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Sample records for pulsed-wave doppler tracing

  1. Left ventricular radial colour and longitudinal pulsed-wave tissue Doppler echocardiography in 39 healthy domestic pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Casamian-Sorrosal, Domingo; Saunders, Richard; Browne, William; Elliot, Sarah; Fonfara, Sonja

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports radial colour and longitudinal mitral annulus pulsed-wave tissue Doppler findings in a large cohort of healthy, adult pet rabbits. Thirty-nine rabbits (22 Dwarf Lops, 14 French Lops and three Alaskans) underwent conscious echocardiography. The median age of the rabbits was 22 months and the median weight was 2.8 kg (Dwarf Lop 2.4 kg/French Lop 6.0 kg). Adequate radial colour and longitudinal pulsed-wave tissue Doppler traces were obtained in 100% and 85% of cases, respectively. Most systolic tissue Doppler parameters were significantly higher in French Lops than in Dwarf Lops. Separation of mitral inflow diastolic waves was present in 40% of cases using conventional spectral Doppler and in >60% of cases using pulsed-wave tissue Doppler which could be beneficial when evaluating diastolic function in rabbits. This study can be used as a reference for normal echocardiographic tissue Doppler values for adult rabbits undergoing conscious echocardiography in clinical practice. PMID:25089025

  2. On-chip laser Doppler vibrometer for arterial pulse wave velocity measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanlu; Segers, Patrick; Dirckx, Joris; Baets, Roel

    2013-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important marker for cardiovascular risk. The Laser Doppler vibrometry has been suggested as a potential technique to measure the local carotid PWV by measuring the transit time of the pulse wave between two locations along the common carotid artery (CCA) from skin surface vibrations. However, the present LDV setups are still bulky and difficult to handle. We present in this paper a more compact LDV system integrated on a CMOS-compatible silicon-on-insulator substrate. In this system, a chip with two homodyne LDVs is utilized to simultaneously measure the pulse wave at two different locations along the CCA. Measurement results show that the dual-LDV chip can successfully conduct the PWV measurement.

  3. Noninvasive Method for Measuring Local Pulse Wave Velocity by Dual Pulse Wave Doppler: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Yang, Yong; Yuan, Li-jun; Liu, Jie; Duan, Yun-you; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the validity and reproducibility of a noninvasive dual pulse wave Doppler (DPWD) method, which involves simultaneous recording of flow velocity of two independent sample volumes with a measurable distance, for measuring the local arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) through in vitro and in vivo studies. Methods The DPWD mode of Hitachi HI Vision Preirus ultrasound system with a 5–13MHz transducer was used. An in vitro model was designed to compare the PWV of a homogeneous rubber tubing with the local PWV of its middle part measured by DPWD method. In the in vivo study, local PWV of 45 hypertensive patients (25 male, 49.8±3.1 years) and 45 matched healthy subjects (25 male, 49.3±3.0 years) were investigated at the left common carotid artery (LCCA) by DPWD method. Results In the in vitro study, the local PWV measured by DPWP method and the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing did not show statistical difference (5.16 ± 0.28 m/s vs 5.03 ± 0.15 m/s, p = 0.075). The coefficient of variation (CV) of the intra- and inter- measurements for local PWV were 3.46% and 4.96%, for the PWV of the homogeneous rubber tubing were 0.99% and 1.98%. In the in vivo study, a significantly higher local PWV of LCCA was found in the hypertensive patients as compared to that in healthy subjects (6.29±1.04m/s vs. 5.31±0.72m/s, P = 0.019). The CV of the intra- and inter- measurements in hypertensive patients were 2.22% and 3.94%, in healthy subjects were 2.07% and 4.14%. Conclusions This study demonstrated the feasibility of the noninvasive DPWD method to determine the local PWV, which was accurate and reproducible not only in vitro but also in vivo studies. This noninvasive echocardiographic method may be illuminating to clinical use. PMID:25786124

  4. Experimental demonstration of noncontact pulse wave velocity monitoring using multiple Doppler radar sensors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Li; Li, Changzhi; Lie, Donald Y C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, two Doppler radars are used to monitor the pulse movements at the heart and the calf in order to measure the pulse wave velocity (PWV) wirelessly. Both simulation and experiment have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed noncontact PWV monitoring. A three-stage calibration procedure, including DC offset calibration, circuit delay calibration and antenna radiation pattern calibration, has been developed for reliable long-term PWV monitoring. The measurement results have been verified by wired contact measurement with pulse transducers.

  5. Design and implementation of a smartphone-based portable ultrasound pulsed-wave Doppler device for blood flow measurement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Lee, Po-Yang; Chen, Pay-Yu; Liu, Ting-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow measurement using Doppler ultrasound has become a useful tool for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases and as a physiological monitor. Recently, pocket-sized ultrasound scanners have been introduced for portable diagnosis. The present paper reports the implementation of a portable ultrasound pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler flowmeter using a smartphone. A 10-MHz ultrasonic surface transducer was designed for the dynamic monitoring of blood flow velocity. The directional baseband Doppler shift signals were obtained using a portable analog circuit system. After hardware processing, the Doppler signals were fed directly to a smartphone for Doppler spectrogram analysis and display in real time. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of this system for medical ultrasound Doppler signal processing. A Couette flow phantom, consisting of two parallel disks with a 2-mm gap, was used to evaluate and calibrate the device. Doppler spectrograms of porcine blood flow were measured using this stand-alone portable device under the pulsatile condition. Subsequently, in vivo portable system verification was performed by measuring the arterial blood flow of a rat and comparing the results with the measurement from a commercial ultrasound duplex scanner. All of the results demonstrated the potential for using a smartphone as a novel embedded system for portable medical ultrasound applications. PMID:22293750

  6. Non-invasive measurement of pulse wave velocity using transputer-based analysis of Doppler flow audio signals.

    PubMed

    Stewart, W R; Ramsey, M W; Jones, C J

    1994-08-01

    A system for the measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity is described. A personal computer (PC) plug-in transputer board is used to process the audio signals from two pocket Doppler ultrasound units. The transputer is used to provide a set of bandpass digital filters on two channels. The times of excursion of power through thresholds in each filter are recorded and used to estimate the onset of systolic flow. The system does not require an additional spectrum analyser and can work in real time. The transputer architecture provides for easy integration into any wider physiological measurement system. PMID:7994208

  7. A feasibility study for measuring accurate tendon displacements using an audio-based Fourier analysis of pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound signals.

    PubMed

    Stegman, K J; Podhorodeski, R P; Park, E J

    2009-01-01

    The accuracy of Pulsed-Wave Doppler Ultrasound displacement measurements of a slow moving "tendon-like" string was investigated in this study. This was accomplished by estimating string displacements using an audio-based Fourier analysis of a Pulsed-Wave Doppler signal from a commercial ultrasound scanner. Our feasibility study showed that the proposed technique is much more accurate at estimating the actual string displacement in comparison to the scanner's onboard software. Furthermore, this study also shows that a real-time Doppler data acquisition from an ultrasound scanner is possible for the ultimate purpose of real-time biological tendon displacement monitoring.

  8. Fetal Echocardiography and Pulsed-wave Doppler Ultrasound in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Ryan; Endo, Masayuki; La Gerche, Andre; Eixarch, Elisenda; DeKoninck, Philip; Ferferieva, Vessilina; D'hooge, Jan; Wallace, Euan M.; Deprest, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Fetal intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) results in abnormal cardiac function that is apparent antenatally due to advances in fetoplacental Doppler ultrasound and fetal echocardiography. Increasingly, these imaging modalities are being employed clinically to examine cardiac function and assess wellbeing in utero, thereby guiding timing of birth decisions. Here, we used a rabbit model of IUGR that allows analysis of cardiac function in a clinically relevant way. Using isoflurane induced anesthesia, IUGR is surgically created at gestational age day 25 by performing a laparotomy, exposing the bicornuate uterus and then ligating 40-50% of uteroplacental vessels supplying each gestational sac in a single uterine horn. The other horn in the rabbit bicornuate uterus serves as internal control fetuses. Then, after recovery at gestational age day 30 (full term), the same rabbit undergoes examination of fetal cardiac function. Anesthesia is induced with ketamine and xylazine intramuscularly, then maintained by a continuous intravenous infusion of ketamine and xylazine to minimize iatrogenic effects on fetal cardiac function. A repeat laparotomy is performed to expose each gestational sac and a microultrasound examination (VisualSonics VEVO 2100) of fetal cardiac function is performed. Placental insufficiency is evident by a raised pulsatility index or an absent or reversed end diastolic flow of the umbilical artery Doppler waveform. The ductus venosus and middle cerebral artery Doppler is then examined. Fetal echocardiography is performed by recording B mode, M mode and flow velocity waveforms in lateral and apical views. Offline calculations determine standard M-mode cardiac variables, tricuspid and mitral annular plane systolic excursion, speckle tracking and strain analysis, modified myocardial performance index and vascular flow velocity waveforms of interest. This small animal model of IUGR therefore affords examination of in utero cardiac function that is

  9. Measurement uncertainty in pulmonary vascular input impedance and characteristic impedance estimated from pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasound and pressure: clinical studies on 57 pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Hunter, Kendall S; Kirby, K Scott; Ivy, D Dunbar; Shandas, Robin

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular input impedance better characterizes right ventricular (RV) afterload and disease outcomes in pulmonary hypertension compared to the standard clinical diagnostic, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). Early efforts to measure impedance were not routine, involving open-chest measurement. Recently, the use of pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler-measured velocity to non-invasively estimate instantaneous flow has made impedance measurement more practical. One critical concern remains with clinical use: the measurement uncertainty, especially since previous studies only incorporated random error. This study utilized data from a large pediatric patient population to comprehensively examine the systematic and random error contributions to the total impedance uncertainty and determined the least error prone methodology to compute impedance from among four different methods. We found that the systematic error contributes greatly to the total uncertainty and that one of the four methods had significantly smaller propagated uncertainty; however, even when this best method is used, the uncertainty can be large for input impedance at high harmonics and for the characteristic impedance modulus. Finally, we found that uncertainty in impedance between normotensive and hypertensive patient groups displays no significant difference. It is concluded that clinical impedance measurement would be most improved by advancements in instrumentation, and the best computation method is proposed for future clinical use of the input impedance.

  10. [Pilot study of echocardiographic studies using color- and pulsed-wave spectral Doppler methods in blue-crowned amazons (Amazona ventralis) and blue-fronted amazons (Amazona a. aestiva)].

    PubMed

    Pees, M; Straub, J; Schumacher, J; Gompf, R; Krautwald-Junghanns, M E

    2005-02-01

    Colour-flow and pulsed-wave spectral Doppler echocardiography was performed on 6 healthy, adult Hispaniolan amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) and 6 blue-fronted amazon parrots (Amazona a. aestiva) to establish normal reference values. Birds were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen and placed in dorsal recumbency. An electrocardiogram was recorded continuously and birds were imaged with a micro-phased-array scanner with a frequency of 7.0 MHz. After assessment of cardiac function in 2-D-echocardiography, blood flow across the left and the right atrioventricular valve and across the aortic valve was determined using color-flow and pulsed-wave spectral Doppler echocardiography. Diastolic inflow (mean value +/- standard deviation) into the left ventricle was 0.17 +/- 0.02 m/s (Hispaniolan amazons) and 0.18 +/- 0.03 m/s (Blue fronted amazons). Diastolic inflow into the right ventricle was 0.22 +/- 0.05 m/s (Hispaniolan amazons) and 0.22 +/- 0.04 m/s (Blue fronted amazons). Velocity across the aortic valve was 0.84 +/- 0.07 m/s (Hispaniolan amazons) and 0.83 +/- 0.08 m/s (Blue fronted amazons). Systolic pulmonary flow could not be detected in any of the birds in this study. No significant differences were evident between the two species examined. Results of this study indicate that Doppler echocardiography is a promising technique to determine blood flow in the avian heart. Further studies in other avian species are needed to establish reference values for assessment of cardiac function in diseased birds.

  11. Arterial pulse wave pressure transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, C.; Gorelick, D.; Chen, W. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An arterial pulse wave pressure transducer is introduced. The transducer is comprised of a fluid filled cavity having a flexible membrane disposed over the cavity and adapted to be placed on the skin over an artery. An arterial pulse wave creates pressure pulses in the fluid which are transduced, by a pressure sensitive transistor in direct contact with the fluid, into an electric signal. The electrical signal is representative of the pulse waves and can be recorded so as to monitor changes in the elasticity of the arterial walls.

  12. Standoff photoacoustic sensing of trace chemicals by laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Y.; Hu, Q.; Liu, H.

    2016-05-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a useful technique that suitable for trace detection of chemicals and explosives. Normally a high-sensitive microphone or a quartz tuning fork is used to detect the signal in photoacoustic cell. In recent years, laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is proposed to remote-sense photoacoustic signal on various substrates. It is a high-sensitivity sensor with a displacement resolution of <10pm. In this research, the photoacoustic effect of various chemicals is excited by a quantum cascade laser (QCL) with a scanning wavelength range of 6.89μm to 8.5 μm. A home-developed LDV at 1550nm wavelength is applied to detect the vibration signal. After normalize the vibration amplitude with QCL power, the photoacoustic spectrum of various chemicals can be obtained. Different factors that affect the detection accuracy and sensitivity have also been discussed. The results show the potential of the proposed technique for standoff detection of trace chemicals and explosives.

  13. Pulse Wave Well Development Demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, S.

    2001-02-23

    Conventional methods of well development at the Savannah River Site generate significant volumes of investigative derived waste (IDW) which must be treated and disposed of at a regulated Treatment, Storage, or Disposal (TSD) facility. Pulse Wave technology is a commercial method of well development utilizing bursts of high pressure gas to create strong pressure waves through the well screen zone, extending out into the formation surrounding the well. The patented process is intended to reduce well development time and the amount of IDW generated as well as to micro-fracture the formation to improve well capacity.

  14. Noninvasive determination of pulse-wave velocity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hartley, C J; Taffet, G E; Michael, L H; Pham, T T; Entman, M L

    1997-07-01

    Some transgenic mice have abnormal vascular function, but arterial geometry and dynamics are difficult to evaluate. To examine whether ultrasonic velocimetry could be used to determine arterial pulse-wave velocity (PWV) in mice, a custom-made 20-MHz pulsed Doppler instrument was used to obtain blood flow velocity signals from the aortic arch and the abdominal aorta 4 cm downstream. The upstroke (foot) of the velocity wave was timed at each site with respect to the R wave of the electrocardiogram, and PWV was calculated by dividing the separation distance by the difference in R-foot times. Doppler determinations were compared with invasive tonometry, and PWV was altered pharmacologically. It was found that the upstrokes of pressure (by tonometry) and velocity were coincident (+/-1 ms) and that PWV could be calculated by either method on exposed vessels. With the use of Doppler methods, pulse transit time was determined noninvasively with +/-1-ms resolution in 140 of 142 attempts in 82 mice. The calculated PWV in mice ranged from 220 to 850 cm/s with vasodilating anesthetics producing the low values and vasoconstricting agents producing the higher values. Thus PWV can be determined noninvasively in mice, is similar to that in other mammals, and responds as expected to vasoactive agents. PMID:9249523

  15. Supratentorial pressures. Part II: Intracerebral pulse waves.

    PubMed

    Miller, J D; Peeler, D F; Pattisapu, J; Parent, A D

    1987-09-01

    Intracerebral pulse waves were recorded in cat and monkey while intracranial pressure (ICP) manipulations were performed. The intracerebral pulse waves appeared comparable to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pulsations. The wave forms were divided into multiple smaller waves, designated P1 to P4. The P1 component was primarily of arterial origin and was accentuated by increasing ICP unrelated to increased venous pressure, most commonly from a mass lesion. Bilateral carotid occlusion resulted in decreased amplitude of P1. Venous hypertension from jugular venous or sagittal sinus occlusion, on the other hand, accentuated waves P2 and P3 more than P1. This is consistent with a Starling resistor model of the cerebral venous system in which mass lesions may compress low-pressure veins and accentuate the arterial pressure-dependent P1 wave, whereas venous hypertension causes increased prominence of the later P2 and P3 waves. PMID:2891069

  16. Pulse Wave Propagation in the Arterial Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Vosse, Frans N.; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    The beating heart creates blood pressure and flow pulsations that propagate as waves through the arterial tree that are reflected at transitions in arterial geometry and elasticity. Waves carry information about the matter in which they propagate. Therefore, modeling of arterial wave propagation extends our knowledge about the functioning of the cardiovascular system and provides a means to diagnose disorders and predict the outcome of medical interventions. In this review we focus on the physical and mathematical modeling of pulse wave propagation, based on general fluid dynamical principles. In addition we present potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. Models of short- and long-term adaptation of the arterial system and methods that deal with uncertainties in personalized model parameters and boundary conditions are briefly discussed, as they are believed to be major topics for further study and will boost the significance of arterial pulse wave modeling even more.

  17. Characterization of fiber-laser-based sub-Doppler NICE-OHMS for quantitative trace gas detection.

    PubMed

    Foltynowicz, Aleksandra; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2008-09-15

    The potential of fiber-laser-based sub-Doppler noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry for trace gas detection is scrutinized. The non-linear dependence of the on-resonance sub-Doppler dispersion signal on the intracavity pressure and power is investigated and the optimum conditions with respect to these are determined. The linearity of the signal strength with concentration is demonstrated and the dynamic range of the technique is discussed. Measurements were performed on C(2)H(2) at 1531 nm up to degrees of saturation of 100. The minimum detectable sub-Doppler optical phase shift was 5 x 10(-11) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2), corresponding to a partial pressure of C(2)H(2) of 1 x 10(-12) atm for an intracavity pressure of 20 mTorr, and a concentration of 10 ppb at 400 mTorr.

  18. An example of scaling MST Doppler spectra using median spectra, spectral smoothing, and velocity tracing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    Although automatic, computer scaling methods appeared at the start of the MST (mesosphere stratosphere troposphere) radar technique, there is a continuing need for scaling algorithms that perform editing functions and increase the sensitivity of radar by post processing. The scaling method presented is an adaptation of the method of scaling MST Doppler spectra presented by Rastogi (1984). A brief overview of this method is as follows: a median spectrum is calculated from several sequential spectra; the median noise value is subtracted from this derived spectrum; the median spectrum is smoothed; the detection/nondetection decision is made by comparing the smoothed spectrum to the variance of the smoothed noise; and if a signal is detected, then the half-power points of the smoothed echo spectrum are used to place limits on the evaluation of the first two moments of the unsmoothed median spectrum. In all of the above steps, the algorithm is guided by tracing the expected velocity range upward from the lowest range as far as possible. The method is discussed in more detail.

  19. Skin pulse wave monitoring during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J; de Lange, J J; Ros, H H

    1988-04-01

    The effectiveness of pulse wave monitoring of the big toes was compared with loss of cold discrimination to determine the onset of nerve blockade during lumbar epidural and spinal anesthesia. Forty-seven patients scheduled for elective urologic or lower extremity operations were assigned to one of three groups. Group 1 (15 patients) received epidural mepivacaine 1.5% with epinephrine; group 2 (12 patients), epidural bupivacaine 0.5%, and group 3 (20 patients), spinal bupivacaine 0.5%. In the epidural groups, the mean time to onset of increases in pulse wave amplitude was less than half the mean time to onset of decrease in cold discrimination (P less than 0.05). In patients given spinal anesthesia, there was no significant difference. The pulse wave monitor seems to be a sensitive and objective detector of early anesthetic effect during spinal and epidural anesthesia.

  20. Arterial stiffness estimation based photoplethysmographic pulse wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huotari, Matti; Maatta, Kari; Kostamovaara, Juha

    2010-11-01

    Arterial stiffness is one of the indices of vascular healthiness. It is based on pulse wave analysis. In the case we decompose the pulse waveform for the estimation and determination of arterial elasticity. Firstly, optically measured with photoplethysmograph and then investigating means by four lognormal pulse waveforms for which we can find very good fit between the original and summed decomposed pulse wave. Several studies have demonstrated that these kinds of measures predict cardiovascular events. While dynamic factors, e.g., arterial stiffness, depend on fixed structural features of the vascular wall. Arterial stiffness is estimated based on pulse wave decomposition analysis in the radial and tibial arteries. Elucidation of the precise relationship between endothelial function and vascular stiffness awaits still further study.

  1. Sonar pulse wave form optimization in cluttered environments.

    PubMed

    Weichman, Peter B

    2006-09-01

    A theory of active sonar (or radar) pulse wave form design, for optimal target detection in cluttered environments, is presented. The received target signal is maximized via a cost function L that incorporates both the signal-to-noise ratio and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which is used to balance bandwidth (or range resolution) against signal gain. The optimal pulse wave form is the ground state solution to a one-dimensional Schrödinger-type equation in frequency space, with an effective potential energy that tends to concentrate pulse energy in frequency bands where the target reflectivity dominates the clutter reflectivity.

  2. Sonar pulse wave form optimization in cluttered environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weichman, Peter B.

    2006-09-01

    A theory of active sonar (or radar) pulse wave form design, for optimal target detection in cluttered environments, is presented. The received target signal is maximized via a cost function L that incorporates both the signal-to-noise ratio and a generalization of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, which is used to balance bandwidth (or range resolution) against signal gain. The optimal pulse wave form is the ground state solution to a one-dimensional Schrödinger-type equation in frequency space, with an effective potential energy that tends to concentrate pulse energy in frequency bands where the target reflectivity dominates the clutter reflectivity.

  3. Elastic modulus in young diabetic patients (ultrasound measurements of pulse wave velocity).

    PubMed

    Stella, A; Gessaroli, M; Cifiello, B I; Salardi, S; Reggiani, A; Cacciari, E; D'Addato, M

    1984-11-01

    Aim of this study is to confirm the validity of non-invasive evaluation with Doppler C.W. in the study of arterial diseases and in the identification of pre-clinical arterial lesions. We studied twenty-eight children suffering from diabetes mellitus, and dependent on insulin and a control group composed of twenty-eight healthy persons. All subjects were studied using the methodology of the transit time for the determination of the elastic modulus of the lower limb arterial wall and results were analysed according to a statistical method. Although the groups were small, an increase in pulse wave velocity was noted in diabetic children and a significative correlation was found between the elastic modulus and duration of diabetes.

  4. A fast algorithm for the simulation of arterial pulse waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tao; Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional models have been widely used in studies of the propagation of blood pulse waves in large arterial trees. Under a periodic driving of the heartbeat, traditional numerical methods, such as the Lax-Wendroff method, are employed to obtain asymptotic periodic solutions at large times. However, these methods are severely constrained by the CFL condition due to large pulse wave speed. In this work, we develop a new numerical algorithm to overcome this constraint. First, we reformulate the model system of pulse wave propagation using a set of Riemann variables and derive a new form of boundary conditions at the inlet, the outlets, and the bifurcation points of the arterial tree. The new form of the boundary conditions enables us to design a convergent iterative method to enforce the boundary conditions. Then, after exchanging the spatial and temporal coordinates of the model system, we apply the Lax-Wendroff method in the exchanged coordinate system, which turns the large pulse wave speed from a liability to a benefit, to solve the wave equation in each artery of the model arterial system. Our numerical studies show that our new algorithm is stable and can perform ∼15 times faster than the traditional implementation of the Lax-Wendroff method under the requirement that the relative numerical error of blood pressure be smaller than one percent, which is much smaller than the modeling error.

  5. Three-dimensional ray tracing through curvilinear interfaces with application to laser Doppler anemometry in a blood analogue fluid.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Allen H; Bertram, Christopher D

    2010-02-01

    Prediction of the effects of refractive index (RI) mismatch on laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements within a curvilinear cavity (an artificial ventricle) was achieved by developing a general technique for modelling the paths of the convergent beams of the LDA system using 3D vector geometry. Validated by ray tracing through CAD drawings, the predicted maximum tolerance in RI between the solid model and the working fluid was +/- 0.0005, equivalent to focusing errors commensurate with the geometric and alignment uncertainties associated with the flow model and the LDA arrangement. This technique supports predictions of the effects of refraction within a complex geometry. Where the RI mismatch is unavoidable but known, it is possible not only to calculate the true position of the measuring volume (using the probe location and model geometry), but also to estimate degradation in signal quality arising from differential displacement and refraction of the laser beams.

  6. Three-dimensional ray tracing through curvilinear interfaces with application to laser Doppler anemometry in a blood analogue fluid.

    PubMed

    Nugent, Allen H; Bertram, Christopher D

    2010-02-01

    Prediction of the effects of refractive index (RI) mismatch on laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) measurements within a curvilinear cavity (an artificial ventricle) was achieved by developing a general technique for modelling the paths of the convergent beams of the LDA system using 3D vector geometry. Validated by ray tracing through CAD drawings, the predicted maximum tolerance in RI between the solid model and the working fluid was +/- 0.0005, equivalent to focusing errors commensurate with the geometric and alignment uncertainties associated with the flow model and the LDA arrangement. This technique supports predictions of the effects of refraction within a complex geometry. Where the RI mismatch is unavoidable but known, it is possible not only to calculate the true position of the measuring volume (using the probe location and model geometry), but also to estimate degradation in signal quality arising from differential displacement and refraction of the laser beams. PMID:19669821

  7. Flexible pulse-wave sensors from oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Morito; Ueno, Naohiro; Nonaka, Kazuhiro; Tateyama, Hiroshi

    2003-03-01

    Flexible pulse-wave sensors were fabricated from density-packed oriented aluminum nitride nanocolumns prepared on aluminum foils. The nanocolumns were prepared by the rf magnetron sputtering method and were perpendicularly oriented to the aluminum foil surfaces. The sensor structure is laminated, and the structure contributes to avoiding unexpected leakage of an electric charge. The resulting sensor thickness is 50 μm. The sensor is flexible like aluminum foil and can respond to frequencies from 0.1 to over 100 Hz. The sensitivity of the sensor to pressure is proportional to the surface area. The sensor sensitively causes reversible charge signals that correlate with the pulse wave form, which contains significant information on arteriosclerosis and cardiopathy of a man sitting on it.

  8. Reliability assessment for pulse wave measurement using artificial pulse generator.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chi-Wei; Wang, Wei-Kung

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess intrinsic reliabilities of devices for pulse wave measurement (PWM). An artificial pulse generator system was constructed to create a periodic pulse wave. The stability of the periodic output was tested by the DP103 pressure transducer. The pulse generator system was then used to evaluate the TD01C system. Test-re-test and inter-device reliability assessments were conducted on the TD01C system. First, 11 harmonic components of the pulse wave were calculated using Fourier series analysis. For each harmonic component, coefficient of variation (CV), intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot were used to determine the degree of reliability of the TD01C system. In addition, device exclusion criteria were pre-specified to improve consistency of devices. The artificial pulse generator system was stable to evaluate intrinsic reliabilities of devices for PWM (ICCs > 0.95, p < 0.001). TD01C was reliable for repeated measurements (ICCs of test-re-test reliability > 0.95, p < 0.001; CVs all < 3%). Device exclusion criteria successfully excluded the device with defect; therefore, the criteria reduced inter-device CVs of harmonics and improved consistency of the selected devices for all harmonic components. This study confirmed the feasibility of intrinsic reliability assessment of devices for PWM using an artificial pulse generator system. Moreover, potential novel findings on the assessment combined with device exclusion criteria could be a useful method to select the measuring devices and to evaluate the qualities of them in PWM.

  9. Measurement of the Doppler power of flowing blood using ultrasound Doppler devices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chou, Hung-Lung; Chen, Pay-Yu

    2015-02-01

    Measurement of the Doppler power of signals backscattered from flowing blood (henceforth referred to as the Doppler power of flowing blood) and the echogenicity of flowing blood have been used widely to assess the degree of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation for more than 20 y. Many studies have used Doppler flowmeters based on an analogue circuit design to obtain the Doppler shifts in the signals backscattered from flowing blood; however, some recent studies have mentioned that the analogue Doppler flowmeter exhibits a frequency-response problem whereby the backscattered energy is lost at higher Doppler shift frequencies. Therefore, the measured Doppler power of flowing blood and evaluations of RBC aggregation obtained using an analogue Doppler device may be inaccurate. To overcome this problem, the present study implemented a field-programmable gate array-based digital pulsed-wave Doppler flowmeter to measure the Doppler power of flowing blood, in the aim of providing more accurate assessments of RBC aggregation. A clinical duplex ultrasound imaging system that can acquire pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms is now available, but its usefulness for estimating the ultrasound scattering properties of blood is still in doubt. Therefore, the echogenicity and Doppler power of flowing blood under the same flow conditions were measured using a laboratory pulser-receiver system and a clinical ultrasound system, respectively, for comparisons. The experiments were carried out using porcine blood under steady laminar flow with both RBC suspensions and whole blood. The experimental results indicated that a clinical ultrasound system used to measure the Doppler spectrograms is not suitable for quantifying Doppler power. However, the Doppler power measured using a digital Doppler flowmeter can reveal the relationship between backscattering signals and the properties of blood cells because the effects of frequency response are eliminated. The measurements of the Doppler power and

  10. Effect of Viscoelasticity of Vessel Walls on Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2010-07-01

    The pulse wave comes from the displacement of surface skin and is composed of incident and reflected waves. Since the properties of the reflected wave change considerably owing to the viscoelasticity of the vessel walls, the analysis of the reflected wave is considered to be useful for evaluating arterial stiffness; thereby, appropriate estimation of the incident wave is important for separating the pulse wave. Here, the incident wave is generated by a forward wave, which is the intravascular pressure caused by blood flow. In the former analysis, we assumed the blood vessel as an elastic tube and estimated the forward wave from the blood flow velocity waveform. In this study, we used a viscoelastic model to estimate a more appropriate forward wave. In this estimation, we used viscoelastic properties similar to those of bovine aorta, human aorta, or human artery. The estimated forward waves showed that the difference in the viscous properties of vessel walls causes minimal changes in the forward waves, which were also similar to that estimated using the elastic model. The result tells us that the elastic model is acceptable and useful for the estimation of forward wave, incident wave, and reflected wave, which enables the simple evaluation of the viscoelastic properties of vessel walls.

  11. Pulse wave transit time for monitoring respiration rate.

    PubMed

    Johansson, A; Ahlstrom, C; Lanne, T; Ask, P

    2006-06-01

    In this study, we investigate the beat-to-beat respiratory fluctuations in pulse wave transit time (PTT) and its subcomponents, the cardiac pre-ejection period (PEP) and the vessel transit time (VTT) in ten healthy subjects. The three transit times were found to fluctuate in pace with respiration. When applying a simple breath detecting algorithm, 88% of the breaths seen in a respiration air-flow reference could be detected correctly in PTT. Corresponding numbers for PEP and VTT were 76 and 81%, respectively. The performance during hypo- and hypertension was investigated by invoking blood pressure changes. In these situations, the error rates in breath detection were significantly higher. PTT can be derived from signals already present in most standard monitoring set-ups. The transit time technology thus has prospects to become an interesting alternative for respiration rate monitoring.

  12. Temporal pattern of pulse wave velocity during brachial hyperemia reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, S.; Valero, M. J.; Craiem, D.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Zócalo, Y.; Valls, G.; Bía, D.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial function can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound, analyzing the change of brachial diameter in response to transient forearm ischemia. We propose a new technique based in the same principle, but analyzing a continuous recording of carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) instead of diameter. PWV was measured on 10 healthy subjects of 22±2 years before and after 5 minutes forearm occlusion. After 59 ± 31 seconds of cuff release PWV decreased 21 ± 9% compared to baseline, reestablishing the same after 533 ± 65 seconds. There were no significant changes observed in blood pressure. When repeating the study one hour later in 5 subjects, we obtained a coefficient of repeatability of 4.8%. In conclusion, through analysis of beat to beat carotid-radial PWV it was possible to characterize the temporal profiles and analyze the acute changes in response to a reactive hyperemia. The results show that the technique has a high sensitivity and repeatability.

  13. Optimization of arterial age prediction models based in pulse wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scandurra, A. G.; Meschino, G. J.; Passoni, L. I.; Pra, A. L. Dai; Introzzi, A. R.; Clara, F. M.

    2007-11-01

    We propose the detection of early arterial ageing through a prediction model of arterial age based in the coherence assumption between the pulse wave morphology and the patient's chronological age. Whereas we evaluate several methods, a Sugeno fuzzy inference system is selected. Models optimization is approached using hybrid methods: parameter adaptation with Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Algorithms. Features selection was performed according with their projection on main factors of the Principal Components Analysis. The model performance was tested using the bootstrap error type .632E. The model presented an error smaller than 8.5%. This result encourages including this process as a diagnosis module into the device for pulse analysis that has been developed by the Bioengineering Laboratory staff.

  14. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity: Myths, Misconceptions, and Realities.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Jun; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    A variety of techniques to evaluate central arterial stiffness have been developed and introduced. None of these techniques, however, have been implemented widely in regular clinical settings, except for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The most prominent procedural advantage of baPWV is its ease of use, since it only requires the wrapping of blood pressure cuffs on the 4 extremities. There is mounting evidence indicating the ability of baPWV to predict the risk of future cardiovascular events and total mortality. Additionally, the guidelines for the management of hypertension in Japan recommended the measurement of baPWV be included in the assessment of subclinical target organ damage. However, baPWV has not been fully accepted worldwide due to perceived theoretical and methodological issues. In this review, we address the most frequently mentioned questions and concerns regarding baPWV to shed some light on this simple and easy arterial stiffness measurement. PMID:26587459

  15. Ultrasonic Doppler Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortoli, Piero; Fidanzati, Paolo; Luca, Bassi

    Any US equipment includes Doppler facilities capable of providing information about moving structures inside the human body. In most cases, the primary interest is in the investigation of blood flow dynamics, since this may be helpful for early diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. However, there is also an increasing interest in tracking the movements of human tissues, since such movements can give an indirect evaluation of their elastic properties, which are valuable indicators of the possible presence of pathologies. This paper aims at presenting an overview of the different ways in which the Doppler technique has been developed and used in medical ultrasound (US), from early continuous wave (CW) systems to advanced pulsed wave (PW) colour-Doppler equipment. In particular, the most important technical features and clinical applications of CW, single-gate PW, multi-gate PW and flow-imaging systems are reviewed. The main signal processing approaches used for detection of Doppler frequencies are described, including time-domain and frequency-domain (spectral) methods, as well as novel strategies like, e.g., harmonic Doppler mode, which have been recently introduced to exploit the benefits of US contrast agents.

  16. FPGA-based design and implementation of arterial pulse wave generator using piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Lisheng; Zhao, Dazhe; Yao, Yang; Song, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Because arterial pulse waves contain vital information related to the condition of the cardiovascular system, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of pulse waves in recent years. Accurate acquisition is essential to investigate arterial pulse waves. However, at the stage of developing equipment for acquiring and analyzing arterial pulse waves, specific pulse signals may be unavailable for debugging and evaluating the system under development. To produce test signals that reflect specific physiological conditions, in this paper, an arterial pulse wave generator has been designed and implemented using a field programmable gate array (FPGA), which can produce the desired pulse waves according to the feature points set by users. To reconstruct a periodic pulse wave from the given feature points, a method known as piecewise Gaussian-cosine fitting is also proposed in this paper. Using a test database that contains four types of typical pulse waves with each type containing 25 pulse wave signals, the maximum residual error of each sampling point of the fitted pulse wave in comparison with the real pulse wave is within 8%. In addition, the function for adding baseline drift and three types of noises is integrated into the developed system because the baseline occasionally wanders, and noise needs to be added for testing the performance of the designed circuits and the analysis algorithms. The proposed arterial pulse wave generator can be considered as a special signal generator with a simple structure, low cost and compact size, which can also provide flexible solutions for many other related research purposes.

  17. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung; Kim, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance. PMID:27579304

  18. Pulse Wave Variation during the Menstrual Cycle in Women with Menstrual Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Soo Hyung; Kim, Kyu Kon; Lee, In Seon; Lee, Yong Tae; Kim, Gyeong Cheol; Chi, Gyoo Yong; Cho, Hye Sook; Kang, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study is performed to obtain objective diagnostic indicators associated with menstrual pain using pulse wave analysis. Methods. Using a pulse diagnostic device, we measured the pulse waves of 541 women aged between 19 and 30 years, placed in either an experimental group with menstrual pain (n = 329) or a control group with little or no menstrual pain (n = 212). Measurements were taken during both the menstrual and nonmenstrual periods, and comparative analysis was performed. Results. During the nonmenstrual period, the experimental group showed a significantly higher value in the left radial artery for the radial augmentation index (RAI) (p = 0.050) but significantly lower values for pulse wave energy (p = 0.021) and time to first peak from baseline (T1) (p = 0.035) in the right radial artery. During the menstrual period, the experimental group showed significantly lower values in the left radial artery for cardiac diastole and pulse wave area during diastole and significantly higher values for pulse wave area during systole, ratio of systolic phase to the full heartbeat, and systolic-diastolic ratio. Conclusion. We obtained indicators of menstrual pain in women during the menstrual period, including prolonged systolic and shortened diastolic phases, increases in pulse wave energy and area of representative pulse wave, and increased blood vessel resistance. PMID:27579304

  19. Site of origin of spinal cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Urayama, K; Hoshino, Y

    1998-01-01

    : Since vascular pulsation in the cerebrospinal fluid causes the cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave (CSFPW), spinal CSFPW may serve as a monitor of spinal cord blood flow. However, there are two possible sources of spinal CSFPW: brain and spinal cord pulsation, and it is unclear for which region spinal CSFPW provides blood flow information. To resolve this question, we analyzed changes in CSFPW caused by occlusion of the large vessels in mongrel dogs. The thoracic and abdominal aorta (TA group, n = 13; AA, n = 6), bilateral internal carotid arteries (ICA, n = 7), and superior and inferior vena cava (SVC, n = 6; IVC, n = 8) were occluded. The CSFPW was measured at the second cervical and sixth lumbar spine level. To eliminate the influence of hemodynamic changes caused by the occlusion, CSFPWs were decomposed into component frequencies, harmonic waves (HWs), and analyzed using the system analysis method. After occlusion, cervical CSFPW was decreased in groups ICA (change in the first HW, 38%; P < 0.05 by Wilcoxon signed-ranks test), TA (40%; P < 0.05), and SVC (53%; P < 0.05), while lumbar CSFPW was decreased in groups TA (71%; P < 0.01), AA (78%; P < 0.05), and IVC (48%; P < 0.05). These results show that spinal CSFPW provides information on the blood flow of a relatively localized region, and could be used to monitor spinal cord blood flow.

  20. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  1. Assessment of aortic pulse wave velocity by ultrasound: a feasibility study in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faita, Francesco; Di Lascio, Nicole; Stea, Francesco; Kusmic, Claudia; Sicari, Rosa

    2014-03-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered a surrogate marker of arterial stiffness and could be useful for characterizing cardiovascular disease progression even in mouse models. Aim of this study was to develop an image process algorithm for assessing arterial PWV in mice using ultrasound (US) images only and test it on the evaluation of age-associated differences in abdominal aorta PWV (aaPWV). US scans were obtained from six adult (7 months) and six old (19 months) wild type male mice (strain C57BL6) under gaseous anaesthesia. For each mouse, diameter and flow velocity instantaneous values were achieved from abdominal aorta B-mode and PW-Doppler images; all measurements were obtained using edge detection and contour tracking techniques. Single-beat mean diameter and velocity were calculated and time-aligned, providing the lnD-V loop. aaPWV values were obtained from the slope of the linear part of the loop (the early systolic phase), while relative distension (relD) measurements were calculated from the mean diameter signal. aaPWV values for young mice (3.5±0.52 m/s) were lower than those obtained for older ones (5.12±0.98 m/s) while relD measurements were higher in young (25%±7%) compared with older animals evaluations (15%±3%). All measurements were significantly different between the two groups (P<0.01 both). In conclusion, the proposed image processing technique well discriminate between age groups. Since it provides PWV assessment just from US images, it could represent a simply and useful system for vascular stiffness evaluation at any arterial site in the mouse, even in preclinical small animal models.

  2. Estimation of Arterial Stiffness by Time-Frequency Analysis of Pulse Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Masashi; Yamamoto, Yuya; Shibayama, Yuka; Matsukawa, Mami; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Furuya, Mio; Asada, Takaaki

    2011-07-01

    Evaluation of a pulse wave is effective for the early diagnosis of arteriosclerosis because the pulse wave contains the reflected wave that is the age- and stiffness-dependent component. In this study, we attempted to extract the parameter reflecting the component by pulse wave analysis using continuous wavelet transform. The Morlet wavelet was used as the mother wavelet. We then investigated the relationship between the parameter and the reflected wave that was extracted from the pulse wave by our previously reported separation technique. Consequently, the result of wavelet transform of the differentiated pulse waveform changed markedly owing to age and had medium correlation with the peak of the reflected wave (R=0.68).

  3. [Research on the Method of Blood Pressure Monitoring Based on Multiple Parameters of Pulse Wave].

    PubMed

    Miao, Changyun; Mu, Dianwei; Zhang, Cheng; Miao, Chunjiao; Li, Hongqiang

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of blood pressure measurement in wearable devices, this paper presents a method for detecting blood pressure based on multiple parameters of pulse wave. Based on regression analysis between blood pressure and the characteristic parameters of pulse wave, such as the pulse wave transit time (PWTT), cardiac output, coefficient of pulse wave, the average slope of the ascending branch, heart rate, etc. we established a model to calculate blood pressure. For overcoming the application deficiencies caused by measuring ECG in wearable device, such as replacing electrodes and ECG lead sets which are not convenient, we calculated the PWTT with heart sound as reference (PWTT(PCG)). We experimentally verified the detection of blood pressure based on PWTT(PCG) and based on multiple parameters of pulse wave. The experiment results showed that it was feasible to calculate the PWTT from PWTT(PCG). The mean measurement error of the systolic and diastolic blood pressure calculated by the model based on multiple parameters of pulse wave is 1.62 mm Hg and 1.12 mm Hg, increased by 57% and 53% compared to those of the model based on simple parameter. This method has more measurement accuracy. PMID:26964321

  4. Pulse wave imaging in normal, hypertensive and aneurysmal human aortas in vivo: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ronny X.; Luo, Jianwen; Balaram, Sandhya K.; Chaudhry, Farooq A.; Shahmirzadi, Danial; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-07-01

    Arterial stiffness is a well-established biomarker for cardiovascular risk, especially in the case of hypertension. The progressive stages of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) have also been associated with varying arterial stiffness. Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique that uses the pulse wave-induced arterial wall motion to map the propagation of the pulse wave and measure the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) as an index of arterial stiffness. In this study, the clinical feasibility of PWI was evaluated in normal, hypertensive, and aneurysmal human aortas. Radiofrequency-based speckle tracking was used to estimate the pulse wave-induced displacements in the abdominal aortic walls of normal (N = 15, mean age 32.5 ± 10.2 years), hypertensive (N = 13, mean age 60.8 ± 15.8 years), and aneurysmal (N = 5, mean age 71.6 ± 11.8 years) human subjects. Linear regression of the spatio-temporal variation of the displacement waveform in the anterior aortic wall over a single cardiac cycle yielded the slope as the PWV and the coefficient of determination r2 as an approximate measure of the pulse wave propagation uniformity. The aortic PWV measurements in all normal, hypertensive, and AAA subjects were 6.03 ± 1.68, 6.69 ± 2.80, and 10.54 ± 6.52 m s-1, respectively. There was no significant difference (p = 0.15) between the PWVs of the normal and hypertensive subjects while the PWVs of the AAA subjects were significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to those of the other two groups. Also, the average r2 in the AAA subjects was significantly lower (p < 0.001) than that in the normal and hypertensive subjects. These preliminary results suggest that the regional PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity (r2) obtained using PWI, in addition to the PWI images and spatio-temporal maps that provide qualitative visualization of the pulse wave, may potentially provide valuable information for the clinical characterization of aneurysms

  5. Imaging pulse wave velocity in mouse retina using swept-source OCT (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shaozhen; Wei, Wei; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-03-01

    Blood vessel dynamics has been a significant subject in cardiology and internal medicine, and pulse wave velocity (PWV) on artery vessels is a classic evaluation of arterial distensibility, and has never been ascertained as a cardiovascular risk marker. The aim of this study is to develop a high speed imaging technique to capture the pulsatile motion on mouse retina arteries with the ability to quantify PWV on any arterial vessels. We demonstrate a new non-invasive method to assess the vessel dynamics on mouse retina. A Swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is used for imaging micro-scale blood vessel motion. The phase-stabilized SS-OCT provides a typical displacement sensitivity of 20 nm. The frame rate of imaging is ~16 kHz, at A-line rate of ~1.62 MHz, which allows the detection of transient pulse waves with adequate temporal resolution. Imaging volumes with repeated B-scans are obtained on mouse retina capillary bed, and the mouse oxymeter signal is recorded simultaneously. The pulse wave on artery and vein are resolved, and with the synchronized heart beat signal, the temporal delay on different vessel locations is determined. The vessel specific measurement of PWV is achieved for the first time with SS-OCT, for pulse waves propagating more than 100 cm/s. Using the novel methodology of retinal PWV assessment, it is hoped that the clinical OCT scans can provide extended diagnostic information of cardiology functionalities.

  6. [Design and implementation of the pulse wave generator with field programmable gate array based on windkessel model].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Fu, Quanhai; Xu, Lisheng; Liu, Jia; He, Dianning; Li, Qingchun

    2014-10-01

    Pulse waves contain rich physiological and pathological information of the human vascular system. The pulse wave diagnosis systems are very helpful for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Accurate pulse waveform is necessary to evaluate the performances of the pulse wave equipment. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate pulse waveform due to several kinds of physiological and pathological conditions for testing and maintaining the pulse wave acquisition devices. A pulse wave generator was designed and implemented in the present study for this application. The blood flow in the vessel was simulated by modeling the cardiovascular system with windkessel model. Pulse waves can be generated based on the vascular systems with four kinds of resistance. Some functional models such as setting up noise types and signal noise ratio (SNR) values were also added in the designed generator. With the need of portability, high speed dynamic response, scalability and low power consumption for the system, field programmable gate array (FPGA) was chosen as hardware platform, and almost all the works, such as developing an algorithm for pulse waveform and interfacing with memory and liquid crystal display (LCD), were implemented under the flow of system on a programmable chip (SOPC) development. When users input in the key parameters through LCD and touch screen, the corresponding pulse wave will be displayed on the LCD and the desired pulse waveform can be accessed from the analog output channel as well. The structure of the designed pulse wave generator is simple and it can provide accurate solutions for studying and teaching pulse waves and the detection of the equipments for acquisition and diagnosis of pulse wave. PMID:25764709

  7. A new method for the acquisition of arterial pulse wave using self-mixing interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasanz, A.; Azcona, F. J.; Royo, S.; Jha, A.; Pladellorens, J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we present a technique based on self-mixing interferometry as a method for the acquisition and reconstruction of the arterial pulse wave. A modification of the classic fringe counting reconstruction algorithm is proposed to deal with some of the problems caused by biological tissue surface roughness, therefore allowing a reconstruction of the arterial displacement with a resolution of 400 nm. The traits of the arterial pulse wave have been retrieved with high detail, allowing their interpretation by a skilled practitioner. The heart beat measurements show a good agreement when compared to the readings of a commercial pulse-meter, therefore proving the versatility and the viability of the technique for the measurement of other cardiovascular signals.

  8. Pulse Wave Analysis by Applanation Tonometry for the Measurement of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Doupis, John; Papanas, Nikolaos; Cohen, Alison; McFarlan, Lyndsay; Horton, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA)-derived measurements for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. A total of 20 (7 male and 13 female) healthy, non-smoking individuals, with mean age 31 ± 12years were included. PWV and PWA measurements were performed using a SphygmoCor apparatus (Atcor Medical Blood Pressure Analysis System, Sydney Australia). PWV significantly correlated with all central aortic haemodynamic parameters, especially with pulse pressure (PP) (p < 0.0001), augmentation index corrected for 75 pulses/min (AI75) (p = 0.035) and augmentation pressure (AP) (p = 0.005). Male subjects presented significantly higher PWV compared with females (p = 0.03), while there were no differences in PP, AP and AI75. In conclusion, PWA is strongly correlated with PWV as a method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness.

  9. Pulse Wave Analysis by Applanation Tonometry for the Measurement of Arterial Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Doupis, John; Papanas, Nikolaos; Cohen, Alison; McFarlan, Lyndsay; Horton, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA)-derived measurements for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. A total of 20 (7 male and 13 female) healthy, non-smoking individuals, with mean age 31 ± 12years were included. PWV and PWA measurements were performed using a SphygmoCor apparatus (Atcor Medical Blood Pressure Analysis System, Sydney Australia). PWV significantly correlated with all central aortic haemodynamic parameters, especially with pulse pressure (PP) (p < 0.0001), augmentation index corrected for 75 pulses/min (AI75) (p = 0.035) and augmentation pressure (AP) (p = 0.005). Male subjects presented significantly higher PWV compared with females (p = 0.03), while there were no differences in PP, AP and AI75. In conclusion, PWA is strongly correlated with PWV as a method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. PMID:27651842

  10. Pulse wave transit time measured by imaging photoplethysmography in upper extremities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volynsky, M. A.; Mamontov, O. V.; Sidorov, I. S.; Kamshilin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    We describe highly reliable measurement method of the pulse wave transit time (PWTT) to human limbs by using simultaneous recordings of imaging photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. High accuracy of measurements was achieved by access to a larger number of statistically independent data obtained simultaneously in different points. The method is characterized by higher diagnostic reliability because of automatic selection of the regions less affected by environmental noise. The technique was tested in the group of 12 young healthy subjects aged from 21 to 33 years. Even though PWTT in right and left hands was comparable after averaging over the whole group of subjects, significant difference in the time delay of pulse wave between the hands was found in several individuals. The technique can be used for early-stage diagnostics of various vascular diseases.

  11. Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity using RGB cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Kazuya; Aoki, Yuta; Satoh, Ryota; Hoshi, Akira; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Nishidate, Izumi

    2016-03-01

    Non-contact measurement of pulse wave velocity (PWV) using red, green, and blue (RGB) digital color images is proposed. Generally, PWV is used as the index of arteriosclerosis. In our method, changes in blood volume are calculated based on changes in the color information, and is estimated by combining multiple regression analysis (MRA) with a Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) model of the transit of light in human skin. After two pulse waves of human skins were measured using RGB cameras, and the PWV was calculated from the difference of the pulse transit time and the distance between two measurement points. The measured forehead-finger PWV (ffPWV) was on the order of m/s and became faster as the values of vital signs raised. These results demonstrated the feasibility of this method.

  12. Pulse Wave Analysis by Applanation Tonometry for the Measurement of Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Doupis, John; Papanas, Nikolaos; Cohen, Alison; McFarlan, Lyndsay; Horton, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association between pulse wave velocity (PWV) and pulse wave analysis (PWA)-derived measurements for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. A total of 20 (7 male and 13 female) healthy, non-smoking individuals, with mean age 31 ± 12years were included. PWV and PWA measurements were performed using a SphygmoCor apparatus (Atcor Medical Blood Pressure Analysis System, Sydney Australia). PWV significantly correlated with all central aortic haemodynamic parameters, especially with pulse pressure (PP) (p < 0.0001), augmentation index corrected for 75 pulses/min (AI75) (p = 0.035) and augmentation pressure (AP) (p = 0.005). Male subjects presented significantly higher PWV compared with females (p = 0.03), while there were no differences in PP, AP and AI75. In conclusion, PWA is strongly correlated with PWV as a method for the evaluation of arterial stiffness. PMID:27651842

  13. High resolution wavenumber analysis for investigation of arterial pulse wave propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Sato, Masakazu; Irie, Takasuke

    2016-07-01

    The propagation of the pulse wave along the artery is relatively fast (several m/s), and a high-temporal resolution is required to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a regional segment of the artery. High-frame-rate ultrasound enables the measurement of the regional PWV. In analyses of wave propagation phenomena, the direction and propagation speed are generally identified in the frequency-wavenumber space using the two-dimensional Fourier transform. However, the wavelength of the pulse wave is very long (1 m at a propagation velocity of 10 m/s and a temporal frequency of 10 Hz) compared with a typical lateral field of view of 40 mm in ultrasound imaging. Therefore, PWV cannot be identified in the frequency-wavenumber space owing to the low resolution of the two-dimensional Fourier transform. In the present study, PWV was visualized in the wavenumber domain using phases of arterial wall acceleration waveforms measured by high-frame-rate ultrasound.

  14. Pulse-wave propagation in the arterial system of the diamond python Morelia spilotes.

    PubMed

    Avolio, A P; O'Rourke, M F; Webster, M E

    1983-12-01

    Pulse-wave velocity (PWV) and pulse-wave amplification (PWA) were measured over a proximal [51 +/- 3 (SE) cm] and distal segment (60 +/- 6 cm) of the common descending aorta of 10 anesthetized diamond python snakes (Morelia spilotes). For proximal and distal segments, PWV values were 551 +/- 66 and 921 +/- 116 cm/s and PWA were 0.91 +/- 0.05 and 0.91 +/- 0.06, respectively. PWV for proximal and distal segments were significantly different (P less than 0.02), but PWA were not. PWA for separate harmonics of heart frequency showed no significant increase above unity. Increase of PWV between distal and proximal aorta indicates a reduction in arterial distensibility, a phenomenon that in other species is associated with amplification of the pressure pulse; this was not observed in snakes. Using a simple elastic tube model 56 cm in length and 3 mm in diameter it was found that the amplification produced by the measured PWV changes is offset by attenuation due to viscous damping. Thus similarity of pulse-wave contour throughout the snake's aorta is attributable to the opposing effects of elastic nonuniformity and viscous damping.

  15. Estimation of local pulse wave velocity using arterial diameter waveforms: Experimental validation in sheep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, S.; Craiem, D.; Barra, J. G.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Increased arterial stiffness is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. Estimation of arterial stiffness using local pulse wave velocity (PWV) promises to be very useful for noninvasive diagnosis of arteriosclerosis. In this work we estimated in an instrumented sheep, the local aortic pulse wave velocity using two sonomicrometry diameter sensors (separated 7.5 cm) according to the transit time method (PWVTT) with a sampling rate of 4 KHz. We simultaneously measured aortic pressure in order to determine from pressure-diameter loops (PWVPDLoop), the "true" local aortic pulse wave velocity. A pneumatic cuff occluder was implanted in the aorta in order to compare both methods under a wide range of pressure levels. Mean pressure values ranged from 47 to 101 mmHg and mean proximal diameter values from 12.5. to 15.2 mm. There were no significant differences between PWVTT and PWVPDLoop values (451±43 vs. 447±48 cm/s, p = ns, paired t-test). Both methods correlated significantly (R = 0.81, p<0.05). The mean difference between both methods was only -4±29 cm/s, whereas the range of the limits of agreement (mean ± 2 standard deviation) was -61 to +53 cm/s, showing no trend. In conclusion, the diameter waveforms transit time method was found to allow an accurate and precise estimation of the local aortic PWV.

  16. Correlates of Osteoprotegerin and Association with Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Mary B.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Appel, Lawrence; Wolf, Myles; Budoff, Matt J.; Chen, Jing; Lustigova, Eva; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Glenn, Melanie; Hanish, Asaf; Raj, Dominic; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Seliger, Stephen L.; Weir, Matthew R.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a cytokine that regulates bone resorption, has been implicated in the process of vascular calcification and stiffness. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Serum OPG was measured in 351 participants with chronic kidney disease (CKD) from one site of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. Cortical bone mineral content (BMC) was measured by quantitative computed tomography in the tibia. Multivariable linear regression was used to test the association between serum OPG and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, measures of abnormal bone and mineral metabolism, and pulse wave velocity. Results Higher serum OPG levels were associated with older age, female gender, greater systolic BP, lower estimated GFR, and lower serum albumin. OPG was not associated with measures of abnormal bone or mineral metabolism including serum phosphorus, albumin-corrected serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, or cortical BMC. Among 226 participants with concurrent aortic pulse wave velocity measurements, increasing tertiles of serum OPG were associated with higher aortic pulse wave velocity after adjustment for demographics, traditional vascular risk factors, and nontraditional risk factors such as estimated GFR, albuminuria, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, presence of secondary hyperparathyroidism, serum albumin, and C-reactive protein or after additional adjustment for cortical BMC in a subset (n = 161). Conclusions These data support a strong relationship between serum OPG and arterial stiffness independent of many potential confounders including traditional cardiovascular risk factors, abnormal bone and mineral metabolism, and inflammation. PMID:21940840

  17. Detection of cerebral ischemia using the power spectrum of the pulse wave measured by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Akira; Tanaka, Yuichi; Konno, Takehiko; Kawasaki, Shingo; Fujiwara, Michiyuki; Watanabe, Eiju

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and medical treatment of cerebral ischemia are becoming more important due to the increase in the prevalence of cerebrovascular disease. However, conventional methods of evaluating cerebral perfusion have several drawbacks: they are invasive, require physical restraint, and the equipment is not portable, which makes repeated measurements at the bedside difficult. An alternative method is developed using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). NIRS signals are measured at 44 positions (22 on each side) on the fronto-temporal areas in 20 patients with cerebral ischemia. In order to extract the pulse-wave component, the raw total hemoglobin data recorded from each position are band-pass filtered (0.8 to 2.0 Hz) and subjected to a fast Fourier transform to obtain the power spectrum of the pulse wave. The ischemic region is determined by single-photon emission computed tomography. The pulse-wave power in the ischemic region is compared with that in the symmetrical region on the contralateral side. In 17 cases (85%), the pulse-wave power on the ischemic side is significantly lower than that on the contralateral side, which indicates that the transmission of the pulse wave is attenuated in the region with reduced blood flow. Pulse-wave power might be useful as a noninvasive marker of cerebral ischemia.

  18. High-frequency Ultrasound Doppler System for Biomedical Applications with a 30 MHz Linear Array

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaochen; Sun, Lei; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Yen, Jesse T.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the development of the first high-frequency (HF) pulsed-wave Doppler system using a 30 MHz linear array transducer to assess the cardiovascular functions in small animal. This array based pulsed-wave Doppler system included a 16-channel HF analog beamformer, a HF pulsed-wave Doppler module, timing circuits, HF bipolar pulsers, and analog front-ends. The beamformed echoes acquired by the 16 channel analog beamformer, were directly fed to the HF pulsed-wave Doppler module. Then the in-phase and quadrature-phase (IQ) audio Doppler signals were digitized by either a sound card or a Gage digitizer and stored in a PC. The Doppler spectrogram was displayed on a PC in real time. The two-way beam-widths were determined to be 160 μm to 320 μm when the array was electronically focused at different focal points at depths from 5–10 mm. A micro flow phantom, consisting of a polyimide tube with inner diameter of 127 μm, and the wire phantom were used to evaluate and calibrate the system. The results show that the system is capable of detecting motion velocity of the wire phantom as low as 0.1 mm/s, and detecting blood-mimicking flow velocity in the 127 μm tube lower than 7 mm/s. The system was subsequently used to measure the blood flow in vivo in two mouse abdominal superficial vessels with diameters of approximately 200 μm, and a mouse aorta close to the heart. These results demonstrated that this system may become an indispensable part of the current HF array based imaging systems for small animal studies. PMID:17993243

  19. A digital multigate Doppler method for high frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Ye, Zongying; Yu, Yanyan; Chen, Yan; Chi, Liyang; Mu, Peitian; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Congzhi; Xiao, Yang; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei; Zheng, Hairong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive visualization of blood flow with high frequency Doppler ultrasound has been extensively used to assess the morphology and hemodynamics of the microcirculation. A completely digital implementation of multigate pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler method was proposed in this paper for high frequency ultrasound applications. Analog mixer was eliminated by a digital demodulator and the same data acquisition path was shared with traditional B-mode imaging which made the design compact and flexible. Hilbert transform based quadrature demodulation scheme was employed to achieve the multigate Doppler acquisition. A programmable high frequency ultrasound platform was also proposed to facilitate the multigate flow visualization. Experimental results showed good performance of the proposed method. Parabolic velocity gradient inside the vessel and velocity profile with different time slots were acquired to demonstrate the functionality of the multigate Doppler. Slow wall motion was also recorded by the proposed method.

