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Sample records for pulses initial structural

  1. Correlation analysis between initial preliminary breakdown process, the characteristic of radiation pulse, and the charge structure on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Guangshu; Wen, Jun; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yajun; Wang, Yanhui

    2016-10-01

    Using synchronous data from a three-dimensional lightning VHF radiation source mapping system, broadband electric field changes, and the radiation intensity of lightning on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, we divided the preliminary breakdown process into two processes by subdividing the original definition: an initial preliminary breakdown process and a subsequent preliminary breakdown process. We comparatively analyzed the initial preliminary breakdown process and the initial pulse cluster for different types of lightning in a thunderstorm and studied the correlation between the propagation direction of the initial streamer and the polarity of the initial pulse cluster, as well as the correlation between the propagation path of the initial streamer and the charge structure of the thunderstorm. The statistical analysis shows that the streamer propagation distance of the initial preliminary breakdown process maintained good consistency with the number of the initial pulse clusters generated in the initial preliminary breakdown process. When the initial preliminary breakdown process included multiple pulse clusters, the initial streamer exhibited a discontinuous discharge channel through a stepped development traveling upward or downward. Each step corresponded to a pulse cluster. The amplitude of the radiation and the broad electric field change pulse first increased and then decreased in each pulse cluster. The polarity of the initial pulse cluster was consistent with the propagation direction of the initial streamer in the initial preliminary breakdown process, and the propagation direction of the initial streamer was consistent with the charge structure of the thunderstorms.

  2. Pulsed COIL initiated by discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryshev, Nikolai N.

    2004-06-01

    Pulsed mode makes COIL possible to produce pulses which power can significantly exceed that of CW COIL mode at the same flowrate of chemicals. Such a mode can find application in material treatment, in drilling for oil wells, as an optical locator, in laser frequency conversion via non-linear processes, in laser propulsion, etc. The method of volume generation of iodine atoms was shown to be the most effective one in generation of high power pulses. The base of method is substitution of molecular iodine in operation mixture for iodide which is stable in the mixture with singlet oxygen, and subsequent forced dissociation of iodide. In this approach the advantage of direct I-atom injection in laser active medium is demonstrated. The comparison of experimental results obtained with different sources used for iodide dissociation shows the electric discharge provides significantly higher electrical laser efficiency in comparison with photolysis initiation. At the same time, the specific energy of the electric discharge initiated COIL is at disadvantage in relation with that obtained with photolysis initiation. This fact is a result of active medium temperature increase due to insufficient initiation selectivity of electric discharge. Both longitudinal and transverse electric discharges were investigated as possible sources for laser initiation. The transverse discharge is more promising for increased operation pressure of active medium. The operation pressure is limited by dark reaction of iodide with singlet delta oxygen. The repetitively pulsed operation with repetition rate of up to 75 Hz of pulsed COIL is demonstrated.

  3. Fast initial continuous current pulses versus return stroke pulses in tower-initiated lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadifar, Mohammad; Rachidi, Farhad; Rubinstein, Marcos; Rakov, Vladimir A.; Paolone, Mario; Pavanello, Davide; Metz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    We present a study focused on pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current of upward negative discharges. The study is based on experimental data consisting of correlated lightning current waveforms recorded at the instrumented Säntis Tower in Switzerland and electric fields recorded at a distance of 14.7 km from the tower. Two different types of pulses superimposed on the initial continuous current were identified: (1) M-component-type pulses, for which the microsecond-scale electric field pulse occurs significantly earlier than the onset of the current pulse, and (2) fast pulses, for which the onset of the field matches that of the current pulse. We analyze the currents and fields associated with these fast pulses (return-stroke type (RS-type) initial continuous current (ICC) pulses) and compare their characteristics with those of return strokes. A total of nine flashes containing 44 RS-type ICC pulses and 24 return strokes were analyzed. The median current peaks associated with RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes are, respectively, 3.4 kA and 8 kA. The associated median E-field peaks normalized to 100 km are 1.5 V/m and 4.4 V/m, respectively. On the other hand, the electric field peaks versus current peaks for the two data sets (RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes) are characterized by very similar linear regression slopes, namely, 3.67 V/(m kA) for the ICC pulses and 3.77 V/(m kA) for the return strokes. Assuming the field-current relation based on the transmission line model, we estimated the apparent speed of both the RS-type ICC pulses and return strokes to be about 1.4 × 108 m/s. A strong linear correlation is observed between the E-field risetime and the current risetime for the ICC pulses, similar to the relation observed between the E-field risetime and current risetime for return strokes. The similarity of the RS-type ICC pulses with return strokes suggests that these pulses are associated with the mixed mode of charge transfer to ground.

  4. Pulse structure of four pulsars.

    PubMed

    Drake, F D; Craft, H D

    1968-05-17

    The pulse structure of the four known pulsars is given. The pulse is about 38 milliseconds for the two pulsars of longest period, and within the pulsewidth three subpulses typically appear. The pulsar of next longest period typically radiates two pulses separated about 23 milliseconds in time. The one short-period pulsar emits single pulses of constant shape. The first subpulses of all pulsars have nearly the same shape. The shape of the first subpulse agrees well with the pulse shape expected from a radio-emitting sphere which is excited by a spherically expanding disturbance, and in which the radio emission, once excited, decays exponentially.

  5. EVOLUTION OF FAST MAGNETOACOUSTIC PULSES IN RANDOMLY STRUCTURED CORONAL PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, D.; Li, B.; Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Keppens, R. E-mail: bbl@sdu.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of fast magnetoacoustic pulses in randomly structured plasmas, in the context of large-scale propagating waves in the solar atmosphere. We perform one-dimensional numerical simulations of fast wave pulses propagating perpendicular to a constant magnetic field in a low-β plasma with a random density profile across the field. Both linear and nonlinear regimes are considered. We study how the evolution of the pulse amplitude and width depends on their initial values and the parameters of the random structuring. Acting as a dispersive medium, a randomly structured plasma causes amplitude attenuation and width broadening of the fast wave pulses. After the passage of the main pulse, secondary propagating and standing fast waves appear. Width evolution of both linear and nonlinear pulses can be well approximated by linear functions; however, narrow pulses may have zero or negative broadening. This arises because narrow pulses are prone to splitting, while broad pulses usually deviate less from their initial Gaussian shape and form ripple structures on top of the main pulse. Linear pulses decay at an almost constant rate, while nonlinear pulses decay exponentially. A pulse interacts most efficiently with a random medium with a correlation length of about half of the initial pulse width. This detailed model of fast wave pulses propagating in highly structured media substantiates the interpretation of EIT waves as fast magnetoacoustic waves. Evolution of a fast pulse provides us with a novel method to diagnose the sub-resolution filamentation of the solar atmosphere.

  6. Initial Black Pulse Findings, Bulletin No. l.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Urban League, Inc., Washington, DC. Research Dept.

    In 1979, the National Urban League and its local affiliates launched the Black Pulse, a nationwide survey designed to (1) assess the needs and status of blacks in such areas as employment, housing, child care, education, health, crime, political participation, family patterns, and discrimination; and (2) determine the extent to which major…

  7. Investigation of breakdown in porous ceramics initiated by nanosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punanov, I. F.; Emlin, R. V.; Morozov, P. A.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2012-07-01

    Breakdown delay times are measured and velocities of forming a conductive channel in aluminum oxide based porous ceramic materials impregnated with transformer oil are determined for pulsed electrical breakdown initiated by nanosecond pulses at a voltage of 140 kV. The breakdown delay times are also measured in monolithic aluminum oxide ceramics and leuco-sapphire single crystals. It is demonstrated that in porous ceramics, the average velocity of breakdown channel propagation decreases with increasing volume of the sample occupied by the liquid dielectric in comparison with single crystal and monolythic ceramics; it makes 50% of the velocity of breakdown channel propagation in leuco-sapphire and exceeds 3 times the corresponding value in transformer oil measured at the same voltage and pulse duration.

  8. Modeling short pulse duration shock initiation of solid explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Tarver, C.M.; Hallquist, J.O.; Erickson, L.M.

    1985-06-27

    The chemical reaction rate law in the ignition and growth model of shock initiation and detonation of solid explosives is modified so that the model can accurately simulate short pulse duration shock initiation. The reaction rate law contains three terms to model the ignition of hot spots by shock compression, the slow growth of reaction from these isolated hot spots, and the rapid completion of reaction as the hot spots coalesce. Comparisons for PBX 9404 between calculated and experimental records are presented for the electric gun mylar flyer plate system, the minimum priming charge test, embedded manganin pressure and particle velocity gauges, and VISAR particle velocity measurements for a wide variety of input pressures, rise times and pulse durations. The ignition and growth model is now a fully developed phenomenological tool that can be applied with confidence to almost any hazard, vulnerability or explosive performance problem. 27 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Electromagnetic activity before initial breakdown pulses of lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathna, N.; Karunarathne, S.

    2014-11-01

    Lightning flash initiation is studied using electric field change (E-change) measurements made in Florida. An initial E-change (IEC) was found immediately before the first initial breakdown (IB) pulse in both cloud-to-ground (CG) and intracloud (IC) flashes if the E-change sensor was within 80% of the reversal distance of the IEC. For 18 CG flashes, the IECs had an average point dipole moment of 23 C m and an average duration of 0.18 ms; these parameters for 18 IC flashes were -170 C m and 1.53 ms. The IECs of CG flashes began with a change in the slope of the E-change (with respect to time) from zero slope to a positive slope, consistent with downward motion of negative charge and/or upward motion of positive charge. For IECs of IC flashes, the beginning slope change was from zero to negative slope, consistent with upward motion of negative charge and/or downward motion of positive charge. During an IEC, the E-change monotonically increased for CG flashes and monotonically decreased for IC flashes. In 14 of 36 cases, the IEC beginning was coincident with a discrete, impulsive source of VHF radiation; another 13 cases had at least one VHF source during the IEC or the first IB pulse. Before the IECs, there were no preliminary variations detected in the 36 flashes. It is hypothesized that lightning initiation begins with an ionizing event that causes the IEC and that the IEC enhances the ambient electric field to produce the first IB pulse.

  10. Ultrafast electron dynamics in phenylalanine initiated by attosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calegari, F.; Ayuso, D.; Trabattoni, A.; Belshaw, L.; De Camillis, S.; Anumula, S.; Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L.; Palacios, A.; Decleva, P.; Greenwood, J. B.; Martín, F.; Nisoli, M.

    2014-10-01

    In the past decade, attosecond technology has opened up the investigation of ultrafast electronic processes in atoms, simple molecules, and solids. Here, we report the application of isolated attosecond pulses to prompt ionization of the amino acid phenylalanine and the subsequent detection of ultrafast dynamics on a sub-4.5-femtosecond temporal scale, which is shorter than the vibrational response of the molecule. The ability to initiate and observe such electronic dynamics in polyatomic molecules represents a crucial step forward in attosecond science, which is progressively moving toward the investigation of more and more complex systems.

  11. Ultrafast electron dynamics in phenylalanine initiated by attosecond pulses.

    PubMed

    Calegari, F; Ayuso, D; Trabattoni, A; Belshaw, L; De Camillis, S; Anumula, S; Frassetto, F; Poletto, L; Palacios, A; Decleva, P; Greenwood, J B; Martín, F; Nisoli, M

    2014-10-17

    In the past decade, attosecond technology has opened up the investigation of ultrafast electronic processes in atoms, simple molecules, and solids. Here, we report the application of isolated attosecond pulses to prompt ionization of the amino acid phenylalanine and the subsequent detection of ultrafast dynamics on a sub-4.5-femtosecond temporal scale, which is shorter than the vibrational response of the molecule. The ability to initiate and observe such electronic dynamics in polyatomic molecules represents a crucial step forward in attosecond science, which is progressively moving toward the investigation of more and more complex systems.

  12. Structural basis of transcription initiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Feng, Yu; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Tuske, Steve; Ho, Mary X; Arnold, Eddy; Ebright, Richard H

    2012-11-23

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase (RNAP) binds and unwinds promoter DNA to form an RNAP-promoter open complex. We have determined crystal structures at 2.9 and 3.0 Å resolution of functional transcription initiation complexes comprising Thermus thermophilus RNA polymerase, σ(A), and a promoter DNA fragment corresponding to the transcription bubble and downstream double-stranded DNA of the RNAP-promoter open complex. The structures show that σ recognizes the -10 element and discriminator element through interactions that include the unstacking and insertion into pockets of three DNA bases and that RNAP recognizes the -4/+2 region through interactions that include the unstacking and insertion into a pocket of the +2 base. The structures further show that interactions between σ and template-strand single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) preorganize template-strand ssDNA to engage the RNAP active center.

  13. Physical Mechanism of Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva, C.; Pasko, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The initial breakdown stage of a lightning flash encompasses its first several to tens of milliseconds and it is characterized by a sequence of pulses typically detected with electric field change sensors on the ground [e.g., Villanueva et al., JGR, 99, D7, 1994]. A typical (referred to as "classical") initial breakdown pulse (IBP) has duration of tens of microseconds and it is one of the largest pulses at the beginning of a lightning flash, but a wide range of pulse durations and amplitudes also occur [e.g., Nag et al., Atmos. Res., 91, 316, 2009]. Recent results by Marshall et al. [JGR, 119, 445, 2014] suggest that IBPs should be observable in all lightning discharges. Complementarily, Stolzenburg et al. [JGR, 118, 2918, 2013] correlated individual IBPs to bursts of light that appear to be illumination of a lightning leader channel and Karunarathne et al. [JGR, 118, 7129, 2013] have determined that as a flash evolves the location of IBP sources inside the cloud coincide with the position of negative leaders as determined by a VHF lightning mapping system. In view of the above listed properties of IBPs, we have developed a new numerical model to investigate the electromagnetic signatures associated with these events and to relate them to the initial lightning leader development. The model is built on a bidirectional (zero-net-charge) lightning leader concept [e.g., Mazur and Ruhnke, JGR, 103, D18, 1998]. We simulate a finite-length finite-conductivity leader elongating in the thunderstorm electric field and we solve a set of integro-differential equations to retrieve the full dynamics of charges and currents induced in it. Our proposed approach is a generalization of the transmission-line [e.g., Nag and Rakov, JGR, 115, D20102, 2010] and electrostatic [e.g., Pasko, GRL, 41, 179, 2014] approximations used for analysis of in-cloud discharge processes. We also allow for different propagation mechanisms at the different polarity leader extremities, i.e., continuous

  14. Inertial cavitation initiated by polytetrafluoroethylene nanoparticles under pulsed ultrasound stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-09-01

    Nanoscale gas bubbles residing on a macroscale hydrophobic surface have a surprising long lifetime (on the order of days) and can serve as cavitation nuclei for initiating inertial cavitation (IC). Whether interfacial nanobubbles (NBs) reside on the infinite surface of a hydrophobic nanoparticle (NP) and could serve as cavitation nuclei is unknown, but this would be very meaningful for the development of sonosensitive NPs. To address this problem, we investigated the IC activity of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) NPs, which are regarded as benchmark superhydrophobic NPs due to their low surface energy caused by the presence of fluorocarbon. Both a passive cavitation detection system and terephthalic dosimetry was applied to quantify the intensity of IC. The IC intensities of the suspension with PTFE NPs were 10.30 and 48.41 times stronger than those of deionized water for peak negative pressures of 2 and 5MPa, respectively. However, the IC activities were nearly completely inhibited when the suspension was degassed or ethanol was used to suspend PTFE NPs, and they were recovered when suspended in saturated water, which may indicates the presence of interfacial NBs on PTFE NPs surfaces. Importantly, these PTFE NPs could sustainably initiate IC for excitation by a sequence of at least 6000 pulses, whereas lipid microbubbles were completely depleted after the application of no more than 50 pulses under the same conditions. The terephthalic dosimetry has shown that much higher hydroxyl yields were achieved when PTFE NPs were present as cavitation nuclei when using ultrasound parameters that otherwise did not produce significant amounts of free radicals. These results show that superhydrophobic NPs may be an outstanding candidate for use in IC-related applications.

  15. Pulsed spray structure and atomisation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yule, A. J.

    1987-08-01

    The process of atomisation from diesel injectors is found to persist for a significant proportion of the spray length before impaction on the cylinder wall. Both aerodynamic shear and cavitation appear to be of importance for the liquid jet breakdown. In addition cyclic variations are found in the atomisation and penetration of sprays. The transient nature of the spray initial conditions can cause pile up and coagulation of droplets at the leading edge of the spray pulse for certain cases. Improved modeling of diesel injection requires recognition of these phenomena and this is supported by both modeling and experimental data which have been obtained under realistic engine conditions in a specially developed rig.

  16. Helical Pulse Line Structures for Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, R.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Waldron, W.L.

    2005-05-01

    The basic concept of the ''Pulse Line Ion Accelerator'' is presented, where pulse power sources create a ramped traveling wave voltage pulse on a helical pulse line. Ions can surf on this traveling wave and achieve energy gains much larger than the peak applied voltage. Tapered and untapered lines are compared, and a transformer coupling technique for launching the wave is described.

  17. Plasma chemical conversion of sulphur hexafluoride initiated by a pulsed electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholodnaya, Galina; Sazonov, Roman; Ponomarev, Denis; Guzeeva, Tatiana

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of plasma chemical conversion of sulphur hexafluoride initiated by a pulsed electron beam (TEA-500 pulsed electron accelerator) with the following characteristics: 400-450 keV electron energy, 60 ns pulse duration, up to 200 J pulse energy, and 5 cm beam diameter. Experiments were conducted on the effect of the pulsed electron beam on SF6 and on mixtures of SF6 with O2, Ar, or N2. For the mixture of SF6 and oxygen, the results indicated chemical reactions involving the formation of a number of products of which one is sulphur, confirming the Wray - Fluorescence Analysis. The plasma chemical conversion of SF6 initiated by the pulsed electron beam was not detected when SF6 was mixed with Ar or N2, suggesting a possible mechanism for the reaction of SF6 in the presence of O2.

  18. Direct Initiation Through Detonation Branching in a Pulsed Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    important features noted ................................. 33  Figure 20. GM Quad 4 engine head used as the PDE research engine with the detonation tube...Deflagration to Detonation Transition EF – Engine Frequency FF – Fill Fraction NPT – National Pipe Thread MPT – Male National Pipe Thread PDE – Pulsed... Detonation Engines ( PDE ) has increased greatly in recent years due in part to the potential for increased thermal efficiency derived from constant

  19. The optical emission spectroscopy of pulsed and pulse- periodic discharges initiated with runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M.; Sorokin, D.; Tarasenko, V.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the results of measurements of an electron Te and a gas Tg temperatures as well as a reduced electric field strength E/N in the plasma of a high-voltage nanosecond discharge initiated with runaway electrons in a gap with a strongly nonuniform electric field distribution. The foregoing plasma parameters were determined with optical emission spectroscopy techniques. The possibility of using the method for determining Te and E/N in thermodynamically nonequilibrium plasma, which is based on a determination of a ratio of a peak intensities of the ionic (λ = 391.4 nm) and molecular N2 (λ = 394 nm) nitrogen bands, is proved. To measure a gas temperature the optical emission spectroscopy technique based on the measurement of a relative radiation intensity of rotation structure of electronic-vibrational molecular transitions was used, as well.

  20. Dynamic propagation of symmetric Airy pulses with initial chirps in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaohui; Huang, Xianwei; Deng, Yangbao; Tan, Chao; Bai, Yanfeng; Fu, Xiquan

    2017-09-01

    We analytically and numerically investigate the propagation dynamics of initially chirped symmetric Airy pulses in an optical fiber. The results show that the positive chirps act to promote the interference in generating a focal point on the propagation axis, while the negative chirps tend to suppress the focusing effect, as compared to conventional unchirped symmetric Airy pulses. The numerical results demonstrate that the linear propagation of chirped symmetric Airy pulses depend considerably on the chirp parameter and the primary lobe position. In the anomalous dispersion region, positively chirped symmetric Airy pulses first undergo an initial compression, and reach a foci due to the opposite acceleration, and then experience a lossy inversion transformation, and come to the opposite facing focal position. The impact of truncation coefficient and Kerr nonlinearity on the chirped symmetric Airy pulses propagation is also disclosed separately.

  1. Probabilistic SSME blades structural response under random pulse loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiao, Michael; Rubinstein, Robert; Nagpal, Vinod K.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose is to develop models of random impacts on a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopump blade and to predict the probabilistic structural response of the blade to these impacts. The random loading is caused by the impact of debris. The probabilistic structural response is characterized by distribution functions for stress and displacements as functions of the loading parameters which determine the random pulse model. These parameters include pulse arrival, amplitude, and location. The analysis can be extended to predict level crossing rates. This requires knowledge of the joint distribution of the response and its derivative. The model of random impacts chosen allows the pulse arrivals, pulse amplitudes, and pulse locations to be random. Specifically, the pulse arrivals are assumed to be governed by a Poisson process, which is characterized by a mean arrival rate. The pulse intensity is modelled as a normally distributed random variable with a zero mean chosen independently at each arrival. The standard deviation of the distribution is a measure of pulse intensity. Several different models were used for the pulse locations. For example, three points near the blade tip were chosen at which pulses were allowed to arrive with equal probability. Again, the locations were chosen independently at each arrival. The structural response was analyzed both by direct Monte Carlo simulation and by a semi-analytical method.

  2. Characterization of initial current pulses in negative rocket-triggered lightning with sensitive magnetic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gaopeng; Zhang, Hongbo; Jiang, Rubin; Fan, Yanfeng; Qie, Xiushu; Liu, Mingyuan; Sun, Zhuling; Wang, Zhichao; Tian, Ye; Liu, Kun

    2016-09-01

    We report the new measurement of initial current pulses in rocket-triggered lightning with a broadband magnetic sensor at 78 m distance. The high sensitivity of our sensor makes it possible to detect weak ripple deflections (as low as 0.4 A) that are not readily resolved in the typical measurements of channel-base current in rocket-triggered lightning experiments. The discernible magnetic pulses within 1 ms after the inception of a sustained upward positive leader from the triggering wire can be classified into impulsive pulses and ripple pulses according to the discernibility of separation between individual pulses. The time scale (usually >20 µs) of ripple pulses is substantially longer than the leading impulsive pulses (with time scales typically <10 µs), and the amplitude is significantly reduced, whereas there is no considerable difference in the interpulse pulse. Along with our previous finding on the burst of magnetic pulses during the initial continuous current in rocket-triggered lightning, the new measurements suggest that the stepwise propagation might be a persistent feature for the upward positive leader in rocket-triggered lightning, and the stepping of positive leader early in triggered lightning could be characterized with the observation of ripple pulses. The precedence of impulsive magnetic pulse measured at 78 m range relative to the arrival of corresponding current pulse at the channel base indicates that the ionization wave launched by individual stepping of positive leader propagates downward along the triggering wire at a mean velocity of 1.23 × 108 m/s to 2.25 × 108 m/s.

  3. Recurrent Initiation: A Mechanism for Triggering p53 Pulses in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Eric; Mock, Caroline; Bhan, Irun; Loewer, Alexander; Lahav, Galit

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage initiates a series of p53 pulses. Although much is known about the interactions surrounding p53, little is known about which interactions contribute to p53’s dynamical behavior. The simplest explanation is that these pulses are oscillations intrinsic to the p53/Mdm2 negative feedback loop. Here we present evidence that this simple mechanism is insufficient to explain p53 pulses; we show that p53 pulses are externally driven by pulses in the upstream signaling kinases, ATM and Chk2, and that the negative feedback between p53 and ATM, via Wip1, is essential for maintaining the uniform shape of p53 pulses. We propose that p53 pulses result from repeated initiation by ATM which is re-activated by persistent DNA damage. Our study emphasizes the importance of collecting quantitative dynamic information at high temporal resolution for understanding the regulation of signaling pathways and opens new ways to manipulate p53 pulses to ask questions about their function in response to DNA damage. PMID:18471974

  4. Phase-Imposing Initiation of Cherenkov Superradiance Emission by an Ultrashort-Seed Microwave Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Ginzburg, N. S.; Golovanov, A. A.; Denisov, G. G.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Rostov, V. V.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shpak, V. G.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ulmaskulov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.; Zotova, I. V.

    2017-06-01

    For the first time, we demonstrate experimentally the possibility of Cherenkov superradiant generation with a phase imposed by an ultrashort seed microwave pulse. The phases of seed and initiated Ka-band microwave pulses were correlated with the accuracy of 0.5-0.7 rad for the power ratio down to -35 dB . Characteristics of such a process were determined in the frame of a basic theoretical model that describes both spontaneous and stimulated emission of an electron beam moving in corrugated waveguides. The obtained results open up opportunities of reaching extremely high radiation power density in phased arrays of short-pulse coherently operating microwave generators.

  5. Systematic study on pulse parameters in fabricating porous silicon-layered structures by pulse electrochemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, J.; Yin, W. J.; Ma, L. L.; Obbard, E.; Ding, X. M.; Hou, X. Y.

    2007-08-01

    Pulse electrochemical etching was used to improve the quality of porous silicon (PS) layers. Although alternative PS layers of different porosities have been realized by this etching technique, there is no systematic study on the influence of different etching pulse parameters on PS during the etching process. We test various combinations of pulse parameters, including duty cycle and duration, in fabricating PS-layered structures. The optical thickness and actual thickness of the PS structures fabricated are investigated by means of reflectance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It is found that reducing the duty cycle and pulse duration of the pulse can promote the formation of PS layers with a large optical thickness and high refractive index. Meanwhile, the uniformity of PS is also improved. The duty cycle of 1:10-1:20 and pulse duration of 0.1-0.2 ms can result in the best uniformity and smoothness for the highly doped p-Si wafers. We believe that our work could set the foundation for further improvement of pulse electrochemical etching.

  6. Dislocation structure produced by an ultrashort shock pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomoki Hirose, Akio; Sano, Tomokazu; Arakawa, Kazuto

    2014-11-14

    We found an ultrashort shock pulse driven by a femtosecond laser pulse on iron generates a different dislocation structure than the shock process which is on the nanosecond timescale. The ultrashort shock pulse produces a highly dense dislocation structure that varies by depth. According to transmission electron microscopy, dislocations away from the surface produce microbands via a network structure similar to a long shock process, but unlike a long shock process dislocations near the surface have limited intersections. Considering the dislocation motion during the shock process, the structure near the surface is attributed to the ultrashort shock duration. This approach using an ultrashort shock pulse will lead to understanding the whole process off shock deformation by clarifying the early stage.

  7. Fibonacci-like photonic structure for femtosecond pulse compression.

    PubMed

    Makarava, L N; Nazarov, M M; Ozheredov, I A; Shkurinov, A P; Smirnov, A G; Zhukovsky, S V

    2007-03-01

    The compression of femtosecond laser pulses by linear quasiperiodic and periodic photonic multilayer structures is studied both experimentally and theoretically. We compare the compression performance of a Fibonacci and a periodic structure with similar total thickness and the same number of layers, and find the performance to be higher in the Fibonacci case, as predicted by numerical simulation. This compression enhancement takes place due to the larger group velocity dispersion at a defect resonance of the transmission spectrum of the Fibonacci structure. We demonstrate that the Fibonacci structure with the thickness of only 2.8 microm can compress a phase-modulated laser pulse by up to 30%. The possibility for compression of laser pulses with different characteristics in a single multilayer is explored. The operation of the compressor in the reflection regime has been modeled, and we show numerically that the reflected laser pulse is subjected to real compression: not only does its duration decrease but also its amplitude rises.

  8. Effect of pulsed light on structure and immunoreactivity of gluten.

    PubMed

    Panozzo, Agnese; Manzocco, Lara; Lippe, Giovanna; Nicoli, Maria Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The effect of pulsed light (from 1.75 to 26.25Jcm(-2)) on selected properties of wheat gluten powder and aqueous suspension (absorbance, particle size and microstructure, free sulfhydryl content, protein fractions, protein electrophoretic mobility and immunoreactivity) was investigated. Gluten photoreactivity was strongly affected by hydration. While minor photo-induced structure modifications were observed in gluten powder, pulsed light induced the development of browning and promoted partial depolymerisation of hydrated gluten proteins by disulphide exchange. These changes were associated with a significant decrease in immunoreactivity, suggesting that pulsed light could be exploited to efficiently modify structure and thus functionality of gluten.

  9. Pulsed THz TDS of objects covered by disordered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, V. A.; Zakharova, I. G.; Zagursky, D. Y.; Varentsova, Svetlana A.

    2016-05-01

    Using both computer simulation and physical experiment, we demonstrate principal limitations of standard Time Domain Spectroscopy based on a broadband THz pulse for the detection and identification of substance placed inside the disordered structure. The interaction of a THz pulse with a disordered layered structure was simulated in order to show the influence of the disordered layers on the spectral characteristics of the transmitted and reflected signals. Spectral characteristics of these signals were analyzed in a direct comparison with the incident pulse spectrum. We showed that a disordered structure disturbs the reflected pulse spectrum dramatically. To avoid this, we used the integral correlation criteria in real experiment. Computer simulation results were confirmed by physical experiment. We provided the experiments with paper bag, and ordinary sheets of paper, and napkins.

  10. Note: Design and initial results of a multi-pulsed intense electron beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, L. Zhang, H.; Yang, A.; Shen, Y.; Wang, W.; Wen, L.; Zhang, K.; Shi, J.; Zhang, L.; Deng, J.

    2014-06-15

    A multi-pulsed intense electron beam source is introduced, including the design and the initial experimental results. The source can generate a burst of three pulses of intense electron beams with energy of 2–3 MeV and beam intensities of around 2.5 kA. An inductive adder is chosen to generate the pulsed diode voltages and a dispenser cathode is chosen to emit electron beams. The test results indicate that the design of the source is reliable. The multi-pulsed diode voltage is up to 2.5 MV and the beam intensities are more than 2 kA at the exit of the source with small variation.

  11. Dependence of Initial Oxygen Concentration on Ozone Yield Using Inductive Energy Storage System Pulsed Power Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, Tomio; Tanaka, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Nobuyuki; Mukaigawa, Seiji; Takaki, Koichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    Dependence of initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield using streamer discharge reactor driven by an inductive energy storage system pulsed power generator is described in this paper. Fast recovery type diodes were employed as semiconductor opening switch to interrupt a circuit current within 100 ns. This rapid current change produced high-voltage short pulse between a secondary energy storage inductor. The repetitive high-voltage short pulse was applied to a 1 mm diameter center wire electrode placed in a cylindrical pulse corona reactor. The streamer discharge successfully occurred between the center wire electrode and an outer cylinder ground electrode of 2 cm inner diameter. The ozone was produced with the streamer discharge and increased with increasing pulse repetition rate. The ozone yield changed in proportion to initial oxygen concentration contained in the injected gas mixture at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. However, the decrease of the ozone yield by decreasing oxygen concentration in the gas mixture at 180 ns forward pumping time of the current was lower than the decrease at 800 ns forward pumping time of the current. This dependence of the initial oxygen concentration on ozone yield at 180 ns forward pumping time is similar to that of dielectric barrier discharge reactor.

  12. Luminosity with Intracloud-Type Initial Breakdown Pulses and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Marshall, Thomas; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Orville, Richard

    2016-04-01

    High-speed video data for three hybrid lightning flashes show luminosity increases at visible wavelengths that are time-correlated with large, intracloud (IC) type initial breakdown (IB) pulses in electric field change (E-change) data. In one case, a diffuse luminosity increase is visible for 280-300 us, apparently centered near 9 km altitude. At the same time, locations of VHF sources and E-change pulses indicate breakdown activity occurring at altitudes of 9.2-10.2 km altitude, and the initial leader was developing rapidly upward. The second case has a diffuse luminosity increase at the time of three large IC-type IB pulses, while the initial leader is advancing upward from about 7 km altitude. In the third example, a series of luminosity bursts are visible at the times of several large-amplitude IC-type IB pulses, although the center of the activity is apparently above the video frame. In all three hybrid flashes, the luminous IC-type IB pulses are relatively complicated and large in E-change amplitude, and most have distinct electrostatic offset at horizontal distances of 20-25 km from a sensor. Such large amplitude IB pulses have been associated with the production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) in prior work [Marshall et al., 2013, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50866]. No satellite or ground-based TGF observations were available for these events, hence it is not known if these TGF candidates produced gammas or other high energy radiation. This presentation describes the video and E-change observations during the intracloud and cloud-to-ground initial breakdown periods of these flashes and implications for TGF production.

  13. Swept-Ramp Detonation Initiation Performance in a High-Pressure Pulse Detonation Combustor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    wide range of thrust and power generation applications. Thrust applications would require initial combustor pressures of about 1 –4 atm while power...5 1 . General ... General To fully understand the pulse detonation engine cycle it is necessary to understand the difference between a detonation and the more common

  14. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, C.C.

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  15. Investigating short-pulse shock initiation in HMX-based explosives with reactive meso-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, H. K.; Tarver, C. M.; Reaugh, J. E.; May, C. M.

    2014-05-01

    We performed reactive meso-scale simulations of short-pulse experiments to study the influence of flyer velocity and pore structure on shock initiation of LX-10 (95wt% HMX, 5wt% Viton A). Our calculations show that the reaction evolution fit a power law relationship in time and increases with increasing porosity, decreasing pore size, and increasing flyer velocity. While heterogeneous shock initiation modes, dependent on hot spot mechanisms, are predicted at lower flyer velocities, mixed heterogeneous-homogeneous shock initiation modes, less dependent on hot spots, are predicted at higher velocities. These studies are important because they enable the development of predictive shock initiation models that incorporate complex microstructure and can be used to optimize performance-safety characteristics of explosives.

  16. Initiation of meiotic recombination in chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2013-08-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is markedly activated during meiotic prophase to play central roles in faithful chromosome segregation and conferring genetic diversity to gametes. It is initiated by programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the conserved protein Spo11, and preferentially occurs at discrete sites called hotspots. Since the functions of Spo11 are influenced by both of local chromatin at hotspots and higher-order chromosome structures, formation of meiotic DSBs is under regulation of chromatin structure. Therefore, investigating features and roles of meiotic chromatin is crucial to elucidate the in vivo mechanism of meiotic recombination initiation. Recent progress in genome-wide chromatin analyses tremendously improved our understanding on this point, but many critical questions are left unaddressed. In this review, we summarize current knowledge in the field, and also discuss the future problems that must be solved to understand the role of chromatin structure in meiotic recombination.

  17. Sprite streamer initiation from natural mesospheric structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningyu; Dwyer, Joseph R; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C; McHarg, Matthew G

    2015-06-29

    Sprites are large, luminous electrical discharges in the upper atmosphere caused by intense cloud-to-ground lightning flashes, manifesting an impulsive coupling mechanism between lower and upper atmospheric regions. Their dynamics are governed by filamentary streamer discharges whose propagation properties have been well studied by past work. However, how they are initiated is still under active debate. It has recently been concluded that ionospheric/mesospheric inhomogeneities are required for their initiation, but it is an open question as to what the sources of those inhomogeneities are. Here we present numerical simulation results to demonstrate that naturally-existing, small-scale mesospheric structures such as those created by gravity waves via instability and breaking are viable sources. The proposed theory is supported by a recent, unique high-speed observation from aircraft flying at 14-km altitude. The theory naturally explains many aspects of observed sprite streamer initiation and has important implications for future observational work.

  18. Mathematical modeling of the optimum pulse structure for safe and effective photo epilation using broadband pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Ash, Caerwyn; Donne, Kelvin; Daniel, Gwenaelle; Town, Godfrey; Clement, Marc; Valentine, Ronan

    2012-09-06

    The objective of this work is the investigation of intense pulsed light (IPL) photoepilation using Monte Carlo simulation to model the effect of the output dosimetry with millisecond exposure used by typical commercial IPL systems. The temporal pulse shape is an important parameter, which may affect the biological tissue response in terms of efficacy and adverse reactions. This study investigates the effect that IPL pulse structures, namely free discharge, square pulse, close, and spaced pulse stacking, has on hair removal. The relationship between radiant exposure distribution during the IPL pulse and chromophore heating is explored and modeled for hair follicles and the epidermis using a custom Monte Carlo computer simulation. Consistent square pulse and close pulse stacking delivery of radiant exposure across the IPL pulse is shown to generate the most efficient specific heating of the target chromophore, whilst sparing the epidermis, compared to free discharge and pulse stacking pulse delivery. Free discharge systems produced the highest epidermal temperature in the model. This study presents modeled thermal data of a hair follicle in situ, indicating that square pulse IPL technology may be the most efficient and the safest method for photoepilation. The investigation also suggests that the square pulse system design is the most efficient, as energy is not wasted during pulse exposure or lost through interpulse delay times of stacked pulses.

  19. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharge in Water without Bubbles: A Fundamental Study of Initiation, Propagation and Plasma Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan

    The state of plasma is widely known as a gas-phase phenomenon, but plasma in liquids have also received significant attention over the last century. Generating plasma in liquids however is theoretically challenging, and this problem is often overcome via liquid-gas phase transition preceding the actual plasma formation. In this sense, plasma forms in gas bubbles in the liquid. Recent work at the Drexel Plasma Institute has shown that nanosecond pulsed electric fields can initiate plasma in liquids without any initial cavitation phase, at voltages below theoretical direct-ionization thresholds. This unique regime is poorly understood and does not fit into any current descriptive mechanisms. As with all new phenomena, a complete fundamental description is paramount to understanding its usefulness to practical applications. The primary goals of this research were to qualitatively and quantitatively understand the phenomenon of nanosecond pulsed discharge in liquids as a means to characterizing properties that may open up niche application possibilities. Analysis of the plasma was based on experimental results from non-invasive, sub-nanosecond time-resolved optical diagnostics, including direct imaging, transmission imaging (Schlieren and shadow), and optical emission spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of the plasma were studied as a function of variations in the electric field amplitude and polarity, liquid permittivity, and pulse duration. It was found that the plasma size and emission intensity was dependent on the permittivity of the liquid, as well as the voltage polarity, and the structure and dynamics were explained by a 'cold-lightning' mechanism. The under-breakdown dynamics at the liquid-electrode interface were investigated by transmission imaging to provide evidence for a novel mechanism for initiation based on the electrostriction. This mechanism was proposed by collaborators on the project and developed alongside the experimental work in this

  20. Mechanism initiated by nanoabsorber for UV nanosecond-pulse-driven damage of dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chaoyang; Shao, Jianda; He, Hongbo; Yi, Kui; Fan, Zhengxiu

    2008-03-03

    A model of plasma formation for UV nanosecond pulse-laser interaction with SiO(2) thin film based on nanoabsorber is proposed. The formalism considered the temperature dependence of band gap. The numerical results show that during the process of nanosecond pulsed-laser interaction with SiO(2) films, foreign inclusion absorbing a fraction of incident radiation heats the surrounding host material through heat conduction causing the decrease of the band gap and making the initial transparent matrix into an absorptive medium around the inclusion. During the remainder pulse, the abosorbing volume of the host material is effectively growed and lead to the formation of the damage craters. We investigated the experimental damage craters and compared with theoretical prediction. The pulselength dependence of damage threshold was also investigated.

  1. Radiative Characteristics of the Pulse-Periodic Discharge Plasma Initiated by Runaway Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Sorokin, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    Results of experimental investigations of amplitude-temporal and spectral characteristics of radiation of a pulse-periodic discharge plasma initiated in nitrogen by runaway electrons are presented. The discharge was initiated by high-voltage nanosecond voltage pulses with repetition frequency of 60 Hz in a sharply inhomogeneous electric field in a gap between the conic potential cathode and the planar grounded aluminum anode. It is established that intensive lines of Al I atoms and Al II atomic ions, lines of N I atoms and N II ions, bands of the first (1+) and second positive (2+) nitrogen systems, as well as bands of cyanogen CN are observed in the emission spectrum of the discharge plasma under the given excitation conditions.

  2. Acceleration of an Initially Moving Projectile: Velocity-Injected Railguns and Their Effect on Pulsed Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    26-mm- diameter conventional propellant gun. A plasma armature is assumed for the railgun. The capacitor -based, pulsed power supply (PPS), located...size). This report examines a notional railgun injected by a conventional gun with a projectile having an initial velocity. The capacitor -based...Plastic) is a tough and rubbery polypropylene -based plastic and was used to fabricate the obturator/sabot. The forward section of the sabot was

  3. Transcription initiation complex structures elucidate DNA opening.

    PubMed

    Plaschka, C; Hantsche, M; Dienemann, C; Burzinski, C; Plitzko, J; Cramer, P

    2016-05-19

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes begins with assembly of the RNA polymerase (Pol) II initiation complex and promoter DNA opening. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of yeast initiation complexes containing closed and open DNA at resolutions of 8.8 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. DNA is positioned and retained over the Pol II cleft by a network of interactions between the TATA-box-binding protein TBP and transcription factors TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. DNA opening occurs around the tip of the Pol II clamp and the TFIIE 'extended winged helix' domain, and can occur in the absence of TFIIH. Loading of the DNA template strand into the active centre may be facilitated by movements of obstructing protein elements triggered by allosteric binding of the TFIIE 'E-ribbon' domain. The results suggest a unified model for transcription initiation with a key event, the trapping of open promoter DNA by extended protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts.

  4. Coherent acceleration by laser pulse echelons in periodic plasma structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pukhov, A.; Kostyukov, I.; Tückmantel, T.; Luu-Thanh, Ph.; Mourou, G.

    2014-05-01

    We consider a possibilty to use an echelon of mutually coherent laser pulses generated by the emerging CAN (Coherent Amplification Network) technology for direct particle acceleration in periodic plasma structures. We discuss resonant and free streaming configurations. The resonant plasma structures can trap energy of longer laser pulses but are limited to moderate laser intensities of about 1014 W/cm2 and are very sensitive to the structure quality. The free streaming configurations can survive laser intensities above 1018 W/cm2 for several tens of femtoseconds so that sustained accelerating rates well above TeV/m are feasible. In our full electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations we show a test electron bunch gaining up to 200 GeV over a distance of 10.2 cm only.

  5. Large Area and Short-Pulse Shock Initiation of a Tatb/hmx Mixed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiji, Wang; Chengwei, Sun; Jun, Chen; Cangli, Liu; Jianheng, Zhao; Fuli, Tan; Ning, Zhang

    2007-12-01

    The large area and short-pulse shock initiation experiments on the plastic bonded mixed explosive of TATB(80%) and HMX(15%) have been performed with an electric gun where a Mylar flyer of 10-19 mm in diameter and 0.05˜0.30 mm in thickness was launched by an electrically exploding metallic bridge foil. The cylindrical explosive specimens (Φ16 mm×8 mm in size) were initiated by the Mylar flyers in thickness of 0.07˜0.20 mm, which induced shock pressure in specimen was of duration ranging from 0.029 to 0.109 μs. The experimental data were treated with the DRM(Delayed Robbins-Monro) procedure and to provide the initiation threshold of flyer velocities at 50% probability are 3.398˜1.713 km/s and that of shock pressure P 13.73˜5.23 GPa, respectively for different pulse durations. The shock initiation criteria of the explosive specimen at 50% and 100% probabilities are yielded. In addition, the 30° wedged sample was tested and the shock to detonation transition (SDT) process emerging on its inclined surface was diagnosed with a device consisting of multiple optical fiber probe, optoelectronic transducer and digital oscilloscope. The POP plot of the explosive has been gained from above SDT data.

  6. A Search for Structure in Gamma Ray Burst X-ray Flares Confirming Whether They Are Similar To The Three Pulse Structure Found In Propt Emission Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Jason; Racusin, Judith L.; Morris, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the the most luminous electromagnetic events known to occur throughout the Universe. These violent explosions produce relativistic jets in a short burst of prompt emission and are followed by an afterglow emitted across the electromagnetic spectrum. During the afterglow, there are periods of sporadic increase in the X-ray flux, known as flares. Only ~1/2 of all GRBs produce flares. We present a sample selection of the brightest isolated flares observed by the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT). Using light curves from the XRT Team repository at the University of Leicester between 2005 and 2014, and our own light curve fits, the sample was filtered using a stringent set of criteria. We selected bursts that: 1) had a high peak flare flux to afterglow ratio, and/or 2) a high fluence (integrated flux). By further analyzing these flares, we will study the structure of flares, searching for the three components that have been seen in isolated prompt emission pulses: an initial small rapidly decaying pulse, followed by the main flare which then decays over time and is followed by another small but slower decaying pulse. Seeing a similar behavior in X-ray flares as we see in prompt pulses will inform models for the physics of relativistic shocks.

  7. Preliminary Experimental Investigation on Detonation Initiation in the Ejector of a Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yu; Fan, Wei; Mu, Yang

    2012-12-01

    A small pulse detonation rocket engine (PDRE) was used as a predetonator to initiate detonation in its ejector. The detonation products discharged from the PDRE was not only ignition source for the ejector but also primary flow which entrained air from environment into the ejector. Stoichiometric liquid kerosene and gaseous oxygen were used as reactants for the PDRE. While in the ejector injected liquid kerosene was used as fuel and entrained air was used as oxidizer. Reactants in the ejector were ignited by the detonation wave and products discharged from the PDRE. Detonation was successfully initiation in present experiments. It was found that flame propagation upstream at the entrance of the ejector was inevitable, which affected the detonation initiation process in the ejector. Disks with orifices were placed at the entrance of the ejector to weaken the flame propagation upstream effect, which would affect the air flow entraining process, but the results show it worked.

  8. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  9. Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomaev, M. I.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and amplitude-time characteristics of radiation of plasma of a repetitively pulsed discharge initiated by runaway electrons were studied experimentally in nitrogen. Intense emission lines of copper atoms, nitrogen atoms, and ions, as well as the first and the second positive systems of nitrogen, NO, and CN, were observed in the regime of repetitively pulsed excitation.

  10. Nanosecond pulsed laser generation of holographic structures on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L.; Ardron, Marcus; Weston, Nick J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2016-03-01

    A laser-based process for the generation of phase holographic structures directly onto the surface of metals is presented. This process uses 35ns long laser pulses of wavelength 355nm to generate optically-smooth surface deformations on a metal. The laser-induced surface deformations (LISDs) are produced by either localized laser melting or the combination of melting and evaporation. The geometry (shape and dimension) of the LISDs depends on the laser processing parameters, in particular the pulse energy, as well as on the chemical composition of a metal. In this paper, we explain the mechanism of the LISDs formation on various metals, such as stainless steel, pure nickel and nickel-chromium Inconel® alloys. In addition, we provide information about the design and fabrication process of the phase holographic structures and demonstrate their use as robust markings for the identification and traceability of high value metal goods.

  11. Ultrashort pulse lasers for precise processing: overview on a current German research initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, S.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrashort laser pulses provide a powerful means of processing a wide variety of materials with highest precision and minimal damage. In order to exploit the full potential of this technology, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research has launched an initiative with 20 Million EUR funding about two years ago. Within 9 joint research projects, different aspects from novel concepts for robust and powerful laser sources to reliable components with high damage thresholds and dynamic beam shaping and steering are investigated. Applications include eye surgery as well as the processing of semiconductors, carbon fiber reinforced plastics and metals. The paper provides an overview on the different projects and highlights first results.

  12. Experimental investigation of jet pulse control on flexible vibrating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, Grigorios; Papanicolaou, Panos; Zacharopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-08-01

    The feasibility of applying on-line fluid jet pulses to actively control the vibrations of flexible structures subjected to harmonic and earthquake-like base excitations provided by a shake table is explored. The operating principles and capabilities of the control system applied have been investigated in a simplified small-scale laboratory model that is a mass attached at the top free end of a vertical flexible slender beam with rectangular cross-section, the other end of which is mounted on an electrodynamic shaker. A pair of opposite jets placed on the mass at the top of the cantilever beam applied the appropriate forces by ejecting pressurized air pulses controlled by on/off solenoid electro-valves via in house developed control software, in order to control the vibration caused by harmonic, periodic and random excitations at pre-selected frequency content provided by the shaker. The dynamics of the structure was monitored by accelerometers and the jet impulses by pressure sensors. The experimental results have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of Jet Pulse Control Systems (JPCS). It was verified that the measured root mean square (RMS) vibration levels of the controlled structure from harmonic and earthquake base excitations, could be reduced by approximately 50% and 33% respectively.

  13. Dispersion, damping and confinement of propagating pulses in large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    1988-01-01

    Pulse propagations in large space structures caused by repeated pulse excitations are studied analytically (by using the Z-transforms) and numerically. It is found that resonance regimes can be generated not only by periodical, but also by non-periodical repeated pulses; the conditions for such regimes are derived. Special attention is paid to the dispersion of propagating pulses due to structural irregularities, to damping of pulses due to appropriate combination of elastic and viscous properties of joints between structural members, and to the protection of certain areas of Large Space Structures (LSS) from impacts provided by a pulse trapping effect.

  14. Spectroscopic Studies of Quantum Well Structures in Pulsed Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Clive H.

    1998-03-01

    Magneto-photoluminescence spectroscopy (MPS) at low temperatures is a powerful technique for investigating the ground and excited states of high quality quantum well-type semiconductor heterostructures. The spectra are strongly influenced by electron-electron interactions and the method offers a complimentary tool to electrical transport studies. We have established a MPS facility at NHMFL-LANL and have undertaken a comprehensive investigation of magneto-excitonic and Landau transitions in a large variety of undoped and doped (two-dimensional electron gas, 2DEG) GaAs/AlGaAs and InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well structures. Excitation energies are provided by UV, visible, and NIR lasers. Fiber optic probes are used to switch between steady state (to 18 tesla) and short-pulsed (to 65 tesla) magnetic fields applied perpendicular (Faraday geometry) and parallel (Voigt geometry) to the growth axis of the 2D layers. The experimental techniques, optical layout, and data acquisition are reviewed i n some detail. Short-pulse magnets require that the spectroscopic data acquisition to be obtained in a 2 ms time-frame in the 'flat-top' region at the peak of the field. A broad range of samples have been investigated as a function of temperature, sample geometry, and high pressure. Examples of MPL spectra of single and coupled double quantum wells, modulation-doped quantum wells, single interface structures, and other related semiconductor heterojunction structures are given. The recently commissioned long-pulse magnet at NHMFL-LANL offers several new exciting possibilities: (i) The long exponential decay associated with the crow-bar mode has the potential for spectroscopic studies from 60 -10 T in 0.5 T intervals from a single pulse. (ii) Field steps programmed to last from 100-500 ms or longer offer the opportunity for time-resolved MPL spectroscopy in the 60 - 10 T range.

  15. Causal and Structural Connectivity of Pulse-Coupled Nonlinear Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Douglas; Xiao, Yanyang; Zhang, Yaoyu; Xu, Zhiqin; Cai, David

    2013-08-01

    We study the reconstruction of structural connectivity for a general class of pulse-coupled nonlinear networks and show that the reconstruction can be successfully achieved through linear Granger causality (GC) analysis. Using spike-triggered correlation of whitened signals, we obtain a quadratic relationship between GC and the network couplings, thus establishing a direct link between the causal connectivity and the structural connectivity within these networks. Our work may provide insight into the applicability of GC in the study of the function of general nonlinear networks.

  16. Pulse structure dependence of proton spin polarization rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Tomomi; Uesaka, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Youhei; Sakaguchi, Satoshi; Wakui, Takashi

    2009-10-01

    A polarized proton solid target for RI beam experiments has been developed at Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo [1]. The proton is polarized by transferring population difference in photo-excited triplet states of aromatic molecule. Through this method proton polarization of about 20% have been obtained at 0.1 T and in 100 K. Although this target has been successfully applied to RI beam experiments [2,3], further improvement in the polarization is desirable for future applications. To pursuit possible improvement in photo-excitation power, we have examined pulse-structure dependence of proton polarization rate. The excitation light is provided by a cw Ar-ion laser and pulsed by an optical chopper. We have found that proton polarization depends strongly on the pulse structure and the optimum condition is found to be a duty factor of 50% and a repetition frequency of 10 kHz. At this condition, the polarization rate can be increased by a factor 2.5 or more compared with the old settings, where a duty factor and a repetition frequency were 5% and 2.5 kHz, respectively. [1] T. Wakui et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods A 550 (2005) 521. [2] M. Hatano et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 25 (2005) 255. [3] S. Sakaguchi et al., CNS Annual Report 2006 (2007).

  17. Initial Results of Time-Resolved VUV Spectroscopy of Pulsed Dielectric Surface Flashover in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laity, George; Frank, Klaus; Rogers, Garrett; Neuber, Andreas; Dickens, James; Moss, James

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes some initial results from an experimental setup designed for studying the optical emission during pulsed surface flashover for the wavelength range from 115 nm to 180 nm at atmospheric pressures. A VM 505 from Acton Research Corporation was used as the spectrograph, with an Andor DH740 series ICCD camera mounted at the exit flange. Spectra were measured in nitrogen and air at atmospheric pressure with a flashover spark length of 8 mm under pulsed 35 kV excitation. Emission intensities were measured during gated 50 ns intervals, and it was concluded that most VUV emission occurs during the first stage of the flashover event. This is important because it is believed only radiation below 180 nm is energetic enough to cause photoionization leading to streamer discharge, and very little is known about VUV emission during this initial stage. Utilizing the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, a library of temperature dependent emission spectra was generated with SpectraPlot, a spectral software suite developed at TTU. The measured spectra will be discussed in relation to the physics of surface flashover at atmospheric pressure.

  18. Magnetic structures of actinide materials by pulsed neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, A.C.; Goldstone, J.A.; Huber, J.G.; Giorgi, A.L.; Conant, J.W.; Severing, A.; Cort, B.; Robinson, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    We describe some attempts to observe magnetic structure in various actinide (5f-electron) materials. Our experimental technique is neutron powder diffraction as practiced at a spallation (pulsed) neutron source. We will discuss our investigations of {alpha}-Pu, {delta}-Pu, {alpha}-UD{sub 3} and {beta}-UD{sub 3}. {beta}-UD{sub 3} is a simple ferromagnet: surprisingly, the moments on the two non-equivalent uranium atoms are the same within experimental error. {alpha}-UD{sub 3}, {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu are non-magnetic, within the limits of our observations. Our work with pulsed neutron diffraction shows that it is a useful technique for research on magnetic materials.

  19. Liquid ingress recognition in honeycomb structure by pulsed thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dapeng; Zeng, Zhi; Tao, Ning; Zhang, Cunlin; Zhang, Zheng

    2013-05-01

    Pulsed thermography has been proven to be a fast and effective method to detect fluid ingress in aircraft honeycomb structure; however, water and hydraulic oil may have similar appearance in the thermal image sequence. It is meaningful to identify what kind of liquid ingress it is for aircraft maintenance. In this study, honeycomb specimens with glass fiber and aluminum skin are injected different kinds of liquids: water and oil. Pulsed thermography is adopted; a recognition method is proposed to first get the reference curve by linear fitting the beginning of the logarithmic curve, and then an algorithm based on the thermal contrast between liquid and reference is used to recognize what kind of fluid it is by calculating their thermal properties. It is verified with the results of theory and the finite element simulation.

  20. Compression of ultra-short pulses due to cascaded second order nonlinearities in photonic bandgap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Shereena; Shahid Khan, Mohd.; Hafiz, Aurangzeb Khurram

    2016-03-01

    The cascaded second order nonlinearities in a 1-D photonic bandgap structure (1-D PBG) in the spectral domain have been explored. A weak signal pulse operating at frequency of interest is seeded with a strong pulse operating at its second harmonic (SH) frequency. The interaction of both pulses in the periodic structure takes place with a particular phase mismatch condition. The intensity of SH pulse controls the propagation of signal pulse and the signal pulse exhibits pulse compression at particular input SH intensity. Considering the parameter for GaInP/InAlP PBG structure we have demonstrated pulse compression from 290 fs to 155 fs. The dependency of pulse compression on the structural parameters, group velocity mismatch, group velocity dispersion and input intensity of pump has also been explored.

  1. High spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jian-Wu; Zhang, Cheng-Yun; Liu, Hai-Ying; Dai, Qiao-Feng; Wu, Li-Jun; Lan, Sheng; Gopal, Achanta Venu; Trofimov, Vyacheslav A; Lysak, Tatiana M

    2012-01-16

    The high spatial frequency periodic structures induced on metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses was investigated experimentally and numerically. It is suggested that the redistribution of the electric field on metal surface caused by the initially formed low spatial frequency periodic structures plays a crucial role in the creation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The field intensity which is initially localized in the grooves becomes concentrated on the ridges in between the grooves when the depth of the grooves exceeds a critical value, leading to the ablation of the ridges in between the grooves and the formation of high spatial frequency periodic structures. The proposed formation process is supported by both the numerical simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain technique and the experimental results obtained on some metals such as stainless steel and nickel.

  2. Effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation for a focused laser pulse in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Kunwar Pal; Arya, Rashmi; Malik, Anil K.

    2015-09-14

    We have investigated the effect of initial phase on error in electron energy obtained using paraxial approximation to study electron acceleration by a focused laser pulse in vacuum using a three dimensional test-particle simulation code. The error is obtained by comparing the energy of the electron for paraxial approximation and seventh-order correction description of the fields of Gaussian laser. The paraxial approximation predicts wrong laser divergence and wrong electron escape time from the pulse which leads to prediction of higher energy. The error shows strong phase dependence for the electrons lying along the axis of the laser for linearly polarized laser pulse. The relative error may be significant for some specific values of initial phase even at moderate values of laser spot sizes. The error does not show initial phase dependence for a circularly laser pulse.

  3. Structure of Microgravity Transitional and Pulsed Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahadori, M. Yousef; Hegde, Uday; Stocker, Dennis P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained in a study of pulsed gas jet diffusion flames to better characterize the recently observed vortex/flame interactions in microgravity transitional and turbulent diffusion flames, and to improve the understanding of large-scale structures in corresponding normal-gravity flames. In preparation for a space experiment, tests were conducted in the 5.18-Second Zero-Gravity Facility of the NASA Lewis Research Center. Both unpulsed and pulsed laminar flames were studied and numerical modeling of these flames was carried out for data comparison and model validation. In addition, complementary tests for a series of unpulsed flames were conducted on-board the NASA KC-135 research aircraft. The microgravity transitional and turbulent gas-jet diffusion flames have been observed to be dominated by large-scale disturbances, or structures. These structures first appear intermittently in the flame at Reynolds numbers (based on the cold jet injection properties) of about 2100. With increase in injection Reynolds number, the rate of intermittent disturbances increases until the generation becomes continuous at Reynolds numbers of 3000 and higher. The behavior of these structures depends upon the velocity and temperature characteristics of the jet/flame shear layer. These characteristics are different in normal gravity and microgravity.

  4. Physical mechanism of initial breakdown pulses and narrow bipolar events in lightning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Caitano L.; Pasko, Victor P.

    2015-05-01

    To date the true nature of initial breakdown pulses (IBPs) and narrow bipolar events (NBEs) in lightning discharges remains a mystery. Recent experimental evidence has correlated IBPs to the initial development of lightning leaders inside the thundercloud. NBE wideband waveforms resemble classic IBPs in both amplitude and duration. Most NBEs are quite peculiar in the sense that very frequently they occur in isolation from other lightning processes. The remaining fraction, 16% of positive polarity NBEs, according to Wu et al. (2014), happens as the first event in an otherwise regular intracloud lightning discharge. These authors point out that the initiator type of NBEs has no difference with other NBEs that did not start lightning, except for the fact that they occur deeper inside the thunderstorm (i.e., at lower altitudes). In this paper, we propose a new physical mechanism to explain the source of both IBPs and NBEs. We propose that IBPs and NBEs are the electromagnetic transients associated with the sudden (i.e., stepwise) elongation of the initial negative leader extremity in the thunderstorm electric field. To demonstrate our hypothesis a novel computational/numerical model of the bidirectional lightning leader tree is developed, consisting of a generalization of electrostatic and transmission line approximations found in the literature. Finally, we show how the IBP and NBE waveform characteristics directly reflect the properties of the bidirectional lightning leader (such as step length, for example) and amplitude of the thunderstorm electric field.

  5. The analysis of filling pulse parameters influence on ICTS data of GaAs MIS structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drewniak, Ł.; Kochowski, S.; Nitsch, K.; Paszkiewicz, R.; Paszkiewicz, B.

    2013-07-01

    The results of analysis of filling pulse parameters influence on the ICTS spectra recorded for Au/Pd/Ti-SiO2 - (n) GaAs MIS structures have been presented. It was demonstrated that the amplitude and the width of filling pulse strongly affects: the shape, the amplitude and the position of ICTS peaks. Furthermore it was found that the pulse amplitude of 1 V, in the case of investigated structures, corresponds to a small pulse and the width of filling pulse is not connected in simple way with the pulse amplitude as follows from literature. It was shown that both the measurements at short and long time of filling pulse reveal a complex structure of ICTS spectrum. It was also demonstrated that different time constants of interface states are obtained when the measurements are not performed with a small pulse and when the filling pulse time is not long enough to achieve a complete states filling.

  6. Initial state-specific photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole via 1 π σ ∗/ S 0 conical intersection initiated with optimally controlled UV-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandipati, K. R.; Kanakati, Arun Kumar; Singh, H.; Lan, Z.; Mahapatra, S.

    2017-09-01

    Optimal initiation of quantum dynamics of N-H photodissociation of pyrrole on the S0-1πσ∗(1A2) coupled electronic states by UV-laser pulses in an effort to guide the subsequent dynamics to dissociation limits is studied theoretically. Specifically, the task of designing optimal laser pulses that act on initial vibrational states of the system for an effective UV-photodissociation is considered by employing optimal control theory. The associated control mechanism(s) for the initial state dependent photodissociation dynamics of pyrrole in the presence of control pulses is examined and discussed in detail. The initial conditions determine implicitly the variation in the dissociation probabilities for the two channels, upon interaction with the field. The optimal pulse corresponds to the objective fixed as maximization of overall reactive flux subject to constraints of reasonable fluence and quantum dynamics. The simple optimal pulses obtained by the use of genetic algorithm based optimization are worth an experimental implementation given the experimental relevance of πσ∗-photochemistry in recent times.

