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Sample records for pump inhibitor tinidazole

  1. Proton pump inhibitors

    MedlinePlus

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are medicines that work by reducing the amount of stomach acid made by ... Proton pump inhibitors are used to: Relieve symptoms of acid reflux, or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This ...

  2. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors.

  3. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are the one of the most widely used drugs in the world. Hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism has been reported with different proton pump inhibitors with prolonged oral use. We report the first reported case of possible such effect with intravenous preparation of proton pump inhibitor. This case report raises awareness among physicians worldwide of this often unknown association, as life-threatening cardiac and neuromuscular complications can arise with unrecognized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia with proton pump inhibitors. PMID:26069375

  4. Pharmacology of Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jai Moo; Sachs, George

    2010-01-01

    The gastric H,K-ATPase is the primary target for the treatment of acid-related diseases. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are weak bases composed of two moieties, a substituted pyridine with a primary pKa of about 4.0, which allows selective accumulation in the secretory canaliculus of the parietal cell, and a benzimidazole with a second pKa of about 1.0. PPIs are acid-activated prodrugs that convert to sulfenic acids or sulfenamides that react covalently with one or more cysteines accessible from the luminal surface of the ATPase. Because of covalent binding, their inhibitory effects last much longer than their plasma half-life. However, the short half-life of the drug in the blood and the requirement for acid activation impair their efficacy in acid suppression, particularly at night. PPIs with longer half-life promise to improve acid suppression. All PPIs give excellent healing of peptic ulcers and produce good results in reflux esophagitis. PPIs combined with antibiotics eradicate Helicobacter pylori. PMID:19006606

  5. [Safety of the proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Oscanoa Espinoza, Teodoro Julio

    2011-01-01

    Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI) are consumed by millions of people around the world, either by prescription or self-medication, some medications of this group are Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines. PPIs have been associated with hypergastrinemia, rebound acid hypersecretion, malabsorption, osteoporosis and infections. This is an updated review of clinical pharmacology aspects of IPBS, with emphasis on safety aspects.

  6. [Prescription for proton pump inhibitors in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Schonheit, Claire; Le Petitcorps, Hélène; Pautas, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are widely prescribed, notably for the over 65s, despite there being significant side effects in the geriatric population. It is therefore important that doctors, caregivers and patients are fully aware of the recognised indications of PPIs and on the less well-known problems inherent to their prescription. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. [Safety of proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Esplugues, Juan V; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel; Ponce, Julio

    2006-11-25

    The significant inhibitory capacity of gastric acid secretion of PPIs makes them the drugs of choice for treating acid-related diseases. The considerable prevalence of these diseases and the need for maintaining the administration of the drug during considerably long periods results in this therapeutic group being one of the most widely used. However, in spite of their extensive use, there continue to emerge concerns about their potential toxicity; concerns surrounding the specificity of their mechanism of action and a consequential suspicion that something so potent must involve harmful effects. PPIs act selectively on the final stage of the process of gastric acid secretion, namely the H+/K+-ATPase or proton pump. This enzyme represents an essential step in the process of secretion of H+, and PPIs exert a very specific action on the parietal cell, as they need an environment with very low pH levels, which only exist in this cell. In the present article, the adverse effects of PPIs are reviewed, with special emphasis on those related to their continued administration and on the special circumstances of patients, as in the case of the elderly, those with liver failure, pregnant and breastfeeding mothers and children. All the PPIs on the market share a common chemical basis and there are no great differences in their potential adverse effects, the possibility of them promoting opportunist infections or their capacity to generate pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs, which, if occur, are generally insignificant. After two decades of use, PPIs have proved to be very effective and safe drugs.

  8. The Value of Branded Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peura, David A.; Berardi, Rosemary R.; Gonzalez, Javier; Brunetti, Louis

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues to rise, placing an increasing burden on our health care system. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective and widely used therapy for GERD. Many PPIs are now available in generic and over-the-counter forms, and managed care formularies often choose these as their preferred drug for GERD treatment. However, newer-generation branded PPIs, as a result of differences in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, may offer clinical advantages over generic PPIs. This article discusses these differences and the advantages they offer and suggests possible ways to incorporate the newer PPIs into formularies. PMID:21931475

  9. Hypomagnesemia associated with a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Jun; Tsuji, Kunihiro; Doyama, Hisashi; Kim, Fae; Takeda, Yasuhito; Kito, Yosuke; Ito, Renma; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Hayashi, Tomoyuki; Waseda, Yohei; Tsuji, Shigetsugu; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Okada, Toshihide; Kanaya, Honin

    2012-01-01

    Severe hypomagnesemia is a serious clinical condition. Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) induced hypomagnesemia has been recognized since 2006. In March 2011 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration advised that long-term use of PPI can induce hypomagnesemia. We report the first Japanese case of hypomagnesemia associated with chronic use of PPIs in a 64-year-old man hospitalized for nausea, bilateral ankle arthritis, and tremor of the extremities who had convulsions 3 days after admission. Blood analysis showed severe hypomagnesemia. He had been taking rabeprazole (10 mg/day) for 5 years. After stopping rabeprazole and correcting the electrolytes imbalances, his symptoms improved without recurrence.

  10. Proton pump inhibitors: predisposers to Alzheimer disease?

    PubMed

    Fallahzadeh, M K; Borhani Haghighi, A; Namazi, M R

    2010-04-01

    The abnormal processing of amyloid-beta peptide (A beta) and resultant formation of fibrillar A beta (fA beta) are major events in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Microglia as the phagocytic cells of the brain can engulf and digest fA beta within their acidic lysosomes. The lysosomes of AD patients are less acidic and therefore less capable of clearance of fA beta. Vacuolar proton pumps (V-ATPases) which are found abundantly in microglia and macrophages, acidify lysosomes by pumping protons into these structures. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can inhibit V-ATPases of the lysosomes. These drugs are shown to penetrate the blood-brain barrier in animals. PPIs are consumed for long periods in conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, with the resultant exposure of the human brain to the substantial amounts of PPIs. We hypothesize that by blocking the V-ATPases on microglial lysosomes, PPIs may basify lysosomes and hamper degradation of fA beta. Chronic consumption of PPIs may thus be a risk factor for AD.