  20. Wall stress and deformation analysis in a numerical model of pulse wave propagation.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Hua, Lu; Gao, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    To simulate pulse wave propagation, we set up a wave propagation model using blood-wall interaction in previous work. In this paper, our purpose is to investigate wall stress and deformation of the wave propagation model. The finite element method is employed for solving the governing equations of blood and wall. Our results suggest that there are two peaks in the circumferential stress and strain distributions of the normal model. The stress and strain values change with the varieties of different factors, such as wall thickness and vessel diameter. The results indicate that different parameters of fluid and tube wall have remarked impact on wall stress and deformation. PMID:26406044

  1. Wall stress and deformation analysis in a numerical model of pulse wave propagation.

    PubMed

    He, Fan; Hua, Lu; Gao, Lijian

    2015-01-01

    To simulate pulse wave propagation, we set up a wave propagation model using blood-wall interaction in previous work. In this paper, our purpose is to investigate wall stress and deformation of the wave propagation model. The finite element method is employed for solving the governing equations of blood and wall. Our results suggest that there are two peaks in the circumferential stress and strain distributions of the normal model. The stress and strain values change with the varieties of different factors, such as wall thickness and vessel diameter. The results indicate that different parameters of fluid and tube wall have remarked impact on wall stress and deformation.

  2. On the Design of Passive Resonant Circuits to Measure Local Pulse Wave Velocity in a Stent.

    PubMed

    Schächtele, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    In-stent restenosis is a frequent complication after stent implantation. This article investigates the design of a passive sensor system to be integrated into a stent for the detection of an in-stent restenosis by measuring the local pulse wave velocity (PWV). The proposed system uses two resonant circuits consisting of a capacitive pressure sensor and a coil as transponders. The pressure sensors are located at the proximal and distal end of the stent. An alternating external magnetic field with a constant frequency is applied such that the resonance frequencies of the transponders cross the excitation frequency when the pulse wave passes. The time delay between the resonances at the transponders can be captured to obtain the PWV. A model for the measurement system and a correlation between transponder design parameters and minimal resolvable time delay are derived. This correlation is based on the criterion that the 3 dB bandwidth of the transponder resonances may not overlap in the measurement time interval. This correlation can be used to design and analyze a transponder system for the proposed measurement system. In an experiment, in which the pressure sensors have been emulated by varactor diodes, it could be shown that the model is valid and that the criterion is suitable. Finally, the relevant design parameters of the transponders have been identified and their limitations investigated. PMID:26800547

  3. Smart photoplethysmographic sensor for pulse wave registration at different vascular depths.

    PubMed

    Leier, Mairo; Pilt, Kristjan; Karai, Deniss; Jervan, Gert

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a smart optical sensor for cardiovascular activity monitoring at different tissue layers. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a noninvasive optical technique for monitoring mainly blood volume changes in the examined tissue. However, different important physiological parameters, such as oxygen saturation, heart and breathing rate, dynamics of skin micro-circulation, vasomotion activity etc., can be extracted from the registered PPG signal. The developed sensor consists of 32 light emitting sources with four different wavelengths, which are located to the four different distances from four photo detectors. Compared to the existing sensors, the system enables to select the optimal LED (light emitting diode) and photo detector couple in order to obtain the pulse wave signal from the interested blood vessels with the highest possible signal to noise ratio. In this study, the designed PPG sensor was tested for the pulse wave registration from radial artery. The highest efficiency and signal to noise ratio was achieved using infrared LED (940 nm) and photo-diode pair. PMID:26736641

  4. On the Design of Passive Resonant Circuits to Measure Local Pulse Wave Velocity in a Stent.

    PubMed

    Schächtele, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    In-stent restenosis is a frequent complication after stent implantation. This article investigates the design of a passive sensor system to be integrated into a stent for the detection of an in-stent restenosis by measuring the local pulse wave velocity (PWV). The proposed system uses two resonant circuits consisting of a capacitive pressure sensor and a coil as transponders. The pressure sensors are located at the proximal and distal end of the stent. An alternating external magnetic field with a constant frequency is applied such that the resonance frequencies of the transponders cross the excitation frequency when the pulse wave passes. The time delay between the resonances at the transponders can be captured to obtain the PWV. A model for the measurement system and a correlation between transponder design parameters and minimal resolvable time delay are derived. This correlation is based on the criterion that the 3 dB bandwidth of the transponder resonances may not overlap in the measurement time interval. This correlation can be used to design and analyze a transponder system for the proposed measurement system. In an experiment, in which the pressure sensors have been emulated by varactor diodes, it could be shown that the model is valid and that the criterion is suitable. Finally, the relevant design parameters of the transponders have been identified and their limitations investigated.

  5. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects.

  6. A Distinguishing Arterial Pulse Waves Approach by Using Image Processing and Feature Extraction Technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsing-Chung; Kuo, Shyi-Shiun; Sun, Shen-Ching; Chang, Chia-Hui

    2016-10-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is based on five main types of diagnoses methods consisting of inspection, auscultation, olfaction, inquiry, and palpation. The most important one is palpation also called pulse diagnosis which is to measure wrist artery pulse by doctor's fingers for detecting patient's health state. In this paper, it is carried out by using a specialized pulse measuring instrument to classify one's pulse type. The measured pulse waves (MPWs) were segmented into the arterial pulse wave curve (APWC) by image proposing method. The slopes and periods among four specific points on the APWC were taken to be the pulse features. Three algorithms are proposed in this paper, which could extract these features from the APWCs and compared their differences between each of them to the average feature matrix, individually. These results show that the method proposed in this study is superior and more accurate than the previous studies. The proposed method could significantly save doctors a large amount of time, increase accuracy and decrease data volume. PMID:27562483

  7. Twenty-Four-Hour Ambulatory Pulse Wave Analysis in Hypertension Management: Current Evidence and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Omboni, Stefano; Posokhov, Igor N; Kotovskaya, Yulia V; Protogerou, Athanase D; Blacher, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    The predictive value of vascular biomarkers such as pulse wave velocity (PWV), central arterial pressure (CAP), and augmentation index (AIx), obtained through pulse wave analysis (PWA) in resting conditions, has been documented in a variety of patient groups and populations. This allowed to make appropriate recommendations in clinical practice guidelines of several scientific societies. Due to advances in technologies, largely operator-independent methods are currently available for estimating vascular biomarkers also in ambulatory conditions, over the 24 h. According to the acceptable accuracy and reproducibility of 24-h ambulatory PWA, it appears to be a promising tool for evaluating vascular biomarkers in daily life conditions. This approach may provide an opportunity to further improve the early cardiovascular screening in subjects at risk. However, concerning the clinical use of PWA over the 24 h in ambulatory conditions at the moment, there is no sufficient evidence to support its routine clinical use. In particular, long-term outcome studies are needed to show the predictive value of 24-h PWV, CAP, and AIx values, provided by these devices, over and beyond peripheral blood pressure, and to answer the many technical and clinical questions still open. To this regard, the VASOTENS Registry, an international observational prospective study recently started, will help providing answers on a large sample of hypertensive patients recruited worldwide. PMID:27659178

  8. Detection and analysis of multi-dimensional pulse wave based on optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yihui; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Chen, Haiyu

    2014-11-01

    Pulse diagnosis is an important method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Doctors diagnose the patients' physiological and pathological statuses through the palpation of radial artery for radial artery pulse information. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an useful tool for medical optical research. Current conventional diagnostic devices only function as a pressure sensor to detect the pulse wave - which can just partially reflect the doctors feelings and lost large amounts of useful information. In this paper, the microscopic changes of the surface skin above radial artery had been studied in the form of images based on OCT. The deformation of surface skin in a cardiac cycle which is caused by arterial pulse is detected by OCT. The patient's pulse wave is calculated through image processing. It is found that it is good consistent with the result conducted by pulse analyzer. The real-time patient's physiological and pathological statuses can be monitored. This research provides a kind of new method for pulse diagnosis of traditional Chinese medicine.

  9. The 24-hour pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index, and central blood pressure in normotensive volunteers.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Tatyana Y; Korneva, Viktoria A; Bryantseva, Evgeniya N; Barkan, Vitaliy S; Orlov, Artemy V; Posokhov, Igor N; Rogoza, Anatoly N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pulse wave velocity, aortic augmentation index corrected for heart rate 75 (AIx@75), and central systolic and diastolic blood pressure during 24-hour monitoring in normotensive volunteers. Overall, 467 subjects (206 men and 261 women) were recruited in this study. Participants were excluded from the study if they were less than 19 years of age, had blood test abnormalities, had a body mass index greater than 2 7.5 kg/m(2), had impaired glucose tolerance, or had hypotension or hypertension. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) with the BPLab(®) device was performed in each subject. ABPM waveforms were analyzed using the special automatic Vasotens(®) algorithm, which allows the calculation of pulse wave velocity, AIx@75, central systolic and diastolic blood pressure for "24-hour", "awake", and "asleep" periods. Circadian rhythms and sex differences in these indexes were identified. Pending further validation in prospective outcome-based studies, our data may be used as preliminary diagnostic values for the BPLab ABPM additional index in adult subjects. PMID:24812515

  10. POA 01-3 CAROTID-FEMORAL PULSE WAVE VELOCITY IS THE BEST BIOMECHANICAL MARKER FOR RISK PREDICTION.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Gary F

    2016-09-01

    Aortic stiffness increases markedly with advancing age and is associated with widening of pulse pressure, an increase in pulse wave velocity, earlier return of reflected waves to the proximal aorta and increased risk for target organ damage and adverse outcomes. Various measures of arterial stiffness and wave reflection have been proposed as potential surrogate measures of aortic stiffness. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is a direct measure of aortic wall stiffness that is easily measured with modest requirements for special equipment and training and has been shown to predict events and reclassify cardiovascular disease risk in models that include standard cardiovascular disease risk factors. Therefore, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has emerged as the best biomechanical marker for risk prediction. PMID:27643104

  11. Doppler echocardiography

    SciTech Connect

    Labovitz, A.J.; Williams, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors are successful in presenting a basic book on clinical quantitative Doppler echocardiography. It is not intended to be a comprehensive text, but it does cover clinical applications in a succinct fashion. Only the more common diseases in the adult are considered. The subjects are presented logically and are easy to comprehend. The illustrations are good, and the book is paperbound. The basic principles of Doppler echocardiography are presented briefly. The book ends with chapters on left ventricular function (stroke volume and cardiac output), congenital heart disease, and color Doppler echo-cardiography. There are numerous references and a good glossary and index.

  12. Duration of Diabetes Predicts Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity and Vascular Events in Alström Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jamie; Carey, Catherine; Barrett, Timothy; Campbell, Fiona; Maffei, Pietro; Marshall, Jan D.; Paisey, Christopher; Steeds, Richard P.; Edwards, Nicola C.; Bunce, Susan; Geberhiwot, Tarekegn

    2015-01-01

    Context: Alström syndrome is characterized by increased risk of cardiovascular disease from childhood. Objective: To explore the association between risk factors for cardiovascular disease, aortic pulse wave velocity, and vascular events in Alström syndrome. Design: Cross-sectional analyses with 5-year follow-up. Setting: The UK NHS nationally commissioned specialist clinics for Alström syndrome. Patients: Thirty-one Alström patients undertook vascular risk assessment, cardiac studies, and aortic pulse wave velocity measurement. Subsequent clinical outcomes were recorded. Interventions: Insulin resistance was treated with lifestyle intervention and metformin, and diabetes with the addition of glitazones, glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists, and/or insulin. Thyroid and T deficiencies were corrected. Dyslipidemia was treated with statins and nicotinic acid derivatives. Cardiomyopathy was treated with standard therapy as required. Main Outcome Measures: The associations of age, gender, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease with aortic pulse wave velocity were assessed and correlated with the effects of reduction in left ventricular function. Vascular events were monitored for 5 years. Results: Aortic pulse wave velocity was positively associated with the duration of diabetes (P = .001) and inversely with left ventricular ejection fraction (P = .036). Five of the cohort with cardiovascular events had higher aortic pulse wave velocity (P = .0247), and all had long duration of diabetes. Conclusions: Duration of diabetes predicted aortic pulse wave velocity in Alström syndrome, which in turn predicted cardiovascular events. This offers hope of secondary prevention because type 2 diabetes can be delayed or reversed by lifestyle interventions. PMID:26066530

  13. Evaluation of agreement between temporal series obtained from electrocardiogram and pulse wave.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leikan, GM; Rossi, E.; Sanz, MCuadra; Delisle Rodríguez, D.; Mántaras, MC; Nicolet, J.; Zapata, D.; Lapyckyj, I.; Siri, L. Nicola; Perrone, MS

    2016-04-01

    Heart rate variability allows to study the cardiovascular autonomic nervous system modulation. Usually, this signal is obtained from the electrocardiogram (ECG). A simpler method for recording the pulse wave (PW) is by means of finger photoplethysmography (PPG), which also provides information about the duration of the cardiac cycle. In this study, the correlation and agreement between the time series of the intervals between heartbeats obtained from the ECG with those obtained from the PPG, were studied. Signals analyzed were obtained from young, healthy and resting subjects. For statistical analysis, the Pearson correlation coefficient and the Bland and Altman limits of agreement were used. Results show that the time series constructed from the PW would not replace the ones obtained from ECG.

  14. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  15. Robust pulse wave velocity estimation by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Da; Ryan, Kathy L; Rickards, Caroline A; Zhang, Guanqun; Convertino, Victor A; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2010-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a marker of arterial stiffness and may permit continuous, non-invasive, and cuff-less monitoring of blood pressure. Here, robust PWV estimation was sought by application of system identification to proximal and distal arterial waveforms. In this approach, the system that optimally couples the proximal waveform to the distal waveform is identified, and the time delay of this system is then used to calculate PWV. To demonstrate proof-of-concept, a standard identification technique was applied to non-invasive impedance cardiography and peripheral arterial blood pressure waveforms from six humans subjected to progressive reductions in central blood volume induced by lower body negative pressure. This technique estimated diastolic pressure with an overall root-mean-squared-error of 5.2 mmHg. For comparison, the conventional detection method for estimating PWV yielded a corresponding error of 8.3 mmHg. PMID:21097042

  16. [Research of Electronic Sphygmomanometer Intelligent Aeration Based on Pulse Wave Identification].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Song, Xuedong; Gu, Jiajun; Ye, Jilun; Chen, Siping

    2015-03-01

    Through various common domestic and foreign electronic sphygmomanometers to test blood pressure, we find that when measuring high blood pressure or low blood pressure, there is a mismatch between the maximum inflation pressure and the blood pressure measurement, which often results in repeatedly inflating and deflating as well as the problem of high inflation pressure. In order to solve these problems and find a suitable maximum inflation pressure, two intelligent pneumatic solutions based on identifying of pulse wave are suggested and 700 groups of blood pressure experiments are done, then the two solutions are verified by experiments. The experiment proved that these solutions proposed have good stability and accuracy, they can solve the problems appeared in measuring blood pressure effectively, at the same time, the second solution that estimate the maximum inflation pressure during inflation is considered as the best one.

  17. Impact of type A behavior on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjian; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Zhang, Xiumin; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Luo, Yun; Maruyama, Mitsuya; Higa, Masaru; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2006-05-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the velocity of a pulse wave traveling a given distance between 2 sites in the arterial system, and is a well-known indicator of arteriosclerosis. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is a parameter more simple to obtain, compared with the conventional PWV, and is an easy and effective means of evaluating arteriosclerosis. BaPWV can be obtained by only wrapping the four extremities with blood pressure cuffs, and it can be easily used to screen a large number of subjects. Type A behavior has been confirmed as an independent risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. To examine the relationship between Type A behavior and arteriosclerosis, 307 normal Japanese subjects were classified into either a Type A group (n = 90) or a non-Type A group (n = 217) by using Maeda's Type A Scale. BaPWV was evaluated using a PWV diagnosis device. The baPWV in the Type A group was significantly higher than that obtained in the non-Type A group. The baPWV showed a positive correlation with age both in the Type A group and in the non-Type A group; however, the straight-line regression slope of baPWV versus age in the Type A group was significantly larger than that in the non-Type A group. Therefore, our results suggest that arteriosclerosis might be promoted earlier in subjects expressing the Type A behavior pattern. Type A behavior pattern is confirmed as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and may increase the risk of the cardiovascular disease related to arteriosclerosis.

  18. Blood pressure and obesity exert independent influences on pulse wave velocity in youth.

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Torro, Isabel; Garcia-Vicent, Consuelo; Alvarez, Julio; Fernández-Fornoso, José Antonio; Redon, Josep

    2012-08-01

    The objective was to analyze pulse wave velocity (PWV) in normotensive, high-normal, and hypertensive youths by using aortic-derived parameters from peripheral recordings. The impact of obesity on vascular phenotypes was also analyzed. A total of 501 whites from 8 to 18 years of age were included. The subjects were divided according to BP criteria: 424 (85%) were normotensive, 56 (11%) high-normal, and 21 (4%) hypertensive. Obesity was present in 284 (56%) and overweight in 138 (28%). Pulse wave analysis using a SphygmoCor device was performed to determine central blood pressure (BP), augmentation index, and measurement of PWV. Among the BP groups, differences appeared in age, sex, and height but not in body mass index. Significant differences in peripheral and central systolic and diastolic BPs and pulse pressures were observed within groups. A graded increase in PWV was present across the BP strata without differences in augmentation index. Using a multiple regression analysis, age, BP groups, and obesity status were independently associated with PWV. Older and hypertensive subjects had the highest PWV, whereas, from normal weight status to obesity, PWV decreased. Likewise, PWV was positively related to peripheral or central systolic BP and negatively related to body mass index z score. For 1 SD of peripheral systolic BP, PWV increased 0.329 m/s, and for 1 SD of body mass index z score PWV decreased 0.129 m/s. In conclusion, PWV is increased in hypertensive and even in high-normal children and adolescents. Furthermore, obesity, the factor most frequently related to essential hypertension in adolescents, blunted the expected increment in PWV of hypertensive and high-normal subjects.

  19. Ethnic Differences in and Childhood Influences on Early Adult Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maria J.; Molaodi, Oarabile R.; Enayat, Zinat E.; Cassidy, Aidan; Karamanos, Alexis; Read, Ursula M.; Faconti, Luca; Dall, Philippa; Stansfield, Ben; Harding, Seeromanie

    2016-01-01

    Early determinants of aortic stiffness as pulse wave velocity are poorly understood. We tested how factors measured twice previously in childhood in a multiethnic cohort study, particularly body mass, blood pressure, and objectively assessed physical activity affected aortic stiffness in young adults. Of 6643 London children, aged 11 to 13 years, from 51 schools in samples stratified by 6 ethnic groups with different cardiovascular risk, 4785 (72%) were seen again at aged 14 to 16 years. In 2013, 666 (97% of invited) took part in a young adult (21–23 years) pilot follow-up. With psychosocial and anthropometric measures, aortic stiffness and blood pressure were recorded via an upper arm calibrated Arteriograph device. In a subsample (n=334), physical activity was measured >5 days via the ActivPal. Unadjusted pulse wave velocities in black Caribbean and white UK young men were similar (mean±SD 7.9±0.3 versus 7.6±0.4 m/s) and lower in other groups at similar systolic pressures (120 mm Hg) and body mass (24.6 kg/m2). In fully adjusted regression models, independent of pressure effects, black Caribbean (higher body mass/waists), black African, and Indian young women had lower stiffness (by 0.5–0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.1–1.1 m/s) than did white British women (6.9±0.2 m/s). Values were separately increased by age, pressure, powerful impacts from waist/height, time spent sedentary, and a reported racism effect (+0.3 m/s). Time walking at >100 steps/min was associated with reduced stiffness (P<0.01). Effects of childhood waist/hip were detected. By young adulthood, increased waist/height ratios, lower physical activity, blood pressure, and psychosocial variables (eg, perceived racism) independently increase arterial stiffness, effects likely to increase with age. PMID:27141061

  20. Wearable sensor glove based on conducting fabric using electrodermal activity and pulse-wave sensors for e-health application.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngbum; Lee, Byungwoo; Lee, Myoungho

    2010-03-01

    Improvement of the quality and efficiency of health in medicine, both at home and the hospital, calls for improved sensors that might be included in a common carrier such as a wearable sensor device to measure various biosignals and provide healthcare services that use e-health technology. Designed to be user-friendly, smart clothes and gloves respond well to the end users for health monitoring. This study describes a wearable sensor glove that is equipped with an electrodermal activity (EDA) sensor, pulse-wave sensor, conducting fabric, and an embedded system. The EDA sensor utilizes the relationship between drowsiness and the EDA signal. The EDA sensors were made using a conducting fabric instead of silver chloride electrodes, as a more practical and practically wearable device. The pulse-wave sensor measurement system, which is widely applied in oriental medicinal practices, is also a strong element in e-health monitoring systems. The EDA and pulse-wave signal acquisition module was constructed by connecting the sensor to the glove via a conductive fabric. The signal acquisition module is then connected to a personal computer that displays the results of the EDA and pulse-wave signal processing analysis and gives accurate feedback to the user. This system is designed for a number of applications for the e-health services, including drowsiness detection and oriental medicine.

  1. Doppler velocity measurements from large and small arteries of mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Madala, Sridhar; Entman, Mark L.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Taffet, George E.

    2011-01-01

    With the growth of genetic engineering, mice have become increasingly common as models of human diseases, and this has stimulated the development of techniques to assess the murine cardiovascular system. Our group has developed nonimaging and dedicated Doppler techniques for measuring blood velocity in the large and small peripheral arteries of anesthetized mice. We translated technology originally designed for human vessels for use in smaller mouse vessels at higher heart rates by using higher ultrasonic frequencies, smaller transducers, and higher-speed signal processing. With these methods one can measure cardiac filling and ejection velocities, velocity pulse arrival times for determining pulse wave velocity, peripheral blood velocity and vessel wall motion waveforms, jet velocities for the calculation of the pressure drop across stenoses, and left main coronary velocity for the estimation of coronary flow reserve. These noninvasive methods are convenient and easy to apply, but care must be taken in interpreting measurements due to Doppler sample volume size and angle of incidence. Doppler methods have been used to characterize and evaluate numerous cardiovascular phenotypes in mice and have been particularly useful in evaluating the cardiac and vascular remodeling that occur following transverse aortic constriction. Although duplex ultrasonic echo-Doppler instruments are being applied to mice, dedicated Doppler systems are more suitable for some applications. The magnitudes and waveforms of blood velocities from both cardiac and peripheral sites are similar in mice and humans, such that much of what is learned using Doppler technology in mice may be translated back to humans. PMID:21572013

  2. 24-h ambulatory recording of aortic pulse wave velocity and central systolic augmentation: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Luzardo, Leonella; Lujambio, Inés; Sottolano, Mariana; da Rosa, Alicia; Thijs, Lutgarde; Noboa, Oscar; Staessen, Jan A; Boggia, José

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the feasibility of ambulatory pulse wave analysis by comparing this approach with an established tonometric technique. We investigated 35 volunteers (45.6 years; 51.0% women) exclusively at rest (R study) and 83 volunteers (49.9 years; 61.4% women) at rest and during daytime (1000-2000 h) ambulatory monitoring (R+A study). We recorded central systolic (cSP), diastolic (cDP) and pulse (cPP) pressures, augmentation index (cAI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) by brachial oscillometry (Mobil-O-Graph 24h PWA Monitor) and radial tonometry (SphygmoCor). We applied the Bland and Altman's statistics. In the R study, tonometric and oscillometric estimates of cSP (105.6 vs. 106.9 mm Hg), cDP (74.6 vs. 74.7 mm Hg), cPP (31.0 vs. 32.1 mm Hg), cAI (21.1 vs. 20.6%) and PWV (7.3 vs. 7.0 m s(-1)) were similar (P0.11). In the R+A study, tonometric vs. oscillometric assessment yielded similar values for cSP (115.4 vs. 113.9 mm Hg; P=0.19) and cAI (26.5 vs. 25.3%; P=0.54), but lower cDP (77.8 vs. 81.9 mm Hg; P<0.0001), so that cPP was higher (37.6 vs. 32.1 mm Hg; P<0.0001). PWV (7.9 vs. 7.4 m s(-1)) was higher (P=0.0002) on tonometric assessment. The differences between tonometric and oscillometric estimates increased (P0.004) with cSP (r=0.37), cAI (r=0.39) and PWV (r=0.39), but not (P0.17) with cDP (r=0.15) or cPP (r=0.13). Irrespective of measurement conditions, brachial oscillometry compared with an established tonometric method provided similar estimates for cSP and systolic augmentation, but slightly underestimated PWV. Pending further validation, ambulatory assessment of central hemodynamic variables is feasible.

  3. Pulse wave detection method based on the bio-impedance of the wrist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jianman; Wang, Mengjun; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    The real-time monitoring of pulse rate can evaluate the heart health to some extent, and the measurement of bio-impedance has the potential in wearable health monitoring system. In this paper, an effective method, which contains self-balancing bridge, flexible electrode, and high-speed digital lock-in algorithm (DLIA) with over-sampling, was designed to detect the impedance pulse wave at the wrist. By applying the self-balancing bridge, the basic impedance can be compensated as much as possible, and the low amplitude of impedance variation related to heart pulse can be obtained more easily. And the flexible conductive rubber electrode used in our experiment is human-friendly. Besides, the over-sampling method and high-speed DLIA are used to enhance the effective resolution of the existing data sampled by analog to digital converter. With the high-speed data process and simple circuit above, this proposed method has the potential in wrist-band wearable systems and it can satisfy quests of small volume and low power consumption.

  4. Sister chromatid exchanges in mouse after exposure to pulse-wave ultrasound in utero.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Y; Takabayashi, T; Sasaki, H; Ozawa, N; Yajima, A

    1993-06-01

    The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) was investigated in mice after a ten min exposure, in vivo, to 2 MHz focused, pulse-wave ultrasound with a pulse repetition rate of 1000 Hz, pulse duration of 10 microseconds. The bone marrow cells of the pregnant female mice and the fetal liver cells were analyzed. The cell cycle specific metaphase patterns were additionally evaluated. In the bone marrow cells, the mean frequencies of SCEs were 2.77 in control, 3.56 in the cells exposed to ultrasound at 586.2 mW/cm2 (spatial average temporal average, SATA); in the fetal liver cells, 2.64 in control, 3.84 in the cells exposed. The frequencies of SCEs significantly were increased by the treatment. Faster cell kinetics was observed in fetal liver cells than bone marrow cells of pregnant female. But there was no cell-growth inhibitory effect of ultrasound on both bone marrow and fetal liver cells. In fetal liver cells, the critical acoustic power was 160.0-278.9 mW/cm2 (SATA).

  5. Using pulsed wave ultrasound to evaluate the suitability of hydroxyl radical scavengers in sonochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Diaz-Rivera, David; He, Ziqi; Weavers, Linda K

    2013-05-01

    Hydroxyl radical (()OH) scavengers are commonly used in sonochemistry to probe the site and nature of reaction in aqueous cavitational systems. Using pulsed wave (PW) ultrasound with comparative sonochemistry we evaluated the performance of ()OH scavengers (i.e., formic acid, carbonic acid, terephthalic acid/terephthalate, iodide, methanesulfonate, benzenesulfonate, and acetic acid/acetate) in a sonochemical system to determine which ()OH scavengers react only in bulk solution and which ()OH scavengers interact with cavitation bubbles. The ability of each scavenger to interact with cavitation bubbles was assessed by comparing the pulse enhancement (PE) of 10μM of a probe compound, carbamazepine (CBZ), in the presence and absence of a scavenger. Based on PE results, acetic acid/acetate appears to scavenge ()OH in bulk solution, and not interact with cavitation bubbles. Methanesulfonate acts as reaction promoter, increasing rather than inhibiting the degradation of CBZ. For formic acid, carbonic acid, terephthalic acid/terephthalate, benzenesulfonate, and iodide, the PE was significantly decreased compared to in the absence of the scavenger. These scavengers not only quench ()OH in bulk solution but also affect the cavity interface. The robustness of acetic acid/acetate as a bulk ()OH scavenger was validated for pH values between 3.5 and 8.9 and acetic acid/acetate concentrations from 0.5 to 0.1M.

  6. Metabolomic study of carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity in women

    PubMed Central

    Menni, Cristina; Mangino, Massimo; Cecelja, Marina; Psatha, Maria; Brosnan, Mary J.; Trimmer, Jeff; Mohney, Robert P.; Chowienczyk, Phil; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Spector, Tim D.; Valdes, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is a measure of aortic stiffness that is strongly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of the current study was to identify the molecular markers and the pathways involved in differences in PWV in women, in order to further understand the regulation of arterial stiffening. Methods: A total of 280 known metabolites were measured in 1797 female twins (age range: 18–84 years) not on any antihypertensive medication. Metabolites associated with PWV (after adjustment for age, BMI, metabolite batch, and family relatedness) were entered into a backward linear regression. Transcriptomic analyses were further performed on the top compounds identified. Results: Twelve metabolites were associated with PWV (P < 1.8 × 10−4). One of the most strongly associated metabolites was uridine, which was not associated with blood pressure (BP) and traditional risk factors but correlated significantly with the gene-expression levels of the purinergic receptor P2RY2 (Beta = −0.010, SE = 0.003, P = 0.007), suggesting that it may play a role in regulating endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation. On the other hand, phenylacetylglutamine was strongly associated with both PWV and BP. Conclusion: Circulating levels of uridine, phenylacetylglutamine, and serine appear strongly correlated with PWV in women. PMID:25490711

  7. Investigating the effect of glucose on aortic pulse wave velocity using pancreatic clamping methodology.

    PubMed

    Puzantian, Houry; Teff, Karen; Townsend, Raymond R

    2015-05-01

    Aortic stiffness, determined by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), independently predicts cardiovascular outcomes. Recent studies suggest that glucose levels influence arterial stiffness indices. It is not clear, however, whether glucose affects cfPWV independently of glucoregulatory hormones. The aim of this study was to utilize a pancreatic clamping approach to determine whether plasma glucose independently predicts cfPWV. Healthy participants (N = 10) underwent pancreatic clamping to control glucose at varying concentrations using a 20% dextrose infusion while suppressing endogenous glucagon, insulin, and growth hormone by octreotide and replacing the hormones intravenously to achieve basal concentrations. Tonometric cfPWV, blood pressure, heart rate, plasma glucose, glucagon, insulin, growth hormone, and vasoactive biomarkers were measured. Plasma glucose levels of 150 mg/dl at 1 hr and 200 mg/dl at 2 hr postbaseline were achieved. There were no significant changes in cfPWV (5.8 m/s at 0 hr, 5.9 m/s at 1 hr, and 5.9 m/s at 2 hr) with increased glucose levels. There were small increases in insulin secretion. A definitive role for glucose in cfPWV modulation was not determined; there is a potential role for insulin as a cfPWV modulator. Continued efforts in clarifying the independent roles of glucose and insulin can elucidate novel vessel-related targets for cardiovascular disease prevention and management in patients with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes.

  8. Reference Values of Pulse Wave Velocity in Healthy People from an Urban and Rural Argentinean Population

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Alejandro; Galli, Cintia; Tringler, Matías; Ramírez, Agustín; Cabrera Fischer, Edmundo Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    In medical practice the reference values of arterial stiffness came from multicenter registries obtained in Asia, USA, Australia and Europe. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the gold standard method for arterial stiffness quantification; however, in South America, there are few population-based studies. In this research PWV was measured in healthy asymptomatic and normotensive subjects without history of hypertension in first-degree relatives. Normal PWV and the 95% confidence intervals values were obtained in 780 subjects (39.8 ± 18.5 years) divided into 7 age groups (10–98 years). The mean PWV found was 6.84 m/s ± 1.65. PWV increases linearly with aging with a high degree of correlation (r2 = 0.61; P < 0.05) with low dispersion in younger subjects. PWV progressively increases 6–8% with each decade of life; this tendency is more pronounced after 50 years. A significant increase of PWV over 50 years was demonstrated. This is the first population-based study from urban and rural people of Argentina that provides normal values of the PWV in healthy, normotensive subjects without family history of hypertension. Moreover, the age dependence of PWV values was confirmed. PMID:25215227

  9. Pulse wave detection method based on the bio-impedance of the wrist.

    PubMed

    He, Jianman; Wang, Mengjun; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    The real-time monitoring of pulse rate can evaluate the heart health to some extent, and the measurement of bio-impedance has the potential in wearable health monitoring system. In this paper, an effective method, which contains self-balancing bridge, flexible electrode, and high-speed digital lock-in algorithm (DLIA) with over-sampling, was designed to detect the impedance pulse wave at the wrist. By applying the self-balancing bridge, the basic impedance can be compensated as much as possible, and the low amplitude of impedance variation related to heart pulse can be obtained more easily. And the flexible conductive rubber electrode used in our experiment is human-friendly. Besides, the over-sampling method and high-speed DLIA are used to enhance the effective resolution of the existing data sampled by analog to digital converter. With the high-speed data process and simple circuit above, this proposed method has the potential in wrist-band wearable systems and it can satisfy quests of small volume and low power consumption.

  10. Photoplethysmography beyond perfusion and oxygenation monitoring: Pulse wave analysis for hepatic graft monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography is a widely used technique in monitoring perfusion and blood oxygen saturation by using the amplitude of the pulsatile signal on one or multiple wavelengths. However, the pulsatile signal carries in its waveform a substantial amount of information about the mechanical properties of the tissue and vasculature under investigation that is still yet to be utilized to its full potential. In this work, we present the feasibility of pulse wave analysis for the application of monitoring hepatic implants and diagnosing graft complications. In particular, we show the possibility of computing the slope of the pulse during the diastole phase to assess the location of vascular complications when they take place. This hypothesis was tested in a series of in vitro experiments using a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical and mechanical properties of the portal vein. The emptying time of the vessel increased from 305 ms to 515 ms when an occlusion was induced downstream from the phantom. However, in the case of upstream occlusions, the emptying time remained constant. In both cases, a decrease in the amplitude of the pulse was recorded indicating the drop in flow levels. In addition, we show that quantifying the emptying time of the vasculature under investigation can be used to assess its compliance. The emptying time decreased from 305 ms for phantoms with compliance of 15 KPa to 195 ms for phantoms with compliance of 100 KPa. These compliance levels mimic those seen for normal and fibrotic hepatic tissue respectively.

  11. Applicability of the polynomial chaos expansion method for personalization of a cardiovascular pulse wave propagation model.

    PubMed

    Huberts, W; Donders, W P; Delhaas, T; van de Vosse, F N

    2014-12-01

    Patient-specific modeling requires model personalization, which can be achieved in an efficient manner by parameter fixing and parameter prioritization. An efficient variance-based method is using generalized polynomial chaos expansion (gPCE), but it has not been applied in the context of model personalization, nor has it ever been compared with standard variance-based methods for models with many parameters. In this work, we apply the gPCE method to a previously reported pulse wave propagation model and compare the conclusions for model personalization with that of a reference analysis performed with Saltelli's efficient Monte Carlo method. We furthermore differentiate two approaches for obtaining the expansion coefficients: one based on spectral projection (gPCE-P) and one based on least squares regression (gPCE-R). It was found that in general the gPCE yields similar conclusions as the reference analysis but at much lower cost, as long as the polynomial metamodel does not contain unnecessary high order terms. Furthermore, the gPCE-R approach generally yielded better results than gPCE-P. The weak performance of the gPCE-P can be attributed to the assessment of the expansion coefficients using the Smolyak algorithm, which might be hampered by the high number of model parameters and/or by possible non-smoothness in the output space. PMID:25377937

  12. Pulse Wave Velocity at Early Adulthood: Breastfeeding and Nutrition during Pregnancy and Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gigante, Denise Petrucci; de Barros, Fernando Celso Lopes Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an early marker of arterial stiffness. Low birthweight, infant feeding and childhood nutrition have been associated with cardiovascular disease in adulthood. In this study, we evaluated the association of PWV at 30 years of age with birth condition and childhood nutrition, among participants of the 1982 Pelotas birth cohort. Methods In 1982, the hospital births in Pelotas, southern Brazil, were identified just after delivery. Those liveborn infants whose family lived in the urban area of the city were examined and have been prospectively followed. At 30 years of age, we tried to follow the whole cohort and PWV was assessed in 1576 participants. Results Relative weight gain from 2 to 4 years was positively associated with PWV. Regarding nutritional status in childhood, PWV was higher among those whose weight-for-age z-score at 4 years was >1 standard deviation above the mean. On the other hand, height gain, birthweight and duration of breastfeeding were not associated with PWV. Conclusion Relative weight gain after 2 years of age is associated with increased PWV, while birthweight and growth in the first two years of life were not associated. These results suggest that the relative increase of weight later in childhood is associated with higher cardiovascular risk. PMID:27073916

  13. Study of characteristic point identification and preprocessing method for pulse wave signals.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Tang, Ning; Jiang, Guiping

    2015-02-01

    Characteristics in pulse wave signals (PWSs) include the information of physiology and pathology of human cardiovascular system. Therefore, identification of characteristic points in PWSs plays a significant role in analyzing human cardiovascular system. Particularly, the characteristic points show personal dependent features and are easy to be affected. Acquiring a signal with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and integrity is fundamentally important to precisely identify the characteristic points. Based on the mathematical morphology theory, we design a combined filter, which can effectively suppress the baseline drift and remove the high-frequency noise simultaneously, to preprocess the PWSs. Furthermore, the characteristic points of the preprocessed signal are extracted according to its position relations with the zero-crossing points of wavelet coefficients of the signal. In addition, the differential method is adopted to calibrate the position offset of characteristic points caused by the wavelet transform. We investigated four typical PWSs reconstructed by three Gaussian functions with tunable parameters. The numerical results suggested that the proposed method could identify the characteristic points of PWSs accurately. PMID:25997292

  14. Numerical modeling of the pulse wave propagation in large blood vessels based on liquid and wall interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rup, K.; Dróżdż, A.

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to develop a non-linear, one-dimensional model of pulse wave propagation in the arterial cardiovascular system. The model includes partial differential equations resulting from the balance of mass and momentum for the fluid-filled area and the balance equation for the area of the wall and vessels. The considered mathematical model of pulse wave propagation in the thoracic aorta section takes into account the viscous dissipation of fluid energy, realistic values of parameters describing the physicochemical properties of blood and vessel wall. Boundary and initial conditions contain the appropriate information obtained from in vivo measurements. As a result of the numerical solution of the mass and momentum balance equations for the blood and the equilibrium equation for the arterial wall area, time- dependent deformation, respective velocity profiles and blood pressure were determined.

  15. FSI Simulations of Pulse Wave Propagation in Human Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: The Effects of Sac Geometry and Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han; Lin, Kexin; Shahmirzadi, Danial

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to quantify the effects of geometry and stiffness of aneurysms on the pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation in fluid–solid interaction (FSI) simulations of arterial pulsatile flow. Spatiotemporal maps of both the wall displacement and fluid velocity were generated in order to obtain the pulse wave propagation through fluid and solid media, and to examine the interactions between the two waves. The results indicate that the presence of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac and variations in the sac modulus affect the propagation of the pulse waves both qualitatively (eg, patterns of change of forward and reflective waves) and quantitatively (eg, decreasing of PWV within the sac and its increase beyond the sac as the sac stiffness increases). The sac region is particularly identified on the spatiotemporal maps with a region of disruption in the wave propagation with multiple short-traveling forward/reflected waves, which is caused by the change in boundary conditions within the saccular region. The change in sac stiffness, however, is more pronounced on the wall displacement spatiotemporal maps compared to those of fluid velocity. We conclude that the existence of the sac can be identified based on the solid and fluid pulse waves, while the sac properties can also be estimated. This study demonstrates the initial findings in numerical simulations of FSI dynamics during arterial pulsations that can be used as reference for experimental and in vivo studies. Future studies are needed to demonstrate the feasibility of the method in identifying very mild sacs, which cannot be detected from medical imaging, where the material property degradation exists under early disease initiation. PMID:27478394

  16. Performance assessment of Pulse Wave Imaging using conventional ultrasound in canine aortas ex vivo and normal human arteries in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ronny X.; Qaqish, William; Konofagou, Elisa. E.

    2015-01-01

    The propagation behavior of the arterial pulse wave may provide valuable diagnostic information for cardiovascular pathology. Pulse Wave Imaging (PWI) is a noninvasive, ultrasound imaging-based technique capable of mapping multiple wall motion waveforms along a short arterial segment over a single cardiac cycle, allowing for the regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) and propagation uniformity to be evaluated. The purpose of this study was to improve the clinical utility of PWI using a conventional ultrasound system. The tradeoff between PWI spatial and temporal resolution was evaluated using an ex vivo canine aorta (n = 2) setup to assess the effects of varying image acquisition and signal processing parameters on the measurement of the PWV and the pulse wave propagation uniformity r2. PWI was also performed on the carotid arteries and abdominal aortas of 10 healthy volunteers (24.8 ± 3.3 y.o.) to determine the waveform tracking feature that would yield the most precise PWV measurements and highest r2 values in vivo. The ex vivo results indicated that the highest precision for measuring PWVs ~ 2.5 – 3.5 m/s was achieved using 24–48 scan lines within a 38 mm image plane width (i.e. 0.63 – 1.26 lines/mm). The in vivo results indicated that tracking the 50% upstroke of the waveform would consistently yield the most precise PWV measurements and minimize the error in the propagation uniformity measurement. Such findings may help establish the optimal image acquisition and signal processing parameters that may improve the reliability of PWI as a clinical measurement tool. PMID:26640603

  17. Alterations in pulse wave propagation reflect the degree of outflow tract banding in HH18 chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Liang; Goenezen, Sevan; Haller, Stephen; Hinds, Monica T.; Thornburg, Kent L.

    2013-01-01

    Hemodynamic conditions play a critical role in embryonic cardiovascular development, and altered blood flow leads to congenital heart defects. Chicken embryos are frequently used as models of cardiac development, with abnormal blood flow achieved through surgical interventions such as outflow tract (OFT) banding, in which a suture is tightened around the heart OFT to restrict blood flow. Banding in embryos increases blood pressure and alters blood flow dynamics, leading to cardiac malformations similar to those seen in human congenital heart disease. In studying these hemodynamic changes, synchronization of data to the cardiac cycle is challenging, and alterations in the timing of cardiovascular events after interventions are frequently lost. To overcome this difficulty, we used ECG signals from chicken embryos (Hamburger-Hamilton stage 18, ∼3 days of incubation) to synchronize blood pressure measurements and optical coherence tomography images. Our results revealed that, after 2 h of banding, blood pressure and pulse wave propagation strongly depend on band tightness. In particular, while pulse transit time in the heart OFT of control embryos is ∼10% of the cardiac cycle, after banding (35% to 50% band tightness) it becomes negligible, indicating a faster OFT pulse wave velocity. Pulse wave propagation in the circulation is likewise affected; however, pulse transit time between the ventricle and dorsal aorta (at the level of the heart) is unchanged, suggesting an overall preservation of cardiovascular function. Changes in cardiac pressure wave propagation are likely contributing to the extent of cardiac malformations observed in banded hearts. PMID:23709601

  18. Pulse wave analysis in a 180-degree curved artery model: Implications under physiological and non-physiological inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressures, pulse pressures, and left ventricular hypertrophy contribute to cardiovascular risks. Increase of arterial stiffness due to aging and hypertension is an important factor in cardiovascular, chronic kidney and end-stage-renal-diseases. Pulse wave analysis (PWA) based on arterial pressure wave characteristics, is well established in clinical practice for evaluation of arterial distensibility and hypertension. The objective of our exploratory study in a rigid 180-degree curved artery model was to evaluate arterial pressure waveforms. Bend upstream conditions were measured using a two-component, two-dimensional, particle image velocimeter (2C-2D PIV). An ultrasonic transit-time flow meter and a catheter with a MEMS-based solid state pressure sensor, capable of measuring up to 20 harmonics of the observed pressure waveform, monitored flow conditions downstream of the bend. Our novel continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2), in addition to detecting coherent secondary flow structures is used to evaluate arterial pulse wave characteristics subjected to physiological and non-physiological inflows. Results of this study will elucidate the utility of wavelet transforms in arterial function evaluation and pulse wave speed. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  19. Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiac Output vs. Heart Rate in Patients with an Implanted Pacemaker Based on Electric Impedance Method Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, Ladislav; Vondra, Vlastimil; Viščor, Ivo; Jurák, Pavel; Halámek, Josef

    2013-04-01

    The methods and device for estimation of cardiac output and measurement of pulse wave velocity simultaneously is presented here. The beat-to-beat cardiac output as well as pulse wave velocity measurement is based on application of electrical impedance method on the thorax and calf. The results are demonstrated in a study of 24 subjects. The dependence of pulse wave velocity and cardiac output on heart rate during rest in patients with an implanted pacemaker was evaluated. The heart rate was changed by pacemaker programming while neither exercise nor drugs were applied. The most important result is that the pulse wave velocity, cardiac output and blood pressure do not depend significantly on heart rate, while the stroke volume is reciprocal proportionally to the heart rate.

  20. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity is negatively correlated with aortic diameter.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Davies, Jennifer M; Griffin, Kathryn J; Bridge, Katherine I; Johnson, Anne B; Sohrabi, Soroush; Baxter, Paul D; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-10-01

    Cardiovascular events pose significant morbidity and mortality burden to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) patients. Arterial stiffness as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. We investigated the relationship between aortic diameter and PWV. Consecutive patients with AAA were invited to participate. Patients completed a health questionnaire, received aortic ultrasound and carotid-femoral PWV (cfPWV) recordings with a Vicorder. Thirty patients were used for reproducibility assessment. A linear regression model was used to identify significant predictors of cfPWV. Observer variation was assessed using Bland and Altman analysis and the intraclass correlation coefficient. Three hundred and nine patients were included-148 with AAA and 161 controls. The mean difference for repeated cfPWV between observers was 0.11 ms(-1). cfPWV was positively correlated with age (r=0.24, P<0.001) and systolic blood pressure (r=0.29, P<0.001) and negatively correlated with aortic diameter (r=-0.15, P=0.008). There was no difference in cfPWV between AAA and control groups (9.75±2.3 ms(-1) vs. 9.55±2.3 ms(-1), P=0.43). Aortic diameter (P=0.003) and systolic blood pressure (P<0.001) were significant predictors of cfPWV independent of age, aspirin usage and a history of myocardial infarction. Patients with large AAA (>5 cm) had decreased cfPWV compared with patients with small AAA (P=0.02) or normal diameter aorta (P=0.02). Vicorder measurements of cfPWV are repeatable. cfPWV is negatively associated with infra-renal aortic diameter and reduced in large AAA. cfPWV is likely invalid for accurate arterial stiffness assessment in patients with AAA owing to the apparent confounding effect of aortic size.

  1. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity as a predictor of mortality in elderly Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Li, Li-Hua; Huang, Qi-Fang; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Ming; Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Ge-Le; Song, Jie; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-11-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness and predicts cardiovascular events and mortality in the general population and various patient populations. In the present study, we investigated the predictive value of brachial-ankle PWV for mortality in an elderly Chinese population. Our study subjects were older (≥60 years) persons living in a suburban town of Shanghai. We measured brachial-ankle PWV using an automated cuff device at baseline and collected vital information till June 30, 2013, during follow-up. The 3876 participants (1713 [44.2%] men; mean [±SD] age, 68.1±7.3 years) included 2292 (59.1%) hypertensive patients. PWV was on average 17.8 (±4.0) m/s and was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with age (r=0.48) and in unadjusted analysis with all-cause (n=316), cardiovascular (n=148), stroke (n=46), and noncardiovascular mortality (n=168) during a median follow-up of 5.9 years. In further adjusted analysis, we studied the risk of mortality according to the decile distributions of PWV. Only the subjects in the top decile (23.3-39.3 m/s) had a significantly (P≤0.003) higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio relative to the whole study population, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.08), especially in hypertensive patients (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-2.64; P=0.02 for the interaction between PWV and hypertension). Similar trends were observed for cardiovascular, stroke, and noncardiovascular mortality, although statistical significance was not reached (P≥0.08). In conclusion, brachial-ankle PWV predicts mortality in elderly Chinese on the conditions of markedly increased PWV and hypertension.

  2. Platelet to Lymphocyte Percentage Ratio Is Associated With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Su, Ho-Ming; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-02-01

    Increased arterial stiffness in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) is highly prevalent and is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In HD, inflammation is one of the major causes of increased arterial stiffness. Activation of platelets and decreased lymphocyte percentage (LYMPH%) may exhibit inflammation. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between platelet to LYMPH% ratio and arterial stiffness in HD patients.A total of 220 patients receiving HD were enrolled in this study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using an ankle-brachial index form device. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relations of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio and baPWV. The value of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio was 59.2 ± 33.3 (10 cells/L/%). After multivariate stepwise analysis, diabetes (β: 163.973, P = 0.02), high systolic blood pressure (per 1 mm Hg, β: 9.010, P < 0.001), high platelet to LYMPH% ratio (per 10 cells/L/%, β: 3.334, P < 0.01), and low albumin (per 0.1 mg/dL, β: -55.912, P < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased baPWV. Furthermore, high white blood cells (per 10 cells/L, β: 3.941, P < 0.001), high neutrophil percentage (per 1%, β: 1.144, P < 0.001), and high CRP (per 1 mg/L, β: 9.161, P = 0.03) were independently associated with an increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio.An increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio is associated with an increased baPWV in HD patients. An easy and inexpensive laboratory measure of platelet to LYMPH% ratio may provide an important information regarding arterial stiffness in patients with HD. PMID:26871812

  3. Improved Pulse Wave Velocity Estimation Using an Arterial Tube-Load Model

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mingwu; Zhang, Guanqun; Olivier, N. Bari; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2015-01-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most important index of arterial stiffness. It is conventionally estimated by non-invasively measuring central and peripheral blood pressure (BP) and/or velocity (BV) waveforms and then detecting the foot-to-foot time delay between the waveforms wherein wave reflection is presumed absent. We developed techniques for improved estimation of PWV from the same waveforms. The techniques effectively estimate PWV from the entire waveforms, rather than just their feet, by mathematically eliminating the reflected wave via an arterial tube-load model. In this way, the techniques may be more robust to artifact while revealing the true PWV in absence of wave reflection. We applied the techniques to estimate aortic PWV from simultaneously and sequentially measured central and peripheral BP waveforms and simultaneously measured central BV and peripheral BP waveforms from 17 anesthetized animals during diverse interventions that perturbed BP widely. Since BP is the major acute determinant of aortic PWV, especially under anesthesia wherein vasomotor tone changes are minimal, we evaluated the techniques in terms of the ability of their PWV estimates to track the acute BP changes in each subject. Overall, the PWV estimates of the techniques tracked the BP changes better than those of the conventional technique (e.g., diastolic BP root-mean-squared-errors of 3.4 vs. 5.2 mmHg for the simultaneous BP waveforms and 7.0 vs. 12.2 mmHg for the BV and BP waveforms (p < 0.02)). With further testing, the arterial tube-load model-based PWV estimation techniques may afford more accurate arterial stiffness monitoring in hypertensive and other patients. PMID:24263016

  4. Arterial pulse wave velocity, inflammatory markers, pathological GH and IGF states, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael R; Evans, Peter; Davies, Bruce; Baker, Julien S

    2008-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) measurements provide information regarding risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, but only in a specific artery. Arterial stiffness (AS) can be determined by measurement of arterial pulse wave velocity (APWV). Separate from any role as a surrogate marker, AS is an important determinant of pulse pressure, left ventricular function and coronary artery perfusion pressure. Proximal elastic arteries and peripheral muscular arteries respond differently to aging and to medication. Endogenous human growth hormone (hGH), secreted by the anterior pituitary, peaks during early adulthood, declining at 14% per decade. Levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) are at their peak during late adolescence and decline throughout adulthood, mirror imaging GH. Arterial endothelial dysfunction, an accepted cause of increased APWV in GH deficiency (GHD) is reversed by recombinant human (rh) GH therapy, favorably influencing the risk for atherogenesis. APWV is a noninvasive method for measuring atherosclerotic and hypertensive vascular changes increases with age and atherosclerosis leading to increased systolic blood pressure and increased left ventricular hypertrophy. Aerobic exercise training increases arterial compliance and reduces systolic blood pressure. Whole body arterial compliance is lowered in strength-trained individuals. Homocysteine and C-reactive protein are two inflammatory markers directly linked with arterial endothelial dysfunction. Reviews of GH in the somatopause have not been favorable and side effects of treatment have marred its use except in classical GHD. Is it possible that we should be assessing the combined effects of therapy with rhGH and rhIGF-I? Only multiple intervention studies will provide the answer. PMID:19337549

  5. Aortic pulse wave velocity predicts focal white matter hyperintensities in a biracial cohort of older adults.

    PubMed

    Rosano, Caterina; Watson, Nora; Chang, Yuefang; Newman, Anne B; Aizenstein, Howard J; Du, Yan; Venkatraman, Vijay; Harris, Tamara B; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Although the cross-sectional relationship of arterial stiffness with cerebral small vessel disease is consistently shown in middle-aged and young-old adults, it is less clear whether these associations remain significant over time in very old adults. We hypothesize that arterial stiffness is longitudinally associated with white matter characteristics, and associations are stronger within watershed areas. Neuroimaging was obtained in 2006-2008 from 303 elderly (mean age 82.9 years, 59% women, 41% black) with pulse wave velocity (PWV) measures in 1997-1998. Multivariable regression models estimated the coefficients for PWV (cm/sec) in relationship to presence, severity, and spatial distribution of white matter hyperintensities (WMH), gray matter volume, and fractional anisotropy from diffusion tensor, adjusting for demographic, cardiovascular risk factors, and diseases from 1997-1998 to 2006-2008. Higher PWV in 1997-1998 was associated with greater WMH volume in 2006-2008 within the left superior longitudinal fasciculus (age and total brain WMH adjusted, P=0.023), but not with WMH in other tracts or with fractional anisotropy or gray matter volume from total brain (P>0.2). Associations were stronger in blacks than in whites, remaining significant in fully adjusted models. Elderly with WMH in tracts related to processing speed and memory are more likely to have had higher PWV values 10 years prior, before neuroimaging data being available. Future studies should address whether arterial stiffness can serve as an early biomarker of covert brain structural abnormalities and whether early arterial stiffness control can promote successful brain aging, especially in black elderly.

  6. Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity: Impact of Different Arterial Path Length Measurements.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Jun; Hayashi, Koichiro; Yokoi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2010-03-01

    BACKGROUND: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the most established index of arterial stiffness. Yet there is no consensus on the methodology in regard to the arterial path length measurements conducted on the body surface. Currently, it is not known to what extent the differences in the arterial path length measurements affect absolute PWV values. METHODS: Two hundred fifty apparently healthy adults (127 men and 123 women, 19-79 years) were studied. Carotid-femoral PWV was calculated using (1) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites (PWV(car-fem)), (2) the straight distance between suprasternal notch and femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV((ssn-fem)-(ssn-car))), (3) the straight distance between carotid and femoral sites minus carotid arterial length (PWV((car-fem)-(ssn-car))), and (4) the combined distance from carotid site to the umbilicus and from the umbilicus to femoral site minus carotid arterial length (PWV((ssn-umb-fem)-(ssn-car))). RESULTS: All the calculated PWV were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.966-0.995). PWV accounting for carotid arterial length were 16-31% lower than PWV(car-fem). PWV(car-fem) value of 12 m/sec corresponded to 8.3 m/sec for PWV((ssn-fem)-(ssn-car)), 10.0 m/sec for PWV((car-fem)-(ssn-car)), and 8.9 m/sec for PWV((ssn-umb-fem)-(ssn-car)). CONCLUSION: Different body surface measurements used to estimate arterial path length would produce substantial variations in absolute PWV values.

  7. Increased Pulse Wave Velocity Reflecting Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Colorectal Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Kwack, Won Gun; Lee, Youg-Sup; Hahm, Ki Baik; Kim, Young-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    The obese patients with diabetes or cardiovascular risk factors are associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer as well as adenomas under the shared pathogenesis related to atherosclerosis. Here we determined the association between increased arterial stiffness and colorectal adenomas incorporating parameters including age, gender, waist circumference, body mass index, lipid profiles, fasting glucose, and blood pressure. Subjects who simultaneously underwent colonoscopies and pulse wave velocity (PWV) determinations between July 2005 and September 2006 were analyzed, based on which the subjects were classified into two groups as patients group with colorectal adenomas (n = 49) and control group (n = 200) with normal, non-polypoid benign lesions or hyperplastic polyps. Uni- and multi-variate analyses were performed to calculate the odd ratio for colon adenomas. Based on uni-variate analysis, age, waist circumference, body mass index, heart-femoral PWV (hfPWV), and brachial-ankle PWV were significantly associated with adenomas (p<0.05) and multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the heart-femoral PWV, waist circumference, and the levels of LDL-C were significant risk factor for colorectal adenoma. However, arterial stiffness did not affect the progression of colon adenoma. The finding that hfPWV, reflecting aortic stiffness, was increased in patients with colorectal adenomas lead to conclusion that patients who have prominently increased arterial stiffness can be recommended to undergo colonoscopic examinations and at the same time we also recommend counseling about the risk for atherosclerosis in those who have colorectal adenomas. PMID:21103036

  8. Assessment of Model Based (Input) Impedance, Pulse Wave Velocity, and Wave Reflection in the Asklepios Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Parragh, Stephanie; Mayer, Christopher; Weber, Thomas; Van Bortel, Luc; De Buyzere, Marc; Segers, Patrick; Rietzschel, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Arterial stiffness and wave reflection parameters assessed from both invasive and non-invasive pressure and flow readings are used as surrogates for ventricular and vascular load. They have been reported to predict adverse cardiovascular events, but clinical assessment is laborious and may limit widespread use. This study aims to investigate measures of arterial stiffness and central hemodynamics provided by arterial tonometry alone and in combination with aortic root flows derived by echocardiography against surrogates derived by a mathematical pressure and flow model in a healthy middle-aged cohort. Methods Measurements of carotid artery tonometry and echocardiography were performed on 2226 ASKLEPIOS study participants and parameters of systemic hemodynamics, arterial stiffness and wave reflection based on pressure and flow were measured. In a second step, the analysis was repeated but echocardiography derived flows were substituted by flows provided by a novel mathematical model. This was followed by a quantitative method comparison. Results All investigated parameters showed a significant association between the methods. Overall agreement was acceptable for all parameters (mean differences: -0.0102 (0.033 SD) mmHg*s/ml for characteristic impedance, 0.36 (4.21 SD) mmHg for forward pressure amplitude, 2.26 (3.51 SD) mmHg for backward pressure amplitude and 0.717 (1.25 SD) m/s for pulse wave velocity). Conclusion The results indicate that the use of model-based surrogates in a healthy middle aged cohort is feasible and deserves further attention. PMID:26513463

  9. Relationship between global pulse wave velocity and diastolic dysfunction in postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Palmiero, Pasquale; Maiello, Maria; Daly, David D; Zito, Annapaola; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Nanda, Navin C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Global aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVg) is a simple, accurate, and noninvasive method to determine large artery stiffness. The goal of our study was to investigate the relationship between PWVg, LV mass, and diastolic function in postmenopausal women. Patients and method: We screened 321 consecutive women with echocardiographic examination to determine PWVg. LV diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) and LV hypertrophy (LVH) were diagnosed according to ASE (American Society Echocardiography) Guidelines. Results: The mean age of the 321 women studied was 59.9 years of age with 20 percent of the women menstruate and 80 percent post-menopausal. Amongst the post-menopausal women, 168 patients had LVDD (66.7%), 127 had mild diastolic dysfunction, 40 had moderate diastolic dysfunction, and 1had severe diastolic dysfunction. In these post-menopausal patients with diastolic dysfunction, 89.3% had an increased PWVg while 10.7% had a normal PWVg which was highly statistically significant (p < 0.001). The patients with a normal PWVg all had mild diastolic dysfunction. Increased left atrial volume indexed for body surface area was present in only 19 women, 12 of whom had LVDD and 14 increased PWVg, but statistical analysis was not performed due to the low number of women affected. There was no statistically significant difference in age between postmenopausal women with and without increased PWVg. Conclusion: In our population of postmenopausal women, we observed a strong relationship between LVDD and LVH with PWVg. Our study supports the usefulness of assessment of aortic stiffness as a marker of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25664082

  10. Determination of aortic pulse wave velocity from waveform decomposition of the central aortic pressure pulse.

    PubMed

    Qasem, Ahmed; Avolio, Alberto

    2008-02-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), calculated from pulse transit time (PTT) using 2 separate pulse recordings over a known distance, is a significant biomarker of cardiovascular risk. This study evaluates a novel method of determining PTT from waveform decomposition of central aortic pressure using a single pulse measurement. Aortic pressure was estimated from a transformed radial pulse and decomposed into forward and backward waves using a triangular flow wave. Pulse transit time was determined from cross-correlation of forward and backward waves. Pulse transit time, representing twice the PTT between 2 specific sites, was compared with independent measurements of carotid-femoral PTT in a cohort of 46 subjects (23 females; age 57+/-14 years). Linear regression between measured PTT (y; milliseconds) and calculated PTT (x; milliseconds) was y=1.05x-2.1 (r=0.67; P<0.001). This model was tested in a separate group of 44 subjects (21 females; age 55+/-14 years) by comparing measured carotid-femoral PWV (y; meters per second) and PWV calculated using the estimated value of PTT (eTR/2) and carotid femoral distance (x; meters per second; y=1.21x-2.5; r=0.82; P<0.001). Findings indicate that the time lag between the forward and backward waves obtained from the decomposition of aortic pressure wave can be used to determine PWV along the aortic trunk and shows good agreement with carotid-femoral PWV. This technique can be used as a noninvasive and nonintrusive method for measurement of aortic PWV using a single pressure recording.