  7. Pulse

    MedlinePlus

    ... the underside of the opposite wrist, below the base of the thumb. Press with flat fingers until ... determine if the patient's heart is pumping. Pulse measurement has other uses as well. During or immediately ...

  8. Large Area and Short Pulsed Shock Initiation of A TATB/HMX Mixed Explosive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guiji; Sun, Chengwei; Chen, Jun; Liu, Cangli; Tan, Fuli; Zhang, Ning

    2007-06-01

    The large area and short pulsed shock initiation experiment on a plastic bonded mixed explosive of TATB(80%) and HMX(15%) has been performed with an electric gun where a mylar flyer of 19mm in diameter and 0.05˜0.30mm in thickness is launched by an electrically exploding metallic bridge foil. The cylindrical explosive specimens (φ16mm x 8mm in size) were initiated by the mylar flyers in thickness of 0.07˜0.20mm, which induced shock pressure in specimen was of duration ranging 0.029˜0.109μs. The experimental data were treated with the DRM(Delayed Robbins-Monro) procedure and to provide the threshold of shock pressure P 13.73˜5.23GPa. The shock initiation criterion of the explosive specimen is (P/GPa)^1.451(τ/μs) = 1.2. Meanwhile the criterion in 100% probability in the experiment is (P/GPa)^1.8(τ/μs) = 2.63. In addition, the 30^o wedged specimen was tested and the shock to detonation transition (SDT) process emerging on its inclined surface was diagnosed with a device consisting of multiple optical fiber probe, optoelectronic transducer and digital oscilloscope. The POP plot of the explosive has been gained from above SDT data.

  9. Initial color development in radiochromic dye films after a short intense pulse of accelerated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribe, R. M.; Barcelo, M.; McLaughlin, W. L.; Buenfil, A. E.; Rios, J.

    The radiation response of different dye precursors in several host plastics has been investigated after a single short-pulse irradiation with 2.5-MeV electrons. It was observed that in most films the radiation-initiated color development proceeds mainly during the first 300 seconds, after such high dose-rate irradiation (≈ 10 12 Gy/s). Absorption spectra show that the main absorption band increases at the expense of a shorter-wavelength precursor absorption band, showing an isosbestic point approximately midway between the two absorption bands. It was found that a certain combination of dye precursor and host plastic (namely a polyamide containing an aromatic group) constitutes a film which shows a very fast increase in optical density of the main absorption band, making it suitable for immediate dosimetric analysis in very high dose-rate installations.

  10. Streamer-to-spark transition initiated by a nanosecond overvoltage pulsed discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, A.; Cessou, A.; Lacour, C.; Lecordier, B.; Boubert, P.; Xu, D. A.; Laux, C. O.; Vervisch, P.

    2017-04-01

    This study is focused on the streamer-to-spark transition generated by an overvoltage nanosecond pulsed discharge under atmospheric pressure air in order to provide a quantitative insight into plasma-assisted ignition. The discharge is generated in atmospheric pressure air by the application of a positive high voltage pulse of 35 kV to pin-to-pin electrodes and a rise time of 5 ns. The generated discharge consists of a streamer phase with high voltage and high current followed by a spark phase characterized by a low voltage and a decreasing current in several hundreds of nanosecond. During the streamer phase, the gas temperature measured by optical emission spectroscopy related to the second positive system of nitrogen shows an ultra-fast gas heating up to 1200 K at 15 ns after the current rise. This ultra-fast gas heating, due to the quenching of electronically excited species by oxygen molecules, is followed by a quick dissociation of molecules and then the discharge transition to a spark. At this transition, the discharge contracts toward the channel axis and evolves into a highly conducting thin column. The spark phase is characterized by a high degree of ionization of nitrogen and oxygen atoms shown by the electron number density and temperature measured from optical emission spectroscopy measurements of N+ lines. Schlieren imaging and optical emission spectroscopy techniques provide the time evolution of the spark radius, from which the initial pressure in the spark is estimated. The expansion of the plasma is adiabatic in the early phase. The electronic temperature and density during this phase allows the determination of the isentropic coefficient. The value around 1.2-1.3 is coherent with the high ionization rate of the plasma in the early phase. The results obtained in this study provide a database and the initial conditions for the validation of numerical simulations of the ignition by plasma discharge.

  11. Effect of intervention initiation timing of pulsed electromagnetic field on ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Liao, Yuan; Zeng, Yahua; Xie, Haitao; Fu, Chengxiao; Li, Neng

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of timing of initiation of pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy on bone mass, microarchitecture, and biomechanical properties, and to investigate receptor activator of NF-kB (RANK) expression in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Sixty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two equal batches of three groups each (10 rats in each group). The first batch comprised of sham-operated (Sham-0 group), ovariectomized (OVX-0 group), and ovariectomized plus treated with PEMF starting from the day of OVX (Early PEMF group). The second batch comprised of sham-operated (Sham-12 group), ovariectomized (OVX-12 group), and ovariectomized plus treated with PEMF starting 12 weeks after OVX (Late PEMF group). Rats (whole body) in the early and late PEMF groups were exposed to PEMF (3.8 mT peak, 8 Hz pulse burst repetition rate). After 12 weeks of PEMF therapy, Early PEMF prevented OVX-induced deterioration in bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties in lumbar vertebral body and femur, and deterioration in bone microarchitecture in lumbar vertebral body and proximal tibia. Late PEMF intervention only inhibited deterioration of BMD, bone microarchitecture, and mechanical properties in lumbar vertebral body. Both early and late PEMF therapy suppressed RANK protein expression in OVX rats without a concomitant effect on RANK mRNA expression. These results demonstrate that timing of initiation of PEMF therapy plays an important role in achieving optimal beneficial effects. The specific PEMF parameters may exert these favorable biological responses, at least partially, via inhibition of protein expression of RANK. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:456-465, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Health monitoring of operational structures -- Initial results

    SciTech Connect

    James, G.; Mayes, R.; Carne, T.; Simmermacher, T.; Goodding, J.

    1995-03-01

    Two techniques for damage localization (Structural Translational and Rotational Error Checking -- STRECH and MAtriX COmpletioN -- MAXCON) are described and applied to operational structures. The structures include a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) blade undergoing a fatigue test and a highway bridge undergoing an induced damage test. STRECH is seen to provide a global damage indicator to assess the global damage state of a structure. STRECH is also seen to provide damage localization for static flexibility shapes or the first mode of simple structures. MAXCON is a robust damage localization tool using the higher order dynamics of a structure. Several options arc available to allow the procedure to be tailored to a variety of structures.

  13. Latency and initiation of the human vestibuloocular reflex to pulsed galvanic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aw, Swee T; Todd, Michael J; Halmagyi, G Michael

    2006-08-01

    Cathodal galvanic currents activate primary vestibular afferents, whereas anodal currents inhibit them. Pulsed galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was used to determine the latency and initiation of the human vestibuloocular reflex. Three-dimensional galvanic vestibuloocular reflex (g-VOR) was recorded with binocular dual-search coils in response to a bilateral bipolar 100-ms rectangular pulse of current at 0.9 (near-threshold), 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mA in 11 normal subjects. The g-VOR consisted of three components: conjugate torsional eye rotation away from cathode toward anode; vertical divergence (skew deviation) with hypertropia of the eye on the cathodal and hypotropia of the eye on the anodal sides; and conjugate horizontal eye rotation away from cathode toward anode. The g-VOR was repeatable across all subjects, its magnitude a linear function of the current intensity, its latency about 9.0 ms with GVS of >or=2.5 mA, and was not suppressed by visual fixation. At 10-mA stimulation, the g-VOR [x, y, z] on the cathodal side was [0.77 +/- 0.10, -0.05 +/- 0.05, -0.18 +/- 0.06 degrees ] (mean +/- 95% confidence intervals) and on the anodal side was [0.79 +/- 0.10, 0.16 +/- 0.05, -0.19 +/- 0.06 degrees ], with a vertical divergence of 0.20 degrees . Although the horizontal g-VOR could have arisen from activation of the horizontal semicircular canal afferents, the vertical-torsional g-VOR resembled the vestibuloocular reflex in response to roll-plane head rotation about an Earth-horizontal axis and might be a result of both vertical semicircular canal and otolith afferent activations. Pulsed GVS is a promising technique to investigate latency and initiation of the human vestibuloocular reflex because it does not require a large mechanical apparatus nor does it pose problems of head inertia or slippage.

  14. CdSe electronic structure and pulsed laser photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Yonas; Ucer, K. B.; Williams, R. T.; Holzwarth, N. A. W.

    2002-03-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy with pulsed laser excitation can provide a low-background, sensitive view of electonic states in the gap,(M. Yamada et al.), Surf. Sci. 349, L107-L110 (1996) photopopulated states above the Fermi level, and dynamics of the population.(R. T. Williams et al.) Radiation Measurements 33, 497-502 (2001) We report measurements of photoelecton emission from UHV-cleaved CdSe (11bar20) surfaces excited by 4.5 eV and 5.9 eV pulses of 150 fs duration from a Ti:sapphire laser. One-, two-, and three-photon excitation processes are observed and comparison with features of the electronic structure will be discussed. For the purposes of identifying defect and surface features, electronic structure calculations of the CdSe (11bar20) surface are being performed using the pwpaw code,( A. R. Tackett et al.), Comput. Phys. Comm. 35, 348-376 (2001) using both slab and semi-infinite geometries. We hope to simulate both ideal and stepped surfaces.

  15. Compressive strength evaluation of structural lightweight concrete by non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method.

    PubMed

    Bogas, J Alexandre; Gomes, M Glória; Gomes, Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In this paper the compressive strength of a wide range of structural lightweight aggregate concrete mixes is evaluated by the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity method. This study involves about 84 different compositions tested between 3 and 180 days for compressive strengths ranging from about 30 to 80 MPa. The influence of several factors on the relation between the ultrasonic pulse velocity and compressive strength is examined. These factors include the cement type and content, amount of water, type of admixture, initial wetting conditions, type and volume of aggregate and the partial replacement of normal weight coarse and fine aggregates by lightweight aggregates. It is found that lightweight and normal weight concretes are affected differently by mix design parameters. In addition, the prediction of the concrete's compressive strength by means of the non-destructive ultrasonic pulse velocity test is studied. Based on the dependence of the ultrasonic pulse velocity on the density and elasticity of concrete, a simplified expression is proposed to estimate the compressive strength, regardless the type of concrete and its composition. More than 200 results for different types of aggregates and concrete compositions were analyzed and high correlation coefficients were obtained. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring of concrete structures using the ultrasonic pulse velocity method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaiskos, G.; Deraemaeker, A.; Aggelis, D. G.; Van Hemelrijck, D.

    2015-11-01

    Concrete is the material most produced by humanity. Its popularity is mainly based on its low production cost and great structural design flexibility. Its operational and ambient loadings including environmental effects have a great impact in the performance and overall cost of concrete structures. Thus, the quality control, the structural assessment, the maintenance and the reliable prolongation of the operational service life of the existing concrete structures have become a major issue. In the recent years, non-destructive testing (NDT) is becoming increasingly essential for reliable and affordable quality control and integrity assessment not only during the construction of new concrete structures, but also for the existing ones. Choosing the right inspection technique is always followed by a compromise between its performance and cost. In the present paper, the ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV) method, which is the most well known and widely accepted ultrasonic concrete NDT method, is thoroughly reviewed and compared with other well-established NDT approaches. Their principles, inherent limitations and reliability are reviewed. In addition, while the majority of the current UPV techniques are based on the use of piezoelectric transducers held on the surface of the concrete, special attention is paid to a very promising technique using low-cost and aggregate-size piezoelectric transducers embedded in the material. That technique has been evaluated based on a series of parameters, such as the ease of use, cost, reliability and performance.

  17. Pulsed light inactivation of horseradish peroxidase and associated structural changes.

    PubMed

    Pellicer, José Antonio; Gómez-López, Vicente M

    2017-12-15

    Pulsed light (PL) is a non-thermal preservation method in which foods are subjected to one or several intense pulses of wide-spectrum light. Peroxidase (POD) is an enzyme that needs to be inactivated or inhibited because of its deleterious effects on the quality of fruits and vegetables. The feasibility of using PL to inactivate POD was tested and results explained based on measurements of UV-vis spectrum, far-UV circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence, and the phase-diagram method. PL reduced the activity of POD by more than 95% after applying 128Jcm(-2). There was observed a decrease in the Reinheitzahl value and ellipticity and an increase in tryptophan fluorescence at incremental fluences, as well as linear phase diagrams. The study indicates that the inactivation of POD by PL is an all-or-none process related to loss of helical structure, weak unfolding and ejection of the prostetic group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Control structure interactions in large space structures Analysis using energy approach. [for constant and pulsed thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, S. K.; Ried, R. C.; Manoharan, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    A simple energy approach to study the problem of control structure interactions in large space structures is presented. For the illustrative cases of free-free beam and free rectangular plate, the vibrational energy imparted during operation of constant and pulsed thrusters is found in a nondimensional form. Then based on a parametric study, suggestions are made on the choice of the thruster location and parameters to minimize the control structure interactions.

  19. The structure and photoconductivity of SiGe/Si epitaxial layers modified by single-pulse laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivlev, G. D.; Kazuchits, N. M.; Prakopyeu, S. L.; Rusetsky, M. S.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of nanosecond pulses of ruby laser radiation on the structural state and morphology of the epitaxial layers of a SiO0.5Ge0.5 solid solution on silicon with the initiation of a crystal-melt phase transition has been studied by electron microscopy. Data on the photoelectric parameters of the laser-modified layers having a cellular structure owing to the segregation of germanium during the solidification of the binary melt have been derived.

  20. Investigation of Weld Pool Structure and Property Control in Pulsed Arc Welding.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-04

    Ripple Formation in 12 Pulsed-Current GTAW PART II - Heat-Flow Simulation of Pulsed Current Gas 45 Tungsten Arc Welding PART III - Grain Structure and Hot...Cracking in Pulsed 74 Current GTAW of AISI 321 Stainless Steel .]~ S~~ust if lar l _ .Distribution/ .Availabilitv Codes Ava ~1jnd/or D; Special r R&D...Pulsed Current Gas Tungsten Arc Welding Ptir: III - G(rain Structure and Hot Cracking in Pulsed Cur-i * GTAW of AISI 321 Stainless Steel A coinplt’te

  1. Structure-function insights into prokaryotic and eukaryotic translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Simonetti, Angelita; Marzi, Stefano; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2009-06-01

    Translation initiation is the rate-limiting and most complexly regulated step of protein synthesis in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In the last few years, cryo-electron microscopy has provided several novel insights into the universal process of translation initiation. Structures of prokaryotic 30S and 70S ribosomal initiation complexes with initiator transfer RNA (tRNA), messenger RNA (mRNA), and initiation factors have recently revealed the mechanism of initiator tRNA recruitment to the assembling ribosomal machinery, involving molecular rearrangements of the ribosome and associated factors. First three-dimensional pictures of the particularly complex eukaryotic translation initiation machinery have been obtained, revealing how initiation factors tune the ribosome for recruiting the mRNA. A comparison of the available prokaryotic and eukaryotic structures shows that--besides significant differences--some key ribosomal features are universally conserved.

  2. Characterization of multiple twinned structural units in pulse-electrodeposited nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klement, U.; Kahrimanidis, A.; Yao, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation was performed on pulse-electrodeposited Nickel with submicrocrystalline microstructure containing slightly elongated grains having a <110> fibre texture in growth direction. Structural units in form of groups of elongated grains possessing a common <110>-zone axis in growth direction and CSL boundaries (in some cases twins) between them have been found in the microstructure by use of EBSD. Grain growth sets in above 325°C but the texture is conserved up to at least 600°C. This means that the arrangement of twins and other CSL boundaries stabilized the structural units; there is no orientation change (by further twinning) when grain growth occurs as seen in previous studies on Ni and Ni-Fe of different initial texture. The observed structural units were characterized in detail and the occurring grains and grain boundaries are described.

  3. Air cushion effect in the short-pulse initiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, J.N.; Kennedy, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    When thin flyer plates are used to shock initiate high explosive (HE), any air present ahead of the flyer may cause a significant desensitization of the HE. The effect of the air in cushioning the impact of plastic flyers faced with metal films is analyzed here with MACRAME, a code which calculates wave interactions and traces wave propagation. The authors find that the second air shock into the HE has sufficient pressure to collapse the HE to crystal density or higher. Precompressed regions of HE do not react rapidly when the main impact pulse does arrive. Define y{sup *} as the depth where the major shock overtakes the precompression wave (for no air y{sup *} {r_arrow} 0). For various flyers and air combinations, the authors compare pressure profiles at y = y{sup *} + {epsilon}. The shock pressure profile associated with metal film impact may be greatly attenuated at the depth y{sup *}. Density profiles (p(t) at y) show that the shock heating for y > y{sup *} is greater than that for y < y{sup *}.

  4. Dying Pulse Trains in Cygnus XR-1: Initial Results of X-Ray Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.

    2003-01-01

    Dying pulse trains (DPT's) are a signature of a black hole as described by general relativity. Detecting DPT's would establish the existence of black holes by ruling out more exotic objects in systems in which a neutron star or white dwarf component has already been excluded by maximum mass arguments. The positive identification of a black hole would also be an additional test of general relativity. Two possible DPT's were detected in W photometry of Cygnus XR-1, the leading candidate for a stellar mass sized BH, in 3 hours of observational data. A search of X-ray photometry of Cygnus XR-1 from the Ross1 X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has begun. No DPT's have been detected in the first 4 hours of data searched. Because of the low event rate detected in the W data, these initial results are consistent with such disparate scenarios as the rate of DPT occurrence being dependent on the luminosity state of the system; or being more difficult to detect in the X-ray region relative to the W region; or occurring at the same rate in the W and X-ray regions; or even not occurring at all from Cygnus XR-1. The search for DPT's in RXTE photometry is continuing.

  5. Initial pulse of Siberian Traps sills as the trigger of the end-Permian mass extinction.

    PubMed

    Burgess, S D; Muirhead, J D; Bowring, S A

    2017-07-31

    Mass extinction events are short-lived and characterized by catastrophic biosphere collapse and subsequent reorganization. Their abrupt nature necessitates a similarly short-lived trigger, and large igneous province magmatism is often implicated. However, large igneous provinces are long-lived compared to mass extinctions. Therefore, if large igneous provinces are an effective trigger, a subinterval of magmatism must be responsible for driving deleterious environmental effects. The onset of Earth's most severe extinction, the end-Permian, coincided with an abrupt change in the emplacement style of the contemporaneous Siberian Traps large igneous province, from dominantly flood lavas to sill intrusions. Here we identify the initial emplacement pulse of laterally extensive sills as the critical deadly interval. Heat from these sills exposed untapped volatile-fertile sediments to contact metamorphism, likely liberating the massive greenhouse gas volumes needed to drive extinction. These observations suggest that large igneous provinces characterized by sill complexes are more likely to trigger catastrophic global environmental change than their flood basalt- and/or dike-dominated counterparts.Although the mass end-Permian extinction is linked to large igneous provinces, its trigger remains unclear. Here, the authors propose that the abrupt change from flood lavas to sills resulted in the heating of sediments and led to the release of large-scale greenhouse gases to drive the end-Permian extinction.

  6. Dying Pulse Trains in Cygnus XR-1: Initial Results of X-Ray Searches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, Joseph F.

    2003-01-01

    Dying pulse trains (DPT's) are a signature of a black hole as described by general relativity. Detecting DPT's would establish the existence of black holes by ruling out more exotic objects in systems in which a neutron star or white dwarf component has already been excluded by maximum mass arguments. The positive identification of a black hole would also be an additional test of general relativity. Two possible DPT's were detected in W photometry of Cygnus XR-1, the leading candidate for a stellar mass sized BH, in 3 hours of observational data. A search of X-ray photometry of Cygnus XR-1 from the Ross1 X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) has begun. No DPT's have been detected in the first 4 hours of data searched. Because of the low event rate detected in the W data, these initial results are consistent with such disparate scenarios as the rate of DPT occurrence being dependent on the luminosity state of the system; or being more difficult to detect in the X-ray region relative to the W region; or occurring at the same rate in the W and X-ray regions; or even not occurring at all from Cygnus XR-1. The search for DPT's in RXTE photometry is continuing.

  7. Effect of pulsed light on activity and structural changes of horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Zhang, Yanyan; Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar; Wu, Bengang; Pan, Zhongli; Ma, Haile

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of pulsed light on the activity and structure of horseradish peroxidase in buffer solution. Enzyme residual activities were measured. Surface topography, secondary, and tertiary structures of horseradish peroxidase were determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. Results showed that a complete inactivation of horseradish peroxidase was achieved by application of 10 pulses of pulsed light treatment at an intensity of 500J/pulse. The AFM analysis revealed that the aggregation of enzyme protein increased and surface roughness decreased with the increase in the treatment time. Fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy analysis exhibited that pulsed light destroyed the tertiary and secondary protein structures. The β-sheet composition was decreased while β-turn and random coils were increased. Pulsed light could effectively inactivate horseradish peroxidase by destroying the secondary and tertiary structures of protein in the active center of the enzyme. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Initial Results From The Micro-pulse Lidar Network (MPL-Net)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welton, E. J.; Campbell, J. R.; Berkoff, T. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ginoux, P.

    2001-12-01

    The micro-pulse lidar system (MPL) was developed in the early 1990s and was the first small, eye-safe, and autonomous lidar built for fulltime monitoring of cloud and aerosol vertical distributions. In 2000, a new project using MPL systems was started at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This new project, the Micro-pulse Lidar Network or MPL-Net, was created to provide long-term observations of aerosol and cloud vertical profiles at key sites around the world. This is accomplished using both NASA operated sites and partnerships with other organizations owning MPL systems. The MPL-Net sites are co-located with NASA AERONET sunphotometers to provide aerosol optical depth data needed for calibration of the MPL. In addition to the long-term sites, MPL-Net provides lidar support for a limited number of field experiments and ocean cruises each year. We will present an overview of the MPL-Net project and show initial results from the first two MPL-Net sites at the South Pole and at Goddard Space Flight Center. Observations of dust layers transported from the desert regions of China, across the Pacific Ocean, to the east coast of the United States will also be shown. MPL-Net affiliated instruments were in place at the desert source region in China, on a research vessel in the Sea of Japan, at ARM sites in Alaska and Oklahoma, and finally at our home site in Maryland (GSFC) during the massive dust storms that occurred in April 2001. The MPL observations of dust layers at each location are shown in comparison to dust layers predicted using the Georgia Tech/Goddard Global Ozone Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport model (GOCART). Finally, the MPL-Net project is the primary ground-validation program for the Geo-Science Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) satellite lidar project (launch date 2002). We will present an overview demonstrating how MPL-Net results are used to help prepare the GLAS data processing algorithms and assist in the calibration/validation of the GLAS data

  9. Comparative study of radio pulses from simulated hadron-, electron-, and neutrino-initiated showers in ice in the GeV-PeV range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Shahid; McKay, Douglas W.

    2004-11-01

    High energy particle showers produce coherent Cherenkov radio emission in dense, radio-transparent media such as cold ice. Using PYTHIA and GEANT simulation tools, we make a comparative study among electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic showers initiated by single particles and neutrino showers initiated by multiple particles produced at the neutrino-nucleon event vertex. We include all the physics processes and do a complete 3D simulation up to 100TeV for all showers and to 1PeV for electron- and neutrino-induced showers. We calculate the radio pulses for energies between 100GeV and 1PeV and find hadron showers, and consequently neutrino showers, are not as efficient below 1PeV at producing radio pulses as the electromagnetic showers. The agreement improves as energy increases, however, and by a PeV and above the difference disappears. By looking at the 3D structure of the showers in time, we show that the hadronic showers are not as compact as the EM showers and hence the radiation is not as coherent as EM shower emission at the same frequency. We show that the ratio of emitted pulse strength to shower tracklength is a function only of a single, coherence parameter, independent of species and energy of initiating particle.

  10. Comparative study of radio pulses from simulated hadron-, electron-, and neutrino-initiated showers in ice in the GeV-PeV range

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Shahid; McKay, Douglas W.

    2004-11-15

    High energy particle showers produce coherent Cherenkov radio emission in dense, radio-transparent media such as cold ice. Using PYTHIA and GEANT simulation tools, we make a comparative study among electromagnetic (EM) and hadronic showers initiated by single particles and neutrino showers initiated by multiple particles produced at the neutrino-nucleon event vertex. We include all the physics processes and do a complete 3D simulation up to 100 TeV for all showers and to 1 PeV for electron- and neutrino-induced showers. We calculate the radio pulses for energies between 100 GeV and 1 PeV and find hadron showers, and consequently neutrino showers, are not as efficient below 1 PeV at producing radio pulses as the electromagnetic showers. The agreement improves as energy increases, however, and by a PeV and above the difference disappears. By looking at the 3D structure of the showers in time, we show that the hadronic showers are not as compact as the EM showers and hence the radiation is not as coherent as EM shower emission at the same frequency. We show that the ratio of emitted pulse strength to shower tracklength is a function only of a single, coherence parameter, independent of species and energy of initiating particle.

  11. Saturable inductor and transformer structures for magnetic pulse compression

    DOEpatents

    Birx, Daniel L.; Reginato, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    Saturable inductor and transformer for magnetic compression of an electronic pulse, using a continuous electrical conductor looped several times around a tightly packed core of saturable inductor material.

  12. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir). PMID:28272546

  13. Control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states via periodic dynamical decoupling pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Tan, Qing-Shou; Kuang, Le-Man

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the possibility to control quantum evolution speed of a single dephasing qubit for arbitrary initial states by the use of periodic dynamical decoupling (PDD) pulses. It is indicated that the quantum speed limit time (QSLT) is determined by initial and final quantum coherence of the qubit, as well as the non-Markovianity of the system under consideration during the evolution when the qubit is subjected to a zero-temperature Ohmic-like dephasing reservoir. It is shown that final quantum coherence of the qubit and the non-Markovianity of the system can be modulated by PDD pulses. Our results show that for arbitrary initial states of the dephasing qubit with non-vanishing quantum coherence, PDD pulses can be used to induce potential acceleration of the quantum evolution in the short-time regime, while PDD pulses can lead to potential speedup and slow down in the long-time regime. We demonstrate that the effect of PDD on the QSLT for the Ohmic or sub-Ohmic spectrum (Markovian reservoir) is much different from that for the super-Ohmic spectrum (non-Markovian reservoir).

  14. Template Reproduction of GRB Pulse Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkila, Jon E.; Preece, R. D.; Loredo, T. J.; Wolpert, R. L.; Broadbent, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A study of well-isolated pulses in gamma ray burst light curves indicates that simple models having smooth and monotonic pulse rises and decays are inadequate. Departures from the Norris et al. (2005) pulse shape are in the form of a wave-like pre-peak residual that is mirrored and stretched following the peak. Pulse shape departures are present in GRB pulses of all durations, but placement of the departures relative to pulse peaks correlates with asymmetry. This establishes an additional link between temporal structure and spectral evolution, as pulse asymmetry is related to initial hardness while pulse duration indicates the rate of hard-to-soft pulse evolution.

  15. Structural basis of transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Sarah; Bernecky, Carrie; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes commences with the assembly of a conserved initiation complex, which consists of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors, at promoter DNA. After two decades of research, the structural basis of transcription initiation is emerging. Crystal structures of many components of the initiation complex have been resolved, and structural information on Pol II complexes with general transcription factors has recently been obtained. Although mechanistic details await elucidation, available data outline how Pol II cooperates with the general transcription factors to bind to and open promoter DNA, and how Pol II directs RNA synthesis and escapes from the promoter.

  16. Generation and structure of extremely large clusters in pulsed jets

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Daniela Adolph, Marcus; Flückiger, Leonie; Müller, Jan Philippe; Müller, Maria; Sauppe, Mario; Wolter, David; Möller, Thomas; Gorkhover, Tais; Schorb, Sebastian; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph

    2014-07-28

    Extremely large xenon clusters with sizes exceeding the predictions of the Hagena scaling law by several orders of magnitude are shown to be produced in pulsed gas jets. The cluster sizes are determined using single-shot single-particle imaging experiments with short-wavelength light pulses from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). Scanning the time delay between the pulsed cluster source and the intense femtosecond x-ray pulses first shows a main plateau with size distributions in line with the scaling laws, which is followed by an after-pulse of giant clusters. For the extremely large clusters with radii of several hundred nanometers the x-ray scattering patterns indicate a grainy substructure of the particles, suggesting that they grow by cluster coagulation.

  17. First-principles calculations for initial electronic excitation in dielectrics induced by intense femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shunsuke A.; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced damage of SiO2 (α-quartz) is investigated by first-principles calculations. The calculations are based on a coupled theoretical framework of the time-dependent density functional theory and Maxwell equation to describe strongly-nonlinear laser-solid interactions. We simulate irradiation of the bulk SiO2 with femtosecond laser pulses and compute energy deposition from the laser pulse to electrons as a function of the distance from the surface. We further analyze profiles of laser-induced craters, comparing the transferred energy with the cohesive energy of SiO2. The theoretical crater profile well reproduces the experimental features for a relatively weak laser pulse. In contrast, the theoretical result fails to reproduce the measured profiles for a strong laser pulse. This fact indicates a significance of the subsequent atomic motions that take place after the energy transfer ends for the formation of the crater under the strong laser irradiation.

  18. Regulation of DNA Replication Initiation by Chromosome Structure.

    PubMed

    Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-11-01

    Recent advancements in fluorescence imaging have shown that the bacterial nucleoid is surprisingly dynamic in terms of both behavior (movement and organization) and structure (density and supercoiling). Links between chromosome structure and replication initiation have been made in a number of species, and it is universally accepted that favorable chromosome structure is required for initiation in all cells. However, almost nothing is known about whether cells use changes in chromosome structure as a regulatory mechanism for initiation. Such changes could occur during natural cell cycle or growth phase transitions, or they could be manufactured through genetic switches of topoisomerase and nucleoid structure genes. In this review, we explore the relationship between chromosome structure and replication initiation and highlight recent work implicating structure as a regulatory mechanism. A three-component origin activation model is proposed in which thermal and topological structural elements are balanced with trans-acting control elements (DnaA) to allow efficient initiation control under a variety of nutritional and environmental conditions. Selective imbalances in these components allow cells to block replication in response to cell cycle impasse, override once-per-cell-cycle programming during growth phase transitions, and promote reinitiation when replication forks fail to complete.

  19. Characteristics of the Pulse Luminosity in the Initial Breakdown Stage of Cloud-to-Ground and Intracloud Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, R. A.; Uman, M. A.; Pilkey, J. T.; Jordan, D.

    2015-12-01

    The most important unknown in the study of the lightning discharge is the physics of the initiation process. Both cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes lowering negative charge and intracloud (IC) flashes raising negative charge begin with a sequence of relatively large electric field pulses in the initial breakdown (IB) stage that are well documented, however, the pulse luminosity in the IB stage has not yet been analyzed with sufficient time resolution to properly resolve its characteristics. In the summers of 2013, 2014, and 2015 we simultaneously recorded luminosity and electric field waveforms from IB pulses in numerous ground discharges and, for the first time, in cloud discharges. For all of these events radar was available, and, for some, Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) 3-D location of sources during the IB stage. The upper frequency response of the luminosity measurement, made with a photodiode system was 50 MHz. In 2013 and 2014, thirty IB luminosity pulses in CG flashes had an average 10% to 90% rise time of 25 μs, average half width of 68 μs, and average delay time of 8 μs between start of the associated electric field and the start of the pulse luminosity. For IC flashes, thirty-seven luminosity pulses were analyzed and the three time-parameters were found to be significantly longer: 59 μs, 176 μs, and 34 μs. The roughly ten LMA sources associated with the time period of each initial breakdown in the 2014 data are grouped within about 1 km. The mean height of the LMA sources during the IB period for CG flashes is 4.4 km with a standard deviation of 490 m and the same data for IC flashes is 6.2 km and 550 m. It follows from these luminosity data that the physics of the initiation process of CG flashes and IC flashes may indeed be different. We discuss the potential influence of scattering of the optical signal on the IB pulse luminosity wave shapes and delay times. We also will discuss the summer 2015 data, which is being acquired at the time of this

  20. Decomposition of a UWB Pulse in Structures with Facial Feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazizov, A. T.; Zabolotsky, A. M.; Gazizov, T. R.

    2017-07-01

    The urgency of protection of radio-electronic equipment from UWB pulses is indicated. The principle of modal filtration based on the application of the physical phenomenon of signal decomposition in transmission lines is shortly described. An asymmetric modal filter with facial feedback is analyzed. Its models with different parameters have been developed and manufactured. A field experiment and a computer simulation of the time response to a 1 ns pulse width have been performed. The agreement between the experimental and simulation results is demonstrated. For a modal filter with optimal parameters, the input pulse attenuation by 5 times is demonstrated in a 50-Ω channel.

  1. Initial operation of a pulse-burst laser system for high-repetition-rate Thomson scatteringa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, W. S.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Hurst, N. C.

    2010-10-01

    A pulse-burst laser has been installed for Thomson scattering measurements on the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed-field pinch. The laser design is a master-oscillator power-amplifier. The master oscillator is a commercial Nd:YVO4 laser (1064 nm) which is capable of Q-switching at frequencies between 5 and 250 kHz. Four Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) amplifier stages are in place to amplify the Nd:YVO4 emission. Single pulses through the Nd:YAG amplifier stages gives energies up to 1.5 J and the gain for each stage has been measured. Repetitive pulsing at 10 kHz has also been performed for 2 ms bursts, giving average pulse energies of 0.53 J with ΔE /E of 4.6%, where ΔE is the standard deviation between pulses. The next step will be to add one of two Nd:glass (silicate) amplifier stages to produce final pulse energies of 1-2 J for bursts up to 250 kHz.

  2. INITIAL EVALUATION OF A PULSED WHITE SPECTRUM NEUTRON GENERATOR FOR EXPLOSIVE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    King, Michael J.; Miller, Gill T.; Reijonen, Jani; Ji, Qing; Andresen, Nord; Gicquel,, Frederic; Kavlas, Taneli; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Kwan, Joe

    2008-06-02

    Successful explosive material detection in luggage and similar sized containers is acritical issue in securing the safety of all airline passengers. Tensor Technology Inc. has recently developed a methodology that will detect explosive compounds with pulsed fast neutron transmission spectroscopy. In this scheme, tritium beams will be used to generate neutrons with a broad energy spectrum as governed by the T(t,2n)4He fission reaction that produces 0-9 MeV neutrons. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with Tensor Technology Inc., has designedand fabricated a pulsed white-spectrum neutron source for this application. The specifications of the neutron source are demanding and stringent due to the requirements of high yield and fast pulsing neutron emission, and sealed tube, tritium operation. In a unique co-axial geometry, the ion source uses ten parallel rf induction antennas to externally couple power into a toroidal discharge chamber. There are 20 ion beam extraction slits and 3 concentric electrode rings to shape and accelerate the ion beam into a titanium cone target. Fast neutron pulses are created by using a set ofparallel-plate deflectors switching between +-1500 volts and deflecting the ion beams across a narrow slit. The generator is expected to achieve 5 ns neutron pulses at tritium ion beam energies between 80 - 120 kV. First experiments demonstrated ion source operation and successful beam pulsing.

  3. An Effect on Pulse Propagation Characteristics of Via Structures in Multilayer Printed Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke

    This article presents the pulse propagation characteristics through the via structures (via, pad, and clearance hole) by using the FDTD method. We investigated the size of the via structures so as to maximize the peak value of pulse responses for the Gaussian pulse incident with the pulse width from 0.2ps to 20.0ps. We showed that the pulse width is limited by the radius of via and the radius of pad. Numerical accuracy is investigated from the points of the sell size, the terminal conditions of microstrip line, and the distance between the exciting point and PML. The peak value of responses becomes smaller as the pulse width is reduced and the via radius is enlarged.

  4. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, C. M. Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-10

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  5. Initial operation of high power ICRF system for long pulse in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, C. M.; Zhao, Y. P.; Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yuan, S.; Chen, G.

    2015-12-01

    The ICRF heating system on EAST upgraded by active cooling aims for long pulse operation. In this paper, the main technical features of the ICRF system are described. One of a major challenges for long pulse operation is RF-edge interactions induced impurity production and heat loading. In EAST, ICRF antenna protections and Faraday screen bars damaged due to LH electron beam are found. Preliminary results for the analysis of the interaction between LHCD and ICRF antenna are discussed. Increase of metal impurities in the plasma during RF pulse and in a larger core radiation are also shown. These RF-edge interactions at EAST and some preliminary results for the optimizing RF performance will be presented.

  6. Structural Basis of Transcription Initiation by Bacterial RNA Polymerase Holoenzyme*

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Ritwika S.; Warner, Brittany A.; Molodtsov, Vadim; Pupov, Danil; Esyunina, Daria; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing σ factor initiates transcription at specific promoter sites by de novo RNA priming, the first step of RNA synthesis where RNAP accepts two initiating ribonucleoside triphosphates (iNTPs) and performs the first phosphodiester bond formation. We present the structure of de novo transcription initiation complex that reveals unique contacts of the iNTPs bound at the transcription start site with the template DNA and also with RNAP and demonstrate the importance of these contacts for transcription initiation. To get further insight into the mechanism of RNA priming, we determined the structure of initially transcribing complex of RNAP holoenzyme with 6-mer RNA, obtained by in crystallo transcription approach. The structure highlights RNAP-RNA contacts that stabilize the short RNA transcript in the active site and demonstrates that the RNA 5′-end displaces σ region 3.2 from its position near the active site, which likely plays a key role in σ ejection during the initiation-to-elongation transition. Given the structural conservation of the RNAP active site, the mechanism of de novo RNA priming appears to be conserved in all cellular RNAPs. PMID:24973216

  7. Structural basis of transcription initiation by bacterial RNA polymerase holoenzyme.

    PubMed

    Basu, Ritwika S; Warner, Brittany A; Molodtsov, Vadim; Pupov, Danil; Esyunina, Daria; Fernández-Tornero, Carlos; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey; Murakami, Katsuhiko S

    2014-08-29

    The bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme containing σ factor initiates transcription at specific promoter sites by de novo RNA priming, the first step of RNA synthesis where RNAP accepts two initiating ribonucleoside triphosphates (iNTPs) and performs the first phosphodiester bond formation. We present the structure of de novo transcription initiation complex that reveals unique contacts of the iNTPs bound at the transcription start site with the template DNA and also with RNAP and demonstrate the importance of these contacts for transcription initiation. To get further insight into the mechanism of RNA priming, we determined the structure of initially transcribing complex of RNAP holoenzyme with 6-mer RNA, obtained by in crystallo transcription approach. The structure highlights RNAP-RNA contacts that stabilize the short RNA transcript in the active site and demonstrates that the RNA 5'-end displaces σ region 3.2 from its position near the active site, which likely plays a key role in σ ejection during the initiation-to-elongation transition. Given the structural conservation of the RNAP active site, the mechanism of de novo RNA priming appears to be conserved in all cellular RNAPs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Large-scale structures produced on metal surfaces by multiple laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kirichenko, N A

    2009-05-31

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the formation of inhomogeneous surface structures 10-50 {mu}m in height on metal surfaces exposed to repetitive laser pulses with the following parameters: pulse duration of {approx}20 ns, pulse repetition rate of {approx}10 kHz, pulse intensity in the range 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} W cm{sup -2} and beam diameter from 50 to 100 {mu}m. The model takes into account melting of the metal and melt flow over a distorted surface. The surface profile amplitude evaluated in the model agrees with experimental data. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  9. Acoustic and flexural excitation of a floating structure by a single laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Philp, W R; Podlesak, M; Pierce, S G

    1996-12-20

    The acoustic and flexural vibrations of a small-scale floating structure following irradiation by a pulsed Nd:glass laser are compared with a radiated underwater sound field. A single subablative laser pulse of 600-μs duration was used both to bend and shock the floating structure at the irradiation site. The laser pulse caused the structure to flex at a frequency of approximately 1 kHz whereas relaxation oscillations in the laser output simultaneously excited ultrasonic Lamb waves within the material bulk. We present results to illustrate the broad bandwidth provided by this unusual form of excitation.

  10. CONTROL OF LASER RADIATION PARAMETERS: Transformation of pulses with the help of thin-layer interference structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, Yu A.; Gorokhov, P. M.; Kozar', A. V.

    2003-11-01

    The propagation of phase-modulated optical pulses through thin-layer interference antireflection structures is studied. An analytic expression relating the parameters of the incident and reflected pulses is obtained. The time dependence of the phase modulation of the incident pulse was obtained using this expression together with experimental data. The splitting of the pulse after its reflection from the interference structure into two pulses with different spectra allows the use of these pulses in compressors to obtain ultrashort pulses with different carrier frequencies.

  11. Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges in Liquid Phase: Optical diagnostics of positive versus negative modes of initiation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seepersad, Yohan; Fridman, Alexander; Dobrynin, Danil; Applied Physics Group Team

    2013-09-01

    Recent work on nanosecond pulsed discharges in liquids has shown the possibility of producing plasma directly in the liquid phase without bubble formation or heating of the liquid. Paramount to understanding the physical processes leading to this phenomenon is a thorough understanding of the way these discharges behave under various conditions. This work explores the development of nanosecond pulsed discharges in water, for both positively and negatively applied pulses in a pin-to-plane configuration. Time resolved nanosecond ICCD imaging is used to trace the development of the discharge for applied voltages up to 24 kV. From the results we are able to identify breakdown thresholds at which discharge is initiated for both modes. At voltages below the critical breakdown value, Schlieren and shadowgraphy techniques are used to investigate perturbations in the liquid layers near the electrode tip as a consequence of these fat rising pulses. This work was supported by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (grant #DARPA-BAA-11-31).

  12. Benchtop and Initial Clinical Evaluation of the ShockPulse Stone Eliminator in Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Chew, Ben H; Matteliano, Andre A; de Los Reyes, Thomas; Lipkin, Michael E; Paterson, Ryan F; Lange, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Standardized bench testing of the new ShockPulse™ intracorporeal lithotripter was performed against three commercially available lithotripsy systems to determine differences and nuances in performance. The ShockPulse intracorporeal lithotripter was tested against the LUS-2™, CyberWand,™ and EMS LithoClast™ in a standardized bench setting using hard (Ultracal-30) and soft (plaster of Paris) stone phantoms. An in vitro kidney model was used to record the time needed to fragment stone samples into retrievable-sized pieces. The time needed to fully comminute and evacuate stone samples was also recorded. The efficacy of each device at various applied pressures was determined using a hands-free apparatus, which was used to apply 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 pounds of fixed force. For hard and soft stones, the time needed to create retrievable fragments was similar among all systems (p = 0.585). The ShockPulse was significantly faster than the LUS-2 and LithoClast at fully fragmenting and evacuating stone samples (p = 0.046), while the CyberWand was significantly slower than all three systems at this task (p = 0.001). When fixed forces were applied to a large stone phantom, the ShockPulse and CyberWand were significantly faster than the LUS-2 and LithoClast (p < 0.0001). When groups of smaller stones were tested, the ShockPulse was significantly faster at 1.0 pound (p < 0.001) and 1.5 pounds (p < 0.002) of force. At 2.0 pounds, no differences were observed (p = 0.09). The ShockPulse is equally as effective and, in some circumstances, more effective than the three commercially available devices against which it was tested in an in vitro setting.

  13. Uncovering community structures with initialized Bayesian nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xianchao; Xu, Tao; Feng, Xia; Yang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering community structures is important for understanding networks. Currently, several nonnegative matrix factorization algorithms have been proposed for discovering community structure in complex networks. However, these algorithms exhibit some drawbacks, such as unstable results and inefficient running times. In view of the problems, a novel approach that utilizes an initialized Bayesian nonnegative matrix factorization model for determining community membership is proposed. First, based on singular value decomposition, we obtain simple initialized matrix factorizations from approximate decompositions of the complex network's adjacency matrix. Then, within a few iterations, the final matrix factorizations are achieved by the Bayesian nonnegative matrix factorization method with the initialized matrix factorizations. Thus, the network's community structure can be determined by judging the classification of nodes with a final matrix factor. Experimental results show that the proposed method is highly accurate and offers competitive performance to that of the state-of-the-art methods even though it is not designed for the purpose of modularity maximization.

  14. Structural and mechanistic insights into hepatitis C viral translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Christopher S; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus uses an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to control viral protein synthesis by directly recruiting ribosomes to the translation-start site in the viral mRNA. Structural insights coupled with biochemical studies have revealed that the IRES substitutes for the activities of translation-initiation factors by binding and inducing conformational changes in the 40S ribosomal subunit. Direct interactions of the IRES with initiation factor eIF3 are also crucial for efficient translation initiation, providing clues to the role of eIF3 in protein synthesis.

  15. Sensitivity of a Wave Structure to Initial Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Duval, Walter M. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Microgravity experiments aimed at quantifying effects of gentler via controlled sinusoidal forcing transmitted on the interface between two miscible liquids have shown the evolution of a quasi -stationary four-mode wave structure oriented vertically. The sensitivity of the wave structure to phase angle variation is investigated computationally. We show that a slight variation of the phase angle is sufficient to cause a bifurcation to a two-mode structure. The dependence of phase angle on wave structure is attributed to sensitivity on initial conditions due to the strong nonlinearity of the coupled field equations for the parametric space of interest.

  16. Implementation and initial test result of a prototype solid state modulator for pulsed magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Dake, Vishal; Mangalvedekar, H.A.; Tillu, Abhijit; Dixit, Kavita P.; Sarukte, Hemant

    2014-07-01

    A solid-state modulator rated for 50 kV, 120A, 4μs and 250 Hz has been designed. The discharging circuit of the modulator is being tested at ∼ 33 kV, 40-80A, at a maximum pulse repetition rate of 30 pps. The paper discusses development and testing of prototype discharging circuit on resistive load and magnetron. The technique used for measurement of pulse transformer leakage inductance, distributed capacitance and stray primary circuit series inductance will also be discussed in detail. It is necessary to have Energy Storage Capacitors with low ESL for these applications (ESL < 40 nH). The method used for evaluating the ESL of locally available metalized polypropylene capacitors will also be presented. (author)

  17. Infrared nanosecond laser-metal ablation in atmosphere: Initial plasma during laser pulse and further expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Wei, Wenfu; Li, Xingwen; Jia, Shenli; Qiu, Aici

    2013-04-22

    We have investigated the dynamics of the nanosecond laser ablated plasma within and after the laser pulse irradiation using fast photography. A 1064 nm, 15 ns laser beam was focused onto a target made from various materials with an energy density in the order of J/mm{sup 2} in atmosphere. The plasma dynamics during the nanosecond laser pulse were observed, which could be divided into three stages: fast expansion, division into the primary plasma and the front plasma, and stagnation. After the laser terminated, a critical moment when the primary plasma expansion transited from the shock model to the drag model was resolved, and this phenomenon could be understood in terms of interactions between the primary and the front plasmas.

  18. The replication initiator of the cholera pathogen's second chromosome shows structural similarity to plasmid initiators.

    PubMed

    Orlova, Natalia; Gerding, Matthew; Ivashkiv, Olha; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chait, Brian T; Waldor, Matthew K; Jeruzalmi, David

    2016-12-27

    The conserved DnaA-oriC system is used to initiate replication of primary chromosomes throughout the bacterial kingdom; however, bacteria with multipartite genomes evolved distinct systems to initiate replication of secondary chromosomes. In the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae, and in related species, secondary chromosome replication requires the RctB initiator protein. Here, we show that RctB consists of four domains. The structure of its central two domains resembles that of several plasmid replication initiators. RctB contains at least three DNA binding winged-helix-turn-helix motifs, and mutations within any of these severely compromise biological activity. In the structure, RctB adopts a head-to-head dimeric configuration that likely reflects the arrangement in solution. Therefore, major structural reorganization likely accompanies complex formation on the head-to-tail array of binding sites in oriCII Our findings support the hypothesis that the second Vibrionaceae chromosome arose from an ancestral plasmid, and that RctB may have evolved additional regulatory features.

  19. Open Access Initiatives in Africa--Structure, Incentives and Disincentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwagwu, Williams E.

    2013-01-01

    Building open access in Africa is imperative not only for African scholars and researchers doing scientific research but also for the expansion of the global science and technology knowledgebase. This paper examines the structure of homegrown initiatives, and observes very low level of awareness prevailing in the higher educational institutions…

  20. Open Access Initiatives in Africa--Structure, Incentives and Disincentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwagwu, Williams E.

    2013-01-01

    Building open access in Africa is imperative not only for African scholars and researchers doing scientific research but also for the expansion of the global science and technology knowledgebase. This paper examines the structure of homegrown initiatives, and observes very low level of awareness prevailing in the higher educational institutions…

  1. Pulse and lock-in IR NDT in complex structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarin, Markus

    2011-05-01

    Bicycles, cars, airplanes, prosthetics, solar panels...composites are ubiquitous in the modern world. Three thermographic NDT techniques are currently in use for the detection and measurement of defects in these composites, including defects such as impact damage, delamination, voids, inclusions and stresses. The particular technique for optimum results, pulsed flash, pulsed transient, or lock-in, depends upon the sample material and thickness and shape, and the test environment. Choice of camera type varies widely, from high performance cooled to affordable uncooled, with large format 640 x 480 pixels now available, also. NDT hardware and software now includes models that allow all types of excitation sources and excitation methods with the same equipment.

  2. Pulsed UV and ultrafast laser micromachining of surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Paul; Sykes, Neil

    2015-07-01

    We describe and compare the cutting and patterning of various "difficult" materials using pulsed UV Excimer, picosecond and femtosecond laser sources. Beam delivery using both fast galvanometer scanners and scanning mask imaging are described. Each laser source has its own particular strengths and weaknesses, and the optimum choice for an application is also decided by financial constraints. With some materials notable improvements in process quality have been observed using femtosecond lasers compared to picosecond lasers, which makes for an interesting choice now that cost effective reliable femtosecond systems are increasingly available. By contrast Pulsed UV Excimer lasers offer different imaging characteristics similar to mask based Lithographic systems and are particularly suited to the processing of polymers. We discuss optimized beam delivery techniques for these lasers.

  3. Model development and experimental validation for analyzing initial transients of irradiation of tissues during thermal therapy using short pulse lasers.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Mohit; Miller, Stephanie; Mitra, Kunal

    2015-11-01

    Short pulse lasers with pulse durations in the range of nanoseconds and shorter are effective in the targeted delivery of heat energy for precise tissue heating and ablation. This photothermal therapy is useful where the removal of cancerous tissue sections is required. The objective of this paper is to use finite element modeling to demonstrate the differences in the thermal response of skin tissue to short-pulse and continuous wave laser irradiation in the initial stages of the irradiation. Models have been developed to validate the temperature distribution and heat affected zone during laser irradiation of excised rat skin samples and live anesthetized mouse tissue. Excised rat skin samples and live anesthetized mice were subjected to Nd:YAG pulsed laser (1,064 nm, 500 ns) irradiation of varying powers. A thermal camera was used to measure the rise in surface temperature as a result of the laser irradiation. Histological analyses of the heat affected zone created in the tissue samples due to the temperature rise were performed. The thermal interaction of the laser with the tissue was quantified by measuring the thermal dose delivered by the laser. Finite element geometries of three-dimensional tissue sections for continuum and vascular models were developed using COMSOL Multiphysics. Blood flow was incorporated into the vascular model to mimic the presence of discrete blood vessels and contrasted with the continuum model without blood perfusion. The temperature rises predicted by the continuum and the vascular models agreed with the temperature rises observed at the surface of the excised rat tissue samples and live anesthetized mice due to laser irradiation respectively. The vascular model developed was able to predict the cooling produced by the blood vessels in the region where the vessels were present. The temperature rise in the continuum model due to pulsed laser irradiation was higher than that due to continuous wave (CW) laser irradiation in the

  4. A method to extract successive velocity pulses governing structural response from long-period ground motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuoyu; Li, Yingmin; Wang, Guojue

    2017-06-01

    A series of relatively long-period velocity pulses appearing in the later part of ground motion, which is the characterization of far-source long-period ground motions in basin ("long-period ground motion" for short), is mainly influenced by focal mechanism, basin effect, and dispersion. It was supposed that the successive low-frequency velocity pulses in long-period ground motion caused the resonance of long-period structures in basin, which are of special concern to designers of super high-rise buildings. The authors proposed a wavelet-based successive frequency-dependent pulse extraction (WSFPE) method to identify and extract these pulses with dominant period of interest from long-period ground motions. The pulses extracted by using two frequently used methods (zero-crossing analysis, empirical mode decomposition) were compared to the pulses extracted by using WSFPE. The results demonstrate that the WSFPE provides higher resolution in time-frequency domain than the other two methods do. The velocity pulses extracted by using WSFPE are responsible for the resonance and maximum response of structure subjected to long-period ground motions. WSFPE can be used to make a better understanding of long-period ground motions and to promote the formation of long-period ground motion model which will help the seismic design of long-period structures built in sedimentary basin.

  5. Pulse-Like Rupture Induced by Three-Dimensional Fault Zone Flower Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, Christian; Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2015-05-01

    Faults are often embedded in low-velocity fault zones (LVFZ) caused by material damage. Previous 2D dynamic rupture simulations (H uang and A mpuero, 2011; H uang et al., 2014) showed that if the wave velocity contrast between the LVFZ and the country rock is strong enough, ruptures can behave as pulses, i.e. with local slip duration (rise time) much shorter than whole rupture duration. Local slip arrest (healing) is generated by waves reflected from the LVFZ-country rock interface. This effect is robust against a wide range of fault zone widths, absence of frictional healing, variation of initial stress conditions, attenuation, and off-fault plasticity. These numerical studies covered two-dimensional problems with fault-parallel fault zone structures. Here, we extend previous work to 3D and geometries that are more typical of natural fault zones, including complexities such as flower structures with depth-dependent velocity and thickness, and limited fault zone depth extent. This investigation requires high resolution and flexible mesh generation, which are enabled here by the high-order accurate arbitrary high-order derivatives discontinuous Galerkin method with an unstructured tetrahedral element discretization (P elties et al., 2012). We show that the healing mechanism induced by waves reflected in the LVFZ also operates efficiently in such three-dimensional fault zone structures and that, in addition, a new healing mechanism is induced by unloading waves generated when the rupture reaches the surface. The first mechanism leads to very short rise time controlled by the LVFZ width to wave speed ratio. The second mechanism leads to generally longer, depth-increasing rise times, is also conditioned by the existence of an LVFZ, and persists at some depth below the bottom of the LVFZ. Our simulations show that the generation of slip pulses by these two mechanisms is robust to the depth extent of the LVFZ and to the position of the hypocenter. The first healing

  6. Mimicking lizard-like surface structures upon ultrashort laser pulse irradiation of inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermens, U.; Kirner, S. V.; Emonts, C.; Comanns, P.; Skoulas, E.; Mimidis, A.; Mescheder, H.; Winands, K.; Krüger, J.; Stratakis, E.; Bonse, J.

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic materials, such as steel, were functionalized by ultrashort laser pulse irradiation (fs- to ps-range) to modify the surface's wetting behavior. The laser processing was performed by scanning the laser beam across the surface of initially polished flat sample material. A systematic experimental study of the laser processing parameters (peak fluence, scan velocity, line overlap) allowed the identification of different regimes associated with characteristic surface morphologies (laser-induced periodic surface structures, grooves, spikes, etc.). Analyses of the surface using optical as well as scanning electron microscopy revealed morphologies providing the optimum similarity to the natural skin of lizards. For mimicking skin structures of moisture-harvesting lizards towards an optimization of the surface wetting behavior, additionally a two-step laser processing strategy was established for realizing hierarchical microstructures. In this approach, micrometer-scaled capillaries (step 1) were superimposed by a laser-generated regular array of small dimples (step 2). Optical focus variation imaging measurements finally disclosed the three dimensional topography of the laser processed surfaces derived from lizard skin structures. The functionality of these surfaces was analyzed in view of wetting properties.

  7. Pulse Responses of a Two-layered Printed Circuit with an Improved Line-Pad Connected Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Furukawa, Shinichi; Hinata, Takashi

    The peak value of transmitted pulse in printed circuit boards (PCB) is important for a pulse peak detection devices. When an input line and an output line are connected to each pad with the direction of right angle, the propagating pulses with the narrow time duration separate into some parts and decrease the peak value of pulse response. This paper presents an improved line-pad connected structure. The microstrip line is in contact with a pad from outside by considering the pulse propagation time passing through the via structure. We obtained the large peak value of the pulse response for which the time duration is larger than 0.2ps.

  8. Development and initial testing of a pulse oximetry prototype for measuring dental pulp vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerqueira, M.; Ferreira, M.; Caramelo, F.

    2015-05-01

    The guiding principle of endodontic treatment is to preserve teeth while maintaining its aesthetic and functional roles. To accomplish this goal the assessment of teeth pulp vitality is very important since it will determine the procedures that should be adopted and define the therapy strategy. Currently, the most commonly tests for determining dental pulp state are the thermal and the electrical tests, which are based on nerve response and, because of that, have a relatively high rate of false positives and false negatives cases. In this work we present a simple test to be used in the clinical setting for evaluating noninvasively the existence of blood perfusion in dental pulp. This test is based on pulse oximetry principle that was devised to indirectly measure the amount of oxygen in blood. Although pulse oximetry has already demonstrated its usefulness in clinical environment its usage for the determination of dental pulp vitality has been frustrated by several factors, notably the absence of a suitable sensor to the complex shape of the various coronary teeth. We developed a suitable sensor and present the first trials with promising results, regarding the ability for distinguish teeth with and without blood perfusion.

  9. Migrating temperature "thermo-chromatographic" pulses (TCP) initiated by radio-frequency (RF) heating.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Markus; Kopinke, Frank-Dieter; Roland, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, the astonishing influence of water dosage on a purged dry packed bed of NaY zeolite in the presence of an electric field with a frequency of 13.56 MHz was investigated. The injection of a small amount of water to the inlet of the bed led to pronounced selective heating of the inlet zone by more than 150 K. Thus, water represented a very effective coupling medium for dielectric heating. The selectively heated zone then slowly moved through the whole packed bed and a water pulse finally left the zeolite. This effect correlated with a coupled water and heat flux was called thermo-chromatographic pulse (TCP) emphasizing its analogy to chromatography. The phenomenon could not be performed by using conventional (convective) or microwave heating. It was demonstrated under various conditions and explained by a new model based on own experimental results as well as data from literature. The model will be the objective of a forthcoming publication.

  10. Initiation Mechanisms of Low-loss Swept-ramp Obstacles for Deflagration to Detonation Transition in Pulse Detonation Combustors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    minimal pressure losses. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 113 14. SUBJECT TERMS Pulse Detonation Combustors, PDC, Pulse Detonation Engines, PDE , PDE ...Postgraduate School PDC Pulse Detonation Combustor PDE Pulse Detonation Engine RAM Random Access Memory RDT Research, Design and Test RPL...inhibiting the implementation of this advanced propulsion system. The primary advantage offered by pulse detonation engines ( PDEs ) is the high efficiency

  11. Detonation Initiation and Evolution in Spray- Fueled Pulsed Detonation Rocket Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-28

    the wave front. It is possible that a transient ZND detonation wave is produced first. However, in experiments all such waves evolve to a three...instabilities of initially planar ZND -waves.(see, for example, Gamezo, Desbordes and Oran, 1999, Sharpe and Falle, 1999, 2001, Sharpe,2001, Kasimov and Stewart...generation and strong shock formation, reminiscent of Oppenheim’s(1985) observations. An overdriven ZND -detonation is born initially, similar to the

  12. Periodic surface structures on titanium self-organized upon double femtosecond pulse exposures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas; Sakabe, Shuji

    2015-05-01

    Laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) self-organized on Ti surface after irradiations by femtosecond laser beam composed by double pulses with a fixed time delay of 160 fs. The fluence of the first pulse (FPP), responsible for surface plasma formation, was varied in the range 10-50 mJ cm-2 and always kept below the LIPSS formation threshold fluence (FLIPSS) on Ti for 50-single-shots exposure. The fluence of the delayed pulse (FLP), responsible for LIPSS self-organization, was varied in the range 60-150 mJ cm-2 and always kept above FLIPSS. Regardless the specific fluence FLP of the delayed pulse, the interspace of the grating structures increases with the increase of FPP, that is an increase of the surface plasma density. This tendency suggests that a variation of the surface plasma density, due to a variation of FPP, actually leads to a modification of the grating features. Moreover, we observed that the LIPSS periodicities after double pulse exposures are in quite good agreement with data on LIPSS periodicities after single 160 fs pulse irradiations on Ti surface and with the curve predicted by the parametric decay model. This experimental result suggests that the preformed plasma might be produced in the rising edge of the temporal profile of the laser pulse.

  13. Structural Analysis Using Phase-Stepped, Double Pulsed ESPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyrer, John R.

    1990-04-01

    Optical whole-field testing techniques have been carrots dangled in front of engineers' noses for a considerable period of time. The promise of acquiring meaningful data without upsetting the component nor its environment, has significant attractions. ESPI technology has been modified and pursued with these goals in mind. This paper presents some of the recent work containing several developments which now make the engineering realisations a near term possibility. An overview of the correlation imaging mechanism is presented with a discussion on how this principle type of optical interferometer can be configured to provide the data necessary for analytical use. Attempts to produce instrumentation able to function outside the laboratory have required replacement of continuous wave lasers with Nd.YAG pulsed lasers. The new pulsed lasers are able to be combined with the computer based fringe pattern analysis which has been produced to suit the requirements of the engineer. Experimental results using such equipment are presented and further work is included which demonstrates the ability for speckle interferometry to produce three-dimensional analysis with the data being presented in conventional cartesian form.

  14. Single- and multi-pulse formation of surface structures under static femtosecond irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillermin, M.; Garrelie, F.; Sanner, N.; Audouard, E.; Soder, H.

