use of ultrashort laser pulses in embodiments of this invention enables one to generate particles by laser ablation that retain the chemical identity of the starting material while avoiding ignition, deflagration, and detonation of the explosive material.

  20. Improved pulse laser ranging algorithm based on high speed sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan-yi; Qian, Rui-hai; Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; He, Shi-jie; Guo, Xiao-kang

    2016-10-01

    Narrow pulse laser ranging achieves long-range target detection using laser pulse with low divergent beams. Pulse laser ranging is widely used in military, industrial, civil, engineering and transportation field. In this paper, an improved narrow pulse laser ranging algorithm is studied based on the high speed sampling. Firstly, theoretical simulation models have been built and analyzed including the laser emission and pulse laser ranging algorithm. An improved pulse ranging algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines the matched filter algorithm and the constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. After the algorithm simulation, a laser ranging hardware system is set up to implement the improved algorithm. The laser ranging hardware system includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. Subsequently, using Verilog HDL language, the improved algorithm is implemented in the FPGA chip based on fusion of the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm. Finally, the laser ranging experiment is carried out to test the improved algorithm ranging performance comparing to the matched filter algorithm and the CFD algorithm using the laser ranging hardware system. The test analysis result demonstrates that the laser ranging hardware system realized the high speed processing and high speed sampling data transmission. The algorithm analysis result presents that the improved algorithm achieves 0.3m distance ranging precision. The improved algorithm analysis result meets the expected effect, which is consistent with the theoretical simulation.

  1. Pulsed laser generation of ultrasound in a metal plate between the melting and ablation thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Every, A. G.; Utegulov, Z. N.; Veres, I. A.

    2015-03-31

    The generation of ultrasound in a metal plate exposed to nanosecond pulsed laser heating, sufficient to cause melting but not ablation, is treated. Consideration is given to the spatial and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, penetration of the laser beam into the sample, the evolution of the melt pool, and thermal conduction in the melt and surrounding solid. The excitation of the ultrasound takes place over a few nanoseconds, and occurs predominantly within the thermal diffusion length of a micron or so beneath the surface. Because of this, the output of the thermal simulations can be represented as axially symmetric transient radial and normal surface force distributions. The epicentral displacement response at the opposite surface to these forces is obtained by two methods, the one based on the elastodynamic Green’s functions for plate geometry determined by the Cagniard generalized ray method, and the other using a finite element numerical method. The two approaches are in very close agreement. Numerical simulations are reported of the epicentral displacement response of a 3.12mm thick tungsten plate irradiated with a 4 ns pulsed laser beam with Gaussian spatial profile, at intensities below and above the melt threshold. Comparison is made between results obtained using available temperature dependent thermophysical data, and room temperature materials constants except near the melting point.

  2. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  3. Optimizatin Of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Parameters For Titanium Seam-Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, E.; Canel, T.; Demir, A.; Sinmazcelik, T.

    2007-04-01

    Titanium alloys are the most advantageous metals for the medical and aerospace industry because of their light weight and excellent corrosion resistance. Several techniques were investigated to achieve reliable welds with optimal distortion for the fabrication components used in industry. Laser welding is the most important joining technique because of its precision, rapid processing. For pulse mode Nd:YAG laser; pulse shape, energy, duration, repetition rate and peak power are the most important parameters effects the weld quality. And also the combinations of these parameters are very important for pulsed laser seam-welding. In this study, an experimental work has been done to determine the pulsed laser seam-welding parameters for 3mm thick titanium alloys using the Lumonics JK760TR Nd:YAG pulsed laser.

  4. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  5. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  6. Transition metal dichalcogenides based saturable absorbers for pulsed laser technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanraj, J.; Velmurugan, V.; Sivabalan, S.

    2016-10-01

    Ultrashort pulsed laser is an indispensable tool for the evolution of photonic technology in the present and future. This laser has been progressing tremendously with new pulse regimes and incorporating novel devices inside its cavity. Recently, a nanomaterial based saturable absorber (SA) was used in ultrafast laser that has improved the lasing performance and caused a reduction in the physical dimension when compared to conventional SAs. To date, the nanomaterials that are exploited for the development of SA devices are carbon nanotubes, graphene, topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) and black phosphorous. These materials have unique advantages such as high nonlinear optical response, fiber compatibility and ease of fabrication. In these, TMDs are prominent and an emerging two-dimensional nanomaterial for photonics and optoelectronics applications. Therefore, we review the reports of Q-switched and mode-locked pulsed lasers using TMDs (specifically MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2) based SAs.

  7. Analysis on the characteristics of pulsed laser proximity fuze's echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kun; Chen, Huimin

    2011-06-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology and laser technology, a kind of proximity fuze named pulsed laser proximity fuze has been applied. Compared with other fuzes, pulsed laser proximity fuze has high ranging precision and strong resistance to artificial active interference. It is an important development tendency of proximity fuze. The paper analyze the characteristic of target echo of laser signal, and then make theoretical analysis and calculation on the laser signal transmission in the smog. Firstly, use the pulse width of 10ns semiconductor laser fuze to do typical targets experiment, to get the echo information of target distance is 5m; then to do smog interference experiment, by comparing the pulse width amplitude and backscattering signal amplitude of laser fuze in simulation and experiment, analyzing the effect of anti-clutter, providing the evidence for the subsequent of circuit of signal amplification and processing.

  8. Wavelength Effects In Femtosecond Pulsed Laser Ablation And Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Castillejo, Marta; Nalda, Rebeca de; Oujja, Mohamed; Sanz, Mikel

    2010-10-08

    Ultrafast pulsed laser irradiation of solid materials is highly attractive for the micro-and nanostructuring of substrates and for the fabrication of nanostructured deposits. Femtosecond laser pulses promote efficient material removal with reduced heat transfer and high deposition rates of nanometer scale particles free of microscopic particulates. Most of the studies to date have been performed with light pulses centered around the peak wavelength of the Titanium:Sapphire laser, around 800 nm. Analysis of the process over a broader range of wavelengths can provide important information about the processes involved and serve as experimental tests for advanced theoretical models. We report on our current investigations on the effect that laser wavelength of femtosecond pulses has on the superficial nanostructuring induced on biopolymer substrates, and on the characteristics of nanostructured deposits grown by pulsed laser deposition from semiconductor targets.

  9. Optical modulation of astrocyte network using ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jonghee; Ku, Taeyun; Chong, Kyuha; Ryu, Seung-Wook; Choi, Chulhee

    2012-03-01

    Astrocyte, the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system, has been one of major topics in neuroscience. Even though many tools have been developed for the analysis of astrocyte function, there has been no adequate tool that can modulates astrocyte network without pharmaceutical or genetic interventions. Here we found that ultrashort pulsed laser stimulation can induce label-free activation of astrocytes as well as apoptotic-like cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Upon irradiation with high intensity pulsed lasers, the irradiated cells with short exposure time showed very rapid mitochondria fragmentation, membrane blebbing and cytoskeletal retraction. We applied this technique to investigate in vivo function of astrocyte network in the CNS: in the aspect of neurovascular coupling and blood-brain barrier. We propose that this noninvasive technique can be widely applied for in vivo study of complex cellular network.

  10. Applications of pulsed laser ablation for enhanced gold nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hur, Tae-Bong; Phuoc, Tran X.; Chyu, Minking K.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.

    2012-09-01

    We report the exploration for enhanced gold nanofluids by using the laser ablation technique of which pulsed laser ablates energetic clusters from the bulk target immersed into liquid environment. By employing pulsed laser ablation, the behavior of optical absorption band was investigated on spherical Au nanoparticles that approach to the extremely small size of 1 nm, and rod-shaped Au nanoparticles were synthesized by controlling the aggregation behavior of energetic clusters in fluids. It was found that a nominal change in particle size induces a significant change in absorption band energy in the size range. In addition, the attempt to control the growth kinetics of particles has made remarkable progress on the synthesis of environmentally friendly gold nanorods. Experimental evidences show that the laser ablation synthesis can be widely used as a potential method for advanced gold nanofluids.

  11. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Nanoporous Cobalt Thin Films

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunming; Nori, Sudhakar; Wei, Wei; Aggarwal, Ravi; Kumar, Dhananjay; Narayan, Roger J.

    2013-01-01

    Nanoporous cobalt thin films were deposited on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes at room temperature using pulsed laser deposition. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the nanoporous cobalt thin films retained the monodisperse pore size and high porosity of the anodized aluminum oxide substrates. Temperature- and field-dependent magnetic data obtained between 10 K and 350 K showed large hysteresis behavior in these materials. The increase of coercivity values was larger for nanoporous cobalt thin films than for multilayered cobalt/alumina thin films. The average diameter of the cobalt nanograins in the nanoporous cobalt thin films was estimated to be ~5 nm for blocking temperatures near room temperature. These results suggest that pulsed laser deposition may be used to fabricate nanoporous magnetic materials with unusual properties for biosensing, drug delivery, data storage, and other technological applications. PMID:19198344

  12. Pulsed lasers on plasmas produced by electron beams and discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasenko, Viktor F; Yakovlenko, Sergei I

    2003-02-28

    The use of electron beams for pumping dense gases made it possible to obtain lasing on atomic and molecular transitions in different spectral ranges and to develop high-power pulsed lasers. N.G. Basov and coworkers made a substantial contribution to the formation and advancement of this field. A brief review of the research on efficient elevated-pressure active media and high-power pulsed lasers utilising plasmas produced both by an electron beam and an electron-beam-controlled discharge is presented. These are excimer and exciplex lasers, lasers utilising atomic transitions in xenon and neon, an Ar -N{sub 2} mixture laser, a molecular nitrogen ion laser, and a high-pressure CO{sub 2} laser. Data obtained in the investigation of the radiation of rare-gas halide complexes are given. (special issue devoted to the 80th anniversary of academician n g basov's birth)

  13. Pulse laser assisted optical tweezers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tadao; Maeda, Saki; Honda, Ayae

    2012-01-01

    Optical tweezers which enables to trap micron to nanometer sized objects by radiation pressure force is utilized for manipulation of particles under a microscope and for measurement of forces between biomolecules. Weak force of optical tweezers causes some limitations such as particle adhesion or steric barrier like lipid membrane in a cell prevent further movement of objects. For biomedical applications we need to overcome these difficulties. We have developed a technique to exert strong instantaneous force by use of a pulse laser beam and to assist conventional optical tweezers. A pulse laser beam has huge instantaneous laser power of more than 1000 times as strong as a conventional continuous-wave laser beam so that the instantaneous force is strong enough to break chemical bonding and molecular force between objects and obstacles. We derive suitable pulse duration for pulse assist of optical tweezers and demonstrate particle manipulation in difficult situations through an experiment of particle removal from sticky surface of glass substrate.

  14. Plasma induced by pulsed laser and fabrication of silicon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Wei-Qi; Dong, Tai-Ge; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liu Shi-Rong; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Lv, Quan; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-08-01

    It is interesting that in preparing process of nanosilicon by pulsed laser, the periodic diffraction pattern from plasmonic lattice structure in the Purcell cavity due to interaction between plasmons and photons is observed. This kind of plasmonic lattice structure confined in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. Emission manipulation on Si nanostructures fabricated by the plasmonic wave induced from pulsed laser is studied by using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The electronic localized states and surface bonding are characterized by several emission bands peaked near 600 nm and 700 nm on samples prepared in oxygen or nitrogen environment. The electroluminescence wavelength is measured in the telecom window on silicon film coated by ytterbium. The enhanced emission originates from surface localized states in band gap due to broken symmetry from some bonds on surface bulges produced by plasmonic wave in the cavity. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of nanoporous cobalt thin films.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunming; Nori, Sudhakar; Wei, Wei; Aggarwal, Ravi; Kumar, Dhananjay; Narayan, Roger J

    2008-11-01

    Nanoporous cobalt thin films were deposited on anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes at room temperature using pulsed laser deposition. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that the nanoporous cobalt thin films retained the monodisperse pore size and high porosity of the anodized aluminum oxide substrates. Temperature- and field-dependent magnetic data obtained between 10 K and 350 K showed large hysteresis behavior in these materials. The increase of coercivity values was larger for nanoporous cobalt thin films than for multilayered cobalt/alumina thin films. The average diameter of the cobalt nanograins in the nanoporous cobalt thin films was estimated to be approsimately 5 nm for blocking temperatures near room temperature. These results suggest that pulsed laser deposition may be used to fabricate nanoporous magnetic materials with unusual properties for biosensing, drug delivery, data storage, and other technological applications.

  16. Phase Noise Comparision of Short Pulse Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Zhang; S. V. Benson; J. Hansknecht; D. Hardy; G. Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes the phase noise measurement on several different mode-locked laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on the state of the art short pulse lasers, especially the drive lasers for photocathode injectors. A comparison between the phase noise of the drive laser pulses, electron bunches and FEL pulses will also be presented.

  17. Filamentation of a relativistic short pulse laser in a plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naveen; Tripathi, V. K.; Sawhney, B. K.

    2006-06-01

    An intense short pulse laser propagating through a plasma undergoes filamentation instability under the combined effects of relativistic mass variation and ponderomotive force-induced electron density depression. These two nonlinearities superimpose each other. In a tenuous plasma, the filament size scales as {\\sim}( c / \\omega _p\\; a_0 ) \\sqrt 2 \\gamma _0^{1/2} , where ω p is the plasma frequency, a0 is the normalized laser amplitude and γ 0 is the relativistic gamma factor.

  18. PHASE NOISE COMPARISON OF SHORT PULSE LASER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Shukui Zhang; Stephen Benson; John Hansknecht; David Hardy; George Neil; Michelle D. Shinn

    2006-08-27

    This paper describes phase noise measurements of several different laser systems that have completely different gain media and configurations including a multi-kW free-electron laser. We will focus on state-of-the-art short pulse lasers, especially drive lasers for photocathode injectors. Phase noise comparison of the FEL drive laser, electron beam and FEL laser output also will be presented.

  19. Growth of epitaxial thin films by pulsed laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1992-10-01

    High-quality, high-temperature superconductor (HTSc) films can be grown by the pulsed laser ablation (PLA) process. This article provides a detailed introduction to the advantages and curent limitations of PLA for epitaxial film growth. Emphasis is placed on experimental methods and on exploitation of PLA to control epitaxial growth at either the unit cell or the atomic-layer level. Examples are taken from recent HTSc film growth. 33 figs, 127 refs. (DLC)

  20. Fluorescence of silicon nanoparticles prepared by nanosecond pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chunyang Sui, Xin; Yang, Fang; Ma, Wei; Li, Jishun; Xue, Yujun; Fu, Xing

    2014-03-15

    A pulsed laser fabrication method is used to prepare fluorescent microstructures on silicon substrates in this paper. A 355 nm nanosecond pulsed laser micromachining system was designed, and the performance was verified and optimized. Fluorescence microscopy was used to analyze the photoluminescence of the microstructures which were formed using the pulsed laser processing technique. Photoluminescence spectra of the microstructure reveal a peak emission around 500 nm, from 370 nm laser irradiation. The light intensity also shows an exponential decay with irradiation time, which is similar to attenuation processes seen in porous silicon. The surface morphology and chemical composition of the microstructure in the fabricated region was also analyzed with multifunction scanning electron microscopy. Spherical particles are produced with diameters around 100 nm. The structure is compared with porous silicon. It is likely that these nanoparticles act as luminescence recombination centers on the silicon surface. The small diameter of the particles modifies the band gap of silicon by quantum confinement effects. Electron-hole pairs recombine and the fluorescence emission shifts into the visible range. The chemical elements of the processed region are also changed during the interaction between laser and silicon. Oxidation and carbonization play an important role in the enhancement of fluorescence emission.

  1. Rate process models for thermal welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Scott A.; Pearson, S. D.

    1997-06-01

    Laser tissue welding is a thermal process for binding tow tissues together. Optical and thermal models exist to calculate the temperatures of laser irradiated tissues. However, a rate process model is required to relate the time-temperature history to a weld strength. This paper proposes a first-order rate process model based on contraction during heating. The entropy and enthalpy associated with contraction of porcine intestine in a water bath was measured and used to calculate the fraction of altered molecules for both water bath and laser welding. Intestine was welded to intestine in a water bath at 60-80 degrees C for seven minutes. Pulsed laser welding used 10-30 pulses and an exogenous chromophore. The yield strengths of the welds were measured and found to roughly correlate with the fraction of altered molecules estimated for both the water bath and laser welds.

  2. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  3. Virtual Welding — Applying Science to Welding Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhishang; Cao, Zhenning; Chen, X. L.; Ludewig, Howard W.

    2004-06-01

    Welding practice has traditionally been treated as an art and in most cases experience based trial-and-error experimentation has been the major approach to establish a feasible welding procedure. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding welding phenomena based on numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts include simulation of the weld pool formation, weld microstructure evolution, and welding induced residual stress and distortion. The numerical models based on interdisciplinary applied sciences (e.g. heat transfer and fluid flow, materials science, mechanical engineering, and fracture mechanics) have provided detailed insights into welding process and guidance in design of high performance welded-joints and cost effective welding process. The concept of "Virtual Welding," which is a simulation package based on interdisciplinary applied science and multi-scale numerical models, is proposed in this paper. Examples are provided to demonstrate the applications of "Virtual Welding" in industrial practices for high performance welds and reduced manufacturing cost.

  4. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singaravelu, S.; Klopf, J. M.; Schriver, K. E.; Park, H. K.; Kelley, M. J.; Haglund, R. F.

    2014-03-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C-H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C-H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  5. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2007-08-28

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  6. Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D; Kimbrough, J

    2008-02-04

    Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.

  7. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Singaravelu, Senthil R.; Klopf, John M.; Schriver, Kenneth E.; Park, HyeKyoung; Kelley, Michael J.; Haglund, Jr., Richard F.

    2013-08-01

    Barrier materials on thin-film organic optoelectronic devices inhibit the uptake of water, oxygen, or environmental contaminants, and fabricating them is a major challenge. By definition, these barrier layers must be insoluble, so the usual routes to polymer- or organic-film deposition by spin coating are not problematic. In this paper, we report comparative studies of pulsed laser deposition of cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), an excellent moisture barrier and a model system for a larger class of protective materials that are potentially useful in organic electronic devices, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Thin films of COC were deposited by resonant and nonresonant infrared pulsed laser ablation of solid COC targets, using a free-electron laser tuned to the 3.43 μm C–H stretch of the COC, and a high-intensity nanosecond Q-switched laser operated at 1064 nm. The ablation craters and deposited films were characterized by scanning-electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry, atomic-force microscopy, high-resolution optical microscopy, and surface profilometry. Thermal-diffusion calculations were performed to determine the temperature rise induced in the film at the C–H resonant wavelength. The results show that resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition (RIR-PLD) is an effective, low-temperature thin-film deposition technique that leads to evaporation and deposition of intact molecules in homogeneous, smooth films. Nonresonant PLD, on the other hand, leads to photothermal damage, degradation of the COC polymers, and to the deposition only of particulates.

  8. Pulsed Laser Propulsion Studies. Volume 1. Thruster Physics and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    calculated using the Debye - Huckel theory . The decrement in the potential is given by I 1//N n.1 - /2 2/ AI. =2ie 3 .( . - n(3.12.11c) where e is the electron...understanding of the performance of a pulsed laser-powered thruster. Wavelength scaling was explored, with break- down theory and the fluid dynamics model... theory and the fluid dynamics model. It was found that more than 50% of the 0.35 Um radiation could be converted to blast wave energy in the propellant gas

  9. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  10. Acceleration Mechanism Of Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Mashima, Yuki; Yamada, Osamu

    2011-11-10

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted. Laser-ablation plasma in the thruster was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thrusters was evaluated by measuring the ablated mass per pulse and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulses up to 7,200 s were obtained at charge energies of 8.6 J. Moreover, from the Faraday cup measurement, it was confirmed that the speed of ions was accelerated with addition of electric energy.

  11. Crystallization of silicon carbide thin films by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cesare, G.; La Monica, S.; Maiello, G.; Masini, G.; Proverbio, E.; Ferrari, A.; Chitica, N.; Dinescu, M.; Alexandrescu, R.; Morjan, I.; Rotiu, E.

    1996-10-01

    Pulsed laser irradiation at low incident fluences was demonstrated to be effective for the crystallization of amorphous hydrogenated silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films deposited on Si wafers. The amorphous films, with a carbon content in the range 30-50%, were deposited on (100) Si wafers by low temperature plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The crystallization treatment was carried out by a multipulse KrF excimer laser. The crystallinity modifications induced by the laser treatment were evidenced by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. An important increase of the microhardness was evidenced as an effect of the laser treatment.

  12. Ultrashort-pulse laser system for hard dental tissue procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neev, Joseph; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Feit, Michael D.; Perry, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Stuart, Brent C.

    1996-04-01

    In spite of intensive research, lasers have not replaced conventional tools in many hard tissue applications. Ultrashort pulse lasers offer several advantages in their highly per-pulse-efficient operation, negligible thermal and mechanical damage and low noise operation. Possible development of optimal laser systems to replace the high-speed dental drill is discussed. Applications of ultrashort pulse systems for dental procedures are outlined. Selection criteria and critical parameters are considered, and are compared to the conventional air-turbine drill and to long and short pulsed systems.

  13. Cheap, Easy-To-Read Frequency Monitor For Pulsed Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esporoles, Carlos

    1995-01-01

    Electronic circuit provides bar-graph display of difference between carrier frequency of pulsed laser transmitter and frequency of another laser serving as local oscillator in receiver. Display device linear array of light-emitting diodes (LED's), each representing 1-MHz portion of beat-frequency range from 20 to 40 MHz. Middle LED and neighbors green; LED's representing edges of passband yellow; LED's of frequencies outside passband red. Operator determines approximate relative frequency of transmitter at a glance by observing color and position of illuminated LED.

  14. Simulation of ultrashort double-pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Itina, Tatiana E.; Levashov, Pavel R.; Khishchenko, Konstatntin V.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we study the mechanisms of femtosecond double-pulse laser ablation of metals. It was previously shown experimentally that the crater depth monotonically drops when the delay between two successive pulses increases. For delays longer than the time of electron-ion relaxation the crater depth can be even smaller than that produced by a single pulse. The results of the performed hydrodynamic simulation show that the ablation can be suppressed due to the formation of the second shock wave. The modeling results of the double-pulse ablation obtained for different delays correlate with the experimental findings.

  15. System for rapidly tuning a low pressure pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.A.; Ahl, J.L.

    1989-09-19

    This patent describes a system for rapidly tuning a low pressure pulsed laser over multiple wavelengths. The system comprising: a low pressure one electrode pair discharge region in a laser cavity having a laser trigger means connected to the electrode pair for initiating low pressure discharge within the discharge region; a quarterwave plate and a Q-switch in optical alignment with the one electrode pair discharge region along the laser optical axis; a fixed laser output coupler at the discharge region end of the laser cavity; and a rotatable grating means for wavelength switching the at least two high gain Q-switched pulses.

  16. Size control of nanoparticles by multiple-pulse laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiaxin; Nan, Junyi; Zeng, Heping

    2017-04-01

    Bare nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation in water have found their application in catalysis, spectroscopy and biomedical research fields. In this perspective, how to efficiently produce stable nanoparticles with controllable size is an important topic and has attracted a lot of interests. Here, we introduce a multiple-pulse laser as the ablation source. By changing the number of sub-pulses, the average size of nanoparticles can be tuned in a broad range from ∼120 nm to ∼4 nm. The demonstration in this article may offer a new approach to fabricate ultrafine nanostructures and also help the scientific study of the mechanism in laser ablation.

  17. Modeling of High-Energy Pulsed Laser Interactions with Coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2003-02-06

    We describe a computational model of laser-materials interactions in the regime accessed by the solid state heat capacity lasers (SSHCLs) built at LLNL. We show that its predictions compare quite favorably with coupon experiments by the 10 kW SSHCL at LLNL. The body of this paper describes the following topics, listed by section number: (2) model in quiescent air, (3) comparison with experiments in quiescent air, (4) effects of air flow, (5) comparison with experiments involving air flow, (6) importance of material properties, (7) advantage of pulsed lasers over CW lasers, and (8) conclusions and recommendations.

  18. Influences of pulse laser parameters on properties of AISI316L stainless steel thin-walled part by laser material deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinlin; Deng, Dewei; Yi, Hongli; Xu, Haiyan; Yang, Shuhua; Zhang, Hongchao

    2017-07-01

    Laser material deposition (LMD) which combines laser cladding and rapid prototyping technique has been widely used to build full density metal parts directly without using modules or tools. There are many parameters affecting the quality and properties of the LMD parts through changing the energy distribution. Pulse laser provides the user an added degree of controlling over the energy distribution which seriously affects the solidification of molten pool and eventual part formation. In the present study, a series of AISI316L stainless steel thin-walled parts are successfully produced by LMD with different pulse laser parameters to investigate the effects of energy distribution on characteristics (microstructure, hardness, residual stress and tensile properties). The results show that the characteristics of LMD parts are obviously influenced by laser mode (pulse or continuous wave laser) and pulse laser parameters (T_pulse and T_pause). The microstructure of parts presents various grain sizes with the different pulse laser parameters. The different value (D-value) between the hardness of edge and central region varies considerably with the pulse laser parameters. The maximum D-value of hardness is presented in the part deposited by continuous wave laser. The maximum hardness is presented in item 4 (T_pulse=10 ms, T_pause=10 ms) and the minimum hardness is presented in part fabricated by continuous wave laser where the residual stress on Z-component presents tensile stress at the edge region and compress stress at the central region but opposite trend happens to the residual stress on Y-component. Tensile stress on Z-component at the edge region increases even presents compress tensile with the decrease of T_pulse. The stress on Y-component presents a periodic variation between tensile stress and compress stress in the Y-direction of the part fabricated by pulse laser. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the part fabricated using pulse laser is higher than the

  19. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  20. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  1. Time-dependent calculations of molten pool formation and thermal plasma with metal vapour in gas tungsten arc welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Yamamoto, K.; Tashiro, S.; Nakata, K.; Yamamoto, E.; Yamazaki, K.; Suzuki, K.; Murphy, A. B.; Lowke, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    A gas tungsten arc (GTA) was modelled taking into account the contamination of the plasma by metal vapour from the molten anode. The whole region of GTA atmosphere including the tungsten cathode, the arc plasma and the anode was treated using a unified numerical model. A viscosity approximation was used to express the diffusion coefficient in terms of viscosity of the shielding gas and metal vapour. The transient two-dimensional distributions of temperature, velocity of plasma flow and iron vapour concentration were predicted, together with the molten pool as a function of time for a 150 A arc current at atmospheric pressure, both for helium and argon gases. It was shown that the thermal plasma in the GTA was influenced by iron vapour from the molten pool surface and that the concentration of iron vapour in the plasma was dependent on the temperature of the molten pool. GTA on high sulfur stainless steel was calculated to discuss the differences between a low sulfur and a high sulfur stainless steel anode. Helium was selected as the shielding gas because a helium GTA produces more metal vapour than an argon GTA. In the GTA on a high sulfur stainless steel anode, iron vapour and current path were constricted. Radiative emission density in the GTA on high sulfur stainless steel was also concentrated in the centre area of the arc plasma together with the iron vapour although the temperature distributions were almost the same as that in the case of a low sulfur stainless steel anode.

  2. Lipase biofilm deposited by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronne, Antonio; Bloisi, Francesco; Calabria, Raffaela; Califano, Valeria; Depero, Laura E.; Fanelli, Esther; Federici, Stefania; Massoli, Patrizio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2015-05-01

    Lipase is an enzyme that finds application in biodiesel production and for detection of esters and triglycerides in biosensors. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE), a technique derived from Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) for deposition of undamaged biomolecules or polymers, is characterized by the use of a frozen target obtained from a solution/suspension of the guest material (to be deposited) in a volatile matrix (solvent). The presence of the solvent avoids or at least reduces the potential damage of guest molecules by laser radiation but only the guest material reaches the substrate in an essentially solvent-free deposition. MAPLE can be used for enzymes immobilization, essential for industrial application, allowing the development of continuous processes, an easier separation of products, the reuse of the catalyst and, in some cases, enhancing enzyme properties (pH, temperature stability, etc.) and catalytic activity in non-aqueous media. Here we show that MAPLE technique can be used to deposit undamaged lipase and that the complex structure (due to droplets generated during extraction from target) of the deposited material can be controlled by changing the laser beam fluence.

  3. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  4. Making relativistic positrons using ultraintense short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Hui; Wilks, S. C.; Bonlie, J. D.; Chen, S. N.; Cone, K. V.; Elberson, L. N.; Price, D. F.; Schneider, M. B.; Shepherd, R.; Stafford, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Van Maren, R.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gregori, G.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J.

    2009-12-15

    This paper describes a new positron source using ultraintense short pulse lasers. Although it has been theoretically studied since the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2x10{sup 10} positrons/s ejected at the back of approximately millimeter thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short (approx1 ps) ultraintense (approx1x10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser-based positron source with its unique characteristics may complement the existing sources based on radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  5. Approaches to solar cell design for pulsed laser power receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a laser to beam power from Earth to a photovoltaic receiver in space could be a technology with applications to many space missions. Extremely high average-power lasers would be required in a wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. However, high-power lasers inherently operate in a pulsed format. Existing solar cells are not well designed to respond to pulsed incident power. To better understand cell response to pulsed illumination at high intensity, the PC-1D finite-element computer model was used to analyze the response of solar cells to continuous and pulsed laser illumination. Over 50 percent efficiency was calculated for both InP and GaAs cells under steady-state illumination near the optimum wavelength. The time-dependent response of a high-efficiency GaAs concentrator cell to a laser pulse was modeled, and the effect of laser intensity, wavelength, and bias point was studied. Three main effects decrease the efficiency of a solar cell under pulsed laser illumination: series resistance, L-C 'ringing' with the output circuit, and current limiting due to the output inductance. The problems can be solved either by changing the pulse shape or designing a solar cell to accept the pulsed input. Cell design possibilities discussed are a high-efficiency, light-trapping silicon cell, and a monolithic, low-inductance GaAs cell.

  6. Pulsed laser versus electrical energy for peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter; Kao, Chris; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-01-01

    Transient optical neural stimulation has previously been shown to elicit highly controlled, artifact-free potentials within the nervous system in a non-contact fashion without resulting in damage to tissue. This paper presents the physiologic validity of elicited nerve and muscle potentials from pulsed laser induced stimulation of the peripheral nerve in a comparative study with the standard method of electrically evoked potentials. Herein, the fundamental physical properties underlying the two techniques are contrasted. Key laser parameters for efficient optical stimulation of the peripheral nerve are detailed. Strength response curves are shown to be linear for each stimulation modality, although fewer axons can be recruited with optically evoked potentials. Results compare the relative transient energy requirements for stimulation using each technique and demonstrate that optical methods can selectively excite functional nerve stimulation. Adjacent stimulation and recording of compound nerve potentials in their entirety from optical and electrical stimulation are presented, with optical responses shown to be free of any stimulation artifact. Thus, use of a pulsed laser exhibits some advantages when compared to standard electrical means for excitation of muscle potentials in the peripheral nerve in the research domain and possibly for clinical diagnostics in the future. PMID:17537515

  7. Computational Design of Short Pulse Laser Driven Iron Opacity Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Madison E.; London, Richard A.; Goluoglu, Sedat; Whitley, Heather D.