  11. Left ventricular function by echocardiography, tissue Doppler imaging, and carotid intima-media thickness in obese adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ahmet; Aypar, Ebru; Pirgon, Ozgur; Yilmaz, Hakan; Odabas, Dursun; Tolu, Ismet

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function in obese adolescents with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) using conventional echocardiography and pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging and to investigate the relations between LV function and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT). LV remodeling, tissue Doppler-derived LV velocities, and cardiovascular risk profiles in obese adolescents with NAFLD were also studied. One hundred eighty obese adolescents and 68 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. LV end-diastolic and end-systolic and left atrial diameters and LV mass were higher in the 2 obese groups compared with controls. By pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography and pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging, the NAFLD group had normal LV systolic function, impaired diastolic function, and altered global systolic and diastolic myocardial performance. In patients with NAFLD, LV mass was positively correlated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and serum alanine aminotransferase. CIMT was positively correlated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, alanine aminotransferase, and LV mass. By multiple stepwise regression analysis, alanine aminotransferase (β = 0.124, p = 0.026), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (β = 0.243, p = 0.0001), LV mass (β = 0.874, p = 0.0001) were independent parameters associated with increased CIMT. In conclusion, insulin resistance has a significant independent impact on CIMT and LV remodeling in the absence of diabetes in patients with NAFLD. Pulsed-wave tissue Doppler imaging is suggested to detect LV dysfunction at an earlier stage in obese adolescents with NAFLD for careful monitoring of cardiovascular risk. PMID:23642511

  12. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Raptis, A.C.

    1981-11-13

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  13. Pulse wave velocity is associated with muscle mass decline: Health ABC study.

    PubMed

    Abbatecola, Angela Marie; Chiodini, Paolo; Gallo, Ciro; Lakatta, Edward; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Tylavsky, Frances A; Goodpaster, Bret; de Rekeneire, Natalie; Schwartz, Ann V; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Harris, Tamara

    2012-04-01

    Age-related mechanisms that lead to sarcopenia are not entirely understood. Basal leg blood flow declines with aging by augmented sympathetic vasoconstriction and arterial stiffening, thus a dysfunction in blood vessel dynamics may have an independent role on sarcopenia. We determined whether pulse wave velocity (PWV), marker of arterial stiffness, was associated with skeletal muscle decline. Observational cohort study of older adults(70-79 years) living in Pittsburgh, PA, USA or Memphis, TN, USA. Analyses included 2,405 participants. Correlations among muscle parameters including skeletal muscle density and intermuscular adipose tissue using mid-thigh CT scans were assessed. Linear mixed models tested the association between the change in the sarcopenic index (SI) (assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry) over time and baseline PWV independently of multiple confounders. SI was defined: appendicular lean mass/squared height and calculated at every follow-up (n = 6). Baseline PWV was significantly higher in black women compared to white women (930 ± 431 vs. 843 ± 366; p = 0.0001), while there were no significant differences between black and white men (943 ± 402 vs. 911 ± 375; p = 0.1786). Baseline analyses showed an independent negative association between PWV and muscle parameters after adjusting for confounders in both genders. The PWV-by-race interaction was significant in women and analyses are reported separately by race. Prospective mixed models showed that PWV was an independent determinant of the SI in all men (β = -0.1043; p = 0.0065) and in white women (β = -0.1091; p = 0.0192). In analyses examining the effect of arterial stiffness on limb lean mass over time, PWV correlated with lower leg (β = -0.2196; p = 0.0002)and arm mass (β = -0.0985; p = 0.0011) in all men and lower leg mass(β = -0.1608; p = 0.0027)in white women. In older persons, arterial stiffening is associated with skeletal muscle mass decline differently for race and

  14. Comparison of pulse wave velocity assessed by three different techniques: Arteriograph, Complior, and Echo-tracking.

    PubMed

    Mihalcea, Diana J; Florescu, Maria; Suran, Berenice M C; Enescu, Oana A; Mincu, Raluca I; Magda, Stefania; Patrascu, Natalia; Vinereanu, Dragos

    2016-04-01

    Arterial stiffness estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although recommended by the current guidelines, clinical applicability of this parameter is difficult, due to differences between the various techniques used to measure it and to biological variability. Our aim was to compare PWV assessed by 3 different commercially available systems. 100 subjects (51 ± 16 years, 45 men) were evaluated using the 3 methods: an oscillometric technique (Arteriograph, PWV-A); a piezo-electric method (Complior, PWV-C); and an high-resolution ultrasound technique implemented with an Echo-tracking system (Aloka, PWV-E). Conventional biological markers were measured. Correlations of PWV measured by the 3 methods were poor (r = 0.39, r = 0.39, and r = 0.31 for PWV-A vs. PWV-C, PWV-A vs. PWV-E, and PWV-C vs. PWV-E, respectively, all p < 0.05). By Bland-Altman analysis, mean difference (±SD) of PWV-A vs. PWV-C was -1.9 ± 2.0 m/s, of PWV-A vs. PWV-E -3.6 ± 1.9 m/s, and of PWV-C vs. PWV-E -2.7 ± 1.9 m/s, with a wide coefficient of variation (22.3, 25.7, and 25.7 %, respectively). As expected, PWV-A, PWV-C, and PWV-E correlated with other arterial stiffness parameters, such as intima-media thickness (r = 0.22, r = 0.22, and r = 0.36, respectively), E p (r = 0.37, r = 0.26, and r = 0.94, respectively), and augmentation index measured by Arteriograph method (r = 0.66, r = 0.35, and r = 0.26, respectively); all p < 0.05. Assessment of PWV is markedly dependent on the technique used to measure it, related to various methods for measuring traveled distance of the arterial wave. Our results suggest the urgent need to establish reference values of PWV for each of these techniques, separately, to be used in routine clinical practice.

  15. Peak velocity overestimation and linear-array spectral Doppler.

    PubMed

    Eicke, B M; Kremkau, F W; Hinson, H; Tegeler, C H

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasound instruments are used to evaluate blood flow velocities in the human body. Most clinical instruments perform velocity calculations based on the Doppler principle and measure the frequency shift of a reflected ultrasound beam. Doppler-only instruments use single-frequency, single-crystal transducers. Linear- and annular-array multiple-crystal transducers are used for duplex scanning (simultaneous B-mode image and Doppler). Clinical interpretation relies primarily on determination of peak velocities or frequency shifts as identified by the Doppler spectrum. Understanding of the validity of these measurements is important for instruments in clinical use. The present study examined the accuracy with which several ultrasound instruments could estimate velocities based on the identification of the peak of the Doppler spectrum, across a range of different angles of insonation, on a Doppler string phantom. The string was running in a water tank at constant speeds of 50, 100, and 150 cm/sec and also in a sine wave pattern at 100- or 150-cm/sec amplitude. Angles of insonation were 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees. The single-frequency, single-crystal transducers (PC Dop 842, 2-MHz pulsed-wave, 4-MHz continuous-wave) provided acceptably accurate velocity estimates at all tested velocities independent of the angle of insonation. All duplex Doppler instruments with linear-array transducers (Philips P700, 5.0-MHz; Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1000, 7.5-MHz; ATL Ultramark 9 HDI, 7.5-MHz) exhibited a consistent overestimation of the true flow velocity due to increasing intrinsic spectral broadening with increasing angle of insonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. In vivo measurement of local aortic pulse-wave velocity in mice with MR microscopy at 17.6 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Herold, Volker; Parczyk, Marco; Mörchel, Philipp; Ziener, Christian H; Klug, Gert; Bauer, Wolfgang R; Rommel, Eberhard; Jakob, Peter M

    2009-06-01

    Transgenic mouse models of human diseases have gained increasing importance in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). As an indirect measure of vascular stiffness, aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is an important predictor of cardiovascular risk. This study presents an MRI approach that uses a flow area method to estimate local aortic pulse-wave velocity at different sites in the murine aorta. By simultaneously measuring the cross-sectional area and the through-plane velocity with a phase-contrast CINE method, it was possible to measure average values for the PWV in the ascending and descending aorta within the range of 2.4-4.3 m/s for C57BL/6J mice (ages 2 and 8 months) and apoE-knockout mice (age 8 months). Statistically significant differences of the mean values of the PWV of both groups could be determined. By repeating CINE measurements with a time delay of 1 ms between two subsequent data sets, an effective temporal resolution of 1000 frames/s (fps) could be achieved.

  17. Measurement of spatial pulse wave velocity by using a clip-type pulsimeter equipped with a Hall sensor and photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Woo-Beom; Hong, You-Sik; Lee, Sang-Suk

    2013-04-09

    A prototype of a clip-type pulsimeter equipped with a magnetic field-sensing semiconductor Hall sensor was developed. It has a permanent magnet attached in the "Chwan" position to the center of a radial artery. The clip-type pulsimeter is composed of a hardware system measuring voltage signals. To measure spatial pulse wave velocity (SPWV), the signal from the radial artery pulsimeter and that from the photoplethysmography (PPG) were simultaneously compared. The pulse wave data from a clinical test of 39 clinical participants (male:female = 25:14) with a mean age of 24.36 (±2.35) years was analyzed. The mean SPWV, which was simultaneously measured from the radial artery pulsimeter and PPG, was 0.8 m/s. We suggest the SPWV results were higher for men than women, because of the better vascularity of terminal tissue in men. The findings of this research may be useful for developing a biomedical signal storage device for a U-health-care system.

  18. Hyperemia-Related Changes in Arterial Stiffness: Comparison between Pulse Wave Velocity and Stiffness Index in the Vascular Reactivity Assessment.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Bia, Daniel; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Farro, Federico; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2012-01-01

    Carotid-to-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV(cr)) has been proposed to evaluate endothelial function. However, the measurement of PWV(cr) is not without limitations. A new simple approach could have wide application. Stiffness index (SI) is obtained by analysis of the peripheral pulse wave and gives reproducible information about stiffness of large arteries. This study assessed the effects of hyperemia on SI and compared it with PWV(cr) in 14 healthy subjects. Both were measured at rest and during 8 minutes after ischemia. SI temporal course was determined. At 1 minute, SI and PWV(cr) decreased (5.58 ± 0.24 to 5.34 ± 0.23 m/s, P < 0.05; 7.8 ± 1.0 to 7.2 ± 0.9 m/s; P < 0.05, resp.). SI was positively related to PWV(cr) in baseline (r = 0.62 , P < 0.05), at 1 minute (r = 0.79, P < 0.05), and during the whole experimental session (r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusion. Hyperemia significantly decreases SI in healthy subjects. SI was related to PWV(cr) and could be used to facilitate the evaluation of hyperemia-related changes in arterial stiffness.

  19. Investigations of spectral resolution and angle dependency in a 2-D tracking Doppler method.

    PubMed

    Fredriksen, Tonje D; Avdal, Jorgen; Ekroll, Ingvild K; Dahl, Torbjorn; Lovstakken, Lasse; Torp, Hans

    2014-07-01

    An important source of error in velocity measurements from conventional pulsed wave (PW) Doppler is the angle used for velocity calibration. Because there are great uncertainties and interobserver variability in the methods used for Doppler angle correction in the clinic today, it is desirable to develop new and more robust methods. In this work, we have investigated how a previously presented method, 2-D tracking Doppler, depends on the tracking angle. A signal model was further developed to include tracking along any angle, providing velocity spectra which showed good agreement with both experimental data and simulations. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) bandwidth and the peak value of predicted power spectra were calculated for varying tracking angles. It was shown that the spectra have lowest bandwidth and maximum power when the tracking angle is equal to the beam-to-flow angle. This may facilitate new techniques for velocity calibration, e.g., by manually adjusting the tracking angle, while observing the effect on the spectral display. An in vitro study was performed in which the Doppler angles were predicted by the minimum FWHM and the maximum power of the 2-D tracking Doppler spectra for 3 different flow angles. The estimated Doppler angles had an overall error of 0.24° ± 0.75° when using the minimum FWHM. With an in vivo example, it was demonstrated that the 2-D tracking Doppler method is suited for measurements in a patient with carotid stenosis.

  20. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity.

  1. Effect of viscosity on the wave propagation: Experimental determination of compression and expansion pulse wave velocity in fluid-fill elastic tube.

    PubMed

    Stojadinović, Bojana; Tenne, Tamar; Zikich, Dragoslav; Rajković, Nemanja; Milošević, Nebojša; Lazović, Biljana; Žikić, Dejan

    2015-11-26

    The velocity by which the disturbance travels through the medium is the wave velocity. Pulse wave velocity is one of the main parameters in hemodynamics. The study of wave propagation through the fluid-fill elastic tube is of great importance for the proper biophysical understanding of the nature of blood flow through of cardiovascular system. The effect of viscosity on the pulse wave velocity is generally ignored. In this paper we present the results of experimental measurements of pulse wave velocity (PWV) of compression and expansion waves in elastic tube. The solutions with different density and viscosity were used in the experiment. Biophysical model of the circulatory flow is designed to perform measurements. Experimental results show that the PWV of the expansion waves is higher than the compression waves during the same experimental conditions. It was found that the change in viscosity causes a change of PWV for both waves. We found a relationship between PWV, fluid density and viscosity. PMID:26454712

  2. The velocity of the arterial pulse wave: a viscous-fluid shock wave in an elastic tube

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Page R

    2008-01-01

    Background The arterial pulse is a viscous-fluid shock wave that is initiated by blood ejected from the heart. This wave travels away from the heart at a speed termed the pulse wave velocity (PWV). The PWV increases during the course of a number of diseases, and this increase is often attributed to arterial stiffness. As the pulse wave approaches a point in an artery, the pressure rises as does the pressure gradient. This pressure gradient increases the rate of blood flow ahead of the wave. The rate of blood flow ahead of the wave decreases with distance because the pressure gradient also decreases with distance ahead of the wave. Consequently, the amount of blood per unit length in a segment of an artery increases ahead of the wave, and this increase stretches the wall of the artery. As a result, the tension in the wall increases, and this results in an increase in the pressure of blood in the artery. Methods An expression for the PWV is derived from an equation describing the flow-pressure coupling (FPC) for a pulse wave in an incompressible, viscous fluid in an elastic tube. The initial increase in force of the fluid in the tube is described by an increasing exponential function of time. The relationship between force gradient and fluid flow is approximated by an expression known to hold for a rigid tube. Results For large arteries, the PWV derived by this method agrees with the Korteweg-Moens equation for the PWV in a non-viscous fluid. For small arteries, the PWV is approximately proportional to the Korteweg-Moens velocity divided by the radius of the artery. The PWV in small arteries is also predicted to increase when the specific rate of increase in pressure as a function of time decreases. This rate decreases with increasing myocardial ischemia, suggesting an explanation for the observation that an increase in the PWV is a predictor of future myocardial infarction. The derivation of the equation for the PWV that has been used for more than fifty years is

  3. Ultrafast Doppler reveals the mapping of cerebral vascular resistivity in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Demené, Charlie; Pernot, Mathieu; Biran, Valérie; Alison, Marianne; Fink, Mathias; Baud, Olivier; Tanter, Mickaël

    2014-01-01

    In vivo mapping of the full vasculature dynamics based on Ultrafast Doppler is showed noninvasively in the challenging case of the neonatal brain. Contrary to conventional pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler Ultrasound limited for >40 years to the estimation of vascular indices at a single location, the ultrafast frame rate (5,000 Hz) obtained using plane-wave transmissions leads to simultaneous estimation of full Doppler spectra in all pixels of wide field-of-view images within a single cardiac cycle and high sensitivity Doppler imaging. Consequently, 2D quantitative maps of the cerebro-vascular resistivity index (RI) are processed and found in agreement with local measurements obtained on large arteries of healthy neonates using conventional PW Doppler. Changes in 2D resistivity maps are monitored during recovery after therapeutic whole-body cooling of full-term neonates treated for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. Arterial and venous vessels are unambiguously differentiated on the basis of their distinct hemodynamics. The high spatial (250 × 250 μm2) and temporal resolution (<1 ms) of Ultrafast Doppler imaging combined with deep tissue penetration enable precise quantitative mapping of deep brain vascular dynamics and RI, which is far beyond the capabilities of any other imaging modality. PMID:24667916

  4. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever fivemore » minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.« less

  5. DOPPLER WEATHER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Gary J.

    2002-08-05

    The SRS Doppler Weather System consists of a Doppler Server, A Master Server (also known as the Weather Server), several Doppler Slave Servers, and client-side software program called the Doppler Radar Client. This system is used to display near rel-time images taken from the SRS Weather Center's Doppler Radar computer. The Doppler Server is software that resides on the SRS Doppler Computer. It gathers raw data, 24-bit color weather images via screen scraping ever five minutes as requested by the Master Server. The Doppler Server then reduces the 24-bit color images to 8-bit color using a fixed color table for analysis and compression. This preserves the fidelity of the image color and arranges the colors in specific order for display. At the time of color reduction, the white color used for the city names on the background images are remapped to a different index (color) of white that the white on the weather scale. The Weather Server places a time stamp on the image, then compresses the image and passes it to all Doppler Slave servers. Each of the Doppler Slave servers mainitain a circular buffer of the eight most current images representing the last 40 minutes of weather data. As a new image is added, the oldest drops off. The Doppler Radar Client is an optional install program for any site-wide workstation. When a Client session is started, the Client requests Doppler Slave server assignment from the Master Server. Upon its initial request to the Slave Server, the Client obtains all eight current images and maintains its own circular buffer, updating its images every five minutes as the Doppler Slave is updated. Three background reference images are stored as part of the Client. The Client brings up the appropriate background image, decompresses the doppler data, and displays the doppler data on the background image.

  6. Stimulated acoustic emission: pseudo-Doppler shifts seen during the destruction of nonmoving microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, K; Pohl, C; Schlosser, T; Goenechea, J; Bruce, M; Veltmann, C; Kuntz, S; Bangard, M; Becher, H

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the appearance and the characteristics of stimulated acoustic emission (SAE) as an echo contrast-specific color Doppler phenomenon with impact on myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE). Stationary microbubbles of the new contrast agent SH-U 563A (Schering AG) were embedded within a tissue-mimicking gel material. Harmonic power Doppler imaging (H-PDI), color Doppler and pulse-wave Doppler data were acquired using an HDI-5000 equipped with a phased-array transducer (1.67/3.3 MHz). In color Doppler mode, bubble destruction resulted in random noise like Doppler signals. PW-Doppler revealed short "pseudo-Doppler" shifts with a broadband frequency spectrum. Quantification of SAE events by H-PDI demonstrated an exponential decay of signal intensities over successive frames. A strong linear relationship was found between bubble concentration and the square root of the linearized H-PDI signal for a range of concentrations of more than two orders of magnitude (R = 0.993, p < 0.0001). Intensity of the H-PDI signals correlated well with emission power (R = 0.96, p = 0.0014). SAE results from disintegration of microbubbles and can be demonstrated by all Doppler imaging modalities, including H-PDI. Intensity of SAE signals is influenced by the applied acoustic power and correlates highly with the concentration of microbubbles. Because intensity of SAE signals correlates highly with echo contrast concentrations, analysis of SAE signals might be used for quantitative MCE. PMID:11053751

  7. Christian Doppler and the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toman, Kurt

    1984-04-01

    A summary is given of Doppler's life and career. He was born 180 years ago on November 29, 1803, in Salzburg, Austria. He died on March 17, 1853 in Venice. The effect bearing his name was first announced in a presentation before the Royal Bohemian Society of the Sciences in Prague on May 25, 1842. Doppler considered his work a generalization of the aberration theorem as discovered by Bradley. With it came the inference that the perception of physical phenomena can change with the state of motion of the observer. Acceptance of the principle was not without controversy. In 1852, the mathematician Petzval claimed that no useful scientific deductions can be made from Doppler's elementary equations. In 1860, Ernst Mach resolved the misunderstanding that clouded this controversy. The Doppler effect is alive and well. Its role in radio science and related disciplines is enumerated.

  8. Advanced Doppler tracking experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The Doppler tracking method is currently the only technique available for broadband gravitational wave searches in the approx. 10(exp -4) to 10(exp -1) Hz low frequency band. A brief review is given of the Doppler method, a discussion of the main noise sources, and a review of experience with current spacecraft and the prospects for sensitivity improvements in an advanced Doppler tracking experiment.

  9. Advances in Doppler OCT

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    We review the principle and some recent applications of Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT). The advances of the phase-resolved Doppler OCT method are described. Functional OCT algorithms which are based on an extension of the phase-resolved scheme are also introduced. Recent applications of Doppler OCT for quantification of flow, imaging of microvasculature and vocal fold vibration, and optical coherence elastography are briefly discussed. PMID:24443649

  10. Pulse wave myelopathy: An update of an hypothesis highlighting the similarities between syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Grant A

    2015-12-01

    Most hypotheses trying to explain the pathophysiology of idiopathic syringomyelia involve mechanisms whereby CSF is pumped against a pressure gradient, from the subarachnoid space into the cord parenchyma. On review, these theories have universally failed to explain the disease process. A few papers have suggested that the syrinx fluid may originate from the cord capillary bed itself. However, in these papers, the fluid is said to accumulate due to impaired fluid drainage out of the cord. Again, there is little evidence to substantiate this. This proffered hypothesis looks at the problem from the perspective that syringomyelia and normal pressure hydrocephalus are almost identical in their manifestations but only differ in their site of effect within the neuraxis. It is suggested that the primary trigger for syringomyelia is a reduction in the compliance of the veins draining the spinal cord. This reduces the efficiency of the pulse wave dampening, occurring within the cord parenchyma, increasing arteriolar and capillary pulse pressure. The increased capillary pulse pressure opens the blood-spinal cord barrier due to a direct effect upon the wall integrity and interstitial fluid accumulates due to an increased secretion rate. An increase in arteriolar pulse pressure increases the kinetic energy within the cord parenchyma and this disrupts the cytoarchitecture allowing the fluid to accumulate into small cystic regions in the cord. With time the cystic regions coalesce to form one large cavity which continues to increase in size due to the ongoing interstitial fluid secretion and the hyperdynamic cord vasculature.

  11. The effect of workplace smoking bans on heart rate variability and pulse wave velocity of non-smoking hospitality workers

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bauer, Georg F.; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Moeller, Alexander; Röösli, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of a change in second hand smoke (SHS) exposure on heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), this study utilized a quasi-experimental setting when a smoking ban was introduced. Methods HRV, a quantitative marker of autonomic activity of the nervous system, and PWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, were measured in 55 non-smoking hospitality workers before and 3 to 12 months after a smoking ban and compared to a control group that did not experience an exposure change. SHS exposure was determined with a nicotine specific badge and expressed as inhaled cigarette equivalents per day (CE/d). Results PWV and HRV parameters significantly changed in a dose dependent manner in the intervention group compared to the control group. A one CE/d decrease was associated with a 2.3% (95% CI: 0.2, 4.4; p=0.031) higher root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), a 5.7 % (95% CI: 0.9, 10.2; p=0.02) higher high frequency component and a 0.72% (95 % CI: 0.40–1.05; p<0.001) lower PWV. Conclusions PWV and HRV significantly improved after introducing smoke-free workplaces indicating a decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:24504155

  12. Change in Pulse Wave Velocity and Short-Term Development of Cardiovascular Events in the Hemodialysis Population.

    PubMed

    Korjian, Serge; Daaboul, Yazan; El-Ghoul, Balsam; Samad, Salam; Salameh, Pascale; Dahdah, Georges; Hariri, Essa; Mansour, Anthony; Spielman, Kathryn; Blacher, Jacques; Safar, Michel E; Bahous, Sola Aoun

    2016-09-01

    The association between single measurements of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) and cardiovascular (CV) events is driven by late events beyond 12 months of follow-up. This prospective study compares single measurements of cfPWV vs the 2-year delta cfPWV and the association with short-term development of CV events in hemodialysis patients. cfPWV was performed at t=0 and t=1 two years later, and patients were followed-up for development of CV events through 12 months (n=66). In Cox regression models adjusted for CV risk factors, history of CV events and delta cfPWV remained associated with the development of CV events (hazard ratio for prior CV events=8.9, P=.03; hazard ratio for delta cfPWV=1.14; P=.002). When delta cfPWV was substituted for single cfPWV measurement, none of the single measures were associated with new CV events. The change in cfPWV, but not single measurements of cfPWV, was associated with the development of CV events through 12 months.

  13. Evaluation of arterial stiffness with plasma GGT levels and pulse wave velocity measurement in patients with FMF

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Filiz; Ulu, Sena; Akcı, Önder; Ahsen, Ahmet; Demir, Kasım; Yüksel, Şeref

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a non-invasive technique used to evaluate the arterial elasticity, which is an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Lately, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) is considered a determiner of arterial stiffness (AS). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between GGT levels and AS with PWV in patients with Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Material and Methods The study was conducted with 60 patients with FMF and 40 controls. Genetic analysis of the patients were performed. AS was assessed by PWV and, after the measurement of PWV, the presence of AS was determined. Results Mean PWV values and AS frequency were significantly higher in patients with FMF compared with the control group (p<0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). Mean GGT levels of FMF patients were higher than in the control group but the difference was not statistically different. In the correlation analysis, PWV and AS were positively correlated with FMF (r=0349, p<0.001; r=0.435, p<0.001, respectively). FMF duration and FMF were associated with GGT (r=0.300, p=0.02; r=0199, p=0.047, respectively). Conclusion Increased PWV values in FMF patients may indicate arterial stiffness. These patients may be followed closely with PWV as an early indicator of atherosclerosis. Therefore, the cardiovascular risk can be determined in the early stages of disease and it may be possible to take necessary precautions. PMID:27708864

  14. Doppler and Zeeman Doppler Imaging of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochukhov, Oleg

    In this chapter we discuss the problem of reconstructing two-dimensional stellar surface maps from the variability of intensity and/or polarisation profiles of spectral lines. We start by outlining the main principles of the scalar Doppler imaging problem concerned with recovering maps of chemical spots, temperature or brightness from the intensity spectra. After presenting the physical and mathematical foundations of this remote sensing method, we review its applications to mapping different types of spots in early-type chemically peculiar and late-type active stars, and non-radial pulsations in early-type stars. We also discuss an extension of Doppler imaging to the problem of recovering vector distributions of stellar magnetic fields from spectropolarimetric observations and review applications of this Zeeman Doppler imaging technique in the context of stellar magnetism studies.

  15. Experimental study on the pressure and pulse wave propagation in viscoelastic vessel tubes-effects of liquid viscosity and tube stiffness.

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Yuki; Nishi, Shohei; Komagata, Yuka; Saito, Masashi; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Asada, Takaaki; Matsukawa, Mami

    2013-11-01

    A pulse wave is the displacement wave which arises because of ejection of blood from the heart and reflection at vascular bed and distal point. The investigation of pressure waves leads to understanding the propagation characteristics of a pulse wave. To investigate the pulse wave behavior, an experimental study was performed using an artificial polymer tube and viscous liquid. A polyurethane tube and glycerin solution were used to simulate a blood vessel and blood, respectively. In the case of the 40 wt% glycerin solution, which corresponds to the viscosity of ordinary blood, the attenuation coefficient of a pressure wave in the tube decreased from 4.3 to 1.6 dB/m because of the tube stiffness (Young's modulus: 60 to 200 kPa). When the viscosity of liquid increased from approximately 4 to 10 mPa·s (the range of human blood viscosity) in the stiff tube, the attenuation coefficient of the pressure wave changed from 1.6 to 3.2 dB/m. The hardening of the blood vessel caused by aging and the increase of blood viscosity caused by illness possibly have opposite effects on the intravascular pressure wave. The effect of the viscosity of a liquid on the amplitude of a pressure wave was then considered using a phantom simulating human blood vessels. As a result, in the typical range of blood viscosity, the amplitude ratio of the waves obtained by the experiments with water and glycerin solution became 1:0.83. In comparison with clinical data, this value is much smaller than that seen from blood vessel hardening. Thus, it can be concluded that the blood viscosity seldom affects the attenuation of a pulse wave.

  16. Doppler ultrasound monitoring technology.

    PubMed

    Docker, M F

    1993-03-01

    Developments in the signal processing of Doppler ultrasound used for the detection of fetal heart rate (FHR) have improved the operation of cardiotocographs. These developments are reviewed and the advantages and disadvantages of the various Doppler and signal processing methods are compared.

  17. The Cognitive Doppler.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozoil, Micah E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the learning needs of students in the concrete operational stage in mathematics. Identifies the phenomenon of reduced cognitive performance in an out-of-class environment as the "Cognitive Doppler." Suggests methods of reducing the pronounced effects of the Cognitive Doppler by capitalizing on the students' ability to memorize effective…

  18. Automatic human micro-Doppler signature separation by Hough transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Jin, Tian; Qiu, Lei; Zhou, Zhimin

    2015-12-01

    The micro-Doppler signature is one of the most prominent information for target classification and identification. As Hough transform (HT) is an efficient tool for detecting weak straight target traces in the image, an HT based algorithm is proposed for micro-Doppler signature separation of multiple persons. Few seconds data is processed at one time to ensure human motion traces approximate to straight lines in the radar slow time-range image. Taking HT to the slow time-range image, each human's motion trace can be recovered through recursively searching the peaks in HT space. Applying time-frequency transform to the range cells around each recovered line, the human micro-Doppler signature can be achieved and separated. Experimental results are given to illustrate the validity of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Gene-Diet Interaction between SIRT6 and Soybean Intake for Different Levels of Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Kexin; Xiang, Xiao; Li, Na; Huang, Shaoping; Qin, Xueying; Wu, Yiqun; Tang, Xun; Gao, Pei; Li, Jing; Wu, Tao; Chen, Dafang; Hu, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Soybean is a common food for the Chinese people. We aimed to investigate the risk for brachial ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) with inflammatory-related SNPs and soybean. baPWV was measured, and 16 inflammatory-related SNPs located on ADIPOQ, CDH13, SIRT3, SIRT6, CXCL12, CXCR4, NOS1, PON1 and CDKN2B were genotyped in 1749 Chinese participants recruited from various communities. ADIPOQ rs12495941 (GT/TT vs. GG: crude OR = 1.27, p = 0.044) and SIRT6 rs107251 (CT/TT vs. CC: crude OR = 0.74, p = 0.009) were associated with abnormal baPWV (baPWV ≥ 1700 cm/s). After adjustment for conventional environmental risk factors, rs12495941 was associated with abnormal baPWV (GT/TT vs. GG: adjusted OR = 1.43, p = 0.011), but the association between rs107251 and abnormal baPWV was not significant (CT/TT vs. CC: adjusted OR = 0.83, p = 0.173). The interaction between rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV was statistically significant (p = 0.017). Compared with a high level of soybean intake, a low level of soybean intake can significantly decrease the risk of abnormal baPWV in individuals of rs107251 CT/TT genotypes (≤100 vs. >100 g/week: adjusted OR = 0.542, p = 0.003). In this study, associations between ADIPOQ rs12495941, SIRT6 rs107251 and baPWV, as well as an interaction between SIRT6 rs107251 and soybean intake for different levels of baPWV were found. PMID:26114387

  20. Integrated multiomics approach identifies calcium and integrin-binding protein-2 as a novel gene for pulse wave velocity

    PubMed Central

    Mangino, Massimo; Cecelja, Marina; Menni, Cristina; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Yuan, Wei; Small, Kerrin; Bell, Jordana; Mitchell, Gary F.; Chowienczyk, Phillip; Spector, Tim D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an important measure of arterial stiffness, which is an independent predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this study, we used an integrated genetic, epigenetic and transcriptomics approach to uncover novel molecular mechanisms contributing to PWV. Methods and results: We measured PWV in 1505 healthy twins of European descendent. A genomewide association analysis was performed using standardized residual of the inverse of PWV. We identified one single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs7164338) in the calcium and integrin-binding protein-2 (CIB2) gene on chromosome 15q25.1 associated with PWV [β = −0.359, standard error (SE) = 0.07, P = 4.8 × 10–8]. The same variant was also associated with increased CIB2 expression in leucocytes (β = 0.034, SE = 0.008, P = 4.95 × 10–5) and skin (β = 0.072, SE = 0.01, P = 2.35 × 10–9) and with hypomethylation of the gene promoter (β = −0.899, SE = 0.098, P = 3.63 × 10–20). Conclusion: Our data indicate that reduced methylation of the CIB2 promoter in individuals carrying rs7164338 may lead to increased CIB2 expression. Given that CIB2 is thought to regulate intracellular calcium levels, an increase in protein levels may prevent the accumulation of serum calcium and phosphate, ultimately slowing down the process of vascular calcification. This study shows the power of integrating multiple omics to discover novel cardiovascular mechanisms. PMID:26378684

  1. To what extent does aortic pulse wave velocity estimate early atherosclerosis in Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic rabbits?

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shiho; Obara, Shinju; Murakawa, Masahiro; Hazama, Akihiro; Kusanagi, Masahiko; Katsuda, Shin-ichiro

    2011-05-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV), an index of arterial stiffness, is dependent not only on structural alterations in arterial wall but also on distending pressure, which could be related to wall distensibility. We investigated the efficacy of aortic PWV (AoPWV) for detecting early to moderate atherosclerosis in Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits. Pressure waves were recorded at the ascending, and proximal and distal abdominal aortas in 13 male normal and KHC rabbits aged 12 months under pentobarbital anesthesia when angiotensin II or sodium nitroprusside was infused intravenously. AoPWV was compared between the two rabbit groups at different mean arterial pressure (MAP) levels. Vascular diameter (D(m)) was measured using an intravascular ultrasound imaging system in the proximal thoracic and proximal abdominal aortas to determine pressure-strain elastic modulus (E(p)). AoPWV was correlated to MAP in the two rabbit groups (P < 0.001). AoPWV was slightly but significantly greater (< 0.5 m s(-1)) in the KHC rabbit group than in the normal rabbit group at MAP level >80 mm Hg (P < 0.01). The value of h/D(m) (h, wall thickness) was significantly high in the KHC rabbit group at any MAP level (P < 0.001) in these aortic regions. There was no significant difference in E(p) and D(m) between the two rabbit groups at any MAP level. AoPWV showed only a slight but significant increase in the young KHC rabbits at different MAP levels, which was mainly due to the increased h/D(m). AoPWV could underestimate aortic stiffness due to early to moderate atherosclerosis if AoPWV was adjusted for arterial pressure level.

  2. Effect of heat-induced pain stimuli on pulse transit time and pulse wave amplitude in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    van Velzen, Marit H N; Loeve, Arjo J; Kortekaas, Minke C; Niehof, Sjoerd P; Mik, Egbert G; Stolker, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Pain is commonly assessed subjectively by interpretations of patient behaviour and/or reports from patients. When this is impossible the availability of a quantitative objective pain assessment tool based on objective physiological parameters would greatly benefit clinical practice and research beside the standard self-report tests. Vasoconstriction is one of the physiological responses to pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether pulse transit time (PTT) and pulse wave amplitude (PWA) decrease in response to this vasoconstriction when caused by heat-induced pain. The PTT and PWA were measured in healthy volunteers, on both index fingers using photoplethysmography and electrocardiography. Each subject received 3 heat-induced pain stimuli using a Temperature-Sensory Analyzer thermode block to apply a controlled, increasing temperature from 32.0 °C to 50.0 °C to the skin. After reaching 50.0 °C, the thermode was immediately cooled down to 32.0 °C. The study population was divided into 2 groups with a time-interval between the stimuli 20s or 60s. The results showed a significant (p  <  0.05) decrease of both PTT and PWA on the stimulated and contralateral side. Moreover, there was no significant difference between the stimulated and contralateral side. The time-interval of 20s was too short to allow PTT and PWA to return to baseline values and should exceed 40s in future studies. Heat-induced pain causes a decrease of PTT and PWA. Consequently, it is expected that, in the future, PTT and PWA may be applied as objective indicators of pain, either beside the standard self-report test, or when self-report testing is impossible.

  3. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD).We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4.Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003-1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046-1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4.Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  4. Serum Carboxymethyl-lysine, an Advanced Glycation End Product, is Associated with Increased Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Najjar, Samer S.; Sun, Kai; Lakatta, Edward G.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Background The relationship between advanced glycation end products and arterial stiffness has previously been examined in highly selected groups of patients with diabetes or hypertension. Our aim was to determine whether elevated serum advanced glycation end products are associated with increased arterial stiffness in relatively healthy, community-dwelling adults. Methods Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), an index of aortic stiffness, and serum AGEs, as represented by the specific AGE, serum carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), were measured in 493 adults, aged 26-93 years, who participated in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Results Mean (SD) PWV (m/sec) was 6.6 (1.8) m/sec. Mean CML was 0.47 (0.13) μg/mL. Serum CML (per 1 Standard Deviation [S.D.]) was associated with PWV (beta = 0.16, standard error [S.E.] = 0.07, P = 0.02), adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, mean arterial pressure, fasting plasma glucose, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking, and other covariates. After excluding all diabetic patients, serum CML (per 1 S.D.) was associated with PWV (beta = 0.18, S.E. = 0.07, P = 0.009), adjusting for the same covariates. Conclusions Elevated AGEs are associated with increased arterial stiffness, a known predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, among relatively healthy community-dwelling adults. Interventions to lower levels of AGEs, such as altering the pattern of dietary intake, warrant examination as putative novel strategies to lower arterial stiffness in adults. PMID:19023277

  5. The effects of ischemia with and without remote conditioning on hyperemia induced decline in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity.

    PubMed

    Onegbu, Nwamaka; Kamran, Haroon; Sharma, Bhawna; Bapat, Manasi; Littman, Stephen; Warrier, Nikhil; Patel, Rinkesh; Khalid, Muhammad Tanweer; Salciccioli, Louis; Lazar, Jason M

    2012-01-01

    Ischemic conditioning has long held promise for preventing ischemic-reperfusion (I-R) injury. Although a number of studies have evaluated the effects of brief repeated episodes of ischemia before a prolonged ischemic episode on the cardiovascular system using clinical endpoints, more sensitive techniques by which to measure its effects are lacking. Since endothelial function is sensitive to I-R injury, flow mediated dilation of the brachial artery has been proposed for this purpose, but has significant limitations. Hyperemia normally decreases carotid to radial pulse wave velocity (PWV). Accordingly, we sought to determine the effects of I-R injury and ischemic conditioning on the hyperemic change (Δ) in PWV. We induced hyperemia by release of arterial cuff occlusion before and after ipsilateral arm I-R injury (7.5min occlusion) in 25 healthy males, age 29±6 years. The protocol was repeated on 2 occasions in combination with either pre- or post- conditioning stimuli (3× 30s contralateral arm occlusions). Hyperemia resulted in a significant decrease (-13.7%, p<.001) before but not after prolonged ischemia (-0.88%, p=0.40). I-R along with either pre- or post-ischemic conditioning restored the PWV decline (pre: -11.0%, p<0.001; post: -9.9%, p<0.001). In conclusion, 7.5min ischemia blunts the normal PWV decline produced by hyperemia. Remote pre- and post-conditioning restores this response. This technique may be useful for the assessment of novel treatment strategies and mechanisms underlying remote pre- and post-ischemic conditioning in protecting the cardiovascular system.

  6. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD). We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4. Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003–1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046–1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4. Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  7. Assessment of Spectral Doppler for an Array-Based Preclinical Ultrasound Scanner Using a Rotating Phantom

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, David A.; Anderson, Tom; Moran, Carmel M.; Hoskins, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Velocity measurement errors were investigated for an array-based preclinical ultrasound scanner (Vevo 2100, FUJIFILM VisualSonics, Toronto, ON, Canada). Using a small-size rotating phantom made from a tissue-mimicking material, errors in pulse-wave Doppler maximum velocity measurements were observed. The extent of these errors was dependent on the Doppler angle, gate length, gate depth, gate horizontal placement and phantom velocity. Errors were observed to be up to 172% at high beam–target angles. It was found that small gate lengths resulted in larger velocity errors than large gate lengths, a phenomenon that has not previously been reported (e.g., for a beam–target angle of 0°, the error was 27.8% with a 0.2-mm gate length and 5.4% with a 0.98-mm gate length). The error in the velocity measurement with sample volume depth changed depending on the operating frequency of the probe. Some edge effects were observed in the horizontal placement of the sample volume, indicating a change in the array aperture size. The error in the velocity measurements increased with increased phantom velocity, from 22% at 2.4 cm/s to 30% at 26.6 cm/s. To minimise the impact of these errors, an angle-dependent correction factor was derived based on a simple ray model of geometric spectral broadening. Use of this angle-dependent correction factor reduces the maximum velocity measurement errors to <25% in all instances, significantly improving the current estimation of maximum velocity from pulse-wave Doppler ultrasound. PMID:25957754

  8. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  9. [Tissue Doppler in the assessment of myocardial function in stress echocardiography].

    PubMed

    Citro, Rodolfo; Salustri, Alessandro; Trambaiolo, Paolo; Gregorio, Giovanni

    2002-02-01

    Recently, stress echocardiography has emerged as a valuable tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of coronary artery disease, but its interpretation still remains subjective, relying on image quality and reader's experience. These problems could be overcome by quantitative analysis of wall motion. Tissue Doppler provides quantitative information on regional myocardial systolic and diastolic velocities that can be displayed either in spectral mode or color coded, reflecting the peak velocity increment induced by exercise or dobutamine administration. Pulsed wave tissue Doppler allows to measure regional instantaneous myocardial velocities with high temporal resolution and has been shown valuable for detecting stress-induced changes of both myocardial systolic and diastolic function. This method may also identify myocardial viability by measuring increase in systolic peak velocity at low-dose of dobutamine in dysfunctional myocardial segments. Color coded tissue Doppler resolves mean velocities with higher spatial resolution, and post-processing analysis of digital acquired images has been shown feasible and reproducible. Myocardial velocity gradient is a more sensitive parameter compared to the simple measurement of the peak endocardial systolic velocity for evaluating myocardial ischemia during dobutamine echocardiography. From the raw data, it is also possible to measure strain and strain rate. These new parameters have the potential to differentiate between wall motion and contractility, with obvious implications when applied to stress echocardiography. In conclusion, tissue Doppler is able to quantify regional myocardial function. After a large scale validation, this technique will be incorporated with stress echocardiography in clinical practice.

  10. Doppler Lidar (DL) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, RK

    2012-02-13

    The Doppler lidar (DL) is an active remote sensing instrument that provides range- and time-resolved measurements of radial velocity and attenuated backscatter. The principle of operation is similar to radar in that pulses of energy are transmitted into the atmosphere; the energy scattered back to the transceiver is collected and measured as a time-resolved signal. From the time delay between each outgoing transmitted pulse and the backscattered signal, the distance to the scatterer is inferred. The radial or line-of-sight velocity of the scatterers is determined from the Doppler frequency shift of the backscattered radiation. The DL uses a heterodyne detection technique in which the return signal is mixed with a reference laser beam (i.e., local oscillator) of known frequency. An onboard signal processing computer then determines the Doppler frequency shift from the spectra of the heterodyne signal. The energy content of the Doppler spectra can also be used to determine attenuated backscatter.

  11. Cosmology with Doppler lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, David J.; Andrianomena, Sambatra; Clarkson, Chris; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Maartens, Roy

    2014-09-01

    Doppler lensing is the apparent change in object size and magnitude due to peculiar velocities. Objects falling into an overdensity appear larger on its near side, and smaller on its far side, than typical objects at the same redshifts. This effect dominates over the usual gravitational lensing magnification at low redshift. Doppler lensing is a promising new probe of cosmology, and we explore in detail how to utilize the effect with forthcoming surveys. We present cosmological simulations of the Doppler and gravitational lensing effects based on the Millennium simulation. We show that Doppler lensing can be detected around stacked voids or unvirialized overdensities. New power spectra and correlation functions are proposed which are designed to be sensitive to Doppler lensing. We consider the impact of gravitational lensing and intrinsic size correlations on these quantities. We compute the correlation functions and forecast the errors for realistic forthcoming surveys, providing predictions for constraints on cosmological parameters. Finally, we demonstrate how we can make 3D potential maps of large volumes of the Universe using Doppler lensing.

  12. Fast retrospectively triggered local pulse-wave velocity measurements in mice with CMR-microscopy using a radial trajectory

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aortic pulse-wave velocity (PWV) is an important indicator of cardiovascular risk. In recent studies MRI methods have been developed to measure this parameter noninvasively in mice. Present techniques require additional hardware for cardiac and respiratory gating. In this work a robust self-gated measurement of the local PWV in mice without the need of triggering probes is proposed. Methods The local PWV of 6-months-old wild-type C57BL/6J mice (n=6) was measured in the abdominal aorta with a retrospectively triggered radial Phase Contrast (PC) MR sequence using the flow-area (QA) method. A navigator signal was extracted from the CMR data of highly asymmetric radial projections with short repetition time (TR=3 ms) and post-processed with high-pass and low-pass filters for retrospective cardiac and respiratory gating. The self-gating signal was used for a reconstruction of high-resolution Cine frames of the aortic motion. To assess the local PWV the volume flow Q and the cross-sectional area A of the aorta were determined. The results were compared with the values measured with a triggered Cartesian and an undersampled triggered radial PC-Cine sequence. Results In all examined animals a self-gating signal could be extracted and used for retrospective breath-gating and PC-Cine reconstruction. With the non-triggered measurement PWV values of 2.3±0.2 m/s were determined. These values are in agreement with those measured with the triggered Cartesian (2.4±0.2 m/s) and the triggered radial (2.3±0.2 m/s) measurement. Due to the strong robustness of the radial trajectory against undersampling an acceleration of more than two relative to the prospectively triggered Cartesian sampling could be achieved with the retrospective method. Conclusion With the radial flow-encoding sequence the extraction of a self-gating signal is feasible. The retrospective method enables a robust and fast measurement of the local PWV without the need of additional trigger hardware

  13. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave rising from pulsations of both the spinal cord and the brain in humans.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Urayama, K; Hoshino, Y

    1997-11-01

    There are two theories regarding the origin of the lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pulse wave (L-CSFPW): that it arises from the arteries supplying the spinal cord, and that it is due to the pulsations of the brain transmitted through the subarachnoid space of the spine. We investigated L-CSFPW of 11 myelopathic patients with a complete (five patients, CB-group) or an incomplete spinal block (six, ICB-group) on myelography to determine the origin of L-CSFPW. Since arterial pressure amplitude (APA), the energy source of L-CSFPW, is not the same between individuals or between before and after operation, not only L-CSFPW itself but also the transfer function between the arterial pressure wave and the L-CSFPW calculated by the system analysis method was analyzed to eliminate the influence of hemodynamic fluctuations. In the system analysis, the arterial pressure wave, L-CSFPW and transfer function were decomposed into five harmonic waves (HW). In the CB group, L-CSFPW was observed to be 0.72 mmHg on average (range, 0.25-1.00) in spite of blocking pulsations of the brain, showing that there was a contribution to L-CSFPW unrelated to the brain, that is, the spinal cord. In the CB group, however, the preoperative transfer function value of HW1 (mean, 0.056; range, 0.012-0.170) was lower than that in the ICB group (mean, 0.137; range, 0.061-0.236) (P < 0.05), indicating that the brain pulsation also contributed to L-CSFPW. In the ICB group, there was significant reduction of HW1 (P < 0.01) and HW2 (P < 0.05) transfer function after posterior decompression surgery in spite of improvement in the subarachnoid space narrowing: preoperative HW1, mean, 0.137, range, 0.061-0.236; postoperative HW1, mean, 0.065, range, 0.021-0.153; preoperative HW2, mean, 0.092, range, 0.011-0.148; postoperative HW2, mean, 0.044, range, 0.030-0.066. It has been reported that the spinal cord blood flow is decreased 20% or more by laminectomy, therefore, L-CSFPW measurement may be sensitive enough to

  14. Identifying Coronary Artery Disease in Asymptomatic Middle-Aged Sportsmen: The Additional Value of Pulse Wave Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Braber, Thijs L.; Prakken, Niek H. J.; Mosterd, Arend; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; Doevendans, Pieter A. F. M.; Bots, Michiel L.; Velthuis, Birgitta K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular screening may benefit middle-aged sportsmen, as coronary artery disease (CAD) is the main cause of exercise-related sudden cardiac death. Arterial stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity (PWV), may help identify sportsmen with subclinical CAD. We examined the additional value of PWV measurements to traditional CAD risk factors for identifying CAD. Methods From the Measuring Athlete’s Risk of Cardiovascular events (MARC) cohort of asymptomatic, middle-aged sportsmen who underwent low-dose Cardiac CT (CCT) after routine sports medical examination (SME), 193 consecutive sportsmen (aged 55±6.6 years) were included with additional PWV measurements before CCT. Sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of PWV values (>8.3 and >7.5m/s) assessed by Arteriograph were used to identify CAD (coronary artery calcium scoring ≥100 Agatston Units or coronary CT angiography luminal stenosis ≥50%) and to assess the additional diagnostic value of PWV to established cardiovascular risk factors. Results Forty-seven sportsmen (24%) had CAD on CCT. They were older (58.9 vs. 53.8 years, p<0.001), had more hypertension (17 vs. 4%, p=0.003), higher cholesterol levels (5.7 vs. 5.4mmol/l) p=0.048), and more often were (ever) smokers (55 vs. 34%, p=0.008). Mean PWV was higher in those with CAD (8.9 vs. 8.0 m/s, p=0.017). For PWV >8.3m/s respectively >7.5m/s sensitivity to detect CAD on CT was 43% and 74%, specificity 69% and 45%, positive predictive value 31% and 30%, and negative predictive value 79% and 84%. Adding PWV to traditional risk factor models did not change the area under the curve (from 0.78 (95% CI = 0.709-0.848)) to AUC 0.78 (95% CI 0.710-0.848, p = 0.99)) for prediction of CAD on CCT. Conclusions Limited additional value was found for PWV on top of established risk factors to identify CAD. PWV might still have a role to identify CAD in middle-aged sportsmen if risk factors such as cholesterol are unknown. PMID:26147752

  15. Clinical usefulness of ankle brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in patients with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Suk; Lee, Hye Lim; Han, Ho-seong; Yeo, Minju; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Soo; Shin, Dong-Ick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankle brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) are widely used noninvasive modalities to evaluate atherosclerosis. Recently, evidence has increased supporting the use of ABI and baPWV as markers of cerebrovascular disease. This study sought to examine the relationship between ABI and baPWV with ischemic stroke. This study also aimed to determine which pathogenic mechanism, large artery disease (LAD) or small vessel disease (SVD), is related to ABI or baPWV. Retrospectively, 121 patients with ischemic stroke and 38 subjects with no obvious ischemic stroke history were recruited. First, ABI and baPWV were compared between the groups. Then, within the stroke group, the relevance of ABI and baPWV with regard to SVD and LAD, which were classified by brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings, was assessed. The baPWV was higher in the stroke group than non-stroke group (1,944.18±416.6 cm/s vs. 1,749.76±669.6 cm/s, P<0.01). Regarding LAD, we found that mean ABI value was lower in the group with extracranial large artery stenosis (P<0.01), and there was an inverse linear correlation between ABI and the grade of extracranial large artery stenosis (P<0.01). For SVD, there was a significant correlation between SVD and baPWV (2,057.6±456.57 cm/s in the SVD (+) group vs. 1,491±271.62 cm/s in the SVD (-) group; P<0.01). However, the grade of abnormalities detected in SVD did not correlate linearly with baPWV. These findings show that baPWV is a reliable surrogate marker of ischemic stroke. Furthermore, baPWV and ABI can be used to indicate the presence of small vessel disease and large arterial disease, respectively. PMID:27533937

  16. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Conclusions Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk. PMID:27195246

  17. The Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Coronary Artery Disease Evaluated by Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae-Bin; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Woo-Young; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-A; Zo, Joo-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is associated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and to evaluate baPWV as a predictor of obstructive CAD on CCTA. A total of 470 patients who underwent both baPWV and CCTA were included. We evaluated stenosis degree and plaque characteristics on CCTA. To estimate the severity of CAD, we calculated the number of segment with plaque (segment involvement score; SIS), stenosis degree-weighted plaque score (segment stenosis score; SSS), and coronary artery calcium score (CACS). The mean baPWV was 1,485 ± 315 cm/s (range, 935-3,175 cm/s). Non-obstructive (stenosis < 50%) and obstructive (stenosis ≥ 50%) CAD was found in 129 patients (27.4%) and 144 (30.6%), respectively. baPWV in patients with obstructive CAD was higher than that of patients with non-obstructive (1,680 ± 396 cm/s versus 1,477 ± 244 cm/s, P < 0.001) or no CAD (1,680 ± 396 cm/s versus ± 196 1,389 cm/s, P < 0.001). baPWV showed significant correlation with SSS (r = 0.429, P < 0.001), SIS (r = 0.395, P < 0.001), CACS (r 0.346, P < 0.001), and the number of segment with non-calcified plaque (r 0.092, P = 0.047), mixed plaque (r = 0.267, P < 0.001), and calcified plaque (r = 0.348, P < 0.001), respectively. The optimal baPWV cut-off value for the detection of obstructive CAD was 1,547 cm/s. baPWV ≥ 1,547 cm/s was independent predictor for the obstructive CAD. In conclusion, baPWV is well correlated with the severity of CAD evaluated by CCTA. baPWV has the potential to predict severity of coronary artery atherosclerosis. PMID:25875036

  18. Pulse Waves in the Lower Extremities as a Diagnostic Tool of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Predictor of Mortality in Elderly Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Qi-Fang; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Fei-Ka; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease may have elongated upstroke time in pulse waves in the lower extremities. We investigated upstroke time as a diagnostic tool of peripheral arterial disease and predictor of mortality in an elderly (≥60 years) Chinese population. We recorded pulse waves at the left and right ankles by pneumoplethysmography and calculated the percentage of upstroke time per cardiac cycle. Diagnostic accuracy was compared with the conventional ankle-brachial index method (n=4055) and computed tomographic angiography (34 lower extremities in 17 subjects). Upstroke time per cardiac cycle at baseline (mean±SD, 16.4%±3.1%) was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with ankle-brachial index in men (n=1803; r=-0.44) and women (n=2252; r=-0.32) and had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 80%, respectively, for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (upstroke time per cardiac cycle, ≥21.7%) in comparison with computed tomographic angiography. During 5.9 years (median) of follow-up, all-cause and cardiovascular deaths occurred in 366 and 183 subjects, respectively. In adjusted Cox regression analyses, an upstroke time per cardiac cycle ≥21.7% (n=219; 5.4%) significantly (P<0.0001) predicted total and cardiovascular mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios were 1.98 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.65) and 2.29 (1.58-3.32), respectively, when compared with that of 2.10 (1.48-3.00) and 2.44 (1.57-3.79), respectively, associated with an ankle-brachial index of ≤0.90 (n=115; 2.8%). In conclusion, pulse waves in the lower extremities may behave as an accurate and ease of use diagnostic tool of peripheral arterial disease and predictor of mortality in the elderly.

  19. Combined vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging for improved imaging of complex blood flow in the carotid arteries.

    PubMed

    Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Dahl, Torbjørn; Torp, Hans; Løvstakken, Lasse

    2014-07-01

    Color flow imaging and pulsed wave (PW) Doppler are important diagnostic tools in the examination of patients with carotid artery disease. However, measurement of the true peak systolic velocity is dependent on sample volume placement and the operator's ability to provide an educated guess of the flow direction. Using plane wave transmissions and a duplex imaging scheme, we present an all-in-one modality that provides both vector velocity and spectral Doppler imaging from one acquisition, in addition to separate B-mode images of sufficient quality. The vector Doppler information was used to provide automatically calibrated (angle-corrected) PW Doppler spectra at every image point. It was demonstrated that the combined information can be used to generate spatial maps of the peak systolic velocity, highlighting regions of high velocity and the extent of the stenotic region, which could be used to automate work flow as well as improve the accuracy of measurement of true peak systolic velocity. The modality was tested in a small group (N = 12) of patients with carotid artery disease. PW Doppler, vector velocity and B-mode images could successfully be obtained from a single recording for all patients with a body mass index ranging from 21 to 31 and a carotid depth ranging from 16 to 28 mm. PMID:24785436

  20. Method of optical self-mixing for pulse wave transit time in comparison with other methods and correlation with blood pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigas, Kalju; Lass, Jaanus; Kattai, Rain; Karai, Deniss; Kaik, Juri

    2004-07-01

    This paper is a part of research to develop convenient method for continuous monitoring of arterial blood pressure by non-invasive and non-oscillometric way. A simple optical method, using self-mixing in a diode laser, is used for detection of skin surface vibrations near the artery. These vibrations, which can reveal the pulsate propagation of blood pressure waves along the vasculature, are used for pulse wave registration. The registration of the Pulse Wave Transit Time (PWTT) is based on computing the time delay in different regions of the human body using an ECG as a reference signal. In this study, the comparison of method of optical self-mixing with other methods as photoplethysmographic (PPG) and bioimpedance (BI) for PWTT is done. Also correlation of PWTT, obtained with different methods, with arterial blood pressure is calculated. In our study, we used a group of volunteers (34 persons) who made the bicycle exercise test. The test consisted of cycling sessions of increasing workloads during which the HR changed from 60 to 180 beats per minute. In addition, a blood pressure (NIBP) was registered with standard sphygmomanometer once per minute during the test and all NIBP measurement values were synchronized to other signals to find exact time moments where the systolic blood pressure was detected (Korotkoff sounds starting point). Computer later interpolated the blood pressure signal in order to get individual value for every heart cycle. The other signals were measured continuously during all tests. At the end of every session, a recovery period was included until person's NIBP and heart rate (HR) normalized. As a result of our study it turned out that time intervals that were calculated from plethysmographic (PPG) waveforms were in the best correlation with systolic blood pressure. The diastolic pressure does not correlate with any of the parameters representing PWTT. The pulse wave signals measured by laser and piezoelectric transducer are very similar

  1. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm(-5). Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV.