    2007-07-01

    Femtosecond surface structure modifications are investigated under irradiation with laser pulses of 150 fs at 800 nm, on copper and silicon. We report sub-wavelength periodic structures formation (ripples) with a periodicity of 500 nm for both materials. These ripples are perpendicular to the laser polarization and can be obtained with only one pulse. The formation of these ripples corresponds to a fluence threshold of 1 J/cm 2 for copper and 0.15 J/cm 2 for silicon. We find several morphologies when more pulses are applied: larger ripples parallel to the polarization are formed with a periodicity of 1 μm and degenerate into a worm-like morphology with a higher number of pulses. In addition, walls of deep holes also show sub-wavelength and large ripples.

  15. Suppression of beam induced pulse shortening modes in high power RF generator TW output structures

    SciTech Connect

    Haimson, J.; Mecklenburg, B.

    1992-12-31

    Several different style 11.4 GHz relativistic klystrons, operating with beam pulse widths of 50 ns and using large aperture, tapered phase-velocity TW structures,` have recently demonstrated output RF power levels in the range of 100 to 300 MW without breakdown or pulse shortening. To extend this performance into the long pulse regime (1 {mu}s) or to demonstrate a threefold increase in output power by using higher currents, the existing TW circuit designs must be modified (a) to reduce the cavity maximum surface E-fields by a factor of 2 to 3, and (b) to elevate the current threshold values of the beam induced higher order modes (HOM) to ensure avoidance of RF pulse shortening and associated instabilities. A technique for substantially elevating this threshold current is described, and microwave data and photographs are presented showing the degree of HOM damping achieved in a recently constructed 11.4 GHz TW structure.

  16. Pulse number controlled laser annealing for GeSn on insulator structure with high substitutional Sn concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Moto, Kenta; Sadoh, Taizoh; Miyao, Masanobu; Matsumura, Ryo; Ikenoue, Hiroshi

    2016-06-27

    Crystalline GeSn-on-insulator structures with high Sn concentration (>8%), which exceeds thermal equilibrium solid-solubility (∼2%) of Sn in Ge, are essential to achieve high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices. We investigate non-thermal equilibrium growth of Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) on quartz substrates by using pulsed laser annealing (PLA). The window of laser fluence enabling complete crystallization without film ablation is drastically expanded (∼5 times) by Sn doping above 5% into Ge. Substitutional Sn concentration in grown layers is found to be increased with decreasing irradiation pulse number. This phenomenon can be explained on the basis of significant thermal non-equilibrium growth achieved by higher cooling rate after PLA with a lower pulse number. As a result, GeSn crystals with substitutional Sn concentration of ∼12% are realized at pulse irradiation of single shot for the samples with the initial Sn concentration of 15%. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy measurements reveal the high quality of the grown layer. This technique will be useful to fabricate high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices on insulating substrates.

  17. Pulse number controlled laser annealing for GeSn on insulator structure with high substitutional Sn concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moto, Kenta; Matsumura, Ryo; Sadoh, Taizoh; Ikenoue, Hiroshi; Miyao, Masanobu

    2016-06-01

    Crystalline GeSn-on-insulator structures with high Sn concentration (>8%), which exceeds thermal equilibrium solid-solubility (˜2%) of Sn in Ge, are essential to achieve high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices. We investigate non-thermal equilibrium growth of Ge1-xSnx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2) on quartz substrates by using pulsed laser annealing (PLA). The window of laser fluence enabling complete crystallization without film ablation is drastically expanded (˜5 times) by Sn doping above 5% into Ge. Substitutional Sn concentration in grown layers is found to be increased with decreasing irradiation pulse number. This phenomenon can be explained on the basis of significant thermal non-equilibrium growth achieved by higher cooling rate after PLA with a lower pulse number. As a result, GeSn crystals with substitutional Sn concentration of ˜12% are realized at pulse irradiation of single shot for the samples with the initial Sn concentration of 15%. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy measurements reveal the high quality of the grown layer. This technique will be useful to fabricate high-speed thin film transistors and high-efficiency optical devices on insulating substrates.

  18. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Kenneth R.; Meiss, James D.; Crimaldi, John P.

    2015-03-01

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement.

  19. Structural insights into transcription initiation by yeast RNA polymerase I.

    PubMed

    Sadian, Yashar; Tafur, Lucas; Kosinski, Jan; Jakobi, Arjen J; Wetzel, Rene; Buczak, Katarzyna; Hagen, Wim Jh; Beck, Martin; Sachse, Carsten; Müller, Christoph W

    2017-09-15

    In eukaryotic cells, RNA polymerase I (Pol I) synthesizes precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) that is subsequently processed into mature rRNA. To initiate transcription, Pol I requires the assembly of a multi-subunit pre-initiation complex (PIC) at the ribosomal RNA promoter. In yeast, the minimal PIC includes Pol I, the transcription factor Rrn3, and Core Factor (CF) composed of subunits Rrn6, Rrn7, and Rrn11. Here, we present the cryo-EM structure of the 18-subunit yeast Pol I PIC bound to a transcription scaffold. The cryo-EM map reveals an unexpected arrangement of the DNA and CF subunits relative to Pol I. The upstream DNA is positioned differently than in any previous structures of the Pol II PIC. Furthermore, the TFIIB-related subunit Rrn7 also occupies a different location compared to the Pol II PIC although it uses similar interfaces as TFIIB to contact DNA. Our results show that although general features of eukaryotic transcription initiation are conserved, Pol I and Pol II use them differently in their respective transcription initiation complexes. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  20. Initiation of explosive mixtures having multi-sized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasil'ev, A. A.; Vasiliev, V. A.; Trotsyuk, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Theory of strong blast was used as the basis for the experimental method of determining of the energy of source which provides the initiation of combustible mixture. For mono-fuel mixtures the following parameters were experimentally determined at testing: the critical initiation energy of a cylindrical detonation wave in mixtures 2H2+O2 and C2H2+2.5O2 (exploding wire); the critical initiation energy of a spherical detonation in a mixture of C2H2+2.5O2 (electrical discharge). Similarly, for the double-fuel mixtures of acetylene - nitrous oxide - oxygen (having bifurcation cellular structures) the critical initiation energy of spherical wave was determined also. It was found that for the stoichiometric mixture on both fuel components the critical energy of mixture with the bifurcation structure was undervalued by several times in comparison with the value of the critical energy for the mono-fuel mixture, in which the cell size at a given pressure is determined by the large scale of bifurcation cells. This result shows the decrease of the critical energy with an increase of the number of "hot spots", which are the numerous areas of collision of the transverse waves of large and small scales in a mixture with bifurcation properties.

  1. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Kenneth R. Crimaldi, John P.; Meiss, James D.

    2015-03-15

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement.

  2. Lagrangian Coherent Structures are templates for reaction initiation between initially distant scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Kenneth; Meiss, James; Crimaldi, John

    2014-11-01

    Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) are shown to be effective templates for the location of reactions between initially distant scalars in 2D flows. Computations of reactions and finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields demonstrate that reactions are initiated when the scalars come into contact on a common FTLE ridge at a time that depends upon the initial condition. To show robustness of the phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. Coalescence of highly concentrated filaments leads to transient reaction rates that are orders of magnitude greater than predicted by the well-mixed state. As a consequence, we show that chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, also have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. 1205816.

  3. Uncovering Community Structures with Initialized Bayesian Nonnegative Matrix Factorization

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xianchao; Xu, Tao; Feng, Xia; Yang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    Uncovering community structures is important for understanding networks. Currently, several nonnegative matrix factorization algorithms have been proposed for discovering community structure in complex networks. However, these algorithms exhibit some drawbacks, such as unstable results and inefficient running times. In view of the problems, a novel approach that utilizes an initialized Bayesian nonnegative matrix factorization model for determining community membership is proposed. First, based on singular value decomposition, we obtain simple initialized matrix factorizations from approximate decompositions of the complex network’s adjacency matrix. Then, within a few iterations, the final matrix factorizations are achieved by the Bayesian nonnegative matrix factorization method with the initialized matrix factorizations. Thus, the network’s community structure can be determined by judging the classification of nodes with a final matrix factor. Experimental results show that the proposed method is highly accurate and offers competitive performance to that of the state-of-the-art methods even though it is not designed for the purpose of modularity maximization. PMID:25268494

  4. Modeling the initiation and growth of delaminations in composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Mello, F.J.; Guess, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    A method for modeling the initiation and growth of discrete delaminations in shell-like composite structures is presented. The laminate is divided into two or more sublaminates, with each sublaminate modeled with 4-noded quadrilateral shell elements. A special, 8-noded hex constraint element connects the sublaminates and makes them act as a single laminate until a prescribed failure criterion is attained. When the failure criterion is reached, the connection is broken, and a discrete delamination is initiated or grows. This approach has been implemented in a three-dimensional, finite element code. This code uses explicit time integration, and can analyze shell-like structures subjected to large deformations and complex contact conditions. Tensile, compressive, and shear laminate failures are also modeled. This paper describes the 8-noded hex constraint element used to model the initiation and growth of a delamination, and discusses associated implementation issues. In addition, calculated results for double cantilever beam and end notched flexure specimens are presented and compared to measured data to assess the ability of the present approach to reproduce observed behavior. Results are also presented for a diametrally compressed ring to demonstrate the capacity to analyze progressive failure in a highly deformed composite structure.

  5. Time-resolved detection of structural change in polyethylene films using mid-infrared laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, Eduard; Mizobata, Keisuke; Nakajima, Takashi Zen, Heishun; Kii, Toshiteru; Ohgaki, Hideaki

    2015-07-27

    Some of the vibrational modes of crystalline organic polymers are known to be sensitive to the structural change from the crystalline phase to the amorphous phase, and vice versa. Using a mid-infrared (mid-IR) pulse from a free-electron laser as a probe, we demonstrate the time-resolved detection of structural change in crystalline polymer (polyethylene) films upon laser heating by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Transmittance of the resonant mid-IR pulse almost instantaneously changes before and after the Nd:YAG laser pulse if its fluence is sufficient to induce the structural change in the film. The developed technique would be useful to study the time-dependent dynamics of the structural change in various materials.

  6. Structural relaxation phenomena in silicate glasses modified by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Seuthe, Thomas; Mermillod-Blondin, Alexandre; Grehn, Moritz; Bonse, Jörn; Wondraczek, Lothar; Eberstein, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Structural relaxation phenomena in binary and multicomponent lithium silicate glasses were studied upon irradiation with femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (800 nm central wavelength, 130 fs pulse duration) and subsequent thermal annealing experiments. Depending on the annealing temperature, micro-Raman spectroscopy analyses evidenced different relaxation behaviours, associated to bridging and non-bridging oxygen structures present in the glass network. The results indicate that the mobility of lithium ions is an important factor during the glass modification with fs-laser pulses. Quantitative phase contrast imaging (spatial light interference microscopy) revealed that these fs-laser induced structural modifications are closely related to local changes in the refractive index of the material. The results establish a promising strategy for tailoring fs-laser sensitivity of glasses through structural mobility. PMID:28266615

  7. Structural relaxation phenomena in silicate glasses modified by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuthe, Thomas; Mermillod-Blondin, Alexandre; Grehn, Moritz; Bonse, Jörn; Wondraczek, Lothar; Eberstein, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Structural relaxation phenomena in binary and multicomponent lithium silicate glasses were studied upon irradiation with femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (800 nm central wavelength, 130 fs pulse duration) and subsequent thermal annealing experiments. Depending on the annealing temperature, micro-Raman spectroscopy analyses evidenced different relaxation behaviours, associated to bridging and non-bridging oxygen structures present in the glass network. The results indicate that the mobility of lithium ions is an important factor during the glass modification with fs-laser pulses. Quantitative phase contrast imaging (spatial light interference microscopy) revealed that these fs-laser induced structural modifications are closely related to local changes in the refractive index of the material. The results establish a promising strategy for tailoring fs-laser sensitivity of glasses through structural mobility.

  8. Short pulse duration shock initiation experiments plus ignition and growth modeling on Composition B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Chadd M.; Tarver, Craig M.

    2014-05-01

    Composition B (63% RDX, 36% TNT, 1% wax) is still a widely used energetic material whose shock initiation characteristics are necessary to understand. It is now possible to shock initiate Composition B and other secondary explosives at diameters well below their characteristic failure diameters for unconfined self-sustaining detonation. This is done using very high velocity, very thin, small diameter flyer plates accelerated by electric or laser power sources. Recently experimental detonation versus failure to detonate threshold flyer velocity curves for Composition B using several KaptonTM flyer thicknesses and diameters were measured. Flyer plates with diameters of 2 mm successfully detonated Composition B, which has a nominal failure diameter of 4.3 mm. The shock pressures required for these initiations are greater than the Chapman-Jouguet (C-J) pressure in self-sustaining Composition B detonation waves. The initiation process is two-dimensional, because both rear and side rarefactions can affect the shocked Composition B reaction rates. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model for Composition B is extended to yield accurate simulations of this new threshold velocity data for various flyer thicknesses.

  9. Effect of pulsed light on activity and structural changes of horseradish peroxidase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of pulsed light (PL) on the activity and structure of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in buffer solution. Enzyme residual activities were measured after PL. Surface topography, secondary, and tertiary structures of HRP were determined using ...

  10. Local field enhancement on metallic periodic surface structures produced by femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Ionin, Andrei A; Kudryashov, Sergei I; Ligachev, A E; Makarov, Sergei V; Mel'nik, N N; Rudenko, A A; Seleznev, L V; Sinitsyn, D V; Khmelnitskii, R A

    2013-04-30

    Periodic surface structures on aluminium are produced by femtosecond laser pulses for efficient excitation of surface electromagnetic waves using a strong objective (NA = 0.5). The local electromagnetic field enhancement on the structures is measured using the technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering from pyridine molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  11. Layered structure in the interaction of thin foil with two laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yahong; Shen, Baifei E-mail: jill@siom.ac.cn; Yu, Wei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhang, Xiaomei; Ji, Liangliang E-mail: jill@siom.ac.cn; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Zhang, Lingang; Wen, Meng

    2014-02-15

    An interesting layered structure of multiple high density layers are formed when two counter-propagating circularly polarized laser pulses with the same polarization direction irradiate on an ultra-thin foil. This structure changes periodically. For light atoms most of which electrons may be fully ionized, this layered structure can keep for dozens of laser periods after the laser-foil interaction. This interesting structure may have potential applications.

  12. Initiation structure of oblique detonation waves behind conical shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Pengfei; Ng, Hoi Dick; Teng, Honghui; Jiang, Zonglin

    2017-08-01

    The understanding of oblique detonation dynamics has both inherent basic research value for high-speed compressible reacting flow and propulsion application in hypersonic aerospace systems. In this study, the oblique detonation structures formed by semi-infinite cones are investigated numerically by solving the unsteady, two-dimensional axisymmetric Euler equations with a one-step irreversible Arrhenius reaction model. The present simulation results show that a novel wave structure, featured by two distinct points where there is close-coupling between the shock and combustion front, is depicted when either the cone angle or incident Mach number is reduced. This structure is analyzed by examining the variation of the reaction length scale and comparing the flow field with that of planar, wedge-induced oblique detonations. Further simulations are performed to study the effects of chemical length scale and activation energy, which are both found to influence the formation of this novel structure. The initiation mechanism behind the conical shock is discussed to investigate the interplay between the effect of the Taylor-Maccoll flow, front curvature, and energy releases from the chemical reaction in conical oblique detonations. The observed flow fields are interpreted by means of the energetic limit as in the critical regime for initiation of detonation.

  13. Initial experiments using radial foils on the Cornell Beam Research Accelerator pulsed power generator

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdain, P.-A.; Blesener, I. C.; Greenly, J. B.; Hammer, D. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Kusse, B. R.; Schrafel, P. C.

    2010-01-15

    A novel technique involving radial foil explosions can produce high energy density plasmas. A current flows radially inward in a 5 mum thin aluminum foil from a circular anode, which contacts the foil on its outer rim, to the cathode, which connects to the foil at its geometrical center. When using small 'pin' cathodes (approx1 mm in diameter) on a medium size pulsed-current generator such as the Cornell Beam Research Accelerator, the central magnetic field approaches 400 T, yielding magnetic pressures larger than 0.5 Mbar. While the dynamics is similar to radial wire arrays, radial foil discharges have very distinct characteristics. First a plasma jet forms, with densities near 5x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}. JxB forces lift the foil upward with velocities of approx200 km/s. A plasma bubble with electron densities superior to 5x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} then develops, surrounding a central plasma column, carrying most of the cathode current. X-ray bursts coming from the center of this column were recorded at 1 keV photon energy. As the magnetic bubble explodes, ballistic plasma projectiles form and escape with velocities exceeding 300 km/s. Laser shadowgraphy and interferometry, gated extreme ultraviolet imaging and miniature Bdot probes are used to investigate the magnetohydrodynamics properties of such configurations.

  14. Simulation and initial experiments of a high power pulsed TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, R.; Saghafifar, H.; Koushki, A. M.; Ganjovi, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the output characteristics of a UV pin array pre-ionized TEA CO2 laser have been simulated and compared with the associated experimental data. In our simulation, a new theoretical model has been improved for transient behavior analysis of the discharge current pulse. The laser discharge tube was modeled by a nonlinear RLC electric circuit as a real model for electron density calculation. This model was coupled with a six-temperature model (6TM) in order to simulation dynamic emission processes of the TEA CO2 laser. The equations were solved numerically by the fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical method and some important variables such as current and voltage of the main discharge, resistance of the plasma column and electron density in the main discharge region, were calculated as functions of time. The effects of non-dissociation factor, rotational quantum number and output coupler reflectivity were also studied theoretically. The experimental and simulation results are in good agreement.

  15. Phase mapping of ultrashort pulses in bimodal photonic structures: A window on local group velocity dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersen, H.; van Dijk, E. M. H. P.; Korterik, J. P.; van Hulst, N. F.; Kuipers, L.

    2004-12-01

    The amplitude and phase evolution of ultrashort pulses in a bimodal waveguide structure has been studied with a time-resolved photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). When waveguide modes overlap in time intriguing phase patterns are observed. Phase singularities, arising from interference between different modes, are normally expected at equidistant intervals determined by the difference in effective index for the two modes. However, in the pulsed experiments the distance between individual singularities is found to change not only within one measurement frame, but even depends strongly on the reference time. To understand this observation it is necessary to take into account that the actual pulses generating the interference signal change shape upon propagation through a dispersive medium. This implies that the spatial distribution of phase singularities contains direct information on local dispersion characteristics. At the same time also the mode profiles, wave vectors, pulse lengths, and group velocities of all excited modes in the waveguide are directly measured. The combination of these parameters with an analytical model for the time-resolved PSTM measurements shows that the unique spatial phase information indeed gives a direct measure for the group velocity dispersion of individual modes. As a result interesting and useful effects, such as pulse compression, pulse spreading, and pulse reshaping become accessible in a local measurement.

  16. Phase mapping of ultrashort pulses in bimodal photonic structures: a window on local group velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Gersen, H; van Dijk, E M H P; Korterik, J P; van Hulst, N F; Kuipers, L

    2004-12-01

    The amplitude and phase evolution of ultrashort pulses in a bimodal waveguide structure has been studied with a time-resolved photon scanning tunneling microscope (PSTM). When waveguide modes overlap in time intriguing phase patterns are observed. Phase singularities, arising from interference between different modes, are normally expected at equidistant intervals determined by the difference in effective index for the two modes. However, in the pulsed experiments the distance between individual singularities is found to change not only within one measurement frame, but even depends strongly on the reference time. To understand this observation it is necessary to take into account that the actual pulses generating the interference signal change shape upon propagation through a dispersive medium. This implies that the spatial distribution of phase singularities contains direct information on local dispersion characteristics. At the same time also the mode profiles, wave vectors, pulse lengths, and group velocities of all excited modes in the waveguide are directly measured. The combination of these parameters with an analytical model for the time-resolved PSTM measurements shows that the unique spatial phase information indeed gives a direct measure for the group velocity dispersion of individual modes. As a result interesting and useful effects, such as pulse compression, pulse spreading, and pulse reshaping become accessible in a local measurement.

  17. Statistical characterization of the internal structure of noiselike pulses using a nonlinear optical loop mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottiez, O.; Paez-Aguirre, R.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrés, M. V.; Kuzin, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work we study statistically the internal structure of noiselike pulses generated by a passively mode-locked fiber laser. For this purpose, we use a technique that allows estimating the distribution of the amplitudes of the sub-pulses in the bunch. The technique takes advantage of the fast response of the optical Kerr effect in a fiber nonlinear optical loop mirror (NOLM). It requires the measurement of the energy transfer characteristic of the pulses through the NOLM, and the numerical resolution of a system of nonlinear algebraic equations. The results yield a strongly asymmetric distribution, with a high-amplitude tail that is compatible with the existence of extreme-intensity sub-pulses in the bunch. Following the recent discovery of pulse-energy rogue waves and spectral rogue waves in the noiselike pulse regime, we propose a new way to look for extreme events in this particular mode of operation of mode-locked fiber lasers, and confirm that rogue wave generation is a key ingredient in the complex dynamics of these unconventional pulses.

  18. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  19. Nanofractal structure consisting of nanoparticles produced by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Nishikawa, Kumiko; Takano, Kei; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Kawamura, Tohru; Okino, Akitoshi; Hotta, Eiki; Nayuki, Takuya; Oishi, Yuji; Fujii, Takashi; Wang, Xiaofang; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2006-12-11

    By irradiating subpicosecond laser onto an iron plate, a nanofibrous structure consisting of iron nanoparticles with diameters less than 12 nm was produced. The nanofibrous structure was found to be three-dimensional fractal, and its fractal dimension measured from field-emission scanning electron microscopy images conserved the same fractal dimension of 1.73 in the wide-scale range from 30 nm to 60 {mu}m, and the smallest fractal structure was less than 10 nm. The growth of this fractal is related to the cluster-cluster aggregation model, and it suggests that the fractal structure grew by the attachment of clusters consisting of nanoparticles.

  20. Pressure-Energy Coupling, Sound Speed, and Shock Initiation Experiments on Explosives Using Pulsed Electron Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    azide, KDNBF , and single crystal specimens of RDX, PETN, and lead azide. The experiments on the lead azide were unsuccessful. However, sound speed...and thermomechanical response data were obtained on the pressed pellets of KDNBF and on the single crystal specimens of RDX and PETN that allow...calculation of components of the Gruneisen tensor for these materials. Shock initiation experiments on KDNBF were also performed. (Modified author abstract)

  1. Evaluation and Selection of an Efficient Fuel/Air Initiation Strategy for Pulse Detonation Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    8 Figure 5. ZND One-Dimensional Wave Structure (From Ref. 6)...................................10 Figure 6. Three-Dimensional Detonation...is what has become known as the ZND model of a one-dimensional detonation wave. 10 Fi 3 D t ti W P fil (F [3]) Figure 5. ZND One-Dimensional...Wave Structure (From Ref. 6) As seen in the ZND model, the pressure, density, and temperature sharply rise as the relatively-thin, planar shock

  2. Structural engineering of nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide by pulse anodization of aluminium.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo; Schwirn, Kathrin; Steinhart, Martin; Pippel, Eckhard; Scholz, Roland; Gösele, Ulrich

    2008-04-01

    Nanoporous anodic aluminium oxide has traditionally been made in one of two ways: mild anodization or hard anodization. The first method produces self-ordered pore structures, but it is slow and only works for a narrow range of processing conditions; the second method, which is widely used in the aluminium industry, is faster, but it produces films with disordered pore structures. Here we report a novel approach termed "pulse anodization" that combines the advantages of the mild and hard anodization processes. By designing the pulse sequences it is possible to control both the composition and pore structure of the anodic aluminium oxide films while maintaining high throughput. We use pulse anodization to delaminate a single as-prepared anodic film into a stack of well-defined nanoporous alumina membrane sheets, and also to fabricate novel three-dimensional nanostructures.

  3. Processing Structures on Human Fingernail Surfaces Using a Focused Near-Infrared Femtosecond Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayasaki, Yoshio; Takagi, Hayato; Takita, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Nishida, Nobuo; Misawa, Hiroaki

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the processing of a human fingernail surface using a tightly focused femtosecond laser pulse. The processed structure in the fingernail surface is strongly dependent on the focus position and irradiation energy of the single laser pulse. We observed a ring, a simple pit, a small pit with a surrounding uplift, an irregular jagged surface, and a swell containing a void, depending on the focus position. We also observed a sudden change in the size of the processed structure according to the irradiation pulse energy. From a linear theoretical estimation based on the diffraction of the laser beam, we found that the sudden change is primarily due to the diffraction pattern generated by the circular aperture of the objective lens. We also describe the processing features by comparing the structures processed in a fingernail with those processed in glass.

  4. Field deployment and initial results from micro-pulse lidar systems during NASA's DISCOVER AQ campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkoff, T.; Hoff, R. M.; Delgado, R.; Sullivan, J.; Thomas, A.; Lawrence, W. T.; Jones, T.; Decola, P.; Mathur, S.; Zheng, Y.; Wyant, G. J.; Blucher, R. G.; Piatt, R.; Abderrahman, M.; Martins, D. K.; Auvil, R.; Woodman, M.; Connell, R.; Hicks, M.; Venable, D. D.; Demoz, B.; Tzortziou, M.; De Rosa, P. J.; Pickering, K. E.; Starr, D.; Welton, E. J.; Holben, B. N.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Crawford, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    To further improve satellite analysis of surface pollution and related atmospheric and air quality forecast models, NASA conducted the DISCOVER-AQ Mission in the Baltimore-Washington region during July 2011. Data were collected from a combination of surface sites and research aircraft to provide a comprehensive assessment of the conditions leading up to and during air pollution events. Surface sensors included micro-pulse lidar (MPL) systems at various locations, forming a regional scale lidar network that provided continuous atmospheric backscatter profiling of aerosols and clouds throughout the campaign time-frame. Some of the sites used the Sigma Space "MiniMPL", a newer version of MPL that is smaller and more compact, but with a more limited range when compared to conventional MPL systems. One of these systems was deployed on the NOAA research vessel R-8501 SRVX from July 14-20, to enable atmospheric profiling on the Chesapeake Bay. In addition, two established NASA-MPLNET sites in the region (NASA-GSFC/Greenbelt MD & UMBC/Catonsville, MD), provide additional profiling data sources that benefit DISCOVER-AQ efforts. An overview and data status will be provided for the MPLs operating in the region, including site descriptions and examples of aerosol and cloud features during polluted and non-polluted conditions. By providing continuous profiling during the campaign, the MPL systems provide an important link to help relate in-situ surface, airborne, and space-based column-integrated measurements, and enable a more detailed study of a variety of conditions such as aerosol transport, diurnal cycle characteristics, and planetary boundary layer heights and dynamics.

  5. WC/Co composite surface structure and nano graphite precipitate induced by high current pulsed electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, S. Z.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, Y.; Gey, N.; Grosdidier, T.; Dong, C.

    2013-11-01

    High current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) irradiation was conducted on a WC-6% Co hard alloy with accelerating voltage of 27 kV and pulse duration of 2.5 μs. The surface phase structure was examined by using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (GAXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) methods. The surface tribological properties were measured. It was found that after 20 pulses of HCPEB irradiation, the surface structure of WC/Co hard alloy was modified dramatically and composed of a mixture of nano-grained WC1-x, Co3W9C4, Co3W3C phases and graphite precipitate domains ˜50 nm. The friction coefficient of modified surface decreased to ˜0.38 from 0.6 of the initial state, and the wear rate reduced from 8.4 × 10-5 mm3/min to 6.3 × 10-6 mm3/min, showing a significant self-lubricating effect.

  6. Structural basis of initial RNA polymerase II transcription.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Alan C M; Sainsbury, Sarah; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-11-04

    During transcription initiation by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, a transient open promoter complex (OC) is converted to an initially transcribing complex (ITC) containing short RNAs, and to a stable elongation complex (EC). We report structures of a Pol II-DNA complex mimicking part of the OC, and of complexes representing minimal ITCs with 2, 4, 5, 6, and 7 nucleotide (nt) RNAs, with and without a non-hydrolyzable nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) in the insertion site +1. The partial OC structure reveals that Pol II positions the melted template strand opposite the active site. The ITC-mimicking structures show that two invariant lysine residues anchor the 3'-proximal phosphate of short RNAs. Short DNA-RNA hybrids adopt a tilted conformation that excludes the +1 template nt from the active site. NTP binding induces complete DNA translocation and the standard hybrid conformation. Conserved NTP contacts indicate a universal mechanism of NTP selection. The essential residue Q1078 in the closed trigger loop binds the NTP 2'-OH group, explaining how the trigger loop couples catalysis to NTP selection, suppressing dNTP binding and DNA synthesis.

  7. Electrodynamics of a planar photodiode discharge for an obliquely incident initiating laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarev, Y. N. Syrtsova, Yu. G.

    2012-01-15

    An approximate analytic solution of Maxwell's equations is obtained inside a photodiode. Analysis of this solution shows that the earlier discovered significant decrease in the radiation field characteristics over an anode is caused by a considerable increase in the amplitude of a wave generated inside the photodiode, which for angles of incidence {theta} {yields} {pi}/2 achieves a value comparable to the initial electric field strength applied to the photodiode. In this case, the electromagnetic energy flux density inside the photodiode exceeds tens times or more the electromagnetic energy flux density over the anode. The results of numerical calculations confirm the analytic results.

  8. Monitoring of initial patterns and structures in an artificial catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang; Gerwin, Werner; Biemelt, Detlef; Fischer, Anton

    2010-05-01

    To combine process-oriented research on initial development of ecosystems with interactions and co-development of spatial patterns and structures the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre (SFB/TRR) 38 (www.tu-cottbus.de/sfb_trr) was established as an initiative of three universities (BTU Cottbus, TU Munich and ETH Zurich). The objective of the SFB/TRR 38 is to enhance our understanding of structure genesis in ecosystems and of process dynamics as well as their interactions during the initial development phase. The aim is to integrate these feedback mechanisms in the analysis of water and element budgets at the catchment scale and to implement them into models. To allow the clear definition of starting conditions at ´point zeró and to be able to integrate spatially distributed processes and patterns to larger units, an artificial catchment was constructed in the mining area of Lusatia/Germany as the main research site (Gerwin et al. 2009a). With an area of about 6 ha, this catchment ´Chicken Creeḱ is to our knowledge the largest artificial catchment worldwide. It was constructed as a 2-4 m layer of post-glacial sandy to loamy sediments overlying a 1-2 m layer of Tertiary clay that forms a shallow pan and seals the whole catchment at the base. No further measures of restoration like planting, amelioration or fertilization were carried out to allow natural succession and undisturbed development. Due to the artificial construction, boundary conditions of this site are clearly defined including well documented inner structures as compared to natural catchments. It is assumed that the interaction of patterns and processes during initial development will proceed from simpler to more complex states of the systems and that different stages along this phase can be identified at the catchment level. Changes within the catchment are intensively monitored since 2005, when construction finished (Gerwin et al. 2009b), including intensive on-site measurements and micro

  9. Experimental study of filamentation of high-power ultrashort laser pulses with initial angular divergence in air

    SciTech Connect

    Geints, Yu E; Zemlyanov, A A; Kabanov, Andrey M; Matvienko, Gennady G; Stepanov, A N

    2013-04-30

    Experimental study of the nonlinear propagation of near-IR gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses in air in the self-focusing and filamentation regimes have been performed in open air and in laboratory. The influence of the initial geometric divergence (both positive and negative) of the laser beam with an irregular intensity profile on the transverse light energy distribution at the end of the path is studied. It is shown experimentally that the displacement of the filamentation region due to geometric focusing or defocusing, makes it possible to control the number and spatial location of light energy density peaks in the receiving plane. The conditions under which a light filament can be reconstructed after the beam transmission through a linear focal waist are determined. A semi-empirical threshold relation is obtained for the beam focusing force and the beam power, when light beam undergoes filamentation behind the geometric focus of the optical system. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  10. Experimental study of filamentation of high-power ultrashort laser pulses with initial angular divergence in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu E.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Kabanov, Andrey M.; Matvienko, Gennady G.; Stepanov, A. N.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental study of the nonlinear propagation of near-IR gigawatt femtosecond laser pulses in air in the self-focusing and filamentation regimes have been performed in open air and in laboratory. The influence of the initial geometric divergence (both positive and negative) of the laser beam with an irregular intensity profile on the transverse light energy distribution at the end of the path is studied. It is shown experimentally that the displacement of the filamentation region due to geometric focusing or defocusing, makes it possible to control the number and spatial location of light energy density peaks in the receiving plane. The conditions under which a light filament can be reconstructed after the beam transmission through a linear focal waist are determined. A semi-empirical threshold relation is obtained for the beam focusing force and the beam power, when light beam undergoes filamentation behind the geometric focus of the optical system.

  11. An initial lunar outpost based on deployable inflatable structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozette, Stewart

    1990-01-01

    The Great Exploration Plan (GEP) has been proposed as an alternative approach for achieving the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) objectives stated by President Bush on 20 Jul. 1989. The GEP is an evolutionary, end-to-end approach for the establishment bases on the Moon and Mars. The GEP deviates from most other proposed SEI architectures by its extensive use of inflatable structures and by its emphasis on Earth-based assembly and test of all components. The following presentation focuses on the design, development and implementation of an inflatable/deployable Lunar outpost as part of the GEP. Programmatic and technical issues associated with this concept are also addressed.

  12. Breakdown voltages for discharges initiated from plasma pulses produced by high-frequency excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaura, Michiteru

    2006-06-19

    The triggering ability under the different electric field was investigated using a KrF excimer laser with a high repetition rate of kilohertz order. Measurements were made of the magnitude of impulse voltages that were required to initiate a discharge from plasmas produced by a high-frequency excimer laser. Breakdown voltages were found to be reduced by 50% through the production of plasmas in the discharge gap by a high-frequency excimer laser. However, under direct-current electric field, triggering ability decreased drastically due to low plasma density. It is considered that such laser operation applied for laser-triggered lightning due to the produced location of plasma channel is formed under the impulse electric field since an electric field of the location drastically reduces temporary when the downward leader from thunderclouds propagates to the plasma channel.

  13. The NIF Shear Experiment: Emergent Coherent Structures and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; Doss, F. W.; Merritt, E. C.; di Stefano, C. A.; Devolder, B. G.; Kurien, S.; Kot, L.; Loomis, E. N.; Murphy, T. J.; Perry, T. S.; Kline, J. L.; Huntington, C. M.; Nagel, S. R.; MacLaren, S. A.; Schmidt, D. W.

    2016-10-01

    The NIF Shear experiments are designed to stress turbulence models at high Atwood numbers, high convective Mach number, and in a highly compressible regime. The NIF laser system is used to drive two hohlraums on either end of the experiment, which convert the laser drive into a bath of soft x-rays, 250eV in temperature. The counter-propagating shocks and flow, pressure balance the shear layer, such that it can grow due to the KH instability in the center of the experiment for 20 ns. These experiments are the first High Energy Density (HED) hydro-instability studies to show emergent coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) structures arising from random broadband seeds, and the first to control the phenomenological evolution of the tracer layer by controlling the initial surface roughness conditions. The change in initial conditions forces the system evolution on a different path that does not appear to reach a universal nor self-similar state by the end of the experiment. The experiment was modeled using the multi-physics hydrodynamic code RAGE with the BHR turbulence model. The initial scale-length of the model is modified to match the data. When the model is turned off, the pure hydrodynamics do not capture the behavior of the mixing layer and cannot match the data.

  14. Time profiles and pulse structure of bright, long gamma-ray bursts using BATSE TTS data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Bloom, E.; Scargle, J.

    1996-04-01

    The time profiles of many gamma-ray bursts observed by BATSE consist of distinct pulses, which offer the possibility of characterizing the temporal structure of these bursts using a relatively small set of pulse-shape parameters. This pulse analysis has previously been performed on some bright, long bursts using binned data, and on some short bursts using BATSE Time-Tagged Event (TTE) data. The BATSE Time- to-Spill (TTS) burst data records the times required to accumulate a fixed number of photons, giving variable time resolution. The spill times recorded in the TTS data behave as a gamma distribution. We have developed an interactive pulse-fitting program using the pulse model of Norris et al. and a maximum-likelihood fitting algorithm to the gamma distribution of the spill times. We then used this program to analyze a number of bright, long bursts for which TTS data is available. We present statistical information on the attributes of pulses comprising these bursts.

  15. Time profiles and pulse structure of bright, long gamma-ray bursts using BATSE TTS data

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Bloom, E.; Scargle, J.

    1996-08-01

    The time profiles of many gamma-ray bursts observed with BATSE consist of distinct pulses, which offer the possibility of characterizing the temporal structure of these bursts using a relatively small set of pulse-shape parameters. This pulse analysis has previously been performed on some bright, long-bursts using binned data, and on some short bursts using BATSE Time-Tagged Event (TTE) data. The BATSE Time-to-Spill (TTS) burst data record the times required to accumulate a fixed number of photons, giving variable time resolution. The spill times recorded in the TTS data behave as a gamma distribution. We have developed an interactive pulse-fitting program using the pulse model of Norris {ital et al.} and a maximum-likelihood fitting algorithm to the gamma distribution of the spill times. We then used this program to analyze a number of bright, long bursts for which TTS data are available. We present statistical information on the attributes of pulses comprising these bursts. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Highly ordered porous alumina with tailor-made pore structures fabricated by pulse anodization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo; Kim, Jae-Cheon

    2010-12-03

    A new anodization method for the preparation of nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) with pattern-addressed pore structure was developed. The approach is based on pulse anodization of aluminum employing a series of potential waves that consist of two or more different pulses with designated periods and amplitudes, and provides unique tailoring capability of the internal pore structure of anodic alumina. Pores of the resulting AAOs exhibit a high degree of directional coherency along the pore axes without branching, and thus are suitable for fabricating novel nanowires or nanotubes, whose diameter modulation patterns are predefined by the internal pore geometry of AAO. It is found from microscopic analysis on pulse anodized AAOs that the effective electric field strength at the pore base is a key controlling parameter, governing not only the size of pores, but also the detailed geometry of the barrier oxide layer.

  17. Structural and Functional Plasticity at the Axon Initial Segment

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Rei; Kuba, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is positioned between the axonal and somato-dendritic compartments and plays a pivotal role in triggering action potentials (APs) and determining neuronal output. It is now widely accepted that structural properties of the AIS, such as length and/or location relative to the soma, change in an activity-dependent manner. This structural plasticity of the AIS is known to be crucial for homeostatic control of neuronal excitability. However, it is obvious that the impact of the AIS on neuronal excitability is critically dependent on the biophysical properties of the AIS, which are primarily determined by the composition and characteristics of ion channels in this domain. Moreover, these properties can be altered via phosphorylation and/or redistribution of the channels. Recently, studies in auditory neurons showed that alterations in the composition of voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels at the AIS coincide with elongation of the AIS, thereby enhancing the neuronal excitability, suggesting that the interaction between structural and functional plasticities of the AIS is important in the control of neuronal excitability. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge regarding structural and functional alterations of the AIS and discuss how they interact and contribute to regulating the neuronal output. PMID:27826229

  18. Formation of laser induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on Ti upon double fs pulse exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemini, Laura; Hashida, Masaki; Nishii, Takaya; Miyasaka, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Shunsuke; Limpouch, Jiri; Mocek, Tomas; Sakabe, Shuji

    2015-03-01

    Recently a parametric decay model was proposed in order to foresee LIPSS interspaces, and experimental results are in reasonable agreement. To confirm the possibility assumed by the model of pre-formed plasma generation, Ti surface was irradiated by a femtosecond (fs) laser beam composed by double fs pulses, with a fixed delay of 160 fs. The fluence of the first pulse (FPP), responsible for surface plasma formation, was varied in the range 10-50 mJ cm-2 and always kept below the LIPSS formation threshold fluence (FLIPSS) of Ti for 50-single-shots exposure. The fluence of the delayed pulse (FLP), responsible for LIPSS formation, was varied in the range 60-150 mJ cm-2 and always kept above FLIPSS. Regardless the specific fluence FLP of the delayed pulse, the interspace of the grating structures increases with the increase of FPP, that is the increase of the surface plasma density. This tendency suggests that a variation of the surface plasma density, due to a variation of FPP, actually leads to a modification of the grating features, highlighting the driving role of the first pulse in LIPSS formation. Moreover, we observed that the LIPSS periodicities after double pulse exposures are in quite good agreement with data on LIPSS periodicities after single 160 fs pulse irradiations on Ti surface and with the curve predicted by the parametric decay model. This experimental result suggests that the preformed plasma might be produced in the rising edge of the temporal profile of the laser pulse.

  19. Convection roll-driven generation of supra-wavelength periodic surface structures on dielectrics upon irradiation with femtosecond pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsibidis, George D.; Skoulas, Evangelos; Papadopoulos, Antonis; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2016-08-01

    The significance of the magnitude of the Prandtl number of a fluid in the propagation direction of induced convection rolls is elucidated. Specifically, we report on the physical mechanism to account for the formation and orientation of previously unexplored supra-wavelength periodic surface structures in dielectrics, following melting and subsequent capillary effects induced upon irradiation with ultrashort laser pulses. Counterintuitively, it is found that such structures exhibit periodicities, which are markedly, even multiple times, higher than the laser excitation wavelength. It turns out that the extent to which the hydrothermal waves relax depends upon the laser beam energy, produced electron densities upon excitation with femtosecond pulsed lasers, the magnitude of the induced initial local roll disturbances, and the magnitude of the Prandtl number with direct consequences on the orientation and size of the induced structures. It is envisaged that this elucidation may be useful for the interpretation of similar, albeit large-scale periodic or quasiperiodic structures formed in other natural systems due to thermal gradients, while it can also be of great importance for potential applications in biomimetics.

  20. Carbon nitride nanocrystals having cubic structure using pulsed laser induced liquid-solid interfacial reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G. W.; Wang, J. B.

    Carbon nitride nanocrystals were prepared using a pulsed laser induced liquid-solid interfacial reaction and transmission electron microscopy, while high resolution electron microscopy characterized their morphology and structure. It is important that the cubic-C3N4 phase was observed. The formation mechanism of the carbon nitride nanocrystals is also discussed.

  1. Pulsed Electron Double Resonance in Structural Studies of Spin-Labeled Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, O. S.; Tsvetkov, Yu. D.

    2013-01-01

    This review deals with the application of the pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) method to studies of spin-labeled DNA and RNA with complicated spatial structures, such as tetramers, aptamers, riboswitches, and three- and four-way junctions. The use of this method for studying DNA damage sites is also described. PMID:23556128

  2. a New 2.0-6.0 GHz Chirped Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer: Instrumental Analysis and Initial Molecular Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Thomas, Javix; Jäger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2017-06-01

    Low frequency microwave spectroscopy (< 10 GHz) is ideal for studies of large molecular systems including higher order molecular complexes. The cold rotational temperature of a pulsed jet makes detections in this region highly attractive for these larger molecular systems with small rotational constants. Here, we report on the construction and initial benchmarking results for a new 2.0-6.0 GHz CP-FTMW spectrometer, similar in design to the 2.0-8.0 GHz spectrometer designed in Brooks Pate's group at the University of Virginia, that takes advantage of numerous improvements in solid-state microwave devices and high-speed digitizers. In addition to details and analysis of the new instrumental design, comparisons to the previous generation 7.5-18.0 GHz spectrometer at the University of Alberta will be presented using the microwave spectrum of methyl lactate as a benchmark. Finally, initial results for several novel molecular systems studied using this new spectrometer, including the tetramer of 2-fluoroethanol, will be presented. C. Perez, S. Lobsiger, N. A. Seifert, D. P. Zaleski, B. Temelso, G. C. Shields, Z. Kisiel, B. H. Pate, Chem. Phys. Lett., 2013, 571, 1-15.

  3. Initial Mechanical Testing of Superalloy Lattice Block Structures Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krause, David L.; Whittenberger, J. Daniel

    2002-01-01

    , which were not considered in the simplified computer models. The fatigue testing proved the value of redundancies since specimen strength was maintained even after the fracture of one or two ligaments. This ongoing test program is planned to continue through high-temperature testing. Also scheduled for testing are IN 718 lattice block panels with integral face sheets, as well as specimens cast from a higher temperature alloy. The initial testing suggests the value of this technology for large panels under low and moderate pressure loadings and for high-risk, damage-tolerant structures. Potential aeropropulsion uses for lattice blocks include turbine-engine actuated panels, exhaust nozzle flaps, and side panel structures.

  4. Boron nitride nano-structures produced by pulsed laser ablation in acetone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nistor, L. C.; Epurescu, G.; Dinescu, M.; Dinescu, G.

    2010-11-01

    Different phases of boron nitride (BN) nano-structures are synthesized from an hBN ceramic target immersed in acetone, by ablation with a high power pulsed Nd: YAG laser. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction (ED) are used to identify the morphology and structure of the prepared colloidal suspensions. It is revealed that by varying solely a single experimental parameter, i.e. the laser pulse fluency, a large variety of BN nano-structures can be produced: nanotubes, very thin graphene-like foils, nano-curls and nano-particles, all with the hexagonal graphite-like hBN structure, as well as high pressure BN phases: orthorhombic explosion E-BN nano-rods, or cubic diamond-like cBN nano-particles.

  5. Plasmonic emission and plasma lattice structures induced by pulsed laser in Purcell cavity on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Huang, Zhong-Mei; Miao, Xin-Jian; Liu, Shi-Rong; Qin, Chao-Jian

    2015-10-01

    The lattice structure image of a plasma standing wave in a Purcell cavity of silicon is observed. The plasma wave produced by the pulsed laser could be used to fabricate the micro-nanostructure of silicon. The plasma lattice structures induced by the nanosecond pulsed laser in the cavity may be similar to the Wigner crystal structure. It is interesting that the beautiful diffraction pattern could be observed in the plasma lattice structure. The radiation lifetime could be shortened to the nanosecond range throughout the entire spectral range and the relaxation time could be lengthened for higher emission efficiency in the Purcell cavity, which results in the fact that the plasmonic emission is stronger and its threshold is lower. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11264007 and 61465003).

  6. Structure of initial crystals formed during human amelogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, F. J. G.; Voegel, J. C.; Yacaman, J.; Frank, R. M.

    1992-02-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis revealed only the existence of carbonated hydroxyapatite (c.HA) during amelogenesis, whereas conventional transmission electron microscopy investigations showed that developing enamel crystals have a ribbon-like habit. The described compositional changes could be an indication for the presence of minerals different from c.HA. However, the absence of identification of such a mineral shows the need of studies by high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) of initial formed human enamel crystals. We demonstrate the existence of two crystal families involved in the early stages of biomineralization: (a) nanometer-size particles which appeared as a precursor phase; (b) ribbon-like crystals, with a structure closely related to c.HA, which by a progressive thickening process tend to attain the mature enamel crystal habit.

  7. Determination of the temporal structure of femtosecond laser pulses by means of laser-induced air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Bao, Wen-Xia; Yang, Jing-Hui; Zhu, Xiao-Nong

    2013-05-01

    A new approach is presented to reveal the temporal structure of femtosecond laser pulses by recording the corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphs of the laser-induced air plasma. It is shown that the temporal structures of femtosecond laser pulses, normally not observable by the ordinary intensity autocorrelator, can be detected through intuitively analyzing the ultrafast evolution process of the air plasma induced by the femtosecond laser pulses under examination. With this method, existence of pre- and post-pulses has been clearly unveiled within the time window of ±150 fs in reference with the main 50-fs laser pulses output from a commercial 1-kHz femtosecond laser amplifier. The unique advantage of the proposed method is that it can directly provide valuable information about the pulse temporal structures' effect on the laser-induced ionization or material ablation.

  8. Multiple quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from laser-wakefield acceleration with spatially structured laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Y.; Li, M. H.; Li, Y. F.; Wang, J. G.; Tao, M. Z.; Han, Y. J.; Zhao, J. R.; Huang, K.; Yan, W. C.; Ma, J. L.; Li, Y. T.; Chen, L. M.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, Z. Y.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2015-08-15

    By adjusting the focus geometry of a spatially structured laser pulse, single, double, and treble quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were generated, respectively, in laser-wakefield acceleration. Single electron beam was produced as focusing the laser pulse to a single spot. While focusing the laser pulse to two spots that are approximately equal in energy and size and intense enough to form their own filaments, two electron beams were produced. Moreover, with a proper distance between those two focal spots, three electron beams emerged with a certain probability owing to the superposition of the diffractions of those two spots. The energy spectra of the multiple electron beams are quasi-monoenergetic, which are different from that of the large energy spread beams produced due to the longitudinal multiple-injection in the single bubble.

  9. Investigation on the structural characterization of pulsed p-type porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, N. H. Abd; Rahim, A. F. Abd; Mahmood, A.; Yusof, Y.

    2017-08-01

    P-type Porous silicon (PS) was sucessfully formed by using an electrochemical pulse etching (PC) and conventional direct current (DC) etching techniques. The PS was etched in the Hydrofluoric (HF) based solution at a current density of J = 10 mA/cm2 for 30 minutes from a crystalline silicon wafer with (100) orientation. For the PC process, the current was supplied through a pulse generator with 14 ms cycle time (T) with 10 ms on time (Ton) and pause time (Toff) of 4 ms respectively. FESEM, EDX, AFM, and XRD have been used to characterize the morphological properties of the PS. FESEM images showed that pulse PS (PPC) sample produces more uniform circular structures with estimated average pore sizes of 42.14 nm compared to DC porous (PDC) sample with estimated average size of 16.37nm respectively. The EDX spectrum for both samples showed higher Si content with minimal presence of oxide.

  10. Estimation of the Lithospheric Component Share in the Earth Natural Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyshkov, S. Y.; Gordeev, V. F.; Polyvach, V. I.; Shtalin, S. G.; Pustovalov, K. N.

    2017-04-01

    Article describes the results of the atmosphere and Earth’s crust climatic and ecological parameters integrated monitoring. The estimation is made for lithospheric component share in the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field structure. To estimate lithospheric component we performed a round-the-clock monitoring of the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field background variations at the experiment location and measured the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field under electric shields. Natural materials in a natural environment were used for shielding, specifically lakes with varying parameters of water conductivity. Skin effect was used in the experiment - it is the tendency of electromagnetic waves amplitude to decrease with greater depths in the conductor. Atmospheric and lithospheric component the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field data recorded on terrain was compared against the recorded data with atmosphere component decayed by an electric shield. In summary we have demonstrated in the experiment that thunderstorm discharge originating electromagnetic field decay corresponds to the decay calculated using Maxwell equations. In the absence of close lightning strikes the ratio of field intensity recorded on terrain to shielded field intensity is inconsistent with the ratio calculated for atmospheric sources, that confirms there is a lithospheric component present to the Earth natural pulsed electromagnetic field.

  11. Regular subwavelength surface structures induced by femtosecond laser pulses on stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Qi, Litao; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu

    2009-06-15

    In this research, we studied the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface using femtosecond laser pulses. A 780 nm wavelength femtosecond laser, through a 0.2 mm pinhole aperture for truncating fluence distribution, was focused onto the stainless steel surface. Under different experimental condition, low-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 526 nm and high-spatial-frequency laser-induced periodic surface structures with a period of 310 nm were obtained. The mechanism of the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures on the stainless steel surface is discussed.

  12. N-pulse particle image velocimetry-accelerometry for unsteady flow-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Liuyang; Adrian, Ronald J.

    2017-01-01

    Flow-structure interaction experiments are a major area of application of instruments capable of simultaneously measuring instantaneous fields of velocity and acceleration. An N-pulse particle image velocimeter-accelerometer (N-P PIVA) employing bursts of N pulses, where N  =  3 or 4, and operating in the high-image-density particle seeding mode is described and demonstrated in the context of a representative flow-structure interaction experiment. The instrument employs two double-pulsed lasers and a high-resolution, fast-framing camera to acquire successive particle images having time separations small enough to perform good interpolation or finite differencing. The interrogation procedure locates the same group of particles at each pulse time using multiple cross-correlations, and a predictor-corrector algorithm enhances the strength of the cross-correlations by centering the windows on the particle groups at each time. A flow-structure experiment was performed in liquid surrounding a horizontal cylinder suspended by two thin, flexible, vertical rods from a slider block driven horizontally and sinusoidally. The value of the Keulegan-Carpenter number is \\text{KC}=4.85 and the frequency parameter (or Stokes number) is β =7.2 . Data from 2-, 3- and 4-pulse systems are compared to assess their relative performance. Measurements from the 4-pulse method with interpolation have smaller mean bias errors than the 3-pulse method with interpolation or the 4-pulse method with least squares, but larger random error. To make measurements close to the surface of the cylinder, a method using near-wall transformation and correlation analysis on a transformed grid is developed. Image processing used to determine the position, velocity and acceleration of the center of the cylinder is described. These measurements, together with the N-P PIVA data allow complete evaluation of each term in the exact, stationary control surface formulation of the fluid force applied to the

  13. Pulsed Flows Along a Cusp Structure Observed with SOO/AIA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Barbara; Demoulin, P.; Mandrini, C. H.; Mays, M. L.; Ofman, L.; Driel-Gesztelyi, L. Van; Viall, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of a cusp-shaped structure that formed after a flare and coronal mass ejection on 14 February 2011. Throughout the evolution of the cusp structure, blob features up to a few Mm in size were observed flowing along the legs and stalk of the cusp at projected speeds ranging from 50 to 150 km/sec. Around two dozen blob features, on order of 1 - 3 minutes apart, were tracked in multiple AlA EUV wavelengths. The blobs flowed outward (away from the Sun) along the cusp stalk, and most of the observed speeds were either constant or decelerating. We attempt to reconstruct the 3-D magnetic field of the evolving structure, discuss the possible drivers of the flows (including pulsed reconnect ion and tearing mode instability), and compare the observations to studies of pulsed reconnect ion and blob flows in the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere.

  14. Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2007-04-03

    Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

  15. Formation of nanoporous structures in metallic materials by pulse-periodic laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murzin, Serguei P.

    2015-09-01

    A method of the formation of nanoporous structures in metallic materials by pulse-periodic laser treatment was developed. In this study, the multicomponent aluminum-iron brass was considered and the nanoporous structure across the entire cross section of the material with a thickness of 50 μm was formed. The method was implemented using a CO2 laser processing unit. The pulse-periodic laser treatment of the Cu-Zn-Al-Fe alloy with pulse frequency of 5 Hz has led to the formation of nanosized cavities due to accumulation of internal stresses during cyclic heating and cooling at high speeds. It was determined that the pores of a channel type with average widths of 80-100 nm are formed in the central region of the heat-affected zone during laser action with thermocycling. When implementing the chosen conditions of the pulse-periodic laser processing, the localness in depth and area of the physical processes occurring in the heat-affected zone is ensured, while maintaining the original properties of the material and the absence of significant deformations in the rest of the volume. This patented process is perspective for the production not only catalysts for chemical reactions, but for ultrafiltration and microfiltration membranes as well.

  16. The Mystic River Watershed Initiative Steering Committee Purpose and Structure

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Mystic River Watershed Initiative (MRWI) works to improve water quality and public access to open spaces in the Mystic River watershed. The MRWI Steering Committee meets regularly to discuss key issues and priority actions related to this initiative.

  17. Structure of nonevaporating sprays. I. Initial conditions and mean properties

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, A.S.P.; Shuen, J.S.; Zhang, Q.F.; Faeth, G.M.

    1985-10-01

    Structure measurements were completed within the dilute portion of axisymmetric nonevaporating sprays. Measurements included: mean velocities, velocity fluctuations, and Reynolds stress of the gas phase; and mean velocities, fluctuating velocities, mass flux, and diameter distributions of the drop phase. The measurements were used to evaluate three typical methods of analyzing sprays: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) analysis, where slip between the phases is neglected; (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) analysis, where slip is considered but effects of drop interactions with turbulence are ignored; and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) analysis, where effects of both slip and turbulence are considered using random-walk computations for drop motion. Measurements of initial conditions of both phases near the injector, mean gas-phase properties, and liquid flux distributions are described herein. Best agreement between predictions and measurements was obtained with the SSF model, which provided a reasonable representation of turbulent dispersion of drops. A companion paper presents additional measurements of drop continuous phase properties. 26 references.

  18. Structure of nonevaporating sprays. I - Initial conditions and mean properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, A. S. P.; Shuen, J.-S.; Zhang, Q.-F.; Faeth, G. M.

    1985-01-01

    Structure measurements were completed within the dilute portion of axisymmetric nonevaporating sprays. Measurements included: mean velocities, velocity fluctuations, and Reynolds stress of the gas phase; and mean velocities, fluctuating velocities, mass flux, and diameter distributions of the drop phase. The measurements were used to evaluate three typical methods of analyzing sprays: (1) a locally homogeneous flow (LHF) analysis, where slip between the phases is neglected; (2) a deterministic separated flow (DSF) analysis, where slip is considered but effects of drop interactions with turbulence are ignored; and (3) a stochastic separated flow (SSF) analysis, where effects of both slip and turbulence are considered using random-walk computations for drop motion. Measurements of initial conditions of both phases near the injector, mean gas-phase properties, and liquid flux distributions are described herein. Best agreement between predictions and measurements was obtained with the SSF model, which provided a reasonable representation of turbulent dispersion of drops. A companion paper presents additional measurements of drop continuous phase properties.

  19. The structure of slip-pulses and supershear ruptures driving slip in bimaterial friction

    PubMed Central

    Shlomai, Hadar; Fineberg, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The most general frictional motion in nature involves bimaterial interfaces, when contacting bodies possess different elastic properties. Frictional motion occurs when the contacts composing the interface separating these bodies detach via propagating rupture fronts. Coupling between slip and normal stress variations is unique to bimaterial interfaces. Here we use high speed simultaneous measurements of slip velocities, real contact area and stresses to explicitly reveal this bimaterial coupling and its role in determining different classes of rupture modes and their structures. We directly observe slip-pulses, highly localized slip accompanied by large local reduction of the normal stress near the rupture tip. These pulses propagate in the direction of motion of the softer material at a selected (maximal) velocity and continuously evolve while propagating. In the opposite direction bimaterial coupling favors crack-like ‘supershear' fronts. The robustness of these structures shows the importance of bimaterial coupling to frictional motion and modes of frictional dissipation. PMID:27278687

  20. JPL self pulsed laser surface measurement system development. [large space deployed antenna structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berdahl, M.

    1980-01-01

    The use of a self pulsed laser system for accurately describing the surface shape of large space deployed antenna structures was evaluated. Tests with a breadboard system verified functional operation with short time resolution on the order of .2 mm, nonambiguous ranging, and a maximum range capability on the order of 150 m. The projected capability of the system is resolution of less than .1 mm over a reasonable time period and a range extension to over 300 m.

  1. Surface modification of structural materials by low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Panin, A. V. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Kazachenok, M. S. E-mail: kms@ms.tsc.ru; Sinyakova, E. A.; Borodovitsina, O. M.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Leontieva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2014-11-14

    Microstructure formation in surface layers of pure titanium and ferritic-martensitic steel subjected to electron beam treatment is studied. It is shown that low energy high-current pulsed electron beam irradiation leads to the martensite structure within the surface layer of pure titanium. Contrary, the columnar ferrite grains grow during solidification of ferritic-martensitic steel. The effect of electron beam energy density on the surface morphology and microstructure of the irradiated metals is demonstrated.

  2. Pulsed second-harmonic generation in nonlinear, one-dimensional, periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalora, M.; Bloemer, M. J.; Manka, A. S.; Dowling, J. P.; Bowden, C. M.; Viswanathan, R.; Haus, J. W.

    1997-10-01

    We present a numerical study of second-harmonic (SH) generation in a one-dimensional, generic, photonic band-gap material that is doped with a nonlinear χ(2) medium. We show that a 20-period, 12-μm structure can generate short SH pulses (similar in duration to pump pulses) whose energy and power levels may be 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than the energy and power levels produced by an equivalent length of a phase-matched, bulk medium. This phenomenon comes about as a result of the combination of high electromagnetic mode density of states, low group velocity, and spatial phase locking of the fields near the photonic band edge. The structure is designed so that the pump pulse is tuned near the first-order photonic band edge, and the SH signal is generated near the band edge of the second-order gap. This maximizes the density of available field modes for both the pump and SH field. Our results show that the χ(2) response is effectively enhanced by several orders of magnitude. Therefore, mm- or cm-long, quasi-phase-matched devices could be replaced by these simple layered structures of only a few micrometers in length. This has important applications to high-energy lasers, Raman-type sources, and frequency up- and down-conversion schemes.

  3. Phase and frequency structure of superradiance pulses generated by relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rostov, V. V.; Romanchenko, I. V.; Elchaninov, A. A.; Sharypov, K. A.; Shunailov, S. A.; Ul'masculov, M. R.; Yalandin, M. I.

    2016-08-15

    Phase and frequency stability of electromagnetic oscillations in sub-gigawatt superradiance (SR) pulses generated by an extensive slow-wave structure of a relativistic Ka-band backward-wave oscillator were experimentally investigated. Data on the frequency tuning and radiation phase stability of SR pulses with a variation of the energy and current of electron beam were obtained.

  4. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Large-scale structures produced on metal surfaces by multiple laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirichenko, N. A.

    2009-05-01

    A mathematical model is constructed to describe the formation of inhomogeneous surface structures 10-50 μm in height on metal surfaces exposed to repetitive laser pulses with the following parameters: pulse duration of ~20 ns, pulse repetition rate of ~10 kHz, pulse intensity in the range 107—108 W cm-2 and beam diameter from 50 to 100 μm. The model takes into account melting of the metal and melt flow over a distorted surface. The surface profile amplitude evaluated in the model agrees with experimental data.