  11. A rapid Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic method for analysis of certain proton pump inhibitors in binary and ternary mixtures.

    PubMed

    Khashaba, Pakinaz Y; Ali, Hassan Refat H; El-Wekil, Mohamed M

    2017-09-05

    A simple and non-destructive FTIR method was used to determine certain proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in binary and ternary mixtures. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs); omeprazole (OMZ), esomeprazole (EZM), lansoprazole (LAN), pantoprazole sodium (PAN sodium) and rabeprazole sodium (RAB sodium) in binary mixture with domperidone (DOM) and ternary mixture of OMZ, clarithromycin (CLM) and tinidazole (TNZ) were determined in the solid-state by FTIR spectroscopy for the first time. The method was validated according to ICH-guidelines where linearity was ranged from 20 to 850μg/g and 20-360μg/g for PPIs and DOM, respectively in binary mixtures and 10-400, 100-8000 and 150-14,000μg/g for OMZ, CLM and TNZ, respectively. Limits of detection were found to be 6-100 and 9-100μg/g for PPIs and DOM, respectively and 4, 40 and 50μg/g for OMZ, CLM and TNZ, respectively. The method was applied successfully for determination of the cited drugs in their respective pharmaceutical dosage forms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Dynamic release of tinidazole from the degradable PLLA-tinidazole blend gel].

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Xiao, Li-Ying; Li, Wei; Ding, Yi; Zhang, Ping; Yuan, Ming-Long

    2005-06-01

    To determine the dynamic release of tinidazole from the degradable poly-lactic acid (PLLA)-tinidazole blend gel (a periodontal local drug delivery) by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in vitro and to observe the polylactic acid (as a vector of tinidazole) how to affect the release of tinidazole. HPLC analysis was conducted. The operating conditions were C18-ODS-A column, water-methanol-acetic acid as mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.5 ml/min and a detection wavelength at 310 nm and a column temperature at 30 degrees C. The retention time of tinidazole was about 12 min. There was good linear relationship between the concentrations of tinidazole in blend gel and their peak areas in the ranges of 5 - 500 mg/L. The regression reaction was y = 0.836 + 8.452 2 x 10(-5) x (r = 0.998 6). RSD was 0.2%. Polylactic acid had no influence on the determination of tinidazole. The daily average release of tinidazole was 5.60%. The cumulative release of tinidazole was about 78.40% in 14 days. The in vitro drug release analysis is an useful method in evaluating the performance of local drug delivery system. HPLC analysis is a simple and accurate method with good reproducibility.

  13. Adverse Risks Associated With Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most commonly utilized agents for treatment of symptomatic disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, accounting for a significant proportion of sales of both over-the-counter and prescription formulations. A systematic review of the literature was conducted via MEDLINE to evaluate the most rigorous studies linking the potential risk of PPI therapy with adverse events. Emerging data illustrate the potential risks associated with both short-and long-term PPI therapy, including Clostridium difficile–associated diarrhea, community-acquired pneumonia, osteoporotic fracture, vitamin B12 deficiency, and inhibition of antiplatelet therapy. Due to these associations, it is recommended that clinicians assess the continuing need for PPI therapy and use the lowest possible dose to achieve the desired therapeutic goals.

  14. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Scott J; Howden, Colin W

    2017-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with a variety of adverse events, although the level of evidence for many of these is weak at best. Recently, one national regulatory authority has mandated a change to the labeling of one PPI based on reports of possible associated rhabdomyolysis. Thus, in this review we summarize the available evidence linking PPI use with rhabdomyolysis. The level of evidence is insufficient to establish a causal relationship and is largely based on sporadic case reports. In general, patients with suspected PPI-associated rhabdomyolysis have not been re-challenged with a PPI after recovery. The mechanism whereby PPIs might have been associated with rhabdomyolysis is unclear but possibly related to interaction with concomitantly administered drugs such as HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). For patients with rhabdomyolysis, a careful search must be made for possible etiological factors. In patients who recover from an episode of possible PPI-related rhabdomyolysis but do not have a genuine requirement for PPI treatment, the PPI should not be re-introduced. For those with a definite indication for ongoing PPI treatment, the PPI can be re-introduced but should preferably not be administered with a statin.

  15. Tinidazole

    MedlinePlus

    ... men and women), giardiasis (an infection of the intestine that can cause diarrhea, gas, and stomach cramps), and amebiasis (an infection of the intestine that can cause diarrhea, gas, and stomach cramps ...

  16. Recent safety concerns with proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joan; Yuan, Yuhong Cathy; Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Howden, Colin W

    2012-02-01

    There have been recent concerns about the safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We focus here on 3 specific concerns-the possible interaction between PPIs and clopidogrel, the postulated link between PPI use and fractures, and the possibility that long-term PPI use might lead to hypomagnesemia. There is evidence for an in vitro interaction between clopidogrel and at least some PPIs. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned against the use of certain PPIs by patients on clopidogrel. However, a randomized controlled trial that compared clopidogrel alone with the combination of clopidogrel and omeprazole found no increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes and a reduction in the rate of adverse gastrointestinal outcomes attributable to omeprazole. PPI use may be a weak risk factor for certain fractures, but the quality of evidence is relatively poor and there is a strong possibility of confounding. The mechanism whereby PPI use might increase fracture risk is unknown. Currently, no additional measures concerning calcium supplementation or bone mineral density monitoring are recommended for patients on a PPI. The FDA has suggested monitoring serum magnesium levels in patients on PPI therapy. The mechanism and frequency of PPI-induced hypomagnesemia are unclear. PPI treatment should not be withheld from patients who genuinely require it, but the PPI should be taken in the lowest effective dose and only for as long as clinically indicated. The same is, of course, true for all medicines. The benefits of PPI therapy greatly outweigh the risks.