  2. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft.

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm(-5). Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  3. Non-Invasive Pulse Wave Analysis in a Thrombus-Free Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm after Implantation of a Nitinol Aortic Endograft

    PubMed Central

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Argyriou, Christos; Georgiadis, George S.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2016-01-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair has been associated with changes in arterial stiffness, as estimated by pulse wave velocity (PWV). This marker is influenced by the medical status of the patient, the elastic characteristics of the aneurysm wall, and the presence of intraluminal thrombus. Therefore, in order to delineate the influence of the endograft implantation in the early post-operative period, we conducted non-invasively pulse wave analysis in a male patient with an abdominal aortic aneurysm containing no intraluminal thrombus, unremarkable past medical history, and absence of peripheral arterial disease. The estimated parameters were the systolic and diastolic pressure calculated at the aortic level (central pressures), PWV, augmentation pressure (AP) and augmentation index (AI), pressure wave reflection magnitude (RM), and peripheral resistance. Central systolic and diastolic pressure decreased post-operatively. PWV showed subtle changes from 11.6 to 10.6 and 10.9 m/s at 1-week and 1-month, respectively. Accordingly, the AI decreased from 28 to 14% and continued to drop to 25%. The AP decreased gradually from 15 to 6 and 4 mmHg. The wave RM dropped from 68 to 52% at 1-month. Finally, the peripheral resistance dropped from 1.41 to 0.99 and 0.85 dyn × s × cm−5. Our example shows that the implantation of an aortic endograft can modify the pressure wave reflection over the aortic bifurcation without causing significant alterations in PWV. PMID:26793712

  4. Laser Doppler projection tomography.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yaguang; Xiong, Ke; Lu, Xuanlong; Feng, Guanping; Han, Dingan; Wu, Jing

    2014-02-15

    We propose a laser Doppler projection tomography (LDPT) method to obtain visualization of three-dimensional (3D) flowing structures. With LDPT, the flowing signal is extracted by a modified laser Doppler method, and the 3D flowing image is reconstructed by the filtered backprojection algorithm. Phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate that LDPT is able to obtain 3D flowing structure with higher signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Our experiment results display its potentially useful application to develop 3D label-free optical angiography for the circulation system of live small animal models or microfluidic experiments.

  5. Atmospheric probing by Doppler radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lhermitte, R. M.

    1969-01-01

    A survey is presented of the application of Doppler techniques to the study of atmospheric phenomena. Particular emphasis is placed on the requirement of adequate digital processing means for the Doppler signal and the Doppler data which are acquired at a very high rate. The need is discussed of a two or three Doppler method as an ultimate approach to the problem of observing the three-dimensional field of particle motion inside convective storms.

  6. Medical diagnosis of the cardiovascular system on the carotid artery with IR laser Doppler vibrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignanelli, Laura; Rembe, Christian; Kroschel, Kristian; Luik, Armin; Castellini, Paolo; Scalise, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) is known to be a possible diagnosis tool for many cardiac applications as the detection and monitoring of some important vital parameters (Heart Rate, Heart Rate Variability, Pulse Wave Velocity) in a non-contact and non-intrusive way. The technique has become known as Optical Vibrocardiography (VCG) i.e. by measuring the vibrations on the carotid artery or on the thorax [1-5]. The aim of the present study is to interpret the vibrational signal acquired from the carotid artery in relation to the electrocardiographic and hemodynamic aspects and to enable the extraction of further medical information relevant for diagnosis purpose. For the investigation an infrared (IR) Laser Doppler Vibrometer has been used. The acquired VCG signals have been processed and compared with the simultaneously acquired electrocardiogram and the color-coded Doppler sonogram. This has enabled a deeper understanding of the signature of the vibrational signal. Furthermore, in this paper, we also discuss the medical value of the VCG signal obtained from the carotid artery.

  7. Catadioptric optics for laser Doppler velocimeter applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the adaptation of low-cost Schmidt-Cassegrain astronomical telescopes to perform the laser-beam-focusing and scattered-light collection tasks associated with dual-beam laser Doppler velocimetry. A generic telescope design is analyzed using ray-tracing methods and Gaussian beam-propagation theory. A straightforward modification procedure to convert from infinite to near unity conjugate-ratio operation with very low residual aberration is identified and tested with a 200-mm-aperture telescope modified for f/10 operation. Performance data for this modified telescope configuration are near the diffraction limit and agree well with predictions.

  8. Laser Doppler imaging: usefulness in chronic pain medicine.

    PubMed

    Grothusen, John R; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Sympathetic nervous system dysfunction is thought to be a factor in neuropathic pain conditions such as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome and in vascular conditions such as Raynaud's phenomenon. Laser Doppler fluxmetry has been used as a fast non-invasive method to quantify changes in skin capillary blood flow which reflect activation of sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction of the arterioles that supply the capillaries. Studies of dynamic change of skin capillary blood flow with sympathetic activation such as cold or inspiratory gasp have generally used single point laser Doppler systems where the probe is in contact with the skin. The results are a single line tracing representing the capillary flow at a single point on the skin a few millimeters in diameter. Laser Doppler imaging (moorLDI laser Doppler imager, Moor Instruments Ltd.) allows for non-contact recording of skin blood flow of an area as large as 50 centimeters square with a resolution of 256 by 256 pixels and 4 milliseconds per pixel. Most work with laser Doppler imaging has studied changes that occur between successive scans. We have found it useful to look at changes that occur during a scan. In this way we obtain data that is comparable to the time resolution of single point laser Doppler methods, but with the larger spatial information that is available with laser Doppler imaging. We present a small series of case reports in which inspiratory gasp during laser Doppler imaging was able to provide quick, useful and unequivocal clinical information regarding the status of regional bilateral skin capillary response to sympathetic activation. This may be useful for distinguishing sympathetically mediated from sympathetically independent pain. We believe the methods described may provide the basis for future quantitative studies similar to those that use single point laser Doppler methods.

  9. Finnish Meteorological Institute Doppler Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Ewan OConnor

    2015-03-27

    This doppler lidar system provides co-polar and cross polar attenuated backscatter coefficients,signal strength, and doppler velocities in the cloud and in the boundary level, including uncertainties for all parameters. Using the doppler beam swinging DBS technique, and Vertical Azimuthal Display (VAD) this system also provides vertical profiles of horizontal winds.

  10. The Doppler Pendulum Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, C. K.; Wong, H. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to verify the Doppler effect of sound waves is described. An ultrasonic source is mounted at the end of a simple pendulum. As the pendulum swings, the rapid change of frequency can be recorded by a stationary receiver using a simple frequency-to-voltage converter. The experimental results are in close agreement with the Doppler…

  11. Photonic doppler velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M E; Molau, N E; Sargis, P D; Strand, O T; Sweider, D

    1999-01-01

    We are developing a novel fiber-optic approach to laser Doppler velocimetry as a diagnostic for high explosives tests. Using hardware that was originally developed for the telecommunications industry, we are able to measure surface velocities ranging from centimeters per second to kilometers per second. Laboratory measurements and field trials have shown excellent agreement with other diagnostics.

  12. Ultrasonic colour Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David H.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonic colour Doppler is an imaging technique that combines anatomical information derived using ultrasonic pulse-echo techniques with velocity information derived using ultrasonic Doppler techniques to generate colour-coded maps of tissue velocity superimposed on grey-scale images of tissue anatomy. The most common use of the technique is to image the movement of blood through the heart, arteries and veins, but it may also be used to image the motion of solid tissues such as the heart walls. Colour Doppler imaging is now provided on almost all commercial ultrasound machines, and has been found to be of great value in assessing blood flow in many clinical conditions. Although the method for obtaining the velocity information is in many ways similar to the method for obtaining the anatomical information, it is technically more demanding for a number of reasons. It also has a number of weaknesses, perhaps the greatest being that in conventional systems, the velocities measured and thus displayed are the components of the flow velocity directly towards or away from the transducer, while ideally the method would give information about the magnitude and direction of the three-dimensional flow vectors. This review briefly introduces the principles behind colour Doppler imaging and describes some clinical applications. It then describes the basic components of conventional colour Doppler systems and the methods used to derive velocity information from the ultrasound signal. Next, a number of new techniques that seek to overcome the vector problem mentioned above are described. Finally, some examples of vector velocity images are presented. PMID:22866227

  13. High-Frame-Rate Echocardiography Using Coherent Compounding With Doppler-Based Motion-Compensation.

    PubMed

    Poree, Jonathan; Posada, Daniel; Hodzic, Amir; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-07-01

    High-frame-rate ultrasonography based on coherent compounding of unfocused beams can potentially transform the assessment of cardiac function. As it requires successive waves to be combined coherently, this approach is sensitive to high-velocity tissue motion. We investigated coherent compounding of tilted diverging waves, emitted from a 2.5 MHz clinical phased array transducer. To cope with high myocardial velocities, a triangle transmit sequence of diverging waves is proposed, combined with tissue Doppler imaging to perform motion compensation (MoCo). The compound sequence with integrated MoCo was adjusted from simulations and was tested in vitro and in vivo. Realistic myocardial velocities were analyzed in an in vitro spinning disk with anechoic cysts. While a 8 dB decrease (no motion versus high motion) was observed without MoCo, the contrast-to-noise ratio of the cysts was preserved with the MoCo approach. With this method, we could provide high-quality in vivo B-mode cardiac images with tissue Doppler at 250 frames per second. Although the septum and the anterior mitral leaflet were poorly apparent without MoCo, they became well perceptible and well contrasted with MoCo. The septal and lateral mitral annulus velocities determined by tissue Doppler were concordant with those measured by pulsed-wave Doppler with a clinical scanner (r(2)=0.7,y=0.9 x+0.5,N=60) . To conclude, high-contrast echo cardiographic B-mode and tissue Doppler images can be obtained with diverging beams when motion compensation is integrated in the coherent compounding process.

  14. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall. PMID:26773791

  15. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. Discussion: The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. Ethics and dissemination: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University’s Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer

  16. Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation on the Radial artery’s Pressure Pulse Wave in Healthy Young Participants: Protocol for a prospective, single-Arm, Exploratory, Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Young; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Ku, Boncho; Bae, Jang Han; un, Min-Ho; Kim, Jaeuk U.; Kim, Tae-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aims to investigate the effects of acupuncture stimulation on the radial artery’s pressure pulse wave, along with various hemodynamic parameters, and to explore the possible underlying mechanism of pulse diagnosis in healthy participants in their twenties. Methods and analysis: This study is a prospective, single-arm, exploratory clinical study. A total of 25 healthy participants, without regard to gender, in their twenties will be recruited by physicians. Written informed consent will be obtained from all participants. The participants will receive acupuncture once at ST36 on both sides. The radial arterial pulse waves will be measured on the left arm of the subjects by using an applicable pulse tonometric device (KIOM-PAS). On the right arm (appearing twice), electrocardiogram (ECG), photoplethysmogram (PPG), respiration and cardiac output (CO) signals, will be measured using a physiological data acquisition system (Biopac module), while the velocity of blood flow, and the diameter and the depth of the blood vessel will be measured using an ultrasonogram machine on the right arm (appearing twice). All measurements will be conducted before, during, and after acupuncture. The primary outcome will be the spectral energy at high frequencies above 10 Hz (SE10-30Hz) calculated from the KIOM-PAS device signal. Secondary outcomes will be various variables obtained from the KIOM-PAS device, ECG, PPG, impedance cardiography modules, and an ultrasonogram machine. Discussion: The results of this trial will provide information regarding the physiological and the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying acupuncture stimulation and clinical evidence for the influence of acupuncture on the pressure pulse wave in the radial artery. Ethics and dissemination: This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) of Kyung Hee University’s Oriental Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (KOMCIRB-150818-HR-030). The study findings will be published in peer

  17. High frame rate and high line density ultrasound imaging for local pulse wave velocity estimation using motion matching: A feasibility study on vessel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Li, Fubing; He, Qiong; Huang, Chengwu; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinhua; Luo, Jianwen

    2016-04-01

    Pulse wave imaging (PWI) is an ultrasound-based method to visualize the propagation of pulse wave and to quantitatively estimate regional pulse wave velocity (PWV) of the arteries within the imaging field of view (FOV). To guarantee the reliability of PWV measurement, high frame rate imaging is required, which can be achieved by reducing the line density of ultrasound imaging or transmitting plane wave at the expense of spatial resolution and/or signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this study, a composite, full-view imaging method using motion matching was proposed with both high temporal and spatial resolution. Ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data of 4 sub-sectors, each with 34 beams, including a common beam, were acquired successively to achieve a frame rate of ∼507 Hz at an imaging depth of 35 mm. The acceleration profiles of the vessel wall estimated from the common beam were used to reconstruct the full-view (38-mm width, 128-beam) image sequence. The feasibility of mapping local PWV variation along the artery using PWI technique was preliminarily validated on both homogeneous and inhomogeneous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel vessel phantoms. Regional PWVs for the three homogeneous phantoms measured by the proposed method were in accordance with the sparse imaging method (38-mm width, 32-beam) and plane wave imaging method. Local PWV was estimated using the above-mentioned three methods on 3 inhomogeneous phantoms, and good agreement was obtained in both the softer (1.91±0.24 m/s, 1.97±0.27 m/s and 1.78±0.28 m/s) and the stiffer region (4.17±0.46 m/s, 3.99±0.53 m/s and 4.27±0.49 m/s) of the phantoms. In addition to the improved spatial resolution, higher precision of local PWV estimation in low SNR circumstances was also obtained by the proposed method as compared with the sparse imaging method. The proposed method might be helpful in disease detections through mapping the local PWV of the vascular wall.

  18. Blood flow in intracranial aneurysms treated with Pipeline embolization devices: computational simulation and verification with Doppler ultrasonography on phantom models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation of flow-diverter treatment through Doppler ultrasonography measurements in patient-specific models of intracranial bifurcation and side-wall aneurysms. Methods: Computational and physical models of patient-specific bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms were constructed from computed tomography angiography with use of stereolithography, a three-dimensional printing technology. Flow dynamics parameters before and after flow-diverter treatment were measured with pulse-wave and color Doppler ultrasonography, and then compared with CFD simulations. Results: CFD simulations showed drastic flow reduction after flow-diverter treatment in both aneurysms. The mean volume flow rate decreased by 90% and 85% for the bifurcation aneurysm and the side-wall aneurysm, respectively. Velocity contour plots from computer simulations before and after flow diversion closely resembled the patterns obtained by color Doppler ultrasonography. Conclusion: The CFD estimation of flow reduction in aneurysms treated with a flow-diverting stent was verified by Doppler ultrasonography in patient-specific phantom models of bifurcation and side-wall aneurysms. The combination of CFD and ultrasonography may constitute a feasible and reliable technique in studying the treatment of intracranial aneurysms with flow-diverting stents. PMID:25754367

  19. Laser Doppler flowmetry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Gert E.; Wardell, Karin

    1994-02-01

    A laser Doppler perfusion imager has been developed that makes possible mapping of tissue blood flow over surfaces with extensions up to about 12 cm X 12 cm. The He-Ne laser beam scans the tissue under study throughout 4096 measurement sites. A fraction of the backscattered and Doppler broadened light is detected by a photo diode positioned about 20 cm above the tissue surface. After processing, a signal that scales linearly with perfusion is stored in a computer and a color coded image of the spatial tissue perfusion is shown on a monitor. A full format scan is completed in about 4.5 minutes. Algorithms for calculating perfusion profiles and averages as well as substraction of one image from another, form an integral part of the system data analysis software. The perfusion images can also be exported to other software packages for further processing and analysis.

  20. Doppler radar results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracalente, Emedio M.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are covered in viewgraph form and include the following: (1) a summary of radar flight data collected; (2) a video of combined aft cockpit, nose camera, and radar hazard displays; (3) a comparison of airborne radar F-factor measurements with in situ and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) F-factors for some sample events; and (4) a summary of wind shear detection performance.

  1. Holographic laser Doppler ophthalmoscopy.

    PubMed

    Simonutti, M; Paques, M; Sahel, J A; Gross, M; Samson, B; Magnain, C; Atlan, M

    2010-06-15

    We report laser Doppler ophthalmoscopic fundus imaging in the rat eye with near-IR heterodyne holography. Sequential sampling of the beat of the reflected radiation against a frequency-shifted optical local oscillator is made onto an array detector. Wide-field maps of fluctuation spectra in the 10 Hz to 25 kHz band exhibit angiographic contrasts in the retinal vascular tree without requirement of an exogenous marker.

  2. Reduction in visceral adiposity is highly related to improvement in vascular endothelial dysfunction among obese women: an assessment of endothelial function by radial artery pulse wave analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Hoon; Shim, Kyung-Won

    2005-08-31

    Because obesity is frequently complicated by other cardiovascular risk factors, the impact of a reduction in visceral adiposity on vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) in obese patients is difficult to determine. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of a reduction in visceral adiposity on VED in obese women. Thirty-six premenopausal obese women (BMI >/= 25 kg/m2) without complications were enrolled in the study. VED was evaluated by determining the augmentation index (AIx) from radial artery pulse waves obtained by applanation tonometry. Changes in AIx in response to nitroglycerin- induced endothelium-independent vasodilatation (DeltaAIx-NTG) and in response to salbutamol administration (DeltaAIx-Salb) were determined before and after weight reduction. After a 12-week weight reduction program, the average weight loss was 7.96 +/- 3.47 kg, with losses of 21.88 +/- 20.39 cm2 in visceral fat areas (p < 0.001). Pulse wave analysis combined with provocative pharmacological testing demonstrated preserved endothelium-independent vasodilation in healthy premenopausal obese women (DeltaAIx-NTG: 31.36 +/- 9.80% before weight reduction vs. 28.25 +/- 11.21% after weight reduction, p > 0.1) and an improvement in endothelial-dependent vasodilation following weight reduction (DeltaAIx-Salb: 10.03 +/- 6.49% before weight reduction vs. 19.33 +/- 9.28% after reduction, p < 0.001). A reduction in visceral adipose tissue was found to be most significantly related to an increase in DeltaAIx-Salb (beta=-0.57, p < 0.001). A reduction in visceral adiposity was significantly related to an improvement in VED. This finding suggests that reduction of visceral adiposity may be as important as the control of other major risk factors in the prevention of atherosclerosis in obese women. PMID:16127776

  3. Evaluation of New Calibrated Pulse-Wave Analysis (VolumeViewTM/EV1000TM) for Cardiac Output Monitoring Undergoing Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Park, MiHye; Han, Sangbin; Kim, Gaab Soo; Gwak, Mi Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background Intrapulmonary thermodilution technique using a pulmonary artery catheter is widely used for measuring cardiac output (CO) in patients undergoing liver transplantation. However, its invasiveness and associated complications have led to an interest in less invasive modalities. Thus, we aimed to evaluate whether the new calibrated pulse-wave analysis method monitoring (VolumeViewTM/EV1000TM) is interchangeable with intrapulmonary thermodilution technique. Methods Twenty-eight patients undergoing living donor liver transplantation were enrolled in this prospective observational study. COs were recorded automatically by the two devices and compared simultaneously at 10-minute intervals. The agreement of absolute CO values and the tracking ability of CO changes trends were compared. A Bland-Altman analysis with percentage errors and concordance rate for trend analysis using both a 4-quadrant plot and a polar plot were performed on the data. Results A total of 375 paired datasets from 25 patients were included in analysis. COs measured by intrapulmonary thermodilution ranged from 3.8–13.7 L/min. The mean CO difference between the two techniques was 0.57 L/min, and the 95% limits of agreement were -0.98 L/min to 2.12 L/min with a percentage error of 42.3%. The percentage errors in the dissection, anhepatic, and reperfusion phase were 30.5%, 31.7%, and 27.4%, respectively. The concordance rate between the two techniques was 78.4%. Conclusion The calibrated pulse-wave analysis and intrapulmonary thermodilution failed to show acceptable interchangeability in terms of both estimating CO and tracking CO changes during living donor liver transplantation. PMID:27736921

  4. Ethnic Differences in and Childhood Influences on Early Adult Pulse Wave Velocity: The Determinants of Adolescent, Now Young Adult, Social Wellbeing, and Health Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Silva, Maria J; Molaodi, Oarabile R; Enayat, Zinat E; Cassidy, Aidan; Karamanos, Alexis; Read, Ursula M; Faconti, Luca; Dall, Philippa; Stansfield, Ben; Harding, Seeromanie

    2016-06-01

    Early determinants of aortic stiffness as pulse wave velocity are poorly understood. We tested how factors measured twice previously in childhood in a multiethnic cohort study, particularly body mass, blood pressure, and objectively assessed physical activity affected aortic stiffness in young adults. Of 6643 London children, aged 11 to 13 years, from 51 schools in samples stratified by 6 ethnic groups with different cardiovascular risk, 4785 (72%) were seen again at aged 14 to 16 years. In 2013, 666 (97% of invited) took part in a young adult (21-23 years) pilot follow-up. With psychosocial and anthropometric measures, aortic stiffness and blood pressure were recorded via an upper arm calibrated Arteriograph device. In a subsample (n=334), physical activity was measured >5 days via the ActivPal. Unadjusted pulse wave velocities in black Caribbean and white UK young men were similar (mean±SD 7.9±0.3 versus 7.6±0.4 m/s) and lower in other groups at similar systolic pressures (120 mm Hg) and body mass (24.6 kg/m(2)). In fully adjusted regression models, independent of pressure effects, black Caribbean (higher body mass/waists), black African, and Indian young women had lower stiffness (by 0.5-0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-1.1 m/s) than did white British women (6.9±0.2 m/s). Values were separately increased by age, pressure, powerful impacts from waist/height, time spent sedentary, and a reported racism effect (+0.3 m/s). Time walking at >100 steps/min was associated with reduced stiffness (P<0.01). Effects of childhood waist/hip were detected. By young adulthood, increased waist/height ratios, lower physical activity, blood pressure, and psychosocial variables (eg, perceived racism) independently increase arterial stiffness, effects likely to increase with age.

  5. A database of virtual healthy subjects to assess the accuracy of foot-to-foot pulse wave velocities for estimation of aortic stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Chowienczyk, Phil; Alastruey, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    While central (carotid-femoral) foot-to-foot pulse wave velocity (PWV) is considered to be the gold standard for the estimation of aortic arterial stiffness, peripheral foot-to-foot PWV (brachial-ankle, femoral-ankle, and carotid-radial) are being studied as substitutes of this central measurement. We present a novel methodology to assess theoretically these computed indexes and the hemodynamics mechanisms relating them. We created a database of 3,325 virtual healthy adult subjects using a validated one-dimensional model of the arterial hemodynamics, with cardiac and arterial parameters varied within physiological healthy ranges. For each virtual subject, foot-to-foot PWV was computed from numerical pressure waveforms at the same locations where clinical measurements are commonly taken. Our numerical results confirm clinical observations: 1) carotid-femoral PWV is a good indicator of aortic stiffness and correlates well with aortic PWV; 2) brachial-ankle PWV overestimates aortic PWV and is related to the stiffness and geometry of both elastic and muscular arteries; and 3) muscular PWV (carotid-radial, femoral-ankle) does not capture the stiffening of the aorta and should therefore not be used as a surrogate for aortic stiffness. In addition, our analysis highlights that the foot-to-foot PWV algorithm is sensitive to the presence of reflected waves in late diastole, which introduce errors in the PWV estimates. In this study, we have created a database of virtual healthy subjects, which can be used to assess theoretically the efficiency of physiological indexes based on pulse wave analysis. PMID:26055792

  6. Ethnic Differences in and Childhood Influences on Early Adult Pulse Wave Velocity: The Determinants of Adolescent, Now Young Adult, Social Wellbeing, and Health Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Silva, Maria J; Molaodi, Oarabile R; Enayat, Zinat E; Cassidy, Aidan; Karamanos, Alexis; Read, Ursula M; Faconti, Luca; Dall, Philippa; Stansfield, Ben; Harding, Seeromanie

    2016-06-01

    Early determinants of aortic stiffness as pulse wave velocity are poorly understood. We tested how factors measured twice previously in childhood in a multiethnic cohort study, particularly body mass, blood pressure, and objectively assessed physical activity affected aortic stiffness in young adults. Of 6643 London children, aged 11 to 13 years, from 51 schools in samples stratified by 6 ethnic groups with different cardiovascular risk, 4785 (72%) were seen again at aged 14 to 16 years. In 2013, 666 (97% of invited) took part in a young adult (21-23 years) pilot follow-up. With psychosocial and anthropometric measures, aortic stiffness and blood pressure were recorded via an upper arm calibrated Arteriograph device. In a subsample (n=334), physical activity was measured >5 days via the ActivPal. Unadjusted pulse wave velocities in black Caribbean and white UK young men were similar (mean±SD 7.9±0.3 versus 7.6±0.4 m/s) and lower in other groups at similar systolic pressures (120 mm Hg) and body mass (24.6 kg/m(2)). In fully adjusted regression models, independent of pressure effects, black Caribbean (higher body mass/waists), black African, and Indian young women had lower stiffness (by 0.5-0.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-1.1 m/s) than did white British women (6.9±0.2 m/s). Values were separately increased by age, pressure, powerful impacts from waist/height, time spent sedentary, and a reported racism effect (+0.3 m/s). Time walking at >100 steps/min was associated with reduced stiffness (P<0.01). Effects of childhood waist/hip were detected. By young adulthood, increased waist/height ratios, lower physical activity, blood pressure, and psychosocial variables (eg, perceived racism) independently increase arterial stiffness, effects likely to increase with age. PMID:27141061

  7. Doppler Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Werkmeister, René M.; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  8. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  9. Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Leitgeb, Rainer A; Werkmeister, René M; Blatter, Cedric; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2014-07-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has revolutionized ophthalmology. Since its introduction in the early 1990s it has continuously improved in terms of speed, resolution and sensitivity. The technique has also seen a variety of extensions aiming to assess functional aspects of the tissue in addition to morphology. One of these approaches is Doppler OCT (DOCT), which aims to visualize and quantify blood flow. Such extensions were already implemented in time domain systems, but have gained importance with the introduction of Fourier domain OCT. Nowadays phase-sensitive detection techniques are most widely used to extract blood velocity and blood flow from tissues. A common problem with the technique is that the Doppler angle is not known and several approaches have been realized to obtain absolute velocity and flow data from the retina. Additional studies are required to elucidate which of these techniques is most promising. In the recent years, however, several groups have shown that data can be obtained with high validity and reproducibility. In addition, several groups have published values for total retinal blood flow. Another promising application relates to non-invasive angiography. As compared to standard techniques such as fluorescein and indocyanine-green angiography the technique offers two major advantages: no dye is required and depth resolution is required is provided. As such Doppler OCT has the potential to improve our abilities to diagnose and monitor ocular vascular diseases. PMID:24704352

  10. Laser Doppler diagnostics for orthodontia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkova, Anastasia V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Kharish, Natalia A.

    2004-06-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of intensity fluctuations of light, scattered from mucous membrane of oral cavity of healthy volunteers and patients, abused by the orthodontic diseases, are presented. Analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, is carried out. New approach to monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of Doppler measuring system on formation of the output signal is studied.

  11. Attenuated Vector Tomography -- An Approach to Image Flow Vector Fields with Doppler Ultrasonic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiu; Peng, Qiyu; Huang, Bin; Cheryauka, Arvi; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2008-05-15

    The measurement of flow obtained using continuous wave Doppler ultrasound is formulated as a directional projection of a flow vector field. When a continuous ultrasound wave bounces against a flowing particle, a signal is backscattered. This signal obtains a Doppler frequency shift proportional to the speed of the particle along the ultrasound beam. This occurs for each particle along the beam, giving rise to a Doppler velocity spectrum. The first moment of the spectrum provides the directional projection of the flow along theultrasound beam. Signals reflected from points further away from the detector will have lower amplitude than signals reflected from points closer to the detector. The effect is very much akin to that modeled by the attenuated Radon transform in emission computed tomography.A least-squares method was adopted to reconstruct a 2D vector field from directional projection measurements. Attenuated projections of only the longitudinal projections of the vector field were simulated. The components of the vector field were reconstructed using the gradient algorithm to minimize a least-squares criterion. This result was compared with the reconstruction of longitudinal projections of the vector field without attenuation. Ifattenuation is known, the algorithm was able to accurately reconstruct both components of the full vector field from only one set of directional projection measurements. A better reconstruction was obtained with attenuation than without attenuation implying that attenuation provides important information for the reconstruction of flow vector fields.This confirms previous work where we showed that knowledge of the attenuation distribution helps in the reconstruction of MRI diffusion tensor fields from fewer than the required measurements. In the application of ultrasound the attenuation distribution is obtained with pulse wave transmission computed tomography and flow information is obtained with continuous wave Doppler.

  12. The flail mitral valve: echocardiographic findings by precordial and transesophageal imaging and Doppler color flow mapping.

    PubMed

    Himelman, R B; Kusumoto, F; Oken, K; Lee, E; Cahalan, M K; Shah, P M; Schiller, N B

    1991-01-01

    To determine the echocardiographic and Doppler characteristics of mitral regurgitation associated with a flail mitral valve, precordial and transesophageal echocardiography with pulsed wave and Doppler color flow mapping was performed in 17 patients with a flail mitral valve leaflet due to ruptured chordae tendineae (Group I) and 22 patients with moderate or severe mitral regurgitation due to other causes (Group II). Echocardiograms were performed before or during cardiac surgery; cardiac catheterization was also performed in 28 patients (72%). Mitral valve disease was confirmed at cardiac surgery in all patients. By echocardiography, the presence of a flail mitral valve leaflet was defined by the presence of abnormal mitral leaflet coaptation or ruptured chordae. Using these criteria, transesophageal imaging showed a trend toward greater sensitivity and specificity than precordial imaging in the diagnosis of flail mitral valve leaflet. By Doppler color flow mapping, a flail mitral valve leaflet was also characterized by an eccentric, peripheral, circular mitral regurgitant jet that closely adhered to the walls of the left atrium. The direction of flow of the eccentric jet in the left atrium distinguished a flail anterior from a flail posterior leaflet. By transesophageal echocardiography with Doppler color flow mapping, the ratio of mitral regurgitant jet arc length to radius of curvature was significantly higher in Group I than Group II patients (5.0 +/- 2.3 versus 0.7 +/- 0.6, p less than 0.001); all of the Group I patients and none of the Group II patients had a ratio greater than 2.5.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Laser Doppler velocimetry primer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachalo, William D.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced research in experimental fluid dynamics required a familiarity with sophisticated measurement techniques. In some cases, the development and application of new techniques is required for difficult measurements. Optical methods and in particular, the laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) are now recognized as the most reliable means for performing measurements in complex turbulent flows. And such, the experimental fluid dynamicist should be familiar with the principles of operation of the method and the details associated with its application. Thus, the goals of this primer are to efficiently transmit the basic concepts of the LDV method to potential users and to provide references that describe the specific areas in greater detail.

  14. A Fisheye Lens as a Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect

    Frogget, B. C.

    2012-08-16

    These presentation visuals report an instrument that, by use of a fish-eye lens, generates a beat signal using fiber mixing of unshifted light with Doppler-shifted light and measures the beat frequency. Ray trace diagrams are shown to illustrate advantages and disadvantages. The authors find their instrument has a long tracking distance, and large angle coverage. Index matching eases assembly, reduces return loss and flattens the field.

  15. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  16. Doppler Beats or Interference Fringes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Paul S.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the following: another version of Doppler beats; alternate proof of spin-1 sin-1/2 problems; some mechanisms related to Dirac's strings; Doppler redshift in oblique approach of source and observer; undergraduate experiment on noise thermometry; use of the time evolution operator; resolution of an entropy maximization controversy;…

  17. Real-time arrhythmia detection with supplementary ECG quality and pulse wave monitoring for the reduction of false alarms in ICUs.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Leber, Remo; Schmid, Ramun; Abächerli, Roger

    2016-08-01

    False intensive care unit (ICU) alarms induce stress in both patients and clinical staff and decrease the quality of care, thus significantly increasing both the hospital recovery time and rehospitalization rates. In the PhysioNet/CinC Challenge 2015 for reducing false arrhythmia alarms in ICU bedside monitor data, this paper validates the application of a real-time arrhythmia detection library (ADLib, Schiller AG) for the robust detection of five types of life-threatening arrhythmia alarms. The strength of the application is to give immediate feedback on the arrhythmia event within a scan interval of 3 s-7.5 s, and to increase the noise immunity of electrocardiogram (ECG) arrhythmia analysis by fusing its decision with supplementary ECG quality interpretation and real-time pulse wave monitoring (quality and hemodynamics) using arterial blood pressure or photoplethysmographic signals. We achieved the third-ranked real-time score (79.41) in the challenge (Event 1), however, the rank was not officially recognized due to the 'closed-source' entry. This study shows the optimization of the alarm decision module, using tunable parameters such as the scan interval, lead quality threshold, and pulse wave features, with a follow-up improvement of the real-time score (80.07). The performance (true positive rate, true negative rate) is reported in the blinded challenge test set for different arrhythmias: asystole (83%, 96%), extreme bradycardia (100%, 90%), extreme tachycardia (98%, 80%), ventricular tachycardia (84%, 82%), and ventricular fibrillation (78%, 84%). Another part of this study considers the validation of ADLib with four reference ECG databases (AHA, EDB, SVDB, MIT-BIH) according to the international recommendations for performance reports in ECG monitors (ANSI/AAMI EC57). The sensitivity (Se) and positive predictivity (+P) are: QRS detector QRS (Se, +P)  >  99.7%, ventricular ectopic beat (VEB) classifier VEB (Se, +P)  =  95%, and ventricular

  18. Real-time arrhythmia detection with supplementary ECG quality and pulse wave monitoring for the reduction of false alarms in ICUs.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Vessela; Jekova, Irena; Leber, Remo; Schmid, Ramun; Abächerli, Roger

    2016-08-01

    False intensive care unit (ICU) alarms induce stress in both patients and clinical staff and decrease the quality of care, thus significantly increasing both the hospital recovery time and rehospitalization rates. In the PhysioNet/CinC Challenge 2015 for reducing false arrhythmia alarms in ICU bedside monitor data, this paper validates the application of a real-time arrhythmia detection library (ADLib, Schiller AG) for the robust detection of five types of life-threatening arrhythmia alarms. The strength of the application is to give immediate feedback on the arrhythmia event within a scan interval of 3 s-7.5 s, and to increase the noise immunity of electrocardiogram (ECG) arrhythmia analysis by fusing its decision with supplementary ECG quality interpretation and real-time pulse wave monitoring (quality and hemodynamics) using arterial blood pressure or photoplethysmographic signals. We achieved the third-ranked real-time score (79.41) in the challenge (Event 1), however, the rank was not officially recognized due to the 'closed-source' entry. This study shows the optimization of the alarm decision module, using tunable parameters such as the scan interval, lead quality threshold, and pulse wave features, with a follow-up improvement of the real-time score (80.07). The performance (true positive rate, true negative rate) is reported in the blinded challenge test set for different arrhythmias: asystole (83%, 96%), extreme bradycardia (100%, 90%), extreme tachycardia (98%, 80%), ventricular tachycardia (84%, 82%), and ventricular fibrillation (78%, 84%). Another part of this study considers the validation of ADLib with four reference ECG databases (AHA, EDB, SVDB, MIT-BIH) according to the international recommendations for performance reports in ECG monitors (ANSI/AAMI EC57). The sensitivity (Se) and positive predictivity (+P) are: QRS detector QRS (Se, +P)  >  99.7%, ventricular ectopic beat (VEB) classifier VEB (Se, +P)  =  95%, and ventricular

  19. Effects of salt substitute on pulse wave analysis among individuals at high cardiovascular risk in rural China: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jihong; Jiang, Xiongjing; Li, Nicole; Yu, Xuequn; Perkovic, Vlado; Chen, Bailing; Zhao, Liancheng; Neal, Bruce; Wu, Yangfeng

    2009-04-01

    Reduced-sodium, increased-potassium salt substitutes lower blood pressure but may also have direct effects on vascular structure and arterial function. This study aimed to test the effects of long-term salt substitution on indices of these outcomes. The China Salt Substitute Study was a randomized, controlled trial designed to establish the effects of salt substitute (65% sodium chloride, 25% potassium chloride, 10% magnesium sulfate) compared with regular salt (100% sodium chloride) on blood pressure among 600 high-risk individuals living in six rural areas in northern China over a 12-month intervention period. Data on central aortic blood pressure, aortic pressure augmentation (AUG), augmentation index (AIx), the differences of the peak of first and baseline waves (P(1)-P(0)) and pulse wave reflection time (RT) were collected at randomization and at the completion of follow-up in 187 participants using the Sphygmocor pulse wave analysis system. Mean baseline blood pressure was 150.1/91.4 mm Hg, mean age was 58.4 years, 41% were male and three quarters had a history of vascular disease. After 12 months of intervention, there were significant net reductions in peripheral (7.4 mm Hg, P=0.009) and central (6.9 mm Hg, P=0.011) systolic blood pressure levels and central pulse pressure (4.5 mm Hg, P=0.012) and correspondingly there was a significant net reduction in P(1)-P(0) (3.0 mm Hg, P=0.007), borderline significant net reduction in AUG (1.5 mm Hg, P=0.074) and significant net increase in RT (2.59 ms, P=0.001). There were no detectable reductions in peripheral (2.8 mm Hg, P=0.14) or central (2.4 mm Hg, P=0.13) diastolic blood pressure levels or AIx (0.06%, P=0.96). In conclusion, over the 12-month study period the salt substitute significantly reduced not only peripheral and central systolic blood pressure but also reduced arterial stiffness.

  20. Brief history of vector Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmire, Barbrina; Beach, Kirk W.

    2001-05-01

    Since the development of the directional Doppler by McLeod in 1967, methods of acquiring, analyzing, and displaying blood velocity information have been under constant exploration. These efforts are motivated by a variety of interest and objectives including, to: a) simplify clinical examination, examiner training, and study interpretation, b) provide more hemodynamic information, and c) reduce examination variability and improve accuracy. The vector Doppler technique has been proposed as one potential avenue to achieve these objects. Vector Doppler systems are those that determine the true 2D or 3D blood flow velocity by combining multiple independent velocity component measurements. Most instruments can be divided into two broad categories: 1) cross-beam and 2) time-domain. This paper provides a brief synopsis of the progression of vector Doppler techniques, from its onset in 1970 to present, as well as possible avenues for future work. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of all vector Doppler systems.

  1. Regional in vivo transit time measurements of aortic pulse wave velocity in mice with high-field CMR at 17.6 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Transgenic mouse models are increasingly used to study the pathophysiology of human cardiovascular diseases. The aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is an indirect measure for vascular stiffness and a marker for cardiovascular risk. Results This study presents a cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) transit time (TT) method that allows the determination of the PWV in the descending murine aorta by analyzing blood flow waveforms. Systolic flow pulses were recorded with a temporal resolution of 1 ms applying phase velocity encoding. In a first step, the CMR method was validated by pressure waveform measurements on a pulsatile elastic vessel phantom. In a second step, the CMR method was applied to measure PWVs in a group of five eight-month-old apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice and an age matched group of four C57Bl/6J mice. The ApoE(-/-) group had a higher mean PWV (PWV = 3.0 ± 0.6 m/s) than the C57Bl/6J group (PWV = 2.4 ± 0.4 m/s). The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.014). Conclusions The findings of this study demonstrate that high field CMR is applicable to non-invasively determine and distinguish PWVs in the arterial system of healthy and diseased groups of mice. PMID:21134260

  2. Quantification of the pulse wave velocity of the descending aorta using axial velocity profiles from phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hsi-Yu; Peng, Hsu-Hsia; Wang, Jaw-Lin; Wen, Chih-Yung; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2006-10-01

    The pulse wave velocity (PWV) of aortic blood flow is considered a surrogate for aortic compliance. A new method using phase-contrast (PC)-MRI is presented whereby the spatial and temporal profiles of axial velocity along the descending aorta can be analyzed. Seventeen young healthy volunteers (the YH group), six older healthy volunteers (the OH group), and six patients with coronary artery disease (the CAD group) were studied. PC-MRI covering the whole descending aorta was acquired, with velocity gradients encoding the in-plane velocity. From the corrected axial flow velocity profiles, PWV was determined from the slope of an intersecting line between the presystolic and early systolic phases. Furthermore, the aortic elastic modulus (Ep) was derived from the ratio of the brachial pulse pressure to the strain of the aortic diameter. The PWV increased from YH to OH to CAD (541 +/- 94, 808 +/- 184, 1121 +/- 218 cm/s, respectively; P = 0.015 between YH and OH; P = 0.023 between OH and CAD). There was a high correlation between PWV and Ep (r = 0.861, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that age and CAD were independent risk factors for an increase in the PWV. Compared to existing methods, our method requires fewer assumptions and provides a more intuitive and objective way to estimate the PWV.

  3. Is There an Association Between Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Coronary Heart Disease in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Katsiki, Niki; Kollari, Erietta; Dardas, Sotirios; Dardas, Petros; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Athyros, Vasilios G.; Karagiannis, Asterios

    2016-01-01

    Arterial stiffness has been shown to predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is regarded the gold standard marker of arterial stiffness. In previous studies, cfPWV was associated with the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD). However, with regard to CHD severity as assessed by the Syntax Score, only brachial-ankle PWV was reported to correlate with Syntax Score; no data exist for cfPWV. In this pilot study, we evaluated the possible associations between cfPWV, CHD and Syntax Score in 62 consecutive pa-tients (49 males; mean age: 64±12years) with chest pain undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. cfPWV was signifi-cantly higher in CHD patients than in non-CHD individuals (10 vs. 8.4 m/s; p = 0.003). No significant association was found between cfPWV and CHD severity as assessed by Syntax Score. A cut-off point of 12.3 m/s was considered as diagnostic for abnormally increased cfPWV (specificity: 97%; sensitivity: 12%; positive likelihood ratio: 3.558). Further research is needed to establish the relationship between cfPWV and Syntax Score. PMID:27347222

  4. Effects of pomegranate juice supplementation on pulse wave velocity and blood pressure in healthy young and middle-aged men and women.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Anthony; Hamadeh, Hiba; Leung, Wing Chi; Russell, Jean M; Barker, Margo E

    2012-09-01

    Pomegranate juice may improve cardiovascular risk because of its content of antioxidant polyphenols. We conducted a randomized placebo-controlled parallel study to examine the effect of pomegranate juice on pulse wave velocity (PWV), blood pressure (BP) and plasma antioxidant status (ferric reducing power; FRAP) in 51 healthy adults (30-50 years). Participants consumed 330 ml/day of pomegranate juice or control drink for four weeks. Measurements were made at baseline and at four weeks. There was no effect of the intervention on PWV (P = 0.694) and plasma FRAP (P = 0.700). However, there was a significant fall in systolic blood pressure (-3.14 mmHg, P < 0.001), diastolic blood pressure (-2.33 mmHg P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (-2.60 mmHg, P < 0.001). Change in weight was similar in the two groups over the intervention period (P = 0.379). The fall in BP was not paralleled by changes in concentration of serum angiotensin converting enzyme. We conclude that pomegranate juice supplementation has benefits for BP in the short term, but has no effect on PWV. The mechanism for the effect is uncertain.

  5. Laser speckle contrast imaging: age-related changes in microvascular blood flow and correlation with pulse-wave velocity in healthy subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Adil; Humeau-Heurtier, Anne; Mahé, Guillaume; Abraham, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    In the cardiovascular system, the macrocirculation and microcirculation-two subsystems-can be affected by aging. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an emerging noninvasive optical technique that allows the monitoring of microvascular function and can help, using specific data processing, to understand the relationship between the subsystems. Using LSCI, the goals of this study are: (i) to assess the aging effect over microvascular parameters (perfusion and moving blood cells velocity, MBCV) and macrocirculation parameters (pulse-wave velocity, PWV) and (ii) to study the relationship between these parameters. In 16 healthy subjects (20 to 62 years old), perfusion and MBCV computed from LSCI are studied in three physiological states: rest, vascular occlusion, and post-occlusive reactive hyperaemia (PORH). MBCV is computed from a model of velocity distribution. During PORH, the experimental results show a relationship between perfusion and age (R2=0.67) and between MBCV and age (R2=0.72), as well as between PWV and age at rest (R2=0.91). A relationship is also found between perfusion and MBCV for all physiological states (R2=0.98). Relationships between microcirculation and macrocirculation (perfusion-PWV or MBCV-PWV) are found only during PORH with R2=0.76 and R2=0.77, respectively. This approach may prove useful for investigating dysregulation in blood flow.

  6. Effects of Short-Term Exenatide Treatment on Regional Fat Distribution, Glycated Hemoglobin Levels, and Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity of Obese Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Keun-Young; Kim, Byung-Joon; Hwang, Won-Min; Kim, Dong-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background Most type 2 diabetes mellitus patients are obese and have obesity related vascular complications. Exenatide treatment is well known for both decreasing glycated hemoglobin levels and reduction in body weight. So, this study aimed to determine the effects of exenatide on body composition, glycated hemoglobin levels, and vascular stiffness in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Methods For 1 month, 32 obese type 2 diabetes mellitus patients were administered 5 µg of exenatide twice daily. The dosage was then increased to 10 µg. Patients' height, body weight, glycated hemoglobin levels, lipid profile, pulse wave velocity (PWV), body mass index, fat mass, and muscle mass were measured by using Inbody at baseline and after 3 months of treatment. Results After 3 months of treatment, glycated hemoglobin levels decreased significantly (P=0.007). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, and low density lipoprotein levels decreased, while aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels were no change. Body weight, and fat mass decreased significantly (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively), while interestingly, muscle mass did not decrease (P=0.289). In addition to, Waist-to-hip ratio and aortic PWV decreased significantly (P=0.006 and P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion Effects of short term exenatide use in obese type 2 diabetes mellitus with cardiometabolic high risk patients not only reduced body weight without muscle mass loss, body fat mass, and glycated hemoglobin levels but also improved aortic PWV in accordance with waist to hip ratio. PMID:26676329

  7. Nd:YAG pulsed-wave laser as support therapy in the treatment of teno-desmopathies of athlete horses: a clinical and experimental trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Damiano; Rossi, Giacomo; Paolini, Cesare; Magi, Alberto; Losani, Fabrizio; Fallaci, Simone; Pacini, Franco; Porciani, Chiara; Sandler, Anna; Dalla Torre, Riccarda; Pinna, Stefania; Venturini, Antonio

    2002-10-01

    The ultrasonic evolution of tendinous repair envisages the recovery of ecogenicity: "reparative phase", followed by the realignment of the collagen fibres: "rehabilitative phase". The primary objective was to verify the safety and efficacy of Nd:YAG pulsed wave on teno- desmopathies of horses. Secondary to shorten "reparative phase" for to provide more time for "rehabilitative phase". The study has been divided into two investigations: experimental and clinical. In the experimental investigation, on 3 meat horses, the safety and tolerance of a power laser (35 W/cm2, 25 J/cm2) was investigated. The clinical investigation was performed on 79 sport horses through randomized double-blind. All subjects (Controls and Treated) received, on the subskin above the tendon lesion, the same local infiltration of immunostimulant. The results indicates that the High Intensity Laser Therapy (HILT) is safe and tolerated. It is able of reducing, in significative way, the "reparative phase", with a lower percentage of relapse (20% Treated and 40% Controls), but it is not able to reduce the time of the "rehabilitative phase".

  8. Relationship between Sum of the Four Limbs' Pulse Pressure and Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Atherosclerosis Risk Factors in Chinese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yansong; Li, Zongbin; Shu, Hua; Liu, Minyan; Chen, Zhilai; Huang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between the sum of the four limbs' pulse pressure (Sum-PP) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and atherosclerosis risk factors and evaluate the feasibility of Sum-PP in diagnosing atherosclerosis systemically. For the purpose, a cross-sectional study was conducted on the basis of medical information of 20748 adults who had a health examination in our hospital. Both Sum-PP and baPWV exhibited significant variations among different human populations grouped by gender, smoking, drinking, and age. Interestingly, Sum-PP had similar varying tendency with baPWV in different populations. And further study in different populations showed that Sum-PP was significantly positively related to baPWV. We also investigated the relationship between Sum-PP, baPWV, and cardiovascular risk factors, respectively. We found that both Sum-PP and baPWV had significant positive correlation with atherosclerosis risk factors while both of them were negatively related to HDL-c. In addition, there was a significant close correlation between Sum-PP and baPWV in the whole population (r = 0.4616, P < 0.0001). Thus, Sum-PP is closely related to baPWV and is of important value for clinical diagnosis of atherosclerosis. PMID:25695080

  9. GEOS-3 Doppler difference tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, B.

    1977-01-01

    The Doppler difference method as applied to track the GEOS 3 spacecraft is discussed. In this method a pair of 2 GHz ground tracking stations simultaneously track a spacecraft beacon to generate an observable signal in which bias and instability of the carrier frequency cancel. The baselines are formed by the tracking sites at Bermuda, Rosman, and Merritt Island. Measurements were made to evaluate the effectiveness of the Doppler differencing procedure in tracking a beacon target with the high dynamic rate of the GEOS 3 orbit. Results indicate the precision of the differenced data to be at a level comparable to the conventional precise two way Doppler tracking.

  10. Digital Doppler measurement with spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Hinedi, Sami M.; Labelle, Remi C.; Bevan, Roland P.; Del Castillo, Hector M.; Chong, Dwayne C.

    1991-01-01

    Digital and analog phase-locked loop (PLL) receivers were operated in parallel, each tracking the residual carrier from a spacecraft. The PLL tracked the downlink carrier and measured its instantaneous phase. This information, combined with a knowledge of the uplink carrier and the transponder ratio, permitted the computation of a Doppler observable. In this way, two separate Doppler measurements were obtained for one observation window. The two receivers agreed on the magnitude of the Doppler effect to within 1 mHz. There was less jitter on the data from the digital receiver. This was due to its smaller noise bandwidth. The demonstration and its results are described.

  11. Real-time three-dimensional color Doppler echocardiography for characterizing the spatial velocity distribution and quantifying the peak flow rate in the left ventricular outflow tract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsujino, H.; Jones, M.; Shiota, T.; Qin, J. X.; Greenberg, N. L.; Cardon, L. A.; Morehead, A. J.; Zetts, A. D.; Travaglini, A.; Bauer, F.; Panza, J. A.; Thomas, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Quantification of flow with pulsed-wave Doppler assumes a "flat" velocity profile in the left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT), which observation refutes. Recent development of real-time, three-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler allows one to obtain an entire cross-sectional velocity distribution of the LVOT, which is not possible using conventional 2-D echo. In an animal experiment, the cross-sectional color Doppler images of the LVOT at peak systole were derived and digitally transferred to a computer to visualize and quantify spatial velocity distributions and peak flow rates. Markedly skewed profiles, with higher velocities toward the septum, were consistently observed. Reference peak flow rates by electromagnetic flow meter correlated well with 3-D peak flow rates (r = 0.94), but with an anticipated underestimation. Real-time 3-D color Doppler echocardiography was capable of determining cross-sectional velocity distributions and peak flow rates, demonstrating the utility of this new method for better understanding and quantifying blood flow phenomena.

  12. Doppler ultrasonographic assessment of maternal and fetal arteries during normal feline gestation.

    PubMed

    Blanco, P G; Rodríguez, R; Olguín, S; Rube, A; Tórtora, M; Gobello, C

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe Doppler parameters of uterine, umbilical, fetal abdominal aorta, fetal renal and fetal internal carotid arteries, as well as fetal heart rate (FHR), during normal feline gestation. Fifteen, 1-4 years of age, weighing 2.5-3.9kg, domestic short-hair pregnant queens, which were born in our institutional cat colony were included in this study. Color and pulsed-wave Doppler evaluations of uterine arteries were performed every 10 days (Day 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60) from mating. Fetal Doppler and M-mode ultrasonography were performed to assess umbilical, fetal abdominal aorta, fetal renal, fetal internal carotid arteries and FHR. Both peak systolic velocity (PSV) and end diastolic velocity (EDV) of uterine artery increased up to parturition (P<0.01), while resistance index (RI) decreased from Day 10 onwards (P<0.01). From Day 40 onwards, RI of umbilical artery diminished, while PSV and EDV augmented (P<0.01). Fetal abdominal aorta (P<0.01), renal (P<0.01) and internal carotid (P<0.01) arteries diminished their RI from Days 40, 60 and 40 onwards, respectively. Both PSV and EDV of these three arteries increased progressively. Fetal heart rate was first registered on Day 20 when it began to increase up to Day 40 and then diminished to the end of gestation (P<0.01). It is concluded that blood flow of uterine, umbilical, fetal abdominal aorta, fetal renal and fetal internal carotid arteries progressively increased during normal feline pregnancy, while FHR rose to mid gestation and then decreased up to parturition.

  13. Dual-Doppler Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huddleston, Lisa L.

    2012-01-01

    When two or more Doppler weather radar systems are monitoring the same region, the Doppler velocities can be combined to form a three-dimensional (3-D) wind vector field thus providing for a more intuitive analysis of the wind field. A real-time display of the 3-D winds can assist forecasters in predicting the onset of convection and severe weather. The data can also be used to initialize local numerical weather prediction models. Two operational Doppler Radar systems are in the vicinity of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS); these systems are operated by the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) and the National Weather Service Melbourne, Fla. (NWS MLB). Dual-Doppler applications were considered by the 45 SW in choosing the site for the new radar. Accordingly, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), NWS MLB and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to investigate the feasibility of establishing dual-Doppler capability using the two existing systems. This study investigated technical, hardware, and software requirements necessary to enable the establishment of a dual-Doppler capability. Review of the available literature pertaining to the dual-Doppler technique and consultation with experts revealed that the physical locations and resulting beam crossing angles of the 45 SW and NWS MLB radars make them ideally suited for a dual-Doppler capability. The dual-Doppler equations were derived to facilitate complete understanding of dual-Doppler synthesis; to determine the technical information requirements; and to determine the components of wind velocity from the equation of continuity and radial velocity data collected by the two Doppler radars. Analysis confirmed the suitability of the existing systems to provide the desired capability. In addition, it is possible that both 45 SW radar data and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar data from Orlando International Airport could be used to alleviate any

  14. Doppler tracking of planetary spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.

    1992-01-01

    This article concerns the measurement of Doppler shift on microwave links that connect planetary spacecraft with the Deep Space Network. Such measurements are made by tracking the Doppler effect with phase-locked loop receivers. A description of equipment and techniques as well as a summary of the appropriate mathematical models are given. The two-way Doppler shift is measured by transmitting a highly-stable microwave (uplink) carrier from a ground station, having the spacecraft coherently transpond this carrier, and using a phase-locked loop receiver at the ground station to track the returned (downlink) carrier. The largest sources of measurement error are usually plasma noise and thermal noise. The plasma noise, which may originate in the ionosphere or the solar corona, is discussed; and a technique to partially calibrate its effect, involving the use of two simultaneous downlink carriers that are coherently related, is described. Range measurements employing Doppler rate-aiding are also described.

  15. Doppler characteristics of sea clutter.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2010-06-01

    Doppler radars can distinguish targets from clutter if the target's velocity along the radar line of sight is beyond that of the clutter. Some targets of interest may have a Doppler shift similar to that of clutter. The nature of sea clutter is different in the clutter and exo-clutter regions. This behavior requires special consideration regarding where a radar can expect to find sea-clutter returns in Doppler space and what detection algorithms are most appropriate to help mitigate false alarms and increase probability of detection of a target. This paper studies the existing state-of-the-art in the understanding of Doppler characteristics of sea clutter and scattering from the ocean to better understand the design and performance choices of a radar in differentiating targets from clutter under prevailing sea conditions.

  16. Mathematical Models for Doppler Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, William M.

    1987-01-01

    Error analysis increases precision of navigation. Report presents improved mathematical models of analysis of Doppler measurements and measurement errors of spacecraft navigation. To take advantage of potential navigational accuracy of Doppler measurements, precise equations relate measured cycle count to position and velocity. Drifts and random variations in transmitter and receiver oscillator frequencies taken into account. Mathematical models also adapted to aircraft navigation, radar, sonar, lidar, and interferometry.

  17. High Resolution Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Grant supported the development of an incoherent lidar system to measure winds and aerosols in the lower atmosphere. During this period the following activities occurred: (1) an active feedback system was developed to improve the laser frequency stability; (2) a detailed forward model of the instrument was developed to take into account many subtle effects, such as detector non-linearity; (3) a non-linear least squares inversion method was developed to recover the Doppler shift and aerosol backscatter without requiring assumptions about the molecular component of the signal; (4) a study was done of the effects of systematic errors due to multiple etalon misalignment. It was discovered that even for small offsets and high aerosol loadings, the wind determination can be biased by as much as 1 m/s. The forward model and inversion process were modified to account for this effect; and (5) the lidar measurements were validated using rawinsonde balloon measurements. The measurements were found to be in agreement within 1-2 m/s.

  18. High Resolution Doppler Imager

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of the High Resolution Doppler Imager (HRDI) on UARS spacecraft during the period 4/l/96 - 3/31/99. During this period, HRDI operation, data processing, and data analysis continued, and there was a high level of vitality in the HRDI project. The HRDI has been collecting data from the stratosphere, mesosphere, and lower thermosphere since instrument activation on October 1, 1991. The HRDI team has stressed three areas since operations commenced: 1) operation of the instrument in a manner which maximizes the quality and versatility of the collected data; 2) algorithm development and validation to produce a high-quality data product; and 3) scientific studies, primarily of the dynamics of the middle atmosphere. There has been no significant degradation in the HRDI instrument since operations began nearly 8 years ago. HRDI operations are fairly routine, although we have continued to look for ways to improve the quality of the scientific product, either by improving existing modes, or by designing new ones. The HRDI instrument has been programmed to collect data for new scientific studies, such as measurements of fluorescence from plants, measuring cloud top heights, and lower atmosphere H2O.

  19. As compared to allopurinol, urate-lowering therapy with febuxostat has superior effects on oxidative stress and pulse wave velocity in patients with severe chronic tophaceous gout.

    PubMed

    Tausche, A-K; Christoph, M; Forkmann, M; Richter, U; Kopprasch, S; Bielitz, C; Aringer, M; Wunderlich, C

    2014-01-01

    We prospectively evaluated whether an effective 12-month uric acid-lowering therapy (ULT) with the available xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors allopurinol and febuxostat in patients with chronic tophaceous gout has an impact on oxidative stress and/or vascular function. Patients with chronic tophaceous gout who did not receive active ULT were included. After clinical evaluation, serum uric acid levels (SUA) and markers of oxidative stress were measured, and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) was assessed. Patients were then treated with allopurinol (n = 9) or with febuxostat (n = 8) to target a SUA level ≤ 360 μmol/L. After 1 year treatment, the SUA levels, markers of oxidative stress and the cfPWV were measured again. Baseline characteristics of both groups showed no significant differences except a higher prevalence of moderate impairment of renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min) in the febuxostat group. Uric acid lowering with either inhibitors of XO resulted in almost equally effective reduction in SUA levels. The both treatment groups did not differ in their baseline cfPWV (allopurinol group: 14.1 ± 3.4 m/s, febuxostat group: 13.7 ± 2.7 m/s, p = 0.80). However, after 1 year of therapy, we observed a significant cfPWV increase in the allopurinol group (16.8 ± 4.3 m/s, p = 0.001 as compared to baseline), but not in the febuxostat patients (13.3 ± 2.3 m/s, p = 0.55). Both febuxostat and allopurinol effectively lower SUA levels in patients with severe gout. However, we observed that febuxostat also appeared to be beneficial in preventing further arterial stiffening. Since cardiovascular events are an important issue in treating patients with gout, this unexpected finding may have important implications and should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials.