  5. Initial design of a 1 megawatt average, 150 kilovolt pulse modulator for an industrial plasma source ion implantation processor

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, W.A.; Deb, D.

    1994-07-01

    Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) is a materials surface modification process which can be used to improve performance characteristics of manufacturing tooling and products. Since improvements can be realized in surface hardness, reduced friction, wear, galling, and increased resistance to corrosion, PSII is applicable to a broad spectrum of manufactured items. In PSII, the object to be implanted is placed in a weakly ionized plasma and pulsed to a high negative voltage. The plasma ions are accelerated into the object`s surface, thereby changing its` chemical and physical composition. The plasma dynamic load impedance is highly variable, dependent on implant object area, plasma density, and material composition. The modulator load impedance may be a few tens of ohms and a few thousand picofarads early in time. Late in time, the load may appear as 20,000 Ohms and 100 picofarads. The modulator system must accommodate any process changes, in addition to (frequent) initial ``start-up`` object arcs (from impurities). To implant the required ion densities in a minimum of time, multi-kilohertz rep-rates are often required. An evolutionary design approach was utilized to design a cost-effective and reliable modulator system with components of established performance, suitable for a manufacturing environment. This paper, in addition to presenting the anticipated modulator design required for the PSII application, will review similar modulator topologies and determine operational lifetime characteristics. Further improvements in system electrical efficiency can also be realized with incremental design modifications to the high voltage switch tubes. Development options for upgraded switch tubes of higher efficiency will also be presented.

  6. Trends in structural coverage of the protein universe and the impact of the Protein Structure Initiative.

    PubMed

    Khafizov, Kamil; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Almo, Steven C; Fiser, Andras

    2014-03-11

    The exponential growth of protein sequence data provides an ever-expanding body of unannotated and misannotated proteins. The National Institutes of Health-supported Protein Structure Initiative and related worldwide structural genomics efforts facilitate functional annotation of proteins through structural characterization. Recently there have been profound changes in the taxonomic composition of sequence databases, which are effectively redefining the scope and contribution of these large-scale structure-based efforts. The faster-growing bacterial genomic entries have overtaken the eukaryotic entries over the last 5 y, but also have become more redundant. Despite the enormous increase in the number of sequences, the overall structural coverage of proteins--including proteins for which reliable homology models can be generated--on the residue level has increased from 30% to 40% over the last 10 y. Structural genomics efforts contributed ∼50% of this new structural coverage, despite determining only ∼10% of all new structures. Based on current trends, it is expected that ∼55% structural coverage (the level required for significant functional insight) will be achieved within 15 y, whereas without structural genomics efforts, realizing this goal will take approximately twice as long.

  7. Trends in structural coverage of the protein universe and the impact of the Protein Structure Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Khafizov, Kamil; Madrid-Aliste, Carlos; Almo, Steven C.; Fiser, Andras

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth of protein sequence data provides an ever-expanding body of unannotated and misannotated proteins. The National Institutes of Health-supported Protein Structure Initiative and related worldwide structural genomics efforts facilitate functional annotation of proteins through structural characterization. Recently there have been profound changes in the taxonomic composition of sequence databases, which are effectively redefining the scope and contribution of these large-scale structure-based efforts. The faster-growing bacterial genomic entries have overtaken the eukaryotic entries over the last 5 y, but also have become more redundant. Despite the enormous increase in the number of sequences, the overall structural coverage of proteins—including proteins for which reliable homology models can be generated—on the residue level has increased from 30% to 40% over the last 10 y. Structural genomics efforts contributed ∼50% of this new structural coverage, despite determining only ∼10% of all new structures. Based on current trends, it is expected that ∼55% structural coverage (the level required for significant functional insight) will be achieved within 15 y, whereas without structural genomics efforts, realizing this goal will take approximately twice as long. PMID:24567391

  8. High pressure, thermal and pulsed electric-field-induced structural changes in selected food allergens.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Phil E; Van der Plancken, Iesel; Balasa, Ana; Husband, Fiona A; Grauwet, Tara; Hendrickx, Marc; Knorr, Dietrich; Mills, E N Clare; Mackie, Alan R

    2010-12-01

    The effects of high-pressure/temperature treatment and pulsed electric field treatment on native peanut Ara h 2, 6 and apple Mal d 3 and Mal d 1b prepared by heterologous expression were examined. Changes in secondary structure and aggregation state of the treated proteins were characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy and gel-filtration chromatography. Pulsed electric field treatment did not induce any significant changes in the structure of any of the allergens. High-pressure/temperature at 20 °C did not change the structure of the Ara h 2, 6 or Mal d 3 and resulted in only minor changes in structure of Mal d 1b. Ara h 2, 6 was stable to HPP at 80 °C, whereas changes in circular dichroism spectra were observed for both apple allergens. However, these changes were attributable to aggregation and adiabatic heating during HPP. An ELISA assay of temperature treated Mal d 3 showed the antibody reactivity correlated well with the loss of structure. In conclusion, novel-processing techniques had little effect on purified allergen structure. Further studies will demonstrate if these stability properties are retained in foodmatrices. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. A novel structure of transmission line pulse transformer with mutually coupled windings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binxiong; Su, Jiancang; Li, Rui; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Xibo; Wang, Junjie

    2014-03-01

    A novel structure of transmission line transformer (TLT) with mutually coupled windings is described in this paper. All transmission lines except the first stage of the transformer are wound on a common ferrite core for the TLT with this structure. A referral method was introduced to analyze the TLT with this structure, and an analytic expression of the step response was derived. It is shown that a TLT with this structure has a significantly slower droop rate than a TLT with other winding structures and the number of ferrite cores needed is largely reduced. A four-stage TLT with this structure was developed, whose input and output impedance were 4.2 Ω and 67.7 Ω, respectively. A frequency response test of the TLT was carried out. The test results showed that pulse response time of the TLT is several nanoseconds. The TLT described in this paper has the potential to be used as a rectangle pulse transformer with very fast response time.

  10. Structure and dynamics of paramagnetic transients by pulsed EPR and NMR detection of nuclear resonance. [Pulse radiolysis of methanol in D/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of transient radicals in pulse radiolysis can be studied by time resolved EPR and NMR techniques. EPR study of kinetics and relaxation is illustrated. The NMR detection of nuclear resonance in transient radicals is a new method which allows the study of hyperfine coupling, population dynamics, radical kinetics, and reaction mechanism. 9 figures.

  11. Structure of picosecond pulses of a Q-switched and mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donin, V. I.; Yakovin, D. V.; Gribanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    The pulse duration of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, in which Q-switching with mode-locking (QML regime) is achieved using a spherical mirror and a travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator, is directly measured with a streak camera. It is found that the picosecond pulses can have a non-single-pulse structure, which is explained by excitation of several competing transverse modes in the Q-switching regime with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. In the case of cw mode-locking (without Q-switching), a new (auto-QML) regime is observed, in which the pulse train repetition rate is determined by the frequency of the relaxation oscillations of the laser field while the train contains single picosecond pulses.

  12. Structure of picosecond pulses of a Q-switched and mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Donin, V I; Yakovin, D V; Gribanov, A V

    2015-12-31

    The pulse duration of a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, in which Q-switching with mode-locking (QML regime) is achieved using a spherical mirror and a travelling-wave acousto-optic modulator, is directly measured with a streak camera. It is found that the picosecond pulses can have a non-single-pulse structure, which is explained by excitation of several competing transverse modes in the Q-switching regime with a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. In the case of cw mode-locking (without Q-switching), a new (auto-QML) regime is observed, in which the pulse train repetition rate is determined by the frequency of the relaxation oscillations of the laser field while the train contains single picosecond pulses. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  13. Structure of the dense cores and ablation plasmas in the initiation phase of tungsten wire-array Z pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglass, J. D.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Bland, S. N.; Bott, S. C.; McBride, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    The early stages of tungsten (W) wire-array Z-pinch implosions have been studied using two-frame point projection x-ray backlighting on the 1MA COBRA pulsed power generator [J. D. Douglass, J. B. Greenly, D. A. Hammer, and B. R. Kusse, in Proceedings of the 15th IEEE International Pulsed Power Conference, Monterey, 2005 (to be published)]. X-pinch backlighter images with subnanosecond time resolution and 4-10μm spatial resolution have been obtained of individual W exploding wires in 8-wire arrays that show evolution of wire-core and coronal plasma structures. The timing of the X-pinch x-ray bursts relative to the Z-pinch initiation time was adjusted over a 50ns time interval by varying the X-pinch mass per unit length. Wire-cores seen in two images separated in view by 120° show that the expansion is remarkably azimuthally symmetric. A strong correlation is observed between the structure on the dense exploding wire-cores and the structure of the ⩾1018/cm3 ablation plasma being drawn from radial prominences. Plasma ablation velocity was estimated to have a lower bound of 24km/s. The wire-core expansion rate was found to be approximately constant with time over the interval 50-100ns after the start of the current pulse. Finally, micron-scale axial gaps, seen as early as 70ns into the current pulse and persisting from that time, were observed along the wire-core.

  14. The effect of magnetron pulsing on the structure and properties of tribological Cr-Al-N coatings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jianliang; Moore, John J; Mishra, Brajendra; Sproul, Williams D; Rees, John A

    2010-02-01

    The paper will discuss the effect of pulsing single or two unbalanced magnetrons in a closed magnetic field configuration on the structure and properties of tribological Cr-Al-N coatings. Nanocrystalline Cr-Al-N coatings were reactively deposited from Cr and Al elemental targets using two unbalanced magnetrons, which were powered in both dc, pulsing only Al target and asynchronously pulsing both Cr and Al targets at 100 kHz and 50% duty cycle conditions. The ion energy distributions of these deposition and pulsing conditions were characterized using a Hiden Electrostatic QuadruPole Plasma Analyzer. It was found that pulsing two magnetrons asynchronously at 100 kHz and 50% duty cycle produced higher ion energies and significant increased ion fluxes than pulsing none or pulsing only one (Al) target. The structure and properties of Cr-Al-N coatings synthesized under different dc and pulsing conditions were investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nanoindentation and ball-on-disk wear test, and were correlated with the effects of ion energies and ion flux regimes observed in the plasma diagnostics. The advantages of using pulsed magnetron sputtering producing different energetic ion regimes to enhance the ion bombardment on the growing films and therefore achieving the improved density, refinement of grain size and properties are illustrated.

  15. Mathematical Constraints on the Use of Transmission Line Models for Simulating Initial Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, C. L.; Merrill, R. A.; Pasko, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    A significant portion of the in-cloud lightning development is observed as a series of initial breakdown pulses (IBPs) that are characterized by an abrupt change in the electric field at a remote sensor. Recent experimental and theoretical studies have attributed this process to the stepwise elongation of an initial lightning leader inside the thunderstorm [da Silva and Pasko, JGR, 120, 4989-5009, 2015, and references therein]. Attempts to visually observe these events are hampered due to the fact that clouds are opaque to optical radiation. Due to this reason, throughout the last decade, a number of researchers have used the so-called transmission line models (also commonly referred to as engineering models), widely employed for return stroke simulations, to simulate the waveshapes of IBPs, and also of narrow bipolar events. The transmission line (TL) model approach is to prescribe the source current dynamics in a certain manner to match the measured E-field change waveform, with the purpose of retrieving key information about the source, such as its height, peak current, size, speed of charge motion, etc. Although the TL matching method is not necessarily physics-driven, the estimated source characteristics can give insights on the dominant length- and time-scales, as well as, on the energetics of the source. This contributes to better understanding of the environment where the onset and early stages of lightning development takes place.In the present work, we use numerical modeling to constrain the number of source parameters that can be confidently inferred from the observed far-field IBP waveforms. We compare different modified TL models (i.e., with different attenuation behaviors) to show that they tend to produce similar waveforms in conditions where the channel is short. We also demonstrate that it is impossible to simultaneously retrieve the speed of source current propagation and channel length from an observed IBP waveform, in contrast to what has been

  16. Cubic Structure and Cation Disordering in Ybco Thin Film Deposited by High Speed Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Jeong-Dae; Sung, Gun Yong; Kang, Kwang Yong

    We have investigated the crystalline structure of high rate deposited YBa2Cu3Ox thin films prepared by high speed pulsed laser deposition. A cation disordered cubic structure with lattice parameter of 0.39 nm was found in YBCO thin film deposited at 12.2 nm/s deposition rate and 650°C substrate temperature conditions. The short range ordered cubic YBa2Cu3Ox thin film growth at high deposition rate was explained by the short migration length of Y and Ba cation atoms owing to the high incident flux rate.

  17. Structure and Properties of Nanocrystalline Iron Oxide Powder Prepared by the Method of Pulsed Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetlichnyi, V. A.; Shabalina, A. V.; Lapin, I. N.

    2017-04-01

    Colloidal solution of iron oxide nanoparticles is synthesized by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation (Nd:YAG laser, 1064 nm, 7 ns, and 180 mJ) of a metallic iron target in water, and nanocrystalline powder is prepared from this solution by vacuum drying. A composition and structure of the material obtained are investigated by methods of electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and optical spectroscopy. It is established that oxide particles with average size of about 5 nm and Fe3O4 magnetite structure are mainly formed during ablation. Preliminary investigation of magnetic properties of the prepared nanoparticle powders shows that they can be in ferromagnetic and/or superparamagnetic states.

  18. Formation of slantwise orientated nanoscale ripple structures on a single-crystal 4H-SiC surface by time-delayed double femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wanlin; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-08-01

    An effective control of the nanoscale periodic ripple structures on a single-crystal 4H-SiC surface is carried out by temporally delayed double collinear femtosecond laser pulse trains with different linear polarizations. The observed evolution of the ripple slant angle shows a dramatic decrease within an initial time delay range of 10 ps between the two laser pulses, but keeps almost steady for larger time elapse. Through the detailed analyses, we propose a theoretical model to reveal the underlying physics: regarding the double femtosecond laser pulses, the first laser pulse transfers the semiconductor into nonequilibrium states associated with a transient refractive index grating on the surface, which subsequently tends to change the direction of the surface plasmon excitation of the second laser pulse. These behaviors can eventually result in the slantwise oriented laser intensity fringes and corresponding periodic ablation of grooves. Such investigations provide additional insights into the ripple formation processes, which is very important for control of nanomanufacturing materials by femtosecond lasers.

  19. Laser energy density, structure and properties of pulsed-laser deposited zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoutsouva, M. G.; Panagopoulos, C. N.; Kompitsas, M.

    2011-05-01

    Zinc oxide thin films were deposited on soda lime glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition in an oxygen-reactive atmosphere at 20 Pa and a constant substrate temperature at 300 °C. A pulsed KrF excimer laser, operated at 248 nm with pulse duration 10 ns, was used to ablate the ceramic zinc oxide target. The structure, the optical and electrical properties of the as-deposited films were studied in dependence of the laser energy density in the 1.2-2.8 J/cm 2 range, with the aid of X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscope, Transmission Spectroscopy techniques, and the Van der Pauw method, respectively. The results indicated that the structural and optical properties of the zinc oxide films were improved by increasing the laser energy density of the ablating laser. The surface roughness of the zinc oxide film increased with the decrease of laser energy density and both the optical bang gap and the electrical resistivity of the film were significantly affected by the laser energy density.

  20. Pulsed modification of germanium films on silicon, sapphire, and quartz substrates: Structure and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, H. A.; Batalov, R. I. Bayazitov, R. M.; Faizrakhmanov, I. A.; Lyadov, N. M.; Shustov, V. A.; Galkin, K. N.; Galkin, N. G.; Chernev, I. M.; Ivlev, G. D.; Prokop’ev, S. L.; Gaiduk, P. I.

    2015-06-15

    The structural and optical properties of thin Ge films deposited onto semiconducting and insulating substrates and modified by pulsed laser radiation are studied. The films are deposited by the sputtering of a Ge target with a low-energy Xe{sup +} ion beam. Crystallization of the films is conducted by their exposure to nanosecond ruby laser radiation pulses (λ = 0.694 μm) with the energy density W = 0.2−1.4 J cm{sup −2}. During pulsed laser treatment, the irradiated area is probed with quasi-cw (quasi-continuous-wave) laser radiation (λ = 0.532 and 1.064 μm), with the reflectance recorded R(t). Experimental data on the lifetime of the Ge melt are compared with the results of calculation, and good agreement between them is demonstrated. Through the use of a number of techniques, the dependences of the composition of the films, their crystal structure, the level of strains, and the reflectance and transmittance on the conditions of deposition and annealing are established.

  1. THz pulse emission from InAs-based epitaxial structures grown on InP substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevinskas, I.; Butkutė, R.; Stanionytė, S.; Bičiūnas, A.; Geižutis, A.; Krotkus, A.

    2016-11-01

    Undoped InAs and InAs p-n junction epitaxial layers were grown on (100)-cut InP substrates with molecular beam epitaxy. The lattice difference between the substrate and the InAs layers was matched with a graded AlInAs buffer layer. The alloy composition, structural characteristics and carrier mobility of the structures were determined from the high-resolution x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy and Hall-effect measurements, respectively. The optical parameters of the layers were characterized by the emission of terahertz (THz) pulses when the samples were illuminated with femtosecond laser pulses. It has been found that the built-in electric field in the p-n junction enhances the THz emission. Registering THz signals in the quasi-reflection direction, the p-n junction emits more intense radiation in comparison to an undoped bulk InAs. At excitation wavelengths >1.8 μm the InAs p-n junction provides stronger THz pulses than those from (111)-cut p-InAs, the best surface THz emitter known to date. The epitaxial layers were also exposed to a constant magnetic field from neodymium permanent magnets, which further enhances THz emission and allows registering THz radiation in the line-of-sight terahertz time-domain-spectroscopy geometry.

  2. Refractive index-modified structures in glass written by 266nm fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Saliminia, Ali; Bérubé, Jean-Philippe; Vallée, Réal

    2012-12-03

    We demonstrate the inscription of embedded waveguides, anti-waveguides and Bragg gratings by use of intense femtosecond (fs) UV laser pulses at 266nm in pure fused silica, and for the first time, in bulk fused quartz and ZBLAN glasses. The magnitude of induced index changes, depends, besides pulse energy and translation speed, largely on writing depth and varies from ~10(-4) for smooth modifications to ~10(-3) for damaged structures. The obtained results are promising as they present the feasibility of fabrication of short (< 0.2μm) period first-order fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) for applications such as in realization of all-fiber lasers operating at short wavelengths.

  3. Composition and structure modification of a WTi/Si system by short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrović, S.; Gaković, B.; Peruško, D.; Radak, B.; Desai, T.; Kovač, J.; Panjan, P.; Trtica, M.

    2010-03-01

    Picosecond (40 ps) pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation of a WTi thin film on silicon with a wavelength of 532 nm and a fluence 2.1 J/cm2 was performed in air. This led to significant changes of the chemical composition and morphology on the surface of the WTi thin film. The results show an increase in surface roughness, due to formation of conical structures, about 50 nm wide in the base, and a very thin oxide layer composed of WO3 and TiO2, with a dominant TiO2 phase at the top, within the depth of about 20 nm. The thickness of the oxide layer was dependent on the number of laser pulses. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  4. Performance of a Hydrogen Pulsed Electrothermal Thruster. Strategic Defense Initiative Organization Innovative Science and Technology. SBIR. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-28

    Electrothermal thrusters (e.g. arcjet , Fig. 2) also produce ions, but unlike electrostatic ion thrusters can in principle recover their ion production...Hydrogen Pulsed Electrothermal Thruster," SBIR Phase I, AFOSR Contract No. F49620-87-C-0028, 1/30/87 - 7/30/87. 46 hydrogen arcjet , but the efficiency...NO. NO. NO. IACCESSION NO. I1.- TITLE ()idude Security Calcaieon) Performance of a Hydrogen Pulsed Electrothermal Thrust er (SDI) 12- PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  5. Structural Basis of RNA Polymerase I Transcription Initiation.

    PubMed

    Engel, Christoph; Gubbey, Tobias; Neyer, Simon; Sainsbury, Sarah; Oberthuer, Christiane; Baejen, Carlo; Bernecky, Carrie; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-03-23

    Transcription initiation at the ribosomal RNA promoter requires RNA polymerase (Pol) I and the initiation factors Rrn3 and core factor (CF). Here, we combine X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to obtain a molecular model for basal Pol I initiation. The three-subunit CF binds upstream promoter DNA, docks to the Pol I-Rrn3 complex, and loads DNA into the expanded active center cleft of the polymerase. DNA unwinding between the Pol I protrusion and clamp domains enables cleft contraction, resulting in an active Pol I conformation and RNA synthesis. Comparison with the Pol II system suggests that promoter specificity relies on a distinct "bendability" and "meltability" of the promoter sequence that enables contacts between initiation factors, DNA, and polymerase.

  6. Decomposing the Excited State Dynamics of Carotenoids in Light Harvesting Complexes and Dissecting Pulse Structures from Optimal Control Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papagiannakis, Emmanouil; van Stokkum, Ivo H. M.; van Grondelle, Rienk; Vengris, Mikas; Valkunas, Leonas; Cogdell, Richard J.; Larsen, Delmar S.

    Dispersed transient absorption and multi-pump spectroscopies were used to illustrate how the interplay between excited-state dynamics, saturation, and annihilation phenomena in the LH2 protein from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila generates structured pulses in optimal control experiments.

  7. Metal surface coloration by oxide periodic structures formed with nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, Vadim; Karlagina, Yulia; Moskvin, Mikhail; Mikhailovskii, Vladimir; Odintsova, Galina; Olshin, Pavel; Pankin, Dmitry; Romanov, Valery; Yatsuk, Roman

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we studied a method of laser-induced coloration of metals, where small-scale spatially periodic structures play a key role in the process of color formation. The formation of such structures on a surface of AISI 304 stainless steel was demonstrated for the 1.06 μm fiber laser with nanosecond duration of pulses and random (elliptical) polarization. The color of the surface depends on the period, height and orientation of periodic surface structures. Adjustment of the polarization of the laser radiation or change of laser incidence angle can be used to control the orientation of the structures. The formation of markings that change their color under the different viewing angles becomes possible. The potential application of the method is metal product protection against falsification.

  8. Pulse-like rupture induced by three-dimensional fault zone flower structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelties, Christian; Huang, Yihe; Ampuero, Jean-Paul

    2013-04-01

    Mature faults are often embedded in low-velocity fault zones (LVFZs). Numerical simulations of dynamic rupture including a LVFZ by Huang and Ampuero (2011) showed that if the wave velocity contrast between the LVFZ and the country rock is strong enough, ruptures can behave as pulse-like ruptures. The healing front that stops the rupture is generated by reflected waves from the LVFZ-country rock interface. However, the numerical study by Huang and Ampuero (2011) was limited to two-dimensional problems with fault-parallel fault zone structures. Natural fault zones include complexities such as flower structures with depth-dependent velocity and thickness, and limited depth extent. We will show here that the mechanism of pulse generation induced by the LVFZ also operates efficiently in such three-dimensional fault zone structures. This investigation requires high resolution and flexible mesh generation, which are enabled here by the high-order accurate ADER-DG method with an unstructured tetrahedral element discretization (Pelties et al., 2012). Our simulations show that the pulse generation mechanism is robust to the depth extent of the LVFZ and to the position of the hypocenter (whether it is inside or below the LVFZ). In particular, for events with hypocenter deeper than a shallow LVFZ, we find that a healing front emerges soon after the rupture enters the LVFZ, with rise time controlled by the LVFZ properties. Moreover, this healing front reflects from the free surface and propagates downdip beyond the bottom of the LVFZ, inducing there pulse-like rupture with longer rise time. Thus, we find that the depth-dependence of rise time might reflect the depth extent of the LVFZ. References: Huang, Y. and J.-P. Ampuero (2011), Pulse-like ruptures induced by low-velocity fault zones, J. Geophys. Res., 116, B12307, doi:10.1029/2011JB008684. Pelties, C., J. de la Puente, J.-Pl Ampuero, G. B. Brietzke, and M. Käser (2012), Three-Dimensional Dynamic Rupture Simulation with a

  9. Implications of transient changes of optical and surface properties of solids during femtosecond laser pulse irradiation to the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonse, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.

    2011-04-01

    The formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) upon irradiation of silicon wafer surfaces by linearly polarized Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser pulses (pulse duration 130 fs, central wavelength 800 nm) is studied experimentally and theoretically. In the experiments, so-called low-spatial frequency LIPSS (LSFL) were found with periods smaller than the laser wavelength and an orientation perpendicular to the polarization. The experimental results are analyzed by means of a new theoretical approach, which combines the widely accepted LIPSS theory of Sipe et al. with a Drude model, in order to account for transient (intra-pulse) changes of the optical properties of the irradiated materials. It is found that the LSFL formation is caused by the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons, SPPs, once the initially semiconducting material turns to a metallic state upon formation of a dense free-electron-plasma in the material and the subsequent interference between its electrical field with that of the incident laser beam resulting in a spatially modulated energy deposition at the surface. Moreover, the influence of the laser-excited carrier density and the role of the feedback upon the multi-pulse irradiation and its relation to the excitation of SPP in a grating-like surface structure is discussed.

  10. [Raman spectra study of soy protein isolate structure treated with pulsed electric fields].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Yan; Zeng, Xin-An; Han, Zhong

    2010-12-01

    The effect of pulsed electric field on molecular structure of soy protein isolate (SPI) was investigated by Raman spectroscopy method. The applied pulsed electric field was up to 50 kV * cm(-1) with pulse width 40 micros. It was demonstrated from the Raman spectra that the PEF treatment undei 50 kV * cm(-1) had induced disappearance significantly of peak near 2 886 cm(-1) bond. It was also explored that with the increase in treatment time, the polarity of microenvironment of aliphatic amino acid residues and the exposure of tryptophan residues from a buried hydrophobic microenvironment were increased. On the other hand, the interaction of serine acid residues, the C-H plane bend vibration, C-N stretch vibration, and the C=O stretch vibration of aspartic acid and glutamic acid were decreased. The embeding or participation of the tyrosine phenolic groups as hydrogen bond donors was firstly increased with the treatment time (less than 1 600 micros), and afterwards decreased (from 1 600 to 3 200 micros).

  11. Effect on structure and mechanical property of tungsten irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Zhang, Xiaonan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Younian

    2017-09-01

    The anti-thermal radiation performance of tungsten was investigated by high intensity pulsed ion beam technology. The ion beam was mainly composed of Cn+ (70%) and H+ (30%) at an acceleration voltage of 250 kV under different energy densities for different number of pulses. GIXRD analysis showed that no obvious phase structural changes occurred on the tungsten, and microstress generated. SEM analysis exhibited that there was no apparent irradiation damage on the surface of tungsten at the low irradiation frequency (3 times and 10 times) and at the low energy density (0.25 J/cm2 and 0.7 J/cm2). Cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten after 100-time and 300-time irradiation. Shedding phenomenon even appeared on the surface of tungsten at the energy densities of 1.4 J/cm2 and 2.0 J/cm2. The surface nano-hardness of tungsten decreased with the increase of the pulse times and the energy density. The tungsten has good anti-thermal radiation properties under certain heat load environment.

  12. Resistive pulse sensing of magnetic beads and supraparticle structures using tunable pores

    PubMed Central

    Willmott, Geoff R.; Platt, Mark; Lee, Gil U.

    2012-01-01

    Tunable pores (TPs) have been used for resistive pulse sensing of 1 μm superparamagnetic beads, both dispersed and within a magnetic field. Upon application of this field, magnetic supraparticle structures (SPSs) were observed. Onset of aggregation was most effectively indicated by an increase in the mean event magnitude, with data collected using an automated thresholding method. Simulations enabled discrimination between resistive pulses caused by dimers and individual particles. Distinct but time-correlated peaks were often observed, suggesting that SPSs became separated in pressure-driven flow focused at the pore constriction. The distinct properties of magnetophoretic and pressure-driven transport mechanisms can explain variations in the event rate when particles move through an asymmetric pore in either direction, with or without a magnetic field applied. Use of TPs for resistive pulse sensing holds potential for efficient, versatile analysis and measurement of nano- and microparticles, while magnetic beads and particle aggregation play important roles in many prospective biosensing applications. PMID:22662090

  13. Femtosecond laser pulses for fast 3-D surface profilometry of microelectronic step-structures.

    PubMed

    Joo, Woo-Deok; Kim, Seungman; Park, Jiyong; Lee, Keunwoo; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Seungchul; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2013-07-01

    Fast, precise 3-D measurement of discontinuous step-structures fabricated on microelectronic products is essential for quality assurance of semiconductor chips, flat panel displays, and photovoltaic cells. Optical surface profilers of low-coherence interferometry have long been used for the purpose, but the vertical scanning range and speed are limited by the micro-actuators available today. Besides, the lateral field-of-view extendable for a single measurement is restricted by the low spatial coherence of broadband light sources. Here, we cope with the limitations of the conventional low-coherence interferometer by exploiting unique characteristics of femtosecond laser pulses, i.e., low temporal but high spatial coherence. By scanning the pulse repetition rate with direct reference to the Rb atomic clock, step heights of ~69.6 μm are determined with a repeatability of 10.3 nm. The spatial coherence of femtosecond pulses provides a large field-of-view with superior visibility, allowing for a high volume measurement rate of ~24,000 mm3/s.

  14. Structural Influences on Initial Accent Placement in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astesano, Corine; Bard, Ellen Gurman; Turk, Alice

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the phrase-final accent (FA), the French phonological system includes a phonetically distinct Initial Accent (IA). The present study tested two proposals: that IA marks the onset of phonological phrases, and that it has an independent rhythmic function. Eight adult native speakers of French were instructed to read syntactically…

  15. Structural Influences on Initial Accent Placement in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astesano, Corine; Bard, Ellen Gurman; Turk, Alice

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the phrase-final accent (FA), the French phonological system includes a phonetically distinct Initial Accent (IA). The present study tested two proposals: that IA marks the onset of phonological phrases, and that it has an independent rhythmic function. Eight adult native speakers of French were instructed to read syntactically…

  16. Study of structural property of Co ferrite thin film grown by pulsed laser deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nongjai, Razia; Khan, Shakeel; Ahmad, Hilal; Khan, Imran; Asokan, K.

    2012-06-01

    Thin film of Cobalt Ferrite was deposited on Si (1 0 0) substrate using Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) technique. The deposited film was characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS) and Raman Spectroscopy and was found to be single phase, textured along (1 1 1) directions and approximately matching the stoichoimetry of the target with negligible strain. The film had a very uniform and flat surface. Raman spectroscopy measurement further confirmed the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure. T2g Raman mode was missing from the spectra which may be due to cation redistribution and crystallite size effect.

  17. Micro-structuring of thin titanium films with ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Regina; Gschwilm, Tobias; Zacherle, Adrian; Heise, Gerhard; Huber, Heinz P.; Marowsky, Gerd

    2013-03-01

    Electron beam guns with approximately 10 kW power are used for drying printing colors. As exit window for the electrons, 15 μm thin Titanium films are used, their thickness is at the current limit for industrial rolling processes. Thinner exit windows would increase the electron's transmission and therefore reduce the required acceleration voltage, power consumption, shielding against X-rays and in the end machine and processing costs. The Titanium films should locally be thinned to about 5 μm, in the ranges of 3 mm diameter. Ultra-short laser pulses are well known for high precision micro structuring, as they offer small heat effect zones. We optimized the processing parameters and the ultra-short laser ablation of thin Titanium foils to achieve high manufacturing velocity and quality of the surface structure. Experiments with single pulse laser ablation and different spot diameter were conducted to find a connection between spot diameter and ablation threshold. The experiments show no dependency of the thresholds on the laser spot diameter.. First Experiments with different parameters were conducted to structure a three dimensional geometry in thin Titanium foils.

  18. Process-structure-property correlations in pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtered vanadium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasubramanian, Chandrasekaran; Cabarcos, Orlando M.; Drawl, William R.; Allara, David L.; Ashok, S.; Horn, Mark W.; Bharadwaja, S. S. N.

    2011-11-15

    Cathode hysteresis in the reactive pulsed dc sputtering of a vanadium metal target was investigated to correlate the structural and electrical properties of the resultant vanadium oxide thin films within the framework of Berg's model [Berg et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 5, 202 (1987)]. The process hysteresis during reactive pulsed dc sputtering of a vanadium metal target was monitored by measuring the cathode (target) current under different total gas flow rates and oxygen-to-argon ratios for a power density of {approx}6.6.W/cm{sup 2}. Approximately 20%-25% hysteretic change in the cathode current was noticed between the metallic and oxidized states of the V-metal target. The extent of the hysteresis varied with changes in the mass flow of oxygen as predicted by Berg's model. The corresponding microstructure of the films changed from columnar to equiaxed grain structure with increased oxygen flow rates. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicates subtle changes in the film structure as a function of processing conditions. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and charge transport mechanism, obeying the Meyer-Neldel relation [Meyer and Neldel, Z. Tech. Phys. (Leipzig) 12, 588 (1937)], were correlated with the cathode current hysteric behavior.

  19. Fabrication of Nb/Pb structures through ultrashort pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Gontad, Francisco; Lorusso, Antonella Perrone, Alessio; Klini, Argyro; Fotakis, Costas; Broitman, Esteban

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the fabrication of Nb/Pb structures with an application as photocathode devices. The use of relatively low energy densities for the ablation of Nb with ultrashort pulses favors the reduction of droplets during the growth of the film. However, the use of laser fluences in this ablation regime results in a consequent reduction in the average deposition rate. On the other hand, despite the low deposition rate, the films present a superior adherence to the substrate and an excellent coverage of the irregular substrate surface, avoiding the appearance of voids or discontinuities on the film surface. Moreover, the low energy densities used for the ablation favor the growth of nanocrystalline films with a similar crystalline structure to the bulk material. Therefore, the use of low ablation energy densities with ultrashort pulses for the deposition of the Nb thin films allows the growth of very adherent and nanocrystalline films with adequate properties for the fabrication of Nb/Pb structures to be included in superconducting radiofrequency cavities.

  20. Simulation of pulsed optical logic gates based on photonic band gap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedov, Igor; Morozov, Yurii; Gusyatnikov, Viktor; Zheltikov, Aleksei

    2001-04-01

    The change in the refractive index of GaAs due to the light-induced generation of nonequilibrium charge carriers is shown to substantially change the transmission of a one-dimensional GaAs/GaAlAs photonic band-gap structure, allowing low-threshold photonic-crystal optical logic gates to be created. Elementary logic operations of the Boolean algebra performed with nonlinear PBG structures, including the biconditional implication, modulo-two addition, Peirce's arrow, and disjunction, are demonstrated. It is demonstrated that different results of optical switching can be achieved and, consequently, different logic operations can be performed with the same photonic band-gap structure at different delay times by varying the energy of the control light pulse.

  1. Initialization of Tropical Cyclone Structure for Operational Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-30

    656-4704, fax: (831) 656-4769, e-mail: melinda.peng@nrlmry.navy.mil Award Number: N000141010774 Final Report (5/1/2010- 4 /30/2013) LONG-TERM GOAL...controlled by environmental absolute angular momentum. 4 . Evaluation of multiple TC dynamics initialization schemes using COAMPS-TC Three different...Li , and M.-Y. Lee, 2011: Impacts of Central Pacific and Eastern Pacific El Ninos on tropical cyclone tracks over the western North Pacific

  2. Reversible Phase Change Characteristics of Cr-Doped Sb2Te3 Films with Different Initial States Induced by Femtosecond Pulses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Jiang, Minghui; Liu, Bo; Wang, Yang; Zheng, Yonghui; Song, Sannian; Wu, Yiqun; Song, Zhitang; Feng, Songlin

    2016-08-17

    As a kind of chalcogenide alloy, phase change material has been widely used as novel storage medium in optical disk or electrical memory. In this paper, femtosecond pulses are used to study the reversible phase transition processes of Cr-doped Sb2Te3 films with different initial states. The SET processes are all induced by multiple pulses and relate to the increase of crystallized partial in the irradiated spot. When the Cr concentration is 5.3 at % or 10.5 at %, the crystallization mechanism is still growth-dominated as Sb2Te3, which is beneficial for high speed and high density storage, whereas the necessary crystallization energy increases with more Cr-dopants, leading to higher amorphous thermal stability. RESET results by multiple pulses show that Cr-dopants will not increase the power consumption, and the increase in Cr-dopants could greatly increase the antioxidant capacity. Single-pulse experiments show that the RESET process involves the competition of melting/amorphization and recrystallization. The reversible SET/RESET results on different initial states are quite different from each other, which is mainly due to the different surroundings around the irradiated spot. Crystalline surroundings provide higher thermal conductivity and lead to easier crystallization, whereas amorphous surroundings were the reverse. All in all, Cr-doped Sb2Te3 films with suitable composition have advantages for storage with high density, better thermal stability, and lower power consumption; and the suitable initial states could ensure better reversible phase transition performances.

  3. Structure of the Jovian Magnetodisk Current Sheet: Initial Galileo Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Huddleston, D. E.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The ten-degree tilt of the Jovian magnetic dipole causes the magnetic equator to move back and forth across Jupiter's rotational equator and tile Galileo orbit that lies therein. Beyond about 24 Jovian radii, the equatorial current sheet thins and tile magnetic structure changes from quasi-dipolar into magnetodisk-like with two regions of nearly radial but antiparallel magnetic field separated by a strong current layer. The magnetic field at the center of the current sheet is very weak in this region. Herein we examine tile current sheet at radial distances from 24 55 Jovian radii. We find that the magnetic structure very much resembles tile structure seen at planetary magnetopause and tail current sheet crossings. Tile magnetic field variation is mainly linear with little rotation of the field direction, At times there is almost no small-scale structure present and the normal component of the magnetic field is almost constant through the current sheet. At other times there are strong small-scale structures present in both the southward and northward directions. This small-scale structure appears to grow with radial distance and may provide the seeds for tile explosive reconnection observed at even greater radial distances oil tile nightside. Beyond about 40 Jovian radii, the thin current sheet also appears to be almost constantly in oscillatory motion with periods of about 10 min. The amplitude of these oscillations also appears to grow with radial distance. The source of these fluctuations may be dynamical events in tile more distant magnetodisk.

  4. Structure of the Jovian Magnetodisk Current Sheet: Initial Galileo Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Huddleston, D. E.; Khurana, K. K.; Kivelson, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    The ten-degree tilt of the Jovian magnetic dipole causes the magnetic equator to move back and forth across Jupiter's rotational equator and tile Galileo orbit that lies therein. Beyond about 24 Jovian radii, the equatorial current sheet thins and tile magnetic structure changes from quasi-dipolar into magnetodisk-like with two regions of nearly radial but antiparallel magnetic field separated by a strong current layer. The magnetic field at the center of the current sheet is very weak in this region. Herein we examine tile current sheet at radial distances from 24 55 Jovian radii. We find that the magnetic structure very much resembles tile structure seen at planetary magnetopause and tail current sheet crossings. Tile magnetic field variation is mainly linear with little rotation of the field direction, At times there is almost no small-scale structure present and the normal component of the magnetic field is almost constant through the current sheet. At other times there are strong small-scale structures present in both the southward and northward directions. This small-scale structure appears to grow with radial distance and may provide the seeds for tile explosive reconnection observed at even greater radial distances oil tile nightside. Beyond about 40 Jovian radii, the thin current sheet also appears to be almost constantly in oscillatory motion with periods of about 10 min. The amplitude of these oscillations also appears to grow with radial distance. The source of these fluctuations may be dynamical events in tile more distant magnetodisk.

  5. Structural insights into the mycobacteria transcription initiation complex from analysis of X-ray crystal structures

    DOE PAGES

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Lilic, Mirjana; Darst, Seth A.; ...

    2017-07-13

    The mycobacteria RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a target for antimicrobials against tuberculosis, motivating structure/function studies. Here we report a 3.2 Å-resolution crystal structure of a Mycobacterium smegmatis (Msm) open promoter complex (RPo), along with structural analysis of the Msm RPo and a previously reported 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of an Msm transcription initiation complex with a promoter DNA fragment. We observe the interaction of the Msm RNAP α-subunit C-terminal domain (αCTD) with DNA, and we provide evidence that the a CTD may play a role in Mtb transcription regulation. Here, our results reveal the structure of an Actinobacteria-unique insert ofmore » the RNAP β' subunit. Finally, our analysis reveals the disposition of the N-terminal segment of Msm σA, which may comprise an intrinsically disordered protein domain unique to mycobacteria. The clade-specific features of the mycobacteria RNAP provide clues to the profound instability of mycobacteria RPo compared with E. coli.« less

  6. Ultrafast gigantic photo-response in (EDO-TTF)2PF6 initiated by 10-fs laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenlein, Robert William; Itatani, Jiro; Rini, Matteo; Cavalleri, Andrea; Onda, Ken; Ishikawa, Tadahiko; Koshihara, Shin-ya; Shao, Xiangfeng; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Schoenlein, Robert W.

    2006-08-07

    We photo-exited a charge-ordered organic salt (EDO-TTF)2PF6 with sub-10-fs optical pulses. The photo-induced metallic phase appeared within 80-fs after pumping, characterized by large changes in reflectivity (DELTA R/R~0.8) followed by strong coherent phonon modulation

  7. Molecular Structure and Chirality Determination from Pulsed-Jet Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobsiger, Simon; Perez, Cristobal; Evangelisti, Luca; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks; Lehmann, Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy has been used for many years as one of the most accurate methods to determine gas-phase structures of molecules and small molecular clusters. In the last years two pioneering works ushered in a new era applications. First, by exploiting the reduced measurement time and the high sensitivity, the development of chirped-pulse CP-FTMW spectrometers enabled the full structural determination of molecules of increasing size as well as molecular clusters. Second, and more recently, Patterson et al. showed that rotational spectroscopy can also be used for enantiomer-specific detection. Here we present an experimental approach that combines both in a single spectrometer. This set-up is capable to rapidly obtain the full heavy-atom substitution structure using the CP-FTMW features. The inclusion of an extra set of broadband horns allows for a chirality-sensitive measurement of the sample. The measurement we implement is a three-wave mixing experiment that uses time-separated pulses to optimally create the chiral coherence - an approach that was proposed recently. Using samples of R-, S- and racemic Solketal, the physical properties of the three-wave mixing experiment were studied. This involved the measurement of the corresponding nutation curves (molecular signal intensity vs excitation pulse duration) to demonstrate the optimal pulse sequence. The phase stability of the chiral signal, required to assign the absolute stereochemistry, has been studied as a function of the measurement signal-to-noise ratio using a "phasogram" method. G. G. Brown, B. C. Dian, K. O. Douglass, S. M. Geyer, S. T. Shipman, B. H. Pate, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 2008, 79, 053103. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J. M. Doyle, Nature 2013, 497, 475-477. D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 2013, 111, 023008. V. A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J. M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 1152-1155. J.-U. Grabow, Angew. Chem. 2013, 125, 11914

  8. The effect of a negatively chirped laser pulse on the evolution of bubble structure in nonlinear bubble regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vosoughian, H.; Riazi, Z.; Afarideh, H.; Sarri, G.

    2016-12-01

    In the nonlinear bubble regime, due to localized depletion at the front of the pulse during its propagation through the plasma, the phase shift between carrier waves and pulse envelope plays an important role in plasma response. The Carrier-Envelope Phase (CEP) breaks down the symmetric transverse ponderomotive force of the laser pulse that makes the bubble structure unstable. Our studies using a series of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that the utilization of a negatively chirped laser pulse is more effective in controlling the pulse depletion rate, and consequently, the effect of the CEP in the bubble regime. The results indicate that the pulse depletion rate diminishes during the propagation of the pulse in plasma that leads to postponing the effect of Carrier-Envelope Phase (CEP) in plasma response, and therefore, maintaining the stability of the bubble shape for a longer time than the un-chirped laser pulse. As a result, a localized electron bunch with higher maximum energy is produced during the acceleration process.

  9. Fine Structure of Anomalously Intense Pulses of PSR J0814+7429 Radio Emission in the Decameter Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoryk, A. O.; Ulyanov, O. M.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Shevtsova, A. I.; Vasylieva, I. Y.; Plakhov, M. S.; Kravtsov, I. M.

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: The fine structure of the anomalously intense pulses of PSR J0814+7429 (B0809+74) has been studied. The pulsar radio emission fine structure is investigated to determine its parameters in the lowest part of spectrum available for groundbased observations. Design/methodology/approach: The scattering measure in the interstellar plasma have been estimated using the spectral and correlation analyses of pulsar data recorded by the UTR-2 radio telescope. Results: Two characteristic time scales of the anomalously intense pulses fine structure of the PSR J0814+7429 radio emission have been found. The strongest pulses of this pulsar in the decameter range can have a duration of about t 2÷3 ms. These pulses are emitted in short series. In some cases, they are emitted over the low-intensity plateau consisting of the “long” subpulse component. Conclusions: The narrowest correlation scale of pulsar J0814+7429 radio emission corresponds to the doubled scattering time constant of the interstellar medium impulse response. Broader scale of the fine structure of its radio emission can be explained by the radiation of a short series of narrow pulses or relatively broad pulses inside this pulsar magnetosphere.

  10. Pulsed laser deposition to synthesize the bridge structure of artificial nacre: Comparison of nano- and femtosecond lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Melaibari, Ammar A.; Molian, Pal

    2012-11-15

    Nature offers inspiration to new adaptive technologies that allow us to build amazing shapes and structures such as nacre using synthetic materials. Consequently, we have designed a pulsed laser ablation manufacturing process involving thin film deposition and micro-machining to create hard/soft layered 'brick-bridge-mortar' nacre of AlMgB{sub 14} (hard phase) with Ti (soft phase). In this paper, we report pulsed laser deposition (PLD) to mimic brick and bridge structures of natural nacre in AlMgB{sub 14}. Particulate formation inherent in PLD is exploited to develop the bridge structure. Mechanical behavior analysis of the AlMgB{sub 14}/Ti system revealed that the brick is to be 250 nm thick, 9 {mu}m lateral dimensions while the bridge (particle) is to have a diameter of 500 nm for a performance equivalent to natural nacre. Both nanosecond (ns) and femtosecond (fs) pulsed lasers were employed for PLD in an iterative approach that involves varying pulse energy, pulse repetition rate, and target-to-substrate distance to achieve the desired brick and bridge characteristics. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and optical profilometer were used to evaluate the film thickness, particle size and density, stoichiometry, and surface roughness of thin films. Results indicated that both ns-pulsed and fs-pulsed lasers produce the desired nacre features. However, each laser may be chosen for different reasons: fs-pulsed laser is preferred for much shorter deposition time, better stoichiometry, uniform-sized particles, and uniform film thickness, while ns-pulsed laser is favored for industrial acceptance, reliability, ease of handling, and low cost.

  11. Spatial Moran models, II: cancer initiation in spatially structured tissue

    PubMed Central

    Foo, J; Leder, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the accumulation and spread of advantageous mutations in a spatial stochastic model of cancer initiation on a lattice. The parameters of this general model can be tuned to study a variety of cancer types and genetic progression pathways. This investigation contributes to an understanding of how the selective advantage of cancer cells together with the rates of mutations driving cancer, impact the process and timing of carcinogenesis. These results can be used to give insights into tumor heterogeneity and the “cancer field effect,” the observation that a malignancy is often surrounded by cells that have undergone premalignant transformation. PMID:26126947

  12. Production of Multi-Terawatt Time-Structured CO{sub 2} Laser Pulses for Ion Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Haberberger, Dan; Tochitsky, Sergei; Gong Chao; Joshi, Chan

    2010-11-04

    The UCLA Neptune Laboratory CO{sub 2} laser system has been recently upgraded to produce 3ps multi-terawatt 10{mu}m laser pulses. The laser energy is distributed over several 3 ps pulses separated by 18 ps. These temporally structured pulses are applied for laser driven ion acceleration in an H{sub 2} gas jet at a measured plasma density of 2x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Protons in excess of 20 MeV have been observed in the forward direction and with energy spreads ({Delta}E/E{approx}10%).

  13. Propagation of the Ultra-Short Laser Pulses Through the Helical 1D Photonic Crystal Structure with Twist Defect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, Dmitrii V.; Iegorov, Roman

    2016-02-01

    The presence of the photonic band-gap is a featured property of the cholesteric liquid crystals (CLC). It can be practically realized for almost any reasonable wavelengths with very high degree of tunability. We have investigated theoretically the influence of the twist defect of the CLC helical structure onto the bandwidth-limited ultra-short laser pulse propagating inside the photonic band-gap. The changes of both pulse duration and peak power with defect angle were observed together with pulse acceleration and retardation for a case of normal incidence of the light.

  14. Structural and phase transformations in zinc and brass wires under heating with high-density current pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The work is focused on revealing the mechanism of structure and phase transformations in the metal wires under heating with a high-density current pulse (the electric explosion of wires, EEWs). It has been demonstrated on the example of brass and zinc wires that the transition of a current pulse with the density of j ≈ 3.3 × 107 A/cm2 results in homogeneous heating of the crystalline structure of the metal/alloy. It has been determined that under heating with a pulse of high-density current pulse, the electric resistance of the liquid phases of zinc and brass decreases as the temperature increases. The results obtained allow for a conclusion that the presence of the particles of the condensed phase in the expanding products of EEW is the result of overheating instabilities in the liquid metal.

  15. Structural and phase transformations in zinc and brass wires under heating with high-density current pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Pervikov, A. V.

    2016-06-15

    The work is focused on revealing the mechanism of structure and phase transformations in the metal wires under heating with a high-density current pulse (the electric explosion of wires, EEWs). It has been demonstrated on the example of brass and zinc wires that the transition of a current pulse with the density of j ≈ 3.3 × 10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2} results in homogeneous heating of the crystalline structure of the metal/alloy. It has been determined that under heating with a pulse of high-density current pulse, the electric resistance of the liquid phases of zinc and brass decreases as the temperature increases. The results obtained allow for a conclusion that the presence of the particles of the condensed phase in the expanding products of EEW is the result of overheating instabilities in the liquid metal.

  16. From structure to mechanism—understanding initiation of DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Riera, Alberto; Barbon, Marta; Noguchi, Yasunori; Reuter, L. Maximilian; Schneider, Sarah; Speck, Christian

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication results in the doubling of the genome prior to cell division. This process requires the assembly of 50 or more protein factors into a replication fork. Here, we review recent structural and biochemical insights that start to explain how specific proteins recognize DNA replication origins, load the replicative helicase on DNA, unwind DNA, synthesize new DNA strands, and reassemble chromatin. We focus on the minichromosome maintenance (MCM2–7) proteins, which form the core of the eukaryotic replication fork, as this complex undergoes major structural rearrangements in order to engage with DNA, regulate its DNA-unwinding activity, and maintain genome stability. PMID:28717046

  17. The RDoC initiative and the structure of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Robert F; DeYoung, Colin G

    2016-03-01

    The NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) project represents a welcome effort to circumvent the limitations of psychiatric categories as phenotypes for psychopathology research. Here, we describe the hierarchical and dimensional structure of phenotypic psychopathology and illustrate how this structure provides phenotypes suitable for RDoC research on neural correlates of psychopathology. A hierarchical and dimensional approach to psychopathology phenotypes holds great promise for delineating connections between neuroscience constructs and the patterns of affect, cognition, and behavior that constitute manifest psychopathology. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  18. Initial effects of restoring natural forest structures in Estonia

    Treesearch

    D. Laarmann; H. Korjus; A. Sims; A. Kangur; J.A. Stanturf

    2013-01-01

    The legacy of structural homogenization due to forest management for commercial products is a loss of biodiversity. A common policy in many European countries is to increase forest diversity by converting managed forests to more natural conditions. The aim of this study was to provide an early evaluation of the effectiveness of different restoration treatments to...

  19. Wear Resistance of Steels with Surface Nanocrystalline Structure Generated by Mechanical-Pulse Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the surface mechanical-pulse treatment based on high-speed friction with a rapid cooling by the technological environment on the wear resistance of medium- and high-carbon steels was considered. The treatment due to a severe plastic deformation enabled obtaining the nanocrystalline structure with a grain size of 14-40 nm. A high positive effect of this treatment was obtained not only because of metal nanocrystallization but also thanks to other factors, namely, structural-phase transformations, carbon saturation of the surface due to decomposition of the coolant and the friction coefficient decrease. Higher carbon content leads to better strengthening of the surface, and its microhardness can reach 12 GPa.

  20. Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of Zinc Oxide Layers Produced by Pulsed Laser Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisz, G.; Virt, I.; Sagan, P.; Potera, P.; Yavorskyi, R.

    2017-04-01

    The structural, optical, and electrical properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) layers manufactured at different process conditions were investigated. ZnO epitaxial layers were grown on silicon, glass, and ITO/glass substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The influence of power beam, substrate temperature, and deposition time on films properties was analysed. Morphological features of the film surface were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. A structural study shown planar orientation of films at low temperatures of substrate, but the columnar type of growth originated in temperature enhances. Electrical properties were determined in the temperature range 300-500 K. It was shown that the type of films conductivity is metallic and it is limited by charge transfer across grain boundaries.

  1. Flame Structure and Emissions of Strongly-Pulsed Turbulent Diffusion Flames with Swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ying-Hao

    This work studies the turbulent flame structure, the reaction-zone structure and the exhaust emissions of strongly-pulsed, non-premixed flames with co-flow swirl. The fuel injection is controlled by strongly-pulsing the fuel flow by a fast-response solenoid valve such that the fuel flow is completely shut off between pulses. This control strategy allows the fuel injection to be controlled over a wide range of operating conditions, allowing the flame structure to range from isolated fully-modulated puffs to interacting puffs to steady flames. The swirl level is controlled by varying the ratio of the volumetric flow rate of the tangential air to that of the axial air. For strongly-pulsed flames, both with and without swirl, the flame geometry is strongly impacted by the injection time. Flames appear to exhibit compact, puff-like structures for short injection times, while elongated flames, similar in behaviors to steady flames, occur for long injection times. The flames with swirl are found to be shorter for the same fuel injection conditions. The separation/interaction level between flame puffs in these flames is essentially governed by the jet-off time. The separation between flame puffs decreases as swirl is imposed, consistent with the decrease in flame puff celerity due to swirl. The decreased flame length and flame puff celerity are consistent with an increased rate of air entrainment due to swirl. The highest levels of CO emissions are generally found for compact, isolated flame puffs, consistent with the rapid quenching due to rapid dilution with excess air. The imposition of swirl generally results in a decrease in CO levels, suggesting more rapid and complete fuel/air mixing by imposing swirl in the co-flow stream. The levels of NO emissions for most cases are generally below the steady-flame value. The NO levels become comparable to the steady-flame value for sufficiently short jet-off time. The swirled co-flow air can, in some cases, increase the NO

  2. Effect of gel structure of matrix orientation in pulsed alternating electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Stellwagen, N.C.; Stellwagen, J.

    1993-12-31

    Four polymeric gels with different structures, LE agarose, HEEO agarose, beta-carrageenan, and polyacrylamide, were studied by transient electric birefringence to determine the importance of various structural features on the orientation of the gels in pulsed alternating electric fields. The birefrigence relaxation times observed for agarose gels in low voltage electric fields suggest that long fibers and/or domains, ranging up to tens of microns in size, are oriented by the electric field. The sign of the birefringence reverses when the direction of the electric field is reversed, suggesting that the oriented domains change their direction of orientation from parallel to perpendicular (or vice versa) when the polarity of the electric field is reversed. These anamalous orientation effects are observed with both types of agarose gels, but not with beta-carrageenan or polyacrylamide gels, suggesting that the alternating D,L galactose residues in the agarose backbone are responsible for the anomalies.

  3. From structure to mechanism-understanding initiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Riera, Alberto; Barbon, Marta; Noguchi, Yasunori; Reuter, L Maximilian; Schneider, Sarah; Speck, Christian

    2017-06-01

    DNA replication results in the doubling of the genome prior to cell division. This process requires the assembly of 50 or more protein factors into a replication fork. Here, we review recent structural and biochemical insights that start to explain how specific proteins recognize DNA replication origins, load the replicative helicase on DNA, unwind DNA, synthesize new DNA strands, and reassemble chromatin. We focus on the minichromosome maintenance (MCM2-7) proteins, which form the core of the eukaryotic replication fork, as this complex undergoes major structural rearrangements in order to engage with DNA, regulate its DNA-unwinding activity, and maintain genome stability. © 2017 Riera et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Efficient Cherenkov emission of broadband terahertz radiation from an ultrashort laser pulse in a sandwich structure with nonlinear core

    SciTech Connect

    Bodrov, S. B.; Bakunov, M. I.; Hangyo, M.

    2008-11-01

    A scheme for efficient generation of broadband terahertz radiation by a femtosecond laser pulse propagating in a planar sandwichlike structure is proposed. The structure consists of a thin nonlinear core cladded with prisms made of a material with low terahertz absorption. The focused into a line laser pulse propagates in the core as a leaky or waveguide mode and emits Cherenkov wedge of terahertz waves in the cladding. We developed a theory that describes terahertz generation in such a structure and calculated spatial distribution of the generated terahertz field, its energy spectrum and optical-to-terahertz conversion efficiency. The developed theory predicts the conversion efficiency of up to several percent in a 1 cm long and 1 cm wide Si-LiNbO{sub 3}-Si sandwich structure with a 20 {mu}m thick nonlinear layer pumped by 8.5 {mu}J Ti:sapphire laser with pulse duration of 100 fs.

  5. Adaptive Structures Programs for the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Advanced Control Technology Experiment ( ACTEX ) Modular Control Patch High Frequency Passive Damping Strut Development Optional PZT Passive...on this space test bed in FY95. The Advanced Control Technology Experiment ( ACTEX ) will demonstrate many of the adaptive structures technologies...Accelerometer Bi-ax Accelerometer Smart Strut Figure 7. Schematic of Advanced Control Technology Experiment ( ACTEX ) 6-28-91-2M 1-6-92-5M PZ Stack

  6. Structural basis for angiopoietin-1–mediated signaling initiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xuehong; Seegar, Tom C. M.; Dalton, Annamarie C.; Tzvetkova-Robev, Dorothea; Goldgur, Yehuda; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Barton, William A.

    2013-04-30

    Angiogenesis is a complex cellular process involving multiple regulatory growth factors and growth factor receptors. Among them, the ligands for the endothelial-specific tunica intima endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Tie2) receptor kinase, angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and Ang2, play essential roles in balancing vessel stability and regression during both developmental and tumor-induced angiogenesis. Despite possessing a high degree of sequence identity, Ang1 and Ang2 have distinct functional roles and cell-signaling characteristics. Here, we present the crystal structures of Ang1 both unbound and in complex with the Tie2 ectodomain. Comparison of the Ang1-containing structures with their Ang2-containing counterparts provide insight into the mechanism of receptor activation and reveal molecular surfaces important for interactions with Tie2 coreceptors and associated signaling proteins. Using structure-based mutagenesis, we identify a loop within the angiopoietin P domain, adjacent to the receptor-binding interface, which confers the specific agonist/antagonist properties of the molecule. We demonstrate using cell-based assays that an Ang2 chimera containing the Ang1 loop sequence behaves functionally similarly to Ang1 as a constitutive Tie2 agonist, able to efficiently dissociate the inhibitory Tie1/Tie2 complex and elicit Tie2 clustering and downstream signaling.

  7. Super-hydrophobicity of PMMA and PDMS surfaces structured by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hong-Myeong; Lee, Woon-Young; Lee, Jin-Ho; Yang, Deok-Cho; Lim, Ki-Soo

    2013-03-01

    Surface wettability depends on both physical surface structure and chemical material. In this report, we demonstrate super-hydrophobic surface of cast polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheet by femtosecond laser fabrication. Twodimensional micro-array structures of square-typed pillars with various heights, widths, and intervals were fabricated on the PMMA surface by femtosecond laser irradiation and chemical etching. The Yb:KGW femtosecond laser processing system (λ=1030 nm) delivering 250 fs pulses at a repetition rate 100 kHz was employed for fabrication. The contact angle of PMMA changed 64° (hydrophilic plane) to 150° (super-hydrophobic structure). We also improved superhydrophobicity up to 170° contact angle by spin-coating PMMA surface with PDMS and fabricating regular microstructures including irregular nano-structures. We also coated the structured PMMA surface with a car ash spray material to use another combination of surface morphology and chemistry. All the experimental results were compared with those expected values by Cassie-Baxter model.

  8. Goal Specificity and Difficulty and Leader Initiating Structure as Strategies for Managing Role Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cynthia; Schuler, Randall S.

    1980-01-01

    Presents a role perception model of goal setting content and leader initiating structure to examine their effectiveness as strategies to reduce role stress and to increase employee satisfaction. Results indicated that both goal setting content and leader initiating structure are related to employee satisfaction. (Author)

  9. Structural basis for DNA binding by replication initiator Mcm10

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, Eric M.; Vaithiyalingam, Sivaraja; Haworth, Justin; Greer, Briana; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.

    2009-06-30

    Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic DNA replication protein required for assembly and progression of the replication fork. The highly conserved internal domain (Mcm10-ID) has been shown to physically interact with single-stranded (ss) DNA, DNA polymerase alpha, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). The crystal structure of Xenopus laevis Mcm10-ID presented here reveals a DNA binding architecture composed of an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-fold followed in tandem by a variant and highly basic zinc finger. NMR chemical shift perturbation and mutational studies of DNA binding activity in vitro reveal how Mcm10 uses this unique surface to engage ssDNA. Corresponding mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae result in increased sensitivity to replication stress, demonstrating the functional importance of DNA binding by this region of Mcm10 to replication. In addition, mapping Mcm10 mutations known to disrupt PCNA, polymerase alpha, and DNA interactions onto the crystal structure provides insight into how Mcm10 might coordinate protein and DNA binding within the replisome.

  10. Lightning initiation from a tall structure in the Basque Country

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, J.; Montanyà, J.; Maruri, M.; De la Vega, D.; Aranda, J. A.; Gaztelumendi, S.