  17. Proton pump inhibitors and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Panjawatanan, Panadeekarn; Ungprasert, Patompong

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed medications. Recent studies have raised a concern over increased risk of dementia among PPIs users but the results of those studies were inconsistent. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize all available data. Methods A literature search was performed in MEDLINE and EMBASE database from inception to April 2016. Observational studies that reported risk of dementia among PPIs users compared with non-users were included. Point estimates were extracted from individual studies and pooled risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Results Four studies were included in the analysis. Pooled RR of dementia among PPIs users compared with non-users was 1.08 (95% CI, 0.82–1.43). Sensitivity analysis including only cohort studies demonstrated a higher risk with pooled RR of 1.44 (95% CI, 1.36–1.52). Conclusions Our study demonstrated an increased risk of dementia among PPIs users. Whether this association is causal requires further investigations. PMID:27429966

  18. Antiplatelet drug interactions with proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Non-aspirin antiplatelet agents (e.g., clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) are commonly prescribed for the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events among patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). In addition, combination therapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is often recommended to attenuate gastrointestinal bleeding risk, particularly during dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with clopidogrel and aspirin. Importantly, a pharmacological interaction between clopidogrel and some PPIs has been proposed based on mutual CYP450-dependent metabolism, but available evidence is inconsistent. Areas covered This article provides an overview of the currently approved antiplatelet agents and PPIs, including their metabolic pathways. Additionally, the CYP450 isoenzyme at the center of the drug interaction, CYP2C19, is described in detail, and the available evidence on both the potential pharmacological interaction and influence on clinical outcomes are summarized and evaluated. Expert opinion Although concomitant DAPT and PPI use reduces clopidogrel active metabolite levels and ex vivo-measured platelet inhibition, the influence of the drug interaction on clinical outcomes has been conflicting and largely reported from non-randomized observational studies. Despite this inconsistency, a clinically important interaction cannot be definitively excluded, particularly among patient subgroups with higher overall cardiovascular risk and potentially among CYP2C19 loss-of-function allele carriers. PMID:24205916

  19. Proton pump inhibitors for functional dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Yuan, Yuhong; Bercik, Premysl; Moayyedi, Paul

    2017-03-08

    Functional dyspepsia (FD or non-ulcer dyspepsia) is defined as continuous or frequently recurring epigastric pain or discomfort for which no organic cause can be found. Acid suppressive therapy, including proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), has been proposed as a therapeutic option in FD, but its efficacy remains controversial. While PPIs are generally considered safe and well tolerated, they have been associated with adverse events, especially in the long term. For this reason, decisions on whether to initiate or continue PPI therapy should be made based on an appropriate clinical indication. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate whether PPI therapy provides symptomatic relief in FD. To determine the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in the improvement of global symptoms of dyspepsia and quality of life compared to placebo, H2 receptor antagonists or prokinetics, in people with functional dyspepsia. We searched in the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Library (to January 2016), MEDLINE (OvidSP; to February 2016), Embase (OvidSP; to February 2016), and SIGLE grey literature (up to February 2016) and clinical trial registries; we handsearched abstracts from conferences up to February 2016. We screened non-systematic reviews, systematic reviews and guidelines to identify any additional trials. We contacted trialists to obtain missing information. All randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any PPI with placebo, H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) or prokinetics for the treatment of FD. Participants were adults (aged 16 years or greater) with an adequate diagnosis of FD (any validated criteria such as Rome I, II, III or Lancet Working Group). Two review authors independently assessed eligibility, trial quality and extracted data. We collected data on dyspeptic symptoms, quality of life and number of overall adverse events. Specific adverse events were beyond the scope of this review. We identified 23 RCTs from 22 papers (with 8759

  20. Do proton pump inhibitors decrease calcium absorption?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Karen E; Jones, Andrea N; Lindstrom, Mary J; Davis, Lisa A; Ziegler, Toni E; Penniston, Kristina L; Alvig, Amy L; Shafer, Martin M

    2010-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increase osteoporotic fracture risk presumably via hypochlorhydria and consequent reduced fractional calcium absorption (FCA). Existing studies provide conflicting information regarding the direct effects of PPIs on FCA. We evaluated the effect of PPI therapy on FCA. We recruited women at least 5 years past menopause who were not taking acid suppressants. Participants underwent three 24-hour inpatient FCA studies using the dual stable isotope method. Two FCA studies were performed 1 month apart to establish baseline calcium absorption. The third study occurred after taking omeprazole (40 mg/day) for 30 days. Each participant consumed the same foods during all FCA studies; study meals replicated subjects' dietary habits based on 7-day diet diaries. Twenty-one postmenopausal women ages 58 ± 7 years (mean ± SD) completed all study visits. Seventeen women were white, and 2 each were black and Hispanic. FCA (mean ± SD) was 20% ± 10% at visit 1, 18% ± 10% at visit 2, and 23% ± 10% following 30 ± 3 days of daily omeprazole (p = .07, ANOVA). Multiple linear regression revealed that age, gastric pH, serum omeprazole levels, adherence to omeprazole, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were unrelated to changes in FCA between study visits 2 and 3. The 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) level at visit 2 was the only variable (p = .049) associated with the change in FCA between visits 2 and 3. PPI-associated hypochlorhydria does not decrease FCA following 30 days of continuous use. Future studies should focus on identifying mechanisms by which PPIs increase the risk of osteoporotic fracture.