  20. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-01-01

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV. PMID:26892486

  1. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D visco-elastic simulations against in vitro measurements.

    PubMed

    Alastruey, Jordi; Khir, Ashraf W; Matthys, Koen S; Segers, Patrick; Sherwin, Spencer J; Verdonck, Pascal R; Parker, Kim H; Peiró, Joaquim

    2011-08-11

    The accuracy of the nonlinear one-dimensional (1-D) equations of pressure and flow wave propagation in Voigt-type visco-elastic arteries was tested against measurements in a well-defined experimental 1:1 replica of the 37 largest conduit arteries in the human systemic circulation. The parameters required by the numerical algorithm were directly measured in the in vitro setup and no data fitting was involved. The inclusion of wall visco-elasticity in the numerical model reduced the underdamped high-frequency oscillations obtained using a purely elastic tube law, especially in peripheral vessels, which was previously reported in this paper [Matthys et al., 2007. Pulse wave propagation in a model human arterial network: Assessment of 1-D numerical simulations against in vitro measurements. J. Biomech. 40, 3476-3486]. In comparison to the purely elastic model, visco-elasticity significantly reduced the average relative root-mean-square errors between numerical and experimental waveforms over the 70 locations measured in the in vitro model: from 3.0% to 2.5% (p<0.012) for pressure and from 15.7% to 10.8% (p<0.002) for the flow rate. In the frequency domain, average relative errors between numerical and experimental amplitudes from the 5th to the 20th harmonic decreased from 0.7% to 0.5% (p<0.107) for pressure and from 7.0% to 3.3% (p<10(-6)) for the flow rate. These results provide additional support for the use of 1-D reduced modelling to accurately simulate clinically relevant problems at a reasonable computational cost.

  2. Independent and Joint Effect of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Blood Pressure Control on Incident Stroke in Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Song, Yun; Xu, Benjamin; Xu, Richard; Tung, Renee; Frank, Eric; Tromble, Wayne; Fu, Tong; Zhang, Weiyi; Yu, Tao; Zhang, Chunyan; Fan, Fangfang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Jianping; Bao, Huihui; Cheng, Xiaoshu; Qin, Xianhui; Tang, Genfu; Chen, Yundai; Yang, Tianlun; Sun, Ningling; Li, Xiaoying; Zhao, Lianyou; Hou, Fan Fan; Ge, Junbo; Dong, Qiang; Wang, Binyan; Xu, Xiping; Huo, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) has been shown to influence the effects of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Data are limited on whether PWV is an independent predictor of stroke above and beyond hypertension control. This longitudinal analysis examined the independent and joint effect of brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) with hypertension control on the risk of first stroke. This report included 3310 hypertensive adults, a subset of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial (CSPPT) with baseline measurements for baPWV. During a median follow-up of 4.5 years, 111 participants developed first stroke. The risk of stroke was higher among participants with baPWV in the highest quartile than among those in the lower quartiles (6.3% versus 2.4%; hazard ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.60). Similarly, the participants with inadequate hypertension control had a higher risk of stroke than those with adequate control (5.1% versus 1.8%; hazard ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.49-3.61). When baPWV and hypertension control were examined jointly, participants in the highest baPWV quartile and with inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with their counterparts (7.5% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 3.57; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-6.77). There was a significant and independent effect of high baPWV on stroke as shown among participants with adequate hypertension control (4.2% versus 1.3%; hazard ratio, 2.29, 95% confidence interval, 1.09-4.81). In summary, among hypertensive patients, baPWV and hypertension control were found to independently and jointly affect the risk of first stroke. Participants with high baPWV and inadequate hypertension control had the highest risk of stroke compared with other groups. PMID:27217412

  3. Robot-assisted gait training improves brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eun Young; Im, Sang Hee; Kim, Bo Ryun; Seo, Min Ji; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) evaluates arterial stiffness and also predicts early outcome in stroke patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate arterial stiffness of subacute nonfunctional ambulatory stroke patients and to compare the effects of robot-assisted gait therapy (RAGT) combined with rehabilitation therapy (RT) on arterial stiffness and functional recovery with those of RT alone. Method: The RAGT group (N = 30) received 30 minutes of robot-assisted gait therapy and 30 minutes of conventional RT, and the control group (N = 26) received 60 minutes of RT, 5 times a week for 4 weeks. baPWV was measured and calculated using an automated device. The patients also performed a symptom-limited graded exercise stress test using a bicycle ergometer, and parameters of cardiopulmonary fitness were recorded. Clinical outcome measures were categorized into 4 categories: activities of daily living, balance, ambulatory function, and paretic leg motor function and were evaluated before and after the 4-week intervention. Results: Both groups exhibited significant functional recovery in all clinical outcome measures after the 4-week intervention. However, peak aerobic capacity, peak heart rate, exercise tolerance test duration, and baPWV improved only in the RAGT group, and the improvements in baPWV and peak aerobic capacity were more noticeable in the RAGT group than in the control group. Conclusion: Robot-assisted gait therapy combined with conventional rehabilitation therapy represents an effective method for reversing arterial stiffness and improving peak aerobic capacity in subacute stroke patients with totally dependent ambulation. However, further large-scale studies with longer term follow-up periods are warranted to measure the effects of RAGT on secondary prevention after stroke. PMID:27741123

  4. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-02-19

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV.

  5. [Doppler ultrasound of penis arteries].

    PubMed

    Jünemann, K P; Siegsmund, M; Löbelenz, M; Alken, P

    1990-05-01

    In addition to pharmaco testing, pharmaco-Doppler sonography of the penile arteries is part of the basic work-up for erectile dysfunction. Insufficient training with the Doppler method, lack of standardized criteria for evaluation of the penis, and analysis of the Doppler curves all make it difficult to use Doppler sonography for the evaluation of impotent men. The aim of this study was to explain the principal criteria of the method and demonstrate the most important details for analyzing the form of the Doppler waves. Pharmaco-Doppler sonography includes the evaluation of blood-flow velocities within the dorsal and deep cavernous arteries of the penis before and after intracavernous application of a vasoactive drug. The following main criteria have proven to be most important for analysis of the Doppler curves: evaluation of the amplitude height, the actual wave form, differences between the left and right arteries and along the individual vessel, amplitude increase, and elevation of the curve baseline after pharmaco stimulation. The most frequent mistakes made during evaluation of the penile arteries are changes in the probe angle, pressure put on the artery by the probe during evaluation and a false estimation of the evaluation time after pharmaco stimulation. Recently, duplex sonography of the penile arteries has been introduced, and this method allows an accurate measurement of the blood-flow velocity and arterial diameter changes before and after application of the drug. Furthermore, additional calculation of the resistancy index permits determination of the vascular resistance and optimizes the evaluation of the penile arterial status. The technical details, the method, and the analyzation criteria are all explained in detail.

  6. Doppler echocardiography in stress testing.

    PubMed

    Teague, S M

    1991-06-01

    Doppler ultrasound may have a role in the stress testing laboratory for the identification of patients with coronary disease through the assessment of dynamic ventricular systolic function. Quantitative systolic ejection phase indexes of maximal acceleration, peak velocity, and volume of blood ejected from the left ventricle can be obtained in the exercising patient. Trials comparing stress Doppler ultrasound with ST-segment changes, gated blood pool radionuclide or echocardiographic studies of ejection fraction or wall motion abnormality, and thallium scintigraphic perfusion defects have returned comparable or better sensitivity and specificity referencing coronary angiography. Graded treadmill exercise, stationary bicycle exercise, and pharmacological stress (dipyridamole) have been used. The normal Doppler stress response is a near linear increase in peak ejection velocity with increasing cardiac work, as reflected in heart rate. Patients with coronary artery disease show blunted augmentation of Doppler ejection dynamics between rest and peak stress, and the degree of blunting appears to be proportional to the anatomic extent of coronary disease and the magnitude of ventricular perfusion and performance impairment. Stress Doppler ultrasound achieves diagnostic power for coronary disease with ultrasonic technology, inexpensive equipment, without ionizing radiation, and few personnel.

  7. Planetary Doppler Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N.; Jefferies, S.; Hart, M.; Hubbard, W. B.; Showman, A. P.; Hernandez, G.; Rudd, L.

    2014-12-01

    Determining the internal structure of the solar system's gas and ice giant planets is key to understanding their formation and evolution (Hubbard et al., 1999, 2002, Guillot 2005), and in turn the formation and evolution of the solar system. While internal structure can be constrained theoretically, measurements of internal density distributions are needed to uncover the details of the deep interior where significant ambiguities exist. To date the interiors of giant planets have been probed by measuring gravitational moments using spacecraft passing close to, or in orbit around the planet. Gravity measurements are effective in determining structure in the outer envelope of a planet, and also probing dynamics (e.g. the Cassini and Juno missions), but are less effective in probing deep structure or the presence of discrete boundaries. A promising technique for overcoming this limitation is planetary seismology (analogous to helioseismology in the solar case), postulated by Vorontsov, 1976. Using trapped pressure waves to probe giant planet interiors allows insight into the density and temperature distribution (via the sound speed) down to the planetary core, and is also sensitive to sharp boundaries, for example at the molecular to metallic hydrogen transition or at the core-envelope interface. Detecting such boundaries is not only important in understanding the overall structure of the planet, but also has implications for our understanding of the basic properties of matter at extreme pressures. Recent Doppler measurements of Jupiter by Gaulme et al (2011) claimed a promising detection of trapped oscillations, while Hedman and Nicholson (2013) have shown that trapped waves in Saturn cause detectable perturbations in Saturn's C ring. Both these papers have fueled interest in using seismology as a tool for studying the solar system's giant planets. To fully exploit planetary seismology as a tool for understanding giant planet structure, measurements need to be made

  8. Useful method to monitor the physiological effects of alcohol ingestion by combination of micro-integrated laser Doppler blood flow meter and arm-raising test.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Ito, Hiroki; Gotanda, Takeshi; Peng, Yao; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2012-10-01

    Alcohol has a variety of effects on the human body, affecting both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system. We examined the peripheral blood flow of alcohol drinkers using a micro-integrated laser Doppler blood flow meter (micro-electromechanical system blood flow sensor). An increased heart rate and blood flow was recorded at the earlobe after alcohol ingestion, and we observed strong correlation between blood flow, heart rate, and breath alcohol content in light drinkers; but not heavy drinkers. We also found that the amplitude of pulse waves measured at the fingertip during an arm-raising test significantly decreased on alcohol consumption, regardless of the individual's alcohol tolerance. Our micro-electromechanical system blood flow sensor successfully detected various physiological changes in peripheral blood circulation induced by alcohol consumption.

  9. Brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity as an independent prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has a risk for cardiovascular disease. Increased arterial stiffness has been observed in women with PCOS. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate (CC) in women with PCOS. Methods This study was a retrospective cohort study of 62 women with PCOS conducted from January 2009 to December 2012 at the university hospital, Yamagata, Japan. We analyzed 62 infertile PCOS patients who received CC. Ovulation was induced by 100 mg CC for 5 days. CC non-responder was defined as failure to ovulate for at least 2 consecutive CC-treatment cycles. The endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular parameters between CC responder (38 patients) and non-responder (24 patients) groups were analyzed. Results In univariate analysis, waist-to-hip ratio, level of free testosterone, percentages of patients with dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes mellitus, blood glucose and insulin levels at 60 min and 120 min, the area under the curve of glucose and insulin after 75-g oral glucose intolerance test, and baPWV were significantly higher in CC non-responders compared with responders. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, both waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 2.2–14.1; P = 0.04) and baPWV (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–2.8; P = 0.03) were independent predictors of ovulation induction by CC in PCOS patients. The predictive values of waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV for the CC resistance in PCOS patients were determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. The area under the curves for waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV were 0.76 and 0.77, respectively. Setting the threshold at 0.83 for waist-to-hip ratio offered the best compromise between specificity (0.65) and sensitivity (0.84), while the setting the threshold at 1,182 cm/s for

  10. Markers of Mineral Metabolism Are Not Associated With Aortic Pulse Wave Velocity in Community-Living Elderly Persons: The Health Aging and Body Composition Study

    PubMed Central

    Madero, Magdalena; Wassel, Christina L.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Najjar, Samer S.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Fried, Linda F.; de Boer, Ian H.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Newman, Anne B.; Hausman, Dorothy; Sarnak, Mark J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Ix, Joachim H.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Disorders in mineral metabolism are associated with risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients with kidney disease as well as in the general population. This risk is thought to be mediated, in part, through the mechanism of stiffening of the arteries. METHODS The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationships between serum calcium, phosphorus, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and arterial pulse wave velocity (aPWV) among 2,229 community-dwelling elderly persons participating in the Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC) study. RESULTS The mean age of the participants was 72 years; 52% were woman, 39% were black, and 17% had chronic kidney disease (CKD) (estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73 m2). In parallel unadjusted analyses, the following associations were observed: 2.86% greater aPWV per 12 ng/ml (s.d.) lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D (95% confidence interval −4.38%, −1.31%), 3.04% greater aPWV per 28 pg/ml (s.d.) higher iPTH (95% confidence interval 1.42–4.68%), and 2.37% lower aPWV per 0.5 mg/dl (s.d.) higher phosphorus (95% confidence interval −3.90% to − 0.81%). Except for phosphorus, these associations were attenuated and rendered no longer statistically significant after adjustment for demographic risk factors, clinical site, season, medications and other CVD risk factors. The results were similar in men and women and were not dependent on the presence of CKD. CONCLUSIONS Among well-functioning community-dwelling elderly persons, only serum phosphorus was associated with aPWV; and this association was in the opposite direction of the one hypothesized. Factors other than vascular stiffening may mediate the relationship between disordered mineral metabolism and CVD events in community-living elders. PMID:21436791

  11. Modification over time of pulse wave velocity parallel to changes in aortic BP, as well as in 24-h ambulatory brachial BP.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, A; Segura, J; Suarez, C; García-Ortiz, L; Abad-Cardiel, M; Vigil, L; Gómez-Marcos, M A; Sans Atxer, L; Martell-Claros, N; Ruilope, L M; de la Sierra, A

    2016-03-01

    Arterial stiffness as assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a marker of preclinical organ damage and a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, independently of blood pressure (BP). However, limited evidence exists on the association between long-term variation (Δ) on aortic BP (aoBP) and ΔcfPWV. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of ΔBP with ΔcfPWV over time, as assessed by office and 24-h ambulatory peripheral BP, and aoBP. AoBP and cfPWV were evaluated in 209 hypertensive patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) at baseline(b) and at 12 months of follow-up(fu). Peripheral BP was also determined by using validated oscillometric devices (office(o)-BP) and on an outpatient basis by using a validated (Spacelabs-90207) device (24-h ambulatory BP). ΔcfPWV over time was calculated as follows: ΔcfPWV=[(cfPWVfu-cfPWVb)/cfPWVb] × 100. ΔBP over time resulted from the same formula applied to BP values obtained with the three different measurement techniques. Correlations (Spearman 'Rho') between ΔBP and ΔcfPWV were calculated. Mean age was 62 years, 39% were female and 80% had type 2 diabetes. Baseline office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 143±20/82±12. Follow-up (12 months later) office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 136±20/79±12. ΔcfPWV correlated with ΔoSBP (Rho=0.212; P=0.002), Δ24-h SBP (Rho=0.254; P<0.001), Δdaytime SBP (Rho=0.232; P=0.001), Δnighttime SBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001) and ΔaoSBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001). A multiple linear regression analysis included the following independent variables: ΔoSBP, Δ24-h SBP, Δdaytime SBP, Δnighttime SBP and ΔaoSBP. ΔcfPWV was independently associated with Δ24-h SBP (β-coefficient=0.195; P=0.012) and ΔaoSBP (β-coefficient= 0.185; P=0.018). We conclude that changes in both 24-h SBP and aoSBP more accurately reflect changes in arterial stiffness than do office BP measurements. PMID:26108366

  12. The Independent and Joint Association of Blood Pressure, Serum Total Homocysteine, and Fasting Serum Glucose Levels With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Chinese Hypertensive Adults.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyun; Sun, Ningling; Yu, Tao; Fan, Fangfang; Zheng, Meili; Qian, Geng; Wang, Binyan; Wang, Yu; Tang, Genfu; Li, Jianping; Qin, Xianhui; Hou, Fanfan; Xu, Xiping; Yang, Xinchun; Chen, Yundai; Wang, Xiaobin; Huo, Yong

    2016-09-28

    This study aimed to investigate the independent and joint association of blood pressure (BP), homocysteine (Hcy), and fasting blood glucose (FBG) levels with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, a measure of arterial stiffness) in Chinese hypertensive adults.The analyses included 3967 participants whose BP, Hcy, FBG, and baPWV were measured along with other covariates. Systolic BP (SBP) was analyzed as 3 categories (SBP < 160 mmHg; 160 to 179 mmHg; ≥ 180 mmHg); Hcy as 3 categories (< 10 μmol/L; 10 to 14.9 μmol/L; ≥ 15.0 μmol/L) and FBG: normal (FBG < 5.6 mmol/L), impaired (5.6 mmol/L ≤ FBG < 7.0 mmol/L), and diabetes mellitus (FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L). We performed linear regression analyses to evaluate their associations with baPWV with adjustment for covariables.When analyzed individually, BP, Hcy, and FBG were each associated with baPWV. When BP and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 2227 ± 466 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and SBP ≥ 180 mmHg (β = 432.5, P < 0.001), and the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1692 ± 289 cm/s) was seen in participants with NFG and SBP < 160 mmHg. When Hcy and FBG were analyzed jointly, the highest baPWV value (2072 ± 480 cm/s) was observed in participants with FBG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L and Hcy ≥ 15.0 μmol/L (β = 167.6, P < 0.001), while the lowest baPWV value (mean ± SD: 1773 ± 334 cm/s) was observed in participants with NFG and Hcy < 10 μmol/L.In Chinese hypertensive adults, SBP, Hcy, and FBG are individually and jointly associated with baPWV.Our findings underscore the importance of identifying individuals with multiple risk factors of baPWV including high SBP, FBG, and Hcy.

  13. Effect of Pulsed Wave Low-Level Laser Therapy on Tibial Complete Osteotomy Model of Fracture Healing With an Intramedullary Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavinia, Atarodalsadat; Masteri Farahani, Reza; Abbasian, Mohammadreza; Vasheghani Farahani, Mohammadmehdi; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Zandpazandi, Sara; Ghoreishi, Seyed Kamran; Abdollahifar, Mohammad Amin; Pouriran, Ramin; Bayat, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fractures pose a major worldwide challenge to public health, causing tremendous disability for the society and families. According to recent studies, many in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown the positive effects of PW LLLT on osseous tissue. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of infrared pulsed wave low-level laser therapy (PW LLLT) on the fracture healing process in a complete tibial osteotomy in a rat model, which was stabilized by an intramedullary pin. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. We performed complete tibial osteotomies in the right tibias for the population of 15 female rats. The rats were divided randomly into three different groups: I) Control rats with untreated bone defects; II) Rats irradiated by a 0.972 J/cm2 PW LLLT; and III) Rats irradiated by a 1.5 J/cm2 PW LLLT. The right tibias were collected six weeks following the surgery and a three-point bending test was performed to gather results. Immediately after biomechanical examination, the fractured bones were prepared for histological examinations. Slides were examined using stereological method. Results: PW LLLT significantly caused an increase in maximum force (N) of biomechanical repair properties for osteotomized tibias in the first and second laser groups (30.0 ± 15.9 and 32.4 ± 13.8 respectively) compared to the control group (8.6 ± 4.5) LSD test, P = 0.019, P = 0.011 respectively). There was a significant increase in the osteoblast count of the first and second laser groups (0.53 ± 0.06, 0.41 ± 0.06 respectively) compared to control group (0.31 ± 0.04) (LSD test, P = 0001, P = 0.007 respectively). Conclusions: This study confirmed the efficacy of PW LLLT on biomechanical strength, trabecular bone volume, callus volume, and osteoblast number of repairing callus in a complete tibial osteotomy animal model at a relatively late stage of the bone

  14. Differential Doppler as a diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Dzieciuch, M.; Munk, W. )

    1994-10-01

    Differential Doppler compression and travel time of individual peaks in the arrival sequence (relative to an overall average) are measured for the 5500-km acoustic transmissions from a moving source at Heard Island to Christmas (Crab) Island. The differentials cannot be explained by simple adiabatic propagation models. A hybrid theory, coupling polar and temperate models at the Antarctic Front can account for some of the qualitative features. Differential Doppler could be a useful tool for identifying ray arrivals. 10 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Right Ventricular Tissue Doppler in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ebert, Douglas; Martin, David S.; Barratt, Michael R.; Martin, David S.; Bogomolov, Valery V.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Duncan, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The presentation slides review normal physiology of the right ventricle in space, general physiology of the right ventricle; difficulties in imaging the heart in space, imaging methods, tissue Doppler spectrum, right ventricle tissue Doppler, and Rt Tei Index.

  16. Understanding Doppler Broadening of Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini; Sullivan, John P.

    2014-07-03

    Doppler-broadened gamma ray peaks are observed routinely in the collection and analysis of gamma-ray spectra. If not recognized and understood, the appearance of Doppler broadening can complicate the interpretation of a spectrum and the correct identification of the gamma ray-emitting material. We have conducted a study using a simulation code to demonstrate how Doppler broadening arises and provide a real-world example in which Doppler broadening is found. This report describes that study and its results.

  17. Development of Doppler Global Velocimetry as a Flow Diagnostics Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.

    1995-01-01

    The development of Doppler global velocimetry is described from its inception to its use as a flow diagnostics tool. Its evolution is traced from an elementary one-component laboratory prototype, to a full three-component configuration operating in a wind tunnel at focal distances exceeding 15 m. As part of the developmental process, several wind tunnel flow field investigations were conducted. These included supersonic flow measurements about an oblique shock, subsonic and supersonic measurements of the vortex flow above a delta wing, and three-component measurements of a high-speed jet.

  18. Pulse transit times to the capillary bed evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry

    PubMed Central

    Bernjak, Alan; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2010-01-01

    The pulse transit time (PTT) of a wave over a specified distance along a blood vessel provides a simple non-invasive index that can be used for the evaluation of arterial distensibility. Current methods of measuring the PTT determine the propagation times of pulses only in the larger arteries. We have evaluated the pulse arrival time (PAT) to the capillary bed, through the microcirculation, and have investigated its relationship to the arterial PAT to a fingertip. To do so, we detected cardiac-induced pulse waves in skin microcirculation using laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Using the ECG as a reference, PATs to the microcirculation were measured on the four extremities of 108 healthy subjects. Simultaneously, PATs to the radial artery of the left index finger were obtained from blood pressure recordings using a piezoelectric sensor. Both PATs correlate in similar ways with heart rate and age. That to the microcirculation is shown to be sensitive to local changes in skin perfusion induced by cooling. We introduce a measure for the PTT through the microcirculation. We conclude that a combination of LDF and pressure measurements enables simultaneous characterization of the states of the macro and microvasculature. Information about the microcirculation, including an assessment of endothelial function, may be obtained from the responses to perturbations in skin perfusion, such as temperature stress or vasoactive substances. PMID:19202235

  19. Comparison of pulse-wave velocity in different aortic regions in relation to the extent and severity of atherosclerosis between young and older Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits.

    PubMed

    Katsuda, S; Hasegawa, M; Kusanagi, M; Shimizu, T

    2000-11-01

    The present study was performed to investigate the effects of the development of atherosclerosis on foot-to-foot pulse-wave velocity (PWV) from the ascending aorta to different positions along the aorta in Kurosawa and Kusanagi-Hypercholesterolemic (KHC) rabbits aged 10-12 and 22-24 months old, in relation to the percentage fractional lesioned area (PFLA) in different aortic regions through which the pulse wave travels, as well as the rheological and pathohistological properties of the aortic wall. PWV, when measured in the KHC rabbit from the ascending aorta to each aortic position, showed the highest value on passage through the aortic arch, decreased with conduction to the distal thoracic aorta, reached the minimal value on passage to the distal thoracic aorta or to the middle abdominal aorta in the 10-12- and 22-24-month-old animals respectively, and increased gradually on conduction to the iliac artery. PWV at all aortic regions examined was significantly greater in the 22-24-month-old than in the 10-12-month-old KHC rabbits. PFLA, when measured in the aortic region from the ascending aorta to each aortic position, was maximal in the aortic arch and decreased gradually towards the peripheral aorta in both age groups. PFLA in the 22-24-month-old group was significantly greater than that in the 10-12-month-old group in all aortic regions examined. The atherosclerotic aortic wall showed a significantly lower elastic modulus in the young KHC rabbits compared with age-matched normal rabbits. A significantly higher elastic modulus was observed in the older KHC rabbits compared with that in the younger animals of both strains, associated with the progression of sclerosis. These findings indicate that the increase in PWV is due mainly to an increase with aging in the extent and severity of atherosclerosis in vessels in which the pulse wave travels.

  20. The Doppler Effect--A New Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, J.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the Doppler effect as it applies to different situations, such as a stationary source of sound with the observer moving, a stationary observer, and the sound source and observer both moving. Police radar, satellite surveillance radar, radar astronomy, and the Doppler navigator, are discussed as applications of Doppler shift. (JR)

  1. Airborne cw Doppler lidar (ADOLAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Stefan; Werner, Christian; Nagel, E.; Herrmann, H.; Klier, M.; Knott, H. P.; Haering, R.; Wildgruber, J.

    1994-12-01

    During the last 10 years the DLR container LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometer) was used for many wind related measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The experience out of this were used to construct an airborne Doppler lidar ADOLAR. Based on the available Doppler lidars it is now proposed to perform a campaign to demonstrate the concept of the spaceborne sensor ALADIN, and to answer some questions concerning the signal quality from clouds, water and land. For the continuous wave CO2 laser, the energy is focused by the telescope into the region of investigation. Some of the radiation is back scattered by small aerosol particles drifting with the wind speed through the sensing volume. The back scattered radiation is collected by the telescope and detected by coherent technique. With the laser Doppler method one gets the radial wind component. To determine the magnitude and direction of the horizontal wind, some form of scanning in azimuth and elevation is required. To keep the airborne system compact, the transceiver optics is directly coupled to a wedge scanner which provides the conical scan with the axis in Nadir direction from the aircraft. The system ADOLAR was tested in 1994. Results of the flight over the lake Ammersee are presented and are compared with the data of the inertial reference system of the aircraft.

  2. Simulating photospheric Doppler velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for constructing artificial data that realistically simulate photospheric velocity fields. The velocity fields include rotation, differential rotation, meridional circulation, giant cell convection, supergranulation, convective limb shift, p-mode oscillations, and observer motion. Data constructed by this method can be used for testing algorithms designed to extract and analyze these velocity fields in real Doppler velocity data.

  3. JAWS multiple Doppler derived winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elmore, Kimberly L.

    1987-01-01

    An elementary working knowledge is given of the advantages and limitations of the multiple Doppler radar analyses that have recently become available from the Joint Airport Weather Studies (JAWS) project. What Doppler radar is and what it does is addressed and the way Doppler radars were used in the JAWS project to gather wind shear data is described. The working definition of wind shear used is winds that affect aircraft flight over a span of 15 to 45 seconds and turbulence is defined as air motion that cause abrupt aircraft motions. The JAWS data current available contain no turbulence data. The concept of multiple Doppler analysis and the geometry of how it works are described, followed by an explanation of how data gathered in radar space are interpolated to a common Cartesian coordinate system and the limitations involved. A discussion is also presented of the analysis grid and how it was constructed. What the user actually gets is discussed, followed by a discussion of the expected errors in the three orthogonal wind components. Finally, a discussion is presented of why JAWS data are significant.

  4. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect are made at the Stanford Solar Observatory. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about 1%. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large-scale magnetic field structures.

  5. Doppler observations of solar rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    Daily observations of the photospheric equatorial rotation rate using the Doppler effect mode at the Sanford Solar Observatory are presented. These observations show no variations in the rotation rate that exceed the observational error of about one percent. The average rotation rate is indistinguishable from that of sunspots and large scale magnetic field structures.

  6. Central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity: relationship to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality in diabetic patients or metabolic syndrome. An observational prospective study. LOD-DIABETES study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetic patients show an increased prevalence of non-dipping arterial pressure pattern, target organ damage and elevated arterial stiffness. These alterations are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The objectives of this study are the following: to evaluate the prognostic value of central arterial pressure and pulse wave velocity in relation to the incidence and outcome of target organ damage and the appearance of cardiovascular episodes (cardiovascular mortality, myocardial infarction, chest pain and stroke) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome. Methods/Design Design: This is an observational prospective study with 5 years duration, of which the first year corresponds to patient inclusion and initial evaluation, and the remaining four years to follow-up. Setting: The study will be carried out in the urban primary care setting. Study population: Consecutive sampling will be used to include patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between 20-80 years of age. A total of 110 patients meeting all the inclusion criteria and none of the exclusion criteria will be included. Measurements: Patient age and sex, family and personal history of cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular risk factors. Height, weight, heart rate and abdominal circumference. Laboratory tests: hemoglobin, lipid profile, creatinine, microalbuminuria, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, blood insulin, fibrinogen and high sensitivity C-reactive protein. Clinical and 24-hour ambulatory (home) blood pressure monitoring and self-measured blood pressure. Common carotid artery ultrasound for the determination of mean carotid intima-media thickness. Electrocardiogram for assessing left ventricular hypertrophy. Ankle-brachial index. Retinal vascular study based on funduscopy with non-mydriatic retinography and evaluation of pulse wave morphology and pulse wave velocity using the SphygmoCor system. The medication used for

  7. Human polarimetric micro-doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, David; Silvious, Jerry

    2011-06-01

    Modern radars can pick up target motions other than just the principle target Doppler; they pick out the small micro-Doppler variations as well. These can be used to visually identify both the target type as well as the target activity. We model and measure some of the micro-Doppler motions that are amenable to polarimetric measurement. Understanding the capabilities and limitations of radar systems that utilize micro-Doppler to measure human characteristics is important for improving the effectiveness of these systems at securing areas. In security applications one would like to observe humans unobtrusively and without privacy issues, which make radar an effective approach. In this paper we focus on the characteristics of radar systems designed for the estimation of human motion for the determination of whether someone is loaded. Radar can be used to measure the direction, distance, and radial velocity of a walking person as a function of time. Detailed radar processing can reveal more characteristics of the walking human. The parts of the human body do not move with constant radial velocity; the small micro-Doppler signatures are timevarying and therefore analysis techniques can be used to obtain more characteristics. Looking for modulations of the radar return from arms, legs, and even body sway are being assessed by researchers. We analyze these techniques and focus on the improved performance that fully polarimetric radar techniques can add. We perform simulations and fully polarimetric measurements of the varying micro-Doppler signatures of humans as a function of elevation angle and azimuthal angle in order to try to optimize this type of system for the detection of arm motion, especially for the determination of whether someone is carrying something in their arms. The arm is often bent at the elbow, providing a surface similar to a dihedral. This is distinct from the more planar surfaces of the body and allows us to separate the signals from the arm (and

  8. Laser Doppler vibrometry for assessment of arteriosclerosis: A first step towards validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-05-01

    It has been shown that in cardiovascular risk management, stiffness of large arteries has a very good predictive value for cardiovascular disease and mortality. This parameter can be estimated from the pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured between the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck and femoral artery (FA) in the groin. However PWV can also be measured locally in the CCA, using non-invasive methods such as ultrasound (US) or laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Potential of the latter approach was already explored in previous research, and in this work a first step towards clinical validation is made. 50 hypertension II/III patients aged between 30 and 65 participate in the study. Patients were asked to remain sober for 4 hours prior to the measurements. The trajectory of the CCA in the neck was determined by a trained clinician guided by an US probe. 3 laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) systems were aimed along the CCA. PWV was then calculated from the distance between beams and the time-shift between waveforms. Immediately after LDV measurements, PWV was measured with US. Additionally, carotid-femoral PWV was measured. As a validation, PWV results of the different techniques were compared with each other, and with medical background of the test subjects. Since data acquisition is still ongoing, data from only 20 patients will be discussed. No trends between measurement methods for PWV are apparent. However, a positive trend was detected between PWV as measured with LDV and blood pressure. More data, including additional experiments will be needed to verify this observation.

  9. Laser Doppler vibrometry for assessment of arteriosclerosis: A first step towards validation

    SciTech Connect

    Campo, Adriaan; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-05-27

    It has been shown that in cardiovascular risk management, stiffness of large arteries has a very good predictive value for cardiovascular disease and mortality. This parameter can be estimated from the pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured between the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck and femoral artery (FA) in the groin. However PWV can also be measured locally in the CCA, using non-invasive methods such as ultrasound (US) or laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Potential of the latter approach was already explored in previous research, and in this work a first step towards clinical validation is made. 50 hypertension II/III patients aged between 30 and 65 participate in the study. Patients were asked to remain sober for 4 hours prior to the measurements. The trajectory of the CCA in the neck was determined by a trained clinician guided by an US probe. 3 laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) systems were aimed along the CCA. PWV was then calculated from the distance between beams and the time-shift between waveforms. Immediately after LDV measurements, PWV was measured with US. Additionally, carotid-femoral PWV was measured. As a validation, PWV results of the different techniques were compared with each other, and with medical background of the test subjects. Since data acquisition is still ongoing, data from only 20 patients will be discussed. No trends between measurement methods for PWV are apparent. However, a positive trend was detected between PWV as measured with LDV and blood pressure. More data, including additional experiments will be needed to verify this observation.

  10. Azimuthal Doppler Effect in Optical Vortex Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Yoshimura, Shinji; Toda, Yasunori; Morisaki, Tomohiro; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masayoshi

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortices (OV) are a set of solutions of the paraxial Helmholtz equation in the cylindrical coordinates, and its wave front has a spiral shape. Since the Doppler shift is caused by the phase change by the movement in a wave field, the observer in the OV, which has the three-dimensional structured wave front, feels a three-dimensional Doppler effect. Since the multi-dimensional Doppler components are mixed into a single Doppler spectrum, development of a decomposition method is required. We performed a modified saturated absorption spectroscopy to separate the components. The OV and plane wave are used as a probe beam and pump beam, respectively. Although the plane-wave pump laser cancels the z-direction Doppler shift, the azimuthal Doppler shift remains in the saturated dip. The spatial variation of the dip width gives the information of the azimuthal Doppler shift. The some results of optical vortex spectroscopy will be presented.

  11. Doppler ultrasound evaluation in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide preeclampsia (PE) is the leading cause of maternal death and affects 5 to 8% of pregnant women. PE is characterized by elevated blood pressure and proteinuria. Doppler Ultrasound (US) evaluation has been considered a useful method for prediction of PE; however, there is no complete data about the most frequently altered US parameters in the pathology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the uterine, umbilical, and the middle cerebral arteries using Doppler US parameters [resistance index (RI), pulsatility index (PI), notch (N), systolic peak (SP) and their combinations] in pregnant women, in order to make a global evaluation of hemodynamic repercussion caused by the established PE. Results A total of 102 pregnant Mexican women (65 PE women and 37 normotensive women) were recruited in a cases and controls study. Blood velocity waveforms from uterine, umbilical, and middle cerebral arteries, in pregnancies from 24 to 37 weeks of gestation were recorded by trans-abdominal examination with a Toshiba Ultrasound Power Vision 6000 SSA-370A, with a 3.5 MHz convex transducer. Abnormal general Doppler US profile showed a positive association with PE [odds ratio (OR) = 2.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2 - 7.3, P = 0.021)], and a specificity and predictive positive value of 89.2% and 88.6%, respectively. Other parameters like N presence, RI and PI of umbilical artery, as well as the PI of middle cerebral artery, showed differences between groups (P values < 0.05). Conclusion General Doppler US result, as well as N from uterine vessel, RI from umbilical artery, and PI from umbilical and middle cerebral arteries in their individual form, may be considered as tools to determine hemodynamic repercussion caused by PE. PMID:24252303

  12. Analysis of Doppler lidar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, J.

    1985-01-01

    Dual Doppler lidar analyses of data taken by pulsed lidars demonstrated feasibility of deriving wind fields from coordinated lidar scans. Limited case histories of thunderstorm outflows were obtained. Co-located comparison between Marshall Space Flight Center lidar and NCAR 5.5 cm radar demonstrated desirability of lidar in cases of marginal radar reflectivity in clear air and low-elevation scans. Analysis continued on backscattered intensity and velocity measurements made from April 1983 to February 1984. A slant path method was used to calculate vertical profiles of volumetric backscatter and adsorption in the lower troposphere. High-quality VAD scans were identified as candidates for investigating feasibility of calculating horizontal motion fields using single Doppler lidar. Activities during FY-85 also included participation in Fall 1984 airborne Doppler lidar flight experiments. Preliminary data review was begun using McIdas system. Analysis of backscatter and absorpiton profiles continues. Focus is on understanding spatial and temporal variations, as well as frequency distribution, of backscatter at several tropospheric levels. Results from this study provide input to evaluation of clean/dirty airmass hypothesis of aerosol distribution. Assistance is being given to preparation of a comprehensive, global backscatter measurement plan. Analysis of data from Fall 1984 flight experiments is just beginning. Work has begun on preprocessing data to minimize errors due to electro-optic modulator malfunction during flights.

  13. Derivation of systolic time intervals from Doppler measurement of temporal arterial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rothendler, J A; Schick, E C; Ryan, T J

    1981-01-01

    The carotid pulse method of recording systolic time intervals is limited by significant motion-induced artifact, making it unsuitable for studying patients during exercise. As an approach to overcoming this limitation, a new method utilizing the blood velocity profile of the superficial temporal artery measured by Doppler ultrasound has been developed. When compared with the values obtained from the conventional carotid pulse method, Doppler-derived left ventricular ejection time and preejection period showed excellent correlation (r = 0.99 for both) and the Doppler-derived measurements showed little intra- or interobserver variability. Studies performed during treadmill exercise showed that in 8 of 10 subjects, suitable tracing could be recorded through stage 3 of the Bruce protocol, confirming the enhanced stability of the technique compared with the carotid pulse method.

  14. Performance Of A Doppler-Corrected MDPSK Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tien M.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Hinedi, Sami; Agan, Martin J.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents theoretical analysis of effect of rate of change of Doppler shift of received multiple-differential-phase-shift-keyed (MDPSK) radio signal on performance of Doppler-corrected differential detector. In particular detector, phase of received signal corrected for Doppler shift by use of Doppler estimator designed to operate in presence of negligibly small Doppler rate.

  15. Doppler effects on periodicities in Saturn's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbary, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    The magnetosphere of Saturn exhibits a wide variety of periodic phenomena in magnetic fields, charged particles, and radio emissions. The periodicities are observed from a moving spacecraft, so an issue arises about the periodicities being influenced by the Doppler effects. Doppler effects can be investigated using models of the periodicities and then flying the spacecraft through the model, effectively measuring any Doppler phenomena with the simulation. Using 200 days of typical elliptical orbits from the Cassini mission at Saturn, three models were tested: an azimuthal wave (or "searchlight") model, a radial wave (or "pond ripple") model, and a model of an outwardly traveling spiral wave. The azimuthal wave model produced virtually no Doppler effects in the periodicities because its wave vector is nearly perpendicular to the spacecraft trajectory. The radial wave model generated strong Doppler effects of an upshifted and a downshifted signal (a dual period) on either side of the true period, because the wave vector is either parallel or antiparallel to the spacecraft trajectory. Being intermediate to the searchlight and radial waves, the spiral wave produced Doppler effects but only for low wave speeds (<10 RS/h). For higher wave speeds the Doppler effects were not as clear. The Doppler effects can be mitigated by employing only observations beyond ~15 RS where the spacecraft speed is low compared to the wave speed. The observed periodicities over the same 200 day interval do not show evidence of Doppler effects but generally display a single feature at the expected ~10.7 h period.

  16. Doppler Ultrasound Detection of Preclinical Changes in Foot Arteries in Early Stage of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Leoniuk, Jolanta; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Szorc, Małgorzata; Sackiewicz, Izabela; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are few reports regarding the changes within the vessels in the initial stage of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to estimate the hemodynamic and morphological parameters in foot arteries in type 2 diabetes subjects and to compare these parameters to those obtained in a control group of healthy volunteers. Material/Methods Ultrasound B-mode, color Doppler and pulse wave Doppler imaging of foot arteries was conducted in 37 diabetic patients and 36 non-diabetic subjects to determine their morphological (total vascular diameter and flow lumen diameter) and functional parameters (spectral analysis). Results In diabetic patients, the overall vascular diameter and wall thickness were statistically significantly larger when compared to the control group in the right dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.01; P=0.001), left dorsalis pedis artery (P=0.007; P=0.006), right posterior tibial artery (P=0.005; P=0.0005), and left posterior tibial artery (P=0.007; P=0.0002). No significant differences were observed in both groups in flow lumen diameters and blood flow parameters (PSV, EDV, PI, RI). In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index in the right dorsalis pedis artery (r=0.38; P=0.02), right posterior tibial artery (r=0.38; P=0.02) and left posterior tibial artery (r=0.42; P=0.009). The pulsatility index within the dorsalis pedis artery decreased with increased trophic skin changes (r=–0.431, P=0.009). Conclusions In the diabetic group, overall artery diameters larger than and flow lumina comparable to the control group suggest vessel wall thickening occurring in the early stage of diabetes. Doppler flow parameters are comparable in both groups. In the diabetic group, the level of HbA1c positively correlated with flow resistance index and negative correlation was observed between the intensity of trophic skin changes and the pulsatility index. PMID:25202434

  17. Feasibility of using a reliable automated Doppler flow velocity measurements for research and clinical practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolgharni, Massoud; Dhutia, Niti M.; Cole, Graham D.; Willson, Keith; Francis, Darrel P.

    2014-03-01

    Echocardiographers are often unkeen to make the considerable time investment to make additional multiple measurements of Doppler velocity. Main hurdle to obtaining multiple measurements is the time required to manually trace a series of Doppler traces. To make it easier to analyse more beats, we present an automated system for Doppler envelope quantification. It analyses long Doppler strips, spanning many heartbeats, and does not require the electrocardiogram to isolate individual beats. We tested its measurement of velocity-time-integral and peak-velocity against the reference standard defined as the average of three experts who each made three separate measurements. The automated measurements of velocity-time-integral showed strong correspondence (R2 = 0.94) and good Bland-Altman agreement (SD = 6.92%) with the reference consensus expert values, and indeed performed as well as the individual experts (R2 = 0.90 to 0.96, SD = 5.66% to 7.64%). The same performance was observed for peak-velocities; (R2 = 0.98, SD = 2.95%) and (R2 = 0.93 to 0.98, SD = 2.94% to 5.12%). This automated technology allows <10 times as many beats to be acquired and analysed compared to the conventional manual approach, with each beat maintaining its accuracy.

  18. Observations of ULF waves on the ground and ionospheric Doppler shifts during storm sudden commencement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Xinyan; Liu, Wenlong; Xiao, Zuo; Hao, Yongqiang

    2016-04-01

    Using data from ground-based magnetometers and HF Doppler sounder, we study ultralow frequency (ULF) waves excited during the storm sudden commencement (SSC) on 8 March 2012 and find possible evidence on the link between ULF waves and ionospheric Doppler shifts. Pc1-Pc2 ULF waves are observed from 11:04 to 11:27 UT after the SSC by ground stations of L shell ranging from 1.06 to 2.31, mapping to the topside ionosphere. There are weak responses in this frequency range in the power spectra of ionospheric Doppler shift. From 11:19 to 11:23 UT, oscillations of magnetic field in a lower frequency range of Pc3-Pc4 are observed and are well correlated with the trace of Doppler shift. It is thus suggested that ionospheric Doppler shift can response to ULF oscillations in magnetic field in various frequency ranges, especially in the frequency range of Pc3-Pc4 and below. This paper demonstrates a new mechanism of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  19. PATH TO NEXRAD: Doppler Radar Development at the National Severe Storms Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Rodger A.; Lewis, John M.

    2005-10-01

    In this historical paper, we trace the scientific- and engineering-based steps at the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and in the larger weather radar community that led to the development of NSSL's first 10-cm-wavelength pulsed Doppler radar. This radar was the prototype for the current Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), or Weather Surveillance Radar-1998 Doppler (WSR-88D) network.We track events, both political and scientific, that led to the establishment of NSSL in 1964. The vision of NSSL's first director, Edwin Kessler, is reconstructed through access to historical documents and oral histories. This vision included the development of Doppler radar, where research was to be meshed with the operational needs of the U.S. Weather Bureau and its successor—the National Weather Service.Realization of the vision came through steps that were often fit-ful, where complications arose due to personnel concerns, and where there were always financial concerns. The historical research indicates that 1) the engineering prowess and mentorship of Roger Lhermitte was at the heart of Doppler radar development at NSSL; 2) key decisions by Kessler in the wake of Lhermitte's sudden departure in 1967 proved crucial to the ultimate success of the project; 3) research results indicated that Doppler velocity signatures of mesocyclones are a precursor of damaging thunderstorms and tornadoes; and 4) results from field testing of the Doppler-derived products during the 1977 79 Joint Doppler Operational Project—especially the noticeable increase in the verification of tornado warnings and an associated marked decrease in false alarms—led to the government decision to establish the NEXRAD network.

  20. Doppler photoacoustic and Doppler ultrasound in blood with optical contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinfeld, Adi; Eyal, Avishay

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry as well as Doppler ultrasound were performed in acoustic resolution regime on tubes filled with flowing blood with indocyanine green (ICG) at different concentrations. The photoacoustic excitation utilized a pair of directly-modulated fiber-coupled 830nm laser-diodes, modulated with either CW or tone-bursts for depthresolved measurements. The amplitude of the Doppler peak in photoacoustic Doppler measurements was found to be proportional to the ICG concentration. Photoacoustic Doppler was measured in ICG at human safe concentrations, but not in whole blood. Comparing the results between the two modalities implied that using a wavelength with higher optical absorption may improve the photoacoustic signal in blood.

  1. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  2. Doppler tomography in fusion plasmas and astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salewski, M.; Geiger, B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Madsen, J.; Moseev, D.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stagner, L.; Steeghs, D.; Stejner, M.; Tardini, G.; Weiland, M.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler tomography is a well-known method in astrophysics to image the accretion flow, often in the shape of thin discs, in compact binary stars. As accretion discs rotate, all emitted line radiation is Doppler-shifted. In fast-ion Dα (FIDA) spectroscopy measurements in magnetically confined plasma, the Dα-photons are likewise Doppler-shifted ultimately due to gyration of the fast ions. In either case, spectra of Doppler-shifted line emission are sensitive to the velocity distribution of the emitters. Astrophysical Doppler tomography has lead to images of accretion discs of binaries revealing bright spots, spiral structures and flow patterns. Fusion plasma Doppler tomography has led to an image of the fast-ion velocity distribution function in the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade. This image matched numerical simulations very well. Here we discuss achievements of the Doppler tomography approach, its promise and limits, analogies and differences in astrophysical and fusion plasma Doppler tomography and what can be learned by comparison of these applications.

  3. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-08-31

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  4. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhai, S L; Zhao, X P; Liu, S; Shen, F L; Li, L L; Luo, C R

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with 'flute-like' acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  5. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology. PMID:27046395

  6. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology.

  7. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-08-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe.

  8. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-05

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology.

  9. Development of the doppler electron velocimeter: theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of dynamic events at the nano-scale is currently impossible. This paper presents the theoretical underpinnings of a method for making these measurements using electron microscopes. Building on the work of Moellenstedt and Lichte who demonstrated Doppler shifting of an electron beam with a moving electron mirror, further work is proposed to perfect and utilize this concept in dynamic measurements. Specifically, using the concept of ''fringe-counting'' with the current principles of transmission electron holography, an extension of these methods to dynamic measurements is proposed. A presentation of the theory of Doppler electron wave shifting is given, starting from the development of the de Broglie wave, up through the equations describing interference effects and Doppler shifting in electron waves. A mathematical demonstration that Doppler shifting is identical to the conceptually easier to understand idea of counting moving fringes is given by analogy to optical interferometry. Finally, potential developmental experiments and uses of a Doppler electron microscope are discussed.

  10. Observation of the Zero Doppler Effect.

    PubMed

    Ran, Jia; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Xiaodong; Fang, Kai; Zhao, Junfei; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The normal Doppler effect has well-established applications in many areas of science and technology. Recently, a few experimental demonstrations of the inverse Doppler effect have begun to appear in negative-index metamaterials. Here we report an experimental observation of the zero Doppler effect, that is, no frequency shift irrespective of the relative motion between the wave signal source and the detector in a zero-index metamaterial. This unique phenomenon, accompanied by the normal and inverse Doppler effects, is generated by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in a composite right/left-handed transmission line loaded with varactors when operating in the near zero-index passband, or the right/left-handed passband. This work has revealed a complete picture of the Doppler effect in metamaterials and may lead to potential applications in electromagnetic wave related metrology. PMID:27046395

  11. Epidemic contact tracing via communication traces.

    PubMed

    Farrahi, Katayoun; Emonet, Rémi; Cebrian, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Traditional contact tracing relies on knowledge of the interpersonal network of physical interactions, where contagious outbreaks propagate. However, due to privacy constraints and noisy data assimilation, this network is generally difficult to reconstruct accurately. Communication traces obtained by mobile phones are known to be good proxies for the physical interaction network, and they may provide a valuable tool for contact tracing. Motivated by this assumption, we propose a model for contact tracing, where an infection is spreading in the physical interpersonal network, which can never be fully recovered; and contact tracing is occurring in a communication network which acts as a proxy for the first. We apply this dual model to a dataset covering 72 students over a 9 month period, for which both the physical interactions as well as the mobile communication traces are known. Our results suggest that a wide range of contact tracing strategies may significantly reduce the final size of the epidemic, by mainly affecting its peak of incidence. However, we find that for low overlap between the face-to-face and communication interaction network, contact tracing is only efficient at the beginning of the outbreak, due to rapidly increasing costs as the epidemic evolves. Overall, contact tracing via mobile phone communication traces may be a viable option to arrest contagious outbreaks. PMID:24787614

  12. Parametric Trace Slicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosu, Grigore (Inventor); Chen, Feng (Inventor); Chen, Guo-fang; Wu, Yamei; Meredith, Patrick O. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A program trace is obtained and events of the program trace are traversed. For each event identified in traversing the program trace, a trace slice of which the identified event is a part is identified based on the parameter instance of the identified event. For each trace slice of which the identified event is a part, the identified event is added to an end of a record of the trace slice. These parametric trace slices can be used in a variety of different manners, such as for monitoring, mining, and predicting.

  13. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  14. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2015-01-01

    Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise. PMID:26445047

  15. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2015-01-01

    Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise. PMID:26445047

  16. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2015-10-05

    Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise.

  17. Gosling's Doppler pulsatility index revisited.

    PubMed

    Michel, E; Zernikow, B

    1998-05-01

    In Doppler sonography, the physiological meaning of Gosling's pulsatility index (PI) as a measure of downstream resistance is still under dispute. We deliver the theoretical derivation of its physiological significance. We present a mathematical model based on the linked theories of critical closing pressure (CCP) and cerebrovascular impedance, verified in preterm neonates. Mathematical transformation results in a series of equations interrelating several physiological parameters. Instead of indicating cerebrovascular resistance, PI is linked to the ratio of cerebrovascular impedances at the heart rate and at zero frequency. Next to arterial blood pressure, CCP is the principal determinant of PI. PI is identical to the ratio of the alternate and the direct component of the effective driving force. Thus, PI has no distinctive physiological meaning by itself. At present, our model is confined to physiological conditions where the lowest velocity is the end diastolic, and always more than zero.

  18. Laser Doppler dust devil measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilbro, J. W.; Jeffreys, H. B.; Kaufman, J. W.; Weaver, E. A.

    1977-01-01

    A scanning laser doppler velocimeter (SLDV) system was used to detect, track, and measure the velocity flow field of naturally occurring tornado-like flows (dust devils) in the atmosphere. A general description of the dust devil phenomenon is given along with a description of the test program, measurement system, and data processing techniques used to collect information on the dust devil flow field. The general meteorological conditions occurring during the test program are also described, and the information collected on two selected dust devils are discussed in detail to show the type of information which can be obtained with a SLDV system. The results from these measurements agree well with those of other investigators and illustrate the potential for the SLDV in future endeavors.

  19. Detection of Early Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Young Patients With Thalassemia Major Using Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bornaun, Helen; Dedeoglu, Reyhan; Oztarhan, Kazim; Dedeoglu, Savas; Erfidan, Erkan; Gundogdu, Muge; Aydogan, Gonul; Cengiz, Dicle

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial iron overload is the most common cause of mortality in patients with thalassemia major (TM), also known as beta-thalassemia. T2* cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best way of monitoring cardiac iron, and new echocardiographic techniques can be used to assess cardiac function. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the systolic and diastolic right ventricular (RV) function of patients with TM using tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) and to determine whether this echocardiographic technique is an adequate diagnostic tool for the screening and detection of subclinical cardiac dysfunction. Patients and Methods Eighty-four patients with TM were evaluated by conventional echocardiography and pulse-wave TDI. The data of the TM group (Group 1) were compared with that of 85 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (Group 2). Cardiovascular T2* MRI examinations were performed in 49 of the 85 patients. Results The patients with TM had significantly lower values for weight, height, body mass index, systolic arterial pressure, deceleration time, E’/A’, and ejection time (ET) than the controls. Group 1 also had significantly higher values for peak early diastolic velocity (E) over peak late diastolic velocity (A), peak early diastolic velocity of TDI (E’), peak late diastolic velocity of TDI (A’), E/E’, isovolumetric relaxation time, isovolumetric contraction time, and RV magnetic perfusion imaging (MPI) than Group 2. Conclusions RV diastolic dysfunction occurs before systolic deterioration in patients with TM and cannot be screened with conventional echocardiographic techniques. In routine practice, TDI measurements, MPI (for global function) and the E/E’ parameter (for diastolic function) can be used to screen and detect early RV dysfunction. PMID:27617076

  20. Non-invasive technique for assessment of vascular wall stiffness using laser Doppler vibrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Adriaan; Segers, Patrick; Heuten, Hilde; Goovaerts, Inge; Ennekens, Guy; Vrints, Christiaan; Baets, Roel; Dirckx, Joris

    2014-06-01

    It has been shown that in cardiovascular risk management, stiffness of large arteries has a very good predictive value for cardiovascular disease and mortality. This parameter is best known when estimated from the pulse wave velocity (PWV) measured between the common carotid artery (CCA) in the neck and femoral artery in the groin, but may also be determined locally from short-distance measurements on a short vessel segment. In this work, we propose a novel, non-invasive, non-contact laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) technique for evaluating PWV locally in an elastic vessel. First, the method was evaluated in a phantom setup using LDV and a reference method. Values correlated significantly between methods (R ≤ 0.973 (p ≤ 0.01)); and a Bland-Altman analysis indicated that the mean bias was reasonably small (mean bias ≤ -2.33 ms). Additionally, PWV was measured locally on the skin surface of the CCA in 14 young healthy volunteers. As a preliminary validation, PWV measured on two locations along the same artery was compared. Local PWV was found to be between 3 and 20 m s-1, which is in line with the literature (PWV = 5-13 m s-1). PWV assessed on two different locations on the same artery correlated significantly (R = 0.684 (p < 0.01)). In summary, we conclude that this new non-contact method is a promising technique to measure local vascular stiffness in a fully non-invasive way, providing new opportunities for clinical diagnosing.

  1. Optical Doppler tomography and spectral Doppler imaging of localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Nguyen, Elaine; Liu, Gangjun; Rao, Bin; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    We present a combined optical Doppler tomography/spectral Doppler imaging modality to quantitatively evaluate the dynamic blood circulation and the artery blockage before and after a localized ischemic stroke in a mouse model. Optical Doppler Tomography (ODT) combines the Doppler principle with optical coherence tomography for noninvasive localization and measurement of particle flow velocity in highly scattering media with micrometer scale spatial resolution. Spectral Doppler imaging (SDI) provides complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler imaging. Fast, repeated, ODT scans across an entire vessel were performed to record flow dynamic information with high temporal resolution of cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time for scatters within the imaging volume using spectral Doppler waveforms. Furthermore, vascular conditions can be quantified with various Doppler-angle-independent flow indices. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to evaluate microvascular blood circulation of a localized ischemic stroke mouse model.

  2. Are the Current Doppler Echocardiography Criteria Able to Discriminate Mitral Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Malfunction? An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Evin, Morgane; Guivier-Curien, Carine; Pibarot, Philippe; Kadem, Lyes; Rieu, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Malfunction of bileaflet mechanical heart valves in the mitral position could either be due to patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM) or leaflet obstruction. The aim of this article is to investigate the validity of current echocardiographic criteria used for diagnosis of mitral prosthesis malfunction, namely maximum velocity, mean transvalvular pressure gradient, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index. In vitro testing was performed on a double activation left heart duplicator. Both PPM and leaflet obstruction were investigated on a St. Jude Medical Master. PPM was studied by varying the St. Jude prosthesis size (21, 25, and 29 mm) and stroke volume (70 and 90 mL). Prosthesis leaflet obstruction was studied by partially or totally blocking the movement of one valve leaflet. Mitral flow conditions were altered in terms of E/A ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) to simulate physiologic panel of diastolic function. Maximum velocity, effective orifice area, and Doppler velocity index are shown to be insufficient to distinguish normal from malfunctioning St. Jude prostheses. Doppler velocity index and effective orifice area were 1.3 ± 0.49 and 1.83 ± 0.43 cm(2) for testing conditions with no malfunction below the 2.2 and 2 cm(2) thresholds (1.19 cm(2) for severe PPM and 1.23 cm(2) for fully blocked leaflet). The mean pressure gradient reached 5 mm Hg thresholds for several conditions of severe PPM only (6.9 mm Hg and mean maximum velocity value: 183.4 cm/s) whereas such value was never attained in the case of leaflet obstruction. In the case of leaflet obstruction, the maximum velocity averaged over the nine pulsed-wave Doppler locations increased by 38% for partial leaflet obstruction and 75% for a fully blocked leaflet when compared with normal conditions. Current echocardiographic criteria might be suboptimal for the detection of bileaflet mechanical heart valve malfunction. Further developments and investigations are required in order

  3. Staggered Multiple-PRF Ultrafast Color Doppler.

    PubMed

    Posada, Daniel; Poree, Jonathan; Pellissier, Arnaud; Chayer, Boris; Tournoux, Francois; Cloutier, Guy; Garcia, Damien

    2016-06-01

    Color Doppler imaging is an established pulsed ultrasound technique to visualize blood flow non-invasively. High-frame-rate (ultrafast) color Doppler, by emissions of plane or circular wavefronts, allows severalfold increase in frame rates. Conventional and ultrafast color Doppler are both limited by the range-velocity dilemma, which may result in velocity folding (aliasing) for large depths and/or large velocities. We investigated multiple pulse-repetition-frequency (PRF) emissions arranged in a series of staggered intervals to remove aliasing in ultrafast color Doppler. Staggered PRF is an emission process where time delays between successive pulse transmissions change in an alternating way. We tested staggered dual- and triple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler, 1) in vitro in a spinning disc and a free jet flow, and 2) in vivo in a human left ventricle. The in vitro results showed that the Nyquist velocity could be extended to up to 6 times the conventional limit. We found coefficients of determination r(2) ≥ 0.98 between the de-aliased and ground-truth velocities. Consistent de-aliased Doppler images were also obtained in the human left heart. Our results demonstrate that staggered multiple-PRF ultrafast color Doppler is efficient for high-velocity high-frame-rate blood flow imaging. This is particularly relevant for new developments in ultrasound imaging relying on accurate velocity measurements.