    2015-11-01

    Opacity is a critical parameter in the transport of radiation in systems such as inertial confinement fusion capsules and stars. The resolution of current disagreements between solar models and helioseismological observations would benefit from experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat targets to higher temperatures and densities than long pulse lasers and pulsed power machines, thus potentially enabling access to emission spectra at conditions relevant to solar models. In order to ensure that the relevant plasma conditions are accessible and that an emission measurement is practical, we use computational design of experiments to optimize the target characteristics and laser conditions. Radiation-hydrodynamic modeling, using HYDRA, is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance, target dimensions, and dopant dilution on the plasma conditions and emission of an iron opacity target. Several optimized designs reaching temperatures and densities relevant to the radiative zone of the sun will be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  8. Hybrid modulation driving power technology for pulsed laser fuze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Zhang, He

    2016-10-01

    According to the requirement of the long range detection of the circumferential detection system of the laser fuze, a hybrid modulated pulsed laser driving power supplying for APD avalanche photodiode is designed. The working principle of the laser circumferential detection system is analyzed, and the APD is selected as the photoelectric detector according to the measurement equation of the circumferential detection system. According to the different kinds of APD requirements for high voltage power supply, the principle of boost converter is analyzed. By using PWM and PFM hybrid modulation type power supply technology, PWM modulation is applied in low rising voltage. When the voltage is required to achieve more than 100V, PFM mode boost is chosen. Simulation of the output voltages which are 85V and 200V of the two modes respectively is made. The PCB circuit board is processed to verify the experiment. The experimental results show that the hybrid modulation pulse laser drive power supply can meet the requirements of all kinds of APD power supply. The circuit board can be used in the detection of laser fuze with different target distance, and has wide application prospect.

  9. Nanosecond laser ablation for pulsed laser deposition of yttria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Sucharita

    2013-09-01

    A thermal model to describe high-power nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of yttria (Y2O3) has been developed. This model simulates ablation of material occurring primarily through vaporization and also accounts for attenuation of the incident laser beam in the evolving vapor plume. Theoretical estimates of process features such as time evolution of target temperature distribution, melt depth and ablation rate and their dependence on laser parameters particularly for laser fluences in the range of 6 to 30 J/cm2 are investigated. Calculated maximum surface temperatures when compared with the estimated critical temperature for yttria indicate absence of explosive boiling at typical laser fluxes of 10 to 30 J/cm2. Material ejection in large fragments associated with explosive boiling of the target needs to be avoided when depositing thin films via the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique as it leads to coatings with high residual porosity and poor compaction restricting the protective quality of such corrosion-resistant yttria coatings. Our model calculations facilitate proper selection of laser parameters to be employed for deposition of PLD yttria corrosion-resistive coatings. Such coatings have been found to be highly effective in handling and containment of liquid uranium.

  10. A Bright Neutron Source Driven by a Short Pulse Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus

    2012-10-01

    Neutrons are a unique tool to alter and diagnose material properties, and to exciting nuclear reactions, for many applications. Accelerator based spallation sources provide high neutron fluxes for research, but there is a growing need for more compact sources with higher peak brightness, whether fast or moderated neutrons. Intense lasers promise such as source, readily linkable to other experimental facilities, or deployable outside a laboratory setting. We present experimental results on the first short-pulse laser-driven neutron source powerful enough for radiography. A novel laser-driven ion acceleration mechanism (Breakout Afterburner), operating in the relativistic transparency regime, is used. Based on the mechanism's advantages, a laser-driven deuteron beam is used to achieve a new record in laser-neutron production, in numbers, energy and directionality. This neutron beam is a highly directional pulse < 1 ns at ˜ 1 cm from the target, with a flux > 40/2̂, and thus suitable for imaging applications with high temporal resolution. The beam contained, for the first time, neutrons with energies of up to 150 MeV. Thus using short pulse lasers, it is now possible to use the resulting hard x-rays and neutrons of different energies to radiograph an unknown object and to determine its material composition. Our data matches the simulated data for our test samples.

  11. Fundamentals and industrial applications of ultrashort pulsed lasers at Bosch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Jens; Bauer, Thorsten

    2011-03-01

    Fundamental results of ablation processes of metals with ultrashort laser pulses in the far threshold fluence regime are shown and discussed. Time-resolved measurements of the plasma transmission exhibit two distinctive minima. The minima occurring within the first nanoseconds can be attributed to electrons and sublimated material emitted from the target surface, whereas the subsequent minimum after several 10 ns is due to particles and droplets after a thermal boiling process. Industrial applications of ultrashort pulsed laser micro machining in the Bosch Group are also shown with the production of exhaust gas sensors and common rail diesel systems. Since 2007, ultrashort laser pulses are used at the BOSCH plant in Bamberg for producing lambda-probes, which are made of a special ceramic layer system and can measure the exhaust gas properties faster and more accurately. This enables further reduction of emissions by optimized combustion control. Since 2009, BOSCH uses ultrashort pulsed lasers for micro-structuring the injector of common rail diesel systems. A drainage groove allows a tight system even at increased pressures up to 2000 bar. Diesel injection is thus even more reliable, powerful and environment-friendly.

  12. A vector scanning processing technique for pulsed laser velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Edwards, Robert V.

    1989-03-01

    Pulsed laser sheet velocimetry yields nonintrusive measurements of two-dimensional velocity vectors across an extended planar region of a flow. Current processing techniques offer high precision (1 pct) velocity estimates, but can require several hours of processing time on specialized array processors. Under some circumstances, a simple, fast, less accurate (approx. 5 pct), data reduction technique which also gives unambiguous velocity vector information is acceptable. A direct space domain processing technique was examined. The direct space domain processing technique was found to be far superior to any other techniques known, in achieving the objectives listed above. It employs a new data coding and reduction technique, where the particle time history information is used directly. Further, it has no 180 deg directional ambiguity. A complex convection vortex flow was recorded and completely processed in under 2 minutes on an 80386 based PC, producing a 2-D velocity vector map of the flow field. Hence, using this new space domain vector scanning (VS) technique, pulsed laser velocimetry data can be reduced quickly and reasonably accurately, without specialized array processing hardware.

  13. Epidermal cooling during pulsed laser treatment of selected dermatoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. Stuart; Anvari, Bahman; Tanenbaum, B. S.; Milner, Thomas E.; Kimel, Sol; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The clinical objective in laser treatment of selected dermatoses such as port wine stain (PWS), hemangioma and telangiectasia is to maximize thermal damage to the blood vessels, while at the same time minimizing nonspecific injury to the normal overlying epidermis. 'Dynamic' cooling of skin, whereby a cryogen is sprayed onto the surface for an appropriately short period of time (on the order of tens of milliseconds), may offer an effective method for eliminating epidermal thermal injury during laser treatment. We present theoretical and experimental investigations of the thermal response of skin to dynamic cooling in conjunction with pulsed laser irradiation at 585 nm. Computed temperature distributions indicate that cooling the skin immediately prior to pulsed laser irradiation with a cryogen spurt of tetrafluoroethane is an effective method for eliminating epidermal thermal injury during laser treatment of PWS. Experimental results show rapid reduction of skin surface temperature is obtained when using tetrafluoroethane spurts of 20 - 100 ms duration. Successful blanching of PWS without thermal injury to the overlying epidermis is accomplished.

  14. Iridium thin films deposited via pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chenglin

    High purity Ir thin films for future applications as transition-edge sensors were deposited on Si (100) via pulsed laser deposition. The iridium deposition rate was investigated and found to have a high value with the pulsed laser power higher than 4.2×10 9 W/cm 2 . At this laser intensity range, the PLD Ir films were deposited at substrate temperature ranging from 100 to 700°C. Ir thin films' characteristics were investigated at both room temperature and low temperature with the emphasis on study of the effect of the substrate temperature during deposition on the structure and morphology of the films. The PLD films exhibited a (110) preferentially oriented polycrystalline structure. Their average grain size increased from about 30 to 110 nm as the deposition temperature was raised from 100 to 600°C. With a 700°C substrate temperature the grain size jumped to 500 nm. Iridium silicide was found in the film deposited at 700°C substrate temperature. This indicated a critical deposition temperature between 600 and 700°C. A 50 mK platform was built for low temperature measurements. At low temperature, the Residual Resistance Ratio (RRR) of the Ir thin films had a typical value of 1.50. A typical transition curve of the film showed a transition temperature higher and wider than expected.

  15. The basics of semiautomatic welding

    SciTech Connect

    Uttrachi, G.D. ); Meyer, D.W. )

    1993-08-01

    By definition, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) are semiautomatic processes in which a consumable electrode is fed into a weld at a controlled rate, while in most cases a continuous blanket of gas shields the weld zone from contamination by the atmosphere. Semiautomatic welding includes five distinctive techniques or process variations, known as short circuiting, spray transfer, pulsed spray, gas shielded flux cored, and self-shielded flux cored welding. Short circuiting welding operates on generally lower arc voltages and amperages than spray transfer. This process pinpoints the arc heat and produces a small fast-freezing weld pool. The spray transfer process provides an intensely hot, higher voltage arc and high deposition rates. The pulsed spray mode of metal transfer uses two weld current levels: low background and pulse peak. Droplet transfer usually occurs during the pulse peak portion of the cycle. The low current background allows reduced heat input and improved weld pool control. Flux cored welding transfers metal in a manner similar to spray transfer, but with larger droplets. The higher weld currents usable with flux cored welding result in higher deposition rates and deeper penetration. Self-shielded flux cored welding is similar to gas-shielded flux cored welding except that its weld shielding mechanism is self-contained in the wire. As a result, it can be used outdoors with less need for wind breaks.

  16. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  17. Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-15003 Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials Mark E. Todaro...SUBTITLE Customer Overview of Pulsed Laser Heating for Evaluation of Gun Bore Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  18. Studying the mechanism of micromachining by short pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadag, Shiva

    The semiconductor materials like Si and the transparent dielectric materials like glass and quartz are extensively used in optoelectronics, microelectronics, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) industries. The combination of these materials often go hand in hand for applications in MEMS such as in chips for pressure sensors, charge coupled devices (CCD), and photovoltaic (PV) cells for solar energy generation. The transparent negative terminal of the solar cell is made of glass on one surface of the PV cell. The positive terminal (cathode) on the other surface of the solar cell is made of silicon with a glass negative terminal (anode). The digital watches and cell phones, LEDs, micro-lens, optical components, and laser optics are other examples for the application of silicon and or glass. The Si and quartz are materials extensively used in CCD and LED for digital cameras and CD players respectively. Hence, three materials: (1) a semiconductor silicon and transparent dielectrics,- (2) glass, and (3) quartz are chosen for laser micromachining as they have wide spread applications in microelectronics industry. The Q-switched, nanosecond pulsed lasers are most extensively used for micro-machining. The nanosecond type of short pulsed laser is less expensive for the end users than the second type, pico or femto, ultra-short pulsed lasers. The majority of the research work done on these materials (Si, SiO 2, and glass) is based on the ultra-short pulsed lasers. This is because of the cut quality, pin point precision of the drilled holes, formation of the nanometer size microstructures and fine features, and minimally invasive heat affected zone. However, there are many applications such as large surface area dicing, cutting, surface cleaning of Si wafers by ablation, and drilling of relatively large-sized holes where some associated heat affected zone due to melting can be tolerated. In such applications the nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of materials is very

  19. Fundamental Mechanisms of Pulsed Laser Ablation of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albagli, Douglas

    The ability to cut and remove biological tissue with short pulsed laser light, a process called laser ablation, has the potential to revolutionize many surgical procedures. Ablation procedures using short pulsed lasers are currently being developed or used in many fields of medicine, including cardiology, ophthalmology, dermatology, dentistry, orthopedics, and urology. Despite this, the underlying physics of the ablation process is not well understood. In fact, there is wide disagreement over whether the fundamental mechanism is primarily photothermal, photomechanical, or photochemical. In this thesis, both experimental and theoretical techniques are developed to explore this issue. The photothermal model postulates that ablation proceeds through vaporization of the target material. The photomechanical model asserts that ablation is initiated when the laser-induced tensile stress exceeds the ultimate tensile strength of the target. I have developed a three dimensional model of the thermoelastic response of tissue to short pulsed laser irradiation which allows the time dependent stress distribution to be calculated given the optical, thermal and mechanical properties of the target. A complimentary experimental technique has been developed to verify this model, measure the needed physical properties of the tissue, and record the thermoelastic response of the tissue at the onset of ablation. The results of this work have been widely disseminated to the international research community and have led to significant findings which support the photomechanical model of ablation of tissue. First, the energy deposited in tissue is an order of magnitude less than that required for vaporization. Second, unlike the one-dimensional thermoelastic model of laser-induced stress generation that has appeared in the literature, the full three-dimensional model predicts the development of significant tensile stresses on the surface of the target, precisely where ablation is observed to

  20. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  1. A Coupled Approach to Weld Pool, Phase and Residual Stress Modelling of Laser Direct Metal Deposition (LDMD) Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Michael; Khan, Mushtaq; Ibara-Medina, Juansethi; Pinkerton, Andrew; N'Dri, Narcisse; Megahed, Mustafa

    This paper describes a complete CFD model of the laser metal deposition process. The model covers the complete process, starting from the simulation of powder particles in the deposition head and finishing with the final part. Individual phenomena that are considered in the gas-phase stage of the model include the ricocheting of particles within the head, the flow of powder particles, their interaction with the laser and powder catchment/bouncing. Phenomena considered in the liquid phase (melt pool) stage of the model include particle enthalpy effects, buoyancy, temperature-dependent material properties and Marangoni forces. The CFD model is coupled with a metallurgical database to predict the phase and material properties of the solidified deposit and heat affected area and residual stresses in the part. Modelled and experimental characteristics of multi-track deposits of M2 steel show good agreement.

  2. Crystallographic texture in pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite bioceramic coatings

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunbin; Camata, Renato P.; Lee, Sukbin; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Rollett, Anthony D.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2008-01-01

    The orientation texture of pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite coatings was studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. Increasing the laser energy density of the KrF excimer laser used in the deposition process from 5 to 7 J/cm2 increases the tendency for the c-axes of the hydroxyapatite grains to be aligned perpendicular to the substrate. This preferred orientation is most pronounced when the incidence direction of the plume is normal to the substrate. Orientation texture of the hydroxyapatite grains in the coatings is associated with the highly directional and energetic nature of the ablation plume. Anisotropic stresses, transport of hydroxyl groups and dehydroxylation effects during deposition all seem to play important roles in the texture development. PMID:18563207

  3. Pulsed laser linescanner for a backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2004-02-10

    An active (laser-illuminated) imaging system is described that is suitable for use in backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI). A BAGI imager operates by imaging a scene as it is illuminated with radiation that is absorbed by the gas to be detected. Gases become "visible" in the image when they attenuate the illumination creating a shadow in the image. This disclosure describes a BAGI imager that operates in a linescanned manner using a high repetition rate pulsed laser as its illumination source. The format of this system allows differential imaging, in which the scene is illuminated with light at least 2 wavelengths--one or more absorbed by the gas and one or more not absorbed. The system is designed to accomplish imaging in a manner that is insensitive to motion of the camera, so that it can be held in the hand of an operator or operated from a moving vehicle.

  4. Pulsed laser deposition and characterization of cellulase thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cicco, N.; Morone, A.; Verrastro, M.; Viggiano, V.

    2013-08-01

    Thin films of cellulase were obtained by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on an appropriate substrate. Glycoside hydrolase cellulase has received our attention because it emerges among the antifouling enzymes (enzymes being able to remove and prevent the formation of micro-organism biofilms) used in industry and medicine field. Pressed cellulase pellets, used as target material, were ablated with pulses of a Nd-YAG laser working at wavelength of 532 nm. In this work, we evaluated the impact of PLD technique both on molecular structure and hydrolytic activity of cellulase. Characteristic chemical bonds and morphology of deposited layers were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and SEM respectively. The hydrolytic activity of cellulase thin films was detected by a colorimetric assay.

  5. Thermochromic VO2 on Zinnwaldite Mica by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathevula, L.; Ngom, B. D.; Kotsedi, L.; Sechogela, P.; Doyle, T. B.; Ghouti, M.; Maaza, M.

    2014-09-01

    VO2 thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition on Zinnwaldite Mica substrates. The crystal structure, chemical composition, morphology were determined and the semiconductor/metal transition (SMT) properties of the deposited films were investigated. Without any post annealing, the films exhibit a textured nature with a VO2 (0 1 1) preferred crystallographic orientation and an elevated thermal variation of the electric resistance ratio RS/RM through the SMT at T ≈ 68 °C of the order of 104 and a narrow ∼7 °C hysteresis. In addition, the growth of the VO2 crystallites seem to be governed likely by a Volmer-Weber or Stranski-Krastanov mechanisms and certainly not a Frank-van Der Merwe process.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of anatase thin films on textile substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, André; Kunz, Clemens; Gräf, Stephan; Müller, Frank A.

    2015-10-01

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a highly versatile tool to prepare functional thin film coatings. In our study we utilised a Q-switched CO2 laser with a pulse duration τ ≈ 300 ns, a laser wavelength λ = 10.59 μm, a repetition frequency frep = 800 Hz and a peak power Ppeak = 15 kW to deposit crystalline anatase thin films on carbon fibre fabrics. For this purpose, preparatory experiments were performed on silicon substrates to optimise the anatase deposition conditions including the influence of different substrate temperatures and oxygen partial pressures. Processing parameters were then transferred to deposit anatase on carbon fibres. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analyses, Raman spectroscopy and tactile profilometry were used to characterise the samples and to reveal the formation of phase pure anatase without the occurrence of a secondary rutile phase. Methanol conversion test were used to prove the photocatalytic activity of the coated carbon fibres.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition for the synthesis of monolayer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, A.; Nakamura, H.; Wochner, P.; Ibrahimkutty, S.; Schulz, A.; Müller, K.; Starke, U.; Stuhlhofer, B.; Cristiani, G.; Logvenov, G.; Takagi, H.

    2017-08-01

    Atomically thin films of WSe2 from one monolayer up to 8 layers were deposited on an Al2O3 r-cut ( 1 1 ¯ 02 ) substrate using a hybrid-Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) system where a laser ablation of pure W is combined with a flux of Se. Specular X-ray reflectivities of films were analysed and were consistent with the expected thickness. Raman measurement and atomic force microscopy confirmed the formation of a WSe2 monolayer and its spatial homogeneity over the substrate. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction uncovered an in-plane texture in which WSe2 [ 10 1 ¯ 0 ] preferentially aligned with Al2O3 [ 11 2 ¯ 0 ]. These results present a potential to create 2D transition metal dichalcogenides by PLD, where the growth kinetics can be steered in contrast to common growth techniques like chemical vapor deposition and molecular beam epitaxy.

  8. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-05-30

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future.

  9. Fluorescence study of silicon fabricated by nanosecond pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chunyang; Sun, Lidong; Lu, Yulan; Fu, Xing; Sun, Fengming; Zeppenfield, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Some ~20μm wide slots have been fabricated on Si (100) using a homebuilt 355nm nanosecond pulse laser micromachining system. The slots were characterized by fluorescence microscopy, local spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A kind of microstructure like porous silicon was formed in the fabrication zone. Strong photoluminescence emission from the fabricated zone in the wavelength range between 450nm and 700nm has been detected. Furthermore, a strong decay of the PL intensity has been observed as a function of irradiation time for excitation with wavelength between 400nm and 440nm. The analysis of elemental composition in the fabrication zone shows that the fluorescence emission is in relationship with Oxygen distribution and the modified structure.

  10. Experimental investigation of a unique airbreathing pulsed laser propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Manka, C.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into unique methods of converting pulsed laser energy into propulsive thrust across a flat impulse surface under atmospheric conditions. The propulsion experiments were performed with a 1-micron neodymium-glass laser at the Space Plasma Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory. Laser-induced impulse was measured dynamically by ballistic pendulums and statically using piezoelectric pressure transducers on a stationary impulse surface. The principal goal was to explore methods for increasing the impulse coupling performance of airbreathing laser-propulsion engines. A magnetohydrodynamic thrust augmentation effect was discovered when a tesla-level magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the impulse surface. The impulse coupling coefficient performance doubled and continued to improve with increasing laser-pulse energies. The resultant performance of 180 to 200 N-s/MJ was found to be comparable to that of the earliest afterburning turbojets.

  11. Pulsed Laser Deposition of the Ni-Base Superalloy Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Joonghan; Mazumder, Jyotirmoy

    2016-03-01

    Ni-base superalloy films were deposited on single-crystal (SC) Ni-base superalloy substrates from a target with the same alloy composition by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. Microstructure and growth behavior of the films deposited were investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscope. The homoepitaxial growth of the SC Ni-base superalloy film occurred at the 1123 K (850 °C) substrate temperature and 2 J/cm2 pulse energy. Films generally exhibited a strong polycrystalline characteristic as the substrate temperature and pulse energy increased. The SC film had a smooth surface. The measured root mean square roughness of the SC film surface was ~6 nm. Based on the Taguchi analysis, the substrate temperature and pulse energy were the most significant process parameters influencing the structural characteristics of the films. Also, the influence of the pulse repletion rate and deposition time was not found to be significant.

  12. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future. PMID:24875665

  13. Aluminosilicate glass thin films elaborated by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, Thibault; Saitzek, Sébastien; Méar, François O.; Blach, Jean-François; Ferri, Anthony; Huvé, Marielle; Montagne, Lionel

    2017-03-01

    In the present work, we report the elaboration of aluminosilicate glass thin films by Pulsed Laser Deposition at various temperatures deposition. The amorphous nature of glass thin films was highlighted by Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction and no nanocristallites were observed in the glassy matrix. Chemical analysis, obtained with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy, showed a good transfer and homogeneous elementary distribution with of chemical species from the target to the film a. Structural studies performed by Infrared Spectroscopy showed that the substrate temperature plays an important role on the bonding configuration of the layers. A slight shift of Si-O modes to larger wavenumber was observed with the synthesis temperature, assigned to a more strained sub-oxide network. Finally, optical properties of thins film measured by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry are similar to those of the bulk aluminosilicate glass, which indicate a good deposition of aluminosilicate bulk glass.

  14. Formation of ultrasmooth thin silver films by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, I. A.; Garaeva, M. Ya.; Mamichev, D. A. Grishchenko, Yu. V.; Zanaveskin, M. L.

    2013-09-15

    Ultrasmooth thin silver films have been formed on a quartz substrate with a buffer yttrium oxide layer by pulsed laser deposition. The dependence of the surface morphology of the film on the gas (N{sub 2}) pressure in the working chamber and laser pulse energy is investigated. It is found that the conditions of film growth are optimal at a gas pressure of 10{sup -2} Torr and lowest pulse energy. The silver films formed under these conditions on a quartz substrate with an initial surface roughness of 0.3 nm had a surface roughness of 0.36 nm. These films can be used as a basis for various optoelectronics and nanoplasmonics elements.

  15. Heteroepitaxial Growth of NSMO on Silicon by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kolagani, R; Friedrich, S

    2008-06-25

    The following is the optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) procedure by which we prepared the final samples that were sent to LLNL. These samples are epitaxial multilayer structures of Si/YSZ/CeO/NSMO, where the abbreviations are explained in the following table. In this heterostructure, YSZ serves as a buffer layer to prevent deleterious chemical reactions, and also serves to de-oxygenate the amorphous SiO{sub 2} layer to generate a crystalline template for epitaxy. CeO and BTO serve as template layers to minimize the effects of thermal and lattice mismatch strains, respectively. More details on the buffer and template layer scheme are included in the manuscript [Yong et al., 2008] attached to this report.

  16. Resonant infrared pulsed laser deposition of a polyimide precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dygert, N. L.; Schriver, K. E.; Haglund, R. F., Jr.

    2007-04-01

    Poly(amic acid) (PAA), a precursor to polyimide, was successfully deposited on substrates without reaching curing temperature, by resonant infrared pulsed laser ablation. The PAA was prepared by dissolving pyromellitic dianhydride and 4, 4' oxidianiline in the polar solvent Nmethyl pyrrolidinone (NMP). The PAA was deposited in droplet-like morphologies when ablation occurred in air, and in string-like moieties in the case of ablation in vacuum. In the as-deposited condition, the PAA was easily removed by washing with NMP; however, once cured thermally for thirty minutes, the PAA hardened, indicating the expected thermosetting property. Plume shadowgraphy showed very clear contrasts in the ablation mechanism between ablation of the solvent alone and the ablation of the PAA, even at low concentrations. A Wavelength dependence in plume velocity was also observed.

  17. Prediction of absorption coefficients by pulsed laser induced photoacoustic measurements.

    PubMed

    Priya, Mallika; Satish Rao, B S; Ray, Satadru; Mahato, K K

    2014-06-05

    In the current study, a pulsed laser induced photoacoustic spectroscopy setup was designed and developed, aiming its application in clinical diagnostics. The setup was optimized with carbon black samples in water and with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitations. The sensitivity of the setup was estimated by determining minimum detectable concentration of tryptophan in water at the same excitation, and was found to be 0.035mM. The photoacoustic experiments were also performed with various tryptophan concentrations at 281nm excitation for predicting optical absorption coefficients in them and for comparing the outcomes with the spectrophotometrically-determined absorption coefficients for the same samples. Absorption coefficients for a few serum samples, obtained from some healthy female volunteers, were also determined through photoacoustic and spectrophotometric measurements at the same excitations, which showed good agreement between them, indicating its clinical implications.

  18. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique

    PubMed Central

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    Summary We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections. PMID:24991524

  19. History and current status of commercial pulsed laser deposition equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, James A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper will review the history of the scale-up of the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process from small areas ∼1 cm2 up to 10 m2 starting in about 1987. It also documents the history of commercialization of PLD as various companies become involved in selling fully integrated laser deposition tools starting in 1989. The paper will highlight the current state of the art of commercial PLD equipment for R&D that is available on the market today from mainstream vendors as well as production-oriented applications directed at piezo-electric materials for microelectromechanical systems and high-temperature superconductors for coated-conductor applications. The paper clearly demonstrates that considerable improvements have been made to scaling this unique physical vapour deposition process to useful substrate sizes, and that commercial deposition equipment is readily available from a variety of vendors to address a wide variety of technologically important thin-film applications.

  20. Antimicrobial nanospheres thin coatings prepared by advanced pulsed laser technique.

    PubMed

    Holban, Alina Maria; Grumezescu, Valentina; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Truşcă, Roxana; Cristescu, Rodica; Socol, Gabriel; Iordache, Florin

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of thin coatings based on polylactic acid-chitosan-magnetite-eugenol (PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG) nanospheres by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigation proved that the homogenous Fe3O4@EUG nanoparticles have an average diameter of about 7 nm, while the PLA-CS-Fe3O4@EUG nanospheres diameter sizes range between 20 and 80 nm. These MAPLE-deposited coatings acted as bioactive nanosystems and exhibited a great antimicrobial effect by impairing the adherence and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bacteria strains. Moreover, the obtained nano-coatings showed a good biocompatibility and facilitated the normal development of human endothelial cells. These nanosystems may be used as efficient alternatives in treating and preventing bacterial infections.

  1. Soft X-Ray Optics by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    1996-01-01

    Mo/Si and C/Co multilayers for soft x-ray optics were designed for spectral regions of interest in possible applications. Fabrication was effected by Pulsed Laser Deposition using Nd:YAG (355 nm) or excimer (248 nm) lasers in order to evaluate the suitability of this technique. Results for Mo/Si structures were not considered satisfactory due mainly to problems with particulate production and target surface modification during Si ablation. These problems may be alleviated by a two-wavelength approach, using separate lasers for each target. Results for C/Co multilayers are much more encouraging, since indication of good layering was observed for extremely thin layers. We expect to continue investigating this possibility. In order to compete with traditional PVD techniques, it is necessary to achieve film coverage uniformity over large enough areas. It was shown that this is feasible, and novel means of achieving it were devised.

  2. A preliminary study of pulse-laser powered orbital launcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsurayama, Hiroshi; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2009-10-01

    An air-breathing pulse-laser powered orbital launcher has been proposed as an alternative to conventional chemical launch systems. The aim of the present study is to assess its feasibility through the estimation of its achievable payload mass per unit beam power and launch cost. A transfer trajectory from the ground to a geosynchronous Earth orbit (GEO) is proposed, and the launch trajectory to its geosynchronous transfer orbit (GTO) is computed using the realistic performance modeled in the pulsejet, ramjet, and rocket flight modes of the launcher. Results show that the launcher can transfer 0.084 kg of payload per 1 MW beam power to a geosynchronous earth orbit. The cost becomes a quarter of existing systems if one can divide a single launch into 24,000 multiple launches.

  3. Bioactive glass thin films synthesized by advanced pulsed laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihailescu, N.; Stan, George E.; Ristoscu, C.; Sopronyi, M.; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2016-10-01

    Bioactive materials play an increasingly important role in the biomaterials industry, and are extensively used in a range of applications, including biodegradable metallic implants. We report on Bioactive Glasses (BG) films deposition by pulsed laser techniques onto biodegradable substrates. The BG coatings were obtained using a KrF* excimer laser source (λ= 248 nm, τFWHM ≤ 25 ns).Their thickness has been determined by Profilometry measurements, whilst their morphology has been analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The obtained coatings fairly preserved the targets composition and structure, as revealed by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Grazing Incidence X-Ray Diffraction, and Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy analyses.

  4. Friction behavior of pulsed laser deposited tungsten disulfide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S. V.; Zabinski, J. S.; McDevitt, N. T.

    1995-01-01

    This reseach describes the friction behavior of pulsed laser-deposited tungsten disulfide films. A ball-on-flat apparatus, in which a 440C stainless steel ball was held on rotating disk coated with a WS2 film, was used as the test configuration. Friction measurements were made in dry nitrogen and in laboratory air. Wear surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The friction coefficient of the film in dry nitrogen was 0.04, and in laboratory air it rose to between 0.10 and 0.15. In the dry nitrogen case, friction induced some degree of crystallinity into the otherwise amorphous film, while rubbing in air mostly resulted in oxidation of the film. Transfer films formed in a dry environment were smooth, tenacious and formed in air were patchy and powdery in nature.

  5. Matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition of melanin thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloisi, F.; Pezzella, A.; Barra, M.; Chiarella, F.; Cassinese, A.; Vicari, L.

    2011-07-01

    Melanins constitute a very important class of organic pigments, recently emerging as a potential material for a new generation of bioinspired biocompatible electrically active devices. In this paper, we report about the deposition of synthetic melanin films starting from aqueous suspensions by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In particular, we demonstrate that it is possible to deposit melanin films by MAPLE even if melanin (a) is not soluble in water and (b) absorbs light from UV to IR. AFM images reveal that the film surface features are highly depending on the deposition parameters. UV-VIS and FTIR spectra show both the optical properties and the molecular structure typical of melanins are preserved.

  6. Spatial filter pinhole for high-energy pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Celliers, P.M.; Estabrook, K.G.; Wallace, R.J.; Murray, J.E.; Da Silva, L.B.; MacGowan, B.J.; Van Wonterghem, B.M.; Manes, K.R.