  1. Proton pump inhibitors: impact on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Boj-Carceller, Diana

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a complex chronic disease associated with an absolute insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes (T1D) and a progressive deterioration of β-cell function in type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D pathophysiology has numerous defects including incretin deficiency/resistance. Gastrin has demonstrated to be an islet growth factor (like glucagon-like peptide-1, epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-α,…) and be able to restore a functional β-cell mass in diabetic animals. This hormone is likely to stimulate insulin secretion during an ordinary protein-rich meal, this is, to have an incretin-like effect. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can raise serum gastrin concentration significantly and therefore, affect to glucose metabolism through promoting β-cell regeneration/expansion and also enhancing insulin secretion. The present paper aims to review studies concerning the effect of PPIs on glucose metabolism. Several research groups have recently explored the potential role of this class of drugs on glycemic control, mainly in T2D. The results show antidiabetic properties for the PPIs with a global glucose-lowering power around 0.6-0.7 % points of HbA1c, but the level of evidence for the available literature is still not high. If these data start to become demonstrated in the ongoing clinical trials, PPIs could become a new antidiabetic agent with a good and safe profile for T2D and even useful for T1D, particularly in the area of islet transplantation to preserve β-cell mass.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors affect the gut microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Imhann, Floris; Bonder, Marc Jan; Vich Vila, Arnau; Fu, Jingyuan; Mujagic, Zlatan; Vork, Lisa; Tigchelaar, Ettje F; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Cenit, Maria Carmen; Harmsen, Hermie J M; Dijkstra, Gerard; Franke, Lude; Xavier, Ramnik J; Jonkers, Daisy; Wijmenga, Cisca; Weersma, Rinse K; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the top 10 most widely used drugs in the world. PPI use has been associated with an increased risk of enteric infections, most notably Clostridium difficile. The gut microbiome plays an important role in enteric infections, by resisting or promoting colonisation by pathogens. In this study, we investigated the influence of PPI use on the gut microbiome. Methods The gut microbiome composition of 1815 individuals, spanning three cohorts, was assessed by tag sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The difference in microbiota composition in PPI users versus non-users was analysed separately in each cohort, followed by a meta-analysis. Results 211 of the participants were using PPIs at the moment of stool sampling. PPI use is associated with a significant decrease in Shannon's diversity and with changes in 20% of the bacterial taxa (false discovery rate <0.05). Multiple oral bacteria were over-represented in the faecal microbiome of PPI-users, including the genus Rothia (p=9.8×10−38). In PPI users we observed a significant increase in bacteria: genera Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus and the potentially pathogenic species Escherichia coli. Conclusions The differences between PPI users and non-users observed in this study are consistently associated with changes towards a less healthy gut microbiome. These differences are in line with known changes that predispose to C. difficile infections and can potentially explain the increased risk of enteric infections in PPI users. On a population level, the effects of PPI are more prominent than the effects of antibiotics or other commonly used drugs. PMID:26657899

  3. Stereoselective disposition of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Tommy; Weidolf, Lars

    2008-01-01

    It is estimated that about half of all therapeutic agents are chiral, but most of these drugs are administered in the form of the racemic mixture, i.e. a 50/50 mixture of its enantiomers. However, chirality is one of the main features of biology, and many of the processes essential for life are stereoselective, implying that two enantiomers may work differently from each other in a physiological environment. Thus, receptors or metabolizing enzymes would recognize one of the ligand enantiomers in favour of the other. With one exception, all presently marketed proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)--omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole--used for the treatment of gastric acid-related diseases are racemic mixtures. The exception is esomeprazole, the S-enantiomer of omeprazole, which is the only PPI developed as a single enantiomer drug. The development of esomeprazole (an alkaline salt thereof, e.g. magnesium or sodium) was based on unique metabolic properties that clearly differentiated esomeprazole from omeprazole, the racemate. At comparable doses, these properties led to several clinical advantages, for example higher bioavailability in the majority of patients, i.e. the extensive metabolizers (EMs; 97% in Caucasian and 80-85% in Asian populations), lower exposure in poor metabolizers (PMs; 3% in Caucasian and 15-20% in Asian populations) and lower interindividual variation. For the other, i.e. racemic, PPIs there are some data available on the characteristics of the individual enantiomers, and we have therefore undertaken to analyse the current literature with the purpose of evaluating the potential benefits of developing single enantiomer drugs from lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole. For lansoprazole, the plasma concentrations of the S-enantiomer are lower than those of the R-enantiomer in both EMs and PMs, and, consequently, the variability in the population or between EMs and PMs is not likely to decrease with either of the lansoprazole

  4. Proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia, a distinct disease entity?

    PubMed

    Munday, William; Zhang, Xuchen

    2014-08-14

    Recent studies have suggested the existence of a patient population with esophageal eosinophilia that responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy. These patients are being referred to as having proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), which is currently classified as a distinct and separate disease entity from both gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). The therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on PPI-REE is thought to act directly at the level of the esophageal mucosa with an anti-inflammatory capacity, and completely independent of gastric acid suppression. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the mechanistic data of the proposed immune modulation/anti-inflammatory role of the PPI at the esophageal mucosa, and the existence of PPI-REE as a distinct disease entity from GERD and EoE.

  5. [Pharmacogenic osteoporosis beyond cortisone. Proton pump inhibitors, glitazones and diuretics].

    PubMed

    Kann, P H; Hadji, P; Bergmann, R S

    2014-05-01

    [corrected] There are many drugs which can cause osteoporosis or at least favor its initiation. The effect of hormones and drugs with antihormonal activity, such as glucocorticoids and aromatase inhibitors, on initiation of osteoporosis is well known. In addition, proton pump inhibitors, glitazones and diuretics also influence the formation of osteoporosis. The results of currently available studies on the correlation between proton pump inhibitors, glitazones and diuretics on formation of osteoporosis were evaluated and summarized. Proton pump inhibitors and glitazones increase the risk for osteoporotic fractures. Loop diuretics may slightly increase fracture risk, whereas thiazides were shown to be osteoprotective by reducing fracture probability on a relevant scale. Proton pump inhibitors should not be prescribed without serious consideration and then only as long as necessary. Alternatively, the administration of the less effective H2 antagonists should be considered when possible due to the reduction of acid secretion. Because the long-term intake of thiazides is associated with a clinically relevant reduction in the risk of fractures and they are economic and well-tolerated, prescription can be thoroughly recommended within the framework of differential diagnostic considerations in an appropriate clinical context. The briefly increased risk of falling immediately after starting diuretic therapy is the only point which needs to be considered.

  6. Synthesis of Berberine–Efflux Pump Inhibitor Hybrid Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Bremner, John B.; Kelso, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the compact synthesis of two isomeric dual-action hybrid antimicrobials where the 13-position of the antibacterial berberine has been linked via 3'- and 4'-methylene bridges to INF55 (5-nitro-2-phenylindole), an inhibitor of the bacterial NorA multidrug-resistance pump. PMID:21311737

  7. An overview of bacterial efflux pumps and computational approaches to study efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M

    2016-01-01

    Micro-organisms express a wide range of transmembrane pumps known as multidrug efflux pumps that improve the micro-organism's ability to survive in severe environments and contribute to resistance against antibiotic and antimicrobial agents. There is significant interest in developing efflux inhibitors as an adjunct to treatment with current and next generation of antibiotics. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. We summarize some structural and functional data that could provide insights into the inhibition of transport mechanisms of these intricate molecular nanomachines with a focus on the advances in computational approaches.