  4. Rotational Doppler effect in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guixin; Zentgraf, Thomas; Zhang, Shuang

    2016-08-01

    The translational Doppler effect of electromagnetic and sound waves has been successfully applied in measurements of the speed and direction of vehicles, astronomical objects and blood flow in human bodies, and for the Global Positioning System. The Doppler effect plays a key role for some important quantum phenomena such as the broadened emission spectra of atoms and has benefited cooling and trapping of atoms with laser light. Despite numerous successful applications of the translational Doppler effect, it fails to measure the rotation frequency of a spinning object when the probing wave propagates along its rotation axis. This constraint was circumvented by deploying the angular momentum of electromagnetic waves--the so-called rotational Doppler effect. Here, we report on the demonstration of rotational Doppler shift in nonlinear optics. The Doppler frequency shift is determined for the second harmonic generation of a circularly polarized beam passing through a spinning nonlinear optical crystal with three-fold rotational symmetry. We find that the second harmonic generation signal with circular polarization opposite to that of the fundamental beam experiences a Doppler shift of three times the rotation frequency of the optical crystal. This demonstration is of fundamental significance in nonlinear optics, as it provides us with insight into the interaction of light with moving media in the nonlinear optical regime.

  5. IIP Update: A Packaged Coherent Doppler Wind Lidar Transceiver. Doppler Aerosol WiNd Lidar (DAWN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady J.; Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta

    2006-01-01

    The state-of-the-art 2-micron coherent Doppler wind lidar breadboard at NASA/LaRC will be engineered and compactly packaged consistent with future aircraft flights. The packaged transceiver will be integrated into a coherent Doppler wind lidar system test bed at LaRC. Atmospheric wind measurements will be made to validate the packaged technology. This will greatly advance the coherent part of the hybrid Doppler wind lidar solution to the need for global tropospheric wind measurements.

  6. Doppler waveform study as indicator of change of portal pressure after administration of octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Shahbaz; Hussain, Qurban; Tabassum, Sumera; Hussain, Bilal; Durrani, Muhammad Rasheed; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the effect of portal pressure lowering drug ‘octreotide’, by observing the Doppler waveform before and after the administration of intravenous bolus of octreotide and thus to assess indirectly its efficacy to lower the portal pressure. Methods: This quassi experimental study was carried out in Medical Department in collaboration with Radiology Department of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Center Karachi Pakistan from September 10, 2015 to February 5, 2016. Cases were selected from patients admitted in Medical Wards and those attending Medical OPD. Diagnosis of cirrhosis was confirmed by Clinical Examination and Lab & Imaging investigation in Medical Department. Doppler waveform study was done by experienced radiologist in Radiology Department before and after administration of octreotide. Doppler signals were obtained from the right hepatic vein. Waveform tracings were recorded for five seconds and categorized as ‘monophasic’, ‘biphasic’ and ‘triphasic’. Waveform changes from one waveform to other were noted and analyzed. Results: Significant change i.e. from ‘monophasic’ to ‘biphasic’ or ‘biphasic’ to ‘triphasic’ was seen in 56% cases while ‘monophasic’ to ‘triphasic’ was seen in 20% cases. No change was seen in 24% cases. Improvement in waveform reflects lowering of portal vein pressure. Conclusion: Non invasive Hepatic vein Doppler waveform study showed improvement in Doppler waveform after administration of octreotide in 76% cases. Doppler waveform study has the potential of becoming non invasive ‘follow up tool’ of choice for assessing portal pressure in patients having variceal bleed due to portal hypertension. PMID:27648043

  7. Student Microwave Experiments Involving the Doppler Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, F. Neff; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of the Doppler Effect with microwaves in the measurement of the acceleration due to gravity of falling objects. The experiments described add to the repertoire of quantitative student microwave experiments. (Author/DS)

  8. High range resolution micro-Doppler analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cammenga, Zachary A.; Smith, Graeme E.; Baker, Christopher J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper addresses use of the micro-Doppler effect and the use of high range-resolution profiles to observe complex targets in complex target scenes. The combination of micro-Doppler and high range-resolution provides the ability to separate the motion of complex targets from one another. This ability leads to the differentiation of targets based on their micro-Doppler signatures. Without the high-range resolution, this would not be possible because the individual signatures would not be separable. This paper also addresses the use of the micro-Doppler information and high range-resolution profiles to generate an approximation of the scattering properties of a complex target. This approximation gives insight into the structure of the complex target and, critically, is created without using a pre-determined target model.

  9. Generalized Doppler Formula in a Nonstatic Universe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Peter G.

    1977-01-01

    Derives the general Doppler formula in a nonstatic universe using assumptions of special relativity, homogeneity and isotropy of the universe. Examples of applications to physical cosmology are given. (SL)

  10. Evaluation of a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, M. K.

    1973-01-01

    The in vivo application of the pulsed ultrasound Doppler velocity meter (PUDVM) for measuring arterial velocity waveforms is reported. In particular, the performance of the PUDVM is compared with a hot film anemometer of proven accuracy.

  11. Early intervention of long-acting nifedipine GITS reduces brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity and improves arterial stiffness in Chinese patients with mild hypertension: a 24-week, single-arm, open-label, prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jidong; Wang, Yan; Hu, Haijuan; Yang, Xiaohong; Tian, Zejun; Liu, Demin; Gu, Guoqiang; Zheng, Hongmei; Xie, Ruiqin; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Nifedipine gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) is used to treat angina and hypertension. The authors aimed to study the early intervention impact on arterial stiffness and pulse wave velocity (PWV) independent of its blood-pressure-(BP) lowering effect in mild hypertensive patients. Methods This single-center, single-arm, open-label, prospective, Phase IV study recruited patients with mild hypertension and increased PWV from December 2013 to December 2014 (N=138; age, 18–75 years; systolic blood pressure, 140–160 mmHg; diastolic BP, 90–100 mmHg; increased brachial–ankle pulse wave velocity [baPWV, ≥12 m/s]). Nifedipine GITS (30 mg/d) was administered for 24 weeks to achieve target BP of <140/90 mmHg. The dose was uptitrated at 60 mg/d in case of unsatisfactory BP reduction after 4 weeks. Primary study end point was the change in baPWV after nifedipine GITS treatment. Hemodynamic parameters (office BP, 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring, and heart rate and adverse events) were evaluated at baseline and followed-up at 2, 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 weeks. Results Majority of patients (n=117; 84.8%) completed the study. baPWV decreased significantly at 4 weeks compared with baseline (1,598.87±239.82 vs 1,500.89±241.15 cm/s, P<0.001), was stable at 12 weeks (1,482.24±215.14 cm/s, P<0.001), and remained steady through 24 weeks (1,472.58±205.01 cm/s, P<0.001). Office BP reduced from baseline to week 4 (154/95 vs 136/85 mmHg) and remained steady until 24 weeks. Nifedipine GITS significantly decreased 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring (P<0.001) after 24 weeks from baseline. Mean arterial pressure and pulse pressure were lowered significantly after 4, 12, and 24 weeks of treatment (P<0.001). These changes in baPWV were significantly correlated with changes in systolic blood pressure, diastolic BP, and mean arterial pressure (P<0.05), but not with changes in pulse pressure (P>0.05). There were no other drug-related serious adverse events. Conclusion

  12. Implementing torsional-mode Doppler ladar.

    PubMed

    Fluckiger, David U

    2002-08-20

    Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes carry orbital angular momentum as a consequence of their helical-phase front screw dislocation. This torsional beam structure interacts with rotating targets, changing the orbital angular momentum (azimuthal Doppler) of the scattered beam because angular momentum is a conserved quantity. I show how to measure this change independently from the usual longitudinal momentum (normal Doppler shift) and derive the apropos coherent mixing efficiencies for monostatic, truncated Laguerre and Gaussian-mode ladar antenna patterns. PMID:12206220

  13. Implementing torsional-mode Doppler ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluckiger, David U.

    2002-08-01

    Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes carry orbital angular momentum as a consequence of their helical-phase front screw dislocation. This torsional beam structure interacts with rotating targets, changing the orbital angular momentum (azimuthal Doppler) of the scattered beam because angular momentum is a conserved quantity. I show how to measure this change independently from the usual longitudinal momentum (normal Doppler shift) and derive the apropos coherent mixing efficiencies for monostatic, truncated Laguerre and Gaussian-mode ladar antenna patterns.

  14. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  15. Doppler-corrected differential detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K. (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Doppler in a communication system operating with a multiple differential phase-shift-keyed format (MDPSK) creates an adverse phase shift in an incoming signal. An open loop frequency estimation is derived from a Doppler-contaminated incoming signal. Based upon the recognition that, whereas the change in phase of the received signal over a full symbol contains both the differentially encoded data and the Doppler induced phase shift, the same change in phase over half a symbol (within a given symbol interval) contains only the Doppler induced phase shift, and the Doppler effect can be estimated and removed from the incoming signal. Doppler correction occurs prior to the receiver's final output of decoded data. A multiphase system can operate with two samplings per symbol interval at no penalty in signal-to-noise ratio provided that an ideal low pass pre-detection filter is employed, and two samples, at 1/4 and 3/4 of the symbol interval T sub s, are taken and summed together prior to incoming signal data detection.

  16. The Doppler effect in NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Guéron, Maurice

    2003-02-01

    An NMR sample may be subject to motions, such as those due to sample spinning or to liquid flow. Is the spectrum of such a sample affected by the Doppler effect? The question arises because, instrumental dimensions being much shorter than the wavelength, it is the near-field of the precessing magnetic moment which couples to the receiver coil, rather than the radiated far-field. We expand the near-field into plane propagating waves. For each such wave there is another one with the same amplitude, propagating in the opposite direction. The Doppler shifts are therefore equal and opposite. In the model case of a small fluid sample moving with constant velocity, this leads to a distribution of Doppler shifts which is symmetrical with respect to the unshifted frequency: there is no net spectral shift. We examine the possibility of observing the Doppler distribution in this case. We also consider the case of thermal motion of a gas. We draw attention to the resolved Doppler splitting of molecular rotational transitions in a supersonic burst as observed in a microwave resonator. We also mention briefly the Doppler effect in molecular beam spectroscopy.

  17. Pulsed Doppler lidar airborne scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimarzio, C. A.; Mcvicker, D. B.; Morrow, C. E.; Negus, C. C.

    1985-01-01

    This report covers the work accomplished during the reporting period on Pulsed Doppler Lidar Airborne Scanner and describes plans for the next reporting period. The objectives during the current phase of the contract are divided into four phases. Phase 1 includes ground testing of the system and analysis of data from the 1981 Severe Storms Test Flights. Phase 2 consists of preflight preparation and planning for the 1983 flight series. The flight test itself will be performed during Phase 3, and Phase 4 consists of post-flight analysis and operation of the system after that flight test. The range profile from five samples taken during Flight 10, around 1700 Z is given. The lowest curve is taken from data collected upwind of Mt. Shasta at about 10,000 feet of altitude, in a clear atmosphere, where no signals were observed. It thus is a good representation of the noise level as a function of range. The next curve was taken downwind of the mountain, and shows evidence of atmospheric returns. There is some question as to whether the data are valid at all ranges, or some ranges are contaminated by the others.

  18. Optimization of Doppler velocity echocardiographic measurements using an automatic contour detection method.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, E; Kadem, L; Pibarot, P; Durand, L-G

    2009-01-01

    Intra- and inter-observer variability in Doppler velocity echocardiographic measurements (DVEM) is a significant issue. Indeed, imprecisions of DVEM can lead to diagnostic errors, particularly in the quantification of the severity of heart valve dysfunction. To minimize the variability and rapidity of DVEM, we have developed an automatic method of Doppler velocity wave contour detection, based on active contour models. To validate our new method, results obtained with this method were compared to those obtained manually by an experienced echocardiographer on Doppler echocardiographic images of left ventricular outflow tract and transvalvular flow velocity signals recorded in 30 patients, 15 with aortic stenosis and 15 with mitral stenosis. We focused on three essential variables that are measured routinely by Doppler echocardiography in the clinical setting: the maximum velocity, the mean velocity and the velocity-time integral. Comparison between the two methods has shown a very good agreement (linear correlation coefficient R(2) = 0.99 between the automatically and the manually extracted variables). Moreover, the computation time was really short, about 5s. This new method applied to DVEM could, therefore, provide a useful tool to eliminate the intra- and inter-observer variabilities associated with DVEM and thereby to improve the diagnosis of cardiovascular disease. This automatic method could also allow the echocardiographer to realize these measurements within a much shorter period of time compared to standard manual tracing method. From a practical point of view, the model developed can be easily implanted in a standard echocardiographic system. PMID:19965162

  19. Denoising of arterial and venous Doppler signals using discrete wavelet transform: effect on clinical parameters.

    PubMed

    Tokmakçi, Mahmut; Erdoğan, Nuri

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of a wavelet transform based denoising strategy on clinical Doppler parameters are analyzed. The study scheme included: (a) Acquisition of arterial and venous Doppler signals by sampling the audio output of an ultrasound scanner from 20 healthy volunteers, (b) Noise reduction via decomposition of the signals through discrete wavelet transform, (c) Spectral analysis of noisy and noise-free signals with short time Fourier transform, (d) Curve fitting to spectrograms, (e) Calculation of clinical Doppler parameters, (f) Statistical comparison of parameters obtained from noisy and noise-free signals. The decomposition level was selected as the highest level at which the maximum power spectral density and its corresponding frequency were preserved. In all subjects, noise-free spectrograms had smoother trace with less ripples. In both arterial and venous spectrograms, denoising resulted in a significant decrease in the maximum (systolic) and mean frequency, with no statistical difference in the minimum (diastolic) frequency. In arterial signals, this leads to a significant decrease in the calculated parameters such as Systolic/Diastolic Velocity Ratio, Resistivity Index, Pulsatility Index and Acceleration Time. Acceleration Index did not change significantly. Despite a successful denoising, the effects of wavelet decomposition on high frequency components in the Doppler signal should be challenged by comparison with reference data, or, through clinical investigations. PMID:19470316

  20. Retroreflector for photonic Doppler velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoski, Thomas J.; Coutu, Ronald A., Jr.; Starman, LaVern A.

    2009-08-01

    In order to meet the goals of the Department of Defense (DoD) for smaller and more accurate weapons, numerous projects are currently investigating the miniaturization of weapons and munition fuze components. One of these efforts is to characterize the performance of small detonators. The velocity of the flyer, the key component needed to initiate a detonation sequence, can be measured using a photonic Doppler velocimeter (PDV). The purpose of this research was to develop a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) device that would act as an optimal retroreflective surface for the PDV. Two MEMS solutions were explored: one using the PolyMUMPsTM fabrication process and one in-house fabrication design using silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers. The in-house design consisted of an array of corner reflectors created using an SOI wafer. Each corner reflector consisted of three separate mirror plates which were self-assembled by photoresist pad hinges. When heated to a critical temperature (typically 140-160 °C), the photoresist pads melted and the resulting surface tension caused each mirror to rotate into place. The resulting array of corner reflectors was then coated with a thin layer of gold to increase reflectivity. Despite the successful assembly of a PolyMUMPsTM corner reflector, assembling an array of these reflectors was found to be unfeasible. Although the SOI corner reflector design was completed, these devices were not fabricated in time for testing during this research. However, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) and optical cross section (OCS) of commercially available retroreflective tapes were measured. These results can be used as a baseline comparison for future testing of a fabricated SOI corner reflector array.

  1. The leicester Doppler phantom--a digital electronic phantom for ultrasound pulsed Doppler system testing.

    PubMed

    Gittins, John; Martin, Kevin

    2010-04-01

    Doppler flow and string phantoms have been used to assess the performance of ultrasound Doppler systems in terms of parameters such as sensitivity, velocity accuracy and sample volume registration. However, because of the nature of their construction, they cannot challenge the accuracy and repeatability of modern digital ultrasound systems or give objective measures of system performance. Electronic Doppler phantoms are able to make use of electronically generated test signals, which may be controlled precisely in terms of frequency, amplitude and timing. The Leicester Electronic Doppler Phantom uses modern digital signal processing methods and field programmable gate array technology to overcome some of the limitations of previously described electronic phantoms. In its present form, it is able to give quantitative graphical assessments of frequency response and range gate characteristics, as well as measures of dynamic range and velocity measurement accuracy. The use of direct acoustic coupling eliminates uncertainties caused by Doppler beam effects, such as intrinsic spectral broadening, but prevents their evaluation.

  2. Studying the precision of ray tracing techniques with Szekeres models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koksbang, S. M.; Hannestad, S.

    2015-07-01

    The simplest standard ray tracing scheme employing the Born and Limber approximations and neglecting lens-lens coupling is used for computing the convergence along individual rays in mock N-body data based on Szekeres swiss cheese and onion models. The results are compared with the exact convergence computed using the exact Szekeres metric combined with the Sachs formalism. A comparison is also made with an extension of the simple ray tracing scheme which includes the Doppler convergence. The exact convergence is reproduced very precisely as the sum of the gravitational and Doppler convergences along rays in Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi swiss cheese and single void models. This is not the case when the swiss cheese models are based on nonsymmetric Szekeres models. For such models, there is a significant deviation between the exact and ray traced paths and hence also the corresponding convergences. There is also a clear deviation between the exact and ray tracing results obtained when studying both nonsymmetric and spherically symmetric Szekeres onion models.

  3. Closed loop tracked Doppler optical coherence tomography based heart monitor for the Drosophila melanogaster larvae.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, Mantas; Bradu, Adrian; Ferguson, Daniel R; Hammer, Daniel X; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a novel instrument for biosciences, useful for studies of moving embryos. A dual sequential imaging/measurement channel is assembled via a closed-loop tracking architecture. The dual channel system can operate in two regimes: (i) single-point Doppler signal monitoring or (ii) fast 3-D swept source OCT imaging. The system is demonstrated for characterizing cardiac dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster larva. Closed loop tracking enables long term in vivo monitoring of the larvae heart without anesthetic or physical restraint. Such an instrument can be used to measure subtle variations in the cardiac behavior otherwise obscured by the larvae movements. A fruit fly larva (top) was continuously tracked for continuous remote monitoring. A heartbeat trace of freely moving larva (bottom) was obtained by a low coherence interferometry based doppler sensing technique. PMID:25924107

  4. Optical characteristics of modified fiber tips in single fiber, laser Doppler flowmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberg, P. Ake; Cai, Hongming; Rohman, Hakan; Larsson, Sven-Erik

    1994-02-01

    Percutaneous laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and bipolar surface electromyography (EMG) were used simultaneously for measurement of skeletal muscle (trapezius) perfusion in relation to static load and fatigue. On-line computer (386 SX) processing of the LDF- and EMG- signals made possible interpretation of the relationship between the perfusion and the activity of the muscle. The single fiber laser Doppler technique was used in order to minimize the trauma. A ray-tracing program was developed in the C language by which the optical properties of the fiber and fiber ends could be simulated. Isoirradiance graphs were calculated for three fiber end types and the radiance characteristics were measured for each fiber end. The three types of fiber-tips were evaluated and compared in flow model measurements.

  5. The implication of tissue Doppler echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise in early detection of cardiac dysfunction in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Elnady, Basant M.; Abdelghafar, Ayman Saeed Mohamed; Khalik, El Shazly Abdul; Algethami, Mohammed Mesfer; Basiony, A.S.; Al-otaibi, Mona Dhaif Allah; Al-otaibi, Maram Eidhah

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can present limitations to exercise capacity and quality of life (QoL) because of various clinical conditions, such as pulmonary disease or heart disease. Tissue Doppler echocardiography (TDE) offers the promise of an objective measurement to quantify regional and global ventricular function through the assessment of myocardial velocity data. This study aimed to assess the intensity of left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) systolic and diastolic dysfunction in SLE patients by means of TDE and cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing to determine their impact on QoL. Material and Methods Overall, 56 SLE patients within two tertiary healthcare centers as well as 50 healthy controls were examined with TDE after the exclusion of cardiovascular risk factors. TDE was performed for maximal systolic (S), early diastolic (E′), and late diastolic (A′) velocities of the mitral and tricuspid annulus. Pulsed wave (PW) Doppler of mitral and tricuspid valve inflow was performed in addition to the estimation of the left ventricle ejection fraction and assessment of right ventricle systolic function by tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE). Disease activity was assessed by the Systemic Lupus Activity Measure (SLAM), and the damage index was assessed by the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC)/American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Damage Index (SDI). CPX tests according to the modified Bruce protocol were performed. Results SLE patients in both subgroups had more or less similar laboratory data and statistically higher values of ESR, CRP, and anticardiolipin (aCL) antibodies compared to the control group. LV function showed statistically insignificant EF compared to the control group, being lower in the patient group. Tissue Doppler image revealed that E′ and A′ of the mitral annulus were lower in the patient group than in the control group. Concerning RV, TAPSE in the patient group was

  6. Introduction to field tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrowski, F.; Kuhn, M.

    2011-03-01

    Field tracing is the generalization of ray tracing and enables electromagnetic system modeling. Harmonic fields are traced through the optical system instead of ray bundles. This allows the smooth combination of different modeling techniques in different subdomains of the system, e.g. to use the rigorous spectrum-of-plane-wave operator for homogeneous media, geometrical optics to trace through a lens and finite element methods to include the effect of some scatterer. All modeling techniques have to be formulated for vectorial harmonic fields. The paper introduces the basic concepts of field tracing and derives the corresponding operator equations. Propagation in homogeneous media is of special concern in field tracing to interconnect the modeling in different subdomains of the system. A new concept for a smart propagation algorithm is presented. Because of the success of geometrical optics in ray tracing, it is reasonable to consider its application in field tracing. In this paper we discuss generalizations of geometrical optics that have been enforced by field tracing. Although the basic field tracing equations are formulated for vectorial harmonic fields, general fields can be treated by suitable decompositions into sets of harmonic modes.

  7. Inverse Doppler Effects in Broadband Acoustic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, S. L.; Zhao, X. P.; Liu, S.; Shen, F. L.; Li, L. L.; Luo, C. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Doppler effect refers to the change in frequency of a wave source as a consequence of the relative motion between the source and an observer. Veselago theoretically predicted that materials with negative refractions can induce inverse Doppler effects. With the development of metamaterials, inverse Doppler effects have been extensively investigated. However, the ideal material parameters prescribed by these metamaterial design approaches are complex and also challenging to obtain experimentally. Here, we demonstrated a method of designing and experimentally characterising arbitrary broadband acoustic metamaterials. These omni-directional, double-negative, acoustic metamaterials are constructed with ‘flute-like’ acoustic meta-cluster sets with seven double meta-molecules; these metamaterials also overcome the limitations of broadband negative bulk modulus and mass density to provide a region of negative refraction and inverse Doppler effects. It was also shown that inverse Doppler effects can be detected in a flute, which has been popular for thousands of years in Asia and Europe. PMID:27578317

  8. The EVE Doppler Sensitivity and Flare Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Woods, T. N.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Didkovsky, L.; Del Zanna, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) obtains continuous EUV spectra of the Sun viewed as a star. Its primary objective is the characterization of solar spectral irradiance, but its sensitivity and stability make it extremely interesting for observations of variability on time scales down to the limit imposed by its basic 10 s sample interval. In this paper we characterize the Doppler sensitivity of the EVE data. We find that the 30.4 nm line of He II has a random Doppler error below 0.001 nm (1 pm, better than 10 km/s as a redshift), with ample stability to detect the orbital motion of its satellite, the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Solar flares also displace the spectrum, both because of Doppler shifts and because of EVE's optical layout, which (as with a slitless spectrograph) confuses position and wavelength. As a flare develops, the centroid of the line displays variations that reflect Doppler shifts and therefore flare dynamics. For the impulsive phase of the flare SOL2010-06-12, we find the line centroid to have a redshift of 16.8 +/- 5.9 km/s relative to that of the flare gradual phase (statistical errors only). We find also that high-temperature lines, such as Fe XXIV 19.2 nm, have well-determined Doppler components for major flares, with decreasing apparent blueshifts as expected from chromospheric evaporation flows.

  9. Applications of Doppler ultrasound during labor.

    PubMed

    Mihu, Dan; Diculescu, Doru; Costin, Nicolae; Mihu, Carmen Mihaela; Blaga, Ligia; Ciortea, Răzvan; Măluţan, Andrei

    2011-06-01

    The information provided by Doppler ultrasound examination during labor permits the understanding of the mechanisms regarding the physiology and pathophysiology of feto-placental exchange and the fetal adaptive systems. There are certain technical difficulties related to intrapartum Doppler ultrasound examination. The investigated sites are the uterine arteries, umbilical arteries, fetal circulation. In diastole, when intrauterine pressure exceeds maternal diastolic pressure, the perfusion pressure of the uterine artery blood flow is no longer present. A progressive decrease in the diastolic component is seen along with an increase in intrauterine pressure from 10 to 60 mmHg. During premature birth or preeclampsia, there are particular changes in the uterine blood flow. A remarkable stability of the umbilical resistance index is found during labor, which shows the permanent presence of feto-placental exchange. Certain correlations can be established between fetal heart rate changes in labor and Doppler ultrasound aspects at the level of umbilical arteries. Doppler examination confirms the concept of reduced cerebral blood flow by the compression of the fetal skull as a cause of decelerations occurring during labor. The decision regarding the extraction of the fetus can only be made by correlating the results of Doppler ultrasound with the other paraclinical methods for the monitoring of the intrapartum fetal status.

  10. Spacecraft Doppler Tracking as a Xylophone Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinto, Massimo

    1996-01-01

    We discuss spacecraft Doppler tracking in which Doppler data recorded on the ground are linearly combined with Doppler measurements made on board a spacecraft. By using the four-link radio system first proposed by Vessot and Levine, we derive a new method for removing from the combined data the frequency fluctuations due to the Earth troposphere, ionosphere, and mechanical vibrations of the antenna on the ground. Our method provides also for reducing by several orders of magnitude, at selected Fourier components, the frequency fluctuations due to other noise sources, such as the clock on board the spacecraft or the antenna and buffeting of the probe by non-gravitational forces. In this respect spacecraft Doppler tracking can be regarded as a xylophone detector. Estimates of the sensitivities achievable by this xylophone are presented for two tests of Einstein's theory of relativity: searches for gravitational waves and measurements of the gravitational red shift. This experimental technique could be extended to other tests of the theory of relativity, and to radio science experiments that rely on high-precision Doppler measurements.

  11. Doppler-corrected differential detection of MPSK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Marvin K.; Divsalar, Dariush

    1989-01-01

    An open-loop technique is presented for estimating and correcting Doppler frequency shift in an M-ary differential phase-shift-keyed (MDPSK) receiver. The novelty of the scheme is based on the observation that whereas the change in phase of the received signal over a full symbol contains the sum of the data (phase) and the Doppler-induced phase shift, the same change in phase over half a symbol (within a given symbol interval) contains only the Doppler-induced phase shift. Thus, by proper processing, the latter can be estimated and removed from the former. Analytical and simulation results are given for the variance of the above estimator, and the error probability performance of the MDPSK receiver is evaluated in the presence of the Doppler correction. Next, the practical considerations associated with the application of this technique on bandlimited Nyquist channels are discussed and incorporated into the final design. It is shown that the receiver can, in the absence of timing jitter, be designed to allow combined Doppler correction and data detection with no penalty due to intersymbol interference (ISI). The effects of ISI due to timing jitter are assessed by computer simulation.

  12. Doppler Imaging of Exoplanets and Brown Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crossfield, I.; Biller, B.; Schlieder, J.; Deacon, N.; Bonnefoy, M.; Homeier, D.; Allard, F.; Buenzli, E.; Henning, T.; Brandner, W.; Goldman, Bertr; Kopytova, T.

    2014-03-01

    Doppler Imaging produces 2D global maps. When applied to cool planets or more massive brown dwarfs, it can map atmospheric features and track global weather patterns. The first substellar map, of the 2pc-distant brown dwarf Luhman 16B (Crossfeld et al. 2014), revealed patchy regions of thin & thick clouds. Here, I investigate the feasibility of future Doppler Imaging of additional objects. Searching the literature, I find that all 3 of P, v sin i, and variability are published for 22 brown dwarfs. At least one datum exists for 333 targets. The sample is very incomplete below ~L5; we need more surveys to find the best targets for Doppler Imaging! I estimate limiting magnitudes for Doppler Imaging with various hi-resolution near-infrared spectrographs. Only a handful of objects - at the M/L and L/T transitions - can be mapped with current tools. Large telescopes such as TMT and GMT will allow Doppler Imaging of many dozens of brown dwarfs and the brightest exoplanets. More targets beyond type L5 likely remain to be found. Future observations will let us probe the global atmospheric dynamics of many diverse objects.

  13. Using assertions with trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazimek, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Algorithms for dynamic detection of assertions are designed to find different types of dependences in programs based only on information collected during their execution without static analysis. Specificity of those algorithms and limited quantity of data to analyze needs to investigate the usage principle of discovered assertions for software dependability increase. This article introduces techniques for increasing usage efficiency of detected assertions through using program execution trace. Concept of trace and of an assertion with trace were defined. The work describes algorithms for reducing the number of traces, shortening traces lengths and reducing the number of observation points identifiers in traces. For several applications fault injection based experiments were conducted in order to check the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. Compression of polyphase codes with Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, W. D.

    It is shown that pulse compression with sufficient Doppler tolerance may be achieved with polyphase codes derived from linear frequency modulation (LFM) and nonlinear frequency modulation (NLFM). Low sidelobes in range and Doppler are required especially for the radar search function. These may be achieved by an LFM derived phase coder together with Hamming weighting or by applying a PNL polyphase code derived from NLFM. For a discrete and known Doppler frequency with an expanded and mismatched reference vector a sidelobe reduction is possible. The compression is then achieved without a loss in resolution. A set up for the expanded reference gives zero sidelobes only in an interval around the signal peak or a least square minimization for all range elements. This version may be useful for target tracking.

  15. Inline Ultrasonic Rheometry by Pulsed Doppler

    SciTech Connect

    Pfund, David M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Pappas, Richard A.

    2006-12-22

    This will be a discussion of the non-invasive determination of the viscosity of a non-Newtonian fluid in laminar pipe flow over the range of shear rates present in the pipe. The procedure used requires knowledge of the flow profile in and the pressure drop along a long straight run of pipe. The profile is determined by using a pulsed ultrasonic Doppler velocimeter. This approach is ideal for making non-invasive, real-time measurements for monitoring and control. Rheograms of a shear thinning, thixotropic gel will be presented. The operating parameters and limitations of the Doppler-based instrument will be discussed. The most significant limitation is velocity gradient broadening of the Doppler spectra near the walls of the pipe. This limitation can be significant for strongly shear thinning fluids (depending also on the ratio of beam to pipe diameter and the transducer's insertion angle).

  16. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for Planetary Atmospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamon, Tatiana; Cimo, Giuseppe; Duev, Dmitry; Gurvits, Leonid; Molera Calves, Guifre; Pogrebenko, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a technique that allows the determination of the radial velocity and lateral coordinates of planetary spacecraft with very high accuracy (Duev, 2012). The setup of the experiment consists of several ground stations from the European VLBI Network (EVN) located around the globe, which simultaneously perform Doppler tracking of a spacecraft carrier radio signal, and are subsequently processed in a VLBI-style in phase referencing mode. Because of the accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of planetary research, among which planetary atmospheric studies, gravimetry and ultra-precise celestial mechanics of planetary systems. In the study at hand the application of this technique for planetary atmospheric investigations is demonstrated. As a test case, radio occultation experiments were conducted with PRIDE having as target ESA's Venus Express, during different observing sessions with multiple ground stations in April 2012 and March 2014. Once each of the stations conducts the observation, the raw data is delivered to the correlation center at the Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe (JIVE) located in the Netherlands. The signals are processed with a high spectral resolution and phase detection software package from which Doppler observables of each station are derived. Subsequently the Doppler corrected signals are correlated to derive the VLBI observables. These two sets of observables are used for precise orbit determination. The reconstructed orbit along with the Doppler observables are used as input for the radio occultation processing software, which consists of mainly two modules, the geometrical optics module and the ray tracing inversion module, from which vertical density profiles, and subsequently, temperature and pressure profiles of Venus

  17. Velocity precision measurements using laser Doppler anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopheide, D.; Taux, G.; Narjes, L.

    1985-07-01

    A Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) was calibrated to determine its applicability to high pressure measurements (up to 10 bars) for industrial purposes. The measurement procedure with LDA and the experimental computerized layouts are presented. The calibration procedure is based on absolute accuracy of Doppler frequency and calibration of interference strip intervals. A four-quadrant detector allows comparison of the interference strip distance measurements and computer profiles. Further development of LDA is recommended to increase accuracy (0.1% inaccuracy) and to apply the method industrially.

  18. A visual demo of the Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papacosta, Pangratios

    2010-09-01

    Most physics teachers are familiar with the standard classroom demonstration of the Doppler effect. We invite students to explain the periodic variation of the pitch produced when we swirl a sounding buzzer over our heads. Students are quick to connect this phenomenon to everyday life experiences such as listening to the sound of the siren of a fast-approaching police car or the bell of an approaching train. In addition to these aural experiences, our understanding of the Doppler effect can be strengthened with a useful visual metaphor.

  19. Doppler imaging using spectrally-encoded endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yelin, Dvir; Bouma, B. E.; Rosowsky, J. J.; Tearney, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    The capability to image tissue motion such as blood flow through an endoscope could have many applications in medicine. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a recently introduced technique that utilizes a single optical fiber and miniature diffractive optics to obtain endoscopic images through small diameter probes. Using spectral-domain interferometry, SEE is furthermore capable of three-dimensional volume imaging at video rates. Here we show that by measuring relative spectral phases, this technology can additionally measure Doppler shifts. Doppler SEE is demonstrated in flowing Intralipid phantoms and vibrating middle ear ossicles. PMID:18795020

  20. Observation of the inverse Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Seddon, N; Bearpark, T

    2003-11-28

    We report experimental observation of an inverse Doppler shift, in which the frequency of a wave is increased on reflection from a receding boundary. This counterintuitive effect has been produced by reflecting a wave from a moving discontinuity in an electrical transmission line. Doppler shifts produced by this system can be varied in a reproducible manner by electronic control of the transmission line and are typically five orders of magnitude greater than those produced by solid objects with kinematic velocities. Potential applications include the development of tunable and multifrequency radiation sources.

  1. Reversed Doppler effect in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Reed, Evan J; Soljacić, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D

    2003-09-26

    Nonrelativistic reversed Doppler shifts have never been observed in nature and have only been speculated to occur in pathological systems with simultaneously negative effective permittivity and permeability. This Letter presents a different, new physical phenomenon that leads to a nonrelativistic reversed Doppler shift in light. It arises when light is reflected from a moving shock wave propagating through a photonic crystal. In addition to reflection of a single frequency, multiple discrete reflected frequencies or a 10 GHz periodic modulation can also be observed when a single carrier frequency of wavelength 1 microm is incident.

  2. Broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cobb, E.D.

    1993-01-01

    The broad-band acoustic Doppler current profiler is an instrument that determines velocity based on the Doppler principle by reflecting acoustic signals off sediment particles in the water. The instrument is capable of measuring velocity magnitude and direction throughout a water column and of measuring water depth. It is also capable of bottom tracking and can, therefore, keep track of its own relative position as it is moved across a channel. Discharge measurements can be made quickly and, based on limited tests, accurately with this instrument. ?? 1993.

  3. Laser Doppler And Range Systems For Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, P. W.; Gagliardi, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    Report discusses two types of proposed laser systems containing active transponders measuring distance (range) and line-of-sight velocity (via Doppler effect) between deep space vehicle and earth-orbiting satellite. Laser system offers diffraction advantage over microwave system. Delivers comparable power to distant receiver while using smaller transmitting and receiving antennas and less-powerful transmitter. Less subject to phase scintillations caused by passage through such inhomogeneous media as solar corona. One type of system called "incoherent" because range and Doppler measurements do not require coherence with laser carrier signals. Other type of system called "coherent" because successful operation requires coherent tracking of laser signals.

  4. Laser Doppler velocimeter aerial spray measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalay, A. D.; Eberle, W. R.; Howle, R. E.; Shrider, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental research program for measuring the location, spatial extent, and relative concentration of airborne spray clouds generated by agricultural aircraft is described. The measurements were conducted with a ground-based laser Doppler velocimeter. The remote sensing instrumentation, experimental tests, and the results of the flight tests are discussed. The cross section of the aerial spray cloud and the observed location, extent, and relative concentration of the airborne particulates are presented. It is feasible to use a mobile laser Doppler velocimeter to track and monitor the transport and dispersion of aerial spray generated by an agricultural aircraft.

  5. Opposite predictive value of pulse pressure and aortic pulse wave velocity on heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction: insights from an Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study (EPHESUS) substudy.

    PubMed

    Regnault, Veronique; Lagrange, Jérémy; Pizard, Anne; Safar, Michel E; Fay, Renaud; Pitt, Bertram; Challande, Pascal; Rossignol, Patrick; Zannad, Faiez; Lacolley, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Although hypertension contributes significantly to worsen cardiovascular risk, blood pressure increment in subjects with heart failure is paradoxically associated with lower risk. The objective was to determine whether pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) remain prognostic markers, independent of treatment in heart failure with reduced left ventricular function. The investigation involved 6632 patients of the Eplerenone Post-Acute Myocardial Infarction Heart Failure Efficacy and Survival Study. All subjects had acute myocardial infarction with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% and signs/symptoms of heart failure. Carotid-femoral PWV was measured in a subpopulation of 306 subjects. In the overall population, baseline mean arterial pressure <90 mm Hg was associated with higher all-cause death (hazard ratio, 1.14 [95% confidence interval, 1.00-1.30]; P<0.05), whereas higher left ventricular ejection fraction or pulse pressure was associated with lower rates of all-cause death, cardiovascular death/hospitalization, and cardiovascular death. In the subpopulation, increased baseline PWV was associated with worse outcomes (all-cause death: 1.16 [1.03-1.30]; P<0.05 and cardiovascular deaths: 1.16 [1.03-1.31]; P<0.05), independent of age and left ventricular ejection fraction. Using multiple regression analysis, systolic blood pressure and age were the main independent factors positively associated with pulse pressure or PWV, both in the entire population or in the PWV substudy. In heart failure and low ejection fraction, our results suggest that pulse pressure, being negatively associated with outcome, is more dependent on left ventricular function and thereby no longer a marker of aortic elasticity. In contrast, increased aortic stiffness, assessed by PWV, contributes significantly to cardiovascular death.

  6. Photoacoustic Doppler Effect from Flowing Small Light-Absorbing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  7. Acoustic micro-Doppler radar for human gait imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhaonian; Pouliquen, Philippe O; Waxman, Allen; Andreou, Andreas G

    2007-03-01

    A portable acoustic micro-Doppler radar system for the acquisition of human gait signatures in indoor and outdoor environments is reported. Signals from an accelerometer attached to the leg support the identification of the components in the measured micro-Doppler signature. The acoustic micro-Doppler system described in this paper is simpler and offers advantages over the widely used electromagnetic wave micro-Doppler radars.

  8. Chaotic system for self-synchronizing Doppler measurement.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Thomas L

    2005-03-01

    In a radar system, it is necessary to measure both range and velocity of a target. The movement of the target causes a Doppler shift of the radar signal, and the size of the Doppler shift is used to measure the velocity of the target. In this work, a chaotic drive-response system is simulated that detects a Doppler shift in a chaotic signal. The response system can detect Doppler shifts in more than one signal at a time.

  9. Photoacoustic Doppler effect from flowing small light-absorbing particles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-11-01

    From the flow of a suspension of micrometer-scale carbon particles, the photoacoustic Doppler shift is observed. As predicted theoretically, the observed Doppler shift equals half of that in Doppler ultrasound and does not depend on the direction of laser illumination. This new physical phenomenon provides a basis for developing photoacoustic Doppler flowmetry, which can potentially be used for detecting fluid flow in optically scattering media and especially low-speed blood flow of relatively deep microcirculation in biological tissue.

  10. Thin Lens Ray Tracing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatland, Ian R.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes a ray tracing approach to thin lens analysis based on a vector form of Snell's law for paraxial rays as an alternative to the usual approach in introductory physics courses. The ray tracing approach accommodates skew rays and thus provides a complete analysis. (Author/KHR)

  11. Trace element emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

    1994-10-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is carrying out an investigation that will provide methods to predict the fate of selected trace elements in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) systems to aid in the development of methods to control the emission of trace elements determined to be air toxics. The goal of this project is to identify the effects of critical chemical and physical transformations associated with trace element behavior in IGCC and IGFC systems. The trace elements included in this project are arsenic, chromium, cadmium, mercury, nickel, selenium, and lead. The research seeks to identify and fill, experimentally and/or theoretically, data gaps that currently exist on the fate and composition of trace elements. The specific objectives are to (1) review the existing literature to identify the type and quantity of trace elements from coal gasification systems, (2) perform laboratory-scale experimentation and computer modeling to enable prediction of trace element emissions, and (3) identify methods to control trace element emissions.

  12. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1550 Ultrasonic pulsed doppler...

  13. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1550 Ultrasonic pulsed doppler...

  14. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system is a device that combines the features of continuous wave doppler-effect technology with pulsed-echo effect technology and is intended...

  15. Doppler instrumentation for measuring blood velocity and flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, R. W.; Hottinger, C. F.; Meindl, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonic blood flowmeters are reviewed in detail. The importance of measurement accuracy for transcutaneous flowmeters and their clinical application is stressed. Doppler imaging was combined with conventional pulse echo imaging, and diagnostic information was extracted from flow signals. The range and extent of applications of Doppler instruments was also presented.

  16. [Phlegmasia alba dolens diagnosed with Doppler ultrasonography].

    PubMed

    Wulff, C; Lorentzen, T; Christensen, E; Pedersen, E B

    1996-11-11

    Differential diagnostic problems may occur in a patient with a cold, pale and swollen leg. Especially when the peripheral blood pressure is reduced, it is particularly difficult to distinguish cases caused by venous thrombosis from those caused by arterial embolism. Colour-Doppler ultra-sonography might be helpful for establishing the correct diagnosis. A case history is presented.

  17. Analysis of Doppler radar windshear data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F.; Mckinney, P.; Ozmen, F.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to process Lincoln Laboratory Doppler radar data obtained during FLOWS testing at Huntsville, Alabama, in the summer of 1986, to characterize windshear events. The processing includes plotting velocity and F-factor profiles, histogram analysis to summarize statistics, and correlation analysis to demonstrate any correlation between different data fields.

  18. Acoustic Doppler discharge-measurement system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simpson, Michael R.; Oltmann, Richard N.; ,

    1990-01-01

    A discharge-measurement system that uses a vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler has been developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey. Discharge measurements using the system require a fraction of the time needed for conventional current-meter discharge measurements and do not require shore-based navigational aids or tag lines for positioning the vessel.

  19. Method for Canceling Ionospheric Doppler Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vessot, R. F. C.

    1982-01-01

    Unified transponder system with hydrogen-maser oscillators at both stations can compensate for both motional and ionospheric components of Doppler shift. Appropriate choices of frequency shift in output of mixer m3. System exploits proportionality between dispersive component of frequency shift and reciprocal of frequency to achieve cancellation of dispersive component at output.

  20. Calculating "g" from Acoustic Doppler Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Sebastian; Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, the Doppler effect for sound is introduced in high school and college physics courses. Students calculate the perceived frequency for several scenarios relating a stationary or moving observer and a stationary or moving sound source. These calculations assume a constant velocity of the observer and/or source. Although seldom…

  1. Spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler effect.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, S; Tabosa, J W R; Failache, H; Lezama, A

    2006-09-15

    We report on the first spectroscopic observation of the rotational Doppler shift associated with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum. The effect is evidenced as the broadening of a Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency coherence resonance on Rb vapor when the two incident Laguerre-Gaussian laser beams have opposite topological charges. The observations closely agree with theoretical predictions.

  2. Carotid Doppler evaluation in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    D'Alton, J. G.; Norris, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Doppler technique has proven to be a useful noninvasive technique for evaluating the patency of the carotid artery in patients at risk of stroke. The data obtained from 246 carotid Doppler examinations were compared with the angiographic findings in the same patients. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were high when the degree of stenosis was greater than 50%, but occlusions were less reliably detected, with 8 (33%) of the 24 being misdiagnosed as high-grade stenoses. Carotid Doppler evaluation guides and accelerates decisions regarding further investigations, such as cerebral angiography. It helps one decide whether a neck bruit is of arterial origin and aids assessment following cerebrovascular surgery. It is not a substitute for cerebral angiography because it poorly visualizes both the posterior and the intracranial circulations and cannot accurately detect low-grade (less than 50%) stenoses or ulcerated arterial plaques. Detection of stenosis in a carotid artery in an otherwise uncertain case is an indication for cerebral angiography, so the Doppler technique will probably increase the number of angiograms performed. However, this technique is also useful in follow-up, being without hazard, and should, therefore, reduce the likelihood of unnecessary angiographic examinations. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3A FIG. 3B FIG. 5 PMID:6640454

  3. Satellite Doppler data processing using a microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, P. E.; Lynn, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    A microcomputer which was developed to compute ground radio beacon position locations using satellite measurements of Doppler frequency shift is described. Both the computational algorithms and the microcomputer hardware incorporating these algorithms were discussed. Results are presented where the microcomputer in conjunction with the NIMBUS-6 random access measurement system provides real time calculation of beacon latitude and longitude.

  4. A MAGNETIC CALIBRATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC DOPPLER VELOCITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Welsch, Brian T.; Fisher, George H.; Sun, Xudong

    2013-03-10

    The zero point of measured photospheric Doppler shifts is uncertain for at least two reasons: instrumental variations (from, e.g., thermal drifts); and the convective blueshift, a known correlation between intensity and upflows. Accurate knowledge of the zero point is, however, useful for (1) improving estimates of the Poynting flux of magnetic energy across the photosphere, and (2) constraining processes underlying flux cancellation, the mutual apparent loss of magnetic flux in closely spaced, opposite-polarity magnetogram features. We present a method to absolutely calibrate line-of-sight (LOS) velocities in solar active regions (ARs) near disk center using three successive vector magnetograms and one Dopplergram coincident with the central magnetogram. It exploits the fact that Doppler shifts measured along polarity inversion lines (PILs) of the LOS magnetic field determine one component of the velocity perpendicular to the magnetic field, and optimizes consistency between changes in LOS flux near PILs and the transport of transverse magnetic flux by LOS velocities, assuming that ideal electric fields govern the magnetic evolution. Previous calibrations fitted the center-to-limb variation of Doppler velocities, but this approach cannot, by itself, account for residual convective shifts at the limb. We apply our method to vector magnetograms of AR 11158, observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, and find clear evidence of offsets in the Doppler zero point in the range of 50-550 m s{sup -1}. In addition, we note that a simpler calibration can be determined from an LOS magnetogram and Dopplergram pair from the median Doppler velocity among all near-disk-center PIL pixels. We briefly discuss shortcomings in our initial implementation, and suggest ways to address these. In addition, as a step in our data reduction, we discuss the use of temporal continuity in the transverse magnetic field direction to correct apparently

  5. An electronic Doppler signal generator for assessing continuous-wave ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallwood, R. H.; Dixon, P.

    1986-03-01

    The design and performance of the electric Doppler signal generator are described. The features of the CW ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter, which operates in the 2-10 MHz range, that are relevant to the design of the generator are examined. Methods for evaluating the bandwidth, dynamic range, directional separation, and linearity of the zero-crossing detector are discussed. The use of a polyphase network as a phase shifter to generate a single sideband (SSB) signal is analyzed. The SSB generation is performed at a frequency of 100 kHz and the advantages of generation at this frequency are stated. The selection of proper SSB signals for the system is investigated. The performance of the Doppler signal generator is evaluated with a frequency analyzer; sideband rejection ratios and phase error in the quadrature oscillator are calculated. The Doppler generator was applied to a CW flowmeter and output signal levels were measured. The test reveals that the Doppler signal generator's performance exceeds the flowmeter requirements; rejection of the unwanted sideband exceeds 40 dB for Doppler frequencies up to 10 kHz, which is the minimum upper frequency for 10 MHz flowmeters.

  6. The Novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique and the Coherent Doppler Lidar System Validation Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    The signal processing aspect of a 2-m wavelength coherent Doppler lidar system under development at NASA Langley Research Center in Virginia is investigated in this paper. The lidar system is named VALIDAR (validation lidar) and its signal processing program estimates and displays various wind parameters in real-time as data acquisition occurs. The goal is to improve the quality of the current estimates such as power, Doppler shift, wind speed, and wind direction, especially in low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) regime. A novel Nonlinear Adaptive Doppler Shift Estimation Technique (NADSET) is developed on such behalf and its performance is analyzed using the wind data acquired over a long period of time by VALIDAR. The quality of Doppler shift and power estimations by conventional Fourier-transform-based spectrum estimation methods deteriorates rapidly as SNR decreases. NADSET compensates such deterioration in the quality of wind parameter estimates by adaptively utilizing the statistics of Doppler shift estimate in a strong SNR range and identifying sporadic range bins where good Doppler shift estimates are found. The authenticity of NADSET is established by comparing the trend of wind parameters with and without NADSET applied to the long-period lidar return data.

  7. Pulsatile blood flow in human bone assessed by laser-Doppler flowmetry and the interpretation of photoplethysmographic signals.

    PubMed

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Tchernin, David; Hyacinthe, Jean-Noël; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Richiardi, Jonas

    2013-03-01

    Human bone blood flow, mean blood speed and the number of moving red blood cells were assessed (in arbitrary units), as a function of time, during one cardiac cycle. The measurements were obtained non-invasively on five volunteers by laser-Doppler flowmetry at large interoptode spacing. The investigated bones included: patella, clavicle, tibial diaphysis and tibial malleolus. As hypothesized, we found that in all bones the number of moving cells remains constant during cardiac cycles. Therefore, we concluded that the pulsatile nature of blood flow must be completely determined by the mean blood speed and not by changes in blood volume (vessels dilation). Based on these results, it is finally demonstrated using a mathematical model (derived from the radiative transport theory) that photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulsations observed by others in the literature, cannot be generated by oscillations in blood oxygen saturation, which is physiologically linked to blood speed. In fact, possible oxygen saturation changes during pulsations decrease the amplitude of PPG pulsations due to specific features of the PPG light source. It is shown that a variation in blood oxygen saturation of 3% may induce a negative change of ∼1% in the PPG signal. It is concluded that PPG pulsations are determined by periodic 'positive' changes of the reduced scattering coefficient of the tissue and/or the absorption coefficient at constant blood volume. No explicit experimental PPG measurements have been performed. As a by-product of this study, an estimation of the arterial pulse wave velocity obtained from the analysis of the blood flow pulsations give a value of 7.8 m s(-1) (95% confidence interval of the sample mean distribution: [6.7, 9.5] m s(-1)), which is perfectly compatible with data in the literature. We hope that this note will contribute to a better understanding of PPG signals and to further develop the domain of the vascular physiology of human bone.

  8. The medical Doppler in hand surgery: its scientific basis, applications, and the history of its namesake, Christian Johann Doppler.

    PubMed

    Ghori, Ahmer K; Chung, Kevin C

    2007-12-01

    The word Doppler is used synonymously in hand surgery for evaluating patency of vascular structures; however, the science and history behind the Doppler effect are not as well-known. We will present the theories behind the Doppler effect and the history of the person who made this discovery.

  9. Traceds: An Experimental Trace Element Partitioning Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, R. L.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this project, which is part of the EARTHCHEM initiative, is to compile the existing experimental trace element partitioning data, and to develop a transparent, accessible resource for the community. The primary goal of experimental trace element partitioning studies is to create a database that can be used to develop models of how trace elements behave in natural geochemical systems. The range of approaches as to how this is accomplished and how the data are reported differs dramatically from one system to another and one investigator to another. This provides serious challenges to the creation of a coherent database - and suggests the need for a standard format for data presentation and reporting. The driving force for this compilation is to provide community access to the complete database for trace element experiments. Our new effort includes all the published analytical results from experimental determinations. In compiling the data, we have set a minimum standard for the data to be included. The threshold criteria include: Experimental conditions (temperature, pressure, device, container, time, etc.) Major element composition of the phases Trace element analyses of the phases Data sources that did not report these minimum components were not included. The rationale for not including such data is that the degree of equilibration is unknown, and more important, no rigorous approach to modeling the behavior of trace elements is possible without a knowledge of the actual concentrations or the temperature and pressure of formation. The data are stored using a schema derived from that of the Library of Experimental Phase Relations (LEPR), modified to account for additional metadata, and restructured to permit multiple analytical entries for various element/technique/standard combinations. Our ultimate goal is to produce a database together with a flexible user interface that will be useful for experimentalists to set up their work and to build

  10. Polarized pulse waves in random discrete scatterers.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, A; Jaruwatanadilok, S; Kuga, Y

    2001-10-20

    In recent years there has been increasing interest in the use of polarization for imaging objects in a cluttered environment. Examples are optical imaging through clouds, optical detection of objects in a biological medium, and microwave detection of objects in clutter. We extend previous studies of continuous-wave scattering to pulse-polarization scattering in discrete scatterers. We solve the time-dependent vector radiative transfer equation for a plane-parallel medium by using Mie scattering and the discrete ordinates method. The time-dependent degree of polarization and cross-polarization discrimination are calculated and verify the advantages of circular over linear polarization in maintaining greater copolarized components rather than cross-polarized components.

  11. The Multiple Doppler Radar Workshop, November 1979.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbone, R. E.; Harris, F. I.; Hildebrand, P. H.; Kropfli, R. A.; Miller, L. J.; Moninger, W.; Strauch, R. G.; Doviak, R. J.; Johnson, K. W.; Nelson, S. P.; Ray, P. S.; Gilet, M.

    1980-10-01

    The findings of the Multiple Doppler Radar Workshop are summarized by a series of six papers. Part I of this series briefly reviews the history of multiple Doppler experimentation, fundamental concepts of Doppler signal theory, and organization and objectives of the Workshop. Invited presentations by dynamicists and cloud physicists are also summarized.Experimental design and procedures (Part II) are shown to be of critical importance. Well-defined and limited experimental objectives are necessary in view of technological limitations. Specified radar scanning procedures that balance temporal and spatial resolution considerations are discussed in detail. Improved siting for suppression of ground clutter as well as scanning procedures to minimize errors at echo boundaries are discussed. The need for accelerated research using numerically simulated proxy data sets is emphasized.New technology to eliminate various sampling limitations is cited as an eventual solution to many current problems in Part III. Ground clutter contamination may be curtailed by means of full spectral processing, digital filters in real time, and/or variable pulse repetition frequency. Range and velocity ambiguities also may be minimized by various pulsing options as well as random phase transmission. Sidelobe contamination can be reduced through improvements in radomes, illumination patterns, and antenna feed types. Radar volume-scan time can be sharply reduced by means of wideband transmission, phased array antennas, multiple beam antennas, and frequency agility.Part IV deals with synthesis of data from several radars in the context of scientific requirements in cumulus clouds, widespread precipitation, and severe convective storms. The important temporal and spatial scales are examined together with the accuracy required for vertical air motion in each phenomenon. Factors that introduce errors in the vertical velocity field are identified and synthesis techniques are discussed separately for

  12. Anisotropic sub-Doppler laser cooling in dysprosium magneto-optical traps

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, Seo Ho; Lu, Mingwu; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2010-10-15

    Magneto-optical traps (MOTs) of Er and Dy have recently been shown to exhibit populationwide sub-Doppler cooling due to their near degeneracy of excited- and ground-state Landeg factors. We discuss here an additional, unusual intra-MOT sub-Doppler cooling mechanism that appears when the total Dy MOT cooling laser intensity and magnetic quadrupole gradient increase beyond critical values. Specifically, anisotropically sub-Doppler-cooled cores appear, and their orientation with respect to the quadrupole axis flips at a critical ratio of the MOT laser intensity along the quadrupole axis versus that in the plane of symmetry. This phenomenon can be traced to a loss of the velocity-selective resonance at zero velocity in the cooling force along directions in which the atomic polarization is oriented by the quadrupole field. We present data characterizing this anisotropic laser cooling phenomenon and discuss a qualitative model for its origin based on the extraordinarily large Dy magnetic moment and Dy's near degenerate g factors.

  13. Doppler lidar results from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.; Skarda, J. R.; Renne, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    During FY-84, the Doppler Lidar data from the San Gorgonio Pass experiments were analyzed, evaluated, and interpreted with regard to signal strength, signal width, magnitude and direction of velocity component and a goodness parameter associated with the expected noise level of the signal. From these parameters, a screening criteria was developed to eliminate questionable data. For the most part analysis supports the validity of Doppler Lidar data obtained at San Gorgonio Pass with respect to the mean velocity magnitude and direction. The question as to whether the Doppler width could be interpreted as a measure of the variance of the turbulence within the Doppler Lidar System (DLS) focal volume was not resolved. The stochastic nature of the Doppler broadening from finite residence time of the particles in the beam as well as other Doppler broadening phenomenon tend to mask the Doppler spread associated with small scale turbulence. Future tests with longer pulses may assist in better understanding.

  14. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104-5  ×  107 microbubbles ml-1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s-1, prior to the onset of

  15. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N.; Choi, James J.