    1998-04-01

    Spatial filters are essential components for maintaining high beam quality in high-energy pulsed laser systems. The long-duration (21 ns) high-energy pulses envisioned for future inertial-confinement fusion drive systems, such as the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), are likely to lead to increased plasma generation and closure effects within the pinholes in the spatial filters. The design goal for the pinhole spatial filter for the NIF design is to remove small-angle scatter in the beam to as little as a {plus_minus}100-{mu}rad divergence. It is uncertain whether this design requirement can be met with a conventional pinhole design. We propose a new pinhole architecture that addresses these issues by incorporating features intended to reduce the rate of plasma generation. Initial experiments with this design have verified its performance improvement relative to a conventional pinhole design. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  7. Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, G.

    1995-12-31

    The research is aimed at understanding the structural, electronic, and reactive properties of semiconductors in solutions. Focus is on Si and GaAs surfaces because they are used in photovoltaic devices, etc. The pulsed laser techniques used included surface second harmonic generation in Si and laser induced photoluminescence in GaAs. SHG can measure space charge effects in the semiconductor under various conditions, ie, immersed in electrolyte, in presence of oxide overlayers, and under UHV conditions. The Si studies demonstrated the sensitivity of the phase of the SH response to space charge effects. With GaAs, time-correlated single photon counting methods were used in the picosecond time regime to examine the recombination luminescence following above band gap excitation (surface trapping velocities).

  8. Pulsed-laser deposition of crystalline Teflon (PTFE) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. T.; Arenholz, E.; Heitz, J.; Bäuerle, D.

    1998-01-01

    Thin films of crystalline polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition using 248 nm UV-excimer-laser radiation. Pressed powder pellets and bulk PTFE have been employed as target material. The films were analyzed by means of optical polarization microscopy, stylus profilometry, capacity measurements, XRD, and IR spectroscopy. The effect of substrate temperature Ts on the morphology and crystallinity of the films was studied. Films deposited from pressed powder targets at sufficiently high Ts consist mainly of spherulite-like microcrystallites. These films are continuous, pinhole-free, well adherent to the substrate, and have a composition which is similar to that of the target material. It is suggested that film formation is based on laser-assisted material transfer with subsequent melting and crystallization. They are superior to films deposited from PTFE bulk targets, cut from a solid rod, with respect to film morphology, deposition rate, film cohesion, and optical and electrical properties.

  9. Pulsed laser ablation synthesis of carbon nanoparticles in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemizadeh, Fatemeh; Malekfar, Rasoul; Parvin, Parviz

    2017-05-01

    Crystalline carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with narrow size distribution were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) of graphite in vacuum under a slow flow of argon gas. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate the formation of interconnected carbon particles that exhibit a graphitic nanostructure in X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) characterization. Photoluminescence (PL) was observed after acid treatment and surface passivation on synthesized CNPs. PL spectra indicated the existence of narrow size distribution of particles that is confirmed by TEM image, XRD pattern and Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, TEM image, Raman spectra and XRD patterns of surface passivated CNPs show that raw CNPs in an interconnected structure are fragmented into distinct particles that leads to surface to volume ratio increase and photoluminescence enhancement. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed that in addition to the size confinement, the surface modification of CNPs by carboxylate and methyl groups after surface passivation is also a reason for photoluminescence.

  10. Experimental investigation of a unique airbreathing pulsed laser propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Nagamatsu, H. T.; Manka, C.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Investigations were conducted into unique methods of converting pulsed laser energy into propulsive thrust across a flat impulse surface under atmospheric conditions. The propulsion experiments were performed with a 1-micron neodymium-glass laser at the Space Plasma Branch of the Naval Research Laboratory. Laser-induced impulse was measured dynamically by ballistic pendulums and statically using piezoelectric pressure transducers on a stationary impulse surface. The principal goal was to explore methods for increasing the impulse coupling performance of airbreathing laser-propulsion engines. A magnetohydrodynamic thrust augmentation effect was discovered when a tesla-level magnetic field was applied perpendicular to the impulse surface. The impulse coupling coefficient performance doubled and continued to improve with increasing laser-pulse energies. The resultant performance of 180 to 200 N-s/MJ was found to be comparable to that of the earliest afterburning turbojets.

  11. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  12. Testing of a femtosecond pulse laser in outer space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohyung; Lee, Keunwoo; Jang, Yoon-Soo; Jang, Heesuk; Han, Seongheum; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Kang, Kyung-In; Lim, Chul-Woo; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2014-05-01

    We report a test operation of an Er-doped fibre femtosecond laser which was conducted for the first time in outer space. The fibre-based ultrashort pulse laser payload was designed to meet space-use requirements, undergone through ground qualification tests and finally launched into a low-earth orbit early in 2013. Test results obtained during a one-year mission lifetime confirmed stable mode-locking all the way through although the radiation induced attenuation (RIA) in the Er-doped gain fibre caused an 8.6% reduction in the output power. This successful test operation would help facilitate diverse scientific and technological applications of femtosecond lasers in space and earth atmosphere in the near future.

  13. Substitutional nitrogen impurities in pulsed-laser annealed silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Kouichi; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Takita, Kôki; Masuda, Kohzoh

    1984-07-01

    Single-crystal Si samples with nitrogen (N) impurities (Si:N) and with N and phosphorus (P) impurities (Si:N:P) have been investigated by electron spin resonance measurements. It was found that substitutional N impurities Ns cannot be incorporated into Si by cw laser annealing of N ion-implanted Si or by N doping during crystal growth; however, Ns is incorporated into Si by pulsed-laser annealing (PLA) of N ion-implanted Si. The spin density of Ns decreases with doping of P shallow donors into PLA Si:N and increases by introduction of slight point defects in PLA Si:N:P. These results suggest that Ns with a negative charge are formed in PLA Si: N:P system.

  14. Response of silicon solar cell to pulsed laser illumination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willowby, D.; Alexander, D.; Edge, T.; Herren, K.

    1993-01-01

    The response of silicon solar cell(s) to pulsed laser illumination is discussed. The motivation was due to the interest of Earth to space/Moon power beaming applications. When this work began, it was not known if solar cells would respond to laser light with pulse lengths in the nanosecond range and a repetition frequency in the kHz range. This is because the laser pulse would be shorter than the minority carrier lifetime of silicon. A 20-nanosecond (ns) full width half max (FWHM) pulse from an aluminum-gallium/arsenide (Al-Ga-As) diode laser was used to illuminate silicon solar cells at a wavelength of 885 nanometers (nm). Using a high-speed digital oscilloscope, the response of the solar cells to individual pulses across various resistive loads was observed and recorded.

  15. Vascular spasm complicates continuous wave but not pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gal, D.; Steg, P.G.; Rongione, A.J.; DeJesus, S.T.; Clarke, R.H.; Isner, J.M. )

    1989-11-01

    Preliminary clinical experience with laser angioplasty has suggested that arterial spasm may complicate attempts to employ laser light to accomplish vascular recanalization. The present study was designed to investigate the role of energy profile on the development of arterial spasm during laser angioplasty. Laser irradiation was delivered percutaneously in vivo to New Zealand white rabbits and to Yucatan microswine with or without atherosclerotic lesions induced by a combination of balloon endothelial denudation and atherogenic diet. Continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation from an argon ion gas laser (wavelength 488 to 514 nm) was applied to 23 arteries, while 16 arteries were irradiated using a pulsed xenon chloride (308 nm) or xenon fluoride (351 nm) excimer laser. Arterial spasm, defined as greater than 50% reduction in luminal diameter narrowing, complicated delivery of laser light to 17 (74%) of the 23 arteries irradiated with the CW argon laser. Spasm was consistently observed at powers greater than 2 W, at cumulative exposures greater than 200 seconds, and at total energy greater than 200 joules. Spasm was typically diffuse (including the length of the vessel) and protracted (lasting up to 120 minutes). Intra-arterial nitroglycerin (up to 300 micrograms) produced only temporary and incomplete resolution of laser-induced spasm. In contrast, spasm was never observed in any of the 16 arteries in which laser angioplasty was performed using a pulsed laser (0.95 to 6.37 joules/cm2, 10 to 50 Hz, 48 to 370 seconds). Thus CW but not pulsed laser angioplasty may be complicated by arterial spasm

  16. Welding Behavior of Free Machining Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    BROOKS,JOHN A.; ROBINO,CHARLES V.; HEADLEY,THOMAS J.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.

    2000-07-24

    The weld solidification and cracking behavior of sulfur bearing free machining austenitic stainless steel was investigated for both gas-tungsten arc (GTA) and pulsed laser beam weld processes. The GTA weld solidification was consistent with those predicted with existing solidification diagrams and the cracking response was controlled primarily by solidification mode. The solidification behavior of the pulsed laser welds was complex, and often contained regions of primary ferrite and primary austenite solidification, although in all cases the welds were found to be completely austenite at room temperature. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) pattern analysis indicated that the nature of the base metal at the time of solidification plays a primary role in initial solidification. The solid state transformation of austenite to ferrite at the fusion zone boundary, and ferrite to austenite on cooling may both be massive in nature. A range of alloy compositions that exhibited good resistance to solidification cracking and was compatible with both welding processes was identified. The compositional range is bounded by laser weldability at lower Cr{sub eq}/Ni{sub eq} ratios and by the GTA weldability at higher ratios. It was found with both processes that the limiting ratios were somewhat dependent upon sulfur content.

  17. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser welding of A SiC particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, T. M.; Xu, J. H.; Man, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the laser welding behaviour of a SiC particulate reinforced Al-alloy 2124 composite using a pulsed Nd-YAG laser. The influences of laser welding parameters of laser intensity, pulse duration and the beam's focus position on the depth of weld penetration as well as the size of fusion zone were investigated. These investigations have led to an optimum welding condition proposed for pulsed laser welding of SiC particulate reinforced aluminium alloy composites with minimum defects.

  18. Tb and Ce Doped Y123 Films Processed by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    onto SrTiO3 single crystal substrates by pulsed laser ablation. Doped YBCO films were characterized for Tc, magnetic field dependence of Jc (at 77 K...AFRL-PR-WP-TP-2006-221 Tb AND Ce DOPED Y123 FILMS PROCESSED BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION Joseph W. Kell, Timothy J. Haugan, Mary Frances Locke...From - To) 05/10/2003 — 05/10/2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Tb AND Ce DOPED Y123 FILMS PROCESSED BY PULSED LASER DEPOSITION . 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In

  19. Short-pulse laser formation of monatomic metallic glass in tantalum nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yong; Sun, Zheng; Shen, Yaogen

    2017-01-01

    The short-pulse laser heating of a tantalum nanowire is simulated by a hybrid method coupling the two-temperature model into the molecular dynamics. It is shown that the monatomic metallic glasses can be formed by short-pulse lasers. The critical cooling rate for vitrifying the pure metallic liquids in tantalum nanowire is estimated to be on the order of 1013 K s-1. Further simulations with different laser parameters and heated spot size are performed, demonstrating that the short-pulse laser quenching is a robust and promising alternative to the vitrification of monatomic metallic liquids into glassy state.

  20. The effect of polarization on ultrashort pulsed laser ablation of thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, K.; Tan, B.; Stanley, P.; Sivakumar, N. R.

    2002-08-01

    Ultrashort pulse lasers have proven to have superior advantages over conventional continuous wave and long pulse lasers for ablation of thin metal films. Though several investigations have been carried out to understand the phenomena of ultrashort pulse laser machining, the effect of the beam polarization on ablation of thin metal films has been seldom investigated. In this article, we report our recent observations on how the shape of the machined feature and also the damage threshold of the material varies according to the polarization of the ultrashort pulse laser beam. Based on this we have explained how the polarization of the beam controls the laser cutting rate, kerf width, edge quality, and ablation depth of the ablated feature.

  1. Modeling pulsed-laser melting of embedded semiconductor nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, C. A.; Guzman, J.; Boswell-Koller, C. N.; Sherburne, M. P.; Mastandrea, J. P.; Bustillo, K. C.; Ager, J. W.; Haller, E. E.; Chrzan, D. C.

    2011-11-01

    Pulsed-laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in both thin films and nanoparticles. A model for the size evolution during PLM of nanoparticles confined in a transparent matrix, such as those created by ion-beam synthesis, is presented. A self-consistent mean-field rate equations approach that has been used successfully to model ion beam synthesis of germanium nanoparticles in silica is extended to include the PLM process. The PLM model includes classical optical absorption, multiscale heat transport by both analytical and finite difference methods, and melting kinetics for confined nanoparticles. The treatment of nucleation and coarsening behavior developed for the ion beam synthesis model is modified to allow for a nonuniform temperature gradient and for interacting liquid and solid particles with different properties. The model allows prediction of the particle size distribution after PLM under various laser fluences, starting from any particle size distribution including as-implanted or annealed simulated samples. A route for narrowing the size distribution of embedded nanoparticles is suggested, with simulated distribution widths as low as 15% of the average size.

  2. Computational design of short pulse laser driven iron opacity experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, M. E.; London, R. A.; Goluoglu, S.; Whitley, H. D.

    2017-02-01

    The resolution of current disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations would benefit from the experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Iron's complex ionic structure and large contribution to the opacity in the radiative zone of the sun make iron a good candidate for validation. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat buried layer targets to plasma conditions comparable to the radiative zone of the sun, and the frequency dependent opacity can be inferred from the target's measured x-ray emission. Target and laser parameters must be optimized to reach specific plasma conditions and meet x-ray emission requirements. The HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of iron and iron-magnesium buried layer targets. It was determined that plasma conditions are dominantly controlled by the laser energy and the tamper thickness. The accuracy of the inferred opacity is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. Experiments at conditions relevant to the radiative zone of the sun would investigate the validity of opacity theories important to resolving disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations.

  3. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes ofmore » materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.« less

  4. Quantum Hooke's Law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  5. Hyperbolic Heat Conduction In Pulsed Laser Irradiation Of Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, Sohi

    1989-08-01

    The use of lasers for ablation of biological tissues is becoming common place in many medical and surgical applications. However, the complete nature of the ablation mechanism is yet to be understood. Many authors have contributed to the theoretical understanding and modeling of the thermodynamics of ablation process by a laser. Some examples are [LANGERHOLC,1979; VAN GEMERT et al., 1985; ARMON and LAUFER, 1986; MCKENZIE, 1986; PARTOVI et al., 1987; RASTEGAR et al., 1988]. In a previous theoretical work the effect of optical properties on the ablation process has been shown [RASTEGAR et al., 19881)]. The effect of variation of power and exposure time over a constant fluence delivered on the tissue volume removed and the damage incurred on the surrounding tissue is shown in figure 1 [ RASTEGAR et al., 1988a]. This shows that for a given fluence, as power is increased and exposure duration is decreased the change on the volume removed is not significant while the damage to the surrounding tissue is significantly lessened. However these results, and those of the above references, are based on Fourier's law of heat conduction which is valid for relatively low power CW laser irradiation. The interaction of short pulsed high power lasers with tissues manifests a different behavior and application of Fourier's heat conduction law becomes questionable. In particular, in some experimental observations application of pulsed lasers has shown no apparent thermal damage to the surrounding tissue.

  6. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of gold nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caricato, A. P.; Fernàndez, M.; Leggieri, G.; Luches, A.; Martino, M.; Romano, F.; Tunno, T.; Valerini, D.; Verdyan, A.; Soifer, Y. M.; Azoulay, J.; Meda, L.

    2007-07-01

    We report on the growth and characterization of gold nitride thin films on Si <1 0 0> substrates at room temperature by reactive pulsed laser ablation. A pure (99.95%) Au target was ablated with KrF excimer laser pulses in nitrogen containing atmosphere (N 2 or NH 3). The gas ambient pressure was varied in the range 0.1-100 Pa. The morphology of the films was studied by using optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy, evidencing compact films with RMS roughness in the range 3.6-35.1 nm, depending on the deposition pressure. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) were used to detect the nitrogen concentration into the films. The EDS nitrogen peak does not decrease in intensity after 2 h annealing at 250 °C. Film resistivity was measured using a four-point probe and resulted in the (4-20) × 10 -8 Ω m range, depending on the ambient pressure, to be compared with the value 2.6 × 10 -8 Ω m of a pure gold film. Indentation and scratch measurements gave microhardness values of 2-3 GPa and the Young's modulus close to 100 GPa. X-ray photoemission spectra clearly showed the N 1s peak around 400 eV and displaced with respect to N 2 phase. All these measurements point to the formation of the gold nitride phase.

  7. Pulsed laser photofragment emission for detection of mercuric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoops, Alexandra A.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2006-08-01

    The viability of pulsed laser photofragment emission (PFE) is evaluated for the in situ measurement of vapor-phase mercuric chloride (HgCl2) concentration in combustion flue gas. Dispersed emissions from both the Hg (63P1) and HgCl (B2Σ+) photoproducts are presented, and the dependence of the HgCl2 PFE signal originating from Hg (63P1) on the collisional environment is examined for buffer-gas mixtures of N2, O2, and CO2. Integrated PFE intensity measurements as a function of buffer gas pressure support the assumption that the primary effect of the relevant flue gas constituents is to quench emission from Hg (63P1). The quenching rate constants for PFE from HgCl2 were measured to be 1.37 (±0.16)×105 Torr-1 s-1 for N2, 9.35 (±0.25)×106 Torr-1 s-1 for O2, and 1.49 (±0.29)×106 Torr-1 s-1 for CO2. These values are in good accord with literature values for the quenching of Hg (63P1). The emission cross section for Hg (63P1) generated by photodissociation of HgCl2 in 760 Torr N2 is found to be 1.0 (±0.2)×10-25 m2 by comparing the PFE signal to N2 Raman scattering.

  8. Tailoring of multilayer interfaces by pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luby, S.; Majkova, E.

    2005-07-01

    Multilayers (MLs) consisting of a few nm thick alternating layers of two different materials are broadly used in soft X-ray optics and in giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors. The efficiency of ML-based devices depends on the quality and thermal stability of the interfaces, which must be sharp at the nm scale. It is shown that, using heating with excimer laser pulses of 30 ns and fluence of approximately 0.1 J cm -2, the diffusion length for one laser pulse in the above mentioned MLs is in the region of nanometers, i.e. it closely matches the thickness of the ML sublayers. Therefore, pulsed laser induced diffusion can be used for controlled manipulation and tailoring of ML interface properties. Depending on the miscibility or immiscibility of the ML material combinations, the interfaces could be intermixed or even sharpened, which is attributed to the backdiffusion process. These phenomena are demonstrated for various combinations of ML building layers, like W/Si, Co/Ag, Fe/W and Co/W. The experimental samples were analyzed by X-ray reflectivity and X-ray diffuse scattering, combined with TEM.

  9. Fabrication of Au nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikov, Rumen G.; Dikovska, Anna Og.; Nedyalkov, Nikolay N.; Atanasov, Petar A.

    2016-01-01

    Results on fabrication of Au nanostructures by laser ablation in open air are presented. The ablation of the Au target is performed in air environment by nanosecond laser pulses delivered by Nd:YAG laser system operated at λ = 355 nm. Due to the high density of the ambient atmosphere, the intensive collisions of the plume spices result in formation of nanoparticles and aggregates by condensation close to the target. The produced nanoagregates are deposited on a quartz substrate where grow in a specific nanostructure. Diagnostics of the laser-generated plasma for the laser fluences used in this study is performed. Study based on change of ambient conditions shows that the increase of the air pressure from 10 Torr to atmospheric one leads to transition from thin film to porous structures. It is found that the surface morphology of the structures produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in open air strongly depends on the substrate-target distance. The electrical properties of the obtained structures are studied by measurement of their electrical resistance. It is found that the conductivity of the structures strongly depends on their morphology. The fabricated structures have potential for application in the field of electronics and sensors.

  10. Pulsed laser planarization of metal films for multilevel interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Tuckerman, D.B.; Schmitt, R.L.

    1985-05-01

    Multilevel interconnect schemes for integrated circuits generally require one or more planarization steps, in order to maintain an acceptably flat topography for lithography and thin-film step coverage on the higher levels. Traditional approaches have involved planarization of the interlevel insulation (dielectric) layers, either by spin-on application (e.g., polyimide), or by reflow (e.g., phosphosilicate glass). We have pursued an alternative approach, in which each metal level is melted (hence planarized) using a pulsed laser prior to patterning. Short (approx.1 ..mu..s) pulses are used to preclude undesirable metallurgical reactions between the film, adhesion or barrier layer, and dielectric layer. Laser planarization of metals is particularly well suited to multilevel systems which include ground or power planes. Results are presented for planarization of gold films on SiO/sub 2/ dielectric layers using a flashlamp-pumped dye laser. The pulse duration is approx.1 ..mu..s, which allows the heat pulse to uniformly penetrate the gold while not penetrating substantially through the underlying SiO/sub 2/ (hence not perturbing the lower levels of metal). Excellent planarization of the gold films is achieved (less than 0.1 ..mu..m surface roughness, even starting with extreme topographic variations), as well as improved conductivity. To demonstrate the process, numerous planarized two-layer structures (transmission lines under a ground plane) were fabricated and characterized. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Computational design of short pulse laser driven iron opacity experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, M. E.; London, R. A.; Goluoglu, S.; ...

    2017-02-23

    Here, the resolution of current disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations would benefit from the experimental validation of theoretical opacity models. Iron's complex ionic structure and large contribution to the opacity in the radiative zone of the sun make iron a good candidate for validation. Short pulse lasers can be used to heat buried layer targets to plasma conditions comparable to the radiative zone of the sun, and the frequency dependent opacity can be inferred from the target's measured x-ray emission. Target and laser parameters must be optimized to reach specific plasma conditions and meet x-ray emissionmore » requirements. The HYDRA radiation hydrodynamics code is used to investigate the effects of modifying laser irradiance and target dimensions on the plasma conditions, x-ray emission, and inferred opacity of iron and iron-magnesium buried layer targets. It was determined that plasma conditions are dominantly controlled by the laser energy and the tamper thickness. The accuracy of the inferred opacity is sensitive to tamper emission and optical depth effects. Experiments at conditions relevant to the radiative zone of the sun would investigate the validity of opacity theories important to resolving disagreements between solar parameters calculated from models and observations.« less

  12. Pulsed laser deposition and characterizations of pyrochlore iridate thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Matthew; Aviles-Acosta, Jaime; Xie, Yuantao; Zhu, Wenka; Li, Zhen; Chen, Aiping; Li, Nan; Tao, Chenggang; Jia, Quanxi; Heremans, J. J.; Zhang, S. X.

    Pyrochlore iridates have attracted growing interest in recent years because of their potential to realize novel topological phases. While most of the previous studies have focused on polycrystalline and single crystalline bulk samples, epitaxial thin films offer a unique platform for controllable tuning of material parameters such as oxygen stoichiometry and elastic strain to achieve new electronic states. In this talk, we will present the growth and characterizations of epitaxial thin films of pyrochlore Y2Ir2O7 and Bi2Ir2O7 that are predicted to host topologically non-trivial states. The iridate thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition at different conditions, and a narrow window for epitaxial growth was determined. Characterizations of crystalline structures were performed using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy to establish a growth parameter-structure phase diagram. The compositions of thin films were determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and the surface morphologies were characterized using atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Magneto-transport studies indicate a strong dependence of transport properties on the oxygen stoichiometry and the film thickness.

  13. Luminescent graphene quantum dots fabricated by pulsed laser synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Habiba, Khaled; Makarov, Vladimir I.; Avalos, Javier; Guinel, Maxime J.F.; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has been the subject of intense research in recent years due to its unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties. Furthermore, it is expected that quantum dots of graphene would make their way into devices due to their structure and composition which unify graphene and quantum dots properties. Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are planar nano flakes with a few atomic layers thick and with a higher surface-to-volume ratio than spherical carbon dots (CDs) of the same size. We have developed a pulsed laser synthesis (PLS) method for the synthesis of GQDs that are soluble in water, measure 2–6 nm across, and are about 1–3 layers thick. They show strong intrinsic fluorescence in the visible region. The source of fluorescence can be attributed to various factors, such as: quantum confinement, zigzag edge structure, and surface defects. Confocal microscopy images of bacteria exposed to GQDs show their suitability as biomarkers and nano-probes in high contrast bioimaging. PMID:27570249

  14. The efficiency of photovoltaic cells exposed to pulsed laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, R. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P.

    1993-01-01

    Future space missions may use laser power beaming systems with a free electron laser (FEL) to transmit light to a photovoltaic array receiver. To investigate the efficiency of solar cells with pulsed laser light, several types of GaAs, Si, CuInSe2, and GaSb cells were tested with the simulated pulse format of the induction and radio frequency (RF) FEL. The induction pulse format was simulated with an 800-watt average power copper vapor laser and the RF format with a frequency-doubled mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. Averaged current vs bias voltage measurements for each cell were taken at various optical power levels and the efficiency measured at the maximum power point. Experimental results show that the conversion efficiency for the cells tested is highly dependent on cell minority carrier lifetime, the width and frequency of the pulses, load impedance, and the average incident power. Three main effects were found to decrease the efficiency of solar cells exposed to simulated FEL illumination: cell series resistance, LC 'ringing', and output inductance. Improvements in efficiency were achieved by modifying the frequency response of the cell to match the spectral energy content of the laser pulse with external passive components.

  15. Pulsed laser deposition of strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereiro, I.; Rodríguez-Valencia, C.; Serra, C.; Solla, E. L.; Serra, J.; González, P.

    2012-09-01

    The growing evidence of the beneficial role of strontium in bone has increased the interest of developing strontium-containing biomaterials for medical applications, and specifically biocompatible coatings that can be deposited on metallic implants to benefit from their load-bearing capabilities. In this work, strontium-substituted hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) coatings have been fabricated by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) from initial targets obtained after mixing and compacting commercial HA and SrCO3 powders in different proportions. The films thus fabricated were then structurally, morphologically and chemically characterized using scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The macroscopic morphology of the films presented in all cases equivalent spherical shaped aggregates of typical calcium phosphate coatings. The results reveal, however, the incorporation of Sr2+ and carbonate groups in the coatings as a function of the SrCO3 content in the ablation target, being the incorporation of Sr2+ a linear phenomenon that is accompanied by a similarly linear withdrawal of Ca2+. The role of Sr2+ in the modification of the HA structure and a possible mechanism of substitution of Sr2+ atoms in place of Ca2+ atoms are discussed.

  16. Ion mixing of pulsed laser deposited hydroxylapatite (HA)

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, T.L.; Russell, S.W.; Pizziconi, V.B.; Mayer, J.W.; Levine, T.E.; Nastasi, M.; Cotell, C.M.; Auyeung, R.C.Y.

    1995-12-31

    Hydroxylapatite (HA) is a calcium-phosphate-bioceramic material which has drawn much attention due to its excellent biocompatibility and tissue bioactivity properties. The use of ion-beam techniques to enhance selected properties of bioactive materials, such as the adhesion of hydroxylapatite (HA) coatings on titanium-based substrates has been investigated. In this study, very thin HA films on titanium substrates were created by pulsed laser deposition techniques. Ion irradiations were carried out using 260-keV argon ions, with fluences of 0.25--50 {times} 10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2}, and at room temperature. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry was used to evaluate sample composition before and after irradiation. The amount of mixing was quantified by the mixing rate (the amount of atomic displacement due to an irradiation fluence). This pilot data indicates that mixing was evident after sufficient ion irradiation. The ramification of this preliminary study has provided a quantitative measure of ion mixing as a potential prosthetic biomaterial surface modification technique.

  17. Pulsed laser ablation of dental calculus in the near ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Schoenly, Joshua E; Seka, Wolf; Rechmann, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Pulsed lasers emitting wavelengths near 400 nm can selectively ablate dental calculus without damaging underlying and surrounding sound dental hard tissue. Our results indicate that calculus ablation at this wavelength relies on the absorption of porphyrins endogenous to oral bacteria commonly found in calculus. Sub- and supragingival calculus on extracted human teeth, irradiated with 400-nm, 60-ns laser pulses at ≤8  J/cm2, exhibits a photobleached surface layer. Blue-light microscopy indicates this layer highly scatters 400-nm photons, whereas fluorescence spectroscopy indicates that bacterial porphyrins are permanently photobleached. A modified blow-off model for ablation is proposed that is based upon these observations and also reproduces our calculus ablation rates measured from laser profilometry. Tissue scattering and a stratified layering of absorbers within the calculus medium explain the gradual decrease in ablation rate from successive pulses. Depending on the calculus thickness, ablation stalling may occur at <5  J/cm2 but has not been observed above this fluence.

  18. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2015-12-01

    Niobium nitride (NbNx) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbNx films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ˜40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbNx films from mixed β-Nb2N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb2N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbNx deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbNx films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbNx film morphology and phase.

  19. Human osteoblast response to pulsed laser deposited calcium phosphate coatings.

    PubMed

    Bigi, A; Bracci, B; Cuisinier, F; Elkaim, R; Fini, M; Mayer, I; Mihailescu, I N; Socol, G; Sturba, L; Torricelli, P

    2005-05-01

    Octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and Mn(2+)-doped carbonate hydroxyapatite (Mn-CHA) thin films were deposited on pure, highly polished and chemically etched Ti substrates with pulsed laser deposition. The coatings exhibit different composition, crystallinity and morphology that might affect their osteoconductivity. Human osteoblasts were cultured on the surfaces of OCP and Mn-CHA thin films, and the cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation were evaluated up to 21 days. The cells showed a normal morphology and a very good rate of proliferation and viability in every experimental time. Alkaline phosphatase activity was always higher than the control and Ti groups. From days 7 to 21 collagen type I production was higher in comparison with control and Ti groups. The level of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1) was lower at 3 and 7 days, but reached the highest values during following experimental times (14 and 21 days). Our data demonstrate that both calcium phosphate coatings favour osteoblasts proliferation, activation of their metabolism and differentiation.

  20. Pulsed laser deposition of niobium nitride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Farha, Ashraf Hassan Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Ufuktepe, Yüksel; Myneni, Ganapati

    2015-12-04

    Niobium nitride (NbN{sub x}) films were grown on Nb and Si(100) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. NbN{sub x} films were deposited on Nb substrates using PLD with a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm, ∼40 ns pulse width, and 10 Hz repetition rate) at different laser fluences, nitrogen background pressures and deposition substrate temperatures. When all the fabrication parameters are fixed, except for the laser fluence, the surface roughness, nitrogen content, and grain size increase with increasing laser fluence. Increasing nitrogen background pressure leads to a change in the phase structure of the NbN{sub x} films from mixed β-Nb{sub 2}N and cubic δ-NbN phases to single hexagonal β-Nb{sub 2}N. The substrate temperature affects the preferred orientation of the crystal structure. The structural and electronic, properties of NbN{sub x} deposited on Si(100) were also investigated. The NbN{sub x} films exhibited a cubic δ-NbN with a strong (111) orientation. A correlation between surface morphology, electronic, and superconducting properties was found. The observations establish guidelines for adjusting the deposition parameters to achieve the desired NbN{sub x} film morphology and phase.