  8. Hypersensitivity to proton pump inhibitors: lansoprazole-induced Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vlahos, Nicholas P; Vavilis, George K; Giannelou, Ageliki G; Georgopoulou, Christina N; Kommata, Varvara J; Kougias, Constantinos T; Tsartsalis, Dimitrios N; Kounis, George N; Mazarakis, Andreas; Batsolaki, Maria; Gouvelou-Deligianni, Geogia V; Hahalis, George; Kounis, Nicholas G

    2009-05-29

    Proton pump inhibitors are commonly used in clinical practice for the treatment of peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux and are well tolerated by the patients. Their use is rarely associated with hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions. According to the reports in the Uppsala Monitoring Center database the frequency of hypersensitivity reactions out of all reported adverse reactions for proton pump inhibitors and H2-histamine receptor antagonists was between 0.2% and 0.7%. A few cases of hypersensitivity to lansoprazole have been reported. We report a patient who developed Kounis syndrome after taking 30 mg of lansoprazole. This is the first report of Kounis syndrome associated with lansoprazole administration in the world literature.

  9. Spectrophotometric Determination of Certain Benzimidazole Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Syed, A. A.; Syeda, Ayesha

    2008-01-01

    Spectrophotometric method for the determination of certain proton pump inhibitors belonging to the benzimidazole class of compounds has been developed. The method is based on the reaction of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole with iron (III) and subsequent reaction with ferricyanide under neutral condition which yields Prussian blue product with maximum absorption at 720–730 nm. The commonly encountered excipients and additives that often accompany pharmaceutical preparations did not interfere with the determination. The method was applied for the determination of omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole in pharmaceutical preparations and no difference was found statistically. Thus, the spectrophotometric method can be applied as inexpensive, rapid, easy, accurate and precise method for the routine analysis of the five proton pump inhibitors in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:20046782

  10. Tinidazole versus Metronidazole for the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    SCHWEBKE, Jane R.; DESMOND, Renee A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of two different doses of tinidazole with metronidazole for treatment of bacterial vaginosis and compare side effects of the drugs. Study design Women were randomized to metronidazole 500 mg BID, tinidazole 500 mg BID, or tinidazole 1 gm BID all for 7 days. Follow-up visits were conducted at day 14 and day 28. Results 593 women were enrolled. There were no significant differences between the treatment arms. Overall cure rates were 76.8% at 14 days and 64.5% at one month. Women who admitted to engaging in sexual intercourse during the study were significantly more likely to have BV at follow-up. There were no significant differences in adverse events across treatment arms. Conclusions There were no differences in cure rates between metronidazole and either of the tinidazole dosing regimens studied. In addition, there were no important differences in the side effect profiles of metronidazole and tinidazole. PMID:21167471

  11. How May Proton Pump Inhibitors Impair Cardiovascular Health?

    PubMed

    Sukhovershin, Roman A; Cooke, John P

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely used drugs worldwide. They are used to treat a number of gastroesophageal disorders and are usually prescribed as a long-term medication or even taken without a prescription. There are a number of clinical studies that associate PPI use with an increased cardiovascular risk. In this article, we review the clinical evidence for adverse cardiovascular effects of PPIs, and we discuss possible biological mechanisms by which PPIs can impair cardiovascular health.

  12. Therapeutic substitution post-patent expiry: the cases of ACE inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vandoros, Sotiris

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines whether there is a switch in total (originator and generic) consumption after generic entry from molecules that face generic competition towards other molecules of the same class, which are still in-patent. Data from six European countries for the time period 1991 to 2006 are used to study the cases of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and proton pump inhibitors. Empirical evidence shows that patent expiry of captopril and enalapril led to a switch in total (off-patent originator and generic) consumption towards other in-patent angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, whereas patent expiry of omeprazole led to a switch in consumption towards other proton pump inhibitors. This phenomenon makes generic policies ineffective and results in an increase in pharmaceutical expenditure due to the absence of generic alternatives in the market of in-patent molecules. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Proton pump inhibitors: the good, the bad, and the unwanted.

    PubMed

    Chubineh, Saman; Birk, John

    2012-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of medications in the United States. By inhibiting gastric H/K adenosine triphosphatase via covalent binding to the cysteine residues of the proton pump, they provide the most potent acid suppression available. Long-term PPI use accounts for the majority of total PPI use. Absolute indications include peptic ulcer disease, chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use, treatment of Helicobacter pylori, and erosive esophagitis. Although PPIs are generally considered safe, numerous adverse effects, particularly associated with long-term use have been reported. Many patients receiving chronic PPI therapy do not have clear indications for their use, prompting consideration for reduction or discontinuation of their use. This article reviews the indications for PPI use, the adverse effects/risks involved with their use, and conditions in which their use is controversial.

  14. The value of branded proton pump inhibitors: formulary considerations.

    PubMed

    Peura, David A; Berardi, Rosemary R; Gonzalez, Javier; Brunetti, Louis

    2011-07-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) continues to rise, placing an increasing burden on our health care system. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective and widely used therapy for GERD. Many PPIs are now available in generic and over-the-counter forms, and managed care formularies often choose these as their preferred drug for GERD treatment. However, newer-generation branded PPIs, as a result of differences in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles, may offer clinical advantages over generic PPIs. This article discusses these differences and the advantages they offer and suggests possible ways to incorporate the newer PPIs into formularies.