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  104–5  ×  107 microbubbles ml‑1) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75–366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s‑1, prior to the onset

  16. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  17. Superharmonic microbubble Doppler effect in ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Pouliopoulos, Antonios N; Choi, James J

    2016-08-21

    The introduction of microbubbles in focused ultrasound therapies has enabled a diverse range of non-invasive technologies: sonoporation to deliver drugs into cells, sonothrombolysis to dissolve blood clots, and blood-brain barrier opening to deliver drugs into the brain. Current methods for passively monitoring the microbubble dynamics responsible for these therapeutic effects can identify the cavitation position by passive acoustic mapping and cavitation mode by spectral analysis. Here, we introduce a new feature that can be monitored: microbubble effective velocity. Previous studies have shown that echoes from short imaging pulses had a Doppler shift that was produced by the movement of microbubbles. Therapeutic pulses are longer (>1 000 cycles) and thus produce a larger alteration of microbubble distribution due to primary and secondary acoustic radiation force effects which cannot be monitored using pulse-echo techniques. In our experiments, we captured and analyzed the Doppler shift during long therapeutic pulses using a passive cavitation detector. A population of microbubbles (5  ×  10(4)-5  ×  10(7) microbubbles ml(-1)) was embedded in a vessel (inner diameter: 4 mm) and sonicated using a 0.5 MHz focused ultrasound transducer (peak-rarefactional pressure: 75-366 kPa, pulse length: 50 000 cycles or 100 ms) within a water tank. Microbubble acoustic emissions were captured with a coaxially aligned 7.5 MHz passive cavitation detector and spectrally analyzed to measure the Doppler shift for multiple harmonics above the 10th harmonic (i.e. superharmonics). A Doppler shift was observed on the order of tens of kHz with respect to the primary superharmonic peak and is due to the axial movement of the microbubbles. The position, amplitude and width of the Doppler peaks depended on the acoustic pressure and the microbubble concentration. Higher pressures increased the effective velocity of the microbubbles up to 3 m s(-1), prior to the onset

  18. Trace Organic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ember, Lois R.

    1978-01-01

    Trace organic analysis (TOA) is seen as a more useful way to quantify environmental pollutants. Current practices and future trends are discussed in detail. Seven steps in TOA are identified: collection, storage, extraction, concentration, isolation, identification, and quantification. (MA)

  19. Trace Elements and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettyjohn, Wayne A.

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the effects of arsenic, lead, zinc, mercury, and cadmium on human health, indicates the sources of the elements in water, and considers the possibility of students in high schools analyzing water for trace amounts of the elements. (AL)

  20. Normal Echocardiographic Measurements in a Korean Population Study: Part II. Doppler and Tissue Doppler Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Oh; Shin, Mi-Seung; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Jung, Hae Ok; Park, Jeong Rang; Sohn, Il Suk; Kim, Hyungseop; Park, Seong-Mi; Yoo, Nam Jin; Choi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Kwan; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Lee, Mi-Rae; Park, Jin-Sun; Shim, Chi Young; Kim, Dae-Hee; Shin, Dae-Hee; Shin, Gil Ja; Shin, Sung Hee; Kim, Kye Hun; Park, Jae-Hyeong; Lee, Sang Yeub; Kim, Woo-Shik

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemodynamic and functional evaluation with Doppler and tissue Doppler study as a part of comprehensive echocardiography is essential but normal reference values have never been reported from Korean normal population especially according to age and sex. Methods Using Normal echOcaRdiographic Measurements in a KoreAn popuLation study subjects, we obtained normal reference values for Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiography including tricuspid annular velocities according to current guidelines and compared values according to gender and age groups. Results Mitral early diastolic (E) and late diastolic (A) velocity as well as E/A ratio were significantly higher in women compared to those in men. Conversely, mitral peak systolic and late diastolic annular velocity in both septal and lateral mitral annulus were significantly lower in women compared to those in men. However, there were no significant differences in both septal and lateral mitral early diastolic annular (e') velocity between men and women. In both men and women, mitral E velocity and its deceleration time as well as both E/A and E/e' ratio considerably increased with age. There were no significant differences in tricuspid inflow velocities and tricuspid lateral annular velocities between men and women except e' velocity, which was significantly higher in women compared to that in men. However, changes in both tricuspid inflow and lateral annular velocities according to age were similar to those in mitral velocities. Conclusion Since there were significant differences in Doppler and tissue Doppler echocardiographic variables between men and women and changes according to age were even more considerable in both gender groups, normal Doppler echocardiographic values should be differentially applied based on age and sex. PMID:27358707

  1. Comparing TID simulations using 3-D ray tracing and mirror reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Reinisch, B. W.; Sales, G. S.; Paznukhov, V. V.; Galkin, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the time variations of Doppler frequencies and angles of arrival (AoA) of ionospherically reflected HF waves has been proposed as a means of detecting the occurrence of traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). Simulations are made using ray tracing through the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) electron density model in an effort to reproduce measured signatures. The TID is represented by a wavelike perturbation of the 3-D electron density traveling horizontally in the ionosphere with an amplitude that varies sinusoidally with time. By judiciously selecting the TID parameters the ray tracing simulation reproduces the observed Doppler frequencies and AoAs. Ray tracing in a 3-D realistic ionosphere is, however, excessively time consuming considering the involved homing procedures. It is shown that a carefully selected reflecting corrugated mirror can reproduce the time variations of the AoA and Doppler frequency. The results from the ray tracing through the IRI model ionosphere and the mirror model reflections are compared to assess the applicability of the mirror-reflection model.

  2. SMEAT atmosphere trace contaminants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schornick, J. L.; Heinrich, C. T.; Garcia, G. S., Jr.; Verostko, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The atmosphere trace contaminant analysis support provided for the Skylab Medical Experiments Altitude Test (SMEAT) which was conducted from July 26 through September 20, 1972, at the JSC Crew Systems Division facility is discussed. Sample acquisition techniques and analytical instrumentation methodology utilized for identification and quantification of the trace contaminants are described. Emphasis is placed on the contaminants found, their occurrence patterns, and possible sources.

  3. Common Genetic Variation in the 3-BCL11B Gene Desert Is Associated With Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity and Excess Cardiovascular Disease Risk The AortaGen Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Gary F.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Isaacs, Aaron; Smith, Albert V.; Yasmin; Rietzschel, Ernst R.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Liu, Yongmei; Parsa, Afshin; Najjar, Samer S.; O’Shaughnessy, Kevin M.; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; De Buyzere, Marc L.; Larson, Martin G.; Sie, Mark P.S.; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Post, Wendy S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U.S.; McEniery, Carmel M.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Segers, Patrick; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; van Rijn, Marie Josee E.; Howard, Timothy D.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Dehghan, Abbas; Jewell, Elizabeth; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Bekaert, Sofie; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Newman, Anne B.; Hofman, Albert; Scuteri, Angelo; De Bacquer, Dirk; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Psaty, Bruce; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Wain, Louise V.; Elliott, Paul; Smith, Nicholas L.; Felix, Janine F.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Vita, Joseph A.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Sanna, Serena; Launer, Lenore J.; De Meyer, Tim; Johnson, Andrew D.; Schut, Anna F.C.; Herrington, David M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uda, Manuela; Wilkinson, Ian B.; Aspelund, Thor; Gillebert, Thierry C.; Van Bortel, Luc; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Ding, Jingzhong; Gibson, Quince; Uitterlinden, André G.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Cockcroft, John R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; De Backer, Guy G.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Harris, Tamara B.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Levy, Daniel; Lakatta, Edward G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CFPWV) is a heritable measure of aortic stiffness that is strongly associated with increased risk for major cardiovascular disease events. Methods and Results We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 9 community-based European ancestry cohorts consisting of 20,634 participants. Results were replicated in 2 additional European ancestry cohorts involving 5,306 participants. Based on a preliminary analysis of 6 cohorts, we identified a locus on chromosome 14 in the 3′-BCL11B gene desert that is associated with CFPWV (rs7152623, minor allele frequency = 0.42, beta=−0.075±0.012 SD/allele, P = 2.8 x 10−10; replication beta=−0.086±0.020 SD/allele, P = 1.4 x 10−6). Combined results for rs7152623 from 11 cohorts gave beta=−0.076±0.010 SD/allele, P=3.1x10−15. The association persisted when adjusted for mean arterial pressure (beta=−0.060±0.009 SD/allele, P = 1.0 x 10−11). Results were consistent in younger (<55 years, 6 cohorts, N=13,914, beta=−0.081±0.014 SD/allele, P = 2.3 x 10−9) and older (9 cohorts, N=12,026, beta=−0.061±0.014 SD/allele, P=9.4x10−6) participants. In separate meta-analyses, the locus was associated with increased risk for coronary artery disease (hazard ratio [HR]=1.05, confidence interval [CI]=1.02 to 1.08, P=0.0013) and heart failure (HR=1.10, CI=1.03 to 1.16, P=0.004). Conclusions Common genetic variation in a locus in the BCL11B gene desert that is thought to harbor one or more gene enhancers is associated with higher CFPWV and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Elucidation of the role this novel locus plays in aortic stiffness may facilitate development of therapeutic interventions that limit aortic stiffening and related cardiovascular disease events. PMID:22068335

  4. Traces of Drosophila Memory

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies using functional cellullar imaging of living flies have identified six memory traces that form in the olfactory nervous system after conditioning with odors. These traces occur in distinct nodes of the olfactory nervous system, form and disappear across different windows of time, and are detected in the imaged neurons as increased calcium influx or synaptic release in response to the conditioned odor. Three traces form at, or near acquisition and co-exist with short-term behavioral memory. One trace forms with a delay after learning and co-exists with intermediate-term behavioral memory. Two traces form many hours after acquisition and co-exist with long-term behavioral memory. The transient memory traces may support behavior across the time-windows of their existence. The experimental approaches for dissecting memory formation in the fly, ranging from the molecular to the systems, make it an ideal system for dissecting the logic by which the nervous system organizes and stores different temporal forms of memory. PMID:21482352

  5. TraceContract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavelund, Klaus; Barringer, Howard

    2012-01-01

    TraceContract is an API (Application Programming Interface) for trace analysis. A trace is a sequence of events, and can, for example, be generated by a running program, instrumented appropriately to generate events. An event can be any data object. An example of a trace is a log file containing events that a programmer has found important to record during a program execution. Trace - Contract takes as input such a trace together with a specification formulated using the API and reports on any violations of the specification, potentially calling code (reactions) to be executed when violations are detected. The software is developed as an internal DSL (Domain Specific Language) in the Scala programming language. Scala is a relatively new programming language that is specifically convenient for defining such internal DSLs due to a number of language characteristics. This includes Scala s elegant combination of object-oriented and functional programming, a succinct notation, and an advanced type system. The DSL offers a combination of data-parameterized state machines and temporal logic, which is novel. As an extension of Scala, it is a very expressive and convenient log file analysis framework.

  6. Design of a Doppler reflectometer for KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. D. Nam, Y. U.; Seo, Seong-Heon; Kim, Y. S.

    2014-11-15

    A Doppler reflectometer has been designed to measure the poloidal propagation velocity on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It has the operating frequency range of V-band (50-75 GHz) and the monostatic antenna configuration with extraordinary mode (X-mode). The single sideband modulation with an intermediate frequency of 50 MHz is used for the heterodyne measurement with the 200 MHz in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) phase detector. The corrugated conical horn antenna is used to approximate the Gaussian beam propagation and it is installed together with the oversized rectangular waveguides in the vacuum vessel. The first commissioning test of the Doppler reflectometer system on the KSTAR tokamak is planned in the 2014 KSTAR experimental campaign.

  7. ROTATIONAL DOPPLER BEAMING IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Paul J.

    2012-01-20

    In eclipsing binaries the stellar rotation of the two components will cause a rotational Doppler beaming during eclipse ingress and egress when only part of the eclipsed component is covered. For eclipsing binaries with fast spinning components this photometric analog of the well-known spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect can exceed the strength of the orbital effect. Example light curves are shown for a detached double white dwarf binary, a massive O-star binary and a transiting exoplanet case, similar to WASP-33b. Inclusion of the rotational Doppler beaming in eclipsing systems is a prerequisite for deriving the correct stellar parameters from fitting high-quality photometric light curves and can be used to determine stellar obliquities as well as, e.g., an independent measure of the rotational velocity in those systems that may be expected to be fully synchronized.

  8. Minior Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan E. Hertel; Dwayne Blaylock

    2008-04-10

    The "Minor Actinide Doppler Coefficient Measurement Assessment" was a Department of Energy (DOE) U-NERI funded project intended to assess the viability of using either the FLATTOP or the COMET critical assembly to measure high temperature Doppler coefficients. The goal of the project was to calculate using the MCNP5 code the gram amounts of Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-241, AM-241, AM-242m, Am-243, and CM-244 needed to produce a 1E-5 in reactivity for a change in operating temperature 800C to 1000C. After determining the viability of using the assemblies and calculating the amounts of each actinide an experiment will be designed to verify the calculated results. The calculations and any doncuted experiments are designed to support the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative in conducting safety analysis of advanced fast reactor or acceoerator-driven transmutation systems with fuel containing high minor actinide content.

  9. Design of a Doppler reflectometer for KSTARa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Seo, Seong-Heon; Kim, Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    A Doppler reflectometer has been designed to measure the poloidal propagation velocity on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) tokamak. It has the operating frequency range of V-band (50-75 GHz) and the monostatic antenna configuration with extraordinary mode (X-mode). The single sideband modulation with an intermediate frequency of 50 MHz is used for the heterodyne measurement with the 200 MHz in-phase and quadrature (I/Q) phase detector. The corrugated conical horn antenna is used to approximate the Gaussian beam propagation and it is installed together with the oversized rectangular waveguides in the vacuum vessel. The first commissioning test of the Doppler reflectometer system on the KSTAR tokamak is planned in the 2014 KSTAR experimental campaign.

  10. Considerations for Calibrating a Laser Doppler Anemometer

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, Michael L; Keck, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Laser Doppler Anemometers have long been the device-of-choice for air velocity measurements due to their avoidance of turbulence induced by insertion-method air velocity measurement devices. At first glance, the use of a Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) for calibrating air velocity meters appears to be a relatively simple and straightforward process. As is typical in most metrological applications the process becomes much more complex when attempting to use the apparatus to make high-performance, metrology measurements. This paper focuses on the considerations for calibration of a LDA beginning with a discussion why an LDA needs to be calibrated. Other areas of discussion include alignment of the optics, dealing with imperfections in the alignment process, establishing the traceability of measurements from the apparatus and design and development of and experiences with using a calibration apparatus.

  11. Pulsed Doppler lidar at QinetiQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Guy N.

    2004-12-01

    Recent developments in pulsed Doppler lidar technology for range-resolved aerosol and hard-target imaging applications are presented. Systems based upon CO2 and fiber-optic technologies at wavelengths of 10.6 μm and 1.5 μm respectively are described. Data are presented showing aspects of system and component development as well as recent field deployments.

  12. Doppler Lidar Wind Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Newsom, R. K.; Sivaraman, C.; Shippert, T. R.; Riihimaki, L. D.

    2015-07-01

    Wind speed and direction, together with pressure, temperature, and relative humidity, are the most fundamental atmospheric state parameters. Accurate measurement of these parameters is crucial for numerical weather prediction. Vertically resolved wind measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer are particularly important for modeling pollutant and aerosol transport. Raw data from a scanning coherent Doppler lidar system can be processed to generate accurate height-resolved measurements of wind speed and direction in the atmospheric boundary layer.

  13. Numerical treatment of Doppler radar signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonullu, B.

    1982-12-01

    Doppler radar signal processing algorithms are discussed. The analysis of a moving target identification filter system leads to a fast Fourier transform implementation with a matrix of order eight. The analytic computation of the plot center, the estimation of radial velocity, the logarithmic laws and the multiplication using a PROM table are discussed. Applications of filters with distributed zeroes and of residium arithmetic are examined.

  14. Doppler, Johann Christian Andreas (1803-53)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Born in Salzburg, Austria, Doppler studied and taught mathematics in Vienna. On the verge, because of economic hardship, of emigrating to America, he was offered posts in Prague. Despite huge teaching loads, he was able to carry out some research of his own (in the face of complaints of neglect by his students). In 1842 read a paper to the Royal Bohemian Society `On the colored light of the doubl...

  15. Hydrogen doppler spectroscopy using 15N ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borucki, L.; Becker, H. W.; Gorris, F.; Kubsky, S.; Schulte, W. H.; Rolfs, C.

    The energy spread of atomic and molecular ion beams from the 4 MV Dynamitron tandem accelerator at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum has been studied and in part minimized. Using the ER= 6.40 MeV narrow resonance in 1H(15N,αγ)12C with an 15N energy spread of 4.55 keV, the Doppler broadening for several hydrogen-bearing gases was found to be in good agreement with expectation: e.g. for NH3 gas a rotational-vibrational Doppler width of 10.41 +/- 0.25 keV was observed (theory = 10.4 keV). Studies of the vibrational Doppler widths of H-bonds on a Si <100> surface were performed using a 4πγ-ray detection system together with UHV-chambers for sample preparation, transport, and analysis. The results showed that further improvements in the experimental set-ups are needed for such investigations.

  16. Doppler Lidar for Wind Measurements on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Emmitt, George D.; Yu, Jirong; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has a long history of developing 2-micron laser transmitter for wind sensing. With support from NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and Instrument Incubator Program (IIP), NASA Langley Research Center has developed a state-of-the-art compact lidar transceiver for a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar system for wind measurement. The transmitter portion of the transceiver employs the high-pulse-energy, Ho:Tm:LuLiF, partially conductively cooled laser technology developed at NASA Langley. The transceiver is capable of 250 mJ pulses at 10 Hz. It is very similar to the technology envisioned for coherent Doppler lidar wind measurements from Earth and Mars orbit. The transceiver is coupled to the large optics and data acquisition system in the NASA Langley VALIDAR mobile trailer. The large optics consists of a 15-cm off-axis beam expanding telescope, and a full-hemispheric scanner. Vertical and horizontal vector winds are measured, as well as relative backscatter. The data acquisition system employs frequency domain velocity estimation and pulse accumulation. It permits real-time display of the processed winds and archival of all data. This lidar system was recently deployed at Howard University facility in Beltsville, Mary-land, along with other wind lidar systems. Coherent Doppler wind lidar ground-based wind measurements and comparisons with other sensors will be presented. A simulation and data product for wind measurement at Venus will be presented.

  17. Imaging system considerations in Doppler global velocimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, H.D.; Tatam, R.P.

    1995-12-31

    Doppler Global Velocimetry (DGV) is a full-field optical technique for the measurement of fluid flow velocities. The flow is illuminated using a light sheet, and the Doppler shift imposed on light scattered from moving particles within the sheet is imaged through a cell containing iodine vapor onto a solid-state array camera, thereby converting the Doppler frequency shifts into intensity variations in the image. In this paper, a DGV system is presented based around an argon-ion laser source and a fast digital image-processing system, which allows the DGV velocity map to be updated at camera frame rate. Interpretation of DGV images is complicated by errors which arise at positions some way out in the field of view due to the modified illumination and viewing vectors corresponding to these positions. Typical magnitudes of such errors are calculated. Significant errors can arise for points more than about 5{degree} out from the center of the field of view, and for divergence angles of the illumination beam exceeding about 10{degree} at a distance of 5 cm from the beam axis. Other considerations affecting system accuracy are also discussed.

  18. Doppler compensated underwater acoustic communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Anand; George, Binu; Supiya, M. H.; Kurian, James; Pillai, P. R. Saseendran

    2001-05-01

    Spread spectrum methods are used in communication systems to provide a low probability of intercept in hostile environments and multiple access capability in systems shared by many users as well as to provide high processing gain in channels where the transmitted signal is distorted by multipath effects. Such systems serve to be an effective tool for underwater telemetry environments, where multipath propagation effect and Doppler spreading is seen to be more predominant. This paper describes the implementation of a Doppler compensated underwater telemetry system based on CDMA technique. The system consists of multiple CDMA transmitters and a phase locked loop based carrier recoverable CDMA receiver. The effects of the Doppler shift can be compensated by the carrier recovery subsystem in the demodulator, based on PLL technique, which extracts the carrier frequency/phase and simultaneously demodulates the signal. The decision device in the receiver consists of a PN sequence generator as well as a bank of correlators, which are used to determine the data transmitted. The system simulation has been implemented in MATLAB. The advantage of this system is that multiple transmitting stations can transmit simultaneously to a central receiver, thereby increasing the system throughput.

  19. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  20. A Bistatic Multiple-Doppler Radar Network.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, Joshua; Heckman, Stanley; Boccippio, Dennis

    1993-12-01

    A multiple-Doppler radar network can be constructed using only one, traditional, transmitting pencil-beam radar and one or more passive, low-gain, nontransmitting receivers at remote sites. Radiation scattered from the pencil beam of the transmitting radar as it penetrates weather targets can be detected at the receive-only sites as well as at the active transmitter. The Doppler shifts of the radiation received at all the sites can be used to construct two- and three-dimensional wind fields in a manner similar to that used with traditional Doppler radar networks.There are unique scientific advantages to a bistatic multiple-Doppler network: 1) all radial velocity measurements from individual resolution volumes are collected simultaneously since there is only one source of radiation; 2) the intensity of the obliquely scattered radiation can be compared to Rayleigh scattering predictions and used for hail detection; 3) rapid scanning of localized weather phenomena can be aided by elimination of the need to scan with multiple radars.This type of multiple-Doppler radar network also has significant economic advantages. Passive sites contain no high-voltage transmitting equipment or large rotating antennas. They require no operators and much less maintenance. We estimate initial investment costs, and subsequent operational and maintenance costs are less than one-thirtieth that of conventional radars.There are shortcomings particular to these types of networks: 1) passive, low-gain, receiving sites are more sensitive to contamination from transmitter sidelobes and to secondary scattering from weather echoes; 2) low-gain receiving sites are less sensitive to weak weather echoes; 3) Cartesian (u, v, w) wind fields derived from bistatic network data exhibit about twice the expected error as those constructed from data from traditional monostatic networks containing equal numbers of radars. Multiple scattering and sidelobe contamination levels are acceptable in most situations

  1. Laser ablation and selective excitation directed to trace element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.

    1980-08-01

    A trace (element) analyser based on laser ablation and selectively excited radiation is proposed as an ultramicro-ultratrace technique for quantitative element analysis. Measurements of trace quantities of chromium in samples of NBS standard reference material (steel), doped skim milk powder and doped flour were undertaken. There is a linear 45 deg slope for Log/Log plot dependence of signal versus concentration that extends at least up to 1.3% (concentration by weight) in the case of chromium. The detection limit for the current unoptimized system is in the ppm range which corresponds to the absolute detection limit of 10 to the 13th power g. Although no chemical interference effects were observed, two physical interference effects were evident: differential mass vaporization and inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution of fast expanding analyte. The differential Doppler shift between the atoms along the line of observation reduces self-absorption even at high analyte concentrations.

  2. Doppler effect in resonant photoemission from SF6: correlation between Doppler profile and Auger emission anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Kitajima, M; Ueda, K; De Fanis, A; Furuta, T; Shindo, H; Tanaka, H; Okada, K; Feifel, R; Sorensen, S L; Gel'mukhanov, F; Baev, A; Agren, H

    2003-11-21

    Fragmentation of the SF6 molecule upon F 1s excitation has been studied by resonant photoemission. The F atomiclike Auger line exhibits the characteristic Doppler profile that depends on the direction of the photoelectron momentum relative to the polarization vector of the radiation as well as on the photon energy. The measured Doppler profiles are analyzed by the model simulation that takes account of the anisotropy of the Auger emission in the molecular frame. The Auger anisotropy extracted from the data decreases with an increase in the F-SF5 internuclear distance.

  3. Baroreflex regulation measurement using a noninvasive laser Doppler method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hast, Jukka T.; Myllylae, Risto A.; Sorvoja, Hannu; Nissilae, Seppo M.

    2001-05-01

    In this study, a noninvasive laser Doppler measurement method based on the self-mixing effect of a diode laser was used to measure baroreflex regulation, which is manifest in the blood pressure signal as a 0.1 Hz sinusoidal variation. The laser Doppler measurement system was used to measure the movement of the right radial artery of ten volunteers. Variation in blood pressure caused by the baroreflex affects the elastic properties of the arterial wall. When diastolic blood pressure increases, the elasticity of the arterial wall decreases, causing the wall to lose some of its movability. This decreased elasticity reveals itself in the Doppler signal such that when the blood pressure increases, the Doppler frequency decreases and vice versa. The results show, that the laser Doppler method can be used to measure baroreflex regulation. Finally, baroreflex regulation in the Doppler signal is approximately in the inverse phase with respect to variation in diastolic blood pressure.

  4. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree. The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.

  5. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    2013-02-19

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallell application. STAT uses the MRNet tree based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to from a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence slasses. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  6. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree.more » The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.« less

  7. Stack Trace Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-16

    STAT is a light weight debugging tool that gathers and merges stack traces from all of the processes in a parallel application. STAT uses the MRNet free based overlay network to broadcast commands from the tool front-end to the STAT daemons and for the front-end to gather the traces from the STAT daemons. As the traces propagate through the MRNet network tree, they are merged across all tasks to form a single call prefix tree. The call prefix tree can be examined to identify tasks with similar function call patterns and to delineate a small set of equivalence classes. A representative task from each of these classes can then be fed into a full feature debugger like TotalView for root cause analysis.

  8. Applications of Doppler ultrasound in clinical vascular disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, R. W.; Hokanson, D. E.; Sumner, D. S.; Strandness, D. E., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound has become the most useful and versatile noninvasive technique for objective evaluation of clinical vascular disease. Commercially available continuous-wave instruments provide qualitative and quantitative assessment of venous and arterial disease. Pulsed Doppler ultrasound was developed to provide longitudinal and transverse cross-sectional images of the arterial lumen with a resolution approaching that of conventional X-ray techniques. Application of Doppler ultrasound in venous, peripheral arterial, and cerebrovascular diseases is reviewed.

  9. Doppler and speckle methods for diagnostics in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulyanov, Sergey S.; Lepilin, Alexander V.; Lebedeva, Nina G.; Sedykh, Alexey V.; Kharish, Natalia A.; Osipova, Yulia; Karpovich, Alexander

    2002-02-01

    The results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra of scattered intensity, obtained from tissues of oral cavity membrane of healthy volunteers, are presented. The dependence of the spectral moments of Doppler signal on cutoff frequency is investigated. Some results of statistical analysis of Doppler spectra, obtained from tooth pulp of patients, are presented. New approach for monitoring of blood microcirculation in orthodontics is suggested. Influence of own noise of measuring system on formation of speckle-interferometric signal is studied.

  10. Tropospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gammon, R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Cicerone, R. J.; Delany, A. C.; Harriss, R. T.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Logan, J. A.; Midgley, P.; Prather, M.

    1985-01-01

    Trace gas concentrations in the atmosphere reflect in part the overall metabolism of the biosphere, and in part the broad range of human activities such as agriculture, production of industrial chemicals, and combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. There is compelling evidence that the composition of the atmosphere is now changing. Observed trends in trace gas levels are reviewed and implications for the chemistry of the atmosphere are discussed. Throughout the discussion, particular emphasis is given to those species which are now increasing in the atmosphere.

  11. Atom trap trace analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  12. Eliminating Doppler Effects in Synthetic-Aperture Radar Optical Processors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantindes, N. J.; Bicknell, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Pair of photodetectors generates correction signals. Instrument detects Doppler shifts in radar and corrects processing parameters so ambiguities caused by shifts not manifested as double or overlapping images.

  13. Reexamination of the Doppler effect through Maxwell's equations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Aktas, Yildirim

    2012-08-01

    In this work, the electric field emitted from a moving source, an electric point dipole, is analyzed for the purpose of illustrating the physics behind the Doppler effect. It is found that if the (translational) motion of the source is nonrelativistic, the Doppler effect is realized in two steps: the motion of the source first causes the dyadic Green function associated with the electric field to acquire an oscillation frequency in the far-field region of the source, and then the frequency leads to the Doppler effect. It is also demonstrated that the Doppler effect is observable only in the far-field region of the source.

  14. PRECISE DOPPLER MONITORING OF BARNARD'S STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jieun; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; McCarthy, Chris; Fischer, Debra A.; Johnson, John A.; Wright, Jason T.

    2013-02-20

    We present 248 precise Doppler measurements of Barnard's Star (Gl 699), the second nearest star system to Earth, obtained from Lick and Keck Observatories during the 25 years between 1987 and 2012. The early precision was 20 m s{sup -1} but was 2 m s{sup -1} during the last 8 years, constituting the most extensive and sensitive search for Doppler signatures of planets around this stellar neighbor. We carefully analyze the 136 Keck radial velocities spanning 8 years by first applying a periodogram analysis to search for nearly circular orbits. We find no significant periodic Doppler signals with amplitudes above {approx}2 m s{sup -1}, setting firm upper limits on the minimum mass (Msin i) of any planets with orbital periods from 0.1 to 1000 days. Using a Monte Carlo analysis for circular orbits, we determine that planetary companions to Barnard's Star with masses above 2 M {sub Circled-Plus} and periods below 10 days would have been detected. Planets with periods up to 2 years and masses above 10 M {sub Circled-Plus} (0.03 M {sub Jup}) are also ruled out. A similar analysis allowing for eccentric orbits yields comparable mass limits. The habitable zone of Barnard's Star appears to be devoid of roughly Earth-mass planets or larger, save for face-on orbits. Previous claims of planets around the star by van de Kamp are strongly refuted. The radial velocity of Barnard's Star increases with time at 4.515 {+-} 0.002 m s{sup -1} yr{sup -1}, consistent with the predicted geometrical effect, secular acceleration, that exchanges transverse for radial components of velocity.

  15. Christian Doppler is 200 years young.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Alfred; Partsch, Hugo

    2003-11-01

    Christian Doppler was born 200 years ago in Salzburg, Austria, on November 29, 1803, worked in Prague and Vienna and died 150 years ago in Venice. In an article of eight pages he described the principle, which made him famous. It appeared in 1842 with the exotic title: "On the Coloured Light of the Double Stars and Certain Other Stars of the Heaven". The validity of his principle for velocity measurement was confirmed by trumpet sounds produced on a train moving towards and away from the observer. Around 1960 Japanese scientists suggested that flow velocity in blood vessels could be determined by analysing the difference of frequency between emitted and backscattered ultrasound. Rushmer and coworkers built machines suitable for medicine in Seattle, where Eugene Strandness recognized their potential and applied them in first studies. In 1967 the technique jumped to Europe and started to be used worldwide. Already by using continuous wave ultrasound it was possible to diagnose occlusive disease of neck and limb arteries, venous thrombosis and valvular insufficiency with accuracy. Measurements of postestenotic ankle blood pressure were facilitated by Doppler sensing. Over the years more sophisticated instruments were developed. Pulsed emission of ultrasound waves opened a way to study flow velocity profiles across large vessels. By combining the method with A or B mode ultrasound blood flow could be quantified and finally perfused segments of blood vessels visualized. Duplex scanning in its simple and then in its colour coded version is nowadays the standard non-invasive technique that nobody would like to miss. Vascular territories like intracranial, renal and intestinal arteries can also be explored. For the assessment of microvascular flow in skin and mucosae laser Doppler instruments were introduced.

  16. Christian Doppler is 200 years young.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Alfred; Partsch, Hugo

    2003-11-01

    Christian Doppler was born 200 years ago in Salzburg, Austria, on November 29, 1803, worked in Prague and Vienna and died 150 years ago in Venice. In an article of eight pages he described the principle, which made him famous. It appeared in 1842 with the exotic title: "On the Coloured Light of the Double Stars and Certain Other Stars of the Heaven". The validity of his principle for velocity measurement was confirmed by trumpet sounds produced on a train moving towards and away from the observer. Around 1960 Japanese scientists suggested that flow velocity in blood vessels could be determined by analysing the difference of frequency between emitted and backscattered ultrasound. Rushmer and coworkers built machines suitable for medicine in Seattle, where Eugene Strandness recognized their potential and applied them in first studies. In 1967 the technique jumped to Europe and started to be used worldwide. Already by using continuous wave ultrasound it was possible to diagnose occlusive disease of neck and limb arteries, venous thrombosis and valvular insufficiency with accuracy. Measurements of postestenotic ankle blood pressure were facilitated by Doppler sensing. Over the years more sophisticated instruments were developed. Pulsed emission of ultrasound waves opened a way to study flow velocity profiles across large vessels. By combining the method with A or B mode ultrasound blood flow could be quantified and finally perfused segments of blood vessels visualized. Duplex scanning in its simple and then in its colour coded version is nowadays the standard non-invasive technique that nobody would like to miss. Vascular territories like intracranial, renal and intestinal arteries can also be explored. For the assessment of microvascular flow in skin and mucosae laser Doppler instruments were introduced. PMID:14694774

  17. Current-induced spin wave Doppler shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleul, Matthieu

    2010-03-01

    In metal ferromagnets -namely Fe, Co and Ni and their alloys- magnetism and electrical transport are strongly entangled (itinerant magnetism). This results in a number of properties such as the tunnel and giant magnetoresistance (i.e. the dependence of the electrical resistance on the magnetic state) and the more recently addressed spin transfer (i.e. the ability to manipulate the magnetic state with the help of an electrical current). The spin waves, being the low-energy elementary excitations of any ferromagnet, also exist in itinerant magnets, but they are expected to exhibit some peculiar properties due the itinerant character of the carriers. Accessing these specific properties experimentally could shed a new light on the microscopic mechanism governing itinerant magnetism, which -in turn- could help in optimizing material properties for spintronics applications. As a simple example of these specific properties, it was predicted theoretically that forcing a DC current through a ferromagnetic metal should induce a shift of the frequency of the spin waves [1,2]. This shift can be identified to a Doppler shift undergone by the electron system when it is put in motion by the electrical current. We will show how detailed spin wave measurements allow one to access this current-induced Doppler shift [3]. From an experimental point of view, we will discuss the peculiarities of propagating spin wave spectroscopy experiments carried out at a sub-micrometer length-scale and with MHz frequency resolution. Then, we will discuss the measured value of the Doppler shift in the context of both the old two-current model of spin-polarized transport and the more recent model of adiabatic spin transfer torque. [4pt] [1] P.Lederer and D.L. Mills, Phys.Rev. 148, 542 (1966).[0pt] [2] J. Fernandez-Rossier et al., Phys. Rev. B 69, 174412 (2004)[0pt] [3] V. Vlaminck and M. Bailleul, Science 322, 410 (2008).

  18. Visible Traces. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ASIA Society, New York, NY.

    This teacher's guide is based on the exhibition, "Visible Traces: Rare Books and Special Collections from the National Library of China," a collaborative effort of the Queens Borough Public Library and the National Library of China; it links rare treasures from the National Library of China to curriculum standards. The following themes are…

  19. QCD trace anomaly

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, Jens O.; Leganger, Lars E.; Strickland, Michael; Su, Nan

    2011-10-15

    In this brief report we compare the predictions of a recent next-to-next-to-leading order hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt) calculation of the QCD trace anomaly to available lattice data. We focus on the trace anomaly scaled by T{sup 2} in two cases: N{sub f}=0 and N{sub f}=3. When using the canonical value of {mu}=2{pi}T for the renormalization scale, we find that for Yang-Mills theory (N{sub f}=0) agreement between HTLpt and lattice data for the T{sup 2}-scaled trace anomaly begins at temperatures on the order of 8T{sub c}, while treating the subtracted piece as an interaction term when including quarks (N{sub f}=3) agreement begins already at temperatures above 2T{sub c}. In both cases we find that at very high temperatures the T{sup 2}-scaled trace anomaly increases with temperature in accordance with the predictions of HTLpt.

  20. Spectral Bayesian Knowledge Tracing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falakmasir, Mohammad; Yudelson, Michael; Ritter, Steve; Koedinger, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian Knowledge Tracing (BKT) has been in wide use for modeling student skill acquisition in Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS). BKT tracks and updates student's latent mastery of a skill as a probability distribution of a binary variable. BKT does so by accounting for observed student successes in applying the skill correctly, where success is…

  1. Applying Zeeman Doppler imaging to solar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, G. A. J.; Saar, S. H.; Collier Cameron, A.

    2004-03-01

    A new generation of spectro-polarimeters with high throughput (e.g. CFHT/ESPADONS and LBT/PEPSI) is becoming available. This opportunity can be exploited using Zeeman Doppler imaging (ZDI), a technique that inverts time-series of Stokes V spectra to map stellar surface magnetic fields (Semel 1989). ZDI is assisted by ``Least squares deconvolution'' (LSD), which sums up the signal from 1000's of photospheric lines to produce a mean deconvolved profile with higher S:N (Donati & Collier Cameron 1997).

  2. In-suit Doppler technology assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Arthur E.; Greene, Ernest R.; Nadeau, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was to perform a technology assessment survey of non-invasive air embolism detection utilizing Doppler ultrasound methodologies. The primary application of this technology will be a continuous monitor for astronauts while performing extravehicular activities (EVA's). The technology assessment was to include: (1) development of a full understanding of all relevant background research; and (2) a survey of the medical ultrasound marketplace for expertise, information, and technical capability relevant to this development. Upon completion of the assessment, LSR was to provide an overview of technological approaches and R&D/manufacturing organizations.

  3. Respiratory effort energy estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Yavari, Ehsan; Young, Jared; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Stickley, Cris

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory effort can be harvested to power wearable biosensors and mobile electronic devices. The very first step toward designing a harvester is to estimate available energy and power. This paper describes an estimation of the available power and energy due to the movements of the torso during breathing, using Doppler radar by detecting breathing rate, torso displacement, torso movement velocity and acceleration along the sagittal movement of the torso. The accuracy of the detected variables is verified by two reference methods. The experimental result obtained from a healthy female human subject shows that the available power from circumferential movement can be higher than the power from the sagittal movement. PMID:23365993

  4. Mobile fiber-optic laser Doppler anemometer.

    PubMed

    Stieglmeier, M; Tropea, C

    1992-07-20

    A laser Doppler anemometer (LDA) has been developed that combines the compactness and low power consumption of laser diodes and avalanche photodiodes with the flexibility and possibility of miniaturization by using fiber-optic probes. The system has been named DFLDA for laser diode fiber LDA and is especially suited for mobile applications, for example, in trains, airplanes, or automobiles. Optimization considerations of fiber-optic probes are put forward and several probe examples are described in detail. Measurement results from three typical applications are given to illustrate the use of the DFLDA. Finally, a number of future configurations of the DFLDA concept are discussed.

  5. The new Adelaide medium frequency Doppler radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, I. M.; Vandepeer, B. G. W.; Dillon, S.; Fuller, B.

    1993-08-01

    The Buckland Park Aerial Array (35 deg S, 138 deg E) is situated about 40 km north of Adelaide on a flat coastal plain. It was designed by Basil Briggs and Graham Elford, and constructed between 1965 and 1968. The first results were published in the late 1960's. Some aspects of the history of the array are described in Briggs (1993). A new MF Doppler Radar utilizing the array has been developed. This paper describes some of the technical details of this new facility.

  6. Respiratory effort energy estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Yavari, Ehsan; Young, Jared; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Stickley, Cris

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory effort can be harvested to power wearable biosensors and mobile electronic devices. The very first step toward designing a harvester is to estimate available energy and power. This paper describes an estimation of the available power and energy due to the movements of the torso during breathing, using Doppler radar by detecting breathing rate, torso displacement, torso movement velocity and acceleration along the sagittal movement of the torso. The accuracy of the detected variables is verified by two reference methods. The experimental result obtained from a healthy female human subject shows that the available power from circumferential movement can be higher than the power from the sagittal movement.

  7. Transmission media effects on precise Doppler tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. S.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of the transmission media - the earth's troposphere and ionosphere, and the solar wind - on precise Doppler tracking are discussed. The charged particle effects can be largely removed by dual frequency observations; however there are limitations to these corrections (besides system noise and/or finite integration times) including the effects of magnetic fields, diffraction, and differential refraction, all of which must be carefully evaluated. The earth's troposphere can contribute an error of delta f/f approximately 10 to the minus 14th power.

  8. Doppler Measurements of the Suns Meridional Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1996-01-01

    Doppler velocity data obtained with the Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) instruments in Tucson from 1992 August through 1995 April were analyzed to determine the structure and evolution of the Sun's meridional flow. Individual measurements of the flow were derived from line-of-sight velocity images averaged over 17 minutes to remove the p-mode oscillation signal. Typical flow velocities are poleward at approximately 20 m/s, but the results suggest that episodes may occur with much stronger flows. Such variations may help to explain some of the many disparate reports on the strength and structure of the Sun's meridional flow.

  9. Target motion detecting impulse Doppler radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Robert E.; Hudson, David F.

    1992-03-01

    Radiant energy intermittently emitted from a transmitter is reflected as echo pulses from a moving target being interrogated to produce Doppler signals by counting of photons of the echo pulses during time domain intervals between emission from the transmitter. Such counting of photons is limited to the time domain intervals by operational control of a laser pump through which a reference beam is generated at an energy level activating detectors irradiated by such beam to count the photons absorbed therein after capture of the photons by a receiving antenna.

  10. Target motion detecting impulse Doppler radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehle, Robert E.; Hudson, David F.

    1993-06-01

    Radiant energy intermittently emitted from a transmitter is reflected as echo pulses from a moving target being interrogated to produce Doppler signals by counting of photons of the echo pulses during time domain intervals between emission from the transmitter. Such counting of photons is limited to the time domain intervals by operational control of a laser pump through which a reference beam is generated at an energy level activating detectors irradiated by such beam to count the photons absorbed therein after capture or the photons by a receiving antenna.

  11. Detection of microemboli by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Grosset, D G; Georgiadis, D; Kelman, A W; Cowburn, P; Stirling, S; Lees, K R; Faichney, A; Mallinson, A; Quin, R; Bone, I; Pettigrew, L; Brodie, E; MacKay, T; Wheatley, D J

    1996-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound detection of abnormally high-pitched signals within the arterial waveform offers a new method for diagnosis, and potentially for prediction, of embolic complications in at-risk patients. The nature of Doppler "microembolic" signals is of particular interest in patients with prosthetic heart valves, where a high prevalence of these signals is observed. Monitoring the middle cerebral artery with 2-MHz transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TC-2000, Nicolet Biomedical; Warwick, UK), we looked for microemboli signals in 150 patients (95 women and 55 men), and found 1 or more signals during a 30-min recording in 89% of 70 patients with Bjork-Shiley valves (principally monostrut), 54% of 50 patients with Medtronic-Hall valves, and 50% of 30 patients with Carpentier-Edwards valves (p < 0.001, chi 2). In the patients with Bjork-Shiley valves, the mean number of signals per hour was 59 (range, 42-86; 95% confidence interval), which was significantly higher than the mean in patients with Medtronic-Hall and Carpentier-Edwards valves (1.5[range, 0.5-2.5] and 1 [range, 0-5.3], respectively; both p < 0.04, multiple comparisons. Bonferroni correction). In the patients undergoing serial pre- and postoperative studies, the causative role of the valve implant was emphasized. There was no correlation between the number of emboli signals and a prior history of neurologic deficit, cardiac rhythm, previous cardiac surgery, or the intensity of oral anticoagulation, in patients with prosthetic heart valves. In Bjork-Shiley patients, dual (mitral and aortic) valves were associated with more signals than were single valves. In Medtronic-Hall patients, the signal count was greater for valves in the aortic position than it was for valves in the mitral position. Comparative studies of Doppler emboli signals in other clinical settings suggest a difference in composition or size of the underlying maternal between prosthetic valve patients and patients with carotid stenosis. These

  12. Solar Doppler shifts - Sources of continuous spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Harvey, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    Oscillation observations can be used to study nonoscillatory solar phenomena that exhibit Doppler shifts. The paper discusses several effects of these phenomena and their associated temporal and spatial power spectra: (1) they limit the signal-to-noise ratio and sometimes detectability of oscillation modes; (2) there is the potential for better understanding and/or detection of solar phenomena; (3) large-scale convection may spatially modulate oscillation modes, leading to a continuous background spectrum; and (4) in regions of the spectrum where the resolution to separate modes is lacking one can determine upper limits for the integrated effects of modes.

  13. Laser Doppler anemometry measurements in an engine.

    PubMed

    Cole, J B; Swords, M D

    1979-05-15

    A simple and effective technique is reported which allows measurement of the flow field in the cylinder of a motored internal combustion engine with good temporal and spatial resolution. The experiment, a realfringe laser Doppler anemometer, uses photon counting digital autocorrelation for data capture. The experimental autocorrelation functions have been processed using curve-fitting to a Gaussian velocity profile and by direct Fourier transformation without prior assumption of the form. The ability of such a technique to tolerate poor SNRs makes it a likely choice for measurement in firing engines.

  14. Neutral wind results from TIMED Doppler interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, T.; Gablehouse, R.; Gell, D.; Johnson, R.; Niciejewski, R.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Kafkalidis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the launch of the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in December 2001, the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) has been collecting lower thermosphere and mesospheric data for over a year. After adjustments to the spectral sampling scheme and operational mode, the instrument has been optimized. Efforts have also been made to improve the instrument performance. Preliminary neutral winds from O2 (0-0) have been analyzed. Tidal features and their seasonal variation are shown clearly in the wind data, which are quantitatively consistent with model prediction. We will report our progress on these efforts.

  15. [Color Doppler sonography of focal abdominal lesions].

    PubMed

    Licanin, Zoran; Lincender, Lidija; Djurović, V; Salihefendić, Nizama; Smajlović, Fahrudin

    2004-01-01

    Color Doppler sonography (CDS--spectral, color and power), harmonic imaging techniques (THI, PHI), possibility of 3D analysis of picture, usage of contrast agents, have raised the values of ultrasound as a diagnostic method to a very high level. THI--non-linear gray scale modality, is based on the processing of higher reflected frequencies, that has improved a picture resolution, which is presented with less artifacts and limiting effects of obesity and gases. Ultrasound contrast agents improve analysis of micro and macro circulation of the examined area, and with the assessment of velocity of supply in ROI (wash in), distribution and time of signal weakening (wash out), are significantly increasing diagnostic value of ultrasound. Besides the anatomical and topographic presentation of examined region (color, power), Color Doppler sonography gives us haemodynamic-functional information on vascularisation of that region, as well as on pathologic vascularisation if present. Avascular aspect of a focal pathologic lesion corresponds to a cyst or haematoma, while coloration and positive spectral curve discover that anechogenic lesions actually represents aneurysms, pseudoaneurysms or AVF. In local inflammatory lesion, abscess in an acute phase, CDS shows first increased, and then decreased central perfusion, while in a chronic phase, a pericapsular vascularisation is present. Contribution of CDS in differentiation of hepatic tumors (hemangioma, HCC and metastasis) is very significant. Central color dots along the peripheral blood vessels and the blush phenomenon are characteristics of capillary hemangioma, peritumoral vascular ring "basket" of HCC, and "detour" sign of metastasis. The central artery, RI from 0.45 to 0.60 and radial spreading characterize FNH. Hepatic adenoma is characterized by an intratumoral vein, and rarely by a vascular hallo. Further on, blood velocity in tumor defined by Color Doppler, distinguishes malignant from benign lesion, where 40 cm/s is a

  16. Trace analysis in EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jercinovic, M. J.; Williams, M. L.; Allaz, J.; Donovan, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Trace element micro-analysis has evolved steadily since the early days of EPMA, yet remains an extraordinarily challenging subject. The enhanced capabilities of modern instrumentation, including the use of spectrometers with high X-ray collection efficiencies, high brightness electron sources, and improved stability all contribute to our ability to improve detection limits and analytical spatial resolution. Along with much improved software for data acquisition and analysis, recent progress in EPMA has made the trace realm more accessible than ever. High count precision can be obtained in order to easily bring analytical sensitivity into the single ppm range, but accuracy remains the greatest struggle. With the exception of the calibration, all sources of error encountered in major element analysis are magnified in trace analysis, and other sources become apparent where high spatial resolution is needed. Beam damage and charge effects are difficult problems in high sensitivity, high spatial resolution analysis, particularly in the analysis of insulators. Software can minimize some of the resulting effects on count rates during acquisition in order to improve accuracy, and analysts can empirically evaluate the conditions of analysis (count time, voltage, current, etc.) to try to minimize these effects. Trace analysis is fundamentally an exercise in background characterisation, and the acquisition and evaluation of background is a subject of developing methodology. Background curvature and interferences can result in considerable inaccuracy, but can be dealt with via detailed quantitative wavelength scanning or multi-point spectral acquisitions which allow proper regression of the background shape. In the absence of excellent quality trace element secondary standards of similar matrix to unknowns, blank testing and consistency standards can be used to test at least some aspects of the methods employed. Ultimately, the analyst must rely on accuracy evolving from

  17. Is Doppler ultrasound useful for evaluating gestational trophoblastic disease?

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence H; Bernardes, Lisandra S; Hase, Eliane A; Fushida, Koji; Francisco, Rossana P V

    2015-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound is a non-invasive method for evaluating vascularization and is widely used in clinical practice. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia includes a group of highly vascularized malignancies derived from placental cells. This review summarizes data found in the literature regarding the applications of Doppler ultrasound in managing patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. The PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane and LILACS databases were searched for articles published in English until 2014 using the following keywords: “Gestational trophoblastic disease AND Ultrasonography, Doppler.” Twenty-eight articles met the inclusion criteria and were separated into the 4 following groups according to the aim of the study. 1 Doppler ultrasound does not seem to be capable of differentiating partial from complete moles, but it might be useful when evaluating pregnancies in which a complete mole coexists with a normal fetus. 2 There is controversy in the role of uterine artery Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of development of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. 3 Doppler ultrasound is a useful tool in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia because abnormal myometrial vascularization and lower uterine artery Doppler indices seem to be correlated with invasive disease. 4 Lower uterine artery Doppler indices in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia are associated with methotrexate resistance and might play a role in prognosis. CONCLUSION: Several studies support the importance of Doppler ultrasound in the management of patients with gestational trophoblastic neoplasia, particularly the role of Doppler velocimetry in the prediction of trophoblastic neoplasia and the chemoresistance of trophoblastic tumors. Doppler findings should be used as ancillary tools, along with human chorionic gonadotropin assessment, in the diagnosis of gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. PMID:26735221

  18. Windowed multipole for cross section Doppler broadening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josey, C.; Ducru, P.; Forget, B.; Smith, K.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an in-depth analysis on the accuracy and performance of the windowed multipole Doppler broadening method. The basic theory behind cross section data is described, along with the basic multipole formalism followed by the approximations leading to windowed multipole method and the algorithm used to efficiently evaluate Doppler broadened cross sections. The method is tested by simulating the BEAVRS benchmark with a windowed multipole library composed of 70 nuclides. Accuracy of the method is demonstrated on a single assembly case where total neutron production rates and 238U capture rates compare within 0.1% to ACE format files at the same temperature. With regards to performance, clock cycle counts and cache misses were measured for single temperature ACE table lookup and for windowed multipole. The windowed multipole method was found to require 39.6% more clock cycles to evaluate, translating to a 7.9% performance loss overall. However, the algorithm has significantly better last-level cache performance, with 3 fewer misses per evaluation, or a 65% reduction in last-level misses. This is due to the small memory footprint of the windowed multipole method and better memory access pattern of the algorithm.

  19. Comparison of Triature Doppler Velocimetry and VISAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cenobio H Gallegos, Bruce Marshall, Matthew Teel, Vincent T Romero, Abel Diaz, and Michael Berninger

    2010-01-01

    Triature Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (TDV) is an adaptation of Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) that rejects common-mode data noise after splitting PDV three ways, with each signal 120° out of phase from each other. Testing has demonstrated that TDV also improves temporal resolution from the typical five nanoseconds of PDV to a subnanosecond range. This paper compares the temporal response of TDV with that of PDV and VISAR [velocity interferometer system for any reflector] in an experiment with a subnanosecond (~120-picosecond rise time) shock source. Laboratory tests were performed using a high-power laser on targets of copper and aluminum. A Buce Marshall fast VISAR with a single-point PDV and a prototype TDV were used. A special probe that combined PDV, TDV, and fast VISAR made simultaneous velocity measurements. Breakout velocities of 1.3 km/second on copper and 2.5 km/second on aluminum were observed, where TDV resolved rise times of ~200 ps. This resolution was better than that of a fast VISAR, which can achieve ~500 ps temporal resolution. Test methods and results are presented.

  20. Imaging doppler velocimeter with downward heterodyning in the optical domain

    DOEpatents

    Reu, Phillip L; Hansche, Bruce D

    2013-05-21

    In a Doppler velocimeter, the incoming Doppler-shifted beams are heterodyned to reduce their frequencies into the bandwidth of a digital camera. This permits the digital camera to produce at every sampling interval a complete two-dimensional array of pixel values. This sequence of pixel value arrays provides a velocity image of the target.

  1. A study for developing an ultrasonic Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermans, M.; Bregman, R.

    1984-06-01

    The system parameters for low cost ultrasonic Doppler flowmeters for medical applications were investigated. A flowmeter was built. A phase locked loop is used to find the correct Doppler shift. Laboratory and field tests prove the success of the development, although very often insufficient reflectors exist in the liquids. The accuracy is + or - 5%; the reproducibility is + or - 0.5%.

  2. Micro-Doppler classification of riders and riderless horses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, David

    2014-05-01

    Micro-range Micro-Doppler can be used to isolate particular parts of the radar signature, and in this case we demonstrate the differences in the signature between a walking horse versus a walking horse with a rider. Using micro-range micro-Doppler, we can distinguish the radar returns from the rider as separate from the radar returns of the horse.

  3. Investigations of atmospheric dynamics using a CW Doppler sounder array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional CW Doppler sounding system currently under operation at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama is described. The properties of the neutral atmosphere are discussed along with the theory of Doppler sounding technique. Methods of data analyses used to investigate the dynamical phenomena at the ionospheric heights are presented and suggestions for future investigations provided.

  4. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system is a device that combines...

  5. 21 CFR 892.1550 - Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system. 892.1550 Section 892.1550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... system. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic pulsed doppler imaging system is a device that combines...

  6. Functional Doppler optical coherence tomography for cortical blood flow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingfeng; Liu, Gangjun; Nguyen, Elaine; Choi, Bernard; Chen, Zhongping

    2010-02-01

    Optical methods have been widely used in basic neuroscience research to study the cerebral blood flow dynamics in order to overcome the low spatial resolution associated with magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Although laser Doppler imaging and laser speckle imaging can map out en face cortical hemodynamics and columns, depth resolution is not available. Two-photon microscopy has been used for mapping cortical activity. However, flow measurement requires fluorescent dye injection, which can be problematic. The noninvasive and high resolution tomographic capabilities of optical coherence tomography make it a promising technique for mapping depth resolved cortical blood flow. Here, we present a functional Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging modality for quantitative evaluation of cortical blood flow in a mouse model. Fast, repeated, Doppler OCT scans across a vessel of interest were performed to record flow dynamic information with a high temporal resolution of the cardiac cycles. Spectral Doppler analysis of continuous Doppler images demonstrates how the velocity components and longitudinally projected flow-volume-rate change over time, thereby providing complementary temporal flow information to the spatially distributed flow information of Doppler OCT. The proposed functional Doppler OCT imaging modality can be used to diagnose vessel stenosis/blockage or monitor blood flow changes due to pharmacological agents/neuronal activities. Non-invasive in-vivo mice experiments were performed to verify the capabilities of function Doppler OCT.

  7. Ray Tracing with Virtual Objects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leinoff, Stuart

    1991-01-01

    Introduces the method of ray tracing to analyze the refraction or reflection of real or virtual images from multiple optical devices. Discusses ray-tracing techniques for locating images using convex and concave lenses or mirrors. (MDH)

  8. Embolic Doppler ultrasound signal detection via fractional Fourier transform.

    PubMed

    Gençer, Merve; Bilgin, Gökhan; Aydın, Nizamettin

    2013-01-01

    Computerized analysis of Doppler ultrasound signals can aid early detection of asymptomatic circulating emboli. For analysis, physicians use informative features extracted from Doppler ultrasound signals. Time -frequency analysis methods are useful tools to exploit the transient like signals such as Embolic signals. Detection of discriminative features would be the first step toward automated analysis of embolic Doppler ultrasound signals. The most problematic part of setting up emboli detection system is to differentiate embolic signals from confusing similar wave-like patterns such as Doppler speckle and artifacts caused by tissue movement, probe tapping, speaking etc. In this study, discrete version of fractional Fourier transform is presented as a solution in the detection of emboli in digitized Doppler ultrasound signals. An accurate set of parameters are extracted using short time Fourier transform and fractional Fourier transform and the results are compared to reveal detection quality. Experimental results prove the efficiency of fractional Fourier transform in which discriminative features becomes more evident.

  9. Rotational Doppler effect in x-ray photoionization

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Gel'mukhanov, Faris

    2010-11-15

    The energy of the photoelectron experiences a red or blue Doppler shift when the molecule recedes from the detector or approaches him. This results in a broadening of the photoelectron line due to the translational thermal motion. However, the molecules also have rotational degrees of freedom and we show that the translational Doppler effect has its rotational counterpart. This rotational Doppler effect leads to an additional broadening of the spectral line of the same magnitude as the Doppler broadening caused by translational thermal motion. The rotational Doppler broadening as well as the rotational recoil broadening is sensitive to the molecular orbital from which the photoelectron is ejected. This broadening should be taken into account in analysis of x-ray photoemission spectra of super-high resolution and it can be directly observed using x-ray pump-probe spectroscopy.

  10. One way Doppler extractor. Volume 1: Vernier technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blasco, R. W.; Klein, S.; Nossen, E. J.; Starner, E. R.; Yanosov, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility analysis, trade-offs, and implementation for a One Way Doppler Extraction system are discussed. A Doppler error analysis shows that quantization error is a primary source of Doppler measurement error. Several competing extraction techniques are compared and a Vernier technique is developed which obtains high Doppler resolution with low speed logic. Parameter trade-offs and sensitivities for the Vernier technique are analyzed, leading to a hardware design configuration. A detailed design, operation, and performance evaluation of the resulting breadboard model is presented which verifies the theoretical performance predictions. Performance tests have verified that the breadboard is capable of extracting Doppler, on an S-band signal, to an accuracy of less than 0.02 Hertz for a one second averaging period. This corresponds to a range rate error of no more than 3 millimeters per second.

  11. Doppler-cancelled response to VLF gravitational waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caporali, A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of long periodic gravitational waves with a three link microwave system known as the Doppler Cancelling System is discussed. This system, which was developed for a gravitational redshift experiment, uses one-way and two-way Doppler informatin to construct the beat signal of two reference oscillators moving with respect to each other. The geometric optics approximation is used to derive the frequency shift produced on a light signal propagating in a gravitational wave space-time. The signature left on the Doppler-cancelled beat by burst and continuous gravitational waves is analyzed. A comparison is made between the response to gravitational waves of the Doppler Cancelling System and that of a Doppler tracking system which employs two-way, round-trip radio waves. A three-fold repetition of the gravitational wave form is found to be a common feature of the response functions of both systems. These two functions otherwise exhibit interesting differences.

  12. An online three-class Transcranial Doppler ultrasound brain computer interface.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Anuja; Samadani, Ali-Akbar; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Chau, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCI) can provide communication opportunities for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) measures cerebral blood flow velocities and can be used to develop a BCI. A previously implemented TCD BCI system used verbal and spatial tasks as control signals; however, the spatial task involved a visual cue that awkwardly diverted the user's attention away from the communication interface. Therefore, vision-independent right-lateralized tasks were investigated. Using a bilateral TCD BCI, ten participants controlled online, an on-screen keyboard using a left-lateralized task (verbal fluency), a right-lateralized task (fist motor imagery or 3D-shape tracing), and unconstrained rest. 3D-shape tracing was generally more discernible from other tasks than was fist motor imagery. Verbal fluency, 3D-shape tracing and unconstrained rest were distinguished from each other using a linear discriminant classifier, achieving a mean agreement of κ=0.43±0.17. These rates are comparable to the best offline three-class TCD BCI accuracies reported thus far. The online communication system achieved a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 1.08±0.69bits/min with values reaching up to 2.46bits/min, thereby exceeding the ITR of previous online TCD BCIs. These findings demonstrate the potential of a three-class online TCD BCI that does not require visual task cues.

  13. An online three-class Transcranial Doppler ultrasound brain computer interface.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Anuja; Samadani, Ali-Akbar; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Chau, Tom

    2016-06-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCI) can provide communication opportunities for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) measures cerebral blood flow velocities and can be used to develop a BCI. A previously implemented TCD BCI system used verbal and spatial tasks as control signals; however, the spatial task involved a visual cue that awkwardly diverted the user's attention away from the communication interface. Therefore, vision-independent right-lateralized tasks were investigated. Using a bilateral TCD BCI, ten participants controlled online, an on-screen keyboard using a left-lateralized task (verbal fluency), a right-lateralized task (fist motor imagery or 3D-shape tracing), and unconstrained rest. 3D-shape tracing was generally more discernible from other tasks than was fist motor imagery. Verbal fluency, 3D-shape tracing and unconstrained rest were distinguished from each other using a linear discriminant classifier, achieving a mean agreement of κ=0.43±0.17. These rates are comparable to the best offline three-class TCD BCI accuracies reported thus far. The online communication system achieved a mean information transfer rate (ITR) of 1.08±0.69bits/min with values reaching up to 2.46bits/min, thereby exceeding the ITR of previous online TCD BCIs. These findings demonstrate the potential of a three-class online TCD BCI that does not require visual task cues. PMID:26795195

  14. Mode Gaussian beam tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, M. Yu.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    A mode parabolic equation in the ray centered coordinates for 3D underwater sound propagation is developed. The Gaussian beam tracing in this case is constructed. The test calculations are carried out for the ASA wedge benchmark and proved an excellent agreement with the source images method in the case of cross-slope propagation. But in the cases of wave propagation at some angles to the cross-slope direction an account of mode interaction becomes necessary.