  1. Nonstoichiometric Titanium Oxides via Pulsed Laser Ablation in Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Titanium oxide compounds TiO,Ti2O3, and TiO2 with a considerable extent of nonstoichiometry were fabricated by pulsed laser ablation in water and characterized by X-ray/electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The titanium oxides were found to occur as nanoparticle aggregates with a predominant 3+ charge and amorphous microtubes when fabricated under an average power density of ca. 1 × 108W/cm2 and 1011W/cm2, respectively followed by dwelling in water. The crystalline colloidal particles have a relatively high content of Ti2+ and hence a lower minimum band gap of 3.4 eV in comparison with 5.2 eV for the amorphous state. The protonation on both crystalline and amorphous phase caused defects, mainly titanium rather than oxygen vacancies and charge and/or volume-compensating defects. The hydrophilic nature and presumably varied extent of undercoordination at the free surface of the amorphous lamellae accounts for their rolling as tubes at water/air and water/glass interfaces. The nonstoichiometric titania thus fabricated have potential optoelectronic and catalytic applications in UV–visible range and shed light on the Ti charge and phase behavior of titania-water binary in natural shock occurrence. PMID:20672115

  2. Modeling pulsed-laser melting of embedded semiconductor nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, C.A.; Guzman, J.; Boswell-Koller, C.N.; Sherburne, M.P.; Mastandrea, J.P.; Bustillo, K.C.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Chrzan, D.C.

    2011-05-18

    Pulsed-laser melting (PLM) is commonly used to achieve a fast quench rate in both thin films and nanoparticles. A model for the size evolution during PLM of nanoparticles confined in a transparent matrix, such as those created by ion-beam synthesis, is presented. A self-consistent mean-field rate equations approach that has been used successfully to model ion beam synthesis of germanium nanoparticles in silica is extended to include the PLM process. The PLM model includes classical optical absorption, multiscale heat transport by both analytical and finite difference methods, and melting kinetics for confined nanoparticles. The treatment of nucleation and coarsening behavior developed for the ion beam synthesis model is modified to allow for a non-uniform temperature gradient and for interacting liquid and solid particles with different properties. The model allows prediction of the particle size distribution after PLM under various laser fluences, starting from any particle size distribution including as-implanted or annealed simulated samples. A route for narrowing the size distribution of embedded nanoparticles is suggested, with simulated distribution widths as low as 15% of the average size.

  3. Pulse Laser High Speed Schlieren Photographic System And Its Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuju, Lin; Shicheng, Li; Qingyou, Wang; Wenjun, Ni; Yong, Xiang; Jingliang, Shi

    1989-06-01

    The sequential pulsed, Q-switched ruby laser is used for the light source. Liodel 640 schilieren apparatus is used for the display optical system of image and flow field. The access type rotating mirror scanning high speed camera is used for recording unit. They are assembled into a complete set of Pulsed Laser High Speed Schlieren Photographic System. So far, we have designed and trial-manufactured two types. The Model I system is used for recording the armor-piercing process of the terminal trajectory and the chamber-shooting process of the midway trajectory. The better results have been obtained. The Eodel II system is used for studying the detonating mechanism of high energy dynamite. The framing pictures of the bullet flying attitude before bullet collides the target and the compressive deformation after it collides the target as well as the detonating process have been taken. These photos have provided the basis for research work. The future development of the system has also been discussed in this paper.

  4. Power neodymium-glass amplifier of a repetitively pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, Aleksandr V.; Gaganov, V. E.; Garanin, Sergey G.; Zhidkov, N. V.; Krotov, V. A.; Martynenko, S. P.; Pozdnyakov, E. V.; Solomatin, I. I.

    2011-11-01

    A neodymium-glass diode-pumped amplifier with a zigzag laser beam propagation through the active medium was elaborated; the amplifier is intended for operation in a repetitively pulsed laser. An amplifier unit with an aperture of 20 × 25 mm and a ~40-cm long active medium was put to a test. The energy of pump radiation amounts to 140 J at a wavelength of 806 nm for a pump duration of 550 μs. The energy parameters of the amplifier were experimentally determined: the small-signal gain per pass ~3.2, the linear gain ~0.031 cm-1 with a nonuniformity of its distribution over the aperture within 15%, the stored energy of 0.16 — 0.21 J cm-3. The wavefront distortions in the zigzag laser-beam propagation through the active element of the amplifier did not exceed 0.4λ (λ = 0.63 μm is the probing radiation wavelength).

  5. Extending ultra-short pulse laser texturing over large area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mincuzzi, G.; Gemini, L.; Faucon, M.; Kling, R.

    2016-11-01

    Surface texturing by Ultra-Short Pulses Laser (UPL) for industrial applications passes through the use of both fast beam scanning systems and high repetition rate, high average power P, UPL. Nevertheless unwanted thermal effects are expected when P exceeds some tens of W. An interesting strategy for a reliable heat management would consists in texturing with a low fluence values (slightly higher than the ablation threshold) and utilising a Polygon Scanner Heads delivering laser pulses with unrepeated speed. Here we show for the first time that with relatively low fluence it is possible over stainless steel, to obtain surface texturing by utilising a 2 MHz femtosecond laser jointly with a polygonal scanner head in a relatively low fluence regime (0.11 J cm-2). Different surface textures (Ripples, micro grooves and spikes) can be obtained varying the scan speed from 90 m s-1 to 25 m s-1. In particular, spikes formation process has been shown and optimised at 25 m s-1 and a full morphology characterization by SEM has been carried out. Reflectance measurements with integrating sphere are presented to compare reference surface with high scan rate textures. In the best case we show a black surface with reflectance value < 5%.

  6. Pulsed laser deposition of compact high adhesion polytetrafluoroethylene thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smausz, Tomi; Hopp, Béla; Kresz, Norbert

    2002-08-01

    Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) thin films were prepared from pressed powder pellets via pulsed laser deposition by using ArF (193 nm) excimer laser. The applied laser fluences were in the 1.6-10 J cm-2 range, the substrate temperature was varied between 27°C and 250°C and post-annealing of the films was carried out in air at temperatures between 320°C and 500°C. Films deposited at 250°C substrate temperature were found to be stoichiometric while those prepared at lower temperatures were fluorine deficient. Morphological analyses proved that the film thickness did not significantly depend on the substrate temperature and the post annealing at 500°C resulted in a thickness reduction of approximately 50%. It was demonstrated that the films prepared at 8.2 J cm-2 fluence and annealed at 500°C followed by cooling at 1°C min-1 rate were compact, pinhole-free layers. The adherence of films to the substrates was determined by tensile strength measurements. Tensile strength values up to 2.4 MPa were obtained. These properties are of great significance when PTFE films are fabricated for the purpose of protecting coatings.

  7. CdSe electronic structure and pulsed laser photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Yonas; Ucer, K. B.; Williams, R. T.; Holzwarth, N. A. W.

    2002-03-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy with pulsed laser excitation can provide a low-background, sensitive view of electonic states in the gap,(M. Yamada et al.), Surf. Sci. 349, L107-L110 (1996) photopopulated states above the Fermi level, and dynamics of the population.(R. T. Williams et al.) Radiation Measurements 33, 497-502 (2001) We report measurements of photoelecton emission from UHV-cleaved CdSe (11bar20) surfaces excited by 4.5 eV and 5.9 eV pulses of 150 fs duration from a Ti:sapphire laser. One-, two-, and three-photon excitation processes are observed and comparison with features of the electronic structure will be discussed. For the purposes of identifying defect and surface features, electronic structure calculations of the CdSe (11bar20) surface are being performed using the pwpaw code,( A. R. Tackett et al.), Comput. Phys. Comm. 35, 348-376 (2001) using both slab and semi-infinite geometries. We hope to simulate both ideal and stepped surfaces.

  8. Novel doped hydroxyapatite thin films obtained by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duta, L.; Oktar, F. N.; Stan, G. E.; Popescu-Pelin, G.; Serban, N.; Luculescu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel ovine and bovine derived hydroxyapatite thin films on titanium substrates by pulsed laser deposition for a new generation of implants. The calcination treatment applied to produce the hydroxyapatite powders from ovine/bovine bones was intended to induce crystallization and to prohibit the transmission of diseases. The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Pull-off adherence and profilometry measurements were also carried out. X-ray diffraction ascertained the polycrystalline hydroxyapatite nature of the powders and films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy evidenced the vibrational bands characteristic to a hydroxyapatite material slightly carbonated. The micrographs of the films showed a uniform distribution of spheroidal particulates with a mean diameter of ∼2 μm. Pull-off measurements demonstrated excellent bonding strength values between the hydroxyapatite films and the titanium substrates. Because of their physical-chemical properties and low cost fabrication from renewable resources, we think that these new coating materials could be considered as a prospective competitor to synthetic hydroxyapatite used for implantology applications.

  9. Soft x ray optics by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Felix E.

    1994-01-01

    A series of molybdenum thin film depositions by PLD (Pulsed Laser Deposition) have been carried out, seeking appropriate conditions for multilayer fabrication. Green (532 nm) and UV (355 nm) light pulses, in a wide range of fluences, were used. Relatively large fluences (in comparison with Si) are required to cause evaporation of molybdenum. The optical penetration depths and reflectivities for Mo at these two wavelengths are comparable, which means that results should be, and do appear to be similar for equal fluences. For all fluences above threshold used, a large number of incandescent particles is ejected by the target (either a standard Mo sputtering target or a Mo sheet were tried), together with the plasma plume. Most of these particles are clearly seen to bounce off the substrate. The films were observed with light microscopy using Nomarski and darkfield techniques. There is no evidence of large debris. Smooth films plus micron-sized droplets are usually seen. The concentration of these droplets embedded in the film appears not to vary strongly with the laser fluence employed. Additional characterization with SEM and XRD is under way.

  10. Adaptive optics for ultra short pulsed lasers in UHV environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, Francois; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed an electro-mechanical deformable mirror compatible with Ultra High Vacuum environment, suitable for ultra short pulsed lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations. μ-AME actuators are driven by stepper motors, and their patented special design allows controlling the force with a very high accuracy. Materials and assembly method have been adapted to UHV constraints and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for standard MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The deformable mirror design allows changing easily an actuator or even the membrane if needed, in order to improve the facility availability. They are designed for circular, square or elliptical aperture from 30mm up to 500mm or more, with incidence angle from 0° to 45°. They can be equipped with passive or active cooling for high power lasers with high repetition rate.

  11. Submicro foaming in biopolymers by UV pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Gaspard, Solenne; Abrusci, Concepción; Catalina, Fernando; Lazare, Sylvain; Castillejo, Marta

    2006-05-01

    Microstructuring of polymers and biopolymers is of application in medical technology and biotechnology. Using different fabrication techniques three-dimensionally shaped and micro structured constructs can be developed for drug release and tissue engineering. As an alternative method, laser microstructuring offers a series of advantages including high resolution capability, low heat deposition in the substrate and high level of flexibility. In this work we present evidence of laser microfoam formation in collagen and gelatine by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation in the UV at 248 and 266 nm. Irradiation at 355 nm produces melting followed by resolidification of the substrate, whereas irradiation at 532 and 1064 nm induces the formation of craters of irregular contours. Single pulse irradiation of a collagen film with an homogenized KrF microbeam yields a 20 μm thick expanded layer, which displays the interesting features of a nanofibrous 3-dimensional network with open cells. In gelatine, irradiation at 248 and 266 nm produces similar morphological modifications. The effect of the structural properties of the substrate on the laser induced microfoam is studied by comparing gelatines differing in gel strength (Bloom values 225 and 75) and in crosslinking degree. While results are discussed on the basis of thermal and photomechanical mechanisms and of the role played by the water content of the substrates, it is thought that such structures could have a biomimic function in future 3D cell culture devices for research.

  12. Pulsed Laser Synthesized Magnetic Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Hari; Gupta, Ram; Ghosh, Kartik; Kahol, Pawan; Delong, Robert; Wanekawa, Adam

    2011-03-01

    Nanomaterials research has become a major attraction in the field of advanced materials research in the area of Physics, Chemistry, and Materials Science. Biocompatible and chemically stable magnetic metal oxide nanoparticles have biomedical applications that includes drug delivery, cell and DNA separation, gene cloning, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This research is aimed at the fabrication of magnetic cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a safe, cost effective, and easy to handle technique that is capable of producing nanoparticles free of any contamination. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized at room temperature using cobalt foil by pulsed laser ablation technique. These cobalt oxide nanoparticles were characterized using UV-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic laser light scattering (DLLS). The magnetic cobalt oxides nanoparticles were stabilized in glucose solutions of various concentrations in deionized water. The presence of UV-Vis absorption peak at 270 nm validates the nature of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. The DLLS size distributions of nanoparticles are in the range of 110 to 300 nm, which further confirms the presence nanoparticles. This work is partially supported by National Science Foundation (DMR- 0907037).

  13. Pulsed laser annealing of Be-implanted GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.T.; Tan, L.S.; Chor, E.F.

    2005-11-01

    Postimplantation thermal processing of Be in molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown GaN by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) was investigated. It has been found that the activation of Be dopants and the repair of implantation-induced defects in GaN films cannot be achieved efficiently by conventional RTA alone. On the other hand, good dopant activation and surface morphology and quality were obtained when the Be-implanted GaN film was annealed by PLA with a 248 nm KrF excimer laser. However, observations of off-resonant micro-Raman and high-resolution x-ray-diffraction spectra indicated that crystal defects and strain resulting from Be implantation were still existent after PLA, which probably degraded the carrier mobility and limited the activation efficiency to some extent. This can be attributed to the shallow penetration depth of the 248 nm laser in GaN, which only repaired the crystal defects in a thin near-surface layer, while the deeper defects were not annealed out well. This situation was significantly improved when the Be-implanted GaN was subjected to a combined process of PLA followed by RTA, which produced good activation of the dopants, good surface morphology, and repaired bulk and surface defects well.

  14. Properties of pulsed laser deposited fluorinated hydroxyapatite films on titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Rau, J.V.; Smirnov, V.V.; Laureti, S.; Generosi, A.; Varvaro, G.; Fosca, M.; Ferro, D.; Cesaro, S. Nunziante; Albertini, V. Rossi; Barinov, S.M.

    2010-09-15

    Fluorinated hydroxyapatite coated titanium was investigated for application as implant coating for bone substitute materials in orthopaedics and dentistry. Pulsed laser deposition technique was used for films preparation. Fluorinated hydroxyapatite target composition, Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}F{sub 1.37}(OH){sub 0.63}, was maintained at 2 J/cm{sup 2} of laser fluence and 500-600 {sup o}C of the substrate temperature. Prepared films had a compact microstructure, composed of spherical micrometric-size aggregates. The average surface roughness resulted to be of 3 nm for the film grown at 500 {sup o}C and of 10 nm for that grown at 600 {sup o}C, showing that the temperature increase did not favour the growth of a more fine granulated surface. The films were polycrystalline with no preferential growth orientation. The films grown at 500-600 {sup o}C were about 8 {mu}m thick and possessed a hardness of 12-13 GPa. Lower or higher substrate temperature provides the possibility to obtain coatings with different fine texture and roughness, thus tayloring them for various applications.

  15. Quantum Hooke's law to classify pulse laser induced ultrafast melting.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-03

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a "super pressing" state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  16. Quantum Hooke's Law to Classify Pulse Laser Induced Ultrafast Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-02-01

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a ``super pressing'' state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions.

  17. Quantum Hooke's Law to Classify Pulse Laser Induced Ultrafast Melting

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation is an interesting material's behavior manifesting the complexity of light-matter interaction. There exist two types of such phase transitions: one occurs at a time scale shorter than a picosecond via a nonthermal process mediated by electron-hole plasma formation; the other at a longer time scale via a thermal melting process mediated by electron-phonon interaction. However, it remains unclear what material would undergo which process and why? Here, by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) governed by quantum Hooke's law, we classify the transitions by two distinct classes of materials: the faster nonthermal process can only occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP < 0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure, above a high threshold laser fluence; while the slower thermal process may occur in all materials. Especially, the nonthermal transition is shown to be induced by the QES, acting like a negative internal pressure, which drives the crystal into a “super pressing” state to spontaneously transform into a higher-density liquid phase. Our findings significantly advance fundamental understanding of ultrafast crystal-to-liquid phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori predictions. PMID:25645258

  18. Quantum Hooke's Law to Classify Pulse Laser Induced Ultrafast Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Ding, Hepeng; Liu, Feng

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the ultrafast crystal-to-amorphous phase transition induced by femtosecond pulse laser excitation by exploiting the property of quantum electronic stress (QES) induced by the electron-hole plasma, which follows quantum Hooke's law. We demonstrates that two types of crystal-to-amorphous transitions occur in two distinct material classes: the faster nonthermal process, having a time scale shorter than one picosecond (ps), must occur in materials like ice having an anomalous phase diagram characterized with dTm/dP <0, where Tm is the melting temperature and P is pressure; while the slower thermal process, having a time scale of several ps, occurs preferably in other materials. The nonthermal process is driven by the QES acting like a negative internal pressure, which is generated predominantly by the holes in the electron-hole plasma that increases linearly with hole density. These findings significantly advance our fundamental understanding of physics underlying the ultrafast crystal-to-amorphous phase transitions, enabling quantitative a priori prediction. The work was supported by DOE-BES (Grant # DE-FG02-04ER46148), NSF MRSEC (Grant No. DMR-1121252) and DOE EFRC (Grant Number DE-SC0001061).

  19. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    DOE PAGES

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; ...

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes.more » We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.« less

  20. Pulsed laser interactions with space debris: Target shape effects

    SciTech Connect

    Liedahl, D. A.; Rubenchik, A.; Libby, S. B.; Nikolaev, S.; Phipps, C. R.

    2013-05-24

    Among the approaches to the proposed mitigation and remediation of the space debris problem is the de-orbiting of objects in low Earth orbit through irradiation by ground-based high-intensity pulsed lasers. Laser ablation of a thin surface layer causes target recoil, resulting in the depletion of orbital angular momentum and accelerated atmospheric re-entry. However, both the magnitude and direction of the recoil are shape dependent, a feature of the laser-based remediation concept that has received little attention. Since the development of a predictive capability is desirable, we have investigated the dynamical response to ablation of objects comprising a variety of shapes. We derive and demonstrate a simple analytical technique for calculating the ablation-driven transfer of linear momentum, emphasizing cases for which the recoil is not exclusively parallel to the incident beam. For the purposes of comparison and contrast, we examine one case of momentum transfer in the low-intensity regime, where photon pressure is the dominant momentum transfer mechanism, showing that shape and orientation effects influence the target response in a similar, but not identical, manner. As a result, we address the related problem of target spin and, by way of a few simple examples, show how ablation can alter the spin state of a target, which often has a pronounced effect on the recoil dynamics.

  1. Clutter discrimination algorithm simulation in pulse laser radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan-mei; Li, Huan; Guo, Hai-chao; Su, Xuan; Zhu, Fule

    2015-10-01

    Pulse laser radar imaging performance is greatly influenced by different kinds of clutter. Various algorithms are developed to mitigate clutter. However, estimating performance of a new algorithm is difficult. Here, a simulation model for estimating clutter discrimination algorithms is presented. This model consists of laser pulse emission, clutter jamming, laser pulse reception and target image producing. Additionally, a hardware platform is set up gathering clutter data reflected by ground and trees. The data logging is as clutter jamming input in the simulation model. The hardware platform includes a laser diode, a laser detector and a high sample rate data logging circuit. The laser diode transmits short laser pulses (40ns FWHM) at 12.5 kilohertz pulse rate and at 905nm wavelength. An analog-to-digital converter chip integrated in the sample circuit works at 250 mega samples per second. The simulation model and the hardware platform contribute to a clutter discrimination algorithm simulation system. Using this system, after analyzing clutter data logging, a new compound pulse detection algorithm is developed. This new algorithm combines matched filter algorithm and constant fraction discrimination (CFD) algorithm. Firstly, laser echo pulse signal is processed by matched filter algorithm. After the first step, CFD algorithm comes next. Finally, clutter jamming from ground and trees is discriminated and target image is produced. Laser radar images are simulated using CFD algorithm, matched filter algorithm and the new algorithm respectively. Simulation result demonstrates that the new algorithm achieves the best target imaging effect of mitigating clutter reflected by ground and trees.

  2. A laser spectrometer and wavemeter for pulsed lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, J. A.; Laufer, P. M.; Cotnoir, L. J.

    1989-01-01

    The design, construction, calibration, and evaluation of a pulsed laser wavemeter and spectral analyzer are described. This instrument, called the Laserscope for its oscilloscope-like display of laser spectral structure, was delivered to NASA Langley Research Center as a prototype of a laboratory instrument. The key component is a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer, providing high (0.2 pm) spectral resolution and a linear dispersion of spectral information, ideally suited to linear array photodiode detectors. Even operating alone, with the classic order-number ambiguity of interferometers unresolved, this optical element will provide a fast, real-time display of the spectral structure of a laser output. If precise wavelength information is also desired then additional stages must be provided to obtain a wavelength measurement within the order-number uncertainty, i.e., within the free spectral range of the Fizeau wedge interferometer. A Snyder (single-beam Fizeau) wedge is included to provide this initial wavelength measurement. Difficulties in achieving the required wide-spectrum calibration limit the usefulness of this function.

  3. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of thin gold film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, K.; Tan, B.; Ngoi, B. K. A.

    2002-04-01

    Laser micromachining on 1000 nm-thick gold film using femtosecond laser has been studied. The laser pulses that are used for this study are 400 nm in central wavelength, 150 fs in pulse duration, and the repetition rate is 1 kHz. Plano-concave lens with a focal length of 19 mm focuses the laser beam into a spot of 3 μm (1/ e2 diameter). The sample was translated at a linear speed of 400 μm/ s during machining. Grooves were cut on gold thin film with laser pulses of various energies. The ablation depths were measured and plotted. There are two ablation regimes. In the first regime, the cutting is very shallow and the edges are free of molten material. While in the second regime, molten material appears and the cutting edges are contaminated. The results suggest that clean and precise microstructuring can be achieved with femtosecond pulsed laser by controlling the pulse energy in the first ablation regime.

  4. Pulsed laser annealing of Be-implanted GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. T.; Tan, L. S.; Chor, E. F.

    2005-11-01

    Postimplantation thermal processing of Be in molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown GaN by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) and pulsed laser annealing (PLA) was investigated. It has been found that the activation of Be dopants and the repair of implantation-induced defects in GaN films cannot be achieved efficiently by conventional RTA alone. On the other hand, good dopant activation and surface morphology and quality were obtained when the Be-implanted GaN film was annealed by PLA with a 248 nm KrF excimer laser. However, observations of off-resonant micro-Raman and high-resolution x-ray-diffraction spectra indicated that crystal defects and strain resulting from Be implantation were still existent after PLA, which probably degraded the carrier mobility and limited the activation efficiency to some extent. This can be attributed to the shallow penetration depth of the 248 nm laser in GaN, which only repaired the crystal defects in a thin near-surface layer, while the deeper defects were not annealed out well. This situation was significantly improved when the Be-implanted GaN was subjected to a combined process of PLA followed by RTA, which produced good activation of the dopants, good surface morphology, and repaired bulk and surface defects well.

  5. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J. )

    1990-07-30

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition of the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the Program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research question still outstanding in this area.

  6. Laser-supported detonation waves and pulsed laser propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    A laser thermal rocket uses the energy of a large remote laser, possibly ground-based, to heat an inert propellant and generate thrust. Use of a pulsed laser allows the design of extremely simple thrusters with very high performance compared to chemical rockets. The temperatures, pressures, and fluxes involved in such thrusters (10{sup 4} K, 10{sup 2} atmospheres, 10{sup 7} w/cm{sup 2}) typically result in the creation of laser-supported detonation (LSD) waves. The thrust cycle thus involves a complex set of transient shock phenomena, including laser-surface interactions in the ignition if the LSD wave, laser-plasma interactions in the LSD wave itself, and high-temperature nonequilibrium chemistry behind the LSD wave. The SDIO Laser Propulsion Program is investigating these phenomena as part of an overall effort to develop the technology for a low-cost Earth-to-orbit laser launch system. We will summarize the program's approach to developing a high performance thruster, the double-pulse planar thruster, and present an overview of some results obtained to date, along with a discussion of the many research questions still outstanding in this area. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Fabrication of micro-convex domes using long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingsheng; Zhang, Yongnian; Wang, Ling; Xian, Jieyu; Jin, Meifu; Kang, Min

    2017-01-01

    Micro-convex domes inspired from nature can be machined by chemical and physical routes to achieve specific functions. Laser surface texturing (LST) is the front runner among the current material micro-processing technologies. However, most of the studies relating to LST dealt with the formation of micro-dimples. In this paper, LST using long pulse laser was used to create micro-convex domes on 304L stainless steel. Spherical-cap-shaped domes with diameters of 30-75 μm and height of 0.9-5.5 μm were created through LST. The effects of laser-processing parameters on surface morphologies of the created convex domes were investigated. The height of the convex dome increased at first and then decreased with the increasing laser power. The change tendency of the height with the pulse duration varied at different laser powers. The diameter of the convex dome increased almost linearly with the laser power or pulse duration. The superior micro-convex domes were achieved at a pulse energy of 5.6 mJ with a laser power of 80 W and pulse duration of 70 μs.

  8. Miniaturized X-ray Generation by Pyroelectric Effect using Short Pulse Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-30

    1 Report of AOARD Program CONTRACT NO: FA23861014160 Miniaturized X-ray Generation by Pyroelectric Effect using Short Pulse Laser...induced currents by short- pulse high-power laser irradiation II-1: Experiments and results II-2: Theoretical calculations ~Analysis of currents...effect using short pulse laser aiming at miniaturized X-ray generator 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA23861014160 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  9. Pulsed Laser Deposition of YBCO With Yttrium Oxide Buffer Layers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    AFRL-RZ-WP-TP-2012-0092 PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF YBCO WITH YTTRIUM OXIDE BUFFER LAYERS (POSTPRINT) Paul N. Barnes, Timothy J. Haugan...Paper Postprint 01 January 2002 – 01 January 2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF YBCO WITH YTTRIUM OXIDE BUFFER LAYERS (POSTPRINT...Textured metallic substrate based HTS coated conductors with the YBCO /CeO2/YSZ/CeO2/Ni architecture have already been shown to exhibit high current

  10. Q-switched pulse laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramics waveguides.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Luan, Qingfang; Liu, Fengqin; Chen, Feng; Vázquez de Aldana, Javier Rodríguez

    2013-08-12

    This work reports on the Q-switched pulsed laser generation from double-cladding Nd:YAG ceramic waveguides. Double-cladding waveguides with different combination of diameters were inscribed into a sample of Nd:YAG ceramic. With an additional semiconductor saturable absorber, stable pulsed laser emission at the wavelength of 1064 nm was achieved with pulses of 21 ns temporal duration and ~14 μJ pulse energy at a repetition rate of 3.65 MHz.

  11. Welding Penetration Control of Fixed Pipe in TIG Welding Using Fuzzy Inference System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskoro, Ario Sunar; Kabutomori, Masashi; Suga, Yasuo

    This paper presents a study on welding penetration control of fixed pipe in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding using fuzzy inference system. The welding penetration control is essential to the production quality welds with a specified geometry. For pipe welding using constant arc current and welding speed, the bead width becomes wider as the circumferential welding of small diameter pipes progresses. Having welded pipe in fixed position, obviously, the excessive arc current yields burn through of metals; in contrary, insufficient arc current produces imperfect welding. In order to avoid these errors and to obtain the uniform weld bead over the entire circumference of the pipe, the welding conditions should be controlled as the welding proceeds. This research studies the intelligent welding process of aluminum alloy pipe 6063S-T5 in fixed position using the AC welding machine. The monitoring system used a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to monitor backside image of molten pool. The captured image was processed to recognize the edge of molten pool by image processing algorithm. Simulation of welding control using fuzzy inference system was constructed to simulate the welding control process. The simulation result shows that fuzzy controller was suitable for controlling the welding speed and appropriate to be implemented into the welding system. A series of experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the fuzzy controller. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the control system that is confirmed by sound welds.

  12. Numerical simulation of temperature field in K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-10-01

    The optical component of photoelectric system was easy to be damaged by irradiation of high power pulse laser, so the effect of high power pulse laser irradiation on K9 glass was researched. A thermodynamic model of K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser was established using the finite element software ANSYS. The article analyzed some key problems in simulation process of ultraviolet pulse laser damage of K9 glass based on ANSYS from the finite element models foundation, meshing, loading of pulse laser, setting initial conditions and boundary conditions and setting the thermal physical parameters of material. The finite element method (FEM) model was established and a numerical analysis was performed to calculate temperature field in K9 glass irradiated by ultraviolet pulse laser. The simulation results showed that the temperature of irradiation area exceeded the melting point of K9 glass, while the incident laser energy was low. The thermal damage dominated in the damage mechanism of K9 glass, the melting phenomenon should be much more distinct.

  13. Enhanced 5-aminolevulinic acid-gold nanoparticle conjugate-based photodynamic therapy using pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hao; Yao, Cuiping; Wang, Jing; Chang, Zhennan; Zhang, Zhenxi

    2016-02-01

    The low bioavailability is a crucial limitation for the application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in theranostics. In this research, 5-aminolevulinic acid and gold nanoparticle conjugates (ALA-GNPs) were synthesized to improve the bioavailability of ALA and to investigate the impact of ALA photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) in Hela cells. A 532 nm pulse laser and light-emitting diode (central wavelengths 502 nm) were jointly used as light sources in PDT research. The results show a 532 nm pulse laser can control ALA release from ALA-GNPs by adjusting the pulse laser dose. This laser control release may be attributed to the heat generation from GNPs under pulse laser irradiation, which indicates accurately adjusting the pulse laser dose to control the drug release in the cell interior can be considered as a new cellular surgery modality. Furthermore, the PDT results in Hela cells indicate the enhancement of ALA release by pulse laser before PDT can promote the efficacy of cell eradication in the light-emitting diode PDT (LED-PDT). This laser mediated drug release system can provide a new online therapy approach in PDT and it can be utilized in the optical monitor technologies based individual theranostics.

  14. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, J.C.; Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1996-03-26

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld. 5 figs.

  15. Method for laser welding ultra-thin metal foils

    DOEpatents

    Pernicka, John C.; Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1996-01-01

    A method for simultaneously cutting and welding ultra-thin foils having a thickness of less than 0.002 inches wherein two ultra-thin films are stacked and clamped together. A pulsed laser such as of the Neodymium: YAG type is provided and the beam of the laser is directed onto the stacked films to cut a channel through the films. The laser is moved relative to the stacked foils to cut the stacked foils at successive locations and to form a plurality of connected weld beads to form a continuous weld.

  16. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    DOEpatents

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  17. Experimental Investigation into the Effects of Weld Sequence and Fixture on Residual Stresses in Arc Welding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohandehghan, A. R.; Serajzadeh, S.

    2012-06-01

    This study concentrates on the effects of weld sequence and welding fixtures on distribution and magnitude of induced arc welding residual stresses built up in butt-joint of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) AA5251 plates. Aluminum plates have been welded under different welding conditions and then, longitudinal and transverse residual stresses were measured in different points of the welded plates employing hole-drilling technique. The results indicate that welding sequence significantly alters the distributions of both longitudinal and transverse residual stresses while the changing in the weld sequence leads to 44% decrease in longitudinal residual stress. Besides, both the geometry of weld pool and distribution of residual stresses are affected by the welding fixtures while implementation of fixture causes about 21 and 76% reductions in the depth of weld pool and transverse residual stress, respectively, for the material and welding conditions used in this research.