  15. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Non-Responder: A Clinical Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Zilla H; Henderson, Emily E; Maradey-Romerao, Carla; George, Nina; Fass, Ronnie; Lacy, Brian E

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent chronic condition where in stomach contents reflux into the esophagus causing symptoms, esophageal injury, and subsequent complications. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remain the mainstay of therapy for acid suppression. Despite their efficacy, significant proportions of GERD patients are either partial or non-responders to PPI therapy. Patients should be assessed for mechanisms that can lead to PPI failure and may require further evaluation to investigate for alternative causes. This monograph will outline a diagnostic approach to the PPI non-responder, review mechanisms associated with PPI failure, and discuss therapeutic options for those who fail to respond to PPI therapy. PMID:26270485

  16. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: A new challenge

    PubMed Central

    Florentin, Matilda; Elisaf, Moses S

    2012-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used in clinical practice for the prevention and treatment of peptic ulcer, gastritis, esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux. Hypomagnesemia has recently been recognized as a side effect of PPIs. Low magnesium levels may cause symptoms from several systems, some of which being potentially serious, such as tetany, seizures and arrhythmias. It seems that PPIs affect the gastrointestinal absorption of magnesium. Clinicians should be vigilant in order to timely consider and prevent or reverse hypomagnesemia in patients who take PPIs, especially if they are prone to this electrolyte disorder. PMID:24175253

  17. Proton Pump Inhibitor-Induced Remission of Lymphocytic Esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Naemat; Miick, Ronald; Govil, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Lymphocytic esophagitis is a chronic condition that has been described in the literature; however, there is little information describing its characteristics and treatment. We present a case of lymphocytic esophagitis that was identified following food impaction. Repeat esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with biopsy showed a marked decrease in lymphocytic infiltration after a 6-week course of twice-daily high-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI). After initiation of the high-dose PPI regimen, the patient had no further episodes of dysphagia or food impaction. We propose that treating lymphocytic esophagitis with twice-daily PPI can improve symptoms and show histologic evidence of improvement. PMID:28119946

  18. Occupational Airborne Contact Dermatitis From Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeKoven, Joel G; Yu, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Few published reports have described occupational contact dermatitis from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure in the literature. We present an additional case of a 58-year-old male pharmaceutical worker with an occupational airborne allergic contact dermatitis to PPIs confirmed by patch testing. This is a novel report of workplace exposure to dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole PPIs with resultant clinical contact allergy and relevant positive patch test results to these 2 agents. A literature review of all previously reported cases of occupational contact dermatitis to PPI is summarized. The case also emphasizes the importance of even minute exposures when considering workplace accommodation.

  19. [Tinidazole: a classical anaerobical drug with multiple potential uses nowadays].

    PubMed

    Granizo, J J; Pía Rodicio, M; Manso, F J; Giménez, Ma José

    2009-06-01

    Tinidazole is a 5-nitroimidazole active in vitro against a wide variety of anaerobic bacteria and protozoa. Tinidazole is an effective treatment against anaerobic microorganisms based on its pharmacokinetic characteristics (C(max) 51 microg/ml, t(1/2) 12.5 h) and its excellent in vitro activity. Its long half-life allows once a day regimens. Tinidazole is as effective as metronidazole in the treatment of infections caused by T. vaginalis, giardiasis and amebiasis and bacterial vaginosis, malaria, odontogenic infections, anaerobic bacterial infections (pelvic inflammatory disease, diabetic foot), surgical prophylaxis (abdominal and hysterectomy) and Helicobacter pylori eradication. Tinidazole was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of infections caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia.

  20. Effects of proton pump inhibitors on pediatric inflammatory esophagogastric polyps.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyong Eun; Kim, Mi Jin; Lee, Ji Hyuk; Lee, Jong Seung; Lee, Jee Hyun; Choe, Yon Ho

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitors on symptomatic inflammatory esophagogastric polyps (IEPs) in a pediatric cohort and to determine the optimal duration of treatment. The 11 patients with IEPs were managed with lansoprazole. Follow-up endoscopies were performed at 2 and 6 months after the start of medication. Medication was discontinued when the clinical symptoms completely resolved and the polyp size was reduced by more than 50% compared to the initial size. The initial polyp size was 13.7 ± 3.3 mm. After 2 months of medication, the polyp size was reduced to 8.0 ± 5.8 mm. At 6 months, the polyp size was 4.7 ± 2.2 mm. The mean duration of medication was 4.8 ± 2.1 months. The duration of medication and the change in the polyp size appeared to have a linear correlation (p < 0.001). According to the formula used to calculate polyp size, the optimal duration of treatment was more than 7 months for complete resolution of the polyps. Proton pump inhibitor was effective for the treatment of IEPs. About 5 months of lansoprazole was adequate to treat IEPs in children. The optimal duration for complete resolution of the polyp might be more than 7 months. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Proton pump inhibitor associated hypomagnasaemia ‐ a cause for concern?

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Joe; Smith, Trevor; Barnett, Kirsty; Strike, Paul; Azim, Adnan; Spake, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Aims In recent years, there have been a number of case reports of severe hypomagnesaemia associated with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, such that both the FDA and MHRA have issued drug safety warnings. They have recommended periodic serum magnesium testing in patients prescribed PPIs but provide no guidance on timing of these measurements. Methods To our knowledge, we are the first to perform a prospective study to explore specifically proton pump inhibitor associated hypomagnesaemia (PPIAH). We followed 56 patients new to PPIs prospectively as well as a further 100 patients on long term PPIs cross‐sectionally to identify what factors may be influencing the development of significant hypomagnesaemia. Results For the prospective arm of the study, we measured serum magnesium levels prior to starting a PPI and again at regular intervals for the next 8 months. For the cross‐sectional arm of the study we measured serum magnesium levels on patients on PPI therapy ranging from less than 1 year to over 5 years. Conclusion We found that, although there was a significant downward trend in serum magnesium levels in patients new to PPI therapy with time, clinically relevant hypomagnesaemia was not readily identifiable on regular blood testing. We did however identify patients on concurrent diuretic therapy as being at higher risk and so would recommend regular serum magnesium testing alongside their regular renal function monitoring on a more frequent basis such as annually. PMID:26613375

  2. Proton pump inhibitor associated hypomagnasaemia - a cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Begley, Joe; Smith, Trevor; Barnett, Kirsty; Strike, Paul; Azim, Adnan; Spake, Claire; Richardson, Tristan