    2012-11-01

    Lightning detection in the Spanish Basque Country is performed using the LF TOA, VHF interferometer and the VLF lightning detection technologies in which two independent networks are based, providing a better detection quality due to the combination of these different techniques. Total lightning activity related to the tall structure of the weather radar operated by the Basque Meteorology Agency (Euskalmet) is presented. The tall structure is a 50 m tower located on the top of Kapildui Mountain (at about 1169.48 m ASL). Remarkable electrical activity associated to this place has been witnessed in the last two years. Two particular flashes during November 30th 2009 caused damage to the weather radar. Two different lightning detection networks detected five and six cloud-to-ground strokes, respectively. Only nine VHF sources were detected in the first flash without any VLF detection classified as intracloud. But for the second flash non VHF source was detected and two detections were reported by the VLF system. In both cases some intracloud detections were reported before cloud-to-ground strokes and some others during the flash. This paper presents the study of a winter episode with a special impact in the tower, the research carried out for characterizing the lightning events and the measures taken in order to achieve a better protection mechanism for the radar site.

  11. Structural Engineering of Nanoporous Anodic Alumina Photonic Crystals by Sawtooth-like Pulse Anodization.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel; Nemati, Mahdieh; Losic, Dusan

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a sawtooth-like pulse anodization approach aiming to create a new type of photonic crystal structure based on nanoporous anodic alumina. This nanofabrication approach enables the engineering of the effective medium of nanoporous anodic alumina in a sawtooth-like manner with precision. The manipulation of various anodization parameters such as anodization period, anodization amplitude, number of anodization pulses, ramp ratio and pore widening time allows a precise control and fine-tuning of the optical properties (i.e., characteristic transmission peaks and interferometric colors) exhibited by nanoporous anodic alumina photonic crystals (NAA-PCs). The effect of these anodization parameters on the photonic properties of NAA-PCs is systematically evaluated for the establishment of a fabrication methodology toward NAA-PCs with tunable optical properties. The effective medium of the resulting NAA-PCs is demonstrated to be optimal for the development of optical sensing platforms in combination with reflectometric interference spectroscopy (RIfS). This application is demonstrated by monitoring in real-time the formation of monolayers of thiol molecules (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid) on the surface of gold-coated NAA-PCs. The obtained results reveal that the adsorption mechanism between thiol molecules and gold-coated NAA-PCs follows a Langmuir isotherm model, indicating a monolayer sorption mechanism.

  12. Structure Determination Using X-Ray Free-Electron Laser Pulses.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Henry N

    2017-01-01

    The intense X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers, of only femtoseconds duration, outrun most of the processes that lead to structural degradation in X-ray exposures of macromolecules. Using these sources it is therefore possible to increase the dose to macromolecular crystals by several orders of magnitude higher than usually tolerable in conventional measurements, allowing crystal size to be decreased dramatically in diffraction measurements and without the need to cool the sample. Such pulses lead to the eventual vaporization of the sample, which has required a measurement approach, called serial crystallography, of consolidating snapshot diffraction patterns of many individual crystals. This in turn has further separated the connection between dose and obtainable diffraction information, with the only requirement from a single pattern being that to give enough information to place it, in three-dimensional reciprocal space, in relation to other patterns. Millions of extremely weak patterns can be collected and combined in this way, requiring methods to rapidly replenish the sample into the beam while generating the lowest possible background . The method is suited to time-resolved measurements over timescales below 1 ps to several seconds, and opens new opportunities for phasing. Some straightforward considerations of achievable signal levels are discussed and compared with a wide variety of recent experiments carried out at XFEL, synchrotron, and even laboratory sources, to discuss the capabilities of these new approaches and give some perspectives on their further development.

  13. Mechanism of DNA Trapping in Nanoporous Structures during Asymmetric Pulsed-Field Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ya; Harrison, D. Jed

    2014-03-01

    DNA molecules (>100kbp) are trapped in separation sieves when high electric fields are applied in pulsed field electrophoresis, seriously limiting the speed of separation. Using crystalline particle arrays, to generate interstitial pores for molecular sieving, allows higher electric fields than in gels, (e.g 40 vs 5 V/cm), however trapping still limits the field strength. Using reverse pulses, which release DNA from being fully-stretched, allows higher fields (140 V/cm). We investigate the trapping mechanism of individual DNA molecules in ordered nanoporous structures. Two prerequisites for trapping are revealed by the dynamics of single trapped DNA, hernia formation and fully-stretched U/J shapes. Fully stretched DNA has longer unhooking times than expected by simple models. We propose a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force reduces the mobility of segments at the apex of the U or J, where field gradients are highest, based on simulations. A modified model for unhooking time is obtained after the DEP force is introduced. The new model explains the unhooking time data by predicting an infinite trapping time when the ratio of arm length differences (of the U or J) to molecule length Δx / L < β . β is a DEP parameter that is found to strongly increase with electric field. The work was supported by grant from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) and the National Institute for Nanotechnology (NINT).

  14. Disassembly of actin structures by nanosecond pulsed electric field is a downstream effect of cell swelling.

    PubMed

    Pakhomov, Andrei G; Xiao, Shu; Pakhomova, Olga N; Semenov, Iurii; Kuipers, Marjorie A; Ibey, Bennett L

    2014-12-01

    Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton structures was reported as one of the characteristic effects of nanosecond-duration pulsed electric field (nsPEF) in both mammalian and plant cells. We utilized CHO cells that expressed the monomeric fluorescent protein (mApple) tagged to actin to test if nsPEF modifies the cell actin directly or as a consequence of cell membrane permeabilization. A train of four 600-ns pulses at 19.2 kV/cm (2 Hz) caused immediate cell membrane poration manifested by YO-PRO-1 dye uptake, gradual cell rounding and swelling. Concurrently, bright actin features were replaced by dimmer and uniform fluorescence of diffuse actin. To block the nsPEF-induced swelling, the bath buffer was isoosmotically supplemented with an electropore-impermeable solute (sucrose). A similar addition of a smaller, electropore-permeable solute (adonitol) served as a control. We demonstrated that sucrose efficiently blocked disassembly of actin features by nsPEF, whereas adonitol did not. Sucrose also attenuated bleaching of mApple-tagged actin in nsPEF-treated cells (as integrated over the cell volume), although did not fully prevent it. We conclude that disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton was a result of cell swelling, which, in turn, was caused by cell permeabilization by nsPEF and transmembrane diffusion of solutes which led to the osmotic imbalance.

  15. Role of Wavelength and Pulse Structure in the Ablation of Tissue and Gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribble, Jerri Ann

    The goal of these measurements has been to investigate the wavelength dependence of infrared laser induced tissue ablation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of tissues guided the selection of wavelengths to which the Vanderbilt Free-Electron Laser (FEL) was tuned in order to study ablation rates and residual thermal damage in tissues including neural, ocular and dermal. Targeting FEL radiation to the amide II mode of proteins leads to tissue ablation characterized by minimal collateral damage while maintaining a substantial ablation rate. To account for these observations, a novel ablation mechanism has been proposed based on compromising tissue through resonant denaturation of structural proteins, which was tested using dynamic measurements on mechanical (ns) time scales of ablation of gelatin by FEL radiation. Simultaneous measurements of ejected material using a continuous HeNe probe beam tangential to the gelatin surface and the concomitant stress wave in the bulk of the sample provide an intriguing dynamical picture of the ablation event generated by infrared radiation of different wavelengths and different macropulse durations. By varying the macropulse duration from 60 to 200 ns with a broadband infrared Pockels cell, it is evident in both ejecta data and the stress transient data that the bulk of the ablation occurs after the end of the laser pulse. The most significant difference between ablation induced by different laser wavelengths, however, appears during the laser pulse, at the onset of ablation.

  16. Structural and nonlinear optical characterizations of ZnS/ PVP nanocomposites synthesized by pulsed laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divyasree, M. C.; Chandrasekharan, K.

    2017-05-01

    ZnS/Poly Vinyl Pyrrolidone nanocomposites were synthesized by pulsed laser ablation at ambient conditions using an Nd: YAG laser at 532 nm wavelength and 7ns pulse width. Linear optical characterizations were done using UV-Vis spectrophotometer and fluorometer. Both absorption and emission peaks were found to be blue shifted, which could be due to quantum confinement effect. Spherical morphology and the purity in the elemental composition of the sample were confirmed by scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer respectively. Average particle size of the ZnS nanoparticles was found to be 13.45 nm from the Gaussian fitted histogram of transmission electron Microscopy image and the structure was confirmed as hexagonal wurtzite by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nonlinear optical parameters were figured out by z scan analysis with the same laser system. The nanocomposite showed good absorptive and refractive properties in the nonlinear optical regime. Detailed study of the nanocomposite revealed its potential applications in optoelectronics and nonlinear optical device fabrication.

  17. Inactivation of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores in apple juice by pulsed light. Influence of initial contamination and required reduction levels.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Mariana I; Guerrero, Sandra N

    2017-07-17

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the response of different initial contamination levels of Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris ATCC 49025 spores in apple juice as affected by pulsed light treatment (PL, batch mode, xenon lamp, 3pulses/s, 0-71.6J/cm(2)). Biphasic and Weibull frequency distribution models were used to characterize the relationship between inoculum size and treatment time with the reductions achieved after PL exposure. Additionally, a second order polynomial model was computed to relate required PL processing time to inoculum size and requested log reductions. PL treatment caused up to 3.0-3.5 log reductions, depending on the initial inoculum size. Inactivation curves corresponding to PL-treated samples were adequately characterized by both Weibull and biphasic models (Radj(2) 94-96%), and revealed that lower initial inoculum sizes were associated with higher inactivation rates. According to the polynomial model, the predicted time for PL treatment increased exponentially with inoculum size. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Particle Generation by Pulsed Excimer Laser Ablation in Liquid: Hollow Structures and Laser-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zijie

    2011-12-01

    Pulsed laser ablation of solid targets in liquid media is a powerful method to fabricate micro-/nanoparticles, which has attracted much interest in the past decade. It represents a combinatorial library of constituents and interactions, and one can explore disparate regions of parameter space with outcomes that are impossible to envision a priori. In this work, a pulsed excimer laser (wavelength 248 nm, pulse width 30 ns) has been used to ablate targets in liquid media with varying laser fluences, frequencies, ablation times and surfactants. It is observed that hollow particles could be fabricated by excimer laser ablation of Al, Pt, Zn, Mg, Ag, Si, TiO2, and Nb2O5 in water or aqueous solutions. The hollow particles, with sizes from tens of nanometers to micrometers, may have smooth and continuous shells or have morphologies demonstrating that they were assembled from nanoparticles. A new mechanism has been proposed to explain the formation of these novel particle geometries. They were formed on laser-produced bubbles through bubble interface pinning by laser-produced solid species. Considering the bubble dynamics, thermodynamic and kinetic requirements have been discussed in the mechanism that can explain some phenomena associated with the formation of hollow particles, especially (1) larger particles are more likely to be hollow particles; (2) Mg and Al targets have stronger tendency to generate hollow particles; and (3) the 248 nm excimer laser is more beneficial to fabricate hollow particles in water than other lasers with longer wavelengths. The work has also demonstrated the possiblities to fabricate novel nanostructures through laser-induced reactions. Zn(OH)2/dodecyl sulfate flower-like nanostructures, AgCl cubes, and Ag2O cubes, pyramids, triangular plates, pentagonal rods and bars have been obtained via reactions between laser-produced species with water, electrolyes, or surfactant molecules. The underlying mechanisms of forming these structures have been

  19. Semiclassical modelling of finite-pulse effects on non-adiabatic photodynamics via initial condition filtering: The predissociation of NaI as a test case

    SciTech Connect

    Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-05-21

    Femtosecond-laser pulse driven non-adiabatic spectroscopy and dynamics in molecular and condensed phase systems continue to be a challenge for theoretical modelling. One of the main obstacles is the “curse of dimensionality” encountered in non-adiabatic, exact wavepacket propagation. A possible route towards treating complex molecular systems is via semiclassical surface-hopping schemes, in particular if they account not only for non-adiabatic post-excitation dynamics but also for the initial optical excitation. One such approach, based on initial condition filtering, will be put forward in what follows. As a simple test case which can be compared with exact wavepacket dynamics, we investigate the influence of the different parameters determining the shape of a laser pulse (e.g., its finite width and a possible chirp) on the predissociation dynamics of a NaI molecule, upon photoexcitation of the A(0{sup +}) state. The finite-pulse effects are mapped into the initial conditions for semiclassical surface-hopping simulations. The simulated surface-hopping diabatic populations are in qualitative agreement with the quantum mechanical results, especially concerning the subpicosend photoinduced dynamics, the main deviations being the relative delay of the non-adiabatic transitions in the semiclassical picture. Likewise, these differences in the time-dependent electronic populations calculated via the semiclassical and the quantum methods are found to have a mild influence on the overall probability density distribution. As a result, the branching ratios between the bound and the dissociative reaction channels and the time-evolution of the molecular wavepacket predicted by the semiclassical method agree with those computed using quantum wavepacket propagation. Implications for more challenging molecular systems are given.

  20. Semiclassical modelling of finite-pulse effects on non-adiabatic photodynamics via initial condition filtering: The predissociation of NaI as a test case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Mesa, Aliezer; Saalfrank, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Femtosecond-laser pulse driven non-adiabatic spectroscopy and dynamics in molecular and condensed phase systems continue to be a challenge for theoretical modelling. One of the main obstacles is the "curse of dimensionality" encountered in non-adiabatic, exact wavepacket propagation. A possible route towards treating complex molecular systems is via semiclassical surface-hopping schemes, in particular if they account not only for non-adiabatic post-excitation dynamics but also for the initial optical excitation. One such approach, based on initial condition filtering, will be put forward in what follows. As a simple test case which can be compared with exact wavepacket dynamics, we investigate the influence of the different parameters determining the shape of a laser pulse (e.g., its finite width and a possible chirp) on the predissociation dynamics of a NaI molecule, upon photoexcitation of the A(0+) state. The finite-pulse effects are mapped into the initial conditions for semiclassical surface-hopping simulations. The simulated surface-hopping diabatic populations are in qualitative agreement with the quantum mechanical results, especially concerning the subpicosend photoinduced dynamics, the main deviations being the relative delay of the non-adiabatic transitions in the semiclassical picture. Likewise, these differences in the time-dependent electronic populations calculated via the semiclassical and the quantum methods are found to have a mild influence on the overall probability density distribution. As a result, the branching ratios between the bound and the dissociative reaction channels and the time-evolution of the molecular wavepacket predicted by the semiclassical method agree with those computed using quantum wavepacket propagation. Implications for more challenging molecular systems are given.

  1. On study fine atmospheric structure by using of the method of decomposition of infrasonic signals from pulsed sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulichkov, Sergey; Chunchuzov, Igor; Demin, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    The proposed method are based on the decomposition of infrasonic signals from pulse sources. In this method, the recorded infrasonic signal is modeled by the sequence of single acoustic pulse having the form of a U and N waves. Each pulse U and N wave corresponds to the reflection of sound from atmospheric inhomogeneities at different altitudes in the atmosphere. By determining time intervals between such pulses U and N waves it is possible to determine vertical gradients of the effective sound speed at the different altitudes in the atmosphere. The method to determine the vertical profiles of the vertical gradients of effective sound velocity in the atmosphere by using data from infrasound monitoring are proposed. The obtained data are corresponds to the theory of the fine structure in the upper atmosphere.

  2. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Growth of periodic structures on the surface of germanium subjected to pulsed laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsukov, D. O.; Gusakov, G. M.; Frolov, A. I.

    1991-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the dynamics of growth of periodic surface structures due to the interaction with pulsed laser radiation. Samples of Ge were subjected to laser pulses (λ = 1.06 μm, τ = 70 ns) with energy densities in the range 0.5-5.5 J/cm2. An investigation was made of the dynamics of the first-order diffraction of probe (λ = 0.53 μm) laser pulses with a time resolution 4 ns when p- and s-polarized laser radiation was incident at angles close to normal. A strong nonlinearity of the growth of such periodic surface structures was observed. The energy density from which such growth began depended on the quality of the polished Ge surface. The parameters of the dynamics of the growth of these structures were estimated.

  3. Robust integral variable structure controller and pulse-width pulse-frequency modulated input shaper design for flexible spacecraft with mismatched uncertainty/disturbance.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei

    2007-10-01

    This paper presents a dual-stage control system design method for the flexible spacecraft attitude maneuvering control by use of on-off thrusters and active vibration control by input shaper. In this design approach, attitude control system and vibration suppression were designed separately using lower order model. As a stepping stone, an integral variable structure controller with the assumption of knowing the upper bounds of the mismatched lumped perturbation has been designed which ensures exponential convergence of attitude angle and angular velocity in the presence of bounded uncertainty/disturbances. To reconstruct estimates of the system states for use in a full information variable structure control law, an asymptotic variable structure observer is also employed. In addition, the thruster output is modulated in pulse-width pulse-frequency so that the output profile is similar to the continuous control histories. For actively suppressing the induced vibration, the input shaping technique is used to modify the existing command so that less vibration will be caused by the command itself, which only requires information about the vibration frequency and damping of the closed-loop system. The rationale behind this hybrid control scheme is that the integral variable structure controller can achieve good precision pointing, even in the presence of uncertainties/disturbances, whereas the shaped input attenuator is applied to actively suppress the undesirable vibrations excited by the rapid maneuvers. Simulation results for the spacecraft model show precise attitude control and vibration suppression.

  4. An Improved Chirped Pulse Ftmw Analysis of the Structures of Phenol Dimer and Trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Perez, Cristobal; Steber, Amanda L.; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Lesarri, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    With the recent improvements for chirped pulse FTMW (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy between 2-18 GHz, substitution structures of molecules and clusters with more than 10 heavy atoms are becoming routine. While previous CP-FTMW results for phenol dimer reported at this conference by Steber et al. necessitated reduced-band measurements in order to achieve the sensitivity to detect the carbon isotopologues, the latest improvements for the 2-8 GHz arrangement have enabled full band detection of all 12 ^{13}C and 2 ^{18}O isotopologues of phenol dimer in natural abundance, with improved fits for all detected species. In addition, the added sensitivity of this new 2-8 GHz configuration has enabled a full carbon substitution structure of phenol trimer. The experimental structure of phenol trimer, in agreement with the M06-2X/6-311++g(d,p) ab initio structure, is a C_{3} oblate symmetric top with 21 heavy atoms; however, all possible isotopic substitutions are off-symmetry axis, so the resulting detected isotopologues have been fit as c-type prolate asymmetric tops. Use of Kraitchman's equations for structural determination of a symmetric top molecule require some assumptions from the ab initio structure for the complete r_{s} structure of the trimer. A detailed summary of these methods, as well as the microwave results for both species, will be presented. A. L. Steber, J. L. Neill, D. P. Zaleski, B. H. Pate, A. Lesarri. 67th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2012, MH13.

  5. Modelling the initial structure dynamics of soil and sediment exemplified for a constructed hydrological catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Thomas; Schneider, Anna; Gerke, Horst H.

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge about spatial heterogeneity is of essential for the analysis of the hydrological catchment behavior. Heterogeneity is directly related to the distribution of the solid phase, and in initial hydrological systems, the solid phase is mainly composed of mineral particles. In artificial catchments, such sediment structures relate to the applied construction technology. It is supposed that the development of catchment ecosystems is strongly influenced by such specific initial spatial distributions of the solid phase. Moreover, during the initial development period, the primary structures in a catchment are altered rapidly by translocation processes, thereby subdividing the initial system in different compartments. Questions are: How does initial sediment distribution affect further structural development? How is catchment hydrology influenced by the initial structural development? What structures have a relevant impact on catchment-scale hydrological behavior? We present results from a structural modelling approach using a process-based structure generator program. The constructed hydrological catchment 'Hühnerwasser' (Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany) served exemplarily for the model development. A set of scenarios was created describing possible initial heterogeneities of the catchment. Both the outcrop site from where the parent material was excavated and the specific excavation procedures were considered in the modelling approach. Generated distributions are incorporated in a gridded 3D volume model constructed with the GOCAD software. Results were evaluated by semivariogram analysis and by quantifying point-to-point deviations. We also introduce a modelling conception for simulating the highly dynamic initial structural change, based on the generated initial distributions. We present a strategy on how to develop the initial structure generator into an integrative tool in order to (i) simulate and analyse the spatio-temporal development dynamics

  6. Surface pressure profiles, vortex structure and initialization for hurricane prediction. Part II: numerical simulations of track, structure and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Noel E.; Ma, Yimin

    2012-07-01

    In part 1 of this study, an assessment of commonly used surface pressure profiles to represent TC structures was made. Using the Australian tropical cyclone model, the profiles are tested in case studies of high-resolution prediction of track, structure and intensity. We demonstrate that: (1) track forecasts are mostly insensitive to the imposed structure; (2) in some cases [here Katrina (2005)], specification of vortex structure can have a large impact on prediction of structure and intensity; (3) the forecast model mostly preserves the characteristics of the initial structure and so correct structure at t = 0 is a requirement for improved structure forecasting; and (4) skilful prediction of intensity does not guarantee skilful prediction of structure. It is shown that for Ivan (2004) the initial structure from each profile is preserved during the simulations, and that markedly different structures can have similar intensities. Evidence presented suggests that different initial profiles can sometimes change the timing of intensification. Thus, correct initial vortex structure is an essential ingredient for more accurate intensity and structure prediction.

  7. Structural and morphological properties of metallic thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition for photocathode application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorusso, A.; Gontad, F.; Caricato, A. P.; Chiadroni, E.; Broitman, E.; Perrone, A.

    2016-03-01

    In this work yttrium and lead thin films have been deposited by pulsed laser deposition technique and characterized by ex situ different diagnostic methods. All the films were adherent to the substrates and revealed a polycrystalline structure. Y films were uniform with a very low roughness and droplet density, while Pb thin films were characterized by a grain morphology with a relatively high roughness and droplet density. Such metallic materials are studied because they are proposed as a good alternative to copper and niobium photocathodes which are generally used in radiofrequency and superconducting radiofrequency guns, respectively. The photoemission performances of the photocathodes based on Y and Pb thin films have been also studied and discussed.

  8. Effect of structural steel ion plasma nitriding on material durability in pulsed high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirin, A. V.; Krutikov, V. I.; Koleukh, D. S.; Mamaev, A. S.; Paranin, S. N.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Kaigorodov, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    The work was aimed to study the influence of plasma nitriding on electrical and mechanical properties of structural steels and their durability in pulsed high magnetic field. The plates and cylindrical magnetic flux concentrators were made of several steel grades (30KhGS, 40Kh, 50KhGA, 38Kh2MYuA, and U8A), heat-treated, and subjected to the low-temperature (400, 500°C) plasma nitriding. Electrical and mechanical properties of materials, phase composition of steel surface layer, microstructure and microhardness profiles were investigated on the plates before and after plasma treatment. Microstructure and microhardness profiles across the subsurface layer of plasma treated and untreated concentrators applied for high magnetic field generation were also studied. Magnetic field of 50 T under tens of microseconds in duration inside the flux concentrators was generated by long-life outer coil.

  9. Formation and structure of a current sheet in pulsed-power driven magnetic reconnection experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; Suttle, L. G.; Loureiro, N. F.; Ciardi, A.; Burdiak, G. C.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Eardley, S. J.; Garcia, C.; Halliday, J. W. D.; Niasse, N.; Robinson, T.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Swadling, G. F.; Ma, J.; Wu, J.

    2017-10-01

    We describe magnetic reconnection experiments using a new, pulsed-power driven experimental platform in which the inflows are super-sonic but sub-Alfvénic. The intrinsically magnetised plasma flows are long lasting, producing a well-defined reconnection layer that persists over many hydrodynamic time scales. The layer is diagnosed using a suite of high resolution laser based diagnostics, which provide measurements of the electron density, reconnecting magnetic field, inflow and outflow velocities, and the electron and ion temperatures. Using these measurements, we observe a balance between the power flow into and out of the layer, and we find that the heating rates for the electrons and ions are significantly in excess of the classical predictions. The formation of plasmoids is observed in laser interferometry and optical self-emission, and the magnetic O-point structure of these plasmoids is confirmed using magnetic probes.

  10. Structure Determination of Two Stereoisomers of Sevoflurane Dimer by Chirped Pulse Ftmw Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Perez, Cristobal; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Lesarri, Alberto; Vallejo, Montserrat; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Castano, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    Two stereoisomers of sevoflurane dimer have been detected using chirped pulse FTMW spectroscopy from 2-8 GHz. The identified complexes are distinguished by their differing helicities, and together both isomers form a diastereomeric pair, one being homochiral (RR/SS) and the other heterochiral (RS/SR). For both isomers, all 8 ^{13}C isotopologues have been assigned, and two ^{18}O isotopologues have also been detected for the homochiral isomer, for a total of 18 isotopologues. MP2/6-311++g(d,p) calculations predict the heterochiral isomer as 1.2 kJ mol^{-1} above the homochiral species, which is consistent with the observed relative intensities between the two species. A summary of these microwave results, including a comparison between the Kraitchman and ab initio structures, will be presented.

  11. A comparative study of experimental and simulated ultrasonic pulse-echo signals from multilayered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    The effect on the system acoustic response of variations in the adhesive thickness, coupling thickness, and paint thickness is considered. Both simulations and experimental measurements are used to characterize and classify A-scans from test regions, and to study the effects of various parameters such as paint thickness and epoxy thickness on the variations in the reflected signals. A 1D model of sound propagation in multilayered structures is used to verify the validity of the measured signals, and is also used to computationally generate signals for a class of test locations with gradually varying parameters. This approach exploits the ability of numerical simulations to provide a good understanding of the ultrasonic pulses reflected at disbonds.

  12. Growth Mechanisms and Structural Properties of Lead Chalcogenide Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virt, I. S.; Rudyi, I. O.; Lopatynskyi, I. Ye.; Dubov, Yu.; Tur, Y.; Lusakowska, E.; Luka, G.

    2017-01-01

    Three lead chalcogenide films, PbTe, PbSe, and PbS, with a high structural quality were grown by pulsed lased deposition (PLD). The films were grown on single crystal substrates (Si, KCl, Al2O3) and on Si covered with a Si3N4 buffer layer. The Si3N4 layer latter facilitated the lead chalcogenide layer nucleation during the first growth stages and resulted in a more homogeneous surface morphology and a lower surface roughness. The surface geometry (roughness) of the films grown on Si3N4 was studied by means of the power spectral density analysis. Different growth modes, ranging from plasma plume condensation to bulk diffusion, resulting in observed film morphologies were identified. The investigations were complemented by electrical characterization of the chalcogenide films.

  13. A comparative study of experimental and simulated ultrasonic pulse-echo signals from multilayered structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abedin, M. N.; Prabhu, D. R.; Winfree, W. P.; Johnston, P. H.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the system acoustic response of variations in the adhesive thickness, coupling thickness, and paint thickness is considered. Both simulations and experimental measurements are used to characterize and classify A-scans from test regions, and to study the effects of various parameters such as paint thickness and epoxy thickness on the variations in the reflected signals. A 1D model of sound propagation in multilayered structures is used to verify the validity of the measured signals, and is also used to computationally generate signals for a class of test locations with gradually varying parameters. This approach exploits the ability of numerical simulations to provide a good understanding of the ultrasonic pulses reflected at disbonds.

  14. Silicon structuring by etching with liquid chlorine and fluorine precursors using femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Radu, C.; Simion, S.; Zamfirescu, M.; Ulmeanu, M.; Enculescu, M.; Radoiu, M.

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the micrometer and submicrometer scale structuring of silicon by liquid chlorine and fluorine precursors with 200 fs laser pulses working at both fundamental (775 nm) and frequency doubled (387 nm) wavelengths. The silicon surface was irradiated at normal incidence by immersing the Si (111) substrates in a glass container filled with liquid chlorine (CCl{sub 4}) and fluorine (C{sub 2}Cl{sub 3}F{sub 3}) precursors. We report that silicon surfaces develop an array of spikes with single step irradiation processes at 775 nm and equally at 387 nm. When irradiating the Si surface with 400 pulses at 330 mJ/cm{sup 2} laser fluence and a 775 nm wavelength, the average height of the formed Si spikes in the case of fluorine precursors is 4.2 {mu}m, with a full width at half maximum of 890 nm. At the same irradiation wavelength chlorine precursors develop Si spikes 4 {mu}m in height and with a full width at half maximum of 2.3 {mu}m with irradiation of 700 pulses at 560 mJ/cm{sup 2} laser fluence. Well ordered areas of submicrometer spikes with an average height of about 500 nm and a width of 300 nm have been created by irradiation at 387 nm by chlorine precursors, whereas the fluorine precursors fabricate spikes with an average height of 700 nm and a width of about 200 nm. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the surface show that the formation of the micrometer and sub-micrometer spikes involves a combination of capillary waves on the molten silicon surface and laser-induced etching of silicon, at both 775 nm and 387 nm wavelength irradiation. The energy-dispersive x-ray measurements indicate the presence of chlorine and fluorine precursors on the structured surface. The fluorine precursors create a more ordered area of Si spikes at both micrometer and sub-micrometer scales. The potential use of patterned Si substrates with gradient topography as model scaffolds for the systematic exploration of the role of 3D

  15. Short-pulse Laser Induced Transient Structure Formation and Ablation Studied with Time-resolved Coherent XUV-scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolowski-Tinten, Klaus; Shymanovich, Uladzimir; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Bajt, Sasa; Schulz, Joachim; Boutet, Sebastien; Bogan, Mike; Bostedt, Christoph; Marchesini, Stefano; Hau-Riege, Stefan; Frank, Matthias; Stojanovic, Nikola; Duesterer, Stefan; Redlin, Harald; Treusch, Rolf; Bonse, Joern; Rosandi, Yudi; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Tobey, Ra'anan

    2010-10-08

    The structural dynamics of short-pulse laser irradiated surfaces and nano-structures has been studied with nm spatial and ultrafast temporal resolution by means of single-shot coherent XUV-scattering techniques. The experiments allowed us to time-resolve the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures, and to follow the expansion and disintegration of nano-objects during laser ablation.

  16. Structural properties and digestibility of pulsed electric field treated waxy rice starch.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Feng; Gao, Qun-Yu; Han, Zhong; Zeng, Xin-An; Yu, Shu-Juan

    2016-03-01

    Waxy rice starch was subjected to pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment at intensity of 30, 40 and 50kVcm(-1). The impact of PEF treatment on the granular morphology, molecular weight, semi-crystalline structure, thermal properties, and digestibility were investigated. The micrographs suggested that electric energy could act on the granule structure of starch granule, especially at high intensity of 50kVcm(-1). Gelatinization onset temperature, peak temperature, conclusion temperature and enthalpy value of PEF treated starches were lower than that of native starch. The 9nm lamellar peak of PEF treated starches decreased as revealed by small angle X-ray scattering. The relative crystallinity of treated starches decreased as the increase of electric field intensity. Increased rapidly digestible starch level and decreased slowly digestible starch level was found on PEF treated starches. These results would imply that PEF treatment induced structural changes in waxy rice starch significantly affected its digestibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Aerosol and cloud vertical structure in New York City: micro-pulse lidar measurements and validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassebo, Ahmed; Ahmed, Sameh; Hassebo, Yasser Y.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the measurements of aerosol and cloud vertical structure in New York City (NYC) using the first polarization Micro pulse Lidar (MPL) located at the City University of New York (CUNY). MPL operation, setup, data collection and correction will be introduced. Preliminary results and comparison analysis between 2015 and 2016 of cloud vertical structure and the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) above NYC will be discussed. An investigation analysis of the impact of NYC rush hour pollution on the level of PBL depth will be introduced using the MPL measurements (such as temporal and spatial trends in aerosol and cloud structure). Applications of the MPL tow-polarization channels will be investigated. Potential future studies and collaborations in protecting NYC against environmental disasters by employing more devices along with MPL real-time data will be emphasized. For pedagogical purposes, a lab module was developed to be implemented in the newly developed undergraduate track in Earth System Science and Environmental Engineering (ESE) at LaGuardia Community College of CUNY (LaGCC), more details will be presented.

  18. Features of spatial distribution of the parameters on the initial section of a supersonic plasma jet, created by pulsed discharge in a capillary with ablative wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, A. G.; Bityurin, V. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Efimov, A. V.; Pashchina, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    The results of spectroscopic studies of the initial section of the supersonic plasma jet created by a pulsed discharge in the capillary with the ablative wall are presented. Features of the spatial distribution of the electron density and the intensity of the spectral components, which, in particular, caused by the high electron temperature in the hot central zone, exceeding the “normal” temperature, as well as significant non-isobaricity at the initial section of supersonic jet are revealed. The presence of the molecular components exhibiting their emission properties at the plasma jet periphery permit us to estimate the parameters of the plasma in the spatial domain, where “detached” shock waves of the supersonic jet are created.

  19. Generation of 48-fs pulses and measurement of crystal dispersion by using a regeneratively initiated self-mode-locked chromium-doped forsterite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sennaroglu, Alphan; Pollock, Clifford R.; Nathel, Howard

    1993-05-01

    A regeneratively initiated self-mode-locked chromium-doped forsterite laser operated at 3.5 C is described. By employing intracavity negative-group-velocity dispersion compensation, nearly transform-limited femtosecond pulses of 48-fs (FWHM) duration were generated with average TEM(00) output powers of 380 mW at 1.23 micron. Regenerative initiation provides improvement in the output stability and ease of operation compared with fixed-frequency acousto-optic modulators. By tuning the mode-locked laser in the range 1.21-1.26 micron, estimated values for forsterite dispersion constants have also been obtained for the first time to our knowledge. The demonstrated power and stability open the door to applications such as efficient second-harmonic generation.

  20. Maternal pulse pressure at admission is a risk factor for fetal heart rate changes after initial dosing of a labor epidural: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nathaniel R; Cypher, Rebecca L; Nielsen, Peter E; Foglia, Lisa M

    2013-10-01

    To examine low maternal admission pulse pressure (PP) as a risk factor for new onset postepidural fetal heart rate (FHR) abnormalities. Retrospective cohort study of nulliparous, singleton, vertex-presenting women admitted to labor and delivery after 37 0/7 weeks that received an epidural during labor. Women with a low admission PP were compared with those with a normal admission PP. The primary outcome was new onset FHR abnormalities defined as recurrent late or prolonged FHR decelerations in the first hour after initial dosing of a labor epidural. New onset FHR abnormalities, defined as recurrent late decelerations and/or prolonged decelerations, occurred in 6% of subjects in the normal PP cohort compared with 27% in the low PP cohort (odds ratio, 5.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.1-14.3; P < .001). A multivariate logistic regression analysis generated an adjusted odds ratio of 28.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.7-221.4; P < .001). New onset FHR abnormalities after initial labor epidural dosing occur more frequently in women with a low admission PP than those with a normal admission pulse. Admission PP appears to be a novel predictor of new onset postepidural FHR abnormalities. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pulsed holographic interferometry: a technique for the detection of structural faults in aircraft structures and computerized recognition of records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, John M.; Schmidt, Timothy E.; Mew, Jacqueline M.

    1998-03-01

    A method of application of pulsed holographic interferometry together with the associated hardware has been developed and applied as a non-destructive inspection (NDI) tool for application to aluminum aircraft fuselages such as those used in the present air transport fleet. A number of novel techniques are involved in the design features of the holographic camera and the method of excitation to obtain optimum conditions where any structural faults present can be made apparent. The holographic camera system has been designed to be small, portable and ruggedly designed so it is suitable for field operations in aircraft repair stations and hangars. The technique operates by the introduction of a selected single frequency vibration signal into the area undergoing test. The camera system has been designed to record both the relative and actual phase of the vibrationally induced into the structure of the fuselage undergoing excitation and NDI. Results are presented showing structural defects. A computerized technique is being developed for the analysis of the interferogram fringe maps an preliminary results are discussed.

  2. Influence of phenylacetic acid pulses on anaerobic digestion performance and archaeal community structure in WWTP sewage sludge digesters.

    PubMed

    Cabrol, Léa; Urra, Johana; Rosenkranz, Francisca; Kroff, Pablo Araya; Plugge, Caroline M; Lesty, Yves; Chamy, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    The effect of phenylacetic acid (PAA) pulses on anaerobic digestion (AD) performance and archaeal community structure was evaluated in anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Four pilot-scale continuous stirred tank reactors were set up at a full-scale municipal WWTP in Santiago de Chile, and fed with either primary or mixed sewage sludge. AD performance was evaluated by volatile fatty acid (VFA) and biogas production monitoring. Archaeal community structure was characterized by 16S rRNA denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and band sequencing. In the primary sludge digester, a single PAA pulse at 200 mg L(-1) was sufficient to affect AD performance and archaeal community structure, resulting in long-term VFA accumulation, reduced biogas production and community shift from dominant acetoclastic (Methanosaeta concilii) to hydrogenotrophic (Methanospirillum hungatei) methanogens. By contrast, AD performance and archaeal community structure in the mixed sludge digester were stable and resistant to repeated PAA pulses at 200 and 600 mg L(-1). This work demonstrated that the effect of PAA pulses on methanogenic activity and archaeal community structure differed according to AD substrate, and suggests that better insights of the correlations between archaeal population dynamics and functional performance could help to better face toxic shocks in AD.

  3. Optical Elements: Effect of structural defects of aperiodic multilayer mirrors on the properties of reflected (sub)femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garakhin, S. A.; Meltchakov, E. N.; Polkovnikov, V. N.; Salashchenko, N. N.; Chkhalo, N. I.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of structural defects (for example, of interlayer roughness, layer thickness fluctuations and departures of Mo film density from the tabular one) on the amplitude and phase of the complex reflection coefficient as well as on the amplitude and duration of reflected pulses is numerically studied by the example of a model aperiodic Mo/Si multilayer mirror intended for the compression of a chirped pulse with a spectrum lying in a 50 - 80 eV photon energy range. The departures of Mo film density from the tabular values and film thickness fluctuations are shown to exert the strongest effect on the amplitude and duration of the reflected pulses. The interlayer roughness has a comparable effect on the amplitude of the reflection coefficient, but its effect on the duration of reflected pulses is weaker. Even small film thickness fluctuations may give rise to additional reflected pulses of high intensity, which are delayed in time relative to the principal pulse. The Mo-film density in a Mo/Si mirror is shown to vary from 0.77 to 0.97 (in units of the tabular value for massive molybdenum) as the film thickness varies from 1.5 to 5.5 nm. We discuss the key problems that have to be solved in the development of the fabrication technology of multilayer mirrors with desired characteristics.

  4. Laser-induced periodic surface structures on zinc oxide crystals upon two-colour femtosecond double-pulse irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höhm, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Krüger, J.; Bonse, J.

    2017-03-01

    In order to study the temporally distributed energy deposition in the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO), two-colour double-fs-pulse experiments were performed. Parallel or cross-polarised double-pulse sequences at 400 and 800 nm wavelength were generated by a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, exhibiting inter-pulse delays up to a few picoseconds between the sub-ablation 50-fs-pulses. Twenty two-colour double-pulse sequences were collinearly focused by a spherical mirror to the sample surface. The resulting LIPSS periods and areas were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. The delay-dependence of these LIPSS characteristics shows a dissimilar behaviour when compared to the semiconductor silicon, the dielectric fused silica, or the metal titanium. A wavelength-dependent plasmonic mechanism is proposed to explain the delay-dependence of the LIPSS on ZnO when considering multi-photon excitation processes. Our results support the involvement of nonlinear processes for temporally overlapping pulses. These experiments extend previous two-colour studies on the indirect semiconductor silicon towards the direct wide band-gap semiconductor ZnO and further manifest the relevance of the ultrafast energy deposition for LIPSS formation.

  5. Evaluation of machine learning tools for inspection of steam generator tube structures using pulsed eddy current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, J. A.; Underhill, P. R.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Degradation of nuclear steam generator (SG) tubes and support structures can result in a loss of reactor efficiency. Regular in-service inspection, by conventional eddy current testing (ECT), permits detection of cracks, measurement of wall loss, and identification of other SG tube degradation modes. However, ECT is challenged by overlapping degradation modes such as might occur for SG tube fretting accompanied by tube off-set within a corroding ferromagnetic support structure. Pulsed eddy current (PEC) is an emerging technology examined here for inspection of Alloy-800 SG tubes and associated carbon steel drilled support structures. Support structure hole size was varied to simulate uniform corrosion, while SG tube was off-set relative to hole axis. PEC measurements were performed using a single driver with an 8 pick-up coil configuration in the presence of flat-bottom rectangular frets as an overlapping degradation mode. A modified principal component analysis (MPCA) was performed on the time-voltage data in order to reduce data dimensionality. The MPCA scores were then used to train a support vector machine (SVM) that simultaneously targeted four independent parameters associated with; support structure hole size, tube off-centering in two dimensions and fret depth. The support vector machine was trained, tested, and validated on experimental data. Results were compared with a previously developed artificial neural network (ANN) trained on the same data. Estimates of tube position showed comparable results between the two machine learning tools. However, the ANN produced better estimates of hole inner diameter and fret depth. The better results from ANN analysis was attributed to challenges associated with the SVM when non-constant variance is present in the data.

  6. Native structure of photosystem II at 1.95 Å resolution viewed by femtosecond X-ray pulses.

    PubMed

    Suga, Michihiro; Akita, Fusamichi; Hirata, Kunio; Ueno, Go; Murakami, Hironori; Nakajima, Yoshiki; Shimizu, Tetsuya; Yamashita, Keitaro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ago, Hideo; Shen, Jian-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthesis converts light energy into biologically useful chemical energy vital to life on Earth. The initial reaction of photosynthesis takes place in photosystem II (PSII), a 700-kilodalton homodimeric membrane protein complex that catalyses photo-oxidation of water into dioxygen through an S-state cycle of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC). The structure of PSII has been solved by X-ray diffraction (XRD) at 1.9 ångström resolution, which revealed that the OEC is a Mn4CaO5-cluster coordinated by a well defined protein environment. However, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies showed that the manganese cations in the OEC are easily reduced by X-ray irradiation, and slight differences were found in the Mn-Mn distances determined by XRD, EXAFS and theoretical studies. Here we report a 'radiation-damage-free' structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus in the S1 state at a resolution of 1.95 ångströms using femtosecond X-ray pulses of the SPring-8 ångström compact free-electron laser (SACLA) and hundreds of large, highly isomorphous PSII crystals. Compared with the structure from XRD, the OEC in the X-ray free electron laser structure has Mn-Mn distances that are shorter by 0.1-0.2 ångströms. The valences of each manganese atom were tentatively assigned as Mn1D(III), Mn2C(IV), Mn3B(IV) and Mn4A(III), based on the average Mn-ligand distances and analysis of the Jahn-Teller axis on Mn(III). One of the oxo-bridged oxygens, O5, has significantly longer distances to Mn than do the other oxo-oxygen atoms, suggesting that O5 is a hydroxide ion instead of a normal oxygen dianion and therefore may serve as one of the substrate oxygen atoms. These findings provide a structural basis for the mechanism of oxygen evolution, and we expect that this structure will provide a blueprint for the design of artificial catalysts for water oxidation.

  7. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    SciTech Connect

    Weise, Dana Mitra, Kalyan Yoti Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-02-17

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  8. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weise, Dana; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate.

  9. Surface structuring by ultrashort laser pulses: A review of photoionization models

    SciTech Connect

    Mezel, C.; Hallo, L.; Bourgeade, A.

    2010-11-15

    Photoionization models have been introduced and compared in a three-dimensional code utilizing electromagnetic wave propagation in dielectric materials such as fused silica. Ionization rates are initially compared and matched to linear and circular polarizations. Then, they are implemented in the propagation code followed by some hydrodynamic simulations. Results on the structural and optical modifications have been compared with available experimental data. Experimental damage, ablation threshold, and a theoretical damage threshold criteria have been utilized to discriminate between the different models.

  10. Pulse Pressure Relation to Aortic and Left Ventricular Structure in Older People in the AGES-Reykjavik Study

    PubMed Central

    Torjesen, Alyssa A; Sigurđsson, Sigurđur; Westenberg, Jos JM; Gotal, John D; Bell, Vanessa; Aspelund, Thor; Launer, Lenore J; de Roos, Albert; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Mitchell, Gary F

    2014-01-01

    High pulse pressure, a major cardiovascular risk factor, has been attributed to medial elastic fiber degeneration and aortic dilation, which transfers hemodynamic load to stiffer collagen. However, recent studies suggest higher pulse pressure is instead associated with smaller aortic diameter. Thus, we sought to elucidate relations of pulse pressure with aortic stiffness and aortic and cardiac dimensions. We used magnetic resonance imaging to examine relations of pulse pressure with lumen area and wall stiffness and thickness in the thoracic aorta and left ventricular structure in 526 participants (72 to 94 years of age, 295 women) in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. In a multivariable model that adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and standard vascular risk factors, central pulse pressure had a negative relation with aortic lumen area (all effects expressed as mm Hg/SD; B=−8.1±1.2, P<0.001) and positive relations with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (B=3.8±1.0, P<0.001), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (B=3.6±1.0, P<0.001), and aortic wall area (B=3.0±1.2, P=0.015). Higher pulse pressure in older people is associated with smaller aortic lumen area and greater aortic wall stiffness and thickness and left ventricular volume. Relations of larger ventricular volume and smaller aortic lumen with higher pulse pressure suggest mismatch in hemodynamic load accommodation by the heart and aorta in older people. PMID:25024287

  11. Pulse pressure relation to aortic and left ventricular structure in the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study.

    PubMed

    Torjesen, Alyssa A; Sigurðsson, Sigurður; Westenberg, Jos J M; Gotal, John D; Bell, Vanessa; Aspelund, Thor; Launer, Lenore J; de Roos, Albert; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Mitchell, Gary F

    2014-10-01

    High pulse pressure, a major cardiovascular risk factor, has been attributed to medial elastic fiber degeneration and aortic dilation, which transfers hemodynamic load to stiffer collagen. However, recent studies suggest higher pulse pressure is instead associated with smaller aortic diameter. Thus, we sought to elucidate relations of pulse pressure with aortic stiffness and aortic and cardiac dimensions. We used magnetic resonance imaging to examine relationships of pulse pressure with lumen area and wall stiffness and thickness in the thoracic aorta and left ventricular structure in 526 participants (72-94 years of age, 295 women) in the community-based Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study. In a multivariable model that adjusted for age, sex, height, weight, and standard vascular risk factors, central pulse pressure had a negative relationship with aortic lumen area (all effects expressed as mm Hg/SD; B=-8.1±1.2; P<0.001) and positive relationships with left ventricular end-diastolic volume (B=3.8±1.0; P<0.001), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (B=3.6±1.0; P<0.001), and aortic wall area (B=3.0±1.2; P=0.015). Higher pulse pressure in older people is associated with smaller aortic lumen area and greater aortic wall stiffness and thickness and left ventricular volume. Relationships of larger ventricular volume and smaller aortic lumen with higher pulse pressure suggest mismatch in hemodynamic load accommodation by the heart and aorta in older people. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Structure and composition of oligohaline marsh plant communities exposed to salinity pulses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, R.J.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The response of two oligohaline marsh macrophyte communities to pulses of increased salinity was studied over a single growing season in a greenhouse experiment. The plant communities were allowed a recovery period in freshwater following the pulse events. The experimental treatments included: (1) salinity influx rate (rate of salinity increase from 0 to 12 gl-1); (2) duration of exposure to elevated salinity; and (3) water depth. The communities both included Sagittaria lancifolia L.; the codominant species were Eleocharis palustris (L.) Roemer and J.A. Schultes in community 1 and Schoenoplectus americanus (Pers.) Volk. ex Schinz and R. Keller in community 2. Effects of the treatments on sediment chemical characteristics (salinity, pH, redox potential, and sulfide and ammonium concentrations) and plant community attributes (aboveground and belowground biomass, stem density, leaf tissue nutrients, and species richness) were examined. The treatment effects often interacted to influence sediment and plant communities characteristics following recovery in fresh water. Salinity influx rate per se, however, had little effect on the abiotic or biotic response variables; significant influx effects were found when the 0 gl-1 (zero influx) treatment was compared to the 12 gl-1 treatments, regardless of the rate salinity was raised. A salinity level of 12 gl-1 had negative effects on plant community structure and composition; these effects were usually associated with 3 months of salinity exposure. Water depth often interacted with exposure duration, but increased water depth did independently decrease the values of some community response measures. Community 1 was affected more than community 2 in the most extreme salinity treatment (3 months exposure/15-cm water depth). Although species richness in both communities was reduced, structural changes were more dramatic in community 1. Biomass and stem density were reduced in community 1 overall and in both dominant species

  13. Controlled assembly of high-order nanoarray metal structures on bulk copper surface by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wanwan; Yang, Jianjun

    2017-07-01

    We report a new one-step maskless method to fabricate high-order nanoarray metal structures comprising periodic grooves and particle chains on a single-crystal Cu surface using femtosecond laser pulses at the central wavelength of 400 nm. Remarkably, when a circularly polarized infrared femtosecond laser pulse (spectrally centered at 800 nm) pre-irradiates the sample surface, the geometric dimensions of the composite structure can be well controlled. With increasing the energy fluence of the infrared laser pulse, both the groove width and particle diameter are observed to reduce, while the measured spacing-to-diameter ratio of the nanoparticles tends to present an increasing tendency. A physical scenario is proposed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms: as the infrared femtosecond laser pulse pre-irradiates the target, the copper surface is triggered to display anomalous transient physical properties, on which the subsequently incident Gaussian blue laser pulse is spatially modulated into fringe-like energy depositions via the excitation of ultrafast surface plasmon. During the following relaxation processes, the periodically heated thin-layer regions can be transferred into the metastable liquid rivulets and then they break up into nanodroplet arrays owing to the modified Rayleigh-like instability. This investigation indicates a simple integrated approach for active designing and large-scale assembly of complexed functional nanostructures on bulk materials.

  14. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I.; Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  15. Structural and chemical composition studies of pulsed laser deposited beta-Al-Mg thin films.

    PubMed

    Radziszewska, A

    2010-03-01

    In this work, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy and also an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to examine the morphology, structure and chemical composition of the beta-Al(3)Mg(2) thin films. The beta-Al-Mg thin films were produced by pulsed laser deposition. For the laser fluence (q) of 1.6 J/cm(2) the amorphous structure was observed while for the higher fluence (13.8 J/cm(2)) nanocrystalline grains were visible. The micrometer-sized droplets were also observed in the films deposited at higher laser fluence. It was found that the thickness of beta-Al-Mg films was equal to 95 nm and 260 nm for laser fluence of 1.6 J/cm(2) and 13.8 J/cm(2), respectively. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of thin films revealed that those that were deposited at 1.6 J/cm(2) were characterized by the congruent transfer of the composition of the target to the substrate (Si). However, the contents of aluminium and magnesium varied on the cross-section of films deposited at fluence of 13.8 J/cm(2).

  16. Synthesis, structure, and biocompatibility of pulsed laser-deposited TiN nanowires for implant applications.

    PubMed

    Faruque, Mainul K; Darkwa, Kwadwo M; Watson, Christa Y; Waterman, Jenora T; Kumar, Dhananjay

    2012-07-01

    A bottom-up based pulsed laser deposition technique has been used to grow titanium nitride (TiN) nanowires on single crystalline substrates. The first step of this method is the dissolution of laser ablated gaseous TiN material in the nanodimensional catalytic gold (Au) liquid islands located on the substrate surfaces. The continuous dissolution of TiN results in the supersaturation of liquid Au with TiN followed by extrusion of solid TiN material in the nanowire form at the liquid/solid interface. The growth of TiN nanowires continues as long as its dissolution rate into the catalyst Au matches the extrusion rate of solid TiN. This bottom-up approach gives rise to a one-dimensional TiN nanowire structures (length: 200-300 nm and diameter: 20-30 nm) capped with Au. The ascent of Au nanodots to the top of TiN nanowires can be explained based on breaking of weaker bonds and building of stronger bonds. The TiN nanowires are provided vertical alignment by selecting a plane of the substrate that provides the least lattice mismatching to the (111) plane of TiN which has lower surface energy than its other planes: (100) or (110). After the successful formation and structural characterization, a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay has been used to confirm the biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of these nanowires. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure.

    PubMed

    Balzovsky, E V; Buyanov, Yu I; Koshelev, V I; Nekrasov, E S

    2016-03-01

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from -40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  18. Dual polarized receiving steering antenna array for measurement of ultrawideband pulse polarization structure

    SciTech Connect

    Balzovsky, E. V.; Buyanov, Yu. I.; Koshelev, V. I. Nekrasov, E. S.

    2016-03-15

    To measure simultaneously two orthogonal components of the electromagnetic field of nano- and subnano-second duration, an antenna array has been developed. The antenna elements of the array are the crossed dipoles of dimension 5 × 5 cm. The arms of the dipoles are connected to the active four-pole devices to compensate the frequency response variations of a short dipole in the frequency band ranging from 0.4 to 4 GHz. The dipoles have superimposed phase centers allowing measuring the polarization structure of the field in different directions. The developed antenna array is the linear one containing four elements. The pattern maximum position is controlled by means of the switched ultrawideband true time delay lines. Discrete steering in seven directions in the range from −40° to +40° has been realized. The error at setting the pattern maximum position is less than 4°. The isolation of the polarization exceeds 29 dB in the direction orthogonal to the array axis and in the whole steering range it exceeds 23 dB. Measurement results of the polarization structure of radiated and scattered pulses with different polarization are presented as well.

  19. Structural, morphological and Raman studies of pulse electrosynthesised indium antimonide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Joginder; Chandel, Tarun; Rajaram, P.

    2015-08-01

    InSb films deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a pulse elctrodeposition technique. The deposition was carried out at an applied potential -1.3V versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Structural, morphological and optical studies were performed on the electrodeposited InSb. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show that the deposited InSb films are polycrystalline in nature having the zinc blend structure. The crystallite size (D), dislocation density (δ) and strain (ɛ) were calculated using XRD results. The EDAX analysis shows that chemical composition of In3+ and Sb3+ ions is close to the required stoichiometry. The surface morphology of the deposited films was examined using scanning electron scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM studies reveal that the surface of the films is uniformly covered with submicron sized spherical particles. However, the crystallite size determined by the Scherrer method shows a size close to 30 nm. Surface morphology studies of the InSb films were also performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The average surface roughness as measured by AFM is around 40 nm. Hot probe studies show that all the electrodeposited thin films have n type conductivity and the thickness of the films is calculated using electrochemical formula.

  20. Structural, morphological and Raman studies of pulse electrosynthesised indium antimonide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Joginder Chandel, Tarun; Rajaram, P.

    2015-08-28

    InSb films deposited on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates by a pulse elctrodeposition technique. The deposition was carried out at an applied potential −1.3V versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Structural, morphological and optical studies were performed on the electrodeposited InSb. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies show that the deposited InSb films are polycrystalline in nature having the zinc blend structure. The crystallite size (D), dislocation density (δ) and strain (ε) were calculated using XRD results. The EDAX analysis shows that chemical composition of In{sup 3+} and Sb{sup 3+} ions is close to the required stoichiometry. The surface morphology of the deposited films was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM studies reveal that the surface of the films is uniformly covered with submicron sized spherical particles. However, the crystallite size determined by the Scherrer method shows a size close to 30 nm. Surface morphology studies of the InSb films were also performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The average surface roughness as measured by AFM is around 40 nm. Hot probe studies show that all the electrodeposited thin films have n type conductivity and the thickness of the films is calculated using electrochemical formula.

  1. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32-) to sulfate (SO42-). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH-, H2O, SO32-, or SO42- group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

  2. Initiation of Explosion of Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate by Pulses of the First and Second Harmonics of a Neodymium Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aduev, B. P.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Furega, R. I.; Liskov, I. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    It is shown that during initiation of explosion of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) by the second harmonic of a laser, the primary process of energy absorption is ionization of PETN molecules by the mechanism of two-photon absorption. Possibility of regulating the PETN sensitivity by adding nickel nanoparticles to laser irradiation is established.

  3. Multistage plasma initiation process by pulsed CO2 laser irradiation of a Ti sample in an ambient gas (He, Ar, or N2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, J.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Dubreuil, B.

    1993-02-01

    New experimental results are reported on plasma initiation in front of a titanium sample irradiated by ir (λ=10.6 μm) laser pulses in an ambient gas (He, Ar, and N2) at pressures ranging from several Torr up to the atmosphere. The plasma is studied by space- and time-resolved emission spectroscopy, while sample vaporization is probed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Threshold laser intensities leading to the formation of a plasma in the vapor and in the ambient gases are determined. Experimental results support the model of a vaporization mechanism for the plasma initiation (vaporization-initiated plasma breakdown). The plasma initiation is described by simple numerical criteria based on a two-stage process. Theoretical predictions are found to be in a reasonable agreement with the experiment. This study provides also a clear explanation of the influence of the ambient gas on the laser beam-metal surface energy transfer. Laser irradiation always causes an important vaporization when performed in He, while in the case of Ar or N2, the interaction is reduced in heating and vaporization of some surface defects and impurities.

  4. Fundamental studies on initiation and evolution of multi-channel discharges and their application to next generation pulsed power machines.

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Jens; Savage, Mark E.; Lucero, Diego Jose; Jaramillo, Deanna M.; Seals, Kelly Gene; Pitts, Todd Alan; Hautzenroeder, Brenna M.; Laine, Mark Richard; Karelitz, David B.; Porter, John L.

    2014-09-01

    Future pulsed power systems may rely on linear transformer driver (LTD) technology. The LTD's will be the building blocks for a driver that can deliver higher current than the Z-Machine. The LTD's would require tens of thousands of low inductance ( %3C 85nH), high voltage (200 kV DC) switches with high reliability and long lifetime ( 10 4 shots). Sandia's Z-Machine employs 36 megavolt class switches that are laser triggered by a single channel discharge. This is feasible for tens of switches but the high inductance and short switch life- time associated with the single channel discharge are undesirable for future machines. Thus the fundamental problem is how to lower inductance and losses while increasing switch life- time and reliability. These goals can be achieved by increasing the number of current-carrying channels. The rail gap switch is ideal for this purpose. Although those switches have been extensively studied during the past decades, each effort has only characterized a particular switch. There is no comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics that would allow predictive capability for arbitrary switch geometry. We have studied rail gap switches via an extensive suite of advanced diagnostics in synergy with theoretical physics and advanced modeling capability. Design and topology of multichannel switches as they relate to discharge dynamics are investigated. This involves electrically and optically triggered rail gaps, as well as discrete multi-site switch concepts.

  5. Ionization of hydrogen atoms in attosecond pulse trains and strong infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Sen; He, Pei-Lun; He, Feng

    2016-11-01

    Ionization of a hydrogen atom exposed to an attosecond pulse train and a few-cycle middle infrared (MIR) pulse is calculated with the strong field approximation. The ionization events initiated by two attosecond pulses in the train are streaked in the presence of a weak MIR pulse, making the two ionization events overlap or separate in momentum representation. By changing the weak MIR pulse intensity, the interference structure in the photoelectron momentum distribution can be precisely tailored. When the MIR field is strong enough to produce substantial ionization, the overlapped attosecond pulse train and MIR field trigger the XUV-phase-dependent photoelectron angular distribution. Either the interference pattern or the angular distribution can be used to extract the carrier envelope phase of attosecond pulses, which makes it possible to visualize the sub-XUV-cycle dynamics.

  6. Physical and structural changes in liquid whole egg treated with high-intensity pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Marco-Molés, Raquel; Rojas-Graü, María A; Hernando, Isabel; Pérez-Munuera, Isabel; Soliva-Fortuny, Robert; Martín-Belloso, Olga

    2011-03-01

    Liquid whole egg (LWE) is currently pasteurized through the application of heat; however, this treatment entails deleterious effects against some of the functional and technological properties of the product. In this study, the effect of high-intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF) processing (field strength: 19, 32, and 37 kV/cm) was compared to the traditional heat pasteurization (66 °C for 4.5 min). Different physical and structural characteristics of LWE, subjected or not to homogenization, were evaluated and compared, having the untreated LWE as a reference. Thermal treatment caused an increase in the viscosity of LWE, especially in nonhomogenized samples. HIPEF treatments did not modify the original color of LWE, whereas thermally treated samples developed an opaque appearance. LWE treated at 19 and 32 kV/cm exhibited a similar foaming capacity as fresh untreated egg, whereas thermal processing and PEF treatments of 37 kV/cm caused a substantial decrease in the foaming capacity of untreated liquid egg. Regarding the microstructure, the lipoprotein matrix appeared to be less affected by the HIPEF than by heat treatment if compared to the control. In addition, heat pasteurization had a significant impact on both the water-soluble protein content of the LWE samples (19.5% to 23.6% decrease) and the mechanical properties of the egg gels (up to 21.3% and 14.5% increase in hardness and cohesiveness, respectively). On the other hand, these parameters were not substantially affected in the HIPEF-treated samples. Heat-induced gels obtained from HIPEF-treated samples did not exhibit remarkable differences in the water-holding capacity (WHC) with respect to heat-pasteurized samples. The impact of high-intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF) processing on technological properties of liquid-whole egg was investigated and compared to that of thermal processing. Heat treatments cause a severe impact on the foaming capacity, the water-soluble protein content, and the

  7. Modeling structural features of pulse timing jitter in a single-mode, Q-switched, Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Graham; Siemers, Troy J.; Thompson, John R.

    2017-08-01

    Timing jitter in single-mode, Q-switched pulses is measured for a repetitively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, and the fluctuations in peak times are observed to have distinctive structural features that we model using rate equations with noise sources acting on different time scales. The structural features are found to be a consequence of the interplay of Q-switching dynamics and stochastic and deterministic parameter fluctuations.

  8. Substitution Structures of Multiple Silicon-Containing Species by Chirped Pulse Ftmw Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Lobsiger, Simon; Pate, Brooks H.; Guirgis, Gamil A.; Overby, Jason S.; Durig, James R.