  18. Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material affected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as do electron beam welders) and the welds they produce high depth-to-width ratios. Scoping with a small pulsed 50 J YAG laser indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1 mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Following the initial scoping tests, a series of tests were preformed with a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser. Successful bead-on-plate welds were made on V-4%Cr-4%Ti and V-5%Cr-5%Ti alloys to depths of about 4 mm with this laser.

  19. Pulsed laser processing of electronic materials in micro/nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, David Jen

    2005-08-01

    Time-resolved pump-and-probe side-view imaging has been performed to investigate the energy coupling to the target specimen over a wide range of fluences. Plasmas generated during the laser ablation process are visualized and the decrease of the ablation efficiency in the high fluence regime (>10 J/cm2) is attributed to the strong interaction of the laser pulse with the laser-induced plasmas. The high intensity ultra-short laser pulses also trigger volumetric multi-photon absorption (MPA) processes that can be beneficial in applications such as three-dimensional bulk modification of transparent materials. Femtosecond laser pulses were used to fabricate straight and bent through-channels in the optical glass. Drilling was initiated from the rear surface to preserve consistent absorbing conditions of the laser pulse. Machining in the presence of a liquid solution assisted the debris ejection. Drilling process was further enhanced by introducing ultrasonic waves, thereby increasing the aspect ratio of drilled holes and improving the quality of the holes. In conventional lens focusing schemes, the minimum feature size is determined by the diffraction limit. Finer resolution is accomplished by combining pulsed laser radiation with Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) probes. Short laser pulses are coupled to a fiber-based NSOM probes in order to ablate thin metal films. A detailed parametric study on the effects of probe aperture size, laser pulse energy, temporal width and environment gas is performed. The significance of lateral thermal diffusion is highlighted and the dependence of the ablation process on the imparted near-field distribution is revealed. As a promising application of laser ablation in nanoscale, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) system has been built up based on NSOM ablation configuration. NSOM-LIBS is demonstrated with nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on Cr sample. Far-field collecting scheme by top objective lens was chosen as

  20. Imaging of the Dynamic Melt Movement Induced by a Pulsed Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samarjy, Ramiz S. M.; Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    A special case of an interrupted superheated process was developed, governed by the ablation pressure of a boiling melt, induced by a pulsed Nd:YAG-laser. A kind of cutting process was carried out, but at very low speed to generate a large melt pool that can be well studied. The interaction zone was observed by high speed imaging, with and without illumination. When switching the laser pulse on or off, different dynamic phenomena can be clearly observed, like drilling into a bulk of melt, breaking of a melt bridge, controlled pushing of the melt pool, waves running down, all driven by boiling. After the pulse, the melt smoothens and oscillates and is dragged back upwards by the surface tension forces from the melt shape curvature, ending in a torus-like equilibrium shape. The fundamental understanding that was generated could be applied to improve processes like keyhole laser welding, laser remote fusion cutting or laser drilling

  1. Pulsed Laser Deposition of High Temperature Protonic Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dynys, Fred W.; Berger, M. H.; Sayir, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to fabricate nanostructured BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O3- sigma) films. Protonic conduction of fabricated BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films was compared to sintered BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma). Sintered samples and laser targets were prepared by sintering BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) powders derived by solid state synthesis. Films 1 to 8 micron thick were deposited by KrF excimer laser on porous Al2O3 substrates. Thin films were fabricated at deposition temperatures of 700 to 950 C at O2 pressures up to 200 mTorr using laser pulse energies of 0.45 - 0.95 J. Fabricated films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and electrical impedance spectroscopy. Single phase BaCe(0.85)Y(0.15)O(3-sigma) films with a columnar growth morphology are observed with preferred crystal growth along the [100] or [001] direction. Results indicate [100] growth dependence upon laser pulse energy. Electrical conductivity of bulk samples produced by solid state sintering and thin film samples were measured over a temperature range of 100 C to 900 C. Electrical conduction behavior was dependent upon film deposition temperature. Maximum conductivity occurs at deposition temperature of 900 oC; the electrical conductivity exceeds the sintered specimen. All other deposited films exhibit a lower electrical conductivity than the sintered specimen. Activation energy for electrical conduction showed dependence upon deposition temperature, it varied

  2. Acousto-optical imaging using a powerful long pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Guy; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2008-06-01

    Acousto-optical imaging is an emerging biodiagnostic technique which provides an optical spectroscopic signature and a spatial localization of an optically absorbing target embedded in a strongly scattering medium. The transverse resolution of the technique is determined by the lateral extent of ultrasound beam focal zone while the axial resolution is obtained by using short ultrasound pulses. Although very promising for medical diagnostic, the practical application of this technique is presently limited by its poor sensitivity. Moreover, any method to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio must obviously satisfy the in vivo safety limits regarding the acceptable power level of both the ultrasonic pressure wave and the laser beam. In this paper, we propose to improve the sensitivity by using a pulsed single-frequency laser source to raise the optical peak power applied to the scattering medium and to collect more ultrasonically tagged photons. Such a laser source also allows illuminating the tissues mainly during the transit time of the ultrasonic wave to maintain the average optical power below the maximum permissible exposure. In our experiment, a single-frequency Nd:YAG laser emitting 500-μs pulses with a peak power superior to 100 W was used. Photons were tagged in few-cm thick optical phantoms with tone bursts generated by an ultrasonic transducer. Tagged photons were detected with a GaAs photorefractive interferometer characterized by a large optical etendue to process simultaneously a large number of speckle grains. When pumped by high intensity laser pulses, such an interferometer also provides the fast response time essential to obtain an apparatus insensitive to the speckle decorrelation due to mechanical vibrations or tissues movements. The use of a powerful long pulse laser appears promising to enhance the signal level in ultrasound modulated optical imaging. When combined with a photorefractive interferometer of large optical etendue, such a source could

  3. Femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Kecskeméti, G.; Klini, A.; Bor, Zs.

    2007-07-01

    In our study we investigate and report the femtosecond pulsed laser deposition of biological and biocompatible materials. Teflon, polyhydroxybutyrate, polyglycolic-acid, pepsin and tooth in the form of pressed pellets were used as target materials. Thin layers were deposited using pulses from a femtosecond KrF excimer laser system (FWHM = 450 fs, λ = 248 nm, f = 10 Hz) at different fluences: 0.6, 0.9, 1.6, 2.2, 2.8 and 3.5 J/cm 2, respectively. Potassium bromide were used as substrates for diagnostic measurements of the films on a FTIR spectrometer. The pressure in the PLD chamber was 1 × 10 -3 Pa, and in the case of tooth and Teflon the substrates were heated at 250 °C. Under the optimized conditions the chemical structure of the deposited materials seemed to be largely preserved as evidenced by the corresponding IR spectra. The polyglycolic-acid films showed new spectral features indicating considerable morphological changes during PLD. Surface structure and thickness of the layers deposited on Si substrates were examined by an atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a surface profilometer. An empirical model has been elaborated for the description of the femtosecond PLD process. According to this the laser photons are absorbed in the surface layer of target resulting in chemical dissociation of molecules. The fast decomposition causes explosion-like gas expansion generating recoil forces which can tear off and accelerate solid particles. These grains containing target molecules without any chemical damages are ejected from the target and deposited onto the substrate forming a thin layer.

  4. thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition on different substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navasery, M.; Halim, S. A.; Dehzangi, A.; Soltani, N.; Bahmanrokh, G.; Erfani H, M.; Kamalianfar, A.; Pan, K. Y.; Chang, S. C.; Chen, S. K.; Lim, K. P.; Awang Kechik, M. M.

    2014-09-01

    Perovskite manganite La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 thin films were directly grown on MgO(100), Si(100) and glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition. From the XRD patterns, the films are found to be polycrystalline, single-phase orthorhombic. The metal-insulator transition temperature is 209 K for LCMO/MgO, 266 K for LCMO/Si and 231 K for film deposited on the glass substrate. The conduction mechanism in these films is investigated in different temperature regimes. Low-temperature resistivity data below the phase transition temperature ( T P) have been fitted with the relation , indicating that the electron-electron scattering affects the conduction of these materials. The high-temperature resistivity data ( T > T P) were explained using variable-range hopping (VRH) and small-polaron hopping (SPH) models. Debye temperature values are 548 K for LCMO/Cg, 568 K for LCMO/Si and 508 K for LCMO/MgO thin films. In all thin films, the best fitting in the range of VRH is found for 3D dimension. The density of states near the Fermi level N ( E F) for LCMO/MgO is lower due to the prominent role of the grain boundary in LCMO/MgO and increase in bending of Mn-O-Mn bond angle, which decreases the double exchange coupling of Mn3+-O2-Mn4+ and in turn makes the LCMO/MgO sample less conducting as compared to the other films.

  5. Pulsed laser deposition of transition metal oxides for secondary batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, K.A.; Deng, C.Z.; Cairns, E.J.

    1995-12-31

    Pulsed laser deposition has been used to prepare thin films of several complex metal oxides of significance in secondary batteries from a single stoichiometric target with a substrate temperature of 600 C in the presence of 200 mtorr O{sub 2}. Films of the candidate bifunctional air electrocatalysts, for metal air batteries, La{sub 0.6}Ca{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3}, La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3}, La{sub 0.6}Ca{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} were prepared on glassy carbon substrates. Glassy carbon was found to either erode during the ablation process (with the cobaltates) or cause film cracking after deposition because of its extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion. The use of stainless steel substrates yielded 0.3 {micro}m-thick dense films of La{sub 0.6}Ca{sub 0.4}CoO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.6}Ca{sub 0.4}MnO{sub 3} which were suitable for electrochemical measurements in concentrated alkaline electrolytes. LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and LiCoO{sub 2} films were prepared at thickness` of 0.3 {micro}m and 1.5 {micro}m. The 0.3 {micro}m-thick films delivered 176 mC/cm{sup 2}-{micro}m and 323 mC/cm{sup 2} for LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and LiCoO{sub 2}, respectively, in 1 M LiClO{sub 4}/PC.

  6. Nanostructuring and texturing of pulsed laser deposited hydroxyapatite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunbin; Catledge, Shane; Vohra, Yogesh; Camata, Renato; Lacefield, William

    2003-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) [Ca_10(PO_4)_6(OH)_2] is commonly deposited onto orthopedic and dental metallic implants to speed up bone formation around devices, allowing earlier stabilization in a patient. Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a suitable means of placing thin HA films on these implants because of its control over stoichiometry, crystallinity, and nanostructure. These characteristics determine the mechanical properties of the films that must be optimized to improve the performance of load-bearing implants and other devices that undergo bone insertion. We have used PLD to produce nanostructured and preferentially oriented HA films and evaluated their mechanical properties. Pure, highly crystalline HA films on Ti-6Al-4V substrates were obtained using a KrF excimer laser (248nm) with energy density of 4-8 J/cm^2 and deposition temperature of 500-700^rcC. Scanning electron and atomic force microscopies reveal that our careful manipulation of energy density and substrate temperature has led to films made up of HA grains in the nanometer scale. Broadening of x-ray diffraction peaks as a function of deposition temperature suggests it may be possible to control the film nanostructure to a great extent. X-ray diffraction also shows that as the laser energy density is increased in the 4-8 J/cm^2 range, the hexagonal HA films become preferentially oriented along the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. Texture, nanostructure, and phase make-up all significantly influence the mechanical properties. We will discuss how each of these factors affects hardness and Young's modulus of the HA films as measured by nanoindentation.

  7. Boron carbon nitride films deposited by sequential pulses laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinescu, M.; Perrone, A.; Caricato, A. P.; Mirenghi, L.; Gerardi, C.; Ghica, C.; Frunza, L.

    1998-05-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of c-BCN thin films by reactive pulsed laser ablation (RPLA) of a rotating target (3 Hz) formed of two semidisks: one of h-BN and the other one of graphite, with the substrate at room temperature. The irradiations were performed in vacuum (10 -5 Pa) and in N 2 ambient gas (1-100 Pa) using a XeCl excimer laser ( λ=308 nm, τFWHM=30 ns) with a fluence of 5 J/cm 2. Series of 10,000 pulses at a repetition rate of 10 Hz were directed to target. Different analysis techniques pointed out the synthesis of h-BCN and c-BCN. Microhardness measurements at the deposited films evidence high values up to 2.9 GPa. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) profiles showed the presence of layers of 600-700 nm thickness, with uniform concentrations of B, C and N in the films. Uniform signals of BN and CN, which are related to the BCN bond, are also present. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies pointed out the BCN compound formation. The deconvolution of B 1s recorded spectra evidenced a strong peak (centered at 188 eV) assigned to B bonded in BC 2N; the N 1s and C 1s spectra also confirm the BCN formation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) analysis evidenced the presence of c-BCN phase (with crystallites of 30-80 nm) and h-BCN phase as well. The N 2 pressure strongly influenced the BCN formation and, consequently, the properties of the deposited films.

  8. Differential Gene Expression in Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-Hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Light 12-hours Post-Exposure: Results Compendium John W. Obringer Martin D. Johnson Laser and Optics...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells 12-hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser Light and 1064 nm, 170 ps Pulsed Laser Lightl2-hours...Explanted Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial USAFA F05611-02-P-0471 Cells 24-Hours Post-Exposure to 532 nm, 3.0 ns Pulsed Laser-Light and 1064nm, 170 ps Pulsed

  9. Tunable Stoichiometry of BCxNy Thin Films Through Multitarget Pulsed Laser Deposition Monitored via In Situ Ellipsometry (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-05

    this paper is that by synchronizing a pulsed laser with two different pulsed laser deposition (PLD) target materials and a programmable galvanometer ...Cambridge Technology galvanometer system (two axes servo mirror system with capacitive coupled position feedback for high speed) to a uniform elliptical... galvanometer : PLD A–carbon and PLD B–BN. Jones et al.: Tunable stoichiometry of BCxNy thin films through multitarget pulsed laser. . . Journal of

  10. The mathematical modelling of arc welding operation

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.

    1990-01-01

    This report described the progress that was made during the grant period which examined the mathematical modeling of arc welding operations with emphasis on the transport phenomena occurring at the interface between the welding arc and weld pool. Work that has been carried out during the last three years of this specific project broke entirely new ground by quantifying the importance of free surface phenomena in arc welding systems. the most critical finding of this work was to emphasize the importance of the two way coupling between weld pool behavior and that of the energy source. More specifically, we have been able to model the interaction of a welding arc with a significantly deformed weld pool surface and we have shown that the deformed weld pool shape may have a very marked effect on the heat flux falling on the weld pool. This work is to be contrasted with most previous studies which model the weld pool independently of the welding arc and vice-versa. We have also been able to model the collapse of strongly deformed weld pools and the resultant gas occlusions. Furthermore, we have begun examination of the nature of the stability of the free surface using classical mathematics (Kelvin-Helmholtz instability). The importance in specifying the free surface lies in its effects on the arc behavior (nature of the heat and current flux). This in turn affects the surface temperature distribution on the weld pool which controls (a) the strength of Marangoni flows, and (b) the vaporization rates of volatile species. The former controls the type of pool shape that can be obtained due to convective flows while the latter controls, in part, the net heat input into the workpiece and limits the peak surface temperature. As a result of these understandings, heavy emphases are placed on quantifying the free surface. 49 refs., 15 figs.

  11. Users manual for the laser welding code WELD2D

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, A.J.

    1984-04-01

    The two-dimensional laser welding code, WELD2D, was developed to model the conduction mode welding (weld pool motions are not considered) of common metals. For butt welded configurations two dissimilar materials may be used. Either Gaussian or uniform laser beam power distributions may be selected and insulated or conducting ends can be treated. Specification of the laser wavelength, energy per pulse, pulse duration and repetition rate is required as input and the temperature field and molten pool shape are calculated as functions of time. Currently material parameters for six metals, aluminum, nickel, steel, molybdenum, copper and silicon are included in the code; however, these may be modified or expanded easily with simple changes to data records. This report is a users manual for WELD2D and contains a description of the models employed, code usage, and sample calculations.

  12. Short Pulse Laser Production of Diamond Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, P.S.; Stuart, B.C.; Dinh, L.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; McLean, W.; Perry, M.D.

    1998-03-20

    The use of diamond thin films has the potential for major impact in many industrial and scientific applications. These include heat sinks for electronics, broadband optical sensors, windows, cutting tools, optical coatings, laser diodes, cold cathodes, and field emission displays. Attractive properties of natural diamond consist of physical hardness, high tensile yield strength, chemical inertness, low coefficient of friction, high thermal conductivity, and low electrical conductivity. Unfortunately, these properties are not completely realized in currently produced diamond thin films. Chemical vapor deposition, in its many forms, has been the most successful to this point in producing crystalline diamond films microns to millimeters in thickness which are made up of closely packed diamond crystals microns in physical dimension. However, high purity films are difficult to realize due to the use of hydrogen in the growth process which becomes included in the film matrix. These impurities are manifest in film physical properties which are inferior to those of pure crystalline diamond. In addition, the large density of grain boundaries due to the polycrystalline nature of the films reduce the films' diamond-like character. Finally, substrates must be heated to several hundred degrees Celsius which is not suitable for many materials. Pulsed laser deposition is attractive due to its ability to produce high purity films-limited only by the purity of the target. For diamond film production, high purity carbon can be ablated directly by lasers and deposited as thin films at ambient temperatures. However, lasers currently in use generally deliver long (>10 ns) pulses, and the generally explosive nature of laser ablation, in addition to the desired single-atom or single-ion carbon, liberates significant amounts of carbon clusters (C{sub n} where n=2-30) and macroscopic particles (> 1-10 pm) of carbon. These carbon particles interrupt the ordered deposition of crystalline

  13. Diatomic molecules in strong ultrashort pulse laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nibarger, John Paul

    The advent of ultrashort pulse laser systems has allowed the study of atoms and molecules in extreme environments. In our lab intensities up to 2.1015 W/cm2 have been achieved and pulse durations as short as 25 fs have been characterized. Characterizing these pulses and understanding their effect on diatomic molecules is the focus of this dissertation. To fully characterize an ultrashort laser pulse in both electric field and phase, we have developed a compact dispersion free TG FROG (Transient-Grating Frequency- Resolved-Optical-Gate). This was done through the use of a mask that separates the input beam into three distinct beams which are focused into fused silica to create the FROG signal. To understand the ionization and dissociation process in detail, a comprehensive analysis was made of diatomic nitrogen for charge states of N 2 up to N5+2 . It appears that all ionization up to N5+2 involves the charge asymmetric channel, N4+2-->N1++N3+ . By determining the time between each ionization step we observe the competition between laser intensity and internuclear separation in determining the molecular ionization rate. Finally, we suggest that short pulse (<130 fs) ionization leaves fragments in electronically excited states whereas long pulse (>600 fs) ionization leaves them in electronic ground states. Further investigation was made into the role of charge asymmetric dissociation with short pulses (30 fs) and we prove that charge asymmetric dissociation in diatomic molecules leaves one of the fragments in an electronically excited state. For example, using a new double pulse technique, we observed the reaction: I2+(pulse1) -->(I2+2) **-->I0++(I2+ )*+(pulse 2)-->I0++I3+ demonstrating that the I2+ fragment must have been in an excited state. More generally, just as asymmetric dissociation implies that the initial molecular ion is in an excited electronic state, the observation of asymmetric channels in the post- dissociation ionization shows that the ionic

  14. Interaction of intense ultrashort pulse lasers with clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, George

    2007-11-01

    The last ten years have witnessed an explosion of activity involving the interaction of clusters with intense ultrashort pulse lasers. Atomic or molecular clusters are targets with unique properties, as they are halfway between solid and gases. The intense laser radiation creates hot dense plasma, which can provide a compact source of x-rays and energetic particles. The focus of this investigation is to understand the salient features of energy absorption and Coulomb explosion by clusters. The evolution of clusters is modeled with a relativistic time-dependent 3D Molecular Dynamics (MD) model [1]. The Coulomb interaction between particles is handled by a fast tree algorithm, which allows large number of particles to be used in simulations [2]. The time histories of all particles in a cluster are followed in time and space. The model accounts for ionization-ignition effects (enhancement of the laser field in the vicinity of ions) and a variety of elementary processes for free electrons and charged ions, such as optical field and collisional ionization, outer ionization and electron recapture. The MD model was applied to study small clusters (1-20 nm) irradiated by a high-intensity (10^16-10^20 W/cm^2) sub-picosecond laser pulse. We studied fundamental cluster features such as energy absorption, x-ray emission, particle distribution, average charge per atom, and cluster explosion as a function of initial cluster radius, laser peak intensity and wavelength. Simulations of novel applications, such as table-top nuclear fusion from exploding deuterium clusters [3] and high power synchrotron radiation for biological applications and imaging [4] have been performed. The application for nuclear fusion was motivated by the efficient absorption of laser energy (˜100%) and its high conversion efficiency into ion kinetic energy (˜50%), resulting in neutron yield of 10^6 neutrons/Joule laser energy. Contributors: J. Davis and A. L. Velikovich. [1] G. M. Petrov, et al Phys

  15. A novel micro-pulse laser active imaging method based on photon counting scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chenghao; Yin, Wenye; Miao, Zhuang; He, Wei-ji; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guo-Hua

    2013-12-01

    We present the use and characterization of a Single Photon Detector (SPD) for active micro-pulse laser imaging. Laser active imaging technology obtains the two dimensional (2D) intensity information of objects by using the active continuous or pulsed laser illumination and an image sensor array. The Maximum range of laser active imaging is limited by the performance of image sensor, whose noise can seriously lower the obtainable SNR and degrade the quality of the reconstructed image. This paper presents a photon counting scheme based micro-pulse laser active imaging method that utilizes the SPD as the receiver and the micro-pulsed laser as the source. In this case, SPD was used to detect the laser echo. By using repeated multi-cycle detection strategies, every detected photon event is treated as an independent measurement of laser echo and thus the intensity information of objects is acquired with the response possibility estimation of laser echo. We chose a Geiger-Mode Avalanche Photodiodes (GM-APD) based approach, extending the methods of micro-pulse laser active imaging. In our implement, the number of TTL pulses output from the GM-APD within the duration of the pixel dwell time was recorder by a LabView pre-programmed instrument and then the laser echo response possibility of GM-APD was established by Full Waveform Analysis algorithm. This approach combined remote imaging with single photon sensitivity and laser active imaging.

  16. Study on Nonlinear Absorption Effect of Nanosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation for GaAs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenjun; Liu, Zhongyang; Zhou, Haijiao

    2016-04-01

    In order to research nonlinear absorption effect of pulse laser irradiation for GaAs, a physical model of Gaussian distribution pulse laser irradiation for semiconductor material was established by software COMSOL Multiphysics. The thermal effects of semiconductor material GaAs was analyzed under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with wavelength of 1064 nm. The radial and transverse temperature distribution of semiconductor material GaAs was calculated under irradiation of nanosecond pulse laser with different power density by solving the thermal conduction equations. The contribution of one-photon absorption, two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption to temperature of GaAs material were discussed. The results show that when the pulse laser power density rises to 10(10) W/cm2, free carrier absorption played a leading role and it was more than that of one-photon absorption of material. The temperature contribution of two-photon absorption and free carrier absorption could be ignored at laser power density lower than 10(8) W/cm2. The result is basically consistent with relevant experiments, which shows that physical model constructed is valid.

  17. Developments of pulse laser assist optical tweezers (PLAT) for in vivo manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Saki; Sugiura, Tadao; Minato, Kotaro

    2011-02-01

    Optical tweezers is a technique to trap and to manipulate micron sized objects under a microscope by radiation pressure force exerted by a laser beam. Optical tweezers has been utilized for single-molecular measurements of force exerted by molecular interactions and for cell palpation. To extend applications of optical tweezers we have developed a novel optical tweezers system combined with a pulse laser. We utilize a pulsed laser (Q-switched Nd: YAG laser, wavelength of 1064 nm) to assist manipulations by conventional optical tweezers achieved by a continuous wave (CW) laser. The pulsed laser beam is introduced into the same optics for conventional optical tweezers. In principle, instantaneous radiation force is proportional to instantaneous power of laser beam. As a result, pulsed laser beam generates strong instantaneous force on an object to be manipulated. If the radiation force becomes strong enough to get over an obstacle structure and/or to be released from adhesion, the object will be free from these difficulties. We have named this technique as Pulse Laser beam Assisted optical Tweezers (PLAT). We have successfully demonstrated to manipulate objects surface on a living cell for "in vivo manipulation."

  18. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  19. Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.E.; Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

  20. Three-Dimensional Coaxial Weld Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    Optical system for coaxial-viewing welding torch enables perception or measurement of depth. Light from welding area passes through beam splitter into two optical trains forming two images, each viewed along line making small angle with axis of torch. Two lines of sight intersect at weld pool. Parallax between two views provides sensation of depth over entire field view.

  1. Hyperthermal Pulsed-Laser Ablation Beams for Film Deposition and Surface Microstructural Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lowndes, D.H.

    1999-11-08

    This paper presents an overview of pulsed-laser ablation for film deposition and surface microstructure formation. By changing the ambient gas pressure from high vacuum to several Torr (several hundred Pa) and by selecting the pulsed-laser wavelength, the kinetic energy of ablated atoms/ions can be varied from several hundred eV down to {approximately}0.1 eV and films ranging from superhard to nanocrystalline may be deposited. Furthermore, cumulative (multi-pulse) irradiation of a semiconductor surface (e.g. silicon) in an oxidizing gas (0{sub 2}, SF{sub 6}) et atmospheric pressure can produce dense, self-organized arrays of high-aspect-ratio microcolumns or microcones. Thus, a wide range of materials synthesis and processing opportunities result from the hyperthermal flux and reactive growth conditions provided by pulsed-laser ablation.

  2. Vibration measurement based on the optical cross-correlation technique with femtosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jibo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Li, Shuyi

    2016-10-01

    Two vibration measurement methods with femtosecond pulsed laser based on the optical cross-correlation technique are presented independently in this paper. The balanced optical cross-correlation technique can reflect the time jitter between the reference pluses and measurement pluses by detecting second harmonic signals using type II phase-matched nonlinear crystal and balanced amplified photo-detectors. In the first method, with the purpose of attaining the vibration displacement, the time difference of the reference pulses relative to the measurement pluses can be measured using single femtosecond pulsed laser. In the second method, there are a couple of femtosecond pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequency. Vibration displacement associated with cavity length can be calculated by means of precisely measuring the pulse repetition frequency. The results show that the range of measurement attains ±150μm for a 500fs pulse. These methods will be suited for vibration displacement measurement, including laboratory use, field testing and industrial application.

  3. Pulsed laser interferometry with sub-picometer resolution using quadrature detection

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lei; Gorman, Jason J.

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond pulsed laser interferometry has important applications in measuring picometer-level displacements on sub-nanosecond time scales. In this paper, we experimentally examine its achievable displacement resolution, as well as the relationship between the laser’s optical spectrum and the interferometer’s effective wavelength. The resulting broadband displacement noise and noise floor of the pulsed laser Michelson interferometer are equivalent to that achieved with a stabilized continuous wave HeNe laser, where values of 1.01 nm RMS and 27.75 fm/√Hz have been demonstrated. It is also shown that a single effective wavelength can accurately describe the fringes of the pulsed laser interferometer but the effective wavelength value can only be determined from the optical spectrum under certain conditions. These results will be used for time-resolved displacement metrology with picosecond temporal resolution in the future. PMID:27464192

  4. Molecular delivery into live cells using gold nanoparticle coated substrates fabricated by pulsed laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Xiao, Fan; Teitell, Michael A.; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2010-02-01

    A massively-parallel molecular delivery system for mammalian cells is demonstrated by pulsed-laser irradiation of a gold-nanoparticles-coated substrate situated below a cell monolayer. This system is capable of high throughput and spatially-targeted delivery into desired areas of a cell culture by designing the laser irradiation pattern. Large area, rapid fabrication of the gold-nanoparticle-coated substrate is achieved by pulsed laser annealing of a continuous gold thin film. Randomly distributed gold nanoparticles and periodic gold nanoparticle arrays were obtained by pulsed laser flood exposure and by polymer mold guided laser annealing respectively. Optical image patterned molecular delivery into adherent cells were demonstrated in HeLa and HEK 293T cells. Delivery efficiencies of fluorescent dye, calcein, were as high as >90% with high cell viability (>90%) in HEK 293T using this device.

  5. Pulsed laser interferometry with sub-picometer resolution using quadrature detection.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lei; Gorman, Jason J

    2016-07-25

    Femtosecond pulsed laser interferometry has important applications in measuring picometer-level displacements on sub-nanosecond time scales. In this paper, we experimentally examine its achievable displacement resolution, as well as the relationship between the laser's optical spectrum and the interferometer's effective wavelength. The resulting broadband displacement noise and noise floor of the pulsed laser Michelson interferometer are equivalent to that achieved with a stabilized continuous wave HeNe laser, where values of 1.01 nm RMS and 27.75 fm/√Hz have been demonstrated. It is also shown that a single effective wavelength can accurately describe the fringes of the pulsed laser interferometer but the effective wavelength value can only be determined from the optical spectrum under certain conditions. These results will be used for time-resolved displacement metrology with picosecond temporal resolution in the future.

  6. A Study on the Welding Characteristics of Tailor Welded Blank Metal Sheets Using GTAW and Laser Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thasanaraphan, Pornsak

    In this study, a computational and experimental effort was carried out to qualitatively understand the weld pool shape, distortion and residual stress for continuous laser welding and manual pulsed gas metal arc welding. For all the welding simulations given in this dissertation, a welding specific finite element package, SYSWELD, is used. This research focuses on the welding behavior observed in light-weight metal structures known as the tailor-welded blanks, TWBs. They are a combination of two or more metal sheets with different thickness and/or different materials that are welded together in a single plane prior to forming, e.g., stamping. They made from the low carbon steel. As laser welding experiment results show, the weld pool shape at the top and bottom surface, is strongly influenced by surface tension, giving it a characteristic hourglass shape. In order to simulate the hourglass shape, a new volumetric heat source model was developed to predict the transient temperature profile and weld pool shape, including the effect of surface tension. Tailor welded blanks with different thicknesses were examined in the laser welding process. All major physical phenomena such as thermal conduction, heat radiation and convection heat losses are taken into account in the model development as well as temperature-dependant thermal and mechanical material properties. The model is validated for the case of butt joint welding of cold rolled steel sheets. The results of the numerical simulations provide temperature distributions representing the shape of the molten pool, distortion and residual stress with varying laser beam power and welding speed. It is demonstrated that the finite element simulation results are in good agreement with the experiment results. This includes the weld pool shape and sheet metal distortion. While there is no experimental data to compare directly with residual stress results, the distorted shape provides an indirect measure of the welding

  7. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Method for laser welding a fin and a tube

    DOEpatents

    Fuerschbach, Phillip W.; Mahoney, A. Roderick; Milewski, John O

    2001-01-01

    A method of laser welding a planar metal surface to a cylindrical metal surface is provided, first placing a planar metal surface into approximate contact with a cylindrical metal surface to form a juncture area to be welded, the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface thereby forming an acute angle of contact. A laser beam, produced, for example, by a Nd:YAG pulsed laser, is focused through the acute angle of contact at the juncture area to be welded, with the laser beam heating the juncture area to a welding temperature to cause welding to occur between the planar metal surface and the cylindrical metal surface. Both the planar metal surface and cylindrical metal surface are made from a reflective metal, including copper, copper alloys, stainless steel alloys, aluminum, and aluminum alloys.