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, there have been a number of case reports of severe hypomagnesaemia associated with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, such that both the FDA and MHRA have issued drug safety warnings. They have recommended periodic serum magnesium testing in patients prescribed PPIs but provide no guidance on timing of these measurements. To our knowledge, we are the first to perform a prospective study to explore specifically proton pump inhibitor associated hypomagnesaemia (PPIAH). We followed 56 patients new to PPIs prospectively as well as a further 100 patients on long term PPIs cross-sectionally to identify what factors may be influencing the development of significant hypomagnesaemia. For the prospective arm of the study, we measured serum magnesium levels prior to starting a PPI and again at regular intervals for the next 8 months. For the cross-sectional arm of the study we measured serum magnesium levels on patients on PPI therapy ranging from less than 1 year to over 5 years. We found that, although there was a significant downward trend in serum magnesium levels in patients new to PPI therapy with time, clinically relevant hypomagnesaemia was not readily identifiable on regular blood testing. We did however identify patients on concurrent diuretic therapy as being at higher risk and so would recommend regular serum magnesium testing alongside their regular renal function monitoring on a more frequent basis such as annually. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  3. 25 Years of Proton Pump Inhibitors: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Strand, Daniel S; Kim, Daejin; Peura, David A

    2017-01-15

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were clinically introduced more than 25 years ago and have since proven to be invaluable, safe, and effective agents for the management of a variety of acid-related disorders. Although all members in this class act in a similar fashion, inhibiting active parietal cell acid secretion, there are slight differences among PPIs relating to their pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved clinical indications. Nevertheless, each is effective in managing gastroesophageal reflux disease and uncomplicated or complicated peptic ulcer disease. Despite their overall efficacy, PPIs do have some limitations related to their short plasma half-lives and requirement for meal-associated dosing, which can lead to breakthrough symptoms in some individuals, especially at night. Longer-acting PPIs and technology to prolong conventional PPI activity have been developed to specifically address these limitations and may improve clinical outcomes.

  4. [All proton pump inhibitors are equally efficacious in standard dosages].

    PubMed

    Hellström, Per M; Vitols, Sigurd

    2003-06-19

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are today used at different recommended doses for treatment of acid-related gastro-esophageal, gastric and gastro-duodenal diseases. We reviewed the literature regarding inhibition of acid secretion and healing rates for the different PPIs. Acid secretion in vitro and in vivo as well as healing and relapse rates were similar on a milligram basis for omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and pantoprazole. Rabeprazole had a somewhat faster onset of inhibition of acid secretion; the clinical value of this however seems limited. Esomeprazole had a somewhat stronger inhibitory effect on acid secretion in vivo compared with other PPIs. Studies demonstrating an important clinical advantage of esomeprazole compared to other PPIs are however lacking.

  5. 25 Years of Proton Pump Inhibitors: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Daniel S.; Kim, Daejin; Peura, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were clinically introduced more than 25 years ago and have since proven to be invaluable, safe, and effective agents for the management of a variety of acid-related disorders. Although all members in this class act in a similar fashion, inhibiting active parietal cell acid secretion, there are slight differences among PPIs relating to their pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved clinical indications. Nevertheless, each is effective in managing gastroesophageal reflux disease and uncomplicated or complicated peptic ulcer disease. Despite their overall efficacy, PPIs do have some limitations related to their short plasma half-lives and requirement for meal-associated dosing, which can lead to breakthrough symptoms in some individuals, especially at night. Longer-acting PPIs and technology to prolong conventional PPI activity have been developed to specifically address these limitations and may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:27840364

  6. Do proton pump inhibitors protect against cancer progression in GERD?

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Tomoharu; Shah, Furhawn A; Harmon, John W; Marti, Guy P; Matsui, Daisuke; Okamoto, Koichi; Makino, Isamu; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Nakagawara, Hisatoshi; Tajima, Hidehiro; Fujita, Hideto; Takamura, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Manabu; Ninomiya, Itasu; Kitagawa, Hirohisa; Fushida, Sachio; Fujimura, Takashi; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2013-08-01

    Gastro-duodenal content reflux from gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) induces the inflammation-metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are potent blockers of gastric acid secretion, which are widely used for treating GERD and peptic ulcer-associated acid-secreting diseases. The effect of PPI therapy on esophageal carcinogenesis remains unclear. While some studies suggest PPIs result in a significant reduction in the risk of developing dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in patients with Barrett's esophagus, others suggest that PPIs have no effect. Recent studies have revealed that PPIs can exert anti-inflammatory effects such as anti-oxidant properties and immunomodulatory effects through their interactions with neutrophils, monocytes, endothelial and epithelial cells. In addition, PPIs have the ability to prevent adhesion molecule binding in malignant cells and suppress metastasis. This article reviews the role of PPIs in esophageal carcinogenesis and their use as antitumor agents.

  7. Long-term safety concerns with proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tauseef; Roberts, David Neil; Tierney, William M

    2009-10-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most widely prescribed medications worldwide. Their use has resulted in dramatic improvements in treatment of peptic ulcer disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Despite an acceptable safety profile, mounting data demonstrate concerns about the long-term use of PPIs. To provide a comprehensive review regarding the concerns of long-term PPI use, a literature search was performed to identify pertinent original and review articles. Despite study shortcomings, the collective body of information overwhelmingly suggests an increased risk of infectious complications and nutritional deficiencies. Data regarding any increased risk in gastric or colon malignancy are less convincing. PPIs have revolutionized the management and complications of acid-related disorders with a high margin of safety; however, with the data available, efforts to reduce the dosing of or discontinue the use of PPIs must be reassessed frequently.