    2013-06-01

    The structures of CH_{3}SiHF-NCO, 1-X-silacyclopropane (X = cyano, isocyanato), 1,1,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,3-disilacyclopentane and its hydrogen analogue (1,3-disilacyclopentane), and 1-isocyanato-silacyclohexane have been studied by chirped pulse FTMW spectroscopy in the 6-18 GHz band. Multiple conformers for some of the species were also detected: anti and gauche for both silacyclopropyl species, and axial and equatorial for the silacyclohexane. Heavy atom substitution structures were determined, with all possible single ^{13}C, ^{29}Si/^{30}Si and most ^{15}N isotopologues assigned in natural abundance. Nitrogen hyperfine and distortion parameters for all species have been determined, and the barrier for methyl internal rotation for CH_{3}SiHF-NCO has been determined as 481(20) cm^{-1}, close to the B3LYP/6-311++g(d,p) barrier of 450 cm^{-1}. A summary of the microwave and structural results for the aforementioned molecules will be presented. In addition, emphasis will be placed on the use of previously discussed automated fitting techniques as a means of efficient and fast assignment of isotopologues in spectra with increasingly large line densities. A. L. Steber, J. L. Neill, M. T. Muckle, B. H. Pate, D. F. Plusquellic, V. Lattanzi, S. Spezzano, M. C. McCarthy. 65th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2010, TC10. E. B. Kent, M. N. McCabe, M. A. Phillips, B. P. Gordon, S. T. Shipman. 66th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2011, RH01.

  9. Microstructure and electronic band structure of pulsed laser deposited iron fluoride thin film for battery electrodes.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ortiz, Reinaldo; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Schmid, Stefan; Kuo, Fang-Ling; Kisslinger, Kim; Nag, Soumya; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Zhu, Yimei; Shepherd, Nigel D

    2013-04-10

    Battery electrodes in thin-film form are free of the binders used with traditional powder electrodes and present an ideal platform to obtain basic insight to the evolution of the electrode-electrolyte interface passivation layer, the formation of secondary phases, and the structural underpinnings of reversibility. This is particularly relevant to the not yet fully understood conversion electrode materials, which possess enormous potential for providing transformative capacity improvements in next-generation lithium-ion batteries. However, this necessitates an understanding of the electronic charge transport properties and band structure of the thin films. This work presents an investigation of the electron transport properties of iron fluoride (FeF2) thin-film electrodes for Li-ion batteries. FeF2 thin films were prepared by pulsed-laser deposition, and their phase purity was characterized by electron microscopy and diffraction. The grown materials are polycrystalline FeF2 with a P42/mnm crystallographic symmetry. Room-temperature Hall measurements reveal that as-deposited FeF2 is n-type: the Hall coefficients were negative, electron mobility was 0.33 cm2/(V s) and resistivity was 0.255 Ω cm. The electronic band diagram of FeF2 was obtained using a combination of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, photoluminescence, photoluminescence excitation and optical absorption, which revealed that FeF2 is a direct bandgap, n-type semiconductor whose band structure is characterized by a 3.4 eV bandgap, a workfunction of ∼4.51 eV, and an effective Fermi level that resides approximately 0.22 eV below the conduction band edge. We propose that the shallow donor levels at 0.22 eV are responsible for the measured n-type conductivity. The band diagram was used to understand electron transport in FeF2 thin film and FeF2-C composite electrodes.

  10. Chirped Pulse Adiabatic Passage in CARS for Imaging of Biological Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Malinovskaya, Svetlana A.

    2007-12-26

    We propose the adiabatic passage control scheme implementing chirped femtosecond laser pulses to maximize coherence in a predetermined molecular vibrational mode using two-photon Raman transitions. We investigate vibrational energy relaxation and collisional dephasing as factors of coherence loss, and demonstrate the possibility for preventing decoherence by the chirped pulse train. The proposed method may be used to advance noninvasive biological imaging techniques.

  11. Crystal Structures of the E. coli Transcription Initiation Complexes with a Complete Bubble

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yuhong; Steitz, Thomas A.

    2015-05-01

    During transcription initiation, RNA polymerase binds to promoter DNA to form an initiation complex containing a DNA bubble and enters into abortive cycles of RNA synthesis before escaping the promoter to transit into the elongation phase for processive RNA synthesis. Here we present the crystal structures of E. coli transcription initiation complexes containing a complete transcription bubble and de novo synthesized RNA oligonucleotides at about 6-Å resolution. The structures show how RNA polymerase recognizes DNA promoters that contain spacers of different lengths and reveal a bridging interaction between the 5'-triphosphate of the nascent RNA and the σ factor that may function to stabilize the short RNA-DNA hybrids during the early stage of transcription initiation. The conformation of the RNA oligonucleotides and the paths of the DNA strands in the complete initiation complexes provide insights into the mechanism that controls both the abortive and productive RNA synthesis.

  12. Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on tool steel by multiple picosecond laser pulses of different polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorčič, Peter; Sedlaček, Marko; Podgornik, Bojan; Reif, Jürgen

    2016-11-01

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) are produced on cold work tool steel by irradiation with a low number of picosecond laser pulses. As expected, the ripples, with a period of about 90% of the laser wavelength, are oriented perpendicular to the laser polarization. Subsequent irradiation with the polarization rotated by 45° or 90° results in a corresponding rotation of the ripples. This is visible already with the first pulse and becomes almost complete - erasing the previous orientation - after as few as three pulses. The phenomenon is not only observed for single-spot irradiation but also for writing long coherent traces. The experimental results strongly defy the role of surface plasmon-polaritons as the predominant key to LIPSS formation.

  13. Effects of experimental conditions on the morphologies, structures and growth modes of pulsed laser-deposited CdS nanoneedles.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Li; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Xujun; Guan, Leilei; Sun, Jian; Wu, Jiada; Xu, Ning

    2014-02-22

    CdS nanoneedles with different morphologies, structures, and growth modes have been grown on Ni-coated Si(100) surface under different experimental conditions by pulsed laser deposition method. The effects of catalyst layer, substrate temperature, and laser pulse energy on the growth of the CdS nanoneedles were studied in detail. It was confirmed that the formation of the molten catalyst spheres is the key to the nucleation of the CdS nanoneedles by observing the morphologies of the Ni catalyst thin films annealed at different substrate temperatures. Both the substrate temperature and laser pulse energy strongly affected the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles. The secondary growth of the smaller nanoneedles on the top of the main nanoneedles was found at appropriate conditions. A group of more completed pictures of the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles were presented.

  14. Temporal structure of X-ray radiation pulses of picosecond laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, V S; Kovkov, D V; Matafonov, A P; Karabadzhak, G F; Raikunov, G G; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Skobelev, I Yu; Pikuz, T A; Fokin, D A; Fortov, V E; Ignat'ev, G N; Kapitanov, S V; Krapiva, P S; Korotkov, K E

    2013-09-30

    The shape of the X-ray pulse generated by picosecond laser plasma is experimentally studied. The unusual phenomenon was experimentally observed for the first time for targets made of moderate-heavy chemical elements, namely, the pulse of hard X-ray radiation generated by laser plasma at the laser radiation flux of ∼10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} had a longer duration than the pulse of softer X-ray radiation. A simple kinetic model is suggested for explaining this fact. We have suggested a method for controlling the temporal shape of X-ray pulse emitted by laser plasma by varying the contrast of laser pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  15. Growth of high spatial frequency periodic ripple structures on SiC crystal surfaces irradiated with successive femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Obara, Go; Shimizu, Hisashi; Enami, Taira; Mazur, Eric; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro; Obara, Minoru

    2013-11-04

    We present experimentally and theoretically the evolution of high spatial frequency periodic ripples (HSFL) fabricated on SiC crystal surfaces by irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses in a vacuum chamber. At early stages the seed defects are mainly induced by laser pulse irradiation, leading to the reduction in the ablation threshold fluence. By observing the evolution of these surface structures under illumination with successive laser pulses, the nanocraters are made by nanoablation at defects in the SiC surface. The Mie scattering by the nanoablated craters grows the periodic ripples. The number of HSFL is enhanced with increasing pulse number. At the edge of the laser spot the Mie scattering process is still dominant, causing the fabrication of HSFL. On the periphery of the spot SiC substrate remains a semiconductor state because the electron density in the SiC induced by laser irradiation is kept low. The HSFL observed is very deep in the SiC surface by irradiating with many laser pulses. These experimental results are well explained by 3D FDTD (three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain) simulation.

  16. Initiation of Translation in Bacteria by a Structured Eukaryotic IRES RNA

    PubMed Central

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A.; Jaafar, Zane A.; Plank, Terra-Dawn M.; Noller, Harry F.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA→RNA→protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive1,2. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the steps of translation following initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life3,4. We asked whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here, we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by tRNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence as an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life. PMID:25652826

  17. Structure and mechanical properties of low stress tetrahedral amorphous carbon films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, M.; Ferrari, A. C.; Fioravanti, A.; Li Bassi, A.; Miotello, A.; Ossi, P. M.

    2002-02-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon films have been produced by pulsed laser deposition, at a wavelength of 248 nm, ablating highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at room temperature, in a 10-2 Pa vacuum, at fluences ranging between 0.5 and 35 Jcm-2. Both (100) Si wafers and wafers covered with a SiC polycrystalline interlayer were used as substrates. Film structure was investigated by Raman spectroscopy at different excitation wavelength from 633 nm to 229 nm and by transmission Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy. The films, which are hydrogen-free, as shown by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, undergo a transition from mainly disordered graphitic to up to 80% tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) above a threshold laser fluence of 5 J cm-2. By X-ray reflectivity roughness, density and cross-sectional layering of selected samples were studied. Film hardness as high as 70 GPa was obtained by nanoindentation on films deposited with the SiC interlayer. By scratch test film adhesion and friction coefficients between 0.06 and 0.11 were measured. By profilometry we obtained residual stress values not higher than 2 GPa in as-deposited 80% sp3 ta-C films.

  18. Analysis of pulsed eddy current data using regression models for steam generator tube support structure inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, J. A.; Underhill, P. R.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    Nuclear steam generators (SGs) are a critical component for ensuring safe and efficient operation of a reactor. Life management strategies are implemented in which SG tubes are regularly inspected by conventional eddy current testing (ECT) and ultrasonic testing (UT) technologies to size flaws, and safe operating life of SGs is predicted based on growth models. ECT, the more commonly used technique, due to the rapidity with which full SG tube wall inspection can be performed, is challenged when inspecting ferromagnetic support structure materials in the presence of magnetite sludge and multiple overlapping degradation modes. In this work, an emerging inspection method, pulsed eddy current (PEC), is being investigated to address some of these particular inspection conditions. Time-domain signals were collected by an 8 coil array PEC probe in which ferromagnetic drilled support hole diameter, depth of rectangular tube frets and 2D tube off-centering were varied. Data sets were analyzed with a modified principal components analysis (MPCA) to extract dominant signal features. Multiple linear regression models were applied to MPCA scores to size hole diameter as well as size rectangular outer diameter tube frets. Models were improved through exploratory factor analysis, which was applied to MPCA scores to refine selection for regression models inputs by removing nonessential information.

  19. Enhancing pulsed eddy current for inspection of P-3 Orion lap-joint structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, D. M.; Underhill, P. R.; Krause, T. W.

    2016-02-01

    During flight, aircraft are subjected to cyclic loading. In the Lockheed P-3 Orion airframe, this cyclic loading can lead to development of fatigue cracks at steel fastener locations in the top and second layers of aluminum wing skin lap-joints. An inspection method that is capable of detecting these cracks, without fastener removal, is desirable as this can minimize aircraft downtime, while subsequently reducing the risk of collateral damage. The ability to detect second layer cracks has been demonstrated using a Pulsed Eddy Current (PEC) probe design that utilizes the ferrous fastener as a flux conduit. This allows for deeper penetration of flux into the lap-joint second layer and consequently, sensitivity to the presence of cracks. Differential pick-up coil pairs are used to sense the eddy current response due to the presence of a crack. The differential signal obtained from pick-up coils on opposing sides of the fastener is analyzed using a Modified Principal Components Analysis (MPCA). This is followed by a cluster analysis of the resulting MPCA scores to separate fastener locations with cracks from those without. Probe design features, data acquisition system parameters and signal post-processing can each have a strong impact on crack detection. Physical probe configurations and signal analysis processes, used to enhance the PEC system for detection of cracks in P-3 Orion lap-joint structures, are investigated and an enhanced probe design is identified.

  20. Fabrication of antimicrobial silver-doped carbon structures by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Ion N; Bociaga, Dorota; Socol, Gabriel; Stan, George E; Chifiriuc, Mariana-Carmen; Bleotu, Coralia; Husanu, Marius A; Popescu-Pelin, Gianina; Duta, Liviu; Luculescu, Catalin R; Negut, Irina; Hapenciuc, Claudiu; Besleaga, Cristina; Zgura, Irina; Miculescu, Florin

    2016-12-30

    We report on the selection by combinatorial pulsed laser deposition of Silver-doped Carbon structures with reliable physical-chemical characteristics and high efficiency against microbial biofilms. The investigation of the films was performed by scanning electron microscopy, high resolution atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, bonding strength "pull-out" tests, and surface energy measurements. In vitro biological assays were carried out using a large spectrum of bacterial and fungal strains, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans. The biocompatibility of the films obtained was evaluated on MG63 mammalian cell cultures. The optimal combination with reasonable physical-chemical properties, efficient protection against microbial colonization and beneficial effects on human cells was found for Silver-doped Carbon films containing 2 to 7 at.% silver. These mixtures can be used to fabricate safe and efficient coatings of metallic implants, with the goal to decrease the risk of implant associated biofilm infections which are difficult to treat and often responsible for implant failure.

  1. Optical, structural, and mechanical properties of silicon oxynitride films prepared by pulsed magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chien-Jen; Jaing, Cheng-Chung; Tien, Chuen-Lin; Sun, Wei-Chiang; Lin, Shih-Chin

    2017-02-01

    Silicon oxynitride films were deposited by reactive pulsed magnetron sputtering. The optical, structural, and mechanical properties of silicon oxynitride films with different nitrogen proportions were analyzed via spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, Twyman-Green interferometer, and nanoindentation. The refractive indices of the silicon oxynitride films were adjusted from 1.487 to 1.956 with the increase in nitrogen proportions. The surface roughness decreased from 1.33 to 0.97 nm with the increase in nitrogen proportions. The residual stress of the silicon oxynitride films was higher than for pure silicon nitride and silicon dioxide films. The hardness and Young's modulus increased from 13.51 to 19.74 GPa and 110.41 to 140.49 GPa with the increase in nitrogen proportions, respectively. The hardness and Young's modulus of antireflection coatings using silicon oxynitride film were 13.64 GPa and 102.11 GPa, respectively. Silicon oxynitride film could be used to improve the hardness of antireflective coatings.

  2. Coherent scatter-controlled phase-change grating structures in silicon using femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Edfuf, Yasser; Garcia-Lechuga, Mario; Puerto, Daniel; Florian, Camilo; Garcia-Leis, Adianez; Sanchez-Cortes, Santiago; Solis, Javier; Siegel, Jan

    2017-07-04

    Periodic structures of alternating amorphous-crystalline fringes have been fabricated in silicon using repetitive femtosecond laser exposure (800 nm wavelength and 120 fs duration). The method is based on the interference of the incident laser light with far- and near-field scattered light, leading to local melting at the interference maxima, as demonstrated by femtosecond microscopy. Exploiting this strategy, lines of highly regular amorphous fringes can be written. The fringes have been characterized in detail using optical microscopy combined modelling, which enables a determination of the three-dimensional shape of individual fringes. 2D micro-Raman spectroscopy reveals that the space between amorphous fringes remains crystalline. We demonstrate that the fringe period can be tuned over a range of 410 nm - 13 µm by changing the angle of incidence and inverting the beam scan direction. Fine control over the lateral dimensions, thickness, surface depression and optical contrast of the fringes is obtained via adjustment of pulse number, fluence and spot size. Large-area, highly homogeneous gratings composed of amorphous fringes with micrometer width and millimeter length can readily be fabricated. The here presented fabrication technique is expected to have applications in the fields of optics, nanoelectronics, and mechatronics and should be applicable to other materials.

  3. Structural, morphological and electrical properties of pulsed electrodeposited CdIn2Se4 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudha, D.; Dhanapandian, S.; Manoharan, C.; Arunachalam, A.

    Semiconducting CdIn2Se4 thin films have been deposited on to the conducting glass substrates using pulsed electrodeposition technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows the films are polycrystalline in nature having cubic crystal structure. Energy dispersive analysis (EDAX) spectrum of the surface composition confirms the nearly stoichiometric CdIn2S4 nature of the film. Atomic force microscope (AFM) shows that the deposited films are well adherent and grains are uniformly distributed over the surface of substrate. The surface roughness and grain size increased from 0.2 nm and 12 nm to 0.7 nm and 20 nm respectively with increase of duty cycle. The films are highly transparent in the visible region with an average transmittance reaching up to 80%, which indicates the better crystalline nature with less defects. The CdIn2Se4 thin films show band gap energies of the films decreased from 3.12 eV to 3.77 eV.

  4. Structural and optical properties of silicon nanoparticles prepared by pulsed laser ablation in hydrogen background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, T.; Inada, M.; Yoshida, K.; Umezu, I.; Sugimura, A.

    We studied the structural and optical properties of silicon (Si) nanoparticles (np-Si) prepared by pulsed laser ablation (PLA) in hydrogen (H2) background gas. The mean diameter of the np-Si was estimated to be approximately 5 nm. The infrared absorption corresponding to Si-Hn (n=1,2,3) bonds was observed at around 2100 cm-1, and a Raman scattering peak corresponding to crystalline Si was observed at around 520 cm-1. These results indicate that nanoparticles are not an alloy of Si and hydrogen but Si nanocrystal covered by hydrogen or hydrogenated silicon. This means that surface passivated Si nanoparticles can be prepared by PLA in H2 gas. The band-gap energy of np-Si prepared in H2 gas (1.9 eV) was larger than that of np-Si prepared in He gas (1.6 eV) even though they are almost the same diameter. After decreasing the hydrogen content in np-Si by thermal annealing, the band-gap energy decreased, and reached the same energy level as np-Si prepared in He gas. Thus, the optical properties of np-Si were affected by the hydrogenation of the surface of np-Si.

  5. Structure property relationships of nitride superlattice hard coatings prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nitin

    Today, more than 40% of all cutting tools used in machining applications are covered with coatings. Coatings improve wear resistance, increase tool life, enable use at higher speed, and broaden the application range. Superlattices, where thin layers (typically <10 nm) of two different materials (e.g. TiN and AlN) are deposited in an alternating fashion, are widely used commercially. Importantly, the hardness value of a superlattice (e.g. TiN/AlN) can significantly exceed the rule of mixture value. Superlattice coatings built from crystallographically dissimilar materials are not widely studied but hold promise for improvements in performance by allowing for both hardness and toughness to be simultaneously optimized. This is what this thesis is concerned with: a structure-property comparison of isostructural superlattices with corresponding non-isostructural superlattices. In order to grow both isostructural and non-isostructural superlattices from the same set of materials, it is necessary to grow monolithic films in different phases. Towards this end, the synthesis of different phases of AlN, (Ti,Al)N, TaN, and TiN was investigated. Films were grown by pulsed laser deposition in two different chambers that had different base pressures to study the effect of background gases on the phases and orientations of the films. Growth of AlN and (Ti,Al)N films is strongly affected in a chamber that had a base pressure of 10-6 Torr, but the films adopt their stable nitride structures in a chamber with the lower base pressure of 10-8 Torr. TaN adopts either the cubic rock salt structure or its stable hexagonal structure, depending on the growth temperature, while TiN grows as rock salt in all conditions. Single crystal epitaxial superlattices were then grown with different compositions, periodicities, and crystallographic orientations to compare the effect of chemistry, nanostructure, and crystallographic texture on hardness. Finally, the structure-property relationships of

  6. Influence of the initial surface texture on the resulting surface roughness and waviness for micro-machining with ultra-short laser pulses (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remund, Stefan M.; Jaeggi, Beat; Kramer, Thorsten; Neuenschwander, Beat

    2017-03-01

    The resulting surface roughness and waviness after processing with ultra-short pulsed laser radiation depend on the laser parameters as well as on the machining strategy and the scanning system. However the results depend on the material and its initial surface quality and finishing as well. The improvement of surface finishing represents effort and produces additional costs. For industrial applications it is important to reduce the preparation of a workpiece for laser micro-machining to optimize quality and reduce costs. The effects of the ablation process and the influence of the machining strategy and scanning system onto the surface roughness and waviness can be differenced due to their separate manner. By using the optimal laser parameters on an initially perfect surface, the ablation process mainly increases the roughness to a certain value for most metallic materials. However, imperfections in the scanning system causing a slight variation in the scanning speed lead to a raise of the waviness on the sample surface. For a basic understanding of the influence of grinding marks, the sample surfaces were initially furnished with regular grooves of different depths and spatial frequencies to gain a homogenous and well-defined original surface. On these surfaces the effect of different beam waists and machining strategy are investigated and the results are compared with a simulation of the process. Furthermore the behaviors of common surface finishes used in industrial applications for laser micro-machining are studied and the relation onto the resulting surface roughness and waviness is presented.

  7. Radiography of magnetically-driven implosions of initially solid beryllium cylindrical shells for equation-of-state studies at the Z pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, Ryan

    2011-06-01

    The Z accelerator delivers approximately 4-MV, 26-MA electrical pulses with adjustable current rise times of 100--600 ns, as well as adjustable pulse waveforms. The magnetic pressure produced is used for various applications, including magnetically-driven implosions. The Z-Beamlet Laser (ZBL) is a pulsed (0.3-1.5 ns), multi-kJ, TW-class Nd:glass laser system that provides x-ray radiography capabilities for Z experiments. This talk focuses primarily on the radiography diagnostic used to study the magnetically-driven implosions of initially solid cylindrical shells (also referred to as ``liners''). Specifically, we discuss the 6.151-keV monochromatic backlighting system and its use in obtaining radiographs of imploding beryllium (Be) liners. The high transmission efficiency of 6.151-keV photons in Be allowed us to obtain radiographs with finite transmission throughout the radial extent of the imploding liners. Abel inverting these data, we have obtained time-resolved measurements of the imploding liner's density as a function of both axial and radial location throughout the field of view. These data are allowing us to study magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) growth for inertial-confinement-fusion applications, as well as compression-wave propagation for equation-of-state studies (see talks by R.L. Lemke and M.R. Martin). Additionally, Z's pulse-shaping capabilities have enabled us to obtain data for both shock- and quasi-isentropically-compressed Be. Example data from MRT, shock-compression, and quasi-isentropic-compression experiments will be shown. We will also discuss planned upgrades to 25-keV radiography that will allow us to study materials with opacities beyond that of beryllium. This work was done in collaboration with R.W. Lemke, M.R. Martin, J.-P. Davis, M.D. Knudson, D.B. Sinars, S.A. Slutz, C.A. Jennings, M.E. Cuneo, D.G. Flicker, and M.C. Herrmann. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin company, for the US

  8. Influence of Pulse Time on the Structural and Tribological Properties of Micro Arc Oxidized AZ91D Magnesium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Deniz; Muhaffel, Faiz; Yurekturk, Yakup; Baydogan, Murat

    Micro arc oxidation process is recently developed as a promising surface modification technique applying high voltage and current density onto the light metals. The magnesium alloys exhibit nearly the lowest density among metallic structural materials but its poor characteristics in corrosion resistance, wear resistance, hardness and so on, limit its wide-range of applications. Through micro arc oxidation, thick and wear-resistant ceramic coatings are directly formed on the surface of magnesium alloys. In this study, oxide coatings were formed on AZ91D magnesium alloy in a silicate-based electrolyte by micro arc oxidation (MAO) process. MAO process was applied in an alkaline electrolyte with different pulse time and the contribution of applied pulse time in micro structural and wear resistance was systematically investigated. Structure, composition and tribological characteristics of the coatings were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dry sliding reciprocating wear tests.

  9. Formation of the domain structure in CLN under the pyroelectric field induced by pulse infrared laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Shur, V. Ya.; Kosobokov, M. S.; Mingaliev, E. A.; Karpov, V. R.

    2015-10-15

    The evolution of the self-assembled quasi-regular micro- and nanodomain structures after pulse infrared laser irradiation in congruent lithium niobate crystal was studied by in situ optical observation. Several scenarios of domain kinetics represented covering of the irradiated zone by nets of the separated domain chains and rays have been revealed. The time dependence of the total domain length was analyzed in terms of modified Kolmogorov-Avrami theory. The domain structure evolution was attributed to the action of pyroelectric field appeared during cooling. The time dependence of the spatial distribution of the pyroelectric field during pulse laser heating and subsequent cooling was calculated by finite element method. The results of computer simulation allowed us to explain the experimental results and can be used for creation of tailored domain structures thus opening the new abilities of the submicron-scale domain engineering in ferroelectrics.

  10. Effect of Ultrashort Pulse Laser Structuring of Stainless Steel on Laser-based Heat Conduction Joining of Polyamide Steel Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amend, Philipp; Häfner, Tom; Gränitz, Michael; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    The objective of this paper is to investigate how microstructures generated by ultrashort pulse laser structuring of stainless steel affect the laser-based joining of thermoplastic metal hybrids. For structuring experiments a picosecond laser (λ = 064 nm) is used. The machined surfaces are topographically analyzed by optical microscopy. The experimental setup for the joining process consists of a disk laser (λ = 1030 nm), a scanner optic and a clamping device for lap joint. The joined specimens are mechanically analyzed by tensile shear tests and the influence of ultrashort pulse laser structuring on the mechanical properties of the dissimilar joints is evaluated. Besides, a fracture analysis of the mechanically tested specimens using scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) mapping is done.

  11. [Effects on structure and secretion of pituitary gland in rats after electromagnetic pulse exposure].

    PubMed

    Fang, Heng-hu; Zeng, Gui-ying; Nie, Qing; Kang, Jing-bo; Ren, Dong-qing; Zhou, Jia-xing; Li, Yun-ming

    2010-12-07

    To investigate the exposure effect of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) on the structure and secretion of pituitary gland in rats. Forty-eight male SD rats were randomly divided into eight groups. Four groups were subject to the EMP exposure of 200 kV/m and the others received a sham exposure. At different time points (12, 24, 48 & 96 h) post-exposure, the pathological changes of pituitary gland were observed by light and transmission electron microscope. And the serum levels of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) were measured dynamically by radioimmunoassay. At 12 h post-exposure, swollen mitochondria with cristae loss, dilatation of Golgi complex and diffusive lysosomes were found in endocrine cells of pituitary gland. The above changes became gradually worse. Mitochondrial vacuolization, the formation of myelin figures, distinct dilatation of endoplasmic reticulum, the occurrence of numerous secondary lysosomes and the clustering of heterochromatin under the nuclear membranes could be observed at 48 h. These lesions were alleviated to some degree at 96 h. The serum levels of PRL and ACTH both increased significantly at 12 h (P < 0.01, P < 0.05) and returned to normal at 24 h. The level of GH decreased significantly at 12 h and then returned gradually to normal at 48 h. The level of TSH decreased at 12 h and reached the lowest point at 24 h, then returned to normal at 96 h. LH increased significantly from 24 h to 96 h. The EMP exposure of 200 kV/m may induce the changes of the structure and secretion of pituitary gland in rats.

  12. Mitochondrial iron supply is required for the developmental pulse of ecdysone biosynthesis that initiates metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Llorens, Jose V; Metzendorf, Christoph; Missirlis, Fanis; Lind, Maria I

    2015-12-01

    Synthesis of ecdysone, the key hormone that signals the termination of larval growth and the initiation of metamorphosis in insects, is carried out in the prothoracic gland by an array of iron-containing cytochrome P450s, encoded by the halloween genes. Interference, either with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis in the prothoracic gland or with the ferredoxins that supply electrons for steroidogenesis, causes a block in ecdysone synthesis and developmental arrest in the third instar larval stage. Here we show that mutants in Drosophila mitoferrin (dmfrn), the gene encoding a mitochondrial carrier protein implicated in mitochondrial iron import, fail to grow and initiate metamorphosis under dietary iron depletion or when ferritin function is partially compromised. In mutant dmfrn larvae reared under iron replete conditions, the expression of halloween genes is increased and 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), the active form of ecdysone, is synthesized. In contrast, addition of an iron chelator to the diet of mutant dmfrn larvae disrupts 20E synthesis. Dietary addition of 20E has little effect on the growth defects, but enables approximately one-third of the iron-deprived dmfrn larvae to successfully turn into pupae and, in a smaller percentage, into adults. This partial rescue is not observed with dietary supply of ecdysone's precursor 7-dehydrocholesterol, a precursor in the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway. The findings reported here support the notion that a physiological supply of mitochondrial iron for the synthesis of iron-sulfur clusters and heme is required in the prothoracic glands of insect larvae for steroidogenesis. Furthermore, mitochondrial iron is also essential for normal larval growth.

  13. Heteroepitaxial structures of SrTiO3/TiN on Si(100) by in situ pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vispute, R. D.; Narayan, J.; Dovidenko, K.; Jagannadham, K.; Parikh, N.; Suvkhanov, A.; Budai, J. D.

    1996-12-01

    High-quality ceramics based heteroepitaxial structures of oxide-nitride-semiconductors, i.e., SrTiO3/TiN/Si(100) have been fabricated by in situ pulsed laser deposition. The dependence of substrate temperature and oxygen partial pressure on the crystalline quality of the SrTiO3 films on Si with epitaxial TiN template has been examined. We found that epitaxial growth occurs on TiN/Si(100) above 500 °C, initially at a reduced O2 pressure (10-6 Torr), and followed by a deposition in the range of 5-10×10-4 Torr. X-ray diffraction (Θ, ω, and Φ scans) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) results revealed an excellent alignment of SrTiO3 and TiN films on Si(100) with a cube-on-cube epitaxy. Rutherford backscattering and ion channeling results show a channeling minimum yield (χmin) of ˜13% for the SrTiO3 films. High-resolution TEM results on the SrTiO3/TiN interface show that the epitaxial SrTiO3 film is separated from the TiN by an uniform 80-90 Å crystalline interposing layer presumably of TiNxO1-x (oxy-nitride). The SrTiO3 film fabricated at 700 °C showed a high relative dielectric constant of 312 at the frequency of 1 MHz. The electrical resistivity and the breakdown field of the SrTiO3 films were more than 5×1012 Ω cm and 6×105 V cm-1, respectively. An estimated leakage current density measured at an electric field of 5×105 V/cm-1 was less than 10-7 A/cm2.

  14. Effect of the chemical composition of a hydrogen-containing RH component of the working medium and the initiation method on the parameters of a pulsed chemical SF6 RH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal', A. V.; Dodonov, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.; Shiriaevskii, V. L.; Sholin, G. V.

    1992-02-01

    The effect of working-medium composition on the oscillation characteristics and energy-deposition efficiency for fluorohydrogen pulsed chemical SF6-H2 and SF6-HI lasers under electron beam and electric discharge initiation was investigated. It is shown that the best energy characteristics of the emission are achieved for a working medium of SF6-HI under electron-beam initiation and for SF6-H2 when the pump reaction is initiated by a bulk self-sustained discharge.

  15. Effects of pulsed atrazine exposures on autotrophic community structure, biomass, and production in field-based stream mesocosms.

    PubMed

    King, Ryan S; Brain, Richard A; Back, Jeffrey A; Becker, Christopher; Wright, Moncie V; Djomte, Valerie Toteu; Scott, W Casan; Virgil, Steven R; Brooks, Bryan W; Hosmer, Alan J; Chambliss, C Kevin

    2016-03-01

    The authors performed a multiple-pulsed atrazine experiment to measure responses of autotrophic endpoints in outdoor stream mesocosms. The experiment was designed to synthetically simulate worst-case atrazine chemographs from streams in agricultural catchments to achieve 60-d mean concentrations of 0 μg/L (control), 10 μg/L, 20 μg/L, and 30 μg/L. The authors dosed triplicate streams with pulses of 0 μg/L, 50 μg/L, 100 μg/L, and 150 μg/L atrazine for 4 d, followed by 7 d without dosing. This 11-d cycle occurred 3 times, followed by a recovery (untreated) period from day 34 to day 60. Mean ± standard error 60-d atrazine concentrations were 0.07 ± 0.03 μg/L, 10.7 ± 0.05 μg/L, 20.9 ± 0.24 μg/L, and 31.0 ± 0.17 μg/L for the control, 10-μg/L, 20-μg/L, and 30-μg/L treatments, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that periphyton and phytoplankton community structure did not differ among treatments on any day of the experiment, including during the atrazine pulses. Control periphyton biomass in riffles was higher immediately following the peak of the first atrazine pulse and remained slightly higher than some of the atrazine treatments on most days through the peak of the last pulse. However, periphyton biomass was not different among treatments at the end of the present study. Phytoplankton biomass was not affected by atrazine. Metaphyton biomass in pools was higher in the controls near the midpoint of the present study and remained higher on most days for the remainder of the study. Ceratophyllum demersum, a submersed macrophyte, biomass was higher in controls than in 20-μg/L and 30-μg/L treatments before pulse 3 but was not different subsequent to pulse 3 through the end of the present study. Maximum daily dissolved oxygen (DO, percentage of saturation) declined during each pulse in approximate proportion to magnitude of dose but rapidly converged among treatments after the third pulse. However

  16. Startup and initial operation of a DFGD and pulse jet fabric filter system on Cokenergy's Indiana Harbor coke oven off gas system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, W.J.; Gansley, R.R.; Schaddell, J.G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the design, initial operation and performance testing of a Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization (DFGD) and Modular Pulse Jet Fabric Filter (MPJFF) system installed at Cokenergy's site in East Chicago, Indiana. The combined flue gas from the sixteen (16) waste heat recovery boilers is processed by the system to control emissions of sulfur dioxide and particulates. These boilers recover energy from coke oven off gas from Indiana Harbor Coke Company's coke batteries. The DFGD system consists of two 100% capacity absorbers. Each absorber vessel uses a single direct drive rotary atomizer to disperse the lime slurry for SO{sub 2} control. The MPJFF consists of thirty two (32) modules arranged in twin sixteen-compartment (16) units. The initial start up of the DFGD/MPJFF posed special operational issues due to the low initial gas flows through the system as the four coke oven batteries were cured and put in service for the first time. This occurred at approximately monthly intervals beginning in March 1998. A plan was implemented to perform a staged startup of the DFGD and MPJFF to coincide with the staged start up of the coke batteries and waste heat boilers. Operational issues that are currently being addressed include reliability of byproduct removal. Performance testing was conducted in August and September 1998 at the inlet of the system and the outlet stack. During these tests, particulate, SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, and HCI emissions were measured simultaneously at the common DFGD inlet duct and the outlet stack. Measurements were also taken for average lime, water, and power consumption during the tests as well as system pressure losses. These results showed that all guarantee parameters were achieved during the test periods. The initial operation and performance testing are described in this paper.

  17. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg Petyukevich, Maria Polisadova, Valentina; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga Ikonnikova, Irina

    2016-01-15

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm{sup 2}, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  18. The structure and properties of boron carbide ceramics modified by high-current pulsed electron-beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yuri; Tolkachev, Oleg; Petyukevich, Maria; Teresov, Anton; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Polisadova, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    The present work is devoted to numerical simulation of temperature fields and the analysis of structural and strength properties of the samples surface layer of boron carbide ceramics treated by the high-current pulsed electron-beam of the submillisecond duration. The samples made of sintered boron carbide ceramics are used in these investigations. The problem of calculating the temperature field is reduced to solving the thermal conductivity equation. The electron beam density ranges between 8…30 J/cm2, while the pulse durations are 100…200 μs in numerical modelling. The results of modelling the temperature field allowed ascertaining the threshold parameters of the electron beam, such as energy density and pulse duration. The electron beam irradiation is accompanied by the structural modification of the surface layer of boron carbide ceramics either in the single-phase (liquid or solid) or two-phase (solid-liquid) states. The sample surface of boron carbide ceramics is treated under the two-phase state (solid-liquid) conditions of the structural modification. The surface layer is modified by the high-current pulsed electron-beam produced by SOLO installation at the Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia. The elemental composition and the defect structure of the modified surface layer are analyzed by the optical instrument, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes. Mechanical properties of the modified layer are determined measuring its hardness and crack resistance. Research results show that the melting and subsequent rapid solidification of the surface layer lead to such phenomena as fragmentation due to a crack network, grain size reduction, formation of the sub-grained structure due to mechanical twinning, and increase of hardness and crack resistance.

  19. Effect of Electric-current Pulses on Grain-structure Evolution in Cryogenically Rolled Copper

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    components disappeared almost com- pletely [Figs. 8(a) and 9(a)]. Instead, the texture comprised mainly (55; 30/60; 0) and cube -RD com- ponents as well as...Microstructure region in Fig. 7 Peak intensity of ODF (X random) Volume fraction of main texture components (within 15° tolerance) (%) Brass Goss Cube -RD Cube ...ABSTRACT The effect of electric-current pulses on the evolution of microstructure and texture in cryogenically rolled copper was determined. The pulsed

  20. Effects of sentence-structure complexity on speech initiation time and disfluency.

    PubMed

    Tsiamtsiouris, Jim; Cairns, Helen Smith

    2013-03-01

    There is general agreement that stuttering is caused by a variety of factors, and language formulation and speech motor control are two important factors that have been implicated in previous research, yet the exact nature of their effects is still not well understood. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that sentences of high structural complexity would incur greater processing costs than sentences of low structural complexity and these costs would be higher for adults who stutter than for adults who do not stutter. Fluent adults and adults who stutter participated in an experiment that required memorization of a sentence classified as low or high structural complexity followed by production of that sentence upon a visual cue. Both groups of speakers initiated most sentences significantly faster in the low structural complexity condition than in the high structural complexity condition. Adults who stutter were over-all slower in speech initiation than were fluent speakers, but there were no significant interactions between complexity and group. However, adults who stutter produced significantly more disfluencies in sentences of high structural complexity than in those of low complexity. After reading this article, the learner will be able to: (a) identify integral parts of all well-known models of adult sentence production; (b) summarize the way that sentence structure might negatively influence the speech production processes; (c) discuss whether sentence structure influences speech initiation time and disfluencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Spectral properties of optical pulse, containing a few cycles, reflected from or passed through disordered layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Pedan, Eugeniy V.

    2016-04-01

    As it is well-known, THz TDS is a modern tool for the detection and identification of substance. Often, in real conditions a substance under identification is covered by various materials (paper sheet, napkins, rag, and et.al). Therefore, the identification occurs for a substance covered by disordered structure, which acts for THz radiation as disordered photonic structure. In standard THz TDS method the substance detection carries out using a comparison of spectrum of a substance under consideration with spectra of the substances from database. Thus, an investigation of spectral medium response covered by disordered structure is very important for security and screening problem. Moreover, what we will see if we analyze a response from disordered structure without any dangerous substance? This question is a key one for practical application. Using computer simulation, we investigate below a propagation of laser pulse with a few cycles in a linear layered structure with random fluctuation of either layer dielectric permittivity or layers thicknesses or both characteristics of this structure. The process under consideration is described by 1D Maxwell's equations. We show that a spectrum of pulse either reflected from substance or transmitted through substance depends in strong way from a number of random realization and fluctuating parameters of layered structure and an observer can see various absorption frequencies corresponding to dangerous substances. Nevertheless, we discuss one of possible ways for overcoming the influence of disordered structure on the observed spectrum.

  2. PHYSICAL PROCESSES IN LASER MEDIA: Influence of the chemical composition of the hydrogen-containing component in an RH active medium and of the initiation method on the parameters of a pulsed chemical SF6-RH laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal', A. V.; Dodonov, A. A.; Rusanov, V. D.; Shiryaevskiĭ, V. L.; Sholin, G. V.

    1992-02-01

    The influence of the composition of the active medium on the lasing characteristics and energy deposition efficiency was studied under conditions of electron-beam and electric-discharge initiation in SF6-H2 and SF6-HI pulsed hydrogen fluoride chemical lasers.The best radiation energy characteristics were achieved for an SF6-HI active medium using electron-beam initiation and for an SF6-H2 active medium when the pump reaction was initiated by a self-sustained volume discharge. The following pulse parameters were obtained for an SF6-HI laser:energy 1.5 J, half-height pulse duration 60 ns,and leading edge duration 20 ns.

  3. Structure property relationships in gallium oxide thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition [Structure property relationships in Ga2O3 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition

    DOE PAGES

    Garten, Lauren M.; Zakutayev, Andriy; Perkins, John D.; ...

    2016-11-21

    Beta-gallium oxide (β-Ga2O3) is of increasing interest to the optoelectronic community for transparent conductor and power electronic applications. Considerable variability exists in the literature on the growth and doping of Ga2O3 films, especially as a function of growth approach, temperature, and oxygen partial pressure. Here pulsed laser deposition (PLD) was used to grow high-quality β-Ga2O3 films on (0001) sapphire and (–201) Ga2O3 single crystals and to explore the growth, stability, and dopability of these films as function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. As a result, there is a strong temperature dependence to the phase formation, morphology, and electronic propertiesmore » of β-Ga2O3 from 350 to 550 °C.« less

  4. Maternal, Infant Characteristics, Breastfeeding Techniques, and Initiation: Structural Equation Modeling Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Htun, Tha Pyai; Lim, Peng Im; Ho-Lim, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the relationships among maternal and infant characteristics, breastfeeding techniques, and exclusive breastfeeding initiation in different modes of birth using structural equation modeling approaches. Methods We examined a hypothetical model based on integrating concepts of a breastfeeding decision-making model, a breastfeeding initiation model, and a social cognitive theory among 952 mother-infant dyads. The LATCH breastfeeding assessment tool was used to evaluate breastfeeding techniques and two infant feeding categories were used (exclusive and non-exclusive breastfeeding). Results Structural equation models (SEM) showed that multiparity was significantly positively associated with breastfeeding techniques and the jaundice of an infant was significantly negatively related to exclusive breastfeeding initiation. A multigroup analysis in the SEM showed no difference between the caesarean section and vaginal delivery groups estimates of breastfeeding techniques on exclusive breastfeeding initiation. Breastfeeding techniques were significantly positively associated with exclusive breastfeeding initiation in the entire sample and in the vaginal deliveries group. However, breastfeeding techniques were not significantly associated with exclusive breastfeeding initiation in the cesarean section group. Maternal age, maternal race, gestations, birth weight of infant, and postnatal complications had no significant impacts on breastfeeding techniques or exclusive breastfeeding initiation in our study. Overall, the models fitted the data satisfactorily (GFI = 0.979–0.987; AGFI = 0.951–0.962; IFI = 0.958–0.962; CFI = 0.955–0.960, and RMSEA = 0.029–0.034). Conclusions Multiparity and jaundice of an infant were found to affect breastfeeding technique and exclusive breastfeeding initiation respectively. Breastfeeding technique was related to exclusive breastfeeding initiation according to the mode of birth. This

  5. Sensitivity of the structure of untripped mixing layers to small changes in initial conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesniak, M. W.; Bell, J. H.; Mehta, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted concerning the influence of small changes in initial conditions on the near- and far-field evolution of the three-dimensional structure of a plan mixing layer. A two-stream mixing layer with a velocity ratio of 0.6 was generated with the initial boundary layers on the splitter plate laminar and was nominally two-dimensional. The initial conditions were changed slightly by interchanging the high- and low-speed sides of the wind tunnel, while maintaining the same velocities, and hence velocity ratio. This resulted in small changes in the initial boundary layer properties, and the perturbations present in the boundary layers were interchanged between the high- and low-speed sides for the two cases. The results indicate that, even with this relatively minor change in initial conditions, the near-field regions of the two cases differ significantly. The peak Reynolds stress levels in the near-field differ by up to 100 percent, and this is attributed to a difference in the location of the initial spanwise vortex roll-up. In addition, the positions and shapes of the individual streamwise vortical structures differ for the two cases, although the overall structures differ for the two cases, although the overall qualitative description of these structures is comparable. The subsequent reorganization and decay of the streamwise vortical structures is very similar for the two cases. As a result, in the far field, both mixing layers achieve similar structure, yielding comparable growth rates, Reynolds stress, distribution, and spectral content.

  6. Structure and properties of uranium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianliang; Dahan, Isaac; Valderrama, Billy; Manuel, Michele V.

    2014-05-01

    Crystalline uranium oxide thin films were deposited in an unbalanced magnetron sputtering system by sputtering from a depleted uranium target in an Ar + O2 mixture using middle frequency pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. The substrate temperature was constantly maintained at 500 °C. Different uranium oxide phases (including UO2-x, UO2, U3O7 and U3O8) were obtained by controlling the percentage of the O2 flow rate to the total gas flow rate (f) in the chamber. The crystal structure of the films was characterized using X-ray diffraction and the microstructure of the films was studied using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. When the f was below 10%, the film contains a mixture of metallic uranium and UO2-x phases. As the f was controlled in the range of 10-13%, UO2 films with a (2 2 0) preferential orientation were obtained. The oxide phase rapidly changed to a mixture of U3O7 and U3O8 as the f was increased to the range of 15-18%. Further increasing the f to 20% and above, polycrystalline U3O8 thin films with a (0 0 1) preferential orientation were formed. The hardness and Young's modulus of the uranium oxide films were evaluated using nanoindentation. The film containing a single UO2 phase exhibited the maximum hardness of 14.3 GPa and a Young's modulus of 195 GPa. The UO2 thin film also exhibited good thermal stability in that no phase change was observed after annealing at 600 °C in vacuum for 104 h.

  7. Pulsed field ionization electron spectroscopy and molecular structure of aluminum uracil.

    PubMed

    Krasnokutski, Serge A; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2007-10-25

    Al-uracil (Al-C4H4N2O2) was synthesized in a laser-vaporization supersonic molecular beam source and studied with pulsed field ionization-zero electron kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The DFT calculations predicted several low-energy Al-uracil isomers with Al binding to the diketo, keto-enol, and dienol tautomers of uracil. The ZEKE spectroscopic measurements of Al-uracil determined the ionization energy of 43 064(5) cm-1 [or 5.340(6) eV] and a vibrational mode of 51 cm-1 for the neutral complex and several vibrational modes of 51, 303, 614, and 739 cm-1 for the ionized species. Combination of the ZEEK spectrum with the DFT and Franck-Condon factor calculations determined the preferred isomeric structure and electronic states of the Al-uracil complex. This isomer is formed by Al binding to the O4 atom of the diketo tautomer of uracil and has a planar Cs symmetry. The ground electronic states of the neutral and ionized species are 2A' ' and 1A', respectively. The 2A' ' neutral state has a slightly shorter Al-O4 distance than the 1A' ion state. However, the 1A' ion state has stronger metal-ligand binding compared to the 2A' ' state. The increased Al-O4 distance from the 2A' ' state to the 1A' state is attributed to the loss of the pi binding interaction between Al and O4 in the singlet ion state, whereas the increased metal-ligand binding strength is due to the additional charge-dipole interaction in the ion that surpasses the loss of the pi orbital interaction.

  8. Applications of a New Tropical Cyclone Initialization Scheme on Improving TC Track, Intensity and Structure Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. Y.; Chen, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    The TC initialization scheme developed by Nguyen and Chen (2011) (NC2011) was used to produce the initial TC structure and intensity in the model for 18 TCs (2004-2013) over the Northwestern Pacific using the Weather and Research Forecast Model (WRF). For these storms, the initial storm structure and intensity in the model agrees well with observations. These results attest that the environment, including SST, in which the storm is embedded has a significant impact on the intensity and rainband patterns of these well-developed TCs. Recently, the scheme was used throughout the entire life cycle of super typhoon Jelawat (2012), which underwent a rapid intensification (RI) stage, and a few other storms including Haiyan (2013) and Iniki (1992). The NC2014 scheme was also tested in a real-time experiment forecast for a Category 1 hurricane (Ana 2014) over the Hawaiian Islands and compared with the performance of the Hurricane WRF model (HWRF) and the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS). For all cases considered, the scheme works well in predicting track, intensity and structure for storms with different intensities at different stages of their life cycle. This is because at the model initial time, the initial storm intensity and structure are well adjusted to the environmental conditions in which it is embedded and well adapted to the model employed.

  9. Specific features of the radial distributions of plasma parameters in the initial segment of a supersonic jet generated by a pulsed capillary discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashchina, A. S.; Efimov, A. V.; Chinnov, V. F.; Ageev, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    Results are presented from spectroscopic studies of the initial segment of a supersonic plasma jet generated by a pulsed capillary discharge with an ablative carbon-containing polymer wall. Specific features of the spatial distributions of the electron density and intensities of spectral components caused, in particular, by the high electron temperature in the central zone, much exceeding the normal temperature, as well as by the high nonisobaricity of the initial segment of the supersonic jet, are revealed. Measurements of the radiative properties of the hot jet core (the intensity and profile of the Hα and Hβ Balmer lines and the relative intensities of C II lines) with high temporal (1-50 μs) and spatial (30-50 μm) resolutions made it possible to determine general features of the pressure and temperature distributions near the central shock. The presence of molecular components exhibiting their emission properties at the periphery of the plasma jet allowed the authors to estimate the parameters of the plasma in the jet region where "detached" shock waves form.

  10. Bayesian inference of the initial conditions from large-scale structure surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, Florent

    2016-10-01

    Analysis of three-dimensional cosmological surveys has the potential to answer outstanding questions on the initial conditions from which structure appeared, and therefore on the very high energy physics at play in the early Universe. We report on recently proposed statistical data analysis methods designed to study the primordial large-scale structure via physical inference of the initial conditions in a fully Bayesian framework, and applications to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7. We illustrate how this approach led to a detailed characterization of the dynamic cosmic web underlying the observed galaxy distribution, based on the tidal environment.

  11. Effect of graphite surface structure on initial irreversible reaction in graphite anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kimihito; Hamada, Takeshi; Sugiura, Tsutomu

    1999-03-01

    The initial irreversible reaction that occurs in graphite anodes during the first lithium intercalation in lithium rechargeable batteries was studied in view of graphite surface structure. Graphitized mesophase spheres and pitch-based carbon fibers, which show low irreversible capacity, were shown to have turbostatic surface regions and highly graphitized cores using Ar-ion laser Raman spectroscopy. Burning off these surface regions resulted in remarkable increases of initial irreversible capacity. Those results can be explained by a proposed model that a turbostatic structure of the graphite surface region resists drastic swelling of interlayer spaces arising from cointercalation of solvated ions and depresses the side reaction.

  12. Spectroscopy of spontaneous Raman scattering of a liquid-water local structure in the field of an intense ultrasound pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brysev, A. P.; Bunkin, A. F.; Klopotov, R. V.; Krutyanskii, L. M.; Nurmatov, A. A.; Pershin, S. M.

    2002-08-01

    A shift of the band envelope of liquid water stretching vibrations in the field of an ultrasonic acoustic pulse is experimentally observed; this shift is indicative of modification of the water cluster structure in the acoustic field. Simple evaluations show that the observed shift can be caused by a change in the average distance between oxygen atoms in a molecular cluster by about 0.05 Å.

  13. Impact of the α-Synuclein Initial Ensemble Structure on Fibrillation Pathways and Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jia; Cheng, Kai; Liu, Maili; Li, Conggang

    2016-03-31

    The presence of intracellular filamentous α-synuclein (αS) aggregates is a common feature in Parkinson's disease. Recombinant expressed and purified human αS is also capable of forming fibrils in vitro. Many studies have shown that solution conditions heavily influence αS fibrillation kinetics, fibril structure, and morphology that exhibit differential biological effects. Nevertheless, the αS ensemble structure in various solution conditions is not well characterized; furthermore, how the initial solution ensemble structures impact αS assembly kinetics and pathways that result in diverse fibril structure and morphology remains elusive. Here, we mainly employed NMR spectroscopy to characterize the initial ensemble structure of αS in the presence or absence of a 150 mM sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, where two polymorphs of αS were demonstrated in previous studies. Our data show that αS exhibits distinct conformations and fibrillation kinetics in these two solutions. αS adopts a more compact and rigid ensemble structure that has faster fibrillation kinetics in the absence of NaCl. On the basis of the ensemble structure and dynamics, we proposed a possible molecular mechanism in which αS forms different polymorphs under these two conditions. Our results provide novel insights into how the initial conformation impacts fibrillation pathways and kinetics, suggesting that a microenvironment can be used to regulate the intrinsically disordered proteins assembly.

  14. Pulses of movement across the sea ice: population connectivity and temporal genetic structure in the arctic fox.

    PubMed

    Norén, Karin; Carmichael, Lindsey; Fuglei, Eva; Eide, Nina E; Hersteinsson, Pall; Angerbjörn, Anders

    2011-08-01

    Lemmings are involved in several important functions in the Arctic ecosystem. The Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) can be divided into two discrete ecotypes: "lemming foxes" and "coastal foxes". Crashes in lemming abundance can result in pulses of "lemming fox" movement across the Arctic sea ice and immigration into coastal habitats in search for food. These pulses can influence the genetic structure of the receiving population. We have tested the impact of immigration on the genetic structure of the "coastal fox" population in Svalbard by recording microsatellite variation in seven loci for 162 Arctic foxes sampled during the summer and winter over a 5-year period. Genetic heterogeneity and temporal genetic shifts, as inferred by STRUCTURE simulations and deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, respectively, were recorded. Maximum likelihood estimates of movement as well as STRUCTURE simulations suggested that both immigration and genetic mixture are higher in Svalbard than in the neighbouring "lemming fox" populations. The STRUCTURE simulations and AMOVA revealed there are differences in genetic composition of the population between summer and winter seasons, indicating that immigrants are not present in the reproductive portion of the Svalbard population. Based on these results, we conclude that Arctic fox population structure varies with time and is influenced by immigration from neighbouring populations. The lemming cycle is likely an important factor shaping Arctic fox movement across sea ice and the subsequent population genetic structure, but is also likely to influence local adaptation to the coastal habitat and the prevalence of diseases.

  15. Pulsed UV laser-induced modifications in optical and structural characteristics of alpha-irradiated PM-355 SSNTD.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, S S; Farooq, W A; Baig, M R; Algarawi, M S; Alrashidi, Talal Mohammed; Ali, Syed Mansoor; Alfaramawi, K

    2017-10-01

    Pre- and postalpha-exposed PM-355 detectors were irradiated using UV laser with different number of pulses (100, 150, 200, 300, and 400). UV laser beam energy of 20mJ per pulse with a pulse width of 9ns was incident on an area of 19.6mm(2) of the samples. XRD spectra indicated that for both reference and UV-irradiated samples, the structure is amorphous, but the crystallite size increases upon UV irradiation. The same results were obtained from SEM analysis. Optical properties of PM-355 polymeric solid-state nuclear track detectors were also investigated. Absorbance measurements for all PM-355 samples in the range of 200-400nm showed that the absorption edge had a blue shift up to a certain value, and then, it had an oscillating behavior. Photoluminescence spectra of PM-355 at 250nm revealed a decrease in the broadband peak intensity as a function of the number of UV pulses, while the wavelengths corresponding to the peaks had random shifts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiency at TiO{sub 2} surface: Anomalous structure and electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Tomohiko; Tsuchiya, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Toshiya

    2009-09-15

    We have studied pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiencies at rutile TiO{sub 2} surfaces. The crystal surface was successfully reduced by excimer laser irradiation, and an oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer with 160 nm thickness was formed by means of ArF laser irradiation at 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} for 2000 pulses. The TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer fundamentally maintained a rutile structure, though this structure was distorted by many stacking faults caused by the large oxygen deficiency. The electrical resistivity of the obtained TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer exhibited unconventional metallic behavior with hysteresis. A metal-insulator transition occurred at 42 K, and the electrical resistivity exceeded 10{sup 4} OMEGA cm below 42 K. This metal-insulator transition could be caused by bipolaronic ordering derived from Ti-Ti pairings that formed along the stacking faults. The constant magnetization behavior observed below 42 K is consistent with the bipolaronic scenario that has been observed previously for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These peculiar electrical properties are strongly linked to the oxygen-deficient crystal structure, which contains many stacking faults formed by instantaneous heating during excimer laser irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A pulsed laser-irradiated TiO{sub 2-{delta}} substrate showed an unconventional metallic phase, with hysteresis over a wide range of temperatures and a metal-insulator transition at 42 K.

  17. Inspection of ferromagnetic support structures from within alloy 800 steam generator tubes using pulsed eddy current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Jeremy Andrew

    Nondestructive testing is a critical aspect of component lifetime management. Nuclear steam generator (SG) tubes are the thinnest barrier between irradiated primary heat transport system and the secondary heat transport system, whose components are not rated for large radiation fields. Conventional eddy current testing (ECT) and ultrasonic testing are currently employed for inspecting SG tubes, with the former doing most inspections due to speed and reliability based on an understanding of how flaws affect coil impedance parameters when conductors are subjected to harmonically induced currents. However, when multiple degradation modes are present simultaneously near ferromagnetic materials, such as tube fretting, support structure corrosion, and magnetite fouling, ECT reliability decreases. Pulsed eddy current (PEC), which induces transient eddy currents via square wave excitation, has been considered in this thesis to simultaneously examine SG tube and support structure conditions. An array probe consisting of a central driver, coaxial with the tube, and an array of 8 sensing coils, was used in this thesis to perform laboratory measurements. The probe was delivered from the inner diameter (ID) of the SG tube, where support hole diameter, tube frets, and 2D off-centering were varied. When considering two variables simultaneously, scores obtained from a modified principal components analysis (MPCA) were sufficient for parameter extraction. In the case of hole ID variation with two dimensional tube off-centering (three parameters), multiple linear regression (MLR) of the MPCA scores provided good estimates of parameters. However, once a fourth variable, outer diameter tube frets, was introduced, MLR proved insufficient. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were investigated in order to perform pattern recognition on the MPCA scores to simultaneously extract the four measurement parameters from the data. All models throughout this thesis were created and validated using

  18. An all solid-state, rolled strip pulse forming line with low impedance and compact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shi; Zhong, Hui-Huang; Qian, Bao-Liang; Yang, Han-Wu

    2010-04-01

    An all solid-state and compact pulsed strip pulse forming line (PFL) is investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The electromagnetic field distribution and the pulse formation in the strip PFL are analyzed numerically. Based on the theoretical analysis and numerical results, a rolled strip PFL with output voltage of 20 kV, pulse duration of 230 ns, and characteristic impedance of 0.5 Ω was designed and manufactured. We use the Mylar film and copper as the dielectric and conductor of the strip PFL. The dimension of the strip line is 23 000×400×1.6 mm3 in the case in which the strip line is unrolled, and the strip line is finally rolled into a cylinder of diameter of 311 mm for the experiment. The dimension and weight are about ten times smaller than those of traditional dielectric (oil or pure water) PFL with the same electrical parameters. Two experiments were performed using the strip line. One was for a transmission line experiment, and the other was for a PFL experiment. In the experiment of transmission line, the transmission time of the voltage signal was 115 ns, and the signal had almost no distortion, which verified the design. In the PFL experiment, results gave a 17.8 kV, 270 ns (full width at half maximum) voltage pulse which was a quasisquare wave on the water load of 0.5 Ω. The current going through the load is about 35.6 kA.

  19. Difference-frequency generation in the field of a few-cycle laser pulse propagating in a GaAs crystal with a domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Oganesyan, David L; Vardanyan, Aleksandr O; Oganesyan, G D

    2013-06-30

    Difference-frequency generation in a GaAs crystal with a periodic domain structure in the field of a few-cycle laser pulse is considered for the case of weakly pronounced material dispersion. The straight-line method is used to solve numerically the system of coupled nonlinear partial differential equations describing the evolution of the electric field of this laser pulse in GaAs crystals with periodic and chirped domain structures. It is shown that application of a GaAs crystal with a chirped domain structure makes it possible to control the frequency-modulation law for a broadband differencefrequency pulse. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  20. Simulations of terahertz pulse emission from thin-film semiconductor structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semichaevsky, Andrey

    The photo-Dember effect is the formation of transient electric dipoles due to the interaction of semiconductors with ultrashort optical pulses. Typically the optically-induced dipole moments vary on the ns- or ps- scales, leading to the emission of electromagnetic pulses with terahertz (THz) bandwidths. One of the applications of the photo-Dember effect is a photoconductive dipole antenna (PDA). This work presents a computational model of a PDA based on Maxwell's equations coupled to the Boltzmann transport equation. The latter is solved semiclassically for the doped GaAs using a continuum approach. The emphasis is on the accurate prediction of the emitted THz pulse shape and bandwidth, particularly when materials are doped with a rare-earth metal such as erbium or terbium that serve as carrier recombination centers. Field-dependent carrier mobility is determined from particle-based simulations. Some of the previous experimental results are used as a basis for comparison with our model.

  1. Press-pulse interactions: effects of warming, N deposition, altered winter precipitation, and fire on desert grassland community structure and dynamics.