  9. Modeling crater formation in femtosecond-pulse laser damage from basic principles.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert A; Schumacher, Douglass W; Chowdhury, Enam A

    2015-05-15

    We present the first fundamental simulation method for the determination of crater morphology due to femtosecond-pulse laser damage. To this end we have adapted the particle-in-cell (PIC) method commonly used in plasma physics for use in the study of laser damage and developed the first implementation of a pair potential for PIC codes. We find that the PIC method is a complementary approach to modeling laser damage, bridging the gap between fully ab-initio molecular dynamics approaches and empirical models. We demonstrate our method by modeling a femtosecond-pulse laser incident on a flat copper slab for a range of intensities.

  10. Pulse laser induced graphite-to-diamond phase transition: the role of quantum electronic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZhengFei; Liu, Feng

    2017-02-01

    First-principles calculations show that the pulse laser induced graphite-to-diamond phase transition is related to the lattice stress generated by the excited carriers, termed as "quantum electronic stress (QES)". We found that the excited carriers in graphite generate a large anisotropic QES that increases linearly with the increasing carrier density. Using the QES as a guiding parameter, structural relaxation spontaneously transforms the graphite phase into the diamond phase, as the QES is reduced and minimized. Our results suggest that the concept of QES can be generally applied as a good measure to characterize the pulse laser induced phase transitions, in analogy to pressure induced phase transitions.

  11. Effects of Technical Parameters on the Pulsed Laser Deposited Ferroelectric Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafan; Chen, Chuanzhong; Song, Mingda; Ma, Jie; Wang, Diangang

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD), which is a novel technique in producing thin films in the recent years, shows unique advantages for the deposition of ferroelectric films. Effects of technical parameters on the pulsed laser deposited ferroelectric films, including substrate temperature, oxygen pressure, post-annealing, buffer layer, target composition, energy density, wavelength, target-to-substrate distance, and laser pulse rate, are systematically reviewed in order to optimize these parameters. Processing-microstructure-property relationships of ferroelectric films by PLD are discussed. The application prospect is pointed as well.

  12. Solids sampling using double-pulse laser ablation inductivelycoupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Jhanis; Liu, Chunyi; Yoo, Jong; Mao, Xianglei; Russo,RickRick

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes the use of double-pulse laser ablation to improve ICP-MS internal precision (temporal relative standard deviation, %TRSD). Double pulse laser ablation offers reduced fractionation, increased sensitivity, and improved signal to noise ratios. The first pulse is used to ablate a large quantity of mass from the sample surface. The second pulse is applied with a variable time delay after the first pulse to break the ablated mass into a finer aerosol, which is more readily transported to and digested in the ICP-MS.

  13. Controlling Dopant Profiles in Hyperdoped Silicon by Modifying Dopant Evaporation Rates During Pulsed Laser Melting

    SciTech Connect

    Recht, D.; Sullivan, J. T.; Reedy, R.; Buonassisi, T.; Aziz, M. J.

    2012-03-12

    We describe a method to control the sub-surface dopant profile in 'hyperdoped' silicon fabricated by ion implantation and pulsed laser melting. Dipping silicon ion implanted with sulfur into hydrofluoric acid prior to nanosecond pulsed laser melting leads to a tenfold increase in the rate of sulfur evaporation from the surface of the melt. This results in an 80% reduction of the near-surface dopant concentration, effectively embedding the hyperdoped region in a layer up to 180 nm beneath the surface. This method should facilitate the development of blocked impurity band devices.

  14. An efficient two-dimensional ALE modelling and experimental validation for pulsed laser-matter interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qiang; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-11-01

    We have developed two-dimensional Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) code which is used to study the physical processes, the plasma absorption, the crater profile, and the temperature distribution on metallic target and below the surface. The ALE method overcomes problems with Lagrangian moving mesh distortion by mesh smoothing and conservative quantities remapping from Lagrangian mesh to smoothed one. The results of numerical simulation of pulsed laser ablation are presented. The study presents particular interest for the analysis of experimental results obtained during pulsed laser ablation.

  15. Low-cost laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy system with a pulsed laser diode excitation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhu, Quing

    2017-03-01

    We present a low-cost laser scanning photoacoustic microscopy system with a pulsed laser diode as the excitation source. The system utilizes a 905 nm pulsed laser diode with 120 ns pulse width and 1 KHz repetition rate. No averaging is performed in data acquisition, resulting in a short image acquisition time. The maximum field of view is 4.6 mm × 3.7 mm and the lateral resolution is 71 μm. Images of human hairs and mouse ear are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the system in imaging biological tissue.

  16. In Situ Creation of Nanoparticles from YBCO by Pulsed Laser Deposition (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    entailed pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of YBCO at a high background pressure of 5 Torr O2. The sizes of the nanoparticles range from ~3 to 5 nm and...pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of YBCO at a high background pressure of 5 Torr O2. The sizes of the nanoparticles range from 3 to 5 nm and are typical...are extremely small pieces of matter that have dimensions on the order of a few nm . It may well be possible to use nanoparti- cles of YBCO itself as

  17. Stabilizing laser energy density on a target during pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    DOEpatents

    Dowden, Paul C.; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-05-31

    A process for stabilizing laser energy density on a target surface during pulsed laser deposition of thin films controls the focused laser spot on the target. The process involves imaging an image-aperture positioned in the beamline. This eliminates changes in the beam dimensions of the laser. A continuously variable attenuator located in between the output of the laser and the imaged image-aperture adjusts the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a "constant voltage" mode. The process provides reproducibility and controllability for deposition of electronic thin films by pulsed laser deposition.

  18. Understanding Femtosecond-Pulse Laser Damage through Fundamental Physics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Robert A., III

    It did not take long after the invention of the laser for the field of laser damage to appear. For several decades researchers have been studying how lasers damage materials, both for the basic scientific understanding of highly nonequilibrium processes as well as for industrial applications. Femtosecond pulse lasers create little collateral damage and a readily reproducible damage pattern. They are easily tailored to desired specifications and are particularly powerful and versatile tools, contributing even more industrial interest in the field. As with most long-standing fields of research, many theoretical tools have been developed to model the laser damage process, covering a wide range of complexities and regimes of applicability. However, most of the modeling methods developed are either too limited in spatial extent to model the full morphology of the damage crater, or incorporate only a small subset of the important physics and require numerous fitting parameters and assumptions in order to match values interpolated from experimental data. Demonstrated in this work is the first simulation method capable of fundamentally modeling the full laser damage process, from the laser interaction all the way through to the resolidification of the target, on a large enough scale that can capture the full morphology of the laser damage crater so as to be compared directly to experimental measurements instead of extrapolated values, and all without any fitting parameters. The design, implementation, and testing of this simulation technique, based on a modified version of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, is presented. For a 60 fs, 1 mum wavelength laser pulse with fluences of 0.5 J/cm 2, 1.0 J/cm2, and 2.0 J/cm2 the resulting laser damage craters in copper are shown and, using the same technique applied to experimental crater morphologies, a laser damage fluence threshold is calculated of 0.15 J/cm2, consistent with current experiments performed under conditions similar

  19. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  20. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  1. On the Feasibility of Depth Profiling of Animal Tissue by Ultrashort Pulse Laser Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Milasinovic, Slobodan; Liu, Yaoming; Bhardwaj, Chhavi; Melvin, Blaze M.T.; Gordon, Robert J.; Hanley, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were performed to examine the feasibility of MS depth profiling of animal tissue by ~75 fs, 800 nm laser pulses to expose underlying layers of tissue for subsequent MS analysis. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was used to analyze phospholipids and proteins from both intact bovine eye lens tissue and tissue ablated by ultrashort laser pulses. Laser desorption postionization (LDPI-MS) with 10.5 eV single photon ionization was also used to analyze cholesterol and other small molecules in the tissue before and after laser ablation. Scanning electron microscopy was applied to examine the ablation patterns in the tissue and estimate the depth of the ablation craters. Ultrashort pulse laser ablation was found able to remove a layer of several tens of micrometers from the surface of eye lens tissue while leaving the underlying tissue relatively undamaged for subsequent MS analysis. MS analysis of cholesterol, phospholipids, peptides, and various unidentified species did not reveal any chemical damage caused by ultrashort pulse laser ablation for analytes smaller than ~6 kDa. However, a drop in intensity of larger protein ions was detected by MALDI-MS following laser ablation. An additional advantage was that ablated tissue displayed up to an order of magnitude higher signal intensities than intact tissue when subsequently analyzed by MS. These results support the use of ultrashort pulse laser ablation in combination with MS analysis to permit depth profiling of animal tissue. PMID:22482364

  2. Carbon nitride nanocrystals having cubic structure using pulsed laser induced liquid-solid interfacial reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G. W.; Wang, J. B.

    Carbon nitride nanocrystals were prepared using a pulsed laser induced liquid-solid interfacial reaction and transmission electron microscopy, while high resolution electron microscopy characterized their morphology and structure. It is important that the cubic-C3N4 phase was observed. The formation mechanism of the carbon nitride nanocrystals is also discussed.

  3. Studies of Inactivation Mechanism of non-enveloped icosahedral viruses by a visible ultrashort pulsed laser

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The inactivation mechanism of ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation at a wavelength of 425 nm has been studied using two different-sized, non-enveloped icosahedral viruses, murine norovirus-1 (MNV-1) and human papillomavirus-16 (HPV-16) pseudovirions. Our experimental results are consistent with a mo...

  4. Time differentiated nuclear resonance spectroscopy coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kupenko, I. Strohm, C.; McCammon, C.; Cerantola, V.; Petitgirard, S.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Glazyrin, K.; Vasiukov, D.; Aprilis, G.; Chumakov, A. I.; Rüffer, R.

    2015-11-15

    Developments in pulsed laser heating applied to nuclear resonance techniques are presented together with their applications to studies of geophysically relevant materials. Continuous laser heating in diamond anvil cells is a widely used method to generate extreme temperatures at static high pressure conditions in order to study the structure and properties of materials found in deep planetary interiors. The pulsed laser heating technique has advantages over continuous heating, including prevention of the spreading of heated sample and/or the pressure medium and, thus, a better stability of the heating process. Time differentiated data acquisition coupled with pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells was successfully tested at the Nuclear Resonance beamline (ID18) of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. We show examples applying the method to investigation of an assemblage containing ε-Fe, FeO, and Fe{sub 3}C using synchrotron Mössbauer source spectroscopy, FeCO{sub 3} using nuclear inelastic scattering, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} using nuclear forward scattering. These examples demonstrate the applicability of pulsed laser heating in diamond anvil cells to spectroscopic techniques with long data acquisition times, because it enables stable pulsed heating with data collection at specific time intervals that are synchronized with laser pulses.

  5. Pulsed laser photolysis kinetics study of the O(3P) + ClO reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1988-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis technique was used to investigate the kinetics of the important stratospheric reaction O + ClO yields Cl + O2 in buffer gas over the temperature and pressure ranges of 231-367 K and 25-500 torr. The results indicate a lack of pressure dependence at 298 K over the 25-500 torr range.

  6. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchick, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrown, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using ultrashort pulse laser (USPL). Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  7. Thermal energy transfer by plasmon-resonant composite nanoparticles at pulse laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Avetisyan, Yuri A; Yakunin, Alexander N; Tuchin, Valery V

    2012-04-01

    Heating of composite plasmon-resonant nanoparticles (spherical gold nanoshells) under pulse laser illumination is considered. The numerical solution of the time-dependent heat conduction equation accounting for spatial inhomogeneities of absorbed laser radiation is performed. Important features of temperature kinetics and thermal flux inside nanoparticles are analyzed. Possible applications of the observed effects in nanotechnology and medicine are discussed.

  8. A New Kind of Laser Microphone Using High Sensitivity Pulsed Laser Vibrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chen-Chia; Trivedi, Sudhir; Jin, Feng; Swaminathan, V.; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a new kind of laser microphone using a highly sensitive pulsed laser vibrometer. By using the photo-electromotive-force (photo-EMF) sensors, we present data indicating the real-time detection of surface displacements as small as 4 pm.

  9. Hydroxyapatite and ZrO II biocompatible coatings fabricated by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mašinova, P.; Jelínek, M.; Kocourek, T.; Dostálova, T.; Teuberova, Z.; Seydlova, M.; Jurek, K.; Mróz, W.; Prokopiuk, A.; Smetana, K.

    2006-03-01

    Thin films of ZrO II and hydroxyapatite/ZrO II were created by pulsed laser deposition using KrF and ArF excimer laser. Films were tested by XRD, SEM and WDX methods and in-vitro for cytotoxicity, adhesion and cell proliferation.

  10. Microstructural changes of Zr702 induced by pulsed laser surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Linjiang; Chen, Baofeng; Wang, Shuyan; Guo, Ning; Huang, Can; Zhou, Zhiming; Huang, Weijiu

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the surface of a fully recrystallized Zr702 is treated by pulsed laser following which microstructural changes are investigated by use of electron backscatter diffraction and electron channeling contrast imaging techniques. The pulsed laser treatment results in three distinctly different microstructural features from the surface to the substrate: fine α plates with a few hundred nanometers in width (zone I), irregular-shaped grains with varied sizes (zone II), and essentially unchanged equiaxed grains (zone III). The α plates result from rapid phase transformation due to easy heat extraction of the pulsed laser with dense nanoscale twins inside those plates closer to the surface. The origin of the irregular-shaped grains is found to be related to insufficient recrystallization of antecedently formed α plates near the substrate. Hardness tests reveal highest value (∼356.7 HV) near the surface in zone I and the lowest value (∼165.2 HV) in zone II. Reasons accounting for the difference are discussed in terms of various microstructural characteristics induced by the pulsed laser surface treatment.

  11. A CMOS Visual Sensing System for Welding Control and Information Acquirement in SMAW Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anren, Yao; Zhen, Luo; Sansan, Ao

    A sequential research work on visual information of manual arc welding pool dynamics are presented in this paper. An optical inspection system, for monitoring the shielded manual arc welding (SMAW) process is described. The system consisted of a vision sensor that consisted of a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) camera and lenses, image processing algorithms, and a computer controller. During welding, an image of the weld pool and its vicinity was captured when basic current of welding power. Experimental results showed that the temperature signal varies greatly in the case of instabilities of the weld pool that cause weld defects. The visual information acquirement methods are focused in computer vision sensing, image processing and characteristic extraction of the weld pool surface from the single-item pool images by particular algorithms control strategies are developed to control welding pool dynamics during SMAW.

  12. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  13. Subtask 12B2: Development of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, R.V.; Leong, K.H.; Keppler, E.E.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    The development of techniques for joining vanadium alloys will be required for the construction of fusion devices utilizing the desirable properties of these alloys. The primary objective of this program is to develop of laser welding techniques for vanadium alloys, particularly for the manufacture of welded materials testing specimens. Laser welding is potentially advantageous because of its flexibility and the reduced amount of material effected by the weld. Lasers do not require a vacuum (as does electron beam welders) and the welds they produce have large depth-to-width ratios. Results of scoping tests using a small, pulsed laser (50 joule, YAG laser) indicated that lasers could produce successful welds in vanadium alloy (V-5%Cr-5%Ti) sheet (1-mm thick) when the fusion zone was isolated from air. The pulsed laser required an isolating chamber filled with inert gas to produce welds that did not contain cracks and showed only minor hardness increases. Successful bead-on-plate welds have been made to depths of about 4-mm using a 6 kW continuous CO{sub 2} laser with argon purging. 2 figs.

  14. Effect of pulsed laser parameters on in-situ TiC synthesis in laser surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, M. J.; Torkamany, M. J.; Sabbaghzadeh, J.

    2011-04-01

    Commercial titanium sheets pre-coated with 300-μm thick graphite layer were treated by employing a pulsed Nd:YAG laser in order to enhance surface properties such as wear and erosion resistance. Laser in-situ alloying method produced a composite layer by melting the titanium substrate and dissolution of graphite in the melt pool. Correlations between pulsed laser parameters, microstructure and microhardness of the synthesized composite coatings were investigated. Effects of pulse duration and overlapping factor on the microstructure and hardness of the alloyed layer were deduced from Vickers micro-indentation tests, XRD, SEM and metallographic analyses of cross sections of the generated layer. Results show that the composite cladding layer was constituted with TiC intermetallic phase between the titanium matrix in particle and dendrite forms. The dendritic morphology of composite layer was changed to cellular grain structure by increasing laser pulse duration and irradiated energy. High values of the measured hardness indicate that deposited titanium carbide increases in the conditions with more pulse duration and low process speed. This occurs due to more dissolution of carbon into liquid Ti by heat input increasing and positive influence of the Marangoni flow in the melted zone.

  15. Computerized radiographic sensing and control of an arc welding process

    SciTech Connect

    Rokhlin, S.I.; Guu, A.C. . Dept. of Welding Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    This paper summarizes an effort in which real-time radiography was implemented for on-line arc welding process study and control. X-ray penetrating radiation was used for volume observation in the welding pool and the heat-affected zone during the weld process. The advantages of such a technique are online detection and monitoring of defect formation in the weld and capability to study metal fusion and filler metal/base metal interaction and metal transfer in the welding pool. This technique may also be used for postservice, real-time remote testing of weld quality.

  16. Welding Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Welding fabrication and welding processes were studied. The following research projects are reported: (1) welding fabrication; (2) residual stresses and distortion in structural weldments in high strength steels; (3) improvement of reliability of welding by in process sensing and control (development of smart welding machines for girth welding of pipes); (4) development of fully automated and integrated welding systems for marine applications; (5) advancement of welding technology; (6) research on metal working by high power laser (7) flux development; (8) heat and fluid flow; (9) mechanical properties developments.

  17. Radio-frequency oxygen-plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition of IGZO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chia-Man; Lai, Chih-Chang; Chang, Chih-Wei; Wen, Kai-Shin; Hsiao, Vincent K. S.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate the crystalline structures, optical transmittance, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, chemical compositions, and electrical properties of indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)-based thin films deposited on glass and silicon substrates through pulsed laser deposition (PLD) incorporated with radio-frequency (r.f.)-generated oxygen plasma. The plasma-enhanced pulsed laser deposition (PEPLD)-based IGZO thin films exhibited a c-axis-aligned crystalline (CAAC) structure, which was attributed to the increase in Zn-O under high oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr). High oxygen vapor pressure (150 mTorr) and low r.f. power (10 W) are the optimal deposition conditions for fabricating IGZO thin films with improved electrical properties.

  18. Characterization of Environmental Stability of Pulsed Laser Deposited Oxide Ceramic Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS, THADM

    2004-03-02

    A systematic investigation of candidate hydrogen permeation materials applied to a substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition has been performed. The investigation focused on application of leading permeation-resistant materials types (oxide, carbides, and metals) on a stainless steel substrate. and evaluation of the stability of the applied coatings. Type 304L stainless steel substrates were coated with aluminum oxide, chromium oxide, and aluminum. Characterization of the coating-substrate system adhesion was performed using scratch adhesion testing and microindentation. Coating stability and environmental susceptibility were evaluated for two conditions-air at 350 degrees Celsius and Ar-H2 at 350 degrees Celsius for up to 100 hours. Results from this study have shown the pulsed laser deposition process to be an extremely versatile technology that is capable of producing a sound coating/substrate system for a wide variety of coating materials.

  19. Restructuring of plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates with arbitrary particle size distribution in pulsed laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ershov, A. E.; Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.; Polyutov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied processes of interaction of pulsed laser radiation with resonant groups of plasmonic nanoparticles (resonant domains) in large colloidal nanoparticle aggregates having different interparticle gaps and particle size distributions. These processes are responsible for the origin of nonlinear optical effects and photochromic reactions in multiparticle aggregates. To describe photo-induced transformations in resonant domains and alterations in their absorption spectra remaining after the pulse action, we introduce the factor of spectral photomodification. Based on calculation of changes in thermodynamic, mechanical, and optical characteristics of the domains, the histograms of the spectrum photomodification factor have been obtained for various interparticle gaps, an average particle size, and the degree of polydispersity. Variations in spectra have been analyzed depending on the intensity of laser radiation and various combinations of size characteristics of domains. The obtained results can be used to predict manifestation of photochromic effects in composite materials containing different plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates in pulsed laser fields.

  20. Biocompatible and bioactive nanostructured glass coatings synthesized by pulsed laser deposition: In vitro biological tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, A. C.; Sima, F.; Duta, L.; Popescu, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Capitanu, D.; Mustata, R.; Sima, L. E.; Petrescu, S. M.; Janackovic, D.

    2009-03-01

    We report on the synthesis by pulsed laser deposition with a KrF* excimer laser source ( λ = 248 nm, τ = 25 ns) of bioglass thin films of 6P57 and 6P61 types. Physiology, viability, and proliferation of human osteoblast cells were determined by quantitative in vitro tests performed by flow cytometry on primary osteoblasts cultured on pulsed laser deposited bioglasses. Both types of glass films proved to be appropriate mediums for cell survival and proliferation. In a parallel investigation, cell morphology and adhesion to the surface was studied by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Strong bonds between the materials and cells were found in both cases, as osteoblast pseudopodes penetrated deep into the material. According to our observations, the 6P57 glass films were superior with respect to viability and proliferation performances.

  1. Effects of the substrate temperature on the bioglass films deposited by pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafan; Song, Mingda; Chen, Chuanzhong; Liu, Jian

    2008-08-01

    Effects of the substrate temperature on the bonding configuration and adhesion strength of the bioglass films deposited by pulsed laser were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scratch apparatus. Morphology of the films is compact with the particles on the surface of them and the structure is amorphous glass. Bonding configuration is different from that of the target. Si-O-NBO/Si-O-Si (s) intensity ratios of the films decline as compared with the target. Besides, this tendency is obvious as the substrate temperature decreases. This effect is attributed to the network rearrangement during the film growth, which is associated to special structure of glass and complex physical mechanisms of pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Scratch test results show that the film deposited at 200 °C has the highest adhesion strength.

  2. Single and double long pulse laser ablation of aluminum induced in air and water ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh; Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, single pulse and double pulse laser ablation of an aluminum target in two interaction ambient was investigated experimentally. The interaction was performed by nanosecond Nd:YAG laser beam in air and four depths (i.e. 9, 13, 17, and 21 mm) of distilled water ambient. The irradiation was carried out in single and collinear double pulse configurations in both air and liquid ambient. Crater geometry (depth and diameter) was measured by an optical microscope. The results indicated that the crater geometry strongly depends on both single pulse and double pulse configurations and interaction ambient. In single pulse regime, the crater diameter is higher for all water depths compared to that of air. However, the crater depth, depend on water depth, is higher or lower than the crater depth in air. In double pulse laser ablation, there are greater values for both crater diameters and crater depths in the water.

  3. Method for controlling energy density for reliable pulsed laser deposition of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dowden, P. C. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov; Bi, Z.; Jia, Q. X. E-mail: qxjia@lanl.gov

    2014-02-15

    We have established a methodology to stabilize the laser energy density on a target surface in pulsed laser deposition of thin films. To control the focused laser spot on a target, we have imaged a defined aperture in the beamline (so called image-focus) instead of focusing the beam on a target based on a simple “lens-focus.” To control the laser energy density on a target, we have introduced a continuously variable attenuator between the output of the laser and the imaged aperture to manipulate the energy to a desired level by running the laser in a “constant voltage” mode to eliminate changes in the lasers’ beam dimensions. This methodology leads to much better controllability/reproducibility for reliable pulsed laser deposition of high performance electronic thin films.

  4. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; London, R.A.; Strauss, M.

    1997-10-26

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks.

  5. Cytocompatibility of calcium phosphate coatings deposited by an ArF pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Kawashima, M; Hatanaka, R; Kusunoki, M; Nishikawa, H; Hontsu, S; Nakamura, M

    2007-07-01

    In the current studies, we deposited ultra-thin hydroxyapatite films on a pure titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition, and we examined the effects of these surfaces on rat bone marrow (RBM) cells. This method allowed deposition of 500-, 2000-, and 5000-Angstrom-thick hydroxyapatite films. X-ray diffraction showed that the amorphous films recrystallized to a hydroxyapatite crystal structure after annealing. The proliferation of RBM cells was unaffected by the hydroxyapatite films, but osteocalsin and alkaline phosphatase mRNA and protein levels were elevated in cells grown on 2000- and 5000-Angstrom-thick films. These results indicate that ultra-thin hydroxyapatite films generated by pulsed laser deposition are better at promoting osteogenesis than pure titanium surfaces.

  6. Cytocompatibility of calcium phosphate coatings deposited by an ArF pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Y; Kawashima, M; Hatanaka, R; Kusunoki, M; Nishikawa, H; Hontsu, S; Nakamura, M

    2008-01-01

    In the current studies, we deposited ultra-thin hydroxyapatite films on a pure titanium substrate by pulsed laser deposition, and we examined the effects of these surfaces on rat bone marrow (RBM) cells. This method allowed deposition of 500-, 2,000-, and 5,000-A-thick hydroxyapatite films. X-ray diffraction showed that the amorphous films recrystallized to a hydroxyapatite crystal structure after annealing. The proliferation of RBM cells was unaffected by the hydroxyapatite films, but osteocalsin and alkaline phosphatase mRNA and protein levels were elevated in cells grown on 2,000- and 5,000-A-thick films. These results indicate that ultra-thin hydroxyapatite films generated by pulsed laser deposition are better at promoting osteogenesis than pure titanium surfaces.

  7. Ultra-short pulse laser deep drilling of C/SiC composites in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunhui; Zhang, Litong; Liu, Yongsheng; Cheng, Guanghua; Zhang, Qing; Hua, Ke

    2013-06-01

    Ultra-short pulse laser machining is an important finishing technology for high hardness materials. In this study, it demonstrated that the ultra-short pulse laser can be used to drill the film cooling holes and square holes in aero-engine turbine blades made of C/SiC composites. Both the edges and bottoms of the drilling holes are covered with small particles. The following factors have a great effect on drilling holes according to this work: (1) circular holes can be processed only at a relative small helical lines spacing. (2) With the increase of laser scanning speed, the depth of holes reduces while the diameter rarely changes. (3) Through the holes of high aspect ratio can be obtained via high processing power.

  8. The research on mechanical effect etching Si in pulsed laser micromaching under water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuhong, Long; Liangcai, Xiong; Tielin, Shi

    2011-02-01

    To explore further the influencing of mechanical effects on laser machining in the liquid, in the process of great-energy and short-pulsed laser irradiating matter in the liquid, the experiments of 248 nm laser etching n-Si under water were carried out. The removal mechanism of brittle material etched by mechanical effects, which is induced during high-energy and short-pulsed laser machining in the liquid, was discussed. In the paper, the approximate mechanics model of indentation fracture was used to analyze the mechanical effects for removing brittle materials of silicon when laser machining in the liquid. Based on this, a theoretical model of material removal rate was proposed; the experiment of laser machining under water was adopted to validate the model. The experimental results indicate that the removal rate of brittle material caused by shock forces is relatively great.

  9. Improved passivation of the ZnO/Si interface by pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gluba, M. A.; Nickel, N. H.; Rappich, J.; Hinrichs, K.

    2013-01-28

    Zinc oxide thin-films were grown on crystalline silicon employing magnetron sputtering and pulsed laser deposition. Bulk and interface properties were investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman backscattering, photoluminescence, and infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry. Sputter deposited ZnO samples reveal a large degree of disorder and an interface defect density of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}. A significant improvement of the structural quality is observed in samples grown by pulsed laser deposition. The bulk defect density is further reduced, when introducing monatomic oxygen during deposition. Simultaneously, the defect density at the ZnO/Si interface decreases by about a factor of five. Implications for devices containing ZnO/Si interfaces are discussed.

  10. Simulation studies of vapor bubble generation by short-pulse lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter A.; London, Richard A.; Strauss, Moshe; Glinsky, Michael E.; Maitland, Duncan J.; Celliers, Peter M.; Visuri, Steven R.; Bailey, David S.; Young, David A.; Ho, Darwin; Lin, Charles P.; Kelly, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of vapor bubbles is characteristic of many applications of short-pulse lasers in medicine. An understanding of the dynamics of vapor bubble generation is useful for developing and optimizing laser-based medical therapies. To this end, experiments in vapor bubble generation with laser light deposited in an aqueous dye solution near a fiber-optic tip have been performed. Numerical hydrodynamic simulations have been developed to understand and extrapolate results from these experiments. Comparison of two-dimensional simulations with the experiment shows excellent agreement in tracking the bubble evolution. Another regime of vapor bubble generation is short-pulse laser interactions with melanosomes. Strong shock generation and vapor bubble generation are common physical features of this interaction. A novel effect of discrete absorption by melanin granules within a melanosome is studied as a possible role in previously reported high Mach number shocks [Lin and Kelly, SPIE 2391, 294 (1995)].

  11. Pulsed laser excitation power dependence of photoluminescence peak energies in bulk ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Giang T.; Kanbe, Hiroshi; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Taniwaki, Masafumi

    2011-10-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of hydrothermal bulk ZnO were measured in the temperature range from 5 to 298 K. The sample was excited by means of the 266-nm line of an Nd3+: YAG Q-switched pulsed laser with numerous average excitation powers in the range from 0.33 to 7.50 mW. At constant temperatures, the most intense PL peak red-shifts with average excitation power, whereas positions of other near-band-edge peaks remain unchanged. It was experimentally proven that the red-shift is not due to local heating at the excited spot. Rather, it is due to relaxation of photoexcited carriers to lower energy transitions as the most intense transition is saturated by high excitation photon density. Furthermore, the temperature dependence of energy of the most intense PL peak was fitted with the Varshni equation. The Varshni coefficients α and β decrease with increasing pulsed laser excitation power.

  12. Two-color monochromatic x-ray imaging with a single short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, H.; Daykin, T.; McLean, H. S.; Chen, H.; Patel, P. K.; Ping, Y.; Pérez, F.

    2017-06-01

    Simultaneous monochromatic crystal imaging at 4.5 and 8.0 keV with x-rays produced by a single short-pulse laser is presented. A layered target consisting of thin foils of titanium and copper glued together is irradiated by the 50 TW Leopard short-pulse laser housed at the Nevada Terawatt Facility. Laser-accelerated MeV fast electrons transmitting through the target induce Kα fluorescence from both foils. Two energy-selective curved crystals in the imaging diagnostic form separate monochromatic images on a single imaging detector. The experiment demonstrates simultaneous two-color monochromatic imaging of the foils on a single detector as well as Kα x-ray production at two different photon energies with a single laser beam. Application of the diagnostic technique to x-ray radiography of a high density plasma is also presented.