  15. Lidar Detection of Explosives Traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, Sergei M.; Gorlov, Evgeny V.; Zharkov, Victor I.; Panchenko, Yury N.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of remote detection of traces of explosives using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF) is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexogen (RDX), trotyl-hexogen (Comp B), octogen (HMX), and tetryl with a scanning lidar detector of traces of nitrogen-containing explosives at a distance of 5 m are presented.

  16. Anisotropic ray trace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Wai Sze Tiffany

    Optical components made of anisotropic materials, such as crystal polarizers and crystal waveplates, are widely used in many complex optical system, such as display systems, microlithography, biomedical imaging and many other optical systems, and induce more complex aberrations than optical components made of isotropic materials. The goal of this dissertation is to accurately simulate the performance of optical systems with anisotropic materials using polarization ray trace. This work extends the polarization ray tracing calculus to incorporate ray tracing through anisotropic materials, including uniaxial, biaxial and optically active materials. The 3D polarization ray tracing calculus is an invaluable tool for analyzing polarization properties of an optical system. The 3x3 polarization ray tracing P matrix developed for anisotropic ray trace assists tracking the 3D polarization transformations along a ray path with series of surfaces in an optical system. To better represent the anisotropic light-matter interactions, the definition of the P matrix is generalized to incorporate not only the polarization change at a refraction/reflection interface, but also the induced optical phase accumulation as light propagates through the anisotropic medium. This enables realistic modeling of crystalline polarization elements, such as crystal waveplates and crystal polarizers. The wavefront and polarization aberrations of these anisotropic components are more complex than those of isotropic optical components and can be evaluated from the resultant P matrix for each eigen-wavefront as well as for the overall image. One incident ray refracting or reflecting into an anisotropic medium produces two eigenpolarizations or eigenmodes propagating in different directions. The associated ray parameters of these modes necessary for the anisotropic ray trace are described in Chapter 2. The algorithms to calculate the P matrix from these ray parameters are described in Chapter 3 for

  17. TIMED Doppler Interferometer: Overview and recent results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killeen, T. L.; Wu, Q.; Solomon, S. C.; Ortland, D. A.; Skinner, W. R.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Gell, D. A.

    2006-10-01

    The Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite carries a limb-scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer designed to perform remote-sensing measurements of upper atmosphere winds and temperatures globally. This instrument is called the TIMED Doppler Interferometer, or TIDI. This paper provides an overview of the TIDI instrument design, on-orbit performance, operational modes, data processing and inversion procedures, and a summary of wind results to date. Daytime and nighttime neutral winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere/ionosphere (MLTI) are measured on TIDI using four individual scanning telescopes that collect light from various upper atmosphere airglow layers on both the cold and warm sides of the high-inclination TIMED spacecraft. The light is spectrally analyzed using an ultrastable plane etalon Fabry-Perot system with sufficient spectral resolution to determine the Doppler line characteristics of atomic and molecular emissions emanating from the MLTI. The light from all four telescopes and from an internal calibration field passes through the etalon and is combined on a single image plane detector using a Circle-to-Line Interferometer Optic (CLIO). The four geophysical fields provide orthogonal line-of-sight measurements to either side of the satellite's path and these are analyzed to produce altitude profiles of vector winds in the MLTI. The TIDI wind measurements presented here are from the molecular oxygen (0-0) band, covering the altitude region 85-105 km. The unique TIDI design allows for more extended local time coverage of wind structures than previous wind-measuring instruments from high-inclination satellites. The TIDI operational performance has been nominal except for two anomalies: (1) higher than expected background white light caused by a low-level light leak and (2) ice deposition on cold optical surfaces. Both anomalies are well understood and the instrumental modes and data analysis techniques have been

  18. The superiority of combined continuous wave Doppler examination over periorbital Doppler for the detection of extracranial carotid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Trockel, U; Hennerici, M; Aulich, A; Sandmann, W

    1984-01-01

    Non-invasive examination of 431 vessels in 333 patients with cerebrovascular disease in all stages was performed in order to compare the reliability of the periorbital Doppler test alone and together with the more difficult insonation of the carotid arteries in the neck (combined Doppler). These findings were compared with those of subsequent arteriography. Extracranial obstructive (greater than 50%) carotid disease was detected with 100% sensitivity by the combined Doppler, but with only 48% sensitivity by the periorbital indirect test. The specific ability of both methods to identify non-stenotic carotid arteries (less than 50%) was similar at about 98%. Only the combined Doppler examination reliably differentiated various degrees of obstruction, comparable to that obtained with arteriography. Non-obstructive plaques could not be detected or excluded by either Doppler test. More refined methods will be necessary for their evaluation. Images PMID:6693913

  19. Phase Doppler Anemometry as an Ejecta Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, David; Chapman, David

    2015-06-01

    When a shock wave is incident on a free surface, micron sized pieces of the material can be ejected from the surface. Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) is being developed to simultaneously measure the size and velocity of the individual shock induced ejecta particles. The measurements will provide an insight into ejecta phenomena. The results from experiments performed on the 13 mm bore light gas gun at the Institute of Shock Physics, Imperial College London are presented. Specially grooved tin targets were shocked at pressures of up to 14 GPa, below the melt on release pressure, to generate ejecta particles. The experiments are the first time that PDA has been successfully fielded on dynamic ejecta experiments. The results and the current state of the art of the technique are discussed along with the future improvements required to further improve performance and increase usability.

  20. DC coupled Doppler radar physiological monitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in Doppler radar systems for physiological monitoring is a large DC offset in baseband outputs. Typically, AC coupling is used to eliminate this DC offset. Since the physiological signals of interest include frequency content near DC, it is not desirable to simply use AC coupling on the radar outputs. While AC coupling effectively removes DC offset, it also introduces a large time delay and distortion. This paper presents the first DC coupled IQ demodulator printed circuit board (PCB) design and measurements. The DC coupling is achieved by using a mixer with high LO to RF port isolation, resulting in a very low radar DC offset on the order of mV. The DC coupled signals from the PCB radar system were successfully detected with significant LNA gain without saturation. Compared to the AC coupled results, the DC coupled results show great advantages of less signal distortion and more accurate rate estimation.

  1. Signal Processing Schemes for Doppler Global Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, James F.; Lee, Joseph W.; Cavone, Angelo A.

    1991-01-01

    Two schemes for processing signals obtained from the Doppler global velocimeter are described. The analog approach is a simple, real time method for obtaining an RS-170 video signal containing the normalized intensity image. Pseudo colors are added using a monochromatic frame grabber producing a standard NTSC video signal that can be monitored and/or recorded. The digital approach is more complicated, but maintains the full resolution of the acquisition cameras with the capabilities to correct the signal image for pixel sensitivity variations and to remove of background light. Prototype circuits for each scheme are described and example results from the investigation of the vortical flow field above a 75-degree delta wing presented.

  2. Widefield laser doppler velocimeter: development and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansche, Bruce David; Reu, Phillip L.; Massad, Jordan Elias

    2007-03-01

    The widefield laser Doppler velocimeter is a new measurement technique that significantly expands the functionality of a traditional scanning system. This new technique allows full-field velocity measurements without scanning, a drawback of traditional measurement techniques. This is particularly important for tests in which the sample is destroyed or the motion of the sample is non-repetitive. The goal of creating ''velocity movies'' was accomplished during the research, and this report describes the current functionality and operation of the system. The mathematical underpinnings and system setup are thoroughly described. Two prototype experiments are then presented to show the practical use of the current system. Details of the corresponding hardware used to collect the data and the associated software to analyze the data are presented.

  3. DC coupled Doppler radar physiological monitor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi; Song, Chenyan; Lubecke, Victor; Boric-Lubecke, Olga

    2011-01-01

    One of the challenges in Doppler radar systems for physiological monitoring is a large DC offset in baseband outputs. Typically, AC coupling is used to eliminate this DC offset. Since the physiological signals of interest include frequency content near DC, it is not desirable to simply use AC coupling on the radar outputs. While AC coupling effectively removes DC offset, it also introduces a large time delay and distortion. This paper presents the first DC coupled IQ demodulator printed circuit board (PCB) design and measurements. The DC coupling is achieved by using a mixer with high LO to RF port isolation, resulting in a very low radar DC offset on the order of mV. The DC coupled signals from the PCB radar system were successfully detected with significant LNA gain without saturation. Compared to the AC coupled results, the DC coupled results show great advantages of less signal distortion and more accurate rate estimation. PMID:22254704

  4. Role of transcranial Doppler in cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Amit A; Sharma, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial Doppler (TCD) is the only noninvasive modality for the assessment of real-time cerebral blood flow. It complements various anatomic imaging modalities by providing physiological-flow related information. It is relatively cheap, easily available, and can be performed at the bedside. It has been suggested as an essential component of a comprehensive stroke centre. In addition to its importance in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, its role is expanding in the evaluation of cerebral hemodynamics in various disorders of the brain. The "established" clinical indications for the use of TCD include cerebral ischemia, sickle cell disease, detection of right-to-left shunts, subarachnoid hemorrhage, periprocedural or surgical monitoring, and brain death. We present the role of TCD in acute cerebrovascular ischemia, sonothrombolysis, and intracranial stenosis. PMID:27625245

  5. Laser Doppler systems in atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murty, S. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    The loss of heterodyne signal power for the Marshall Space Flight Center laser Doppler system due to the random changes in the atmospheric index of refraction is investigated. The current status in the physics of low energy laser propagation through turbulent atmosphere is presented. The analysis and approximate evaluation of the loss of the heterodyne signal power due to the atmospheric absorption, scattering, and turbulence are estimated for the conditions of the January 1973 flight tests. Theoretical and experimental signal to noise values are compared. Maximum and minimum values of the atmospheric attenuation over a two way path of 20 km range are calculated as a function of altitude using models of atmosphere, aerosol concentration, and turbulence.

  6. Doppler interpretation of quasar red shifts.

    PubMed

    Zapolsky, H S

    1966-08-01

    The hypothesis that the quasistellar sources (quasars) are local objects moving with velocities close to the speed of light is examined. Provided there is no observational cutoff on apparent bolometric magnitude for the quasars, the transverse Doppler effect leads to the expectation of fewer blue shifts than red shifts for an isotropic distribution of velocities. Such a distribution also yields a function N(z), the number of objects with red shift less than z which is not inconsistent with the present data. On the basis of two extreme assumptions concerning the origin of such rapidly moving sources, we computed curves of red shift plotted against magnitude. In particular, the curve obtained on the assumption that the quasars originated from an explosion in or nearby our own galaxy is in as good agreement with the observations as the curve of cosmological red shift plotted against magnitude.

  7. Microscale Heat Conduction Models and Doppler Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2015-01-22

    The objective of this project is to establish an approach for providing the fundamental input that is needed to estimate the magnitude and time-dependence of the Doppler feedback mechanism in Very High Temperature reactors. This mechanism is the foremost contributor to the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high temperature reactors that use fuel based on Tristructural-Isotropic (TRISO) coated particles. Therefore, its correct prediction is essential to the conduct of safety analyses for these reactors. Since the effect is directly dependent on the actual temperature reached by the fuel during transients, the underlying phenomena of heat deposition, heat transfer and temperature rise must be correctly predicted. To achieve the above objective, this project will explore an approach that accounts for lattice effects as well as local temperature variations and the correct definition of temperature and related local effects.

  8. Color Doppler imaging of retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Dimitrova, Galina; Kato, Satoshi

    2010-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging (CDI) is a widely used method for evaluating ocular circulation that has been used in a number of studies on retinal diseases. CDI assesses blood velocity parameters by using ultrasound waves. In ophthalmology, these assessments are mainly performed on the retrobulbar blood vessels: the ophthalmic, the central retinal, and the short posterior ciliary arteries. In this review, we discuss CDI use for the assessment of retinal diseases classified into the following: vascular diseases, degenerations, dystrophies, and detachment. The retinal vascular diseases that have been investigated by CDI include diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusions, retinal artery occlusions, ocular ischemic conditions, and retinopathy of prematurity. Degenerations and dystrophies included in this review are age-related macular degeneration, myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. CDI has been used for the differential diagnosis of retinal detachment, as well as the evaluation of retrobulbar circulation in this condition. CDI is valuable for research and is a potentially useful diagnostic tool in the clinical setting.

  9. Hands-Free Transcranial Color Doppler Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Robert; Madala, Srihdar; Sattler, Graham

    2012-01-01

    Current transcranial color Doppler (TCD) transducer probes are bulky and difficult to move in tiny increments to search and optimize TCD signals. This invention provides miniature motions of a TCD transducer probe to optimize TCD signals. The mechanical probe uses spherical bearing in guiding and locating the tilting crystal face. The lateral motion of the crystal face as it tilts across the full range of motion was achieved by minimizing the distance between the pivot location and the crystal face. The smallest commonly available metal spherical bearing was used with an outer diameter of 12 mm, a 3-mm tall retaining ring, and 5-mm overall height. Small geared motors were used that would provide sufficient power in a very compact package. After confirming the validity of the basic positioning concept, optimization design loops were completed to yield the final design.

  10. Laser Doppler vibrometer employing active frequency feedback.

    PubMed

    Chijioke, Akobuije; Lawall, John

    2008-09-20

    We present a heterodyne Michelson interferometer for vibration measurement in which feedback is used to obviate the need to unwrap phase data. The Doppler shift of a vibrating target mirror is sensed interferometrically and compensated by means of a voltage-controlled oscillator driving an acousto-optic modulator. For frequencies within the servo bandwidth, the oscillator control voltage provides a direct measurement of the target velocity. Outside the servo bandwidth, phase-sensitive detection is used to evaluate high-frequency displacements. This approach is of great interest for the frequently-occurring situation where vibration amplitudes at low frequency exceed an optical wavelength, but knowledge of the vibration spectrum at high frequency is important as well.

  11. Laser Doppler vibrometer employing active frequency feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Chijioke, Akobuije; Lawall, John

    2008-09-20

    We present a heterodyne Michelson interferometer for vibration measurement in which feedback is used to obviate the need to unwrap phase data. The Doppler shift of a vibrating target mirror is sensed interferometrically and compensated by means of a voltage-controlled oscillator driving an acousto-optic modulator. For frequencies within the servo bandwidth, the oscillator control voltage provides a direct measurement of the target velocity. Outside the servo bandwidth, phase-sensitive detection is used to evaluate high-frequency displacements. This approach is of great interest for the frequently-occurring situation where vibration amplitudes at low frequency exceed an optical wavelength, but knowledge of the vibration spectrum at high frequency is important as well.

  12. Spacecraft Doppler tracking with a VLBI antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comoretto, G.; Iess, L.; Bertotti, B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Horton, T.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported from Doppler-shift measurements to the Voyager-2 spacecraft at a distance of 26 AU, obtained using the 32-m VLBI antenna at Medicina (Italy) during July and August 1988. The apparatus comprises the el-az antenna, an S-X-band receiver, a hydrogen maser to generate the reference signal, a Mark III VLBI terminal, and a digital tone extractor capable of isolating a tone of known frequency from a noisy signal and giving its phase and amplitude. A signal transmitted in S-band from the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) station in Australia and retransmitted coherently in X-band by Voyager, was received 7 h 6 min later at Medicina and at the DSN station in Madrid. Sample data are presented graphically and shown to be of generally high quality; further in-depth analysis is under way.

  13. Planar Particle Imaging Doppler Velocimetry Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wernet, Mark P.

    2000-01-01

    Two current techniques exist for the measurement of planar, three-component velocity fields. Both techniques require multiple views of the illumination plane in order to extract all three velocity components. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is a high-resolution, high accuracy, planar velocimetry technique that provides valuable instantaneous velocity information in aeropropulsion test facilities. PIV can provide three-component flow-field measurements using a two-camera, stereo viewing configuration. Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) is another planar velocimetry technique that can provide three component flow-field measurements; however, it requires three detector systems that must be located at oblique angles from the measurement plane. The three-dimensional configurations of either technique require multiple (DGV) or at least large (stereo PIV) optical access ports in the facility in which the measurements are being conducted. Optical access is extremely limited in aeropropulsion test facilities. In many cases, only one optical access port is available. A hybrid measurement technique has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, planar particle image and Doppler velocimetry (PPIDV), which combines elements from both the PIV and DGV techniques into a single detection system that can measure all three components of velocity across a planar region of a flow field through a single optical access port. In the standard PIV technique, a pulsed laser is used to illuminate the flow field at two closely spaced instances in time, which are recorded on a "frame-straddling" camera, yielding a pair of single-exposure image frames. The PIV camera is oriented perpendicular to the light sheet, and the processed PIV data yield the two-component velocity field in the plane of the light sheet. In the standard DGV technique, an injection-seeded Nd:YAG pulsed laser light sheet illuminates the seeded flow field, and three receiver systems are used to measure three components

  14. Wind Field Measurements With Airborne Doppler Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.

    1999-01-01

    In collaboration with lidar atmospheric remote sensing groups at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Environmental Technology Laboratory, we have developed and flown the Multi-center Airborne Coherent Atmospheric Wind Sensor (MACAWS) lidar on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft. The scientific motivations for this effort are: to obtain measurements of subgrid scale (i.e. 2-200 km) processes and features which may be used to improve parameterizations in global/regional-scale models; to improve understanding and predictive capabilities on the mesoscale; and to assess the performance of Earth-orbiting Doppler lidar for global tropospheric wind measurements. MACAWS is a scanning Doppler lidar using a pulsed transmitter and coherent detection; the use of the scanner allows 3-D wind fields to be produced from the data. The instrument can also be radiometrically calibrated and used to study aerosol, cloud, and surface scattering characteristics at the lidar wavelength in the thermal infrared. MACAWS was used to study surface winds off the California coast near Point Arena, with an example depicted in the figure below. The northerly flow here is due to the Pacific subtropical high. The coastal topography interacts with the northerly flow in the marine inversion layer, and when the flow passes a cape or point that juts into the winds, structures called "hydraulic expansion fans" are observed. These are marked by strong variation along the vertical and cross-shore directions. The plots below show three horizontal slices at different heights above sea level (ASL). Bottom plots are enlargements of the area marked by dotted boxes above. The terrain contours are in 200-m increments, with the white spots being above 600-m elevation. Additional information is contained in the original.

  15. To assess the intimal thickness, flow velocities, and luminal diameter of carotid arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound doppler imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vemuru, Madhuri; Jabbar, Afzal; Chandra, Suman

    2004-04-01

    Carotid imaging is a Gold Standard test that provides useful information about the structure and functions of carotid arteries. Spectral imaging helps to evaluate the vessel and hemodynamic changes. High resolution B-mode imaging has emerged as one of the methods of choice for determining the anatomic extent of atherosclerosis and its progression and for assessing cardiovascular risks. The measurements made with Doppler correlate well with pathologic measurements. Recent prospective studies have clearly demonstrated that these measurements of carotid intimal thickness are potent predictors of Myocardial Infarction and Stroke. This method appears very attractive as it is non-invasive, extremely safe, well accepted by the patient and relatively inexpensive. It can be performed serially and has the advantage of visualizing the arterial wall in contrast to angiographic techniques which provide only an outline of the arterial lumen. Recently, there has been an interest in the clinical use of this technique in making difficult clinical decisions like deciding on preventive therapies. 30 subjects aged 21-60 years and 30 subjects aged 61-85 years of both sexes are selected after doing a baseline study to exclude Hypertension, Diabetes, Obesity and Hyperlipidemia. The carotid arteries were examined for intimal thickening, blood flow velocities and luminal diameter. With aging there is a narrowing of the carotid vessels and significant increase in intimal thickening with a consequent increase in the blood flow velocities. Inter-observer, intra-observer and instrument variations are seen and there is no significant change in the values when the distal flow pattern is considered for measurements. Aging produces major cardiovascular changes including decreased elasticity and compliance of great arteries leading to structural and functional alterations in heart and vessels. With aging there is increased intimal thickness and increased pulse wave velocity which is clearly

  16. RESOLVING DOPPLER-FACTOR CRISIS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: NON-STEADY MAGNETIZED OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Lister, Matthew

    2010-10-10

    Magnetically driven non-stationary acceleration of jets in active galactic nuclei results in the leading parts of the flow being accelerated to much higher Lorentz factors than in the case of steady-state acceleration with the same parameters. The higher Doppler-boosted parts of the flow may dominate the high-energy emission of blazar jets. We suggest that highly variable GeV and TeV emission in blazars is produced by the faster moving leading edges of highly magnetized non-stationary ejection blobs, while the radio data trace the slower-moving bulk flow. Thus, the radio and gamma-ray emission regions have different, but correlated, Doppler factors. High-energy emission is generated, typically within the optically thick core, in the outer parts of the broad-line emission region, avoiding the radiative drag on the faster parts of the flow. The radio emission should correlate with the gamma-ray emission, delayed with frequency-dependent time lag of the order of weeks to months. Model predictions compare favorably with the latest Fermi {gamma}-ray and MOJAVE radio very long baseline interferometry results.

  17. The Use of a Laser Doppler Velocimeter in a Standard Flammability Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strehlow, R. A.; Flynn, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of the Laser Doppler Velocimeter, (LDV), to measure the flow associated with the passage of a flame through a standard flammability limit tube (SFLT) was studied. Four major results are presented: (1) it is shown that by using standard ray tracing calculations, the displacement of the LDV volume and the fringe rotation within the experimental error of measurement can be predicted; (2) the flow velocity vector field associated with passage of an upward propagating flame in an SFLT is determined; (3) it is determined that the use of a light interruption technique to track particles is not feasible; and (4) it is shown that a 25 mW laser is adequate for LDV measurements in the Shuttle or Spacelab.

  18. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; Holland, C.

    2012-10-15

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (k{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub s}{approx} 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  19. 2D full wave modeling for a synthetic Doppler backscattering diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillesheim, J. C.; Holland, C.; Schmitz, L.; Kubota, S.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.

    2012-10-01

    Doppler backscattering (DBS) is a plasma diagnostic used in tokamaks and other magnetic confinement devices to measure the fluctuation level of intermediate wavenumber (kθρs ˜ 1) density fluctuations and the lab frame propagation velocity of turbulence. Here, a synthetic DBS diagnostic is described, which has been used for comparisons between measurements in the DIII-D tokamak and predictions from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. To estimate the wavenumber range to which a Gaussian beam would be sensitive, a ray tracing code and a 2D finite difference, time domain full wave code are used. Experimental density profiles and magnetic geometry are used along with the experimental antenna and beam characteristics. An example of the effect of the synthetic diagnostic on the output of a nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation is presented.

  20. Application of wavelet analysis in laser Doppler vibration signal denoising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yu-fei; Xue, Hui-feng; Li, Xin-liang; Liu, Dan

    2010-10-01

    Large number of experiments show that, due to external disturbances, the measured surface is too rough and other factors make use of laser Doppler technique to detect the vibration signal contained complex information, low SNR, resulting in Doppler frequency shift signals unmeasured, can not be demodulated Doppler phase and so on. This paper first analyzes the laser Doppler signal model and feature in the vibration test, and studies the most commonly used three ways of wavelet denoising techniques: the modulus maxima wavelet denoising method, the spatial correlation denoising method and wavelet threshold denoising method. Here we experiment with the vibration signals and achieve three ways by MATLAB simulation. Processing results show that the wavelet modulus maxima denoising method at low laser Doppler vibration SNR, has an advantage for the signal which mixed with white noise and contained more singularities; the spatial correlation denoising method is more suitable for denoising the laser Doppler vibration signal which noise level is not very high, and has a better edge reconstruction capacity; wavelet threshold denoising method has a wide range of adaptability, computational efficiency, and good denoising effect. Specifically, in the wavelet threshold denoising method, we estimate the original noise variance by spatial correlation method, using an adaptive threshold denoising method, and make some certain amendments in practice. Test can be shown that, compared with conventional threshold denoising, this method is more effective to extract the feature of laser Doppler vibration signal.

  1. Clutter reduction using Doppler sonar in a harbor environment.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C; Schindall, J; Huang, Chen-Fen; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2012-11-01

    A high frequency experiment was conducted in the Woods Hole Harbor in Massachusetts to evaluate the effectiveness of Doppler sonar for discriminating targets from reverberation. Using a pulsed linear frequency modulated signal, one finds that the matched filtered outputs are filled with high-level discrete backscattered returns, referred to as clutter, which are often confused with the target echo. The high level non-target returns have an amplitude distribution that is heavy-tailed. Using a Doppler-sensitive binary-phase-shift-keying signal coded with an m-sequence, the target echo and clutter can be separated by Doppler and delay, and tracked using the Doppler spectrogram (Dopplergram). The Doppler filtered time series show a background reverberation with a Rayleigh-like amplitude distribution, with an improved signal-to-(peak) reverberation ratio compared with that without Doppler filtering. The reduced reverberation level with Doppler processing decreases the probability of false alarm (Pfa) for a given threshold level. Conversely, for a given Pfa, the higher signal-to-(peak) reverberation ratio implies a higher probability of detection. Transmission loss measurement was conducted to estimate some of the system parameters, e.g., the source level and target strength relative to the noise level.

  2. Clinical Applications of Doppler OCT and OCT Angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Ou; Jia, Yali; Wei, Eric; Huang, David

    Doppler optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a functional extension of OCT that allows for the visualization and measurement of blood flow [1, 2]. Phase-resolved Doppler OCT has become a standard algorithm for measuring Doppler shift with Fourier-domain (FD)-OCT because of its high velocity sensitivity [3]. In ophthalmology, several methods have been developed to measure in vivo retinal blood flow using this algorithm. Since Doppler OCT measures only the velocity component parallel to the OCT probe beam, additional information is needed to calculate absolute velocity and volumetric flow rate. One method is to employ two OCT beams with a fixed offset in incidence angles [4, 5]. However, this approach requires special hardware and is not compatible with commercial single-beam OCT systems. Another approach is to use special scan patterns to measure the Doppler angle (angle between the OCT beam and the blood vessel). Some groups used concentric scan patterns [6, 7], while other groups used raster scan patterns [8, 9]. Finally, Srinivasan et al. developed en face Doppler OCT for cerebral blood flow calculation, which obviated the need for Doppler angle estimation [10]. Bauman et al. adapted the method for total retinal blood flow (TRBF) calculation with ultrafast swept-source OCT [11]. In this chapter, we focus our attention on the double-circular scan pattern developed in our research group, which has been used in a number of clinical studies for preliminary demonstration of utility.

  3. Limits on Planetary Companions from Doppler Surveys of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Andrew W.; Fulton, Benjamin J.

    2016-11-01

    Most of our knowledge of planets orbiting nearby stars comes from Doppler surveys. For spaced-based, high-contrast imaging missions, nearby stars with Doppler-discovered planets are attractive targets. The known orbits tell imaging missions where and when to observe, and the dynamically determined masses provide important constraints for the interpretation of planetary spectra. Quantifying the set of planet masses and orbits that could have been detected will enable more efficient planet discovery and characterization. We analyzed Doppler measurements from Lick and Keck Observatories by the California Planet Survey. We focused on stars that are likely targets for three space-based planet imaging mission concepts studied by NASA—WFIRST-AFTA, Exo-C, and Exo-S. The Doppler targets are primarily F8 and later main sequence stars, with observations spanning 1987-2014. We identified 76 stars with Doppler measurements from the prospective mission target lists. We developed an automated planet search and a methodology to estimate the pipeline completeness using injection and recovery tests. We applied this machinery to the Doppler data and computed planet detection limits for each star as a function of planet minimum mass and semimajor axis. For typical stars in the survey, we are sensitive to approximately Saturn-mass planets inside of 1 au, Jupiter-mass planets inside of ˜3 au, and our sensitivity declines out to ˜10 au. For the best Doppler targets, we are sensitive to Neptune-mass planets in 3 au orbits. Using an idealized model of Doppler survey completeness, we forecast the precision of future surveys of non-ideal Doppler targets that are likely targets of imaging missions. Based on observations obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated jointly by the University of California and the California Institute of Technology. Keck time has been granted by NASA, the University of California, and the University of Hawaii.

  4. Extending 3-Frequency Na Doppler Lidar Wind and Temperature Measurements into Lower Atmosphere with Na Double-Edge Magneto-Optic Filters (Na-DEMOF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Chu, X.; Wiig, J.; Williams, B. P.; Harrell, S.; She, C.

    2008-12-01

    An important atmospheric process is the wave coupling among different layers. It is crucial to trace waves from their source regions in the lower atmosphere to their dissipation regions in the middle and upper atmosphere. This requires the profiling of wind and temperature simultaneously from the lower to the upper atmosphere. Utilizing Doppler shift and Doppler broadening effects, various types of Doppler lidars can measure wind and temperature in different atmospheric regions. However, none of the single lidars is able to profile both variables throughout the atmosphere. Resonance fluorescence Na Doppler lidars measure wind and temperature simultaneously in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. They have made significant contributions to the study of wave dynamics. Unfortunately, their measurements are limited to 80-105 km where the trace gas Na atoms are available. We proposed to incorporate a Na double-edge magneto-optic filter (Na-DEMOF) into the receiver of a 3-frequency Na Doppler lidar to extend its wind and temperature measurements into the lower atmosphere. Two prototypes based on cold- and hot-cell designs were constructed and characterized with laboratory tests. The hot-cell filter showed superior performances than the cold-cell containing buffer gas. The hot-cell Na-DEMOF was also successfully modeled by quantum mechanics calculations. Lidar simulations were conducted for analysis of measurement errors in the altitude range of 15-50 km with the hot-cell filter developed. Field test using the hot-cell Na-DEMOF with the Colorado State University Na lidar is under its way and the initial results will be reported and compared to lidar simulation.

  5. [Feasibility study of the Doppler exploration of the renal artery].

    PubMed

    Milon, P; Clavier, E; Genevois, A; Benozio, M

    1990-03-01

    Using arteriography as a reference, the authors investigate the feasibility of pulsed doppler exploration of the normal or pathological renal arteries in 46 successive patients. The poor sensitivity of pulsed doppler, mainly due to the considerable anatomical variations of the renal pedicle, does not currently allow using this technique for the detection of renal arterial stenosis. When combined with angiography, pulsed doppler becomes a definite asset in therapeutic radiology to help in the choice of a treatment and in follow-up. PMID:2191123

  6. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Landini, M.; Roy, S.; Carcagni, L.; Trypogeorgos, D.; Fattori, M.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of system and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows us to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25{+-}3 {mu}K and 47{+-}5 {mu}K in high-density samples of the two isotopes {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K, respectively. Our findings should find application to other atomic systems.

  7. Ultrasonic Doppler measurement of renal artery blood flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, W. R.; Beaver, W. L.; Meindl, J. D.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were made of (1) blood flow redistribution during lower body negative pressure (LBNP), (2) the profile of blood flow across the mitral annulus of the heart (both perpendicular and parallel to the commissures), (3) testing and evaluation of a number of pulsed Doppler systems, (4) acute calibration of perivascular Doppler transducers, (5) redesign of the mitral flow transducers to improve reliability and ease of construction, and (6) a frequency offset generator designed for use in distinguishing forward and reverse components of blood flow by producing frequencies above and below the offset frequency. Finally methodology was developed and initial results were obtained from a computer analysis of time-varying Doppler spectra.

  8. Advances in Direct Detection Doppler Lidar Technology and Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we will describe the ground based Doppler lidar system which is mounted in a modified delivery van to allow field deployment and operations. The system includes an aerosol double edge receiver optimized for aerosol backscatter Doppler measurements at 1064 nm and a molecular double edge receiver which operates at 355 nm. The lidar system will be described including details of the injection seeded diode pumped laser transmitter and the piezoelectrically tunable high spectral resolution Fabry Perot etalon which is used to measure the Doppler shift. Examples of tropospheric wind profiles obtained with the system will also be presented to demonstrate its capabilities.

  9. Considerations pertinent to the Doppler effect for space reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes various theoretical aspects pertinent to the estimation of the Doppler effect for space reactors. The distinct characteristics of space reactors give rise to various issues that are not present in the more thoroughly studied Doppler effect of fast breeder reactors. Key issues concerning the existing resonance data and computational models are extensively discussed. Calculations of the Doppler coefficient for a generic space reactor design having features of current designs have also been carried out to illustrate various aspects of practical importance.

  10. Interferometric millimeter wave and THz wave doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Shaolin; Gopalsami, Nachappa; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Elmer, Thomas

    2015-08-11

    A mixerless high frequency interferometric Doppler radar system and methods has been invented, numerically validated and experimentally tested. A continuous wave source, phase modulator (e.g., a continuously oscillating reference mirror) and intensity detector are utilized. The intensity detector measures the intensity of the combined reflected Doppler signal and the modulated reference beam. Rigorous mathematics formulas have been developed to extract bot amplitude and phase from the measured intensity signal. Software in Matlab has been developed and used to extract such amplitude and phase information from the experimental data. Both amplitude and phase are calculated and the Doppler frequency signature of the object is determined.

  11. Relativistic formulation for the Doppler-broadened line profile

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Young-Sea; Chiue, Juang-Han; Huang, Yi-Chi; Hsiung, Te-Chih

    2010-07-15

    Profiles of spectral lines due to the thermal motion of light-emitting particles are formulated based on the classical and the relativistic Doppler effects, respectively. For the classical case, the well-known Doppler-broadened line profile is reproduced. For the relativistic case, the line profile obtained is asymmetrically broadened with increasing temperature. However, the peak frequency remains unshifted, in contrast to blueshifted, as has been predicted in the current literature. Reasoning is given as to why the relativistic Doppler-broadened line profile currently accepted is probably invalid.

  12. Rotational Doppler Effect and Barnett Field in Spinning NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudo, Hiroyuki; Harii, Kazuya; Matsuo, Mamoru; Ieda, Jun'ichi; Ono, Masao; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eiji

    2015-04-01

    We report the observation of the rotational Doppler effect using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We have developed a coil-spinning technique that enables measurements by rotating a detector and fixing a sample. We found that the rotational Doppler effect gives rise to NMR frequency shifts equal to the rotation frequency. We formulate the rotational Doppler effect and the Barnett field using a vector model for the nuclear magnetic moment. This formulation reveals that, with just the sample rotating, both effects cancel each other, thereby explaining the absence of an NMR frequency shift in conventional sample-spinning NMR measurements.

  13. Support vector analysis of color-Doppler images: a new approach for estimating indices of left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Rojo-Alvarez, J L; Bermejo, J; Juárez-Caballero, V M; Yotti, R; Cortina, C; García-Fernández, M A; Antoranz, J C

    2006-08-01

    Reliable noninvasive estimators of global left ventricular (LV) chamber function remain unavailable. We have previously demonstrated a potential relationship between color-Doppler M-mode (CDMM) images and two basic indices of LV function: peak-systolic elastance (Emax) and the time-constant of LV relaxation (tau). Thus, we hypothesized that these two indices could be estimated noninvasively by adequate postprocessing of CDMM recordings. A semiparametric regression (SR) version of support vector machine (SVM) is here proposed for building a blind model, capable of analyzing CDMM images automatically, as well as complementary clinical information. Simultaneous invasive and Doppler tracings were obtained in nine mini-pigs in a high-fidelity experimental setup. The model was developed using a test and validation leave-one-out design. Reasonably acceptable prediction accuracy was obtained for both Emax (intraclass correlation coefficient Ric, = 0.81) and tau (Ric, = 0.61). For the first time, a quantitative, noninvasive estimation of cardiovascular indices is addressed by processing Doppler-echocardiography recordings using a learning-from-samples method. PMID:16894996

  14. Trace conditioning in insects—keep the trace!

    PubMed Central

    Dylla, Kristina V.; Galili, Dana S.; Szyszka, Paul; Lüdke, Alja

    2013-01-01

    Trace conditioning is a form of associative learning that can be induced by presenting a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) following each other, but separated by a temporal gap. This gap distinguishes trace conditioning from classical delay conditioning, where the CS and US overlap. To bridge the temporal gap between both stimuli and to form an association between CS and US in trace conditioning, the brain must keep a neural representation of the CS after its termination—a stimulus trace. Behavioral and physiological studies on trace and delay conditioning revealed similarities between the two forms of learning, like similar memory decay and similar odor identity perception in invertebrates. On the other hand differences were reported also, like the requirement of distinct brain structures in vertebrates or disparities in molecular mechanisms in both vertebrates and invertebrates. For example, in commonly used vertebrate conditioning paradigms the hippocampus is necessary for trace but not for delay conditioning, and Drosophila delay conditioning requires the Rutabaga adenylyl cyclase (Rut-AC), which is dispensable in trace conditioning. It is still unknown how the brain encodes CS traces and how they are associated with a US in trace conditioning. Insects serve as powerful models to address the mechanisms underlying trace conditioning, due to their simple brain anatomy, behavioral accessibility and established methods of genetic interference. In this review we summarize the recent progress in insect trace conditioning on the behavioral and physiological level and emphasize similarities and differences compared to delay conditioning. Moreover, we examine proposed molecular and computational models and reassess different experimental approaches used for trace conditioning. PMID:23986710

  15. An audit of a hospital-based Doppler ultrasound quality control protocol using a commercial string Doppler phantom.

    PubMed

    Cournane, S; Fagan, A J; Browne, J E

    2014-05-01

    Results from a four-year audit of a Doppler quality assurance (QA) program using a commercially available Doppler string phantom are presented. The suitability of the phantom was firstly determined and modifications were made to improve the reliability and quality of the measurements. QA of Doppler ultrasound equipment is very important as data obtained from these systems is used in patient management. It was found that if the braided-silk filament of the Doppler phantom was exchanged with an O-ring rubber filament and the velocity range below 50 cm/s was avoided for Doppler quality control (QC) measurements, then the maximum velocity accuracy (MVA) error and intrinsic spectral broadening (ISB) results obtained using this device had a repeatability of 18 ± 3.3% and 19 ± 3.5%, respectively. A consistent overestimation of the MVA of between 12% and 56% was found for each of the tested ultrasound systems. Of more concern was the variation of the overestimation within each respective transducer category: MVA errors of the linear, curvilinear and phased array probes were in the range 12.3-20.8%, 32.3-53.8% and 27-40.7%, respectively. There is a dearth of QA data for Doppler ultrasound; it would be beneficial if a multicentre longitudinal study was carried out using the same Doppler ultrasound test object to evaluate sensitivity to deterioration in performance measurements. PMID:24156827

  16. Trace element emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, S.A.; Erickson, T.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Zygarlicke, C.J.; Hauserman, W.B.; Hassett, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The predicting of inorganic transformations (major and minor components) during coal combustion has long been the focus of many research programs (Zygarlicke et al., 1992; Wilemski et al., 1992; Baxter, 1992). In the program described in this paper, the predictive techniques that have been applied to combustion are being modified to predict inorganic transformations under gasification conditions. Many of the current trace element predictive techniques are based on the assumption of equilibrium conditions and not on actual kinetically constrained transformations that occur during coal utilization. The approach used in this program is to combine inorganic transformation algorithms and the thermochemical equilibrium calculations (Ramanathan et al., 1989, 1991). These techniques will be developed to predict the particle-size and composition distribution of the resulting coal ash particulate, along with the state of the vapor species at selected conditions for major, minor, and trace constituents. Many of the computer models recently to predict the evolution of major developed and minor elements during coal gasification were made possible by the development on a highly quantitative analytical technique for coal analysis, CCSEM (Steadman et al., 1990). CCSEM provides a particle-size and composition distribution for the mineral contents of a particular coal for twelve major and minor elements. These raw CCSEM data are the primary input to the newest computer models of ash formation.

  17. The Next Generation Airborne Polarimetric Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Lee, Wen-Chau; Loew, Eric; Salazar, Jorge; Chandrasekar, V.

    2013-04-01

    NCAR's Electra Doppler radar (ELDORA) with a dual-beam slotted waveguide array using dual-transmitter, dual-beam, rapid scan and step-chirped waveform significantly improved the spatial scale to 300m (Hildebrand et al. 1996). However, ELDORA X-band radar's penetration into precipitation is limited by attenuation and is not designed to collect polarimetric measurements to remotely estimate microphysics. ELDORA has been placed on dormancy because its airborne platform (P3 587) was retired in January 2013. The US research community has strongly voiced the need to continue measurement capability similar to the ELDORA. A critical weather research area is quantitative precipitation estimation/forecasting (QPE/QPF). In recent years, hurricane intensity change involving eye-eyewall interactions has drawn research attention (Montgomery et al., 2006; Bell and Montgomery, 2006). In the case of convective precipitation, two issues, namely, (1) when and where convection will be initiated, and (2) determining the organization and structure of ensuing convection, are key for QPF. Therefore collocated measurements of 3-D winds and precipitation microphysics are required for achieving significant skills in QPF and QPE. Multiple radars in dual-Doppler configuration with polarization capability estimate dynamical and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation are mostly available over land. However, storms over complex terrain, the ocean and in forest regions are not observable by ground-based radars (Bluestein and Wakimoto, 2003). NCAR/EOL is investigating potential configurations for the next generation airborne radar that is capable of retrieving dynamic and microphysical characteristics of clouds and precipitation. ELDORA's slotted waveguide array radar is not compatible for dual-polarization measurements. Therefore, the new design has to address both dual-polarization capability and platform requirements to replace the ELDORA system. NCAR maintains a C-130

  18. Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) for studying the thermosphere of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocanegra Bahamón, T. M.; Cimò, G.; Duev, D. A.; Gurvits, L. I.; Marty, J. C.; Molera Calvés, G.; Pogrebenko, S. V.; Rosenblatt, P.

    2013-09-01

    Planetary Radio Interferometry and Doppler Experiment (PRIDE) is a generic experimental setup of on-board and Earth-based radio devices and facilities, which serves as an enhancement of the science return of planetary missions. The main goal of this technique is to provide precise estimates of the spacecraft state vectors, by performing precise Doppler tracking of the spacecraft carrier signal, at one or more Earth-based radio telescopes, and VLBI-style correlation of these signals in phase referencing mode [1]. By allowing an accurate examination of the changes in phase and amplitude of the radio signal propagating from the spacecraft to the multiple stations on Earth, the PRIDE technique can be used for several fields of research, among them: atmospheric and ionospheric structure of planets and their satellites, planetary gravity fields, planets' shapes, masses and ephemerides, solar plasma and different aspects of the theory of general relativity. The PRIDE-team is participating in the so-called Venus Express Atmospheric Drag Experiment (VEx-ADE) campaigns by tracking ESA's Venus Express with multiple radio telescopes on Earth. During each campaign, VEX's orbit pericenter is lowered into an altitude range of approximately 165 to 175 km in order to probe Venus upper atmosphere above its north pole. The first VExADE campaigns were carried out between 2009-2010 using Doppler tracking data acquired by the VEX radio science experiment (VeRa), which provided the first in situ measurements of the density of Venus' polar thermosphere at solar minimum conditions [2]. The last campaign was conducted in December 2012, in which the PRIDE-team participated by tracking VEX with several radio telescopes from the European VLBI Network (EVN) during pericenter passage. A Doppler frequency drop of ∼40 mHz was detected as VEX reached the lowest altitudes at around 170 km. The tracking data for each pericenter pass is fitted for precise orbit determination, from which drag

  19. Stroboscopic Doppler tomography of FO AQR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Duck, S. R.

    1996-10-01

    FO Aqr is a close binary star in which a magnetic white dwarf accretes from a cool companion. Light curves and spectra show variations on the orbital frequency, the white dwarf's spin frequency and combinations of the two. It is not clear from observation or theory whether accretion in FO Aqr is mediated by stream, a disc or a combination of both. We have taken 938 spectra of FO Aqr with the 3.9 m AAT. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our spectra enable us to see variations in the lines directly without recourse to phase folding. HeII 4686 shows an 'S'-wave on the orbital period but on top of this sharp features run across from red-to-blue and blue-to-red, the direction reversing with orbital phase. We apply the method of Doppler tomography in an effort to understand these features. To cope with the variations that occur as the white dwarf rotates we compute Doppler images as a function of the orientation of the white dwarf relative to the binary system. The process is analogous to the use of a stroboscope in freezing the motion of rotating objects. In animated form a spot of emission is seen in the region of the gas stream and secondary star. The spot changes brightness and position as the white dwarf rotates. The movement in position is consistent with an azimuthally extended structure extending 120° around the white dwarf. It is this movement that corresponds to the sharp features which run across the 'S'-wave. We show that these features are the cause of variations in the ratio of blue to red-shifted emission that were formerly interpreted as signs of an eclipse in FO Aqr. There is no evidence for a disc in FO Aqr from our data. Models of the secondary star and gas stream go some way to explaining the variations in spot position and flux, but the observed structure appears more extended than the models can fit. We speculate that magnetospheric interaction may help solve this problem. Edward J.P. van den Heuvel

  20. Radiowave Phase Scintillation and Precision Doppler Tracking of Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Phase scintillation cause by propagation through irregularities in the solar wind, ionosphere, and tropospher, introduces noise in spacecraft radio science experiments. The observations reported here are uses to refine the propagation noise model for Doppler tracking of deep space probes.

  1. Modifications and Moving Measurements of Mobile Doppler LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bing-Yi; Liu, Zhi-Shen; Song, Xiao-Quan; Wu, Song-Hua; Bi, De-Cang; Wang, Xi-Tao; Yin, Qi-Wei; Reitebuch, Oliver

    2010-10-01

    In the last annual report of ID. 5291 LIDAR Cal/Val, a mobile Doppler lidar had been developed for 3D wind measurements by the Chinese partners from Ocean Remote Sensing Institute, Ocean University of China. In this year, in order to further improve the mobility of the mobile Doppler lidar for lidar calibration and validation, both GPS and inertial navigation system are integrated on the vehicle for performing measurements during movement. The modifications of the system and the results of the moving measurements are presented. This work simplifies the construction of the mobile Doppler system and makes the lidar more flexible for ground-based wind measurements and validation with the ADM-Aeolus spaceborne Doppler lidar.

  2. Laser Doppler technology applied to atmospheric environmental operating problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E. A.; Bilbro, J. W.; Dunkin, J. A.; Jeffreys, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Carbon dioxide laser Doppler ground wind data were very favorably compared with data from standard anemometers. As a result of these measurements, two breadboard systems were developed for taking research data: a continuous wave velocimeter and a pulsed Doppler system. The scanning continuous wave laser Doppler velocimeter developed for detecting, tracking and measuring aircraft wake vortices was successfully tested at an airport where it located vortices to an accuracy of 3 meters at a range of 150 meters. The airborne pulsed laser Doppler system was developed to detect and measure clear air turbulence (CAT). This system was tested aboard an aircraft, but jet stream CAT was not encountered. However, low altitude turbulence in cumulus clouds near a mountain range was detected by the system and encountered by the aircraft at the predicted time.

  3. Ambiguity Of Doppler Centroid In Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chi-Yung; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Paper discusses performances of two algorithms for resolution of ambiguity in estimated Doppler centroid frequency of echoes in synthetic-aperture radar. One based on range-cross-correlation technique, other based on multiple-pulse-repetition-frequency technique.

  4. Characterization of pelvic organs by Doppler sonography waveform shape.

    PubMed

    Ronnie, Tepper; Yodfat, Shaharabany; Ron, Shiri; Hershkovitz, Reli

    2010-05-01

    The purpose was to describe blood flow waveform of pelvic organs obtained by Doppler according to their unique characteristics. A prospective study was designed and 79 premenopausal and postmenopausal women were screened. Transvaginal ultrasonography combined with color Doppler was performed. Arterial blood flow of the uterus, fallopian tubes and both ovarian center and periphery were assessed, by a unique computerized program exclusively developed for this research (MATLAB language). Waveform characterization was performed by calculating alpha and beta angles, representing upward curve of each waveform and angles of refraction gamma and delta. alpha to delta angles were found significantly different for each of the pelvic organs. Significant differences in the characteristics of Doppler waveforms were also observed between pre and postmenopausal women. Luteal and follicular phase blood flow waveforms were similar. These findings contribute to our ability to classify the origin of blood vessel by processing Doppler waveforms by a computerized method. PMID:20420968

  5. Coherent Doppler Lidar for Precision Navigation of Spacecrafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego; Petway, Larry; Hines, Glenn; Lockhard, George; Barnes, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-based coherent Doppler lidar, utilizing an FMCW technique, has been developed and its capabilities demonstrated through two successful helicopter flight test campaigns. This Doppler lidar is expected to play a critical role in future planetary exploration missions because of its ability in providing the necessary data for soft landing on the planetary bodies and for landing missions requiring precision navigation to the designated location on the ground. Compared with radars, the Doppler lidar can provide significantly higher precision velocity and altitude data at a much higher rate without concerns for measurement ambiguity or target clutter. Future work calls for testing the Doppler lidar onboard a rocket-powered free-flyer platform operating in a closed-loop with the vehicle s guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) unit.

  6. [Postpartal ovarian thrombophlebitis. Value of Doppler ultrasonograph y].

    PubMed

    Renaud-Giono, A; Giraud, J R; Poulain, P; Proudhon, J F; Grall, J Y; Moquet, P Y; Darnault, J P

    1996-01-01

    Thrombophlebitis of the ovarian vein is a well recognized but uncommon complication during the postpartum period. We report a small series and emphasize the contribution of color Doppler and the basic therapeutic measures.

  7. Doppler electron velocimetry : notes on creating a practical tool.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.; Milster, Tom

    2008-11-01

    The Doppler electron velocimeter (DEV) has been shown to be theoretically possible. This report attempts to answer the next logical question: Is it a practical instrument? The answer hinges upon whether enough electrons are available to create a time-varying Doppler current to be measured by a detector with enough sensitivity and bandwidth. The answer to both of these questions is a qualified yes. A target Doppler frequency of 1 MHz was set as a minimum rate of interest. At this target a theoretical beam current signal-to-noise ratio of 25-to-1 is shown for existing electron holography equipment. A detector is also demonstrated with a bandwidth of 1-MHz at a current of 10 pA. Additionally, a Linnik-type interferometer that would increase the available beam current is shown that would offer a more flexible arrangement for Doppler electron measurements over the traditional biprism.

  8. Doing the Doppler. How to Drive This Concept Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koser, John F.

    1990-01-01

    An outdoor activity that demonstrates the Doppler effect is described. Class predictions are verified by actual involvement in collecting data. Presented is a method of analyzing data. Safety concerns are discussed. (KR)

  9. The Doppler Effect: A Consideration of Quasar Redshifts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Kurtiss J.

    1980-01-01

    Provides information on the calculation of the redshift to blueshift ratio introduced by the transverse Doppler effect at relativistic speeds. Indicates that this shift should be mentioned in discussions of whether quasars are "local" rather than "cosmological" objects. (GS)

  10. Laser Doppler instrument measures fluid velocity without reference beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourquin, K. R.; Shigemoto, F. H.

    1971-01-01

    Fluid velocity is measured by focusing laser beam on moving fluid and measuring Doppler shift in frequency which results when radiation is scattered by particles either originally present or deliberately injected into moving fluid.

  11. Doppler bubble detection and decompression sickness: a prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bayne, C G; Hunt, W S; Johanson, D C; Flynn, E T; Weathersby, P K

    1985-09-01

    Decompression sickness in human beings exposed to high ambient pressure is thought to follow from gas bubble formation and growth in the body during return to low pressure. Detection of Doppler-shifted ultrasonic reflections in major blood vessels has been promoted as a noninvasive and sensitive indicator of the imminence of decompression sickness. We have conducted a double-blind, prospective clinical trial of Doppler ultrasonic bubble detection in simulated diving using 83 men, of whom 8 were stricken and treated for the clinical disease. Diagnosis based only on the Doppler signals had no correlation with clinical diagnosis. Bubble scores were only slightly higher in the stricken group. The Doppler technique does not appear to be of diagnostic value in the absence of other clinical information.

  12. Exploratory Meeting on Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, G. H. (Editor); Kaufman, J. W. (Editor); Vaughan, W. W. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The scientific interests and applications of the Airborne Doppler Lidar Wind Velocity Measurement System to severe storms and local weather are discussed. The main areas include convective phenomena, local circulation, atmospheric boundary layer, atmospheric dispersion, and industrial aerodynamics.

  13. Quantitative Measurement of the Doppler Shift at an Ultrasonic Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nerbun, R. C.; Leskovec, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed is a Doppler shift laboratory experiment for an introductory college physics course. Ultrasonic transducers and a digital phase detector circuit "black box" are used to overcome room noise and "standing waves" and to produce an observable frequency shift. (SL)

  14. Ultrasonic Doppler methods to extract signatures of a walking human.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of Doppler signatures that characterize human motion has attracted a growing interest in recent years. These Doppler signatures are generated by various components of the human body while walking, and contain unique features that can be used for human detection and recognition. Although, a significant amount of research has been done in radio frequency regime for human Doppler signature extraction, considerably less has been done in acoustics. In this work, 40 kHz ultrasonic sonar is employed to measure the Doppler signature generated by the motion of body segments using different electronic and signal processing schemes. These schemes are based on both analog and digital demodulation with homodyne and heterodyne receiver circuitry. The results and analyses from these different schemes are presented.

  15. Micro-Doppler processing for ultra-wideband radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Graeme E.; Ahmad, Fauzia; Amin, Moeness G.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe an operational pulse Doppler radar imaging system for indoor target localization and classification, and show how a target's micro-Doppler signature (μDS) can be processed when ultra-wideband (UWB) waveforms are employed. Unlike narrowband radars where time-frequency signal representations can be applied to reveal the target time-Doppler frequency signatures, the UWB system permits joint range-time-frequency representation (JRTFR). JRTFR outputs the data in a 3D domain representing range, frequency, and time, allowing both the μDS and high range resolution (HRR) signatures to be observed. We delineate the relationship between the μDS and the HRR signature, showing how they would form a complimentary joint feature for classification. We use real-data to demonstrate the effectiveness of the UWB pulse-Doppler radar, combined with nonstationary signal analyses, in gaining valuable insights into human positioning and motions.

  16. Ultrasonic Doppler methods to extract signatures of a walking human.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Asif; Sabatier, James M; Damarla, Thyagaraju

    2012-09-01

    Extraction of Doppler signatures that characterize human motion has attracted a growing interest in recent years. These Doppler signatures are generated by various components of the human body while walking, and contain unique features that can be used for human detection and recognition. Although, a significant amount of research has been done in radio frequency regime for human Doppler signature extraction, considerably less has been done in acoustics. In this work, 40 kHz ultrasonic sonar is employed to measure the Doppler signature generated by the motion of body segments using different electronic and signal processing schemes. These schemes are based on both analog and digital demodulation with homodyne and heterodyne receiver circuitry. The results and analyses from these different schemes are presented. PMID:22979839

  17. Monitoring and Analysis of Respiratory Patterns Using Microwave Doppler Radar.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Siong; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact detection characteristic of Doppler radar provides an unobtrusive means of respiration detection and monitoring. This avoids additional preparations, such as physical sensor attachment or special clothing, which can be useful for certain healthcare applications. Furthermore, robustness of Doppler radar against environmental factors, such as light, ambient temperature, interference from other signals occupying the same bandwidth, fading effects, reduce environmental constraints and strengthens the possibility of employing Doppler radar in long-term respiration detection, and monitoring applications such as sleep studies. This paper presents an evaluation in the of use of microwave Doppler radar for capturing different dynamics of breathing patterns in addition to the respiration rate. Although finding the respiration rate is essential, identifying abnormal breathing patterns in real-time could be used to gain further insights into respiratory disorders and refine diagnostic procedures. Several known breathing disorders were professionally role played and captured in a real-time laboratory environment using a noncontact Doppler radar to evaluate the feasibility of this noncontact form of measurement in capturing breathing patterns under different conditions associated with certain breathing disorders. In addition to that, inhalation and exhalation flow patterns under different breathing scenarios were investigated to further support the feasibility of Doppler radar to accurately estimate the tidal volume. The results obtained for both experiments were compared with the gold standard measurement schemes, such as respiration belt and spirometry readings, yielding significant correlations with the Doppler radar-based information. In summary, Doppler radar is highlighted as an alternative approach not only for determining respiration rates, but also for identifying breathing patterns and tidal volumes as a preferred nonwearable alternative to the conventional

  18. Monitoring and Analysis of Respiratory Patterns Using Microwave Doppler Radar.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yee Siong; Pathirana, Pubudu N; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact detection characteristic of Doppler radar provides an unobtrusive means of respiration detection and monitoring. This avoids additional preparations, such as physical sensor attachment or special clothing, which can be useful for certain healthcare applications. Furthermore, robustness of Doppler radar against environmental factors, such as light, ambient temperature, interference from other signals occupying the same bandwidth, fading effects, reduce environmental constraints and strengthens the possibility of employing Doppler radar in long-term respiration detection, and monitoring applications such as sleep studies. This paper presents an evaluation in the of use of microwave Doppler radar for capturing different dynamics of breathing patterns in addition to the respiration rate. Although finding the respiration rate is essential, identifying abnormal breathing patterns in real-time could be used to gain further insights into respiratory disorders and refine diagnostic procedures. Several known breathing disorders were professionally role played and captured in a real-time laboratory environment using a noncontact Doppler radar to evaluate the feasibility of this noncontact form of measurement in capturing breathing patterns under different conditions associated with certain breathing disorders. In addition to that, inhalation and exhalation flow patterns under different breathing scenarios were investigated to further support the feasibility of Doppler radar to accurately estimate the tidal volume. The results obtained for both experiments were compared with the gold standard measurement schemes, such as respiration belt and spirometry readings, yielding significant correlations with the Doppler radar-based information. In summary, Doppler radar is highlighted as an alternative approach not only for determining respiration rates, but also for identifying breathing patterns and tidal volumes as a preferred nonwearable alternative to the conventional

  19. A pulsed CO2 Doppler lidar for boundary layer monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Guy N.

    1992-01-01

    A monostatic, master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA), CO2 pulsed Doppler lidar was constructed and tested. The system is compact (120 x 60 cm), operates at high pulse repetition rates (greater than 1 kHz) and is intended for simultaneous Doppler/Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) monitoring of the planetary boundary layer. Details of the system design, hard target calibrations, and aerosol returns are presented.

  20. Monitoring and Analysis of Respiratory Patterns Using Microwave Doppler Radar

    PubMed Central

    Pathirana, Pubudu N.; Steinfort, Christopher Louis; Caelli, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Noncontact detection characteristic of Doppler radar provides an unobtrusive means of respiration detection and monitoring. This avoids additional preparations, such as physical sensor attachment or special clothing, which can be useful for certain healthcare applications. Furthermore, robustness of Doppler radar against environmental factors, such as light, ambient temperature, interference from other signals occupying the same bandwidth, fading effects, reduce environmental constraints and strengthens the possibility of employing Doppler radar in long-term respiration detection, and monitoring applications such as sleep studies. This paper presents an evaluation in the of use of microwave Doppler radar for capturing different dynamics of breathing patterns in addition to the respiration rate. Although finding the respiration rate is essential, identifying abnormal breathing patterns in real-time could be used to gain further insights into respiratory disorders and refine diagnostic procedures. Several known breathing disorders were professionally role played and captured in a real-time laboratory environment using a noncontact Doppler radar to evaluate the feasibility of this noncontact form of measurement in capturing breathing patterns under different conditions associated with certain breathing disorders. In addition to that, inhalation and exhalation flow patterns under different breathing scenarios were investigated to further support the feasibility of Doppler radar to accurately estimate the tidal volume. The results obtained for both experiments were compared with the gold standard measurement schemes, such as respiration belt and spirometry readings, yielding significant correlations with the Doppler radar-based information. In summary, Doppler radar is highlighted as an alternative approach not only for determining respiration rates, but also for identifying breathing patterns and tidal volumes as a preferred nonwearable alternative to the conventional