    PubMed

    Collins, Scott L; Ladwig, Laura M; Petrie, Matthew D; Jones, Sydney K; Mulhouse, John M; Thibault, James R; Pockman, William T

    2017-03-01

    Global environmental change is altering temperature, precipitation patterns, resource availability, and disturbance regimes. Theory predicts that ecological presses will interact with pulse events to alter ecosystem structure and function. In 2006, we established a long-term, multifactor global change experiment to determine the interactive effects of nighttime warming, increased atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, and increased winter precipitation on plant community structure and aboveground net primary production (ANPP) in a northern Chihuahuan Desert grassland. In 2009, a lightning-caused wildfire burned through the experiment. Here, we report on the interactive effects of these global change drivers on pre- and postfire grassland community structure and ANPP. Our nighttime warming treatment increased winter nighttime air temperatures by an average of 1.1 °C and summer nighttime air temperature by 1.5 °C. Soil N availability was 2.5 times higher in fertilized compared with control plots. Average soil volumetric water content (VWC) in winter was slightly but significantly higher (13.0% vs. 11.0%) in plots receiving added winter rain relative to controls, and VWC was slightly higher in warmed (14.5%) compared with control (13.5%) plots during the growing season even though surface soil temperatures were significantly higher in warmed plots. Despite these significant treatment effects, ANPP and plant community structure were highly resistant to these global change drivers prior to the fire. Burning reduced the cover of the dominant grasses by more than 75%. Following the fire, forb species richness and biomass increased significantly, particularly in warmed, fertilized plots that received additional winter precipitation. Thus, although unburned grassland showed little initial response to multiple ecological presses, our results demonstrate how a single pulse disturbance can interact with chronic alterations in resource availability to increase ecosystem

  2. The Clause-Initial Position in L2 German Declaratives: Transfer of Information Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnacker, Ute; Rosen, Christina

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the information structure of verb-second (V2) declaratives in Swedish, German, and nonnative German. Even though almost any type of element can occur in the so-called prefield, the clause-initial preverbal position of V2 declaratives, we have found language-specific patterns in native-speaker corpora: The frequencies of…

  3. The structure of a replication initiator unites diverse aspects of nucleic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Louis, John M.; Clérot, Danielle; Gronenborn, Bruno; Gronenborn, Angela M.

    2002-01-01

    Rolling circle replication is a mechanism for copying single-stranded genomes by means of double-stranded intermediates. A multifunctional replication inititiator protein (Rep) is indispensable for the precise initiation and termination of this process. Despite the ubiquitous presence and fundamental importance of rolling circle replication elements, structural information on their respective replication initiators is still missing. Here we present the solution NMR structure of the catalytic domain of Rep, the initiator protein of tomato yellow leaf curl virus. It is composed of a central five-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet, flanked by a small two-stranded β-sheet, a β-hairpin and two α-helices. Surprisingly, the structure reveals that the catalytic Rep domain is related to a large group of proteins that bind RNA or DNA. Identification of Rep as resembling the family of ribonucleoprotein/RNA-recognition motif fold proteins establishes a structure-based evolutionary link between RNA binding proteins, splicing factors, and replication initiators of prokaryotic and eukaryotic single-stranded DNA elements and mammalian DNA tumor viruses. PMID:12130667

  4. Micro pulse laser radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An eye safe, compact, solid state lidar for profiling atmospheric cloud and aerosol scattering is disclosed. The transmitter of the micro pulse lidar is a diode pumped micro-J pulse energy, high repetition rate Nd:YLF laser. Eye safety is obtained through beam expansion. The receiver employs a photon counting solid state Geiger mode avalanche photodiode detector. Data acquisition is by a single card multichannel scaler. Daytime background induced quantum noise is controlled by a narrow receiver field-of-view and a narrow bandwidth temperature controlled interference filter. Dynamic range of the signal is limited to optical geometric signal compression. Signal simulations and initial atmospheric measurements indicate that micropulse lider systems are capable of detecting and profiling all significant cloud and aerosol scattering through the troposphere and into the stratosphere. The intended applications are scientific studies and environmental monitoring which require full time, unattended measurements of the cloud and aerosol height structure.

  5. Comparison between pulsed MIG and short-circuit MAG on economical aspects for structural building

    SciTech Connect

    Scotti, A.; Pereira, W.A.

    1996-12-01

    In this work is presented a comparison between Pulsed MIG and Short-circuit MAG processes concerning economical and operational aspects. A systematic experimental procedure was carried-out so that the response to variation of travel speed, mean current and contact tip-to-work distance could be assessed within the same range. The operational envelopes were built taking into account lack of fusion and lack of penetration. Deposition rate and deposition efficiency were raised to evaluate productivity. The results showed that short-circuit MAG has a broader operational envelop than Pulsed MIG, but the latter, despite the narrower range, provides more productivity.

  6. Effect of pulsed light on structural and physiological properties of Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kramer, B; Muranyi, P

    2014-03-01

    The application of broad-spectrum intense light pulses is an innovative nonthermal technology for the decontamination of packaging materials, liquids or foodstuffs. The objective of this study was the fundamental investigation of the cellular impact of a pulsed light treatment on Listeria innocua and Escherichia coli. Flow cytometry in combination with different fluorescent stains, conventional plate count technique and a viability assay were applied to investigate the effects of a pulsed light treatment on the physiological properties of L. innocua and E. coli. The results showed that loss of cultivability occurred at considerably lower fluences than the shutdown of cellular functions such as the depolarization of cell membranes, the loss of metabolic, esterase and pump activities or the occurrence of membrane damage. Therefore, a considerable proportion of cells appeared to have entered the viable but nonculturable (VBNC) state after the pulsed light treatment. A high percentage of L. innocua was able to maintain certain cellular vitality functions after storage overnight, whereas a further decrease in vitality was observed in case of E. coli. The loss of culturability was on the other hand directly accompanied by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damages, which were assessed by the ROS-sensitive probe DCFH-DA and RAPD-PCR, respectively. A significant discrepancy between conventional plate counts and different viability staining parameters was observed, which shows that a pulsed light treatment does not cause an immediate shutdown of vitality functions even when the number of colony-forming units already decreased for more than 6 log10 sample(-1) . Oxidative stress with concomitant damage to the DNA molecule showed to be directly responsible for the loss of cultivability due to pulsed light rather than a direct rupture of cell membranes or inactivation of intracellular enzymes. The presented results suggest an UV light

  7. Electrochemical formation of laminar deposits of controlled structure and composition; Dual current pulse galvanostatic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Despic, A.R. ); Jovic, V.D. ); Spaic, S. )

    1989-06-01

    The authors present a dual current pulse technique developed for plating two layers of different metals, or any number of pairs of layers, from a single bath. The key conditions is to maintain the current density from the first current pulse well above the former and below the limiting current density of deposition of the less noble metal. If the content of the first metal in the second layer is to be small, the concentration of its ions in solution must be much smaller than that of the ions of the second metal. Example of plating several layers of copper and nickel upon each other is given.

  8. A 3D model describing the initial structure of an artificial hydrological catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, T.; Schneider, A.; Buczko, U.; Gerke, H. H.

    2009-04-01

    The initial development stages of artificially constructed hydrologic catchments are characterized by the absence of vegetation, soil organic matter and soil horizons. This results in increased surface runoff and favors erosion processes that dominate the initial phase. Hydraulic conditions on artificial catchments thus are governed by rapidly changing surface structures as well as by the primary internal structural framework. Contemporary hydrological modeling does not consider any dynamic change of relevant structural features but rather assumes a stable, invariant landscape. The objective of this study was the digital visualization and quantitative description of the initial state and its early structural dynamics, exemplified for the small artificial hydrological catchment "Huehnerwasser" near Cottbus, Germany. Photogrammetric surveys of surface and internal structural units (clay basis liner) during the construction phase provided spatially and temporally resolved data for digital elevation models (DEM). Interpolated physical and chemical soil properties obtained at a borehole grid (e.g., texture) are used for the visualization of spatial distribution of relevant (hydraulic) parameters. The data are merged in a database and visualized in the 3D-GIS application GoCAD. The specific technological construction processes determines the internal structure of the artificial catchment. Resulting differences in bulk density and texture are supposed to have considerable impact on hydraulic properties. A structure generator program was implemented to reproduce the initial structure of the sediment layer as closely as possible. Results of the digital structure generation are checked with non-invasive geophysical measurements, on-site bore holes data and off-site 2D vertical spoil exploration. The accuracy of structure generator results will be compared with predictions of different interpolation methods. Thus, the structure model will serve as a basis for deriving the 3D

  9. Study of deep level characteristics in the neutrons irradiated Si structures by combining pulsed and steady-state spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubas, E.; Kalendra, V.; Ceponis, T.; Uleckas, A.; Tekorius, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Velicka, A.

    2012-11-01

    The standard methods, such as capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (C-DLTS) and thermally stimulated current (TSC) techniques are unsuitable for the analysis of heavily irradiated devices. In this work, therefore, several steady-state and pulsed techniques have been combined to comprehensively evaluate parameters of radiation defects and functional characteristics of the irradiated Si pin detectors. In order to understand defects created by radiation and evaluate their evolution with fluence, C-DLTS and TSC techniques have been employed to make a baseline identification of the radiation induced traps after irradiation with a rather small neutron fluence of 1012 cm-2. The steady-state photo-ionization spectroscopy (PIS) technique has been involved to correlate thermal- and photo- activation energies for definite radiation defects. A contactless technique for simultaneous measurements of the carrier lifetime and the parameters of deep levels based on microwave probed pulsed photo-conductivity (MW-PC) spectroscopy has been applied to correlate carrier capture cross-sections and densities of the identified different radiation defects. A technique for spectroscopy of deep levels in junction structures (BELIV) based on measurements of barrier capacitance charging current transient changes due to additional spectrally resolved pulsed illumination has been applied to evaluate the functional characteristics of the irradiated diodes. Pulsed spectroscopic measurements were implemented by combining the analysis of generation current and of barrier capacitance charging transients modified by a single fs pulse of illumination generated by an optical parametric oscillator of varied wavelength in the range from 0.5 to 10 μm. Several deep levels with activation energy in the range of 0.18-0.8 eV have been resolved from spectral analysis in the samples of Si grown by magnetic field applied Czochralski (MCz) technology.

  10. Evolution of morphology and structure of Pb thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition at different substrate temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lorusso, Antonella Maiolo, Berlinda; Perrone, Alessio; Gontad, Francisco; Maruccio, Giuseppe; Tasco, Vittorianna

    2014-03-15

    Pb thin films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition on a Si (100) substrate at different growth temperatures to investigate their morphology and structure. The morphological analysis of the thin metal films showed the formation of spherical submicrometer grains whose average size decreased with temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements confirmed that growth temperature influences the Pb polycrystalline film structure. A preferred orientation of Pb (111) normal to the substrate was achieved at 30 °C and became increasingly pronounced along the Pb (200) plane as the substrate temperature increased. These thin films could be used to synthesize innovative materials, such as metallic photocathodes, with improved photoemission performances.

  11. Structure of the Sevoflurane-Benzene Complex as Determined by Chirped-Pulse Ftmw Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Lesarri, Alberto; Vallejo, Montserrat; Cocinero, Emilio J.; Castano, Fernando

    2012-06-01

    Following previous microwave studies on sevoflurane monomer by Suenram {et al.} and Vega-Toribio et al. we report the broadband rotational spectrum of sevoflurane clustered with benzene. The structure assigned is consistent with a C-H...π interaction between the benzene ring and the (CF_3)_2C-H hydrogen on sevoflurane. The spectrum of this species is complicated by the six-fold internal rotation of the benzene ring over the C_1 framework of sevoflurane. The six-fold tunneling falls into a high effective barrier case where there are several bound torsional levels. The tunneling spectrum has been successfully analyzed using the BELGI internal rotation program and a barrier to internal rotation of the benzene against sevoflurane of 32.5 cm-1 has been determined. Structural information about the complex has been obtained by studying the complex of sevoflurane with benzene-{d_1}. For this complex, six unique isomers are observed making it possible to determine the positions of the benzene H-atoms in the complex. Combination of these hydrogen r_s positions with the sevoflurane monomer r_s coordinates reported by Lesarri {et al.} results in a substitution structure in excellent agreement with the ab initio results. Finally, initial microwave results on two sevoflurane dimer species will also be presented. R. D. Suenram, D. J. Brugh, F. J. Lovas and C. Chu, 51st OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 1999, RB07. A. Vega-Toribio, A. Lesarri, R.D. Suenram, J. Grabow, 64th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2009, MH07. A. Lesarri, A. Vega-Toribio, R. D. Suenram, D. J. Brugh, J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 12, 9624-9631 (2010).

  12. Determination of secondary structure in the initiation region of ovalbumin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Liarakos, C D; Maddox, R P; Hilscher, K A; Bishop, J R; McGuire, D K; Kopper, R A

    1988-01-01

    We have analyzed the secondary structure in the region surrounding the initiation codons of both cellular and synthetic versions of ovalbumin mRNA. RNase V1 cleavage sites and structure-dependent, chemically modified bases in cellular ovalbumin mRNA were determined by reverse transcription of hen poly A(+) RNA using ovalbumin-specific, synthetic DNA primers. These results indicate an extensive region of unpaired nucleotides preceding the initiation codon and a region of base-paired nucleotides including and following the initiation codon. A synthetic ovalbumin mRNA (SP65.OV) was prepared by run-off transcription of a cloned ovalbumin cDNA (pSP65.OV). Identical regions of hen ovalbumin and SP65.OV mRNAs gave identical patterns of structure-dependent base modifications. A computer program for determining RNA secondary structure was used to find a 5'-region structure for ovalbumin mRNA that is consistent with our data. Images PMID:3205742

  13. Redistribution of Kv1 and Kv7 enhances neuronal excitability during structural axon initial segment plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rei; Ishiguro, Go; Adachi, Ryota

    2015-01-01

    Structural plasticity of the axon initial segment (AIS), the trigger zone of neurons, is a powerful means for regulating neuronal activity. Here, we show that AIS plasticity is not limited to structural changes; it also occurs as changes in ion-channel expression, which substantially augments the efficacy of regulation. In the avian cochlear nucleus, depriving afferent inputs by removing cochlea elongated the AIS, and simultaneously switched the dominant Kv channels at the AIS from Kv1.1 to Kv7.2. Due to the slow activation kinetics of Kv7.2, the redistribution of the Kv channels reduced the shunting conductance at the elongated AIS during the initiation of action potentials and effectively enhanced the excitability of the deprived neurons. The results indicate that the functional plasticity of the AIS works cooperatively with the structural plasticity and compensates for the loss of afferent inputs to maintain the homeostasis of auditory circuits after hearing loss by cochlea removal. PMID:26581625

  14. Redistribution of Kv1 and Kv7 enhances neuronal excitability during structural axon initial segment plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kuba, Hiroshi; Yamada, Rei; Ishiguro, Go; Adachi, Ryota

    2015-11-19

    Structural plasticity of the axon initial segment (AIS), the trigger zone of neurons, is a powerful means for regulating neuronal activity. Here, we show that AIS plasticity is not limited to structural changes; it also occurs as changes in ion-channel expression, which substantially augments the efficacy of regulation. In the avian cochlear nucleus, depriving afferent inputs by removing cochlea elongated the AIS, and simultaneously switched the dominant Kv channels at the AIS from Kv1.1 to Kv7.2. Due to the slow activation kinetics of Kv7.2, the redistribution of the Kv channels reduced the shunting conductance at the elongated AIS during the initiation of action potentials and effectively enhanced the excitability of the deprived neurons. The results indicate that the functional plasticity of the AIS works cooperatively with the structural plasticity and compensates for the loss of afferent inputs to maintain the homeostasis of auditory circuits after hearing loss by cochlea removal.

  15. Comprehensive modeling of structural modification induced by a femtosecond laser pulse inside fused silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Somayeh; Sadat Arabanian, Atoosa; Massudi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A comprehensive theoretical model is proposed based on equations describing the nonlinear propagation of an ultrashort pulse inside transparent material, electron density evolution, non-Fourier heat conduction, and thermo-elasto plastic displacement which are respectively solved by various methods. These methods include the split-step finite difference technique and alternating-direction implicit algorithm, fourth-order Range-Kutta algorithm, hybrid finite-element method/finite-difference method, and finite-element method in both space and time to achieve refractive index changes. The whole chain of processes occurring in the interaction of a focused ultrashort laser pulse with fused silica glass in prevalent conditions of micromachining applications is numerically investigated. By optimizing the numerical method and by using an adaptive mesh approach, the execution time of the program is significantly reduced so that the calculations are done at each time step in a fraction of a second. Simulation results show that the energy and duration of the input pulse are very important parameters in induced changes, but the chirp of the input pulse is not an effective parameter. Consequently, by appropriate setting of those parameters one can design a desired refractive index profile.

  16. Pulse method of structural and parametric identification of models of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kafarov, V.V.; Pisarenko, V.N.; Usacheva, I.I.

    1986-04-01

    A description is given of a pulse method for the investigation of heterogeneous catalytic processes, through which the parameters of a model can be evaluated with high accuracy. An example is given of the application of the procedure to an alloy catalyst.

  17. Structural, mechanical and optical properties of nitrogen-implanted titanium at different pulse frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raaif, Mohamed; Mohamed, Sodky H.; Abd El-Rahman, Ahmed M.; Kolitsch, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Plasma-immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a potent method to obtain hard and wear-resistant surface on Ti by nitrogen implantation. This presentation is one part of a sequence of experiments to optimize the microstructure and physical properties of TiN through adapting the plasma-processing parameters. In this work, nitrogen ions were implanted into samples of pure Ti at different nitrogen pulse frequency without using any external source of heating. The nitrogen-implanted surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), optical microscope, nano-indentation technique, ball-on-disk type tribometer, surface profilemeter, Tafel polarization technique for corrosion performance and ellipsometry. The outcomes show that, nitrogen PIII is an effectual method for nitriding titanium and nitrogen pulse frequency affected the microstructure and physical properties of the treated Ti. X-ray diffraction depicted the formation of α-Ti (N) and the cubic TiN after implanting titanium by nitrogen and the thickness of the nitrided layer increased as the nitrogen pulse frequency increased. The wear and corrosion resistance of the nitrogen-implanted titanium are improved and the friction coefficient decreased from nearly 0.8 for the un-implanted titanium to 0.3 for the implanted titanium, this ascribed to the formation of the titanium nitrided phases. Ellipsometric measurements were carried out on the PIII titanium samples at different nitrogen pulse frequency. The ellipsometric measurements show that, the thickness of the nitrided layer and surface roughness increased while the refractive index decreased with increasing nitrogen pulse frequency.

  18. Backscattering of individual LiDAR pulses from forest canopies explained by photogrammetrically derived vegetation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, Ilkka; Hovi, Aarne; Korhonen, Lauri

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, airborne LiDAR sensors have shown remarkable performance in the mapping of forest vegetation. This experimental study looks at LiDAR data at the scale of individual pulses to elucidate the sources behind interpulse variation in backscattering. Close-range photogrammetry was used for obtaining the canopy reference measurements at the ratio scale. The experiments illustrated different orientation techniques in the field, LiDAR acquisitions and photogrammetry in both leaf-on and leaf-off conditions, and two-waveform recording LiDAR sensors. The intrafootprint branch silhouettes in zenith-looking images, in which the camera, footprint, and LiDAR sensor were collinear, were extracted and contrasted with LiDAR backscattering. An enhanced planimetric match (refinement of strip matching) was achieved by shifting the pulses in a strip and searching for the maximal correlation between the silhouette and LiDAR intensity. The relative silhouette explained up to 80-90% of the interpulse variation. We tested whether accounting for the Gaussian spread of intrafootprint irradiance would improve the correlations, but the effect was blurred by small-scale geometric noise. Accounting for receiver gain variations in the Leica ALS60 sensor data strengthened the dependences. The size of the vegetation objects required for triggering a LiDAR observation was analyzed. We demonstrated the use of LiDAR pulses adjacent to canopy vegetation, which did not trigger a canopy echo, for canopy mapping. Pulses not triggering an echo constitute the complement to the actual canopy. We conclude that field photogrammetry is a useful tool for mapping forest canopies from below and that quantitative analysis is feasible even at the scale of single pulses for enhanced understanding of LiDAR observations from vegetation.

  19. Backscattering of Individual LIDAR Pulses from Forest Canopies Explained by Photogrammetrically Derived Vegetation Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpela, I.; Hovi, A.; Korhonen, L.

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, airborne LiDAR sensors have shown remarkable performance in the mapping of forest vegetation. This experimental study looks at LiDAR data at the scale of individual pulses to elucidate the sources behind interpulse variation in backscattering. Close-range photogrammetry was used for obtaining the canopy reference measurements at the ratio scale. The experiments illustrated different orientation techniques in the field, LiDAR acquisitions and photogrammetry in both leaf-on and leaf-off conditions, and two-waveform recording LiDAR sensors. The intrafootprint branch silhouettes in zenith-looking images, in which the camera, footprint, and LiDAR sensor were collinear, were extracted and contrasted with LiDAR backscattering. An enhanced planimetric match (refinement of strip matching) was achieved by shifting the pulses in a strip and searching for the maximal correlation between the silhouette and LiDAR intensity. The relative silhouette explained up to 80-90% of the interpulse variation. We tested whether accounting for the Gaussian spread of intrafootprint irradiance would improve the correlations, but the effect was blurred by small-scale geometric noise. Accounting for receiver gain variations in the Leica ALS60 sensor data strengthened the dependences. The size of the vegetation objects required for triggering a LiDAR observation was analyzed. We demonstrated the use of LiDAR pulses adjacent to canopy vegetation, which did not trigger a canopy echo, for canopy mapping. Pulses not triggering an echo constitute the complement to the actual canopy. We conclude that field photogrammetry is a useful tool for mapping forest canopies from below and that quantitative analysis is feasible even at the scale of single pulses for enhanced understanding of LiDAR observations from vegetation.

  20. Interactions between surface structures, runoff and erosion in an artificial watershed during the initial ecosystem development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerwin, W.; Raab, T.; Dimitrov, M.

    2009-04-01

    In its initial phase an ecosystem can be characterized as a Geo-(Hydro-)System since biotic compartments are still missing to a large extent. In this very first stage of the ecosystem development the hydrological processes forming the first surface structures are mainly controlled by runoff patterns and by the physical properties of the surface and the substrate. Based on that, it can be hypothesized that the initially formed structures are responsible for the future development of the ecosystem and define later structures. However, initial structures are very dynamic, and few alterations of surface properties may initiate the development of completely new patches and patterns which again control surface processes like erosion and sedimentation. Loose sand and other fine particles are transported directly by wind and water from the upper initial soil surface and a first physical soil crust is formed very quickly. This new surface exhibits clearly different properties compared with the original initial surface. For example, infiltration can be minimized and surface runoff is promoted by this crusting. In contrast, sandy or silty substrate that has been relocated by erosion processes into small hollows of the surface changes the soil physical properties of these parts of the landscape as well but into another direction. In these parts of the system the sedimentation may create small patches with higher infiltration rates and eventually better water storage capacities. This may result into the formation of initial vegetation patches and patterns which in turn influence the further quality and quantity as well as the location of soil surface processes. Against this background this paper presents a recently launched research project using an artificially created water catchment of 6 ha in size. This site called ‘Chicken Creek' (‘Hühnerwasser') was established in 2005 in Lusatia (Germany) and is the central research site of a German-Swiss Collaborative Research

  1. Automated Process Initialization of Laser Surface Structuring Processes by Inline Process Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, R.; Mallmann, G.; Winands, K.; Pothen, M.

    Laser micro machining as well as laser surface structuring are innovative manufacturing technologies with a wide range of machinable materials and a high level of flexibility. These techniques are characterized by different machine, workpiece and environmental parameters. The large amount of process dependencies lead however to a time consuming process initialization and a complex process control. Currently no automated solution exists to achieve material specific process parameters, nor does a sufficient inline process control exist to adapt processing parameters or strategies inline. Therefore a novel scanner based inline metrology solution and an automated process initialization strategy has been developed.

  2. Sediment distribution modeling for evaluating the impact of initial structure on catchment hydrological behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, T. J.; Gerke, H. H.; Hinz, C.

    2015-12-01

    Structural heterogeneity, namely the spatial distribution of soils and sediments (represented by mineral particles), characterizes catchment hydrological behavior. In natural catchments, local geology and the specific geomorphic processes determine the characteristics and spatial distribution of structures. In constructed catchments, structural features are determined primarily by the construction processes and the geological origin of the parent material. Objectives are scenarios of 3D catchment structures in form of complete 3D description of soil hydraulic properties generated from the knowledge of the formation processes. The constructed hydrological catchment 'Hühnerwasser' (Lower Lusatia, Brandenburg, Germany) was used for the calibration and validation of model results due to its well-known conditions. For the modeling of structural features, a structure generator was used to model i) quasi-deterministic sediment distributions using input data from a geological model of the parent material excavation site; ii) sediment distributions that are conditioned to measurement data from soil sampling; and iii) stochastic component sediment distributions. All three approaches allow a randomization within definable limits. Furthermore, the spoil cone / spoil ridge orientation, internal layering, surface compaction and internal spoil cone compaction were modified. These generated structural models were incorporated in a gridded 3D volume model constructed with the GOCAD software. The impact of structure variation was assessed by hydrological modeling with HYDRUS 2D/3D software. 3D distributions of soil hydraulic properties were estimated based on generated sediment properties using adapted pedotransfer functions. Results were compared with hydrological monitoring data. The impact of structural feature variation on hydrological behavior was analyzed by comparing different simulation scenarios. The established initial sediment distributions provide a basis for the

  3. Detonation structure of C 2H 4-O 2-Ar mixtures at elevated initial temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffret, Y.; Desbordes, D.; Presles, H. N.

    The influence of initial pressure and temperature on the detonation structure of stoichiometric ethylene-oxygen-argon mixtures was studied. The detonation tube (53 mm i.d. and 7.2 m long) was electrically heated by Joule effect at a rate of about 100 K per minute. For initial pressures ranging from 0.1 to 1 bar, experimental results show that the detonation cell size increases with the initial temperature in the range of 300-600 K. The detonation cell size data were correlated with the chemical induction length calculated using the ZND model for the detonation wave and global chemical reaction kinetics. Due to the low value of the reduced global activation energy of the chemical kinetics (Ea/{R{ TZND}} ~= 5), the detonation cell size varies inversely with the initial density. Assuming that at elevated initial temperature the classical detonability criteria based on cell size are still valid, we find that the detonability of this mixture decreases when increasing initial temperature.

  4. Experimental study on impact-initiated characters of multifunctional energetic structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. F.; Shi, A. S.; Qiao, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Y. G.; Guan, Z. W.

    2013-02-01

    Multifunctional energetic structural materials (MESMs) are a new class of energetic materials, which release energy due to exothermic chemical reactions initiated under shock loading conditions. In order to analyze the impact-initiated process of MESMs, a quasi-sealed test chamber, which was originally developed by Ames ["Vented chamber calorimetry for impact-initiated energetic materials," in AIAA (American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005), p. 279], is used to study on shock-induced chemical reaction characters at various impact velocities. The impact initiated experiments are involving two typical MESMs, Al/PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene), W/Zr and inert 2024 Al fragment. The video frames recorded from reactive and inert material impact events have shown the process of late-time after burn phenomena. The total pressure and shock wave reflection at the wall of the test chamber are measured using high frequency gauges. The quasi-pressures inside the test chamber, which is fitting from the total pressure curves, are used to determine the impact initiated reaction efficiencies of MESMs at different impact velocities. A thermochemical model for shock-induced reactions, in which the reaction efficiency is considered, is validated against the experimental data from impact initiation. The results show that the impact velocity plays a significant role in chemical reaction and the energy release characteristics of MESMs. The theoretical calculations correlate reasonably well to the corresponding experimental results, which can be used to predict the reaction results of MESMs over a wide range of pressure satisfactorily.

  5. Induced-field enhancement of band-structure effects in photoelectron spectra from Al surfaces by ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ríos Rubiano, C. A.; Della Picca, R.; Mitnik, D. M.; Silkin, V. M.; Gravielle, M. S.

    2017-03-01

    The electron emission produced by the grazing incidence of ultrashort laser pulses on two faces of aluminum, Al(100) and Al(111), is investigated using the band-structure-based-Volkov (BSB-V) approximation. The present version of the BSB-V approach includes not only a realistic description of the surface interaction, accounting for band-structure effects, but also effects due to the induced potential that originates from the collective response of valence electrons to the external electromagnetic field. For both crystallographic orientations we found that the induced potential contributes to the emergence of band-structure signatures in the near-threshold region of photoelectron spectra. This result opens a window to scrutinize band-structure effects in metal surfaces via ultrashort-laser interactions.

  6. Observations of flow path interactions with surface structures during initial soil development stage using irrigation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartl, Steffen; Biemelt, Detlef; Badorreck, Annika; Gerke, Horst H.

    2010-05-01

    Structures and processes are dynamically linked especially during initial stages of soil and ecosystem development. Here we assume that soil pore structures and micro topography determine the flow paths and water fluxes as well as further structure changes. Reports about flow path developments at the soil surface are still limited because of an insufficient knowledge of the changing micro topography at the surface. The objective of this presentation is to evaluate methods for parameterisation of surface micro topography for analysing interactions between infiltration and surface runoff. Complex irrigation experiments were carried out at an experimental site in the neighbourhood of the artificially created water catchment "Chicken Creek". The irrigation rates between 160 mm/h and 250 mm/h were held constant over a time period of 20 minutes. The incoming intensities were measured as well as the raindrop-velocity and -size distributions. The surface runoff was continuously registered, soil samples were taken, and soil water potential heads were monitored using tensiometers. Surface and subsurface flow paths were identified using different tracers. The soil surface structures were recorded using a high resolution digital camera before, during, and after irrigation. Micro topography was surveyed using close-range photogrammetry. With this experimental design both, flow paths on the surface and in the soil as well as structure and texture changes could be observed simultaneously. In 2D vertical cross-sections, the effect of initial sediment deposition structure on infiltration and runoff was observed. Image analysis of surface pictures allowed identifying structural and soil textural changes during the runoff process. Similar structural changes related to surface flow paths were found with the photogrammetric surface analysis. We found evidence for the importance of the initial structures on the flow paths as well as a significant influence of the system development

  7. Generation of high-power Cherenkov superradiance pulses using 2D periodic slow-wave structures based on oversized cylindrical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, N. S.; Zaslavskii, V. Yu.; Malkin, A. M.; Sergeev, A. S.

    2017-08-01

    We propose to stabilize the azimuthal structure of superradiance pulses using two-dimensional (2D) periodic Bragg structures that simultaneously play the role of a slow-wave system. Analysis performed in the framework of a quasi-optical approach is confirmed by the results of 3D particle-in-cell modeling that demonstrates the possibility of using the proposed system for generating multi-GW nanosecond radiation pulses in the millimeter waveband.

  8. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  9. Initial impressions: What they are, what they are not, and how they influence structured interview outcomes.

    PubMed

    Swider, Brian W; Barrick, Murray R; Harris, T Brad

    2016-05-01

    Nearly all employment interviews, even those considered highly structured, begin with a brief meet-and-greet conversation typically coalescing around non-job-related topics (i.e., rapport building). Although applicants and interviewers often view rapport building as an essential, value-adding component of the interview, it may contaminate interviewers' evaluations of answers to subsequently asked structured questions (Levashina, Hartwell, Morgeson, & Campion, 2014). Yet research has not determined the extent to which initial impressions developed during rapport building influence subsequent interviewer ratings through job-related interview content versus non-job-related content; whether these effects extend beyond more commonly examined image-related factors that can bias interviewers (i.e., self-presentation tactics); or how these effects are temporally bound when influencing interviewer ratings during the formal structured interview question-and-answer process. Addressing these questions, we integrate interview research with the extant social psychology literature to clarify rapport building's unique effects in the employment interview. In contrast to prior assumptions, findings based on 163 mock interviews suggest that a significant portion of initial impressions' influence overlaps with job-related interview content and, importantly, that these effects are distinct from other image-related constructs. Finally, initial impressions are found to more strongly relate to interviewer evaluations of applicant responses earlier rather than later in the structured interview. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. Effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) on structures and antioxidant activity of soybean source peptides-SHCMN.

    PubMed

    Lin, Songyi; Liang, Rong; Li, Xingfang; Xing, Jie; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-12-15

    Recently, high-intensity pulsed electric field (PEF) has successfully used in improvement of antioxidant activity. Ser-His-Cys-Met-Asn (SHCMN) obtained from soybean protein was chosen to investigate the phenomenon of antioxidant activity improvement. Effects of PEF treatment on antioxidant activity of SHCMN were evaluated by DPPH radical inhibition. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mid-infrared (MIR), circular dichroism (CD) were used to analyze structures of SHCMN. Two-factor-at-a-time results show that DPPH radical inhibition of SHCMN is significantly (P<0.05) increased to 94.35±0.03% at conditions of electric field intensity of 5kV/cm, pulse frequency of 2400Hz, and retention time of 2h. In addition, MIR and NMR spectra show that the basic structure of peptides SHCMN is stable by PEF treatment. But the secondary structures (α-helix, β-turn, and random coil) can be affected and zeta potential of PEF-treated SHCNM was reduced to 0.59±0.03mV. The antioxidant activity improvement of SHCMN might result from the changes of secondary structures and zeta potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mutually exclusive RNA secondary structures regulate translation initiation of DinQ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, Knut I; Weel-Sneve, Ragnhild; Booth, James A; Bjørås, Magnar

    2016-11-01

    Protein translation can be affected by changes in the secondary structure of mRNA. The dinQ gene in Escherichia coli encodes a primary transcript (+1) that is inert to translation. Ribonucleolytic removal of the 44 first nucleotides converts the +1 transcript into a translationally active form, but the mechanism behind this structural change is unknown. Here we present experimental evidence for a mechanism where alternative RNA secondary structures in the two dinQ mRNA variants affect translation initiation by mediating opening or closing of the ribosome binding sequence. This structural switch is determined by alternative interactions of four sequence elements within the dinQ mRNA and also by the agrB antisense RNA. Additionally, the structural conformation of +1 dinQ suggests a locking mechanism comprised of an RNA stem that both stabilizes and prevents translation initiation from the full-length dinQ transcript. BLAST search and multiple sequence alignments define a new family of dinQ-like genes widespread in Enterobacteriaceae with close RNA sequence similarities in their 5' untranslated regions. Thus, it appears that a whole new family of genes is regulated by the same mechanism of alternative secondary RNA structures. © 2016 Kristiansen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  12. A retroviral RNA secondary structure required for efficient initiation of reverse transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Cobrinik, D; Soskey, L; Leis, J

    1988-01-01

    Genetic evidence is presented which suggests the existence of an important structural element in the 5' noncoding region of avian retrovirus RNA. The proposed structure, which we term the U5-leader stem, is composed of sequences in the middle of U5 and in the leader, flanking the primer-binding site. U5 and leader mutations which would disrupt this structure caused a partial replication defect. However, nucleotide substitutions in the leader, which would structurally compensate for a U5 deletion mutation, restored normal replication. Analysis of replication intermediates of viruses with the above mutations suggests that the U5-leader stem is required for efficient DNA synthesis in vivo and for initiation of DNA synthesis from the tRNA(Trp) primer in melittin-activated virions. However, this structure does not appear to be required for binding of the tRNA(Trp) primer to viral RNA. These results support a role for the U5-leader stem structure, independent of its primary sequence, in the initiation of retroviral replication. Images PMID:2458484

  13. Structure of an RNA Polymerase II-TFIIB Complex and the Transcription Initiation Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin; Bushnell, David A; Wang, Dong; Calero, Guillermo; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-01-14

    Previous x-ray crystal structures have given insight into the mechanism of transcription and the role of general transcription factors in the initiation of the process. A structure of an RNA polymerase II-general transcription factor TFIIB complex at 4.5 angstrom resolution revealed the amino-terminal region of TFIIB, including a loop termed the 'B finger,' reaching into the active center of the polymerase where it may interact with both DNA and RNA, but this structure showed little of the carboxyl-terminal region. A new crystal structure of the same complex at 3.8 angstrom resolution obtained under different solution conditions is complementary with the previous one, revealing the carboxyl-terminal region of TFIIB, located above the polymerase active center cleft, but showing none of the B finger. In the new structure, the linker between the amino- and carboxyl-terminal regions can also be seen, snaking down from above the cleft toward the active center. The two structures, taken together with others previously obtained, dispel long-standing mysteries of the transcription initiation process.

  14. Selective ablation of atherosclerotic lesions with less thermal damage by controlling the pulse structure of a quantum cascade laser in the 5.7-µm wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimura, Keisuke; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    Cholesteryl esters are the main components of atherosclerotic plaques, and they have an absorption peak at the wavelength of 5.75 µm. To realize less-invasive ablation of the atherosclerotic plaques using a quasi-continuous wave (quasi-CW) quantum cascade laser (QCL), the thermal effects on normal vessels must be reduced. In this study, we attempted to reduce the thermal effects by controlling the pulse structure. The irradiation effects on rabbit atherosclerotic aortas using macro pulse irradiation (irradiation of pulses at intervals) and conventional quasi-CW irradiation were compared. The macro pulse width and the macro pulse interval were determined based on the thermal relaxation time of atherosclerotic and normal aortas in the oscillation wavelength of the QCL. The ablation depth increased and the coagulation width decreased using macro pulse irradiation. Moreover, difference in ablation depth between the atherosclerotic and normal rabbit aortas using macro pulse irradiation was confirmed. Therefore, the QCL in the 5.7-µm wavelength range with controlling the pulse structure was effective for less-invasive laser angioplasty.

  15. Influence of pulsed substrate bias on the structure and properties of Ti-Al-N films deposited by cathodic vacuum arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. P.; Gao, G. J.; Wang, X. Q.; Lv, G. H.; Zhou, L.; Chen, H.; Pang, H.; Yang, S. Z.

    2012-07-01

    Ti-Al-N films were deposited by cathodic vacuum arc (CVA) technique in N2 atmosphere with different pulsed substrate bias. The influence of pulsed substrate bias (0 to -800 V) on the deposition rate, surface morphology, crystal structure, and mechanical properties of the Ti-Al-N films were systematically investigated. Increasing pulsed bias voltage resulted in the decrease of deposition rate but the increase of surface roughness. It was found that there was a strong correlation between the pulsed bias and film structure. All the films studied in this paper were composed of TiN, AlN, and Ti-Al-N ternary phases. The grains changed from equiaxial to columnar and exhibited preferred orientation when the pulsed bias increased. With the increase of pulsed bias voltage, the atomic ratio of Ti to Al element increased gradually, while the N to (Ti + Al) ratio decreased. The composite films present an enhanced nanohardness compared with binary TiN and ZrN films. The film deposited with pulsed bias of -200 V possessed the maximum scratch critical load and nanohardness. The minimum friction coefficient with pulsed bias of -300 V was obtained.

  16. Femtosecond Pulse Characterization as Applied to One-Dimensional Photonic Band Edge Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Gamble, Lisa J.; Diffey, William M.

    1999-01-01

    The ability to control the group velocity and phase of an optical pulse is important to many current active areas of research. Electronically addressable one-dimensional photonic crystals are an attractive candidate to achieve this control. This report details work done toward the characterization of photonic crystals and improvement of the characterization technique. As part of the work, the spectral dependence of the group delay imparted by a GaAs/AlAs photonic crystal was characterized. Also, a first generation an electrically addressable photonic crystal was tested for the ability to electronically control the group delay. The measurement technique, using 100 femtosecond continuum pulses was improved to yield high spectral resolution (1.7 nanometers) and concurrently with high temporal resolution (tens of femtoseconds). Conclusions and recommendations based upon the work done are also presented.

  17. Formation of color centers and light scattering structures by femtosecond laser pulses in sodium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryukvina, L. I.; Pestryakov, E. V.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Martynovich, E. F.

    2014-11-01

    Modification of sodium fluoride crystal lattice by means of femtosecond laser pulses with λmax=800 nm, energy 0.5 mJ, duration 30 fs and repetition rate 1 kHz has been considered in the paper. Effective formation of simple and complex aggregate color centers and light scattering nanodefects in the channel of a laser beam in NaF crystal have been shown for the first time. Dependences of color centers concentration on the distance between the channel center and its periphery and along the channel have been presented. Influence of external focusing on color centers creation has been revealed. Explanations of the observed phenomena have been presented on the basis of nonlinear processes taking place under the effect of high-intensity femtosecond pulses.

  18. Ultrafast pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanostructures: Structural and optical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervolaraki, M.; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.; Othonos, A.; Giapintzakis, J.

    2013-08-01

    Carbon nanostructured materials were obtained by high-repetition rate pulsed laser ablation of a graphite target using a train of 10-ps duration pulses at 1064 nm in different pressures of high-purity Ar gas. It is demonstrated that their microstructure and optical properties vary as a function of the argon pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy revealed the existence of onion-like carbon nanostructures embedded in a matrix of amorphous carbon nanofoam for samples prepared at 300 Pa. In comparison samples prepared at 30 Pa show evidence of both onion-like and turbostratic carbon coexisting in a matrix of amorphous carbon nanofoam whereas samples prepared in vacuum are continuous films of amorphous carbon. Transient transmission spectroscopy measurements suggested that free carrier absorption is the dominant effect following photo-excitation for probing wavelengths in the range of 550-1000 nm and its magnitude varies among the materials investigated due to their different microstructures.

  19. Interrogation of orbital structure by elliptically polarized intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-samha, M.; Madsen, L. B.

    2011-08-15

    We solve the three-dimensional time-dependent Schroedinger equation and present investigations of the imprint of the orbital angular node in photoelectron momentum distributions of an aligned atomic p-type orbital following ionization by an intense elliptically polarized laser pulse of femtosecond duration. We investigate the role of light ellipticity and the alignment angle of the major polarization axis of the external field relative to the probed orbital by studying radial and angular momentum distributions, the latter at a fixed narrow interval of final momenta close to the peak of the photoelectron momentum distribution. In general only the angular distributions carry a clear signature of the orbital symmetry. Our study shows that circular polarization gives the most clear imprints of orbital nodes. These findings are insensitive to pulse duration.

  20. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  1. Transcription activator structure reveals redox control of a replication initiation reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Cyril M.; Sizov, Dmytro; Seavers, Philippa R.; Ortiz-Lombardía, Miguel; Antson, Alfred A.

    2007-01-01

    Redox changes are one of the factors that influence cell-cycle progression and that control the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. Proteins regulated through redox-sensitive cysteines have been characterized but specific ‘sulphydryl switches’ in replication proteins remain to be identified. In bovine papillomavirus type-1, DNA replication begins when the viral transcription factor E2 recruits the viral initiator protein E1 to the origin of DNA replication (ori). Here we show that a novel dimerization interface in the E2 transcription activation domain is stabilized by a disulphide bond. Oxidative cross-linking via Cys57 sequesters the interaction surface between E1 and E2, preventing pre-initiation and replication initiation complex formation. Our data demonstrate that as well as a mechanism for regulating DNA binding, redox reactions can control replication by modulating the tertiary structure of critical protein factors using a specific redox sensor. PMID:17478495

  2. Study on the Structures of Two Booster Pellets Having High Initiation Capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuang-Qi, Hu; Hong-Rong, Liu; Li-shuang, Hu; Xiong, Cao; Xiang-Chao, Mi; Hai-Xia, Zhao

    2014-05-01

    Insensitive munitions (IM) improve the survivability of both weapons and their associated platforms, which can lead to a reduction in casualties, mission losses, and whole life costs. All weapon systems contain an explosive train that needs to meet IM criteria but reliably initiate a main charge explosive. To ensure that these diametrically opposed requirements can be achieved, new highly effective booster charge structures were designed. The initiation capacity of the two booster pellets was studied using varied composition and axial-steel-dent methods. The results showed that the two new booster pellets can initiate standard main charge pellets with less explosive mass than the ordinary cylindrical booster pellet. The numerical simulation results were in good agreement with the experiment results.

  3. Enhanced PHY symbol structure based on the IEEE 802.15.4a standardization and orthogonal pulses for 3D positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Changqiang; Jeon, Inho; Kim, Youngok

    2011-12-01

    According to IEEE 802.15.4a standardization, an ultra wideband PHY symbol is capable of carrying two bits of information and only one pulse shall be transmitted in each symbol. To prevent inter symbol interference caused by multipath effect, the guard interval is present between the possible burst positions. In order to make full use of the symbol for estimating the azimuth and the elevation of target, we can add additional information at the guard interval position, if the pulse used at the possible burst position is different from the pulse used at the guard interval position. Using the orthonormality between the multiple pulses, furthermore, inter symbol interference can be avoided at the correlation receiver. In this paper, as the first step for estimating the azimuth and the elevation information, we propose a novel PHY symbol structure for IR-UWB system based on IEEE 802.15.4a standardization and orthogonal pulses to enhance the data rates without the bit-error-rate (BER) performance degradation. In the proposed scheme, the pulse used at the possible burst position is the modified hermite polynomial (MHP) pulse of order n equal to 3 and the pulse used at guard interval position is the MHP pulse of order n equal to 4. The performance of the proposed structure is evaluated by computer simulations over the IEEE 802.15.4a channel model. Simulation results show that the proposed symbol structure with orthogonal pulses can double the data rates of the systems without BER performance degradation. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Characterization and Application of Four-Layer Semiconductor Structures in Pulse Mode Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    DC bias (top) and low DC bias (bottom). The pulse height is approximately equal to the switching voltage of the SCR...the capacitor has a low enough voltage across it that the SCR can switch on, if the voltage across it exceeds the threshold voltage. When the SCR...capacitance must be chosen to be big enough to provide a low impedance path (~1 Ω ) given the switching rise time and the peak transient current (CVp / τ

  5. Structural imaging of the cervical spinal cord with suppressed CSF signal using DANTE pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Li, Linqing; Kong, Yazhuo; Zaitsu, Yuri; Matthews, Lucy; Palace, Jacqueline; Jezzard, Peter

    2015-10-01

    We propose DANTE (Delays Alternating with Nutation for Tailored Excitation) moving fluid attenuation preparation pulse trains, in conjunction with T1 , T2 , and proton-density-weighted fast spin-echo (T1w-TSE, T2w-TSE and PDw-TSE) imaging readout, and three-dimensional fast low flip angle shots (3D-FLASH) T1 -weighted imaging readout to achieve CSF-suppressed high-spatial resolution multicontrast cervical spinal cord images. DANTE pulse trains, consisting of a rapid series of low flip angle radiofrequency pulses interspersed with gradients, were used to substantially attenuate the longitudinal magnetization of flowing spins relative to static tissue/fluid, whose longitudinal magnetization is mostly preserved. We hypothesized that the contrast between spinal cord and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) could be maximized due to moving CSF signal suppression. We demonstrate that metrics of contrast-to-noise ratio between spinal cord, nerve root, and CSF regions (CNRcord-CSF and CNRnerve-CSF ) are improved by at least a factor of 2 when compared with images acquired with non-prepared approaches and with 2D multiple-echo data image combination (MEDIC) imaging. In addition, we find that sagittal image quality can be significantly improved due to flow suppression effects from the DANTE preparation pluses. DANTE prepared imaging techniques for moving CSF signal attenuation are promising tools for cervical spinal cord imaging. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Structure of Shocks in Burgers Turbulence with Lévy Noise Initial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramson, Joshua

    2013-08-01

    We study the structure of the shocks for the inviscid Burgers equation in dimension 1 when the initial velocity is given by Lévy noise, or equivalently when the initial potential is a two-sided Lévy process ψ 0. When ψ 0 is abrupt in the sense of Vigon or has bounded variation with lim sup| h|↓0 h -2 ψ 0( h)=∞, we prove that the set of points with zero velocity is regenerative, and that in the latter case this set is equal to the set of Lagrangian regular points, which is non-empty. When ψ 0 is abrupt we show that the shock structure is discrete. When ψ 0 is eroded we show that there are no rarefaction intervals.

  7. Dynamic recrystallization at superplastic deformation of Duralumin with initial recrystallized structure

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, I.I.; Portnoy, V.K.; Titov, A.O.; Belov, D.Y.

    2000-04-01

    It is well-known that strain-induced grain growth is a characteristic feature of superplastic deformation (SPD) of various materials. Such grain growth has been observed over the whole investigated interval of strains in quasi-single phase superplastic aluminum alloys 7475, Neopral and 5083. At the same time observations indicating dynamic recrystallization in region II of SPD for four aluminum alloys with an initially completely recrystallized structure (with the grain size before SPD no more than 10 {micro}m) have been presented by the authors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the peculiarities of the change of grain size with the increase of sample elongation under SPD at maximum strain rate sensitivity, m, of an aluminum alloy with initial completely recrystallized ultra-fine grain structure.

  8. Spanwise Spacing Effects on the Initial Structure and Decay of Axial Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wendt, B. J.; Reichert, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    The initial structure and axial decay of an array of streamwise vortices embedded in a turbulent pipe boundary layer is experimentally investigated. The vortices are shed in counter-rotating fashion from an array of equally-spaced symmetric airfoil vortex generators. Vortex structure is quantified in terms of crossplane circulation and peak streamwise vorticity. Flow conditions are subsonic and incompressible. The focus of this study is on the effect of the initial spacing between the parent vortex generators. Arrays with vortex generators spaced at 15 and 30 degrees apart are considered. When the spacing between vortex generators is decreased the circulation and peak vorticity of the shed vortices increases. Analysis indicates this strengthening results from regions of fluid acceleration in the vicinity of the vortex generator array. Decreased spacing between the constituent vortices also produces increased rates of circulation and peak vorticity decay.

  9. Identification of fractional-order systems with unknown initial values and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Wei; Miao, Qingying; Tong, Le; Tang, Yang

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the identification problem of fractional-order chaotic systems is proposed and investigated via an evolutionary optimization approach. Different with other studies to date, this research focuses on the identification of fractional-order chaotic systems with not only unknown orders and parameters, but also unknown initial values and structure. A group of fractional-order chaotic systems, i.e., Lorenz, Lü, Chen, Rössler, Arneodo and Volta chaotic systems, are set as the system candidate pool. The identification problem of fractional-order chaotic systems in this research belongs to mixed integer nonlinear optimization in essence. A powerful evolutionary algorithm called composite differential evolution (CoDE) is introduced for the identification problem presented in this paper. Extensive experiments are carried out to show that the fractional-order chaotic systems with unknown initial values and structure can be successfully identified by means of CoDE.

  10. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    SciTech Connect

    Pontzen, Andrew; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slosar, Anze

    2016-05-18

    We introduce and explore “paired” cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x,tinitial) = –δB(x,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from ΛCDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void in simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Furthermore, generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.

  11. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    SciTech Connect

    Pontzen, Andrew; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Slosar, Anze

    2016-05-18

    We introduce and explore “paired” cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x,tinitial) = –δB(x,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from ΛCDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void in simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Furthermore, generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.

  12. Structure of the human autophagy initiating kinase ULK1 in complex with potent inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Michael B; Novotny, Chris J; Shokat, Kevan M

    2015-01-16

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that involves the degradation of cellular components for energy maintenance and cytoplasmic quality control that has recently gained interest as a novel target for a variety of human diseases, including cancer. A prime candidate to determine the potential therapeutic benefit of targeting autophagy is the kinase ULK1, whose activation initiates autophagy. Here, we report the first structures of ULK1, in complex with multiple potent inhibitors. These structures show features unique to the enzyme and will provide a path for the rational design of selective compounds as cellular probes and potential therapeutics.

  13. Observation of an ordered structure in the initial stage of Ge/Si heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohshima, N.; Koide, Y.; Itoh, K.; Zaima, S.; Yasuda, Y.

    1990-12-01

    An ordered structure with the double periodicity in a <111> direction has been found by in situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction observation in the initial stage of Ge films grown on (100)Si and (811)Si substrate surfaces by GeH4 gas source molecular beam epitaxy. The ordered structure is formed on {111} planes parallel to the side planes of <011> steps on {811} facets of Ge growing islands on both substrates. The formation is observed at substrate temperatures of 300-700 °C and is considered to result from solid phase reactions at the interfaces during growth.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli initiator tRNA/f//Met/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, N. H.; Rich, A.; Roe, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The crystal structure of Escherichia coli tRNA(f)(Met), an initiator transfer RNA, has been determined. While grossly similar to that of the chain-elongating yeast tRNA(Phe), there are three major differences. One involves the folding of the anticodon loop; in particular, the position of the constant uridine, U33. This difference was unexpected and may be of functional significance.

  15. Three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli initiator tRNA/f//Met/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, N. H.; Rich, A.; Roe, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The crystal structure of Escherichia coli tRNA(f)(Met), an initiator transfer RNA, has been determined. While grossly similar to that of the chain-elongating yeast tRNA(Phe), there are three major differences. One involves the folding of the anticodon loop; in particular, the position of the constant uridine, U33. This difference was unexpected and may be of functional significance.

  16. Molecular genetic structure-function analysis of translation initiation factor eIF5B.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Sik; Dever, Thomas E

    2007-01-01

    Recently, significant progress has been made in obtaining three-dimensional (3-D) structures of the factors that promote translation initiation, elongation, and termination. These structures, when interpreted in light of previous biochemical characterizations of the factors, provide significant insight into the function of the factors and the molecular mechanism of specific steps in the translation process. In addition, genetic analyses in yeast have helped elucidate the in vivo roles of the factors in various steps of the translation pathway. We have combined these two approaches and use molecular genetic studies to define the structure-function properties of translation initiation factors in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this chapter, we describe our multistep approach in which we first characterize a site-directed mutant of the factor of interest using in vivo and in vitro assays of protein synthesis. Next, we subject the mutant gene to random mutagenesis and screen for second-site mutations that restore the factor's function in vivo. Following biochemical and in vivo characterization of the suppressor mutant, we interpret the results in light of the 3-D structure of the factor to define the structure-function properties of the factor and to provide new molecular insights into the mechanism of translation.

  17. A Reusable PZT Transducer for Monitoring Initial Hydration and Structural Health of Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yaowen; Divsholi, Bahador Sabet; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2010-01-01

    During the construction of a concrete structure, strength monitoring is important to ensure the safety of both personnel and the structure. Furthermore, to increase the efficiency of in situ casting or precast of concrete, determining the optimal time of demolding is important for concrete suppliers. Surface bonded lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers have been used for damage detection and parameter identification for various engineering structures over the last two decades. In this work, a reusable PZT transducer setup for monitoring initial hydration of concrete and structural health is developed, where a piece of PZT is bonded to an enclosure with two bolts tightened inside the holes drilled in the enclosure. An impedance analyzer is used to acquire the admittance signatures of the PZT. Root mean square deviation (RMSD) is employed to associate the change in concrete strength with changes in the PZT admittance signatures. The results show that the reusable setup is able to effectively monitor the initial hydration of concrete and the structural health. It can also be detached from the concrete for future re-use. PMID:22399929

  18. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation.

  19. Structure of the initiation-competent RNA polymerase I and its implication for transcription

    PubMed Central

    Pilsl, Michael; Crucifix, Corinne; Papai, Gabor; Krupp, Ferdinand; Steinbauer, Robert; Griesenbeck, Joachim; Milkereit, Philipp; Tschochner, Herbert; Schultz, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is specialized in rRNA gene transcription synthesizing up to 60% of cellular RNA. High level rRNA production relies on efficient binding of initiation factors to the rRNA gene promoter and recruitment of Pol I complexes containing initiation factor Rrn3. Here, we determine the cryo-EM structure of the Pol I-Rrn3 complex at 7.5 Å resolution, and compare it with Rrn3-free monomeric and dimeric Pol I. We observe that Rrn3 contacts the Pol I A43/A14 stalk and subunits A190 and AC40, that association re-organizes the Rrn3 interaction interface, thereby preventing Pol I dimerization; and Rrn3-bound and monomeric Pol I differ from the dimeric enzyme in cleft opening, and localization of the A12.2 C-terminus in the active centre. Our findings thus support a dual role for Rrn3 in transcription initiation to stabilize a monomeric initiation competent Pol I and to drive pre-initiation complex formation. PMID:27418187

  20. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA.

    PubMed

    Gamache, Eric R; Doh, Jung H; Ritz, Justin; Laederach, Alain; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Mathews, David H; Curcio, M Joan

    2017-04-26

    The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5' terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT). To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1), a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2) that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging.

  1. Structure-Function Model for Kissing Loop Interactions That Initiate Dimerization of Ty1 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Gamache, Eric R.; Doh, Jung H.; Ritz, Justin; Laederach, Alain; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Mathews, David H.; Curcio, M. Joan

    2017-01-01

    The genomic RNA of the retrotransposon Ty1 is packaged as a dimer into virus-like particles. The 5′ terminus of Ty1 RNA harbors cis-acting sequences required for translation initiation, packaging and initiation of reverse transcription (TIPIRT). To identify RNA motifs involved in dimerization and packaging, a structural model of the TIPIRT domain in vitro was developed from single-nucleotide resolution RNA structural data. In general agreement with previous models, the first 326 nucleotides of Ty1 RNA form a pseudoknot with a 7-bp stem (S1), a 1-nucleotide interhelical loop and an 8-bp stem (S2) that delineate two long, structured loops. Nucleotide substitutions that disrupt either pseudoknot stem greatly reduced helper-Ty1-mediated retrotransposition of a mini-Ty1, but only mutations in S2 destabilized mini-Ty1 RNA in cis and helper-Ty1 RNA in trans. Nested in different loops of the pseudoknot are two hairpins with complementary 7-nucleotide motifs at their apices. Nucleotide substitutions in either motif also reduced retrotransposition and destabilized mini- and helper-Ty1 RNA. Compensatory mutations that restore base-pairing in the S2 stem or between the hairpins rescued retrotransposition and RNA stability in cis and trans. These data inform a model whereby a Ty1 RNA kissing complex with two intermolecular kissing-loop interactions initiates dimerization and packaging. PMID:28445416

  2. Morphology and structural studies of WO3 films deposited on SrTiO3 by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhori, Hossein; Porter, Stephen B.; Esmaeily, Amir Sajjad; Coey, Michael; Ranjbar, Mehdi; Salamati, Hadi

    2016-12-01

    WO3 films have been grown by pulsed laser deposition on SrTiO3 (001) substrates. The effects of substrate temperature, oxygen partial pressure and energy fluence of the laser beam on the physical properties of the films were studied. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) patterns during and after growth were used to determine the surface structure and morphology. The chemical composition and crystalline phases were obtained by XPS and XRD respectively. AFM results showed that the roughness and skewness of the films depend on the substrate temperature during deposition. Optimal conditions were determined for the growth of the highly oriented films.

  3. Enhanced trapped field achieved in a superconducting bulk using high thermal conductivity structures following simulated pulsed field magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2012-12-01

    Rapid heat generation is one of the biggest problems faced in carrying out pulsed field magnetization of (RE)BCO superconducting bulks compared to other methods of magnetization. The effects of various thermal conductivities in the ab-plane (kab) and along the c-axis (kc) of a bulk on its trapped field performance following pulsed field magnetization were modelled. The E-J power law was used, coupled with the heat generation, to simulate the effect of anisotropic thermal conductivity combinations on the peak trapped field and total trapped flux. A thermally isolated bulk is not affected so strongly by thermal conductivity, but on cooling the bulk conductively from its base using a cold head, increasing kc significantly enhances both the trapped field and the flux. Embedding highly thermally conducting copper structures in the bulk material was investigated as a practical way to locally increase kab and kc. The structures investigated increased the trapped field and flux by a maximum of around 30% without increasing the size of the bulk. Different structures can be used depending on whether an application requires the highest trapped field or highest total flux.

  4. Structural Barriers to Timely Initiation of Antiretroviral Treatment in Vietnam: Findings from Six Outpatient Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Dam Anh; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Ngo, Anh Duc; Rule, John; Wilson, David P.; Zhang, Lei; Doran, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    In Vietnam, premature mortality due to AIDS-related conditions is commonly associated with late initiation to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This study explores reasons for late ART initiation among people living with HIV (PLHIV) from the perspectives of health care providers and PLHIV. The study was undertaken in six clinics from five provinces in Vietnam. Baseline CD4 counts were collected from patient records and grouped into three categories: very late initiators (≤100 cells/mm3 CD4), late initiators (100–200 cells/mm3) and timely initiators (200–350 cells/mm3). Thirty in-depth interviews with patients who started ART and 15 focus group discussions with HIV service providers were conducted and thematic analysis of the content performed. Of 934 patients, 62% started ART very late and 11% initiated timely treatment. The proportion of patients for whom a CD4 count was obtained within six months of their HIV diagnosis ranged from 22% to 72%. The proportion of patients referred to ART clinics by voluntary testing and counselling centres ranged from 1% to 35%. Structural barriers to timely ART initiation were poor linkage between HIV testing and HIV care and treatment services, lack of patient confidentiality and a shortage of HIV/AIDS specialists. If Vietnam’s treatment practice is to align with WHO recommendations then the connection between voluntary counselling and testing service and ART clinics must be improved. Expansion and decentralization of HIV/AIDS services to allow implementation at the community level increased task sharing between doctors and nurses to overcome limited human resources, and improved patient confidentiality are likely to increase timely access to HIV treatment services for more patients. PMID:23240013

  5. Structural and electrochemical properties of W-Se-O layers prepared by pulsed laser pre-deposition and thermal posttreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, A. A.; Grigoriev, S. N.; Fominski, D. V.; Volosova, M. A.; Romanov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    Novel nanostructured thin-film coatings containing WSe2 and WO3 nanosheets were prepared through a simple and highly reproducible method. Pulsed laser pre-deposition of W- Se-O films on a microcrystalline graphite substrate by ablation of WSe2 target in a mixture of Ar and O2 gases was followed by thermal post-treatment. The influence of pre-deposition and post-treatment conditions on the structure, morphology and chemical composition of the W-Se- O films was studied. Thermal annealing at appropriate conditions of pre-deposited amorphous W-Se-O films resulted in the formation of crystalline structure consisted of nanocrystals of WSe2 and WO3 phases. Such structural modification significantly altered the electrochemical properties of the thin-film coatings with consequences, in particular, on their catalytic activity toward hydrogen evolution reaction in an acid solution.

  6. Mapping the Vibronic Structure of a Molecule by Few-Cycle Continuum Two-Dimensional Spectroscopy in a Single Pulse.

    PubMed

    Spokoyny, Boris; Harel, Elad

    2014-08-21

    Accurate mapping of the electronic and vibrational structure of a molecular system is a basic goal of chemistry as it underpins reactivity and function. Experimentally, the challenge is to uncover the intramolecular interactions and ensuing dynamics that define this structure. Multidimensional coherent spectroscopy can map such interactions analogous to the way in which nuclear magnetic resonance provides access to the nuclear spin structure. Here we present two-dimensional coherent spectra measured using few-cycle continuum light. Critically, our approach instantaneously maps the energy landscape of a complex molecular system in a single laser pulse across 350 nm of bandwidth, thereby making it suitable for rapid molecular fingerprinting. We envision few-cycle supercontinuum spectroscopy based on the nonlinear optical response as a powerful tool to examine molecules in the condensed phase at the extremes of time, space, and energy.