  13. Plasmonic emission and plasma lattice structures induced by pulsed laser in Purcell cavity on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Liu, Shi-Rong; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-10-01

    The lattice structure image of a plasma standing wave in a Purcell cavity of silicon is observed. The plasma wave produced by the pulsed laser could be used to fabricate the micro-nanostructure of silicon. The plasma lattice structures induced by the nanosecond pulsed laser in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. It is interesting that the beautiful diffraction pattern could be observed in the plasma lattice structure. The radiation lifetime could be shortened to the nanosecond range throughout the entire spectral range and the relaxation time could be lengthened for higher emission efficiency in the Purcell cavity, which results in the fact that the plasmonic emission is stronger and its threshold is lower. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  14. Incorporation of gold into silicon by thin film deposition and pulsed laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrender, Jeffrey M.; Hudspeth, Quentin; Malladi, Girish; Efstathiadis, Harry; Mathews, Jay

    2016-12-01

    We report on the incorporation of gold into silicon at a peak concentration of 1.9 × 1020 at./cm3, four orders of magnitude above the equilibrium solubility limit, using pulsed laser melting of a thin film deposited on the silicon surface. We vary the film thickness and laser process parameters (fluence, number of shots) to quantify the range of concentrations that can be achieved. Our approach achieves gold concentrations comparable to those achieved with ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting, in a layer with high crystalline quality. This approach offers an attractive alternative to ion implantation for forming high quality, high concentration layers of transition metals like gold in silicon.

  15. Parametric interference effect in electron-nucleus scattering in the field of two pulsed laser waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshchupkin, S. P.; Lebed', A. A.

    2014-09-01

    Electron scattering on a nucleus in a field of two unidirectional pulsed laser waves is considered. The parametric interference effect is studied, which manifests in electron scattering within the plane formed by both the direction of laser-wave propagation and the initial electron momentum (the interference region). In this kinematics the electron emits and absorbs photons of both waves in a correlated manner. The distribution of the differential cross section of the final-electron energy for the process of electron-nucleus scattering in the field of two pulsed waves is considered. This distribution in the interference region differs qualitatively and quantitatively from the corresponding distribution in any other geometry. The appearance of the parametric interference effect may be experimentally verified by measuring the energy spectrum of final electrons in the framework of modern research projects, which use sources of pulsed laser radiation (XFEL, ELI, PHELIX).

  16. Study on damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xi; Fang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-01

    The damage of K9 glass under 248nm ultraviolet pulsed laser irradiation was studied. The laser pulse energy was kept within the range of 60mJ to 160mJ, and the repetition rate was adjusted within the range of 1Hz to 40Hz. The damage morphologies of single-pulse and multi-pulse laser irradiation were characterized by optical microscope, and the damage mechanism was discussed. The experimental results indicated that the damage of K9 glass irradiated by 248nm ultraviolet laser mainly followed the thermal-mechanical coupling mechanism and the damage threshold of K9 glass was 2.8J/cm2. The intensity of damage area increased gradually with the increase of the laser pulse number. It was shown that accumulation effect of laser induced damage to K9 glass was obvious.

  17. Electron acceleration in relativistic plasma waves generated by a single frequency short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Coverdale, C.A.; Darrow, C.B.; Decker, C.D.; Mori, W.B.; Tzeng, K.C., Clayton, C.E.; Marsh, K.A.; Joshi, C.

    1995-04-27

    Experimental evidence for the acceleration of electrons in a relativistic plasma wave generated by Raman forward scattering (SRS-F) of a single-frequency short pulse laser are presented. A 1.053 {mu}m, 600 fsec, 5 TW laser was focused into a gas jet with a peak intensity of 8{times}10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. At a plasma density of 2{times}10{sup 19} cm{sup {minus}3}, 2 MeV electrons were detected and their appearance was correlated with the anti-Stokes laser sideband generated by SRS-F. The results are in good agreement with 2-D PIC simulations. The use of short pulse lasers for making ultra-high gradient accelerators is explored.

  18. Cytotoxical products formation on the nanoparticles heated by the pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Boris Ya.; Titov, Andrey A.; Rakitin, Victor Yu.; Kvacheva, Larisa D.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Vorozhtsov, Georgy N.

    2006-02-01

    Cytotoxical effect of a pulsed laser irradiation in presence of nanoparticles of carbon black, sulphuretted carbon and fullerene-60 on death of human uterus nick cancer HeLa and mice lymphoma P 388 cells was studied in vitro. Bubbles formation as result of "microexplosions" of nanoparticles is one of possible mechanisms of this effect. Other possible mechanism is cytotoxical products formation in result of pyrolysis of nanoparticles and biomaterial which is adjoining. The cytotoxical effect of addition of a supernatant from the carbon nanoparticles suspensions irradiated by the pulsed laser was studied to test this assumption. Analysis using gas chromatograph determined that carbon monoxide is principal gaseous product of such laser pyrolysis. This is known as cytotoxical product. Efficiency of its formation is estimated.

  19. The keyhole region in VPPA welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1988-01-01

    The morphology and properties of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld composite zone are intimately related to the physical processes associated with the keyhole. The effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in the weld tool are examined. In addition the electrical character of straight and reverse polarity portions of the arc cycle were characterized. The results of the former study indicate that alloy 2219 is weldable because large liquid volumes are available during latter stages of weld solidification. Strains in the pool region, acting in conjunction with weld microsegregation can produce macrosegregation great enough to produce radiographic contrast effects in welds. Mechanisms of surface copper enrichment were identified. The latter study has demonstrated that increased heat is delivered to workpieces if the reverse polarity proportion of the weld cycle is increased. Current in the straight polarity portion of the welding cycle increased as the reverse cycle proportion increased. Voltage during reverse polarity segments is large.

  20. Compositional and Microstructural Evolution of Olivine During Pulsed Laser Irradiation: Insights Based on a FIB/Field-Emission TEM Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Dukes, C. A.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2015-11-01

    Field-emission TEM shows multi-layer vapor and melt deposits produced on olivine by pulsed laser irradiation contain abundant nanophase metallic Fe and have some microstructural similarities to melt deposits in micrometeorite impact craters.

  1. Thin Film Delamination Using a High Power Pulsed Laser Materials Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Bradley

    Thin films attached to substrates are only effective while the film is adhered to the substrate. When the film begins to spall the whole system can fail, thus knowing the working strength of the film substrate system is important when designing structures. Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are suitable for characterization of thin film mechanical properties due to the confinement of their energy within a shallow depth from a material surface. In this project, we study the feasibility of inducing dynamic interfacial failure in thin films using surface waves generated by a high power pulsed laser. Surface acoustic waves are modeled using a finite element numerical code, where the ablative interaction between the pulsed laser and the incident film is modeled using equivalent surface mechanical stresses. The numerical results are validated using experimental results from a laser ultrasonic setup. Once validated the normal film-substrate interfacial stress can be extracted from the numerical code and tends to be in the mega-Pascal range. This study uses pulsed laser generation to produce SAW in various metallic thin film/substrate systems. Each system varies in its response based on its dispersive relationship and as such requires individualized numerical modeling to match the experimental data. In addition to pulsed SAW excitation using an ablative source, a constrained thermo-mechanical load produced by the ablation of a metal film under a polymer layer is explored to generate larger dynamic mechanical stresses. These stresses are sufficient to delaminate the thin film in a manner similar to a peel test. However, since the loading is produced by a pulsed laser source, it occurs at a much faster rate, limiting the influence of slower damage modes that are present in quasi-static loading. This approach is explored to predict the interfacial fracture toughness of weak thin film interfaces.

  2. High-speed droplet generation on demand driven by pulse laser-induced cavitation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung-Yong; Wu, Ting-Hsiang; Chen, Yue; Teitell, Michael A; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2011-03-21

    We report on a pulse laser-driven droplet generation (PLDG) mechanism that enables on-demand droplet generation at rates up to 10,000 droplets per second in a single-layer PDMS-based microfluidic device. Injected droplet volumes can be continuously tuned between 1 pL and 150 pL with less than 1% volume variation. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  3. Pulsed laser deposition of hydroxyapatite film on laser gas nitriding NiTi substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Xing, W.; Man, H. C.

    2009-09-01

    A hydroxyapatite (HA) film was deposited on laser gas nitriding (LGN) NiTi alloy substrate using pulsed laser deposition technique. TiN dendrite prepared by LGN provided a higher number of nucleation sites for HA film deposition, which resulted in that a lot number of HA particles were deposited on TiN dendrites. Moreover, the rough LGN surface could make the interface adhesive strength between HA film and substrate increase as compared with that on bare NiTi substrate.

  4. JPL self pulsed laser surface measurement system development. [large space deployed antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, M.

    1980-01-01

    The use of a self pulsed laser system for accurately describing the surface shape of large space deployed antenna structures was evaluated. Tests with a breadboard system verified functional operation with short time resolution on the order of .2 mm, nonambiguous ranging, and a maximum range capability on the order of 150 m. The projected capability of the system is resolution of less than .1 mm over a reasonable time period and a range extension to over 300 m.

  5. Preparation and some properties of pulsed laser deposited YFeO 3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.; Lisfi, A.; Guyot, M.; Cagan, V.

    1995-06-01

    YFeO 3 orthoferrite films have been deposited on to quartz and sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The films crystallize when annealed at temperatures in the range 750 to 900°C. The perpendicular hysteresis loops are rectangular with a maximum coercivity of 9 kOe. The Faraday rotation at 633 nm wavelength is in the range 4-5 × 10 3 deg/cm.

  6. Simulated electronic heterodyne recording and processing of pulsed-laser holograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    The electronic recording of pulsed-laser holograms is proposed. The polarization sensitivity of each resolution element of the detector is controlled independently to add an arbitrary phase to the image waves. This method which can be used to simulate heterodyne recording and to process three-dimensional optical images, is based on a similar method for heterodyne recording and processing of continuous-wave holograms.

  7. The Application of Pulsed Laser Deposition in Producing Bioactive Ceramic Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yafan; Chen, Chuanzhong; Wang, Diangang

    Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) is a relatively new technique for producing thin films. It presents unique advantages for the deposition of bioactive ceramics. The mechanism and characteristics of the technique PLD are introduced. Its applications and current research status in hydroxyapatite and bioglass thin films are reviewed. The effect of processing parameters of PLD, including atmosphere, substrate temperature, laser wavelength and target properties, on the structures and the properties of the hydroxyapatite film, is analyzed in detail. Future application trends are also analyzed.

  8. Ferromagnetic CrSb film fabricated by pulse-laser deposition and rapidly annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shandong; Lü, Liya; Huang, Zhigao

    2007-05-01

    CrSb film was fabricated by pulse laser deposition (PLD) on Si (1 0 0) wafer. Strong ferromagnetism was observed in the CrSb film annealed at a high heating/cooling rate of 200 K/s, which can be attributed to the presence of ferromagnetic zinc blende (ZB) CrSb phase. The appearance of metastable ZB-CrSb results from the strong inner stress due to the precipitation of the monoclinic Sb.

  9. Reactions of pulsed laser produced boron and nitrogen atoms in a condensing argon stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Lester; Hassanzadeh, Parviz; Burkholder, Thomas R.; Martin, J. M. L.

    1993-01-01

    Reactions of pulsed laser produced B and N atoms at high dilution in argon favored diboron species. At low laser power with minimum radiation, the dominant reaction with N2 gave BBNN (3Π). At higher laser power, reactions of N atoms contributed the B2N (2B2), BNB (2Σu+), NNBN (1Σ+), and BNBN (3Π) species. These new transient molecules were identified from mixed isotopic patterns, isotopic shifts, and ab initio calculations of isotopic spectra.

  10. High Yield Magnetic Nanoparticles Filled Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Using Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    step procedure to fill vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) with cobalt - ferrite using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). There has...been a previous attempt to fill MWNTs in aqueous suspension with cobalt ferrite [3]. Recently, we reported successful chemical filling of CNTs with...majority of the tubes are aligned vertically, a few are misaligned. In Fig. 2, SEM of vertical tubes after being filled with cobalt ferrite is shown

  11. High Yield Magnetic Nanoparticles Filled Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Using Pulsed Laser Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    nanotubes (MWCNTs) with cobalt - ferrite using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Fig. 5 Top view SEM image of vertically grown MWNTs on SiO2 filled...with cobalt ferrite [10] (Keller et al., 2004). Recently, we reported successful chemical filling of MWCNTs with magnetic nanoparticles [11] (Seifu...tubes are aligned vertically, a few are misaligned. In Fig. 4 SEM of vertical tubes after being filled with cobalt ferrite is shown. The filling

  12. Study of Non-LTE Spectra Dependence on Target Mass in Short Pulse Laser Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C. A.; Giraldez, E.; Phommarine, S.; Audbert, P.; Baton, S. D.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Guillou, P.; Barbrel, B.; Gauci, E.; Koenig, M.; Gremillet, L.; Lecherbourg, L.; Rousseaux, C.

    2007-08-02

    Backlight sources created from short pulse lasers are useful probes of high energy density plasmas because of their short duration and brightness. Recent work has shown that the production of K{alpha} radiation can be manipulated by the size and geometry of the targets. Empirical relationships suggest that the electron reflux in the target plays an important role in the heating of these targets to create x-ray backlight sources.

  13. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  14. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  15. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  16. A Stereo Vision Visualization Method in Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuangxin; Richardson, Ian M.; Kleijn, Chris; Kenjeres, Sasa; Saldi, Zaki

    2008-09-01

    The oscillation of weld pool surface, vaporization and spatters make the measurement in welding difficult; two dimensional results can not reflect enough information in welding. However, there are few direct three dimensional methods to understand the fluid flow during welding. In this paper, we described a three dimensional reconstruction method to measure velocity in welding based on a single high speed camera. A stereo adapter was added in front of the high speed camera lens to obtain two images in the same frame from different view points at the same time; according to the machine vision theory, three dimensional parameters could be reconstructed based on these two images

  17. Electrode formulation to reduce weld metal hydrogen and porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1994-12-31

    Residual weld metal hydrogen is a major concern in high strength steel welding, especially when the weld is performed under high cooling rate conditions. In the case of underwater wet welding, weld metal porosity is also of importance because of the water environment. The control of both problems can be achieved by means of pyrochemical reactions in the weld pool. The hydrogen-oxygen reaction and carbon-oxygen reaction are fundamental in the control of residual hydrogen in the weld metal and the amount of gas pores entrapped. A simple model was proposed to estimate weld metal residual hydrogen content by monitoring the weld pool deoxidation reactions. Potent deoxidizers such as aluminum will first react with oxygen in the liquid weld pool, followed by other elements present such as silicon and manganese. Carbon and hydrogen will be the last ones to react with oxygen prior to the iron atoms. The Ellingham-Richardson diagram frequently applied in describing steel and iron making processes was used in the modeling. Following the sequence of deoxidation, the chemical make-up of the gas pores and the amount of each chemical species in the pores could be estimated. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen were determined to be the major components in the weld pores. To minimize the amount of weld metal porosity and residual hydrogen content, specially designed consumables that will control the oxygen potential of the weld pool must be developed.

  18. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-26

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond timescale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ~1010 K/s for temperature increases of ~100 – 200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (~5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-mortem analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ~ ± 3% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ~ ± 5 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  19. Nanoalloy Printed and Pulse-Laser Sintered Flexible Sensor Devices with Enhanced Stability and Materials Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Wei; Rovore, Thomas; Weerawarne, Darshana; Osterhoudt, Gavin; Kang, Ning; Joseph, Pharrah; Luo, Jin; Shim, Bonggu; Poliks, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-06-02

    While conformal and wearable devices have become one of the most desired formats for printable electronics, it is challenging to establish a scalable process that produces stable conductive patterns but also uses substrates compatible with widely available wearable materials. Here, we describe findings of an investigation of a nanoalloy ink printed and pulsed laser sintered conductive patterns as flexible functional devices with enhanced stability and materials compatibility. While nanoparticle inks are desired for printable electronics, almost all existing nanoparticle inks are based on single-metal component, which, as an electronic element, is limited by its inherent stabilities of the metal such as propensity of metal oxidation and mobility of metal ions, especially in sintering processes. The work here has demonstrated the first example in exploiting plasmonic coupling of nanoalloys and pulsed-laser energy with controllable thermal penetration. The experimental and theoretical results have revealed clear correlation between the pulsed laser parameters and the nanoalloy structural characteristics. The superior performance of the resulting flexible sensor device, upon imparting nanostructured sensing materials, for detecting volatile organic compounds has significant implications to developing stable and wearable sensors for monitoring environmental pollutants and breath biomarkers. This simple “nanoalloy printing 'laser sintering' nanostructure printing” process is entirely general to many different sensor devices and nanostructured sensing materials, enabling the ability to easily construct sophisticated sensor array.

  20. Delay time dependence of thermal effect of combined pulse laser machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Boshi; Jin, Guangyong; Ma, Yao; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    The research focused on the effect of delay time in combined pulse laser machining on the material temperature field. Aiming at the parameter optimization of pulse laser machining aluminum alloy, the combined pulse laser model based on heat conduction equation was introduced. And the finite element analysis software, COMSOL Multiphysics, was also utilized in the research. Without considering the phase transition process of aluminum alloy, the results of the numerical simulation was shown in this paper. By the simulation study of aluminum alloy's irradiation with combined pulse, the effect of the change in delay time of combined pulse on the temperature field of the aluminum alloy and simultaneously the quantized results under the specific laser spot conditions were obtained. Based on the results, several conclusions could be reached, the delay time could affect the rule of temperature changing with time. The reasonable delay time controlling would help improving the efficiency. In addition, when the condition of the laser pulse energy density is constant, the optimal delay time depends on pulse sequence.

  1. Surface roughness and wettability of dentin ablated with ultrashort pulsed laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Lü, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and wettability of dentin following ultrashort pulsed laser ablation with different levels of fluence and pulse overlap (PO). Twenty-five extracted human teeth crowns were cut longitudinally into slices of approximately 1.5-mm thick and randomly divided into nine groups of five. Samples in groups 1 to 8 were ablated with an ultrashort pulsed laser through a galvanometric scanning system. Samples in group 9 were prepared using a mechanical rotary instrument. The surface roughness of samples from each group was then measured using a three-dimensional profile measurement laser microscope, and wettability was evaluated by measuring the contact angle of a drop of water on the prepared dentin surface using an optical contact angle measuring device. The results showed that both laser fluence and PO had an effect on dentin surface roughness. Specifically, a higher PO decreased dentin surface roughness and reduced the effect of high-laser fluence on decreasing the surface roughness in some groups. Furthermore, all ablated dentin showed a contact angle of approximately 0 deg, meaning that laser ablation significantly improved wettability. Adjustment of ultrashort pulsed laser parameters can, therefore,significantly alter dentin surface roughness and wettability.

  2. Direct measurement method of specific impulse for pulse laser ablation micro-propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weijing; Jin, Xing; Chang, Hao

    2017-05-01

    Laser ablation micro-propulsion technology is the most promising field in laser propulsion. The specific impulse is the important evaluate indicator of the micro propulsion performance. It represents the impulse generation by consuming unit weight of the working medium. Its accurate measurement can not only help to analyze the mechanism of laser ablation matter, but also help the design of micro laser ablation thruster. This paper presents a measurement method, which can not only obtain the impulse by single pulsed laser ablation the working medium, but also measure the ablation mass, which can directly measure the specific impulse. The method is based on the model of torsion pendulum in vertical direction movement, which is the direction of impulse by pulsed laser ablation and the gravitation direction caused by the loss of the ablation mass, to obtain the corresponding impulse and ablative weight. The paper deduced the measuring principle, pointed out the error and analysed the design principle of the torsion balance, the results show that, according to the torsion angle change due to the impulse by pulsed laser ablation and the mass loss by laser ablation, the maximum angle can be used to calculate the impulse and the stable rotation angle can be used to calculate the loss weight when the torsion period is much greater than four times the width of a single pulse.

  3. The diagnostics of ultra-short pulse laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Since the invention of the laser, coherent light has been used to break down solid or gaseous material and transform it into a plasma. Over the last three decades two things have changed. Due to multiple advancements and design of high power lasers it is now possible to increase the electric and magnetic field strength that pushed the electron motion towards the regime of relativistic plasma physics. Moreover, due to the short pulse duration of the driving laser the underlying physics has become so transient that concepts like thermal equilibrium (even a local one) or spatial isotropy start to fail. Consequently short pulse laser-driven plasmas have become a rich source of new phenomena that we are just about beginning to explore. Such phenomena, like particle acceleration, nuclear laser-induced reactions, the generation of coherent secondary radiation ranging from THz to high harmonics and the production of attosecond pulses have excited an enormous interest in the study of short pulse laser plasmas. The diagnostics of such ultra-short pulse laser plasmas is a challenging task that involves many and different techniques compared to conventional laser-produced plasmas. While this review cannot cover the entire field of diagnostics that has been developed over the last years, we will try to give a summarizing description of the most important techniques that are currently being used.

  4. Numerical simulation of different pulse width of long pulsed laser on aluminum alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingxin; Jin, Guangyong; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Gui-bo; Bi, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Established a physical model to simulate the melt ejection induced by long pulsed laser on aluminum alloy and use the finite element method to simulate the whole process. This simulation is based on the interaction between single pulsed laser with different pulse width and different peak energy and aluminum alloy material. By comparing the theoretical simulation data and the actual test data, we discover that: the theoretical simulation curve is well consistent with the actual experimental curve, this two-dimensional model is with high reliability; when the temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface increases and evaporation happens after the surface temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface reaches boiling point and later the aluminum alloy material sustains in the status of equilibrium vaporization; the keyhole appears on the surface of the target, an increment of the keyhole, the maximum temperature at the center of aluminum alloy surface gradually moves inwardly. This research may provide the theoretical references to the understanding of the interaction between millisecond pulsed laser and many kinds of materials, as well as be beneficial to the application of the laser materials processing and military field.

  5. Pulse laser assisted MOVPE for InGaN with high indium content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Norihito; Hida, Ken-Nosuke; Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori

    2004-09-01

    In0.53Ga0.47N film was grown at 600 °C by Nd:YAG pulse laser assisted MOVPE. The optical and structural properties of the film were compared with that grown without laser assistance at the same condition. The results of XRD measurements showed that the crystallinity of the film grown with laser was better than that of the one grown without laser. The surface morphology and cross-sectional SEM image of the film grown with laser revealed that there were no In droplets on the film. The band-edge emission of the film grown with laser at room temperature and 77 K was observed at 840 nm. The results of micro-Raman measurement showed that the film grown with laser had better crystalline structure than that of the film grown without laser and the radiative recombination which contributed to photoluminescence mainly occurred at In0.53Ga0.47N region. Those results imply that pulse laser enhances the surface migration and reaction of elements in spite of low-growth temperature. We suggest that pulse laser assisted technique is effective for low-temperature growth of InGaN with high indium content.

  6. Surface roughness and wettability of dentin ablated with ultrashort pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Lü, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun; Wang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness and wettability of dentin following ultrashort pulsed laser ablation with different levels of fluence and pulse overlap (PO). Twenty-five extracted human teeth crowns were cut longitudinally into slices of approximately 1.5-mm thick and randomly divided into nine groups of five. Samples in groups 1 to 8 were ablated with an ultrashort pulsed laser through a galvanometric scanning system. Samples in group 9 were prepared using a mechanical rotary instrument. The surface roughness of samples from each group was then measured using a three-dimensional profile measurement laser microscope, and wettability was evaluated by measuring the contact angle of a drop of water on the prepared dentin surface using an optical contact angle measuring device. The results showed that both laser fluence and PO had an effect on dentin surface roughness. Specifically, a higher PO decreased dentin surface roughness and reduced the effect of high-laser fluence on decreasing the surface roughness in some groups. Furthermore, all ablated dentin showed a contact angle of approximately 0 deg, meaning that laser ablation significantly improved wettability. Adjustment of ultrashort pulsed laser parameters can, therefore, significantly alter dentin surface roughness and wettability.

  7. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  8. Nd:YAG Pulsed Laser based flaw imaging techniques for noncontact NDE of an aluminum plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Woong-Ki; Lee, Changgil; Park, Seunghee

    2012-04-01

    Recently, the longitudinal, shear and surface waves have been very widely used as a kind of ultrasonic wave exploration methods to identify internal defects of metallic structures. The ultrasonic wave-based non-destructive testing (NDT) is one of main non-destructive inspection techniques for a health assessment about nuclear power plant, aircraft, ships, and/or automobile manufacturing. In this study, a noncontact pulsed laser-based flaw imaging NDT technique is implemented to detect the damage of a plate-like structure and to identify the location of the damage. To achieve this goal, the Nd:YAG pulsed laser equipment is used to generate a guided wave and scans a specific area to find damage location. The Nd: YAG pulsed laser is used to generate Lamb wave and piezoelectric sensors are installed to measure structural responses. Ann aluminum plate is investigated to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the proposed NDT approach. A notch is a target to detect, which is inflicted on the surface of an aluminum plate. The damagesensitive features are extracted by comparing the time of flight of the guided wave obtained from an acoustic emission (AE) sensor and make use of the flaw imaging techniques of the aluminum plate.

  9. Pulsed-laser deposited transition-metal carbides for field-emission cathode coatings.

    PubMed

    Back, Tyson; Fairchild, Steven B; Averett, Kent; Maruyama, Benji; Pierce, Neal; Cahay, Marc; Murray, P Terrence

    2013-09-25

    Thin films of transition-metal carbides ZrC, HfC, and TiC were deposited by pulsed-laser deposition under vacuum. The surface chemistry of the films was characterized with ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Auger electron spectroscopy in situ. X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the film structure. TiC was shown to be nearly stoichiometric and polycrystalline. The TiC was applied to a vertically aligned carbon nanotube sample and characterized by field emission. Field-emission results showed enhanced current and current density at a film thickness, 5 nm, not previously reported in the literature. Emission from TiC films was also shown to be less affected by adsorbates during field emission. Pulsed-laser deposition of TiC offers a distinct advantage over other techniques in that high-quality films can be obtained under ultrahigh vacuum conditions without the use of a reactive background gas or excessively high annealing temperatures. The application of TiC by pulsed-laser deposition as a cathode coating shows potential for integration into a fabrication process.

  10. Application of femtosecond ultrashort pulse laser to photodynamic therapy mediated by indocyanine green

    PubMed Central

    Sawa, M; Awazu, K; Takahashi, T; Sakaguchi, H; Horiike, H; Ohji, M; Tano, Y

    2004-01-01

    Backgrounds/aims: To evaluate treatment with high peak power pulse energy by femtosecond ultrashort pulse laser (titanium sapphire laser) delivered at an 800 nm wavelength for corneal neovascularisation using photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated by indocyanine green (ICG). Methods: Using a gelatin solid as an in vitro corneal model, the safety of laser power was studied to determine if it degenerated gelatin with or without ICG. The authors then induced corneal neovascularisation in rabbit eyes by an intracorneal suturing technique. Fluorescein angiography was used to evaluate occlusion before PDT and 0, 1, 3, and 10 days after PDT. The authors performed light microscopy with haematoxylin eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy to determine thrombosis formation in the neovascular regions. Results: The threshold of peak laser power density ranged from 39 to 53 W/cm2. Laser irradiation was started 30 seconds after a 10 mg/kg ICG injection, and all irradiated segments were occluded at 0, 1, 3, and 10 days at 3.8 J/cm2. Light and electron microscopy documented thrombosis formation in the neovascular region. Conclusion: Femtosecond pulse laser enhanced by ICG can be used for PDT. Because of effective closure of corneal neovascularisation at a low energy level, the high peak power pulse energy of the femtosecond pulse laser might be more efficacious than continuous wave laser for use with PDT. PMID:15148220

  11. Nanoalloy Printed and Pulse-Laser Sintered Flexible Sensor Devices with Enhanced Stability and Materials Compatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Rovere, Thomas; Weerawarne, Darshana; Osterhoudt, Gavin; Kang, Ning; Joseph, Pharrah; Luo, Jin; Shim, Bonggu; Poliks, Mark; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-06-23

    While conformal and wearable devices have become one of the most desired formats for printable electronics, it is challenging to establish a scalable process that produces stable conductive patterns but also uses substrates compatible with widely available wearable materials. Here, we describe findings of an investigation of a nanoalloy ink printed and pulsed-laser sintered conductive patterns as flexible functional devices with enhanced stability and materials compatibility. While nanoparticle inks are desired for printable electronics, almost all existing nanoparticle inks are based on single-metal component, which, as an electronic element, is limited by its inherent stabilities of the metal such as propensity of metal oxidation and mobility of metal ions, especially in sintering processes. The work here has demonstrated the first example in exploiting plasmonic coupling of nanoalloys and pulsed-laser energy with controllable thermal penetration. The experimental and theoretical results have revealed clear correlation between the pulsed laser parameters and the nanoalloy structural characteristics. The superior performance of the resulting flexible sensor device, upon imparting nanostructured sensing materials, for detecting volatile organic compounds has significant implications to developing stable and wearable sensors for monitoring environmental pollutants and breath biomarkers. This simple "nanoalloy printing-laser sintering-nanostructure printing" process is entirely general to many different sensor devices and nanostructured sensing materials, enabling the ability to easily construct sophisticated sensor array.

  12. Targeted gene transfer into rat facial muscles by nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Akihiro; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Ando, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi; Obara, Minoru; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the feasibility of using nanosecond pulsed laser-induced stress waves (LISWs) for gene transfer into rat facial muscles. LISWs are generated by irradiating a black natural rubber disk placed on the target tissue with nanosecond pulsed laser light from the second harmonics (532 nm) of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, which is widely used in head and neck surgery and proven to be safe. After injection of plasmid deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) coding for Lac Z into rat facial muscles, pulsed laser is used to irradiate the laser target on the skin surface without incision or exposure of muscles. Lac Z expression is detected by X-gal staining of excised rat facial skin and muscles. Strong Lac Z expression is observed seven days after gene transfer, and sustained for up to 14 days. Gene transfer is achieved in facial muscles several millimeters deep from the surface. Gene expression is localized to the tissue exposed to LISWs. No tissue damage from LISWs is observed. LISW is a promising nonviral target gene transfer method because of its high spatial controllability, easy applicability, and minimal invasiveness. Gene transfer using LISW to produce therapeutic proteins such as growth factors could be used to treat nerve injury and paralysis.

  13. Study of Pulse Laser Assisted Metalorganic Vapor Phase Epitaxy of InGaN with Large Indium Mole Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Norihito; Hida, Ken-nosuke; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori

    2004-08-01

    The indium composition of the InGaN film increases with decreasing growth temperature; however, the crystalline quality of the film is poor when it is grown at low temperatures. To form a high-quality InGaN film with a large indium mole fraction, Nd: YAG pulse laser assisted metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) was carried out at low temperatures. The results suggest that film quality can be improved by pulse laser irradiation on the surface of the film.

  14. Temporally and Spatially Resolved Plasma Spectroscopy in Pulsed Laser Deposition of Ultra-Thin Boron Nitride Films (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-24

    in the plasma plume. Boron, being the lighter of the two species ( atomic weights: B¼ 10.81, N¼ 14.01), will escape the Knudsen layer of plasma plume...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0196 TEMPORALLY AND SPATIALLY RESOLVED PLASMA SPECTROSCOPY IN PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF ULTRA-THIN BORON NITRIDE...AND SPATIALLY RESOLVED PLASMA SPECTROSCOPY IN PULSED LASER DEPOSITION OF ULTRA-THIN BORON NITRIDE FILMS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650

  15. Evaluation of weld porosity in laser beam seam welds: optimizing continuous wave and square wave modulated processes.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew; Faraone, Kevin M. (Honeywell FM&T, Kansas City, MO); Roach, Robert Allen; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-02-01

    Nd:YAG laser joining is a high energy density (HED) process that can produce high-speed, low-heat input welds with a high depth-to-width aspect ratio. This is optimized by formation of a ''keyhole'' in the weld pool resulting from high vapor pressures associated with laser interaction with the metallic substrate. It is generally accepted that pores form in HED welds due to the instability and frequent collapse of the keyhole. In order to maintain an open keyhole, weld pool forces must be balanced such that vapor pressure and weld pool inertia forces are in equilibrium. Travel speed and laser beam power largely control the way these forces are balanced, as well as welding mode (Continuous Wave or Square Wave) and shielding gas type. A study into the phenomenon of weld pool porosity in 304L stainless steel was conducted to better understand and predict how welding parameters impact the weld pool dynamics that lead to pore formation. This work is intended to aid in development and verification of a finite element computer model of weld pool fluid flow dynamics being developed in parallel efforts and assist in weld development activities for the W76 and future RRW programs.

  16. Study on laser welding of fuel clad tubes and end plugs made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel of Fast Breeder Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harinath, Y. V.; Gopal, K. A.; Murugan, S.; Albert, S. K.

    2013-04-01

    A procedure for Pulsed Laser Beam Welding (PLBW) has been developed for fabrication of fuel pins made of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for metallic fuel proposed to be used in future in India's Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) programme. Initial welding trials of the samples were carried out with different average power using Nd-YAG based PLBW process. After analyzing the welds, average power for the weld was optimized for the required depth of penetration and weld quality. Subsequently, keeping the average power constant, the effect of various other welding parameters like laser peak power, pulse frequency, pulse duration and energy per pulse on weld joint integrity were studied and a procedure that would ensure welds of acceptable quality with required depth of penetration, minimum size of fusion zone and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) were finalized. This procedure is also found to reduce the volume fraction delta-ferrite in the fusion zone.

  17. Application of welding science to welding engineering: A lumped parameter gas metal arc welding dynamic process model

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, P.E.; Smartt, H.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    We develop a model of the depth of penetration of the weld pool in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) which demonstrates interaction between the arc, filler wire and weld pool. This model is motivated by the observations of Essers and Walter which suggest a relationship between droplet momentum and penetration depth. A model of gas metal arc welding was augmented to include an improved model of mass transfer and a simple model of accelerating droplets in a plasma jet to obtain the mass and momentum of impinging droplets. The force of the droplets and depth of penetration is correlated by a dimensionless linear relation used to predict weld pool depth for a range of values of arc power and contact tip to workpiece distance. Model accuracy is examined by comparing theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of the pool depth obtained from bead on plate welds of carbon steel in an argon rich shielding gas. Moreover, theoretical predictions of pool depth are compared to the results obtained from the heat conduction model due to Christensen et al. which suggest that in some cases the momentum of impinging droplets is a better indicator of the depth of the weld pool and the presence of a deep, narrow penetration.

  18. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  19. Structure property relationships in gallium oxide thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition [Structure property relationships in Ga2O3 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Garten, Lauren M.; Zakutayev, Andriy; Perkins, John D.; ...

    2016-11-21

    Beta-gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) is of increasing interest to the optoelectronic community for transparent conductor and power electronic applications. Considerable variability exists in the literature on the growth and doping of Ga2O3 films, especially as a function of growth approach, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure. Here pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to grow high-quality β-Ga2O3 films on (0001) sapphire and (–201) Ga2O3 single crystals and to explore the growth, stability, and dopability of these films as function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. As a result, there is a strong temperature dependence to the phase formation, morphology, and electronic propertiesmore » of β-Ga2O3 from 350 to 550 °C.« less

  20. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  1. Swimming Pools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministry of Housing and Local Government, London (England).

    Technical and engineering data are set forth on the design and construction of swimming pools. Consideration is given to site selection, pool construction, the comparative merits of combining open air and enclosed pools, and alternative uses of the pool. Guidelines are presented regarding--(1) pool size and use, (2) locker and changing rooms, (3)…

  2. Variable-Polarity Plasma Arc Welding Of Alloy 2219

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Report presents results of study of variable-polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding of aluminum alloy 2219. Consists of two parts: Examination of effects of microsegregation and transient weld stress on macrosegregation in weld pool and, electrical characterization of straight- and reverse-polarity portions of arc cycle.

  3. Importance of Marangoni Convection in Laser Full-Penetration Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiao-Hu; Chen, Xi

    2002-06-01

    We study the effects of welding speed, Marangoni convection and natural convection on heat transfer and melt flow in a laser full-penetration welding using a three-dimensional modelling approach. The computed results demonstrate the importance of considering Marangoni convection. The predicted weld pool profile is favourably compared with experimental observation.

  4. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of high-k silicon dioxide and silicon oxynitride thin films for gate-dielectric applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desbiens, E.; Dolbec, R.; El Khakani, M. A.

    2002-05-01

    We have successfully developed two reactive pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processes for the growth of high-k SiO2 and SiOxNy thin films. At a KrF laser intensity of 3×108 W/cm2, both SiO2 and SiOxNy films have been deposited by ablating a silicon target in a reactive gas atmosphere (O2 and O2/N2 mixture, respectively) on both Si (100) and Pt-coated Si substrates. Two key issues are presented here, namely (i) the effect of the deposition temperature (Td in the 20-450 °C range) and (ii) the effect of the N incorporation (in the 0.3-20 at. % concentration range) on the microstructure and electrical properties of PLD SiO2 and SiOxNy thin films, respectively. For the PLD-SiO2 films, 300 °C has been identified as the optimal deposition temperature that yields stoichiometric ([O]/[Si]~1.9), hydrogen-free films with a low local disorder, a highly dense microstructure and a dielectric constant (k) higher than that quoted for thermally grown SiO2. On the other hand, the PLD SiOxNy films containing 20 at. % of N have exhibited a dielectric constant as high as ~7. A rather good agreement is obtained between the k values deduced from the Poole-Frenkel emission (PFE) model and those obtained from direct impedance measurements, confirming thereby that the PFE remains the predominant conduction mechanism in the PLD SiOxNy films.

  5. Contribution to study of heat transfer and fluid flow during GTA welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koudadje, Koffi; Delalondre, Clarisse; Médale, Marc; Carpreau, Jean-Michel

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the effect of surface-active elements especially sulfur on weld pool shape has been reported. In our contribution, we analyze the influence of the weld pool chemical composition (Mn, Si, …), welding energy, sulphur gradient and electromagnetic effect. The computed results are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results, indicating the validity of the modeling approach.

  6. Adaptive tracking of weld joints using active contour model in arc-welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeseon; Koh, Kyoungchul; Cho, Hyungsuck

    2001-02-01

    12 This paper presents a vision processing scheme to automatic weld joint tracking in robotic arc welding process. Particular attention is concentrated on its robustness against various optical disturbances, such as arc glares and weld spatters radiating from the melted weld pool. Underlying the developed vision processing is a kind of model-based pattern searching, which is necessarily accompanied by two separate stages of modeling and tracking. In the modeling stage, a syntactic approach is adopted to identify unknown weld joint structure. The joint profile identified in the modeling stage is used as a starting point for successive tracking of variations in the geometry of weld joint during welding, which is automatically achieved by an active contour model technology following feature- based template matching. The performance of the developed scheme is investigated through a series of practical welding experiments.

  7. Ultrasonic sensing of GMAW: Laser/EMAT defect detection system. [Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, N.M.; Johnson, J.A.; Larsen, E.D. ); Van Clark, A. Jr.; Schaps, S.R.; Fortunko, C.M. )

    1992-01-01

    In-process ultrasonic sensing of welding allows detection of weld defects in real time. A noncontacting ultrasonic system is being developed to operate in a production environment. The principal components are a pulsed laser for ultrasound generation and an electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for ultrasound reception. A PC-based data acquisition system determines the quality of the weld on a pass-by-pass basis. The laser/EMAT system interrogates the area in the weld volume where defects are most likely to occur. This area of interest is identified by computer calculations on a pass-by-pass basis using weld planning information provided by the off-line programmer. The absence of a signal above the threshold level in the computer-calculated time interval indicates a disruption of the sound path by a defect. The ultrasonic sensor system then provides an input signal to the weld controller about the defect condition. 8 refs.

  8. Sensors control gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Siewert, T.A.; Madigan, R.B.; Quinn, T.P.

    1997-04-01

    The response time of a trained welder from the time a weld problem is identified to the time action is taken is about one second--especially after a long, uneventful period of welding. This is acceptable for manual welding because it is close to the time it takes for the weld pool to solidify. If human response time were any slower, manual welding would not be possible. However, human response time is too slow to respond to some weld events, such as melting of the contact tube in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), and only automated intelligent control systems can react fast enough to correct or avoid these problems. Control systems incorporate welding knowledge that enables intelligent decisions to be made about weld quality and, ultimately, to keep welding parameters in the range where only high-quality welds are produced. This article discusses the correlation of electrical signals with contact-tube wear, changes in shielding gas, changes in arc length, and other weld process data.

  9. Simulation study on thermal effect of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yao; Jin, Guangyong; Yuan, Boshi

    2016-10-01

    Laser machining is one of most widely used technologies nowadays and becoming a hot industry as well. At the same time, many kinds of carbon fiber material have been used in different area, such as sports products, transportation, microelectronic industry and so on. Moreover, there is lack of the combination research on the laser interaction with Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) material with simulation method. In this paper, the temperature status of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP will be simulated and discussed. Firstly, a laser thermal damage model has been built considering the heat conduction theory and thermal-elasto-plastic theory. Then using COMSOL Multiphysics software to build the geometric model and to simulate the mathematic results. Secondly, the functions of long pulse laser interaction with CFRP has been introduced. Material surface temperature increased by time during the laser irradiating time and the increasing speed is faster when the laser fluence is higher. Furthermore, the peak temperature of the center of material surface is increasing by enhanced the laser fluence when the pulse length is a constant value. In this condition, both the ablation depth and the Heat Affected Zone(HAZ) is larger when increased laser fluence. When keep the laser fluence as a constant value, the laser with shorter pulse length is more easier to make the CFRP to the vaporization material. Meanwhile, the HAZ is becoming larger when the pulse length is longer, and the thermal effect depth is as the same trend as the HAZ. As a result, when long pulse laser interaction with CFRP material, the thermal effect is the significant value to analysis the process, which is mostly effect by laser fluence and pulse length. For laser machining in different industries, the laser parameter choose should be different. The shorter pulse length laser is suitable for the laser machining which requires high accuracy, and the longer one is better for the deeper or larger

  10. A nanosecond pulsed laser heating system for studying liquid and supercooled liquid films in ultrahigh vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuntao; Dibble, Collin J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Joly, Alan G.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kay, Bruce D.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2016-04-01

    A pulsed laser heating system has been developed that enables investigations of the dynamics and kinetics of nanoscale liquid films and liquid/solid interfaces on the nanosecond time scale in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Details of the design, implementation, and characterization of a nanosecond pulsed laser system for transiently heating nanoscale films are described. Nanosecond pulses from a Nd:YAG laser are used to rapidly heat thin films of adsorbed water or other volatile materials on a clean, well-characterized Pt(111) crystal in UHV. Heating rates of ˜1010 K/s for temperature increases of ˜100-200 K are obtained. Subsequent rapid cooling (˜5 × 109 K/s) quenches the film, permitting in-situ, post-heating analysis using a variety of surface science techniques. Lateral variations in the laser pulse energy are ˜±2.7% leading to a temperature uncertainty of ˜±4.4 K for a temperature jump of 200 K. Initial experiments with the apparatus demonstrate that crystalline ice films initially held at 90 K can be rapidly transformed into liquid water films with T > 273 K. No discernable recrystallization occurs during the rapid cooling back to cryogenic temperatures. In contrast, amorphous solid water films heated below the melting point rapidly crystallize. The nanosecond pulsed laser heating system can prepare nanoscale liquid and supercooled liquid films that persist for nanoseconds per heat pulse in an UHV environment, enabling experimental studies of a wide range of phenomena in liquids and at liquid/solid interfaces.

  11. Treatment of cellulite using a 1440-nm pulsed laser with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    DiBernardo, Barry E

    2011-03-01

    Cellulite is characterized by a thickened hypodermal fat layer, along with hypodermal fat lobules that extend upward into the dermis, expanding and stretching the fibrous septae that separate the fat lobules. Eventually, the septae sclerose, contract, and harden, holding the skin at an inflexible length while the surrounding tissue continues to expand. The author evaluates the efficacy, safety, and duration of clinical benefit associated with a pulsed laser that delivers 1440-nm energy to the dermal-hypodermal interface for the treatment of cellulite. The changes in the dermal structure that affect the appearance of cellulite are also examined. Ten healthy women with cellulite on their thighs enrolled in a prospective Institutional Review Board-approved study conducted in the author's private plastic surgery clinic. Patients received a single treatment with a 1440-nm pulsed laser. Energy was delivered to the subdermal tissue through a fiber that was designed for side firing and enclosed in a cannula. Treatment addressed the thickened hypodermal fat layer, hypodermal fat lobules that extended upward into the dermis, and fibrous septae by thermal subcision. The mean age of the patients was 47 years ± 5.4 years. Mean skin thickness (as shown by ultrasound) and skin elasticity were shown by objective measurements to increase significantly at one, three, six, and 12 months. Subjective physician and subject evaluations indicated improvement, high subject satisfaction, and minimal adverse effects. In this study, a single treatment with the 1440-nm pulsed laser improved the appearance of cellulite, an improvement that persisted through at least one year of follow-up with minimal adverse effects.

  12. High-Isp Mode Of Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator For Space Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Horisawa, Hideyuki; Kishida, Yoshiaki; Funaki, Ikkoh

    2010-10-08

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted. Laser-ablation plasma in the thruster was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thrusters was evaluated by measuring the mass shot and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulses up to 7,200 sec were obtained at the charge energies of 8.6 J. In addition, typical thrust efficiency varied between 11.8% and 21.3% depending on the charge energy.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies of ultra-short pulsed laser drilling of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michalowski, Andreas; Qin, Yuan; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Methods for the machining of metals based on the use of ultra-short pulsed laser radiation continue to gain importance in industrial production technology. Theoretical considerations and experimental studies on laser drilling of steel are discussed. The applicability of geometrical optics to calculate the absorbed energy distribution inside small blind holes is investigated theoretically. A model for melt transport during ultra-short pulsed drilling is proposed and verified experimentally. It confirms that helical drilling is advantageous for machining burr-free holes.

  14. Functional polyethylene glycol derivatives nanostructured thin films synthesized by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Popescu, A.; Grigorescu, S.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Mihaiescu, D.; Gittard, S. D.; Narayan, R. J.; Buruiana, T.; Stamatin, I.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2009-09-01

    We report the thin film deposition by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) of a polymer conjugate with an hydrophilic sequence between metronidazole molecules that was covalently attached to both oligomer ends of carboxylate poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG 1.5-metronidazole). A pulsed KrF* excimer laser was used to deposit the drug-polymer composite films. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to demonstrate that MAPLE-transferred materials exhibited chemical properties similar to the starting materials. The dependence of the surface morphology on incident laser fluence is given.

  15. Green synthesis of selenium nanoparticles by excimer pulsed laser ablation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Overschelde, O.; Guisbiers, G.; Snyders, R.

    2013-10-01

    Pure selenium nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by Liquid Phase - Pulsed Laser Ablation (LP-PLA) in de-ionized water. Excimer laser (248 nm) operating at low fluence (F ˜ 1 J/cm2) was used to generate colloidal solutions of selenium nanoparticles. The obtained selenium nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and Transmission Electron Microscopy. We describe the multi-modal size distributions generated and use the centrifugation method to isolate the smallest nanoparticles (˜60 nm in diameter).

  16. Temperature field formed inside a blood vessel under the action of pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astafyeva, L. G.; Zheltov, G. I.

    2007-10-01

    A model that simulates the dynamics of the temperature field formed by pulsed laser radiation inside a biological structure containing blood vessels is developed. The threshold conditions of denaturation of vessel walls and subsequent blocking the blood flow are determined based on the thermochemical concept. The possibility of application of a pulsed modulation of the radiation for increasing the homogeneity of coagulation of vessel walls and reducing the risk of damage of tissues caused by the phase transition is considered. The modulation frequency range of radiation that ensures the realization of this effect is determined.

  17. Cubic Structure and Cation Disordering in Ybco Thin Film Deposited by High Speed Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jeong-Dae; Sung, Gun Yong; Kang, Kwang Yong

    We have investigated the crystalline structure of high rate deposited YBa2Cu3Ox thin films prepared by high speed pulsed laser deposition. A cation disordered cubic structure with lattice parameter of 0.39 nm was found in YBCO thin film deposited at 12.2 nm/s deposition rate and 650°C substrate temperature conditions. The short range ordered cubic YBa2Cu3Ox thin film growth at high deposition rate was explained by the short migration length of Y and Ba cation atoms owing to the high incident flux rate.

  18. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    DOE PAGES

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; ...

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  19. Experimental and Analytical Investigation of Cemented Tungsten Carbide Ultra-Short Pulse Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. P. Calderón; Daniel, C.; Emmelmann, C.

    Ultra-short pulse laser processing of hard materials, such as cemented tungsten carbide, requires an accurate and agile experimental and analytical investigation to obtain adequate information and setting parameters to maximize ablation rate. Therefore, this study presents a systematic approach which, first, experimentally searches for the variables with the most significant influence on the objective using a design of experiments method; and second, analyzes by means of existing ablation theory the interaction of the material and laser taking into account the Beer-Lambert law and incubation effect.Therefore, this places a basis for future analytical-experimental validation of the examined material.

  20. Third order nonlinearity in pulsed laser deposited LiNbO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Tumuluri, Anil; Rapolu, Mounika; Rao, S. Venugopal E-mail: svrsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Raju, K. C. James E-mail: svrsp@uohyd.ernet.in

    2016-05-06

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO{sub 3}) thin films were prepared using pulsed laser deposition technique. Structural properties of the same were examined from XRD and optical band gap of the thin films were measured from transmittance spectra recorded using UV-Visible spectrophotometer. Nonlinear optical properties of the thin films were recorded using Z-Scan technique. The films were exhibiting third order nonlinearity and their corresponding two photon absorption, nonlinear refractive index, real and imaginary part of nonlinear susceptibility were calculated from open aperture and closed aperture transmission curves. From these studies, it suggests that these films have potential applications in nonlinear optical devices.

  1. Combinatorial pulsed laser deposition of doped yttrium iron garnet films on yttrium aluminium garnet

    SciTech Connect

    Sposito, A. Eason, R. W.; Gregory, S. A.; Groot, P. A. J. de

    2014-02-07

    We investigate the crystalline growth of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) films doped with bismuth (Bi) and cerium (Ce) by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition, co-ablating a YIG target and either a Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} or a CeO{sub 2} target, for applications in microwave and optical communications. Substrate temperature is critical for crystalline growth of YIG with simultaneous inclusion of Bi in the garnet lattice, whereas Ce is not incorporated in the garnet structure, but forms a separate CeO{sub 2} phase.

  2. Si nanostructures grown by picosecond high repetition rate pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Athanasopoulos, G. I.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    One-step growth of n-doped Si nanostructures by picosecond ultra fast pulsed laser deposition at 1064 nm is reported for the first time. The structure and morphology of the Si nanostructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the shape of the Si nanostructures depends on the ambient argon pressure. Fibrous networks, cauliflower formations and Si rectangular crystals grew when argon pressure of 300 Pa, 30 Pa and vacuum (10-3 Pa) conditions were used, respectively. In addition, the electrical resistance of the vacuum made material was investigated.

  3. Magnetism of pure, disordered carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhne, R.; Han, K.-H.; Esquinazi, P.; Setzer, A.; Semmelhack, H.; Spemann, D.; Butz, T.

    2004-05-01

    We have studied the magnetization of disordered, pure carbon films in order to search for signs of para-, ferro-or antiferromagnetism. Carbon films on silicon substrates were produced by pulsed laser deposition in high vacuum and at room temperature using pressed ultra-clean graphite powder as target. The magnetization shows a Curie-Weiss behaviour added to a temperature-independent term. Annealing the films at 1000°C and in high-vacuum eliminates completely the Curie-Weiss contribution. We compare our results with those recently obtained in activated carbon fibers.

  4. Analysis of thermodynamic effect in Si irradiated by pulsed-laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ming; Jin, Guangyong; Li, Mingxin; Ma, Yao; Yuan, Boshi; Yu, Huadong

    2014-12-01

    According to the heat conduction equation, thermoelastic equation and boundary conditions of finite, using the finite element method(FEM), established the three-dimensional finite element calculation model of thermal elastic ,numerical simulation the transient temperature field and stress field distribution of the single crystal silicon materials by the pulsing laser irradiation, and analytic solution the temperature distribution and stress distribution of laser irradiation on the silicon material , and analyzes the different parameters such as laser energy, pulse width, pulse number influence on temperature and stress, and the intrinsic damage mechanism of pulsed laser irradiation on silicon were studied. The results show that the silicon material is mainly in hot melt under the action of ablation damage.According to the irradiation of different energy and different pulse laser ,we can obtain the center temperature distribution, then get the law of the change of temperature with the variation of laser energy and pulse width in silicon material; according to the principal stress and shear stress distribution in 110 direction with different energy and different pulse, we can get the law of the change of stress distribution with the variation of laser energy and pulse width ;according to the principal stress distribution of single pulse and pulse train in 110 direction, we can get the law of the change of stress with pulse numbers in silicon.When power density of laser on optical material surface (or energy density) is the damage threshold, the optical material surface will form a spontaneous, periodic, and permanent surface ripple, it is called periodic surface structure laser induced (LIPSS).It is the condensed optical field of work to generate low dimensional quantum structures by laser irradiation on Si samples. The pioneering work of research and development and application of low dimensional quantum system has important academic value.The result of this paper

  5. Selective laser melting of metal micropowders with short-pulse laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wałpuski, B.

    2016-09-01

    Selective laser melting is a unique additive technique which can manufacture solid metal objects but it require expensive, high power lasers. The primary aim of this work was to check is it possible to carry out this process by using lower power and high energy pulse laser. The secondary goal was to examine the influence of main technological parameters of selective laser melting on the quality and the thickness of produced layer. The requirements of metal powder, which allowed to obtain a layer with microthickness, were developed.

  6. Synthesis of nanostructured SiC using the pulsed laser deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.X.; Feng, P.X. Makarov, V.; Weiner, B.R.; Morell, G.

    2009-01-08

    We report the new results on the direct synthesis of nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) materials using the pulsed laser deposition technique. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that SiC nanoholes, nanosprouts, nanowires, and nanoneedles were obtained. The crystallographic structure, chemical composition, and bond structure of the nanoscale SiC materials were investigated using X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The transverse optical mode and longitudinal optical mode in Raman spectra were found to become sharper as the substrate temperature was increased, while the material structure evolved from amorphous to crystalline.

  7. Metal oxide hollow nanoparticles formation by a single nanosecond pulsed laser ablation in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Zhen; Hwang, David J.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the trend of metal oxide hollow nanoparticles formation is experimentally inspected by a single nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a bulk metal material in water and/or ethanol. Analysis results by transmission electron microscope indicate that the hollow formation can be completed or initiated by a single nanosecond laser pulse, dictated by the diffusive thermo-chemical and/or bubble-assisted assembly mechanisms, depending on the surrounding liquid medium and laser parameters. The results not only provide experimental clues to unveiling complex mechanisms involved with the hollow formation by the multiple laser shots but also will contribute to improving the hollow particle production efficiency.

  8. In situ imaging of hole shape evolution in ultrashort pulse laser drilling.

    PubMed

    Döring, Sven; Richter, Sören; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2010-09-13

    For the first time, in situ the hole shape evolution during ultrashort pulse laser drilling in semiconductor material is imaged. The trans-illumination of the sample at a wavelength of 1.06 µm is projected onto a standard CCD camera during the ablation, providing an image of the contour of the ablated structure perpendicular to the irradiation for drilling. This demonstrated technique enables a direct, high resolution investigation of the temporal evolution of the drilling process in the depth of the material without complex sample preparation or post processing.

  9. Opacity and atomic analysis of double pulse laser ablated Li plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-09-01

    Opacity effects for neutral and ionic emission lines of lithium have been investigated by Atomic Data Analysis Structure (ADAS). Line ratios and opacity corrected photon emissivity coefficients are calculated over a wide range of electron temperatures and densities. The experimentally measured temporal evolution of the line profiles of the over dense Li plasma formed in the double pulse laser ablation experiment have been explained using the ADAS analysis and the plasma parameters of the plasma plume under consideration have been estimated. These results could be projected as a diagnostic tool to estimate plasma parameters of an over dense lithium plasma.

  10. PbTe thin films grown by femtosecond pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, E.; Silva, D.; Moya, L.; Cesar, C. L.; Barbosa, L. C.; Schrank, A.; Souza Filho, C. R.; de Oliveira, E. P.

    2007-09-01

    PbTe thin films were grown on BK7 glass and Si(100) substrates using femtosecond pulsed laser deposition at room temperature. The influence of the background pressure and the laser fluence on the structural and optical characteristics of the PbTe films was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface and structural properties of the deposited PbTe thin films, respectively. Transmission spectroscopy measurements in the visible and infrared region (VIS-IR) were used to investigate the optical properties of the PbTe thin films.

  11. Short spatial filters with spherical lenses for high-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Burdonov, K F; Soloviev, A A; Shaikin, A A; Potemkin, A K; Egorov, A S

    2013-11-30

    We report possible employment of short spatial filters based on spherical lenses in a pulsed laser source (neodymium glass, 300 J, 1 ns). The influence of the spherical aberration on the quality of output radiation and coefficient of conversion to the second harmonics is studied. The ultra-short aberration spatial filter of length 1.9 m with an aperture of 122 mm is experimentally tested. A considerable shortening of multi-cascade pump lasers for modern petawatt laser systems is demonstrated by the employment of short spatial filters without expensive aspherical optics. (elements of laser systems)

  12. Photomechanical modification of ZnS microcrystal to enhance electroluminescence by ultrashort-pulse laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabesaka, Kyohei; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Uraoka, Yukiharu

    2017-02-01

    A ZnS microcrystal was treated with an ultrashort-pulse laser and applied to an inorganic electroluminescence (EL) phosphor. We found that the emission intensity of the EL phosphor was increased by laser-induced photomechanical modification. The pulse duration dependence of the emission enhancement and structural analysis by scanning electron microscopy indicated that the structural modification was induced inside the ZnS microcrystal, although a mechanical grinding would induce the structural modification mainly on the crystal surface. The results suggested a new way of enhancing the emission of inorganic EL devices.

  13. Study of structural property of Co ferrite thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nongjai, Razia; Khan, Shakeel; Ahmad, Hilal; Khan, Imran; Asokan, K.

    2012-06-01

    Thin film of Cobalt Ferrite was deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique. The deposited film was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and Raman Spectroscopy and was found to be single phase, textured along (1 1 1) directions and approximately matching the stoichoimetry of the target with negligible strain. The film had a very uniform and flat surface. Raman spectroscopy measurement further confirmed the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure. T2g Raman mode was missing from the spectra which may be due to cation redistribution and crystallite size effect.

  14. A Pulsed Laser-Electromagnetic Hybrid Accelerator For Space Propulsion Application

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Tadaki; Horisawa, Hideyuki; Baba, Msahumi; Tei, Kazuyoku

    2010-05-06

    A fundamental study of a newly developed rectangular pulsed laser-electromagnetic hybrid thruster was conducted, in which laser-ablation plasma was induced through laser beam irradiation onto a solid target and accelerated by electrical means instead of direct acceleration only by using a laser beam. The performance of the thruster was evaluated by measuring the mass per shot and impulse bit. As results, significantly high specific impulse ranging from 5,000 approx6,000 sec were obtained at energies of 0.1 and 8.6 J, respectively. In addition, the typical thrust efficiency varied from 17% to 19% depending on the charge energy.

  15. Theory of suppressing avalanche process of carrier in short pulse laser irradiated dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H. X. E-mail: xtzu@uestc.edu.cn Zu, X. T. E-mail: xtzu@uestc.edu.cn Xiang, X.; Zheng, W. G.; Yuan, X. D.; Sun, K. E-mail: xtzu@uestc.edu.cn; Gao, F.

    2014-05-28

    A theory for controlling avalanche process of carrier during short pulse laser irradiation is proposed. We show that avalanche process of conduction band electrons (CBEs) is determined by the occupation number of phonons in dielectrics. The theory provides a way to suppress avalanche process and a direct judgment for the contribution of avalanche process and photon ionization process to the generation of CBEs. The obtained temperature dependent rate equation shows that the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics, e.g., fused silica, increase nonlinearly with the decreases of temperature. Present theory predicts a new approach to improve the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics.

  16. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Santala, M. K.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  17. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. T. Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.; Santala, M. K.

    2016-05-30

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar{sup +} ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. The propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  18. Effect of medium range order on pulsed laser crystallization of amorphous germanium thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. T.; Bayu Aji, L. B.; Heo, T. W.; Santala, M. K.; Kucheyev, S. O.; Campbell, G. H.

    2016-06-03

    Sputter deposited amorphous Ge thin films had their nanostructure altered by irradiation with high-energy Ar+ ions. The change in the structure resulted in a reduction in medium range order (MRO) characterized using fluctuation electron microscopy. The pulsed laser crystallization kinetics of the as-deposited versus irradiated materials were investigated using the dynamic transmission electron microscope operated in the multi-frame movie mode. In conclusion, the propagation rate of the crystallization front for the irradiated material was lower; the changes were correlated to the MRO difference and formation of a thin liquid layer during crystallization.

  19. Infrared Imaging of {ital In Vivo} Microvasculature Following Pulsed Laser Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Telenkov, S.A.; Milner, T.E.; Smithies, D.J.; Nelson, J.S.; Goodman, D.M.; Tanenbaum, B.S.

    1998-10-01

    Infrared emission images of the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) microvasculature following pulsed laser irradiation were recorded using a high speed infrared focal plane array camera. A three-dimensional tomographic reconstruction algorithm was applied to compute the initial space-dependent temperature increase in discrete CAM blood vessels caused by light absorption. The proposed method may provide consistent estimates of the physical dimensions of subsurface blood vessels and may be useful in understanding a variety of biomedical engineering problems involving laser{endash}tissue interaction. {copyright} {ital 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  20. InGaZnO semiconductor thin film fabricated using pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangbo; Wang, Li; Su, Xueqiong; Kong, Le; Liu, Guoqing; Zhang, Xinping

    2010-01-18

    The InGaZnO thin films are fabricated on the quartz glass using pulsed laser deposition (PLD), where the target is prepared by mixing the Ga(2)O(3), In(2)O(3), and ZnO powders at a mol ratio of 1:1:8 before the solid-state reactions in a tube furnace at the atmospheric pressure. The product thin films were characterized comprehensively by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Hall-effect investigation, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Thus, we demonstrate semiconductor thin-film materials with high smoothness, high transmittance in visible region, and excellent electrical properties.