  8. Controversy of proton pump inhibitor and clopidogrel interaction: a review.

    PubMed

    Tan, H J

    2010-12-01

    A proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is often co-prescribed with clopidogrel to reduce the gastrointestinal risk of bleeding ulcers in patients following acute coronary syndrome or a stent implant. However, the safety issue of such practice has been scrutinized after some studies reporting an increased incidence of cardiovascular events and mortality, although there have also been contrary research reports. This has lead to a warning statement from the US Food and Drug Administration cautioning the concomitant use of PPI and clopidogrel. This review examines the evidence of PPI as gastroprotective agent, histamine H(2) antagonists as an alternative therapy, the influence of PPI on the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel, and the controversies of various studies. © 2010 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia: case review

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesaemia is a rare but serious adverse effect of a widely prescribed medication. It has become an increasingly recognised complication since 2006, with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issuing a warning for this risk with regards to long-term PPI use. We present the case of PPI-associated hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia. A 91 year old male presented with tetany from severe hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia. This condition occurred in the context of 18 months of PPI use, and resolved following cessation of PPI therapy and the replenishment of magnesium and calcium stores. Monitoring of magnesium, calcium and potassium levels is crucial in patients prescribed PPIs long-term; especially the elderly patient. PMID:28078056

  10. Proton Pump Inhibitors Display Antitumor Effects in Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Eduardo; Apostolova, Nadezda; Esplugues, Juan V; García-González, María A; Lanas, Ángel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can exert antineoplastic effects through the disruption of pH homeostasis by inhibiting vacuolar ATPase (H(+)-VATPase), a proton pump overexpressed in several tumor cells, but this aspect has not been deeply investigated in EAC yet. In the present study, the expression of H(+)-VATPase was assessed through the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the antineoplastic effects of PPIs and cellular mechanisms involved were evaluated in vitro. H(+)-VATPase expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paraffined-embedded samples or by immunofluorescence in cultured BE and EAC cell lines. Cells were treated with different concentrations of PPIs and parameters of citotoxicity, oxidative stress, and autophagy were evaluated. H(+)-VATPase expression was found in all biopsies and cell lines evaluated, showing differences in the location of the pump between the cell lines. Esomeprazole inhibited proliferation and cell invasion and induced apoptosis of EAC cells. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seemed to be involved in the cytotoxic effects observed since the addition of N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced esomeprazole-induced apoptosis in EAC cells. Esomeprazole also reduced intracellular pH of tumor cells, whereas only disturbed the mitochondrial membrane potential in OE33 cells. Esomeprazole induced autophagy in both EAC cells, but also triggered a blockade in autophagic flux in the metastatic cell line. These data provide in vitro evidence supporting the potential use of PPIs as novel antineoplastic drugs for EAC and also shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger PPIs cytotoxic effects, which differ upon the cell line evaluated.

  11. Proton Pump Inhibitors Display Antitumor Effects in Barrett's Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Eduardo; Apostolova, Nadezda; Esplugues, Juan V.; García-González, María A.; Lanas, Ángel; Piazuelo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has reported that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can exert antineoplastic effects through the disruption of pH homeostasis by inhibiting vacuolar ATPase (H+-VATPase), a proton pump overexpressed in several tumor cells, but this aspect has not been deeply investigated in EAC yet. In the present study, the expression of H+-VATPase was assessed through the metaplasia-dysplasia-adenocarcinoma sequence in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and the antineoplastic effects of PPIs and cellular mechanisms involved were evaluated in vitro. H+-VATPase expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in paraffined-embedded samples or by immunofluorescence in cultured BE and EAC cell lines. Cells were treated with different concentrations of PPIs and parameters of citotoxicity, oxidative stress, and autophagy were evaluated. H+-VATPase expression was found in all biopsies and cell lines evaluated, showing differences in the location of the pump between the cell lines. Esomeprazole inhibited proliferation and cell invasion and induced apoptosis of EAC cells. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) seemed to be involved in the cytotoxic effects observed since the addition of N-acetylcysteine significantly reduced esomeprazole-induced apoptosis in EAC cells. Esomeprazole also reduced intracellular pH of tumor cells, whereas only disturbed the mitochondrial membrane potential in OE33 cells. Esomeprazole induced autophagy in both EAC cells, but also triggered a blockade in autophagic flux in the metastatic cell line. These data provide in vitro evidence supporting the potential use of PPIs as novel antineoplastic drugs for EAC and also shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger PPIs cytotoxic effects, which differ upon the cell line evaluated. PMID:27932981

  12. Tinidazole vs metronidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Schwebke, Jane R; Desmond, Renee A

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of 2 different doses of tinidazole with metronidazole for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and to compare the side effects of the drugs. Women were assigned randomly to receive metronidazole 500 mg twice daily, tinidazole 500 mg twice daily, or tinidazole 1 g twice, all for 7 days. Follow-up visits were conducted at days 14 and 28. Five hundred ninety-three women were enrolled. There were no significant differences between the treatment arms. Overall cure rates were 76.8% at 14 days and 64.5% at 1 month. Women who admitted to engaging in sexual intercourse during the study were significantly more likely to have bacterial vaginosis at the follow-up visit. There were no significant differences in adverse events across treatment arms. There were no differences in cure rates between metronidazole and either of the tinidazole dosing regimens that were studied. In addition, there were no important differences in the side-effect profiles of metronidazole and tinidazole. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Influence of proton pump inhibitors on intestinal fermentative profile: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Senderovky, Melisa; Lasa, Juan; Dima, Guillermo; Peralta, Daniel; Argüello, Mariano; Soifer, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors could have an impact on the results of breath tests performed in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. This impact could be due to the development of small intestine bacterial overgrowth. To compare the prevalence of fermentative profile alterations of irritable bowel syndrome patients exposed and not-exposed to proton pump inhibitor therapy. Subjects with irritable bowel syndrome were enrolled. A validated questionnaire assessing symptom severity as well as proton pump inhibitor treatment was delivered. A lactulose breath test was undertaken by each enrolled subject. Fermentative profile (area under the curve of hydrogen excretion/time) was compared between proton pump inhibitors consumers and non-consumers. Furthermore, small intestine bacterial overgrowth prevalence was compared. Two hundred and twenty five patients were enrolled. No significant differences were found on the fermentative profile between groups [AUC mediana 3,776 (rango 2,124-5,571) vs 4,347 (rango 2,038-5,481), P = 0.3]. Small intestine bacterial overgrowth prevalence was similar as well [33% vs 27.5%]. These differences remained non-significant after adjusting for proton pump inhibitor dose and treatment time. Surprisingly, symptom score was significantly higher in those patients under proton pump inhibitor therapy [28.5 (23-26) vs 23 (15-29), P = 0.01]. Proton pump inhibitors have no significant influence on lactulose breath tests, regardless of the dosage and time of administration.

  14. Hypomagnesemia