  7. High spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structure formation in germanium by mid-IR femtosecond pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Drake. R.; Kafka, Kyle R. P.; Lai, Yu Hang; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Kaikai; Li, Hui; Blaga, Cosmin I.; Yi, Allen Y.; DiMauro, Louis F.; Chowdhury, Enam A.

    2016-10-01

    Formation of high spatial frequency laser induced periodic surface structures (HSFL) in germanium by 90 fs mid-IR pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate with wavelengths between λ = 2 and 3.6 μm was studied with varying angle of incidence and polarization. The period of these structures varied from λ/3 to λ/8. A modified surface-scattering model including Drude excitation and the optical Kerr effect explains the spatial period scaling of HSFL across the mid-IR wavelengths. Transmission electron microscopy shows the presence of a 30 nm amorphous layer above the structure of crystalline germanium. Various mechanisms including two photon absorption and defect-induced amorphization are discussed as probable causes for the formation of this layer.

  8. Correlating Metastable-Atom Density, Reduced Electric Field, and Electron Energy Distribution in the Initiation, Transient, and Post-Transient Stages of a Pulsed Argon Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franek, James B.

    Argon emission lines, particularly those in the near-infrared region (700-900nm), are used to determine plasma properties in low-temperature, partially ionized plasmas to determine effective electron temperature [Boffard et al., 2012], and argon excited state density [Boffard et al., 2009] using appropriately assumed electron energy distributions. While the effect of radiation trapping influences the interpretation of plasma properties from emission-line ratio analysis, eliminating the need to account for these effects by directly observing the 3px-to-1sy transitions [ Boffard et al., 2012] is preferable in most cases as this simplifies the analysis. In this dissertation, a 1-Torr argon, pulsed positive column in a hollow-cathode discharge is used to study the correlation between four quantities: 420.1-419.8nm emission-line ratio, metastable-atom density, reduced electric field, and electron energy distribution. The extended coronal model is used to acquire an expression for 420.1-419.8nm emission-line ratio, which is sensitive to direct electron-impact excitation of argon excited states as well as stepwise electron-impact excitation of argon excited states for the purpose of inferring plasma quantities from experimental measurements. Initial inspection of the 420.1-419.8nm emission-line ratio suggests the pulse may be empirically divided into three distinct stages labelled the Initiation Stage, Transient Stage, and Post-Transient stage. Using equilibrium electron energy distributions from simulation to deduce excitation rates [Adams et al., 2012] in the extended coronal model affords agreement between predicted and observed metastable density in the Post-Transient stage of the discharge [Franek et al., 2015]. Applying this model-assisted diagnostic technique to the characterization of plasma systems utilizing lower-resolution spectroscopic systems is not straightforward, however, as the 419.8nm and 420.1nm emission-line profiles are convolved and become

  9. Activation and repression of transcription initiation by a distant DNA structural transition.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, S D; Opel, M L; Hatfield, G W

    2001-05-01

    Negative superhelical tension can drive local transitions to alternative DNA structures. Long regions of DNA may contain several sites that are susceptible to forming alternative structures. Their relative propensities to undergo transition are ordered according to the energies required for their formation. These energies have two components - the energy needed to drive the transition and the energy relieved by the partial relaxation of superhelicity that the transition provides. This coupling can cause a complex competition among the possible transitions, in which the formation of one energetically favourable alternative structure may inhibit the formation of another within the same domain. In principle, DNA structural competitions can affect the structural and energetic requirements for the initiation of transcription at distant promoter sites. We have tested this possibility by examining the effects of structural transitions on transcription initiation from promoter sites in the same superhelical domain. Specifically, we describe the effects of the presence of a Z-DNA-forming DNA sequence on the basal levels of expression of two supercoiling-sensitive promoters of Escherichia coli, ilvPG and gyrA. We demonstrate transcriptional repression of the ilvPG promoter and activation of the gyrA promoter. We present evidence that this regulation is effected by the superhelically induced B- to Z-DNA transition in a manner that is both orientation and distance independent. We discuss the mechanism of topological coupling between left-handed Z-DNA and the regulation of promoter activity. We also discuss the possibility that the coupling of DNA structural transitions and transcriptional activity might be used as a general regulatory mechanism for gene expression.

  10. Conformal load-bearing antenna structures (CLAS): initiative for multiple military and commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyer, Allen J.; Alt, Kevin H.; Kudva, Jayanth N.; Kinslow, Robert W.; Goetz, Allan C.

    1997-06-01

    The Structures Division of the Air Force's Wright Laboratory is sponsoring the development and demonstration of a new high pay-off technology termed CLAS--Conformal Load Bearing Antenna Structures. Northrop Grumman Corporation and TRW/ASD are developing the technology under the `Smart-Skin Structure Technology Demonstration (S3D)' program, contract, No. F33615-93-C-3200. The program goal is to design, develop, fabricate, and test a CLAS component and lay the foundation for future work where potential benefits from structurally integrated antennas may be realized. Key issues will focus but are not limited to the design, structures, and manufacturing aspects of antenna embedment into load bearing aircraft structures. Results from Phase 1 of the program have been previously reported, where initial pay-offs in reducing overall airframe acquisition and support cost, weight, signature, and drag were quantitatively and qualitatively identified. A full-sized CLAS component, featuring a broadband multi-arm spiral embedded in sandwich stiffened structure, will be fabricated and tested for static strength, durability, and damage tolerance. Basic electrical performance, (e.g., radiation patterns, gain, and impedance) will also be verified; however, extensive electrical validation will be the subject of further work. Key aspects of the work and progress to date are detailed below. Also covered are future projections of CLAS technology expansion beyond tactical aircraft into other military products highlighting ships, army vehicles, and `spin-off' commercial applications to civil aircraft and the automotive industry.

  11. DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and computational Biology/Bioinformatics

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Susan S.

    2008-02-21

    The overall goal of the DOE EPSCoR Initiative in Structural and Computational Biology was to enhance the competiveness of Vermont research in these scientific areas. To develop self-sustaining infrastructure, we increased the critical mass of faculty, developed shared resources that made junior researchers more competitive for federal research grants, implemented programs to train graduate and undergraduate students who participated in these research areas and provided seed money for research projects. During the time period funded by this DOE initiative: (1) four new faculty were recruited to the University of Vermont using DOE resources, three in Computational Biology and one in Structural Biology; (2) technical support was provided for the Computational and Structural Biology facilities; (3) twenty-two graduate students were directly funded by fellowships; (4) fifteen undergraduate students were supported during the summer; and (5) twenty-eight pilot projects were supported. Taken together these dollars resulted in a plethora of published papers, many in high profile journals in the fields and directly impacted competitive extramural funding based on structural or computational biology resulting in 49 million dollars awarded in grants (Appendix I), a 600% return on investment by DOE, the State and University.

  12. High-throughput characterization of intrinsic disorder in proteins from the Protein Structure Initiative.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derrick E; Xue, Bin; Sickmeier, Megan D; Meng, Jingwei; Cortese, Marc S; Oldfield, Christopher J; Le Gall, Tanguy; Dunker, A Keith; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2012-10-01

    The identification of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) among the targets that fail to form satisfactory crystal structures in the Protein Structure Initiative represents a key to reducing the costs and time for determining three-dimensional structures of proteins. To help in this endeavor, several Protein Structure Initiative Centers were asked to send samples of both crystallizable proteins and proteins that failed to crystallize. The abundance of intrinsic disorder in these proteins was evaluated via computational analysis using predictors of natural disordered regions (PONDR®) and the potential cleavage sites and corresponding fragments were determined. Then, the target proteins were analyzed for intrinsic disorder by their resistance to limited proteolysis. The rates of tryptic digestion of sample target proteins were compared to those of lysozyme/myoglobin, apomyoglobin, and α-casein as standards of ordered, partially disordered and completely disordered proteins, respectively. At the next stage, the protein samples were subjected to both far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism (CD) analysis. For most of the samples, a good agreement between CD data, predictions of disorder and the rates of limited tryptic digestion was established. Further experimentation is being performed on a smaller subset of these samples in order to obtain more detailed information on the ordered/disordered nature of the proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of hydrogen peroxide initiator concentration on the structure of eucalyptus lignosulfonate.

    PubMed

    Ye, De zhan; Zhang, Ming hua; Gan, Ling ling; Li, Qi ling; Zhang, Xi

    2013-09-01

    In order to improve lignin-based materials' utilization, the grafting mechanism of lignin was studied by investigating hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) initiator's effect on the structure of eucalyptus lignosulfonate calcium (HLS). HLS was treated by low content of H2O2 (H2O2/HLS(wt)=1%, 2%, 4%) under various reaction temperature and time. Changes in HLS structure were investigated by difference UV, UV, FTIR, (1)H NMR, GPC and intrinsic viscosity. The results showed that though phenolic hydroxyl group (Ph-OH) of HLS was not oxidated to the quinoid structure, its content still decreased after treated by H2O2 initiator. Meanwhile, the new aryl-alkyl ether structures and increased average molecular weight were observed. A radical coupling mechanism for the decreasing Ph-OH group's content was proposed, which radicals may terminate between phenoxy and benzyl radicals. In addition, the cleavage of methoxyl-aryl ether made a decline in the content of syringyl units, while that of guaiacyl, p-hydroxyphenyl units and free aromatic C-5 hydrogen increased when HLS reacted with H2O2.

  14. Micro structuring of transparent materials with NIR ns-laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, S.; Schwaller, P.; von Arx, U.; Bucher, G.; Neuenschwander, B.

    A current challenge in laser processing is high precision micromachining of transparent materials, e.g. to manufacture microoptical elements. This can be achieved amongst others by using laser induced backside wet etching. Research has been done by several groups in the last years. Most of the published results were obtained by using UV excimer lasers. Our approach deals with the implementation of the technique for NIR laser sources. We investigated the effects of different pulse widths and repetition rates on laser induced back side wet etching for 1064 nm wavelength and for different absorbers.

  15. A method for localized computation of Pulse Wave Velocity in carotid structure.

    PubMed

    Patil, Ravindra B; Krishnamoorthy, P; Sethuraman, Shriram

    2015-01-01

    Pulse Wave Velocity (PWV) promises to be a useful clinical marker for noninvasive diagnosis of atherosclerosis. This work demonstrates the ability to perform localized carotid PWV measurements from the distention waveform derived from the Radio Frequency (RF) ultrasound signal using a carotid phantom setup. The proposed system consists of low cost custom-built ultrasound probe and algorithms for envelope detection, arterial wall identification, echo tracking, distension waveform computation and PWV estimation. The method is proposed on a phantom data acquired using custom-built prototype non-imaging probe. The proposed approach is non-image based and can be seamlessly integrated into existing clinical ultrasound scanners.

  16. Pulsed laser deposition of silk protein: Effect of photosensitized-ablation on the secondary structure in thin deposited films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Goto, Masaharu; Itaya, Akira

    2001-06-01

    Silk fibroin is a simple protein expected to have functional applications in medicine and bioelectronics. The primary structure of this protein is quite simple, and the main secondary structures are β-sheet crystals and amorphous random coils. In the present study, we investigated pulsed laser deposition (PLD) of fibroin with the β-sheet structures as targets. The primary and secondary structures in films deposited were analyzed using infrared spectroscopy. Normal laser deposition at 351 nm using neat fibroin targets produced thin films of fibroin with a random coiled structure. Ablation was triggered by two-photonic excitation of the peptide chains, which resulted in the destruction of β-sheet structure in PLD. In order to avoid the two-photonic excitation, we adopted a PLD method utilizing anthracene (5-0.1 wt %) in a photosensitized reaction involving doped fibroin targets. Laser light (351 or 355 nm) was absorbed only by anthracene, which plays an important role converting photon energy to thermal energy with great ablation efficiency. Thin fibroin films deposited by this method had both random coil and β-sheet structures. As the dopant concentration and laser fluence decreased, the ratio of β-sheet domain to random coil increased in thin deposited films.

  17. Deep Structures and Initiation of Plate Tectonics in Thermochemical Mantle Convection Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, U.; Stein, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recently deep thermochemical structures have been studied intensively. The observed large anomalies with reduced seismic velocities (LLSVPs) beneath Africa and the Pacific are obtained in numerical models as an initial dense layer at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) is pushed up to piles by the convective flow (e.g., McNamara et al., EPSL 229, 1-9, 2010). Adding a dense CMB layer to a model featuring active plate tectonics, Trim et al. (EPSL 405, 1-14, 2014) find that surface mobility is strongly hindered by the dense material and can even vanish completely for a CMB layer that has a too high density or too large a volume.In a further study we employed a fully rheological model in which oceanic plates form self-consistently. We observe that an initial dense CMB layer strongly affects the formation of plates and therefore the onset time of plate tectonics. We present a systematic 2D parameter study exploring the time of plate initiation and discuss the resulting deep thermal and thermochemical structures in a self-consistent thermochemical mantle convection system.

  18. Structural Changes Enable Start Codon Recognition by the Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanweer; Llácer, Jose L.; Fernández, Israel S.; Munoz, Antonio; Martin-Marcos, Pilar; Savva, Christos G.; Lorsch, Jon R.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.; Ramakrishnan, V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary During eukaryotic translation initiation, initiator tRNA does not insert fully into the P decoding site on the 40S ribosomal subunit. This conformation (POUT) is compatible with scanning mRNA for the AUG start codon. Base pairing with AUG is thought to promote isomerization to a more stable conformation (PIN) that arrests scanning and promotes dissociation of eIF1 from the 40S subunit. Here, we present a cryoEM reconstruction of a yeast preinitiation complex at 4.0 Å resolution with initiator tRNA in the PIN state, prior to eIF1 release. The structure reveals stabilization of the codon-anticodon duplex by the N-terminal tail of eIF1A, changes in the structure of eIF1 likely instrumental in its subsequent release, and changes in the conformation of eIF2. The mRNA traverses the entire mRNA cleft and makes connections to the regulatory domain of eIF2α, eIF1A, and ribosomal elements that allow recognition of context nucleotides surrounding the AUG codon. PMID:25417110

  19. Substrate temperature effects on the structure and properties of ZnMnO films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riascos, H.; Duque, J. S.; Orozco, S.

    2017-01-01

    ZnMnO thin films were grown on silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Pulsed Nd:YAG laser was operated at a wavelength of 1064 nm and 100 mJ. ZnMnO thin films were deposited at the vacuum pressure of 10-5 Torr and with substrate temperature from room temperature to 600 °C. The effects of substrate temperature on the structural and Optical properties of ZnMnO thin films have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Uv-vis spectroscopy. From XRD data of the samples, it can be showed that temperature substrate does not change the orientation of ZnMnO thin films. All the films prepared have a hexagonal wurtzite structure, with a dominant (002) peak around 2θ=34.44° and grow mainly along the c-axis orientation. The substrate temperature improved the crystallinity of the deposited films. Uv-vis analysis showed that, the thin films exhibit high transmittance and low absorbance in the visible region. It was found that the energy band to 300 ° C is 3.2 eV, whereas for other temperatures the values were lower. Raman reveals the crystal quality of ZnMnO thin films.

  20. Structural changes in a macrozoobenthos assemblage after imidacloprid pulses in aquatic field-based microcosms.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Valentina; Mohr, Silvia; Berghahn, Rüdiger; Pettigrove, Vincent J

    2013-11-01

    A field-based microcosm experiment was performed to investigate the effects of repeated pulses of the neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid on a lentic benthos assemblage. This specific microcosm method was chosen because it allows for both testing of a wide range of organisms under natural conditions and as well as gaining insight into intraspecific and interspecific interactions. The macrozoobenthos that colonised the microcosms was exposed to three pulses each 1 week apart at nominal concentrations ranging from 0.6 to 40 μg/L. Imidacloprid underwent fast aqueous photolysis due to optimal sunlight conditions during the test phase (half-life = 28 ± 8 h [monitored for 21 days]). Nonetheless, decreased abundance and emergence of Ephemeroptera and decreased survival of chironomid species of the subfamilies Tanypodinae and Orthocladiinae were observed at time-weighted average concentrations of 2.3 μg/L. In contrast, the gastropod Radix sp. became dominant at high imidacloprid concentrations, probably due to decreased competition for food with sensitive species. The results of this study show that repeated short-term contamination of imidacloprid at low concentration levels may affect aquatic ecosystems even under optimal conditions for photodegradation. The microcosm approach, with its simple and field-relevant design, proved to be a useful tool for assessing the effects of imidacloprid contamination.

  1. Optimization of the electron beam properties from intense laser pulses interacting with structured gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, K. K.; Tsai, H.-E.; Barber, S. K.; Lehe, R.; Mao, H.-S.; Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2017-05-01

    Laser plasma acceleration has been intensely investigated for its ability to produce energetic, ultrashort electron bunches in a compact distance. A high intensity laser pulse propagating through a plasma expels the electrons from the optical axis via the ponderomotive force, leaving behind a column of ions and driving a density wake. The accelerating electric fields present in the wake can reach several orders of magnitude greater than those found in radio-frequency cavities, allowing for compact systems much smaller than those using conventional accelerators. This compact source can provide electrons for various applications including stages for a high energy collider or for production of x-ray pulses from coherent undulator radiation. However, these applications require tunable, stable and high-quality electron beams. We report on a study of controlled injection along a shock-induced density downramp of laser-plasma- accelerated electrons through precision tailoring of the density profile produced from a mm-scale gas jet. Using BELLA Center's TREX Ti:Sapphire laser, the effects of the plasma density profile and the tilt of the shock front on the beam spatial profile, steering, and energy were investigated experimentally. To explain these rela- tionships, we propose simple models which agree well with experimental results. Using this technique, electron beam quality was tailored, allowing for the production of high-quality electron beams with percent-level energy spreads over a range of energies.

  2. Ordered YBCO sub-micron array structures induced by pulsed femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Luo, C W; Lee, C C; Li, C H; Shih, H C; Chen, Y-J; Hsieh, C C; Su, C H; Tzeng, W Y; Wu, K H; Juang, J Y; Uen, T M; Chen, S P; Lin, J-Y; Kobayashi, T

    2008-12-08

    We report on the formation of organized sub-micron YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) dots induced by irradiating femtosecond laser pulses on YBCO films prepared by pulse laser deposition with fluence in the range of 0.21 approximately 0.53 J/cm(2). The morphology of the YBCO film surface depends strongly on the laser fluences irradiated. At lower laser fluence (approximately 0.21 J/cm(2)) the morphology was pattern of periodic ripples with sub-micrometer spacing. Slightly increasing the laser fluence to 0.26 J/cm(2) changes the pattern into organized sub-micron dots with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 800 nm and height of 150 nm. Further increase of the laser fluence to over 0.32 J/cm(2), however, appeared to result in massive melting and led to irregular morphology. The mechanism and the implications of the current findings will be discussed. Arrays of YBCO sub-micron dots with T(c) = 89.7 K were obtained.

  3. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOEpatents

    Greenly, John B.

    1997-01-01

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  4. Structural changes in corrosion-resistant steel 03Kh26N6T with initial anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmed Fuad, M. F.; Tsepin, M. A.; Lobach, A. A.; Smirnov, O. M.

    1991-09-01

    Resultant analytic curves (2) and (3) are an accurate mathematical model describing the anisotropy characteristics in steel 03Kh26N6T and their variation during superplastic deformation. In this case, the phenomenological laws governing structural changes are based on fully defined physical notions concerning the diffusion nature of the processes that take place in this case. Analysis of the structural changes in the steel with initial metallographic anisotropy indicates that in designing and calculating processes involving the superplastic deformation of hollow articles formed from sheet blanks, it is necessary to consider the different magnitude of the structural components in the characteristic directions and, accordingly, the different rate of structural changes. This may determine to a significant degree both the quality of the components produced (for example, variations in thickness) and variations in the optimal superplastic-deformation regime. The new quantitative data on steel anisotropy, which were obtained in this study, should be considered in developing mathematical models of the superplastic deformation process, which describe the shape variation of structurally sensitive materials with a high accuracy. It is obvious that to determine the range of optimal temperature-rate coditions of superplasticity, the relationships presented in the study make it possible to assess the activation energy of structural variations and, in turn, to ascertain not only the controlling mechanisms of superplastic deformation but also to solve the temperature problem of selecting the SPD regime.

  5. TiN films fabricated by reactive gas pulse sputtering: A hybrid design of multilayered and compositionally graded structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jijun; Zhang, Feifei; Wan, Qiang; Lu, Chenyang; Peng, Mingjing; Liao, Jiali; Yang, Yuanyou; Wang, Lumin; Liu, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Reactive gas pulse (RGP) sputtering approach was used to prepare TiN thin films through periodically changing the N2/Ar gas flow ratio. The obtained RGPsbnd TiN film possessed a hybrid architecture containing compositionally graded and multilayered structures, composed of hcp Ti-phase and fcc TiN-phase sublayers. Meanwhile, the RGP-TiN film exhibited a composition-oscillation along the film thickness direction, where the Ti-phase sublayer had a compositional gradient and the TiN-phase retained a constant stoichiometric ratio of Ti:N ≈ 1. The film modulation ratio λ (the thicknesses ratio of the Ti and TiN-phase sublayer) can be effectively tuned by controlling the undulation behavior of the N2 partial flow rate. Detailed analysis showed that this hybrid structure originated from a periodic transition of the film growth mode during the reactive sputtering process.

  6. Structural Evolution and Li Dynamics in Nanophase Li3PS4 by Solid-State and Pulsed Field Gradient NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Gobet, Mallory; Greenbaum, Steve; Sahu, Gayatri; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-01-01

    The ceramic lithium ion conductor -Li3PS4 has a disordered and nanoporous structure that leads to an enhancement in ionic conductivity by some three orders of magnitude compared to the crystalline phase. The phase is prepared by thermal treatment of an inorganic-organic complex based on Li3PS4 and THF. Multinuclear (1H, 6,7Li, 31P) solid state NMR spectroscopy is used to characterize the structural phase evolution of the starting material at various steps in the thermal treatment. The phase formed after high temperature treatment is recognized as spectroscopically distinct from the bulk -Li3PS4 compound. Also formed is an amorphous lithium thiophosphate phase that is metastable as verified by annealing over an extended period. Lithium ion self-diffusion coefficients are measurable by standard pulsed gradient NMR methods at 100oC and with values consistent with the high ionic conductivity previously reported for this material.

  7. Fiber Bragg grating sensors written by femtosecond laser pulses in micro-structured fiber for downhole pressure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.-Y.; Van Roosbroeck, J.; Bueno Martinez, A.; Geernaert, T.; Berghmans, F.; Caucheteur, C.; Van Hoe, B.; Lindner, E.; Vlekken, J.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that femtosecond laser pulse written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) fabricated in specialty highly birefringent micro-structured optical fiber (MSF) can be used for high pressure and high temperature monitoring in downhole applications. The design of the micro-structure allows encoding the pressure information into the spectral separation between the two Bragg peaks reflected by the obtained MS-FBG. We obtained a differential pressure sensitivity of 3.30 pm/bar over a pressure range from atmospheric up to 1400 bar and at temperatures between 40 °C and 290 °C. Owing to the negligible differential pressure-temperature cross-sensitivity of 6.06E-3 bar/°C, the proposed MSFBG sensor is an ideal candidate for pressure monitoring in the presence of high temperature transients.

  8. Fatigue crack initiation life prediction in high strength structural steel welded joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tricoteaux, A.; Fardoun, F.; Degallaix, S.; Sauvage, F.

    1995-02-01

    The local approach method is used to calculate the fatigue crack initiation/early crack growth lives (N(i)) in high strength structural steel weldments. Weld-toe geometries, welding residual stresses and HAZ (heat affected zone) cyclic mechanical properties are taken into account in the N(i) estimation procedure. Fatigue crack initiation lives are calculated from either a Basquin type or a Manson-Coffin type equation. The local (HAZ) stress and strain amplitudes and the local mean stress are determined from an analysis based on the Neuber rule and the Molski-Glinka energy approach. The accuracy of the different methods is evaluated and discussed. Finally the previous methods are used with HAZ cyclic mechanical properties estimated from hardness measurements.

  9. The Structure of a Transcribing T7 RNA Polymerase in Transition from Initiation to Elongation

    SciTech Connect

    Durniak, K.; Bailey, S; Steitz, T

    2008-01-01

    Structural studies of the T7 bacteriophage DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) have shown that the conformation of the amino-terminal domain changes substantially between the initiation and elongation phases of transcription, but how this transition is achieved remains unclear. We report crystal structures of T7 RNAP bound to promoter DNA containing either a 7- or an 8-nucleotide (nt) RNA transcript that illuminate intermediate states along the transition pathway. The amino-terminal domain comprises the C-helix subdomain and the promoter binding domain (PBD), which consists of two segments separated by subdomain H. The structures of the intermediate complex reveal that the PBD and the bound promoter rotate by 45 degrees upon synthesis of an 8-nt RNA transcript. This allows the promoter contacts to be maintained while the active site is expanded to accommodate a growing heteroduplex. The C-helix subdomain moves modestly toward its elongation conformation, whereas subdomain H remains in its initiation- rather than its elongation-phase location, more than 70 angstroms away.

  10. Brain Genomics Superstruct Project initial data release with structural, functional, and behavioral measures

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Avram J.; Hollinshead, Marisa O.; O’Keefe, Timothy M.; Petrov, Victor I.; Fariello, Gabriele R.; Wald, Lawrence L.; Fischl, Bruce; Rosen, Bruce R.; Mair, Ross W.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Brain Genomics Superstruct Project (GSP) is to enable large-scale exploration of the links between brain function, behavior, and ultimately genetic variation. To provide the broader scientific community data to probe these associations, a repository of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans linked to genetic information was constructed from a sample of healthy individuals. The initial release, detailed in the present manuscript, encompasses quality screened cross-sectional data from 1,570 participants ages 18 to 35 years who were scanned with MRI and completed demographic and health questionnaires. Personality and cognitive measures were obtained on a subset of participants. Each dataset contains a T1-weighted structural MRI scan and either one (n=1,570) or two (n=1,139) resting state functional MRI scans. Test-retest reliability datasets are included from 69 participants scanned within six months of their initial visit. For the majority of participants self-report behavioral and cognitive measures are included (n=926 and n=892 respectively). Analyses of data quality, structure, function, personality, and cognition are presented to demonstrate the dataset’s utility. PMID:26175908

  11. Field-Programmable Gate Array Computer in Structural Analysis: An Initial Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Brown, Samuel

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an initial assessment of using a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) computational device as a new tool for solving structural mechanics problems. A FPGA is an assemblage of binary gates arranged in logical blocks that are interconnected via software in a manner dependent on the algorithm being implemented and can be reprogrammed thousands of times per second. In effect, this creates a computer specialized for the problem that automatically exploits all the potential for parallel computing intrinsic in an algorithm. This inherent parallelism is the most important feature of the FPGA computational environment. It is therefore important that if a problem offers a choice of different solution algorithms, an algorithm of a higher degree of inherent parallelism should be selected. It is found that in structural analysis, an 'analog computer' style of programming, which solves problems by direct simulation of the terms in the governing differential equations, yields a more favorable solution algorithm than current solution methods. This style of programming is facilitated by a 'drag-and-drop' graphic programming language that is supplied with the particular type of FPGA computer reported in this paper. Simple examples in structural dynamics and statics illustrate the solution approach used. The FPGA system also allows linear scalability in computing capability. As the problem grows, the number of FPGA chips can be increased with no loss of computing efficiency due to data flow or algorithmic latency that occurs when a single problem is distributed among many conventional processors that operate in parallel. This initial assessment finds the FPGA hardware and software to be in their infancy in regard to the user conveniences; however, they have enormous potential for shrinking the elapsed time of structural analysis solutions if programmed with algorithms that exhibit inherent parallelism and linear scalability. This potential warrants further

  12. Pulse-biased etching of Si3N4-layer in capacitively-coupled plasmas for nano-scale patterning of multi-level resist structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyelim; Kim, Sechan; Choi, Gyuhyun; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2014-12-01

    Pulse-biased plasma etching of various dielectric layers is investigated for patterning nano-scale, multi-level resist (MLR) structures composed of multiple layers via dual-frequency, capacitively-coupled plasmas (CCPs). We compare the effects of pulse and continuous-wave (CW) biasing on the etch characteristics of a Si3N4 layer in CF4/CH2F2/O2/Aretch chemistries using a dual-frequency, superimposed CCP system. Pulse-biasing conditions using a low-frequency power source of 2 MHz were varied by controlling duty ratio, period time, power, and the gas flow ratio in the plasmas generated by the 27.12 MHz high-frequency power source. Application of pulse-biased plasma etching significantly affected the surface chemistry of the etched Si3N4 surfaces, and thus modified the etching characteristics of the Si3N4 layer. Pulse-biased etching was successfully applied to patterning of the nano-scale line and space pattern of Si3N4 in the MLR structure of KrF photoresist/bottom anti-reflected coating/SiO2/amorphous carbon layer/Si3N4. Pulse-biased etching is useful for tuning the patterning of nano-scale dielectric hard-mask layers in MLR structures.

  13. Damage Detection of Laminated CFRP Structures using Electric Pulse Wave Transmission

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-05

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT For laminated CFRP structures, it is quite difficult to detect internal damage such as delamination, matrix cracks, and...unclassified Abstract. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) laminates are applied to many aerospace structures. For these laminated CFRP ...Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer ( CFRP ) has been increasingly applied to the aerospace primary structures because of its high specific strength and

  14. Turbulent clustering of initially well-mixed buoyant particles on a free-surface by Lagrangian coherent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Kenneth R.; True, Aaron; Crimaldi, John P.

    2017-07-01

    Particles that float on the surface of a 3D incompressible turbulent flow are exposed to non-divergence-free properties that result in clustering and unmixing, a reversal of how turbulence normally acts to mix and dilute scalars. Particle clustering is dominated by Lagrangian processes that depend on the time history of the flow; this suggests that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) might serve as templates for cluster formation. In this study, non-divergence-free clustering is examined both experimentally and numerically to elucidate the role of LCS in the formation of particle clusters and voids. Experiments are performed on the free-surface of a water-filled tank with turbulence driven by the random pulsing of centrifugal pumps on the tank bottom. Clustering is quantified by imaging fluorescent, buoyant particles that are placed in an initially random distribution on the free-surface. Within clusters, concentrations are observed to increase by an order of magnitude, with the likelihood of observing enhanced concentrations increasing by two orders of magnitude. LCS, obtained from velocity fields utilizing particle image velocimetry, are shown to act as templates for cluster formation. In addition, LCS are shown to possess a dilatation component in non-divergence-free flows that is responsible for unmixing. Numerically, a non-divergence-free chaotic model consisting of interacting Taylor vortices is utilized to investigate processes responsible for cluster formation seen in the experiments. The model results support the experimental finding that LCS act as templates for particle clusters, with scalar unmixing driven by the dilatation component.

  15. Crystal Structure of pi Initiator Protein-iteron Complex of Plasmid R6K: Implications for Initiation of Plasmid DNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Swan,M.; Bastia, D.; Davies, C.

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of a monomeric biologically active form of the {pi} initiator protein of plasmid R6K as a complex with a single copy of its cognate DNA-binding site (iteron) at 3.1-{angstrom} resolution. The initiator belongs to the family of winged helix type of proteins. The structure reveals that the protein contacts the iteron DNA at two primary recognition helices, namely the C-terminal {alpha}4' and the N-terminal {alpha}4 helices, that recognize the 5' half and the 3' half of the 22-bp iteron, respectively. The base-amino acid contacts are all located in {alpha}4', whereas the {alpha}4 helix and its vicinity mainly contact the phosphate groups of the iteron. Mutational analyses show that the contacts of both recognition helices with DNA are necessary for iteron binding and replication initiation. Considerations of a large number of site-directed mutations reveal that two distinct regions, namely {alpha}2 and {alpha}5 and its vicinity, are required for DNA looping and initiator dimerization, respectively. Further analysis of mutant forms of {pi} revealed the possible domain that interacts with the DnaB helicase. Thus, the structure-function analysis presented illuminates aspects of initiation mechanism of R6K and its control.

  16. Initiation factor 2 crystal structure reveals a different domain organization from eukaryotic initiation factor 5B and mechanism among translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Eiler, Daniel; Lin, Jinzhong; Simonetti, Angelita; Klaholz, Bruno P; Steitz, Thomas A

    2013-09-24

    The initiation of protein synthesis uses initiation factor 2 (IF2) in prokaryotes and a related protein named eukaryotic initiation factor 5B (eIF5B) in eukaryotes. IF2 is a GTPase that positions the initiator tRNA on the 30S ribosomal initiation complex and stimulates its assembly to the 50S ribosomal subunit to make the 70S ribosome. The 3.1-Å resolution X-ray crystal structures of the full-length Thermus thermophilus apo IF2 and its complex with GDP presented here exhibit two different conformations (all of its domains except C2 domain are visible). Unlike all other translational GTPases, IF2 does not have an effecter domain that stably contacts the switch II region of the GTPase domain. The domain organization of IF2 is inconsistent with the "articulated lever" mechanism of communication between the GTPase and initiator tRNA binding domains that has been proposed for eIF5B. Previous cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions, NMR experiments, and this structure show that IF2 transitions from being flexible in solution to an extended conformation when interacting with ribosomal complexes.

  17. Neuronal substrates for initiation, maintenance, and structural organization of sleep/wake states

    PubMed Central

    Eban-Rothschild, Ada; de Lecea, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Animals continuously alternate between sleep and wake states throughout their life. The daily organization of sleep and wakefulness is orchestrated by circadian, homeostatic, and motivational processes. Over the last decades, much progress has been made toward determining the neuronal populations involved in sleep/wake regulation. Here, we will discuss how the application of advanced in vivo tools for cell type–specific manipulations now permits the functional interrogation of different features of sleep/wake state regulation: initiation, maintenance, and structural organization. We will specifically focus on recent studies examining the roles of wake-promoting neuronal populations. PMID:28357049

  18. In-situ structural integrity evaluation for high-power pulsed spallation neutron source - Effects of cavitation damage on structural vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Tao; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    A double-wall structure mercury target will be installed at the high-power pulsed spallation neutron source in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC). Cavitation damage on the inner wall is an important factor governing the lifetime of the target-vessel. To monitor the structural integrity of the target vessel, displacement velocity at a point on the outer surface of the target vessel is measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV). The measured signals can be used for evaluating the damage inside the target vessel because of cyclic loading and cavitation bubble collapse caused by pulsed-beam induced pressure waves. The wavelet differential analysis (WDA) was applied to reveal the effects of the damage on vibrational cycling. To reduce the effects of noise superimposed on the vibration signals on the WDA results, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), statistical methods were applied. Results from laboratory experiments, numerical simulation results with random noise added, and target vessel field data were analyzed by the WDA and the statistical methods. The analyses demonstrated that the established in-situ diagnostic technique can be used to effectively evaluate the structural response of the target vessel.

  19. Structure of isolated biomolecules obtained from ultrashort x-ray pulses: exploiting the symmetry of random orientations.

    PubMed

    Saldin, D K; Shneerson, V L; Fung, R; Ourmazd, A

    2009-04-01

    Amongst the promised capabilities of fourth-generation x-ray sources currently under construction is the ability to record diffraction patterns from individual biological molecules. One version of such an experiment would involve directing a stream of molecules into the x-ray beam and sequentially recording the scattering from each molecule of a short, but intense, pulse of radiation. The pulses are sufficiently short that the diffraction pattern is that due to scattering from identical molecules 'frozen' in random orientations. Each diffraction pattern may be thought of as a section through the 3D reciprocal space of the molecule, of unknown, random, orientation. At least two algorithms have been proposed for finding the relative orientations from just the measured diffraction data. The 'common-line' method, also employed in 3D electron microscopy, appears not best suited to the very low mean photon count per diffraction pattern pixel expected in such experiments. A manifold embedding technique has been used to reconstruct the 3D diffraction volume and hence the electron density of a small protein at the signal level expected of the scattering of an x-ray free electron laser pulse from a 500 kD biomolecule. In this paper, we propose an alternative algorithm which raises the possibility of reconstructing the 3D diffraction volume of a molecule without determining the relative orientations of the individual diffraction patterns. We discuss why such an algorithm may provide a practical and computationally convenient method of extracting information from very weak diffraction patterns. We suggest also how such a method may be adapted to the problem of finding the variations of a structure with time in a time-resolved pump-probe experiment.

  20. Crystal Initiation Structures in Developing Enamel: Possible Implications for Caries Dissolution of Enamel Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Colin; Connell, Simon D.

    2017-01-01

    Investigations of developing enamel crystals using Atomic and Chemical Force Microscopy (AFM, CFM) have revealed a subunit structure. Subunits were seen in height images as collinear swellings about 30 nM in diameter on crystal surfaces. In friction mode they were visible as positive regions. These were similar in size (30–50 nM) to collinear spherical structures, presumably mineral matrix complexes, seen in developing enamel using a freeze fracturing/freeze etching procedure. More detailed AFM studies on mature enamel suggested that the 30–50 nM structures were composed of smaller units, ~10–15 nM in diameter. These were clustered in hexagonal or perhaps a spiral arrangement. It was suggested that these could be the imprints of initiation sites for mineral precipitation. The investigation aimed at examining original freeze etched images at high resolution to see if the smaller subunits observed using AFM in mature enamel were also present in developing enamel i.e., before loss of the organic matrix. The method used was freeze etching. Briefly samples of developing rat enamel were rapidly frozen, fractured under vacuum, and ice sublimed from the fractured surface. The fractured surface was shadowed with platinum or gold and the metal replica subjected to high resolution TEM. For AFM studies high-resolution tapping mode imaging of human mature enamel sections was performed in air under ambient conditions at a point midway between the cusp and the cervical margin. Both AFM and freeze etch studies showed structures 30–50 nM in diameter. AFM indicated that these may be clusters of somewhat smaller structures ~10–15 nM maybe hexagonally or spirally arranged. High resolution freeze etching images of very early enamel showed ~30–50 nM spherical structures in a disordered arrangement. No smaller units at 10–15 nM were clearly seen. However, when linear arrangements of 30–50 nM units were visible the picture was more complex but also smaller units including

  1. Development, testing, and initial space qualification of 1.5-μm high-power (6W) pulse-position-modulated (PPM) fiber laser transmitter for deep-space laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shantanu; Engin, Doruk; Pachowicz, Dave; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Lander, Juan; Dang, Xung; Litvinovich, Slava; Chuang, Ti; Puffenberger, Kent; Kimpel, Frank; Utano, Rich; Wright, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    We report on the development, testing and initial space qualification of a 1.5-μm, high-power (6W), high wall-plug efficiency (~15%), pulse-position-modulated (PPM), polarization-maintaining (PM), fiber laser transmitter subsystem for deep-space laser communication links. Programmable high-order PPM modulation up to PPM-128 formats, with discrete pulse slots ranging from 0.5- to 8-nsec, satisfies variety of link requirements for deep space laser communication to Mars, asteroids, and other deep-space relay links, per NASA's space laser communication roadmap. We also present initial space qualification results from thermal-vacuum tests, vibration testing, radiation testing and overall reliability assessment.

  2. Development, testing, and initial space qualification of 1.5-μm, high-power (6 W), pulse-position-modulated fiber laser transmitter for deep-space laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shantanu; Engin, Doruk; Pachowicz, Dave; Fouron, Jean-Luc; Lander, Juan; Dang, Xung; Litvinovitch, Slava; Chuang, Ti; Puffenberger, Kent; Kimpel, Frank; Utano, Rich; Wright, Malcolm

    2016-11-01

    We report on the development, testing, and initial space qualification of a 1.5-μm, high-power (6 W), high wall-plug efficiency (˜15%), pulse-position-modulated (PPM), polarization-maintaining, fiber laser transmitter subsystem for deep-space laser communication links. Programmable high-order PPM modulation up to PPM-128 formats, with discrete pulse slots ranging from 0.5 to 8 ns, satisfies variety of link requirements for deep-space laser communication to Mars, asteroids, and other deep-space relay links, as per the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's space laser communication roadmap. We also present initial space qualification results from thermal-vacuum tests, vibration testing, radiation testing, and an overall reliability assessment.

  3. Polythiophene thin films by surface-initiated polymerization: Mechanistic and structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Youm, Sang Gil; Hwang, Euiyong; Chavez, Carlos A.; Li, Xin; Chatterjee, Sourav; Lusker, Kathie L.; Lu, Lu; Strzalka, Joseph; Ankner, John F.; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Garno, Jayne C.; Nesterov, Evgueni E.

    2016-06-15

    The ability to control nanoscale morphology and molecular organization in organic semiconducting polymer thin films is an important prerequisite for enhancing the efficiency of organic thin-film devices including organic light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. The current “top-down” paradigm for making such devices is based on utilizing solution-based processing (e.g., spin-casting) of soluble semiconducting polymers. This approach typically provides only modest control over nanoscale molecular organization and polymer chain alignment. A promising alternative to using solutions of presynthesized semiconducting polymers pursues instead a “bottom-up” approach to prepare surface-grafted semiconducting polymer thin films by surface-initiated polymerization of small-molecule monomers. Herein, we describe the development of an efficient method to prepare polythiophene thin films utilizing surface-initiated Kumada catalyst transfer polymerization. In this study, we provided evidence that the surface-initiated polymerization occurs by the highly robust controlled (quasi-“living”) chain-growth mechanism. Further optimization of this method enabled reliable preparation of polythiophene thin films with thickness up to 100 nm. Extensive structural studies of the resulting thin films using X-ray and neutron scattering methods as well as ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy revealed detailed information on molecular organization and the bulk morphology of the films, and enabled further optimization of the polymerization protocol. One of the remarkable findings was that surface-initiated polymerization delivers polymer thin films showing complex molecular organization, where polythiophene chains assemble into lateral crystalline domains of about 3.2 nm size, with individual polymer chains folded to form in-plane aligned and densely packed oligomeric segments (7-8 thiophene units per each segment) within each domain. Achieving such a complex mesoscale organization

  4. Polythiophene thin films by surface-initiated polymerization: Mechanistic and structural studies

    DOE PAGES

    Youm, Sang Gil; Hwang, Euiyong; Chavez, Carlos A.; ...

    2016-06-15

    The ability to control nanoscale morphology and molecular organization in organic semiconducting polymer thin films is an important prerequisite for enhancing the efficiency of organic thin-film devices including organic light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. The current “top-down” paradigm for making such devices is based on utilizing solution-based processing (e.g., spin-casting) of soluble semiconducting polymers. This approach typically provides only modest control over nanoscale molecular organization and polymer chain alignment. A promising alternative to using solutions of presynthesized semiconducting polymers pursues instead a “bottom-up” approach to prepare surface-grafted semiconducting polymer thin films by surface-initiated polymerization of small-molecule monomers. Herein, we describe themore » development of an efficient method to prepare polythiophene thin films utilizing surface-initiated Kumada catalyst transfer polymerization. In this study, we provided evidence that the surface-initiated polymerization occurs by the highly robust controlled (quasi-“living”) chain-growth mechanism. Further optimization of this method enabled reliable preparation of polythiophene thin films with thickness up to 100 nm. Extensive structural studies of the resulting thin films using X-ray and neutron scattering methods as well as ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy revealed detailed information on molecular organization and the bulk morphology of the films, and enabled further optimization of the polymerization protocol. One of the remarkable findings was that surface-initiated polymerization delivers polymer thin films showing complex molecular organization, where polythiophene chains assemble into lateral crystalline domains of about 3.2 nm size, with individual polymer chains folded to form in-plane aligned and densely packed oligomeric segments (7-8 thiophene units per each segment) within each domain. Achieving such a complex mesoscale

  5. Polythiophene thin films by surface-initiated polymerization: Mechanistic and structural studies

    SciTech Connect

    Youm, Sang Gil; Hwang, Euiyong; Chavez, Carlos A.; Li, Xin; Chatterjee, Sourav; Lusker, Kathie L.; Lu, Lu; Strzalka, Joseph; Ankner, John F.; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Garno, Jayne C.; Nesterov, Evgueni E.

    2016-06-15

    The ability to control nanoscale morphology and molecular organization in organic semiconducting polymer thin films is an important prerequisite for enhancing the efficiency of organic thin-film devices including organic light-emitting and photovoltaic devices. The current “top-down” paradigm for making such devices is based on utilizing solution-based processing (e.g., spin-casting) of soluble semiconducting polymers. This approach typically provides only modest control over nanoscale molecular organization and polymer chain alignment. A promising alternative to using solutions of presynthesized semiconducting polymers pursues instead a “bottom-up” approach to prepare surface-grafted semiconducting polymer thin films by surface-initiated polymerization of small-molecule monomers. Herein, we describe the development of an efficient method to prepare polythiophene thin films utilizing surface-initiated Kumada catalyst transfer polymerization. In this study, we provided evidence that the surface-initiated polymerization occurs by the highly robust controlled (quasi-“living”) chain-growth mechanism. Further optimization of this method enabled reliable preparation of polythiophene thin films with thickness up to 100 nm. Extensive structural studies of the resulting thin films using X-ray and neutron scattering methods as well as ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy revealed detailed information on molecular organization and the bulk morphology of the films, and enabled further optimization of the polymerization protocol. One of the remarkable findings was that surface-initiated polymerization delivers polymer thin films showing complex molecular organization, where polythiophene chains assemble into lateral crystalline domains of about 3.2 nm size, with individual polymer chains folded to form in-plane aligned and densely packed oligomeric segments (7-8 thiophene units per each segment) within each domain. Achieving such a complex mesoscale organization

  6. Chirped-Pulse Fourier Transform Microwave Spectroscopy Coupled with a Flash Pyrolysis Microreactor: Structural Determination of the Reactive Intermediate Cyclopentadienone.

    PubMed

    Kidwell, Nathanael M; Vaquero-Vara, Vanesa; Ormond, Thomas K; Buckingham, Grant T; Zhang, Di; Mehta-Hurt, Deepali N; McCaslin, Laura; Nimlos, Mark R; Daily, John W; Dian, Brian C; Stanton, John F; Ellison, G Barney; Zwier, Timothy S

    2014-07-03

    Chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW) is combined with a flash pyrolysis (hyperthermal) microreactor as a novel method to investigate the molecular structure of cyclopentadienone (C5H4═O), a key reactive intermediate in biomass decomposition and aromatic oxidation. Samples of C5H4═O were generated cleanly from the pyrolysis of o-phenylene sulfite and cooled in a supersonic expansion. The (13)C isotopic species were observed in natural abundance in both C5H4═O and in C5D4═O samples, allowing precise measurement of the heavy atom positions in C5H4═O. The eight isotopomers include: C5H4═O, C5D4═O, and the singly (13)C isotopomers with (13)C substitution at the C1, C2, and C3 positions. Microwave spectra were interpreted by CCSD(T) ab initio electronic structure calculations and an re molecular structure for C5H4═O was found. Comparisons of the structure of this "anti-aromatic" molecule are made with those of comparable organic molecules, and it is concluded that the disfavoring of the "anti-aromatic" zwitterionic resonance structure is consistent with a more pronounced C═C/C-C bond alternation.

  7. Good initialization model with constrained body structure for scene text recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Anna; Wang, Guoyou; Dong, Yangbo

    2016-09-01

    Scene text recognition has gained significant attention in the computer vision community. Character detection and recognition are the promise of text recognition and affect the overall performance to a large extent. We proposed a good initialization model for scene character recognition from cropped text regions. We use constrained character's body structures with deformable part-based models to detect and recognize characters in various backgrounds. The character's body structures are achieved by an unsupervised discriminative clustering approach followed by a statistical model and a self-build minimum spanning tree model. Our method utilizes part appearance and location information, and combines character detection and recognition in cropped text region together. The evaluation results on the benchmark datasets demonstrate that our proposed scheme outperforms the state-of-the-art methods both on scene character recognition and word recognition aspects.

  8. Dynamic analysis of offshore structures with non-zero initial conditions in the frequency domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Lu, Hongchao; Li, Huajun

    2016-03-01

    The state of non-zero conditions is typically treated as fact when considering the dynamic analysis of offshore structures. This article extends a newly proposed method [1] to manage the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures in the frequency domain, including new studies on original environmental loads reconstruction, response comparisons with the commercial software ANSYS, and a demonstration using an experimental cantilever beam. The original environmental loads, such as waves, currents, and winds, that act on a structure are decomposed into multiple complex exponential components are represented by a series of poles and corresponding residues. Counter to the traditional frequency-domain method, the non-zero initial conditions of offshore structures could be solved in the frequency domain. Compared with reference [1], an improvement reported in this article is that practical issues, including the choice of model order and central-processing-unit (CPU) time consumption, are further studied when applying this new method to offshore structures. To investigate the feasibility of the representation of initial environmental loads by their poles and corresponding residues, a measured random wave force collected from a column experiment at the Lab of Ocean University of China is used, decomposed, reconstructed and then compared with the original wave force; then, a numerical offshore platform is used to study the performance of the proposed method in detail. The numerical results of this study indicate that (1) a short duration of environmental loads are required to obtain their constitutive poles and residues, which implies good computational efficiency; and (2) the proposed method has a similar computational efficiency to traditional methods due to the use of the inverse Fourier transform technique. To better understand the performance, of time consumption and accuracy of the proposed method, the commercial software ANSYS is used to determine responses

  9. Core Mediator structure at 3.4 Å extends model of transcription initiation complex.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Kayo; Schneider, Thomas R; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-05-11

    Mediator is a multiprotein co-activator that binds the transcription pre-initiation complex (PIC) and regulates RNA polymerase (Pol) II. The Mediator head and middle modules form the essential core Mediator (cMed), whereas the tail and kinase modules play regulatory roles. The architecture of Mediator and its position on the PIC are known, but atomic details are limited to Mediator subcomplexes. Here we report the crystal structure of the 15-subunit cMed from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at 3.4 Å resolution. The structure shows an unaltered head module, and reveals the intricate middle module, which we show is globally required for transcription. Sites of known Mediator mutations cluster at the interface between the head and middle modules, and in terminal regions of the head subunits Med6 (ref. 16) and Med17 (ref. 17) that tether the middle module. The structure led to a model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cMed that could be combined with the 3.6 Å cryo-electron microscopy structure of the core PIC (cPIC). The resulting atomic model of the cPIC-cMed complex informs on interactions of the submodules forming the middle module, called beam, knob, plank, connector, and hook. The hook is flexibly linked to Mediator by a conserved hinge and contacts the transcription initiation factor IIH (TFIIH) kinase that phosphorylates the carboxy (C)-terminal domain (CTD) of Pol II and was recently positioned on the PIC. The hook also contains residues that crosslink to the CTD and reside in a previously described cradle. These results provide a framework for understanding Mediator function, including its role in stimulating CTD phosphorylation by TFIIH.

  10. Internal translation initiation from HIV-1 transcripts is conferred by a common RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Cencic, Regina; Pelletier, Jerry; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA transcripts produces mRNAs encoding nine different viral proteins. The leader of each contains a common non-coding exon at the 5' end. Previous studies showed that the leaders from the common exon-containing transcripts gag, nef, vif, vpr and vpu can direct protein synthesis through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) with varying efficiencies. Here we explored whether the common exon acts as an IRES element in the context of all the 5' leaders or if each harbors a distinct IRES. We also explored the relationship between the IRESs and initiation codon selection. We find that the common exon adopts a similar conformation in every leader we explored and that the sequence and structure is required for IRES activity. We also find that each leader uses a scanning mechanism for start codon identification. Together, our data point to a model in which the common exon on HIV-1 transcripts acts as the ribosome landing pad, recruiting preinitiation complexes upstream of the initiation codon, followed by scanning to each transcript's initiator AUG. PMID:26779399

  11. Initial gut microbiota structure affects sensitivity to DSS-induced colitis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wu, Yanqiu; Hu, Yingxin; Zhao, Liping; Zhang, Chenhong

    2017-08-15

    The dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model is a widely applied mouse model, but controversial results have been obtained from experiments using the same mouse strain under the same conditions. Because the gut microbiota play an important role in DSS-induced colitis, it is essential to evaluate the influence of the initial gut microbiota in this model. Here, we identified significant variations in the initial gut microbiota of different batches of mice and found that the initial intestinal microbiota had a profound influence on DSS-induced colitis. We performed three independent trials using the same C57BL/6J mouse model with DSS treatment and used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to analyze the gut microbiota. We found that the structure and composition of the gut microbiota in mice with severe colitis, as compared with mice with milder colon damage, had unique features, such as an increase in Akkermansia bacteria and a decrease in Barnesiella spp. Moreover, these varied gut bacteria in the different trials also showed different responses to DSS treatment. Our work suggests that, in studies using mouse models, the gut microbiota must be considered when examining mechanisms of diseases, to ensure that comparable results are obtained.

  12. Internal translation initiation from HIV-1 transcripts is conferred by a common RNA structure.

    PubMed

    Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Whitehurst, James T; Cencic, Regina; Pelletier, Jerry; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) RNA transcripts produces mRNAs encoding nine different viral proteins. The leader of each contains a common non-coding exon at the 5' end. Previous studies showed that the leaders from the common exon-containing transcripts gag, nef, vif, vpr and vpu can direct protein synthesis through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) with varying efficiencies. Here we explored whether the common exon acts as an IRES element in the context of all the 5' leaders or if each harbors a distinct IRES. We also explored the relationship between the IRESs and initiation codon selection. We find that the common exon adopts a similar conformation in every leader we explored and that the sequence and structure is required for IRES activity. We also find that each leader uses a scanning mechanism for start codon identification. Together, our data point to a model in which the common exon on HIV-1 transcripts acts as the ribosome landing pad, recruiting preinitiation complexes upstream of the initiation codon, followed by scanning to each transcript's initiator AUG.

  13. Structural basis for the transition from initiation to elongation transcription in T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y Whitney; Steitz, Thomas A

    2002-11-15

    To make messenger RNA transcripts, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase (T7 RNAP) undergoes a transition from an initiation phase, which only makes short RNA fragments, to a stable elongation phase. We have determined at 2.1 angstrom resolution the crystal structure of a T7 RNAP elongation complex with 30 base pairs of duplex DNA containing a "transcription bubble" interacting with a 17-nucleotide RNA transcript. The transition from an initiation to an elongation complex is accompanied by a major refolding of the amino-terminal 300 residues. This results in loss of the promoter binding site, facilitating promoter clearance, and creates a tunnel that surrounds the RNA transcript after it peels off a seven-base pair heteroduplex. Formation of the exit tunnel explains the enhanced processivity of the elongation complex. Downstream duplex DNA binds to the fingers domain, and its orientation relative to upstream DNA in the initiation complex implies an unwinding that could facilitate formation of the open promoter complex.

  14. Understanding atom transfer radical polymerization: effect of ligand and initiator structures on the equilibrium constants.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Kwak, Yungwan; Braunecker, Wade; Tsarevsky, Nicolay V; Coote, Michelle L; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2008-08-13

    Equilibrium constants in Cu-based atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) were determined for a wide range of ligands and initiators in acetonitrile at 22 degrees C. The ATRP equilibrium constants obtained vary over 7 orders of magnitude and strongly depend on the ligand and initiator structures. The activities of the Cu(I)/ligand complexes are highest for tetradentate ligands, lower for tridentate ligands, and lowest for bidentate ligands. Complexes with tripodal and bridged ligands (Me6TREN and bridged cyclam) tend to be more active than those with the corresponding linear ligands. The equilibrium constants are largest for tertiary alkyl halides and smallest for primary alkyl halides. The activities of alkyl bromides are several times larger than those of the analogous alkyl chlorides. The equilibrium constants are largest for the nitrile derivatives, followed by those for the benzyl derivatives and the corresponding esters. Other equilibrium constants that are not readily measurable were extrapolated from the values for the reference ligands and initiators. Excellent correlations of the equilibrium constants with the Cu(II/I) redox potentials and the carbon-halogen bond dissociation energies were observed.

  15. Initiation and growth of gypsum piercement structures in the Zechstein Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams-Stroud, S. C.; Paul, J.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of tectonic processes in initiating halite diapirs has become much better understood in recent years. Less well understood is the development of diapiric structures involving rocks composed predominantly of gypsum. Below about 1000 m, gypsum dehydrates to anhydrite, which often obscures primary sedimentary textures. If the strain associated with diapiric rise in the rock induces the transition to anhydrite, obliteration of primary features in the gypsum can be expected. In our study, we infer that the diapiric movement in the Werra Anhydrite member of cycle 1 of the Zechstein Formation of Europe occurred before the initial transition of gypsum to anhydrite based on the presence of pseudomorphs of bedded primary gypsum crystals, the overburden lithologies and depositional environment, and the mechanical properties of gypsum, anhydrite and carbonate rocks. Faulting and differential loading of a shallow overburden were the key components in initiating the gypsum diapirism. The transition to anhydrite occurred after burial and after cessation of diapirism. In comparison, the diapirism of calcium sulfate of the Leine Anhydrite into the Leine Halite members of cycle 3 of the Zechstein Formation probably occurred much later after burial and appears to have been triggered by halite diapirism, which in turn triggered the dehydration reaction, causing the calcium sulfate to become the incompetent phase relative to the halite. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  16. In situ probing of pulsed laser melting and laser-induced periodic surface structures formation by dynamic reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Semmar, N.

    2017-09-01

    The melting process and nanostructure formation induced by nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses on bulk silicon and copper thin film were studied by ex situ analysis and in situ real time reflectivity. Three different probing wavelengths (633, 473 and 326 nm) were used during the pump laser processing and were correlated to the beam parameters (pulse duration, laser fluence and number of laser shots) and copper thin film thickness. On a silicon surface using a KrF laser beam (27 ns, 1 Hz, 248 nm), the melting threshold was determined close to 700 mJ cm‑2 and the melting duration increased from 10 to 130 ns as the fluence increased from 700 to 1750 mJ cm‑2. Nanostructures with a spatial period close to the laser wavelength were formed on both copper thin film and silicon substrate after nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (10 ns, 266 nm, 1 Hz) irradiation. In the picosecond regime, using an Nd:YAG laser (40 ps, 266 nm, 1 Hz), different nanostructures, from spikes to laser-induced periodic surface structures, were formed on 500 nm copper thin film and were analyzed with respect to the drop in dynamic reflectivity changes versus the number of laser shots.

  17. Control of Flow Structure on Non-Slender Delta Wing: Bio-inspired Edge Modifications, Passive Bleeding, and Pulsed Blowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Mehmet Metin; Celik, Alper; Cetin, Cenk

    2016-11-01

    In the present study, different flow control approaches including bio-inspired edge modifications, passive bleeding, and pulsed blowing are introduced and applied for the flow over non-slender delta wing. Experiments are conducted in a low speed wind tunnel for a 45 degree swept delta wing using qualitative and quantitative measurement techniques including laser illuminated smoke visualization, particle image velocimety (PIV), and surface pressure measurements. For the bio-inspired edge modifications, the edges of the wing are modified to dolphin fluke geometry. In addition, the concept of flexion ratio, a ratio depending on the flexible length of animal propulsors such as wings, is introduced. For passive bleeding, directing the free stream air from the pressure side of the planform to the suction side of the wing is applied. For pulsed blowing, periodic air injection through the leading edge of the wing is performed in a square waveform with 25% duty cycle at different excitation frequencies and compared with the steady and no blowing cases. The results indicate that each control approach is quite effective in terms of altering the overall flow structure on the planform. However, the success level, considering the elimination of stall or delaying the vortex breakdown, depends on the parameters in each method.

  18. Inverted initial conditions: Exploring the growth of cosmic structure and voids

    DOE PAGES

    Pontzen, Andrew; Roth, Nina; Peiris, Hiranya V.; ...

    2016-05-18

    We introduce and explore “paired” cosmological simulations. A pair consists of an A and B simulation with initial conditions related by the inversion δA(x,tinitial) = –δB(x,tinitial) (underdensities substituted for overdensities and vice versa). We argue that the technique is valuable for improving our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The A and B fields are by definition equally likely draws from ΛCDM initial conditions, and in the linear regime evolve identically up to the overall sign. As nonlinear evolution takes hold, a region that collapses to form a halo in simulation A will tend to expand to create a void inmore » simulation B. Applications include (i) contrasting the growth of A-halos and B-voids to test excursion-set theories of structure formation, (ii) cross-correlating the density field of the A and B universes as a novel test for perturbation theory, and (iii) canceling error terms by averaging power spectra between the two boxes. Furthermore, generalizations of the method to more elaborate field transformations are suggested.« less

  19. Initial dislocation structure and dynamic dislocation multiplication in Mo single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L M; Lassila, D H

    2000-03-22

    Initial dislocation structure in annealed high-purity Mo single crystals and deformation substructure in a crystal subjected to 1% compression have been examined and studied in order to investigate dislocation multiplication mechanisms in the early stages of plastic deformation. The initial dislocation density is in a range of 10{sup 6} {approx} 10{sup 7} cm{sup -2}, and the dislocation structure is found to contain many grown-in superjogs along dislocation lines. The dislocation density increases to a range of 10{sup 8} {approx} 10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}, and the average jog height is also found to increase after compressing for a total strain of 1%. It is proposed that the preexisting jogged screw dislocations can act as (multiple) dislocation multiplication sources when deformed under quasi-static conditions. Both the jog height and length of link segment (between jogs) can increase by stress-induced jog coalescence, which takes place via the lateral migration (drift) of superjogs driven by unbalanced line-tension partials acting on link segments of unequal lengths. Applied shear stress begins to push each link segment to precede dislocation multiplication when link length and jog height are greater than critical lengths. This dynamic dislocation multiplication source is subsequently verified by direct simulations of dislocation dynamics under stress to be crucial in the early stages of plastic deformation in Mo single crystals.

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p{sub o} final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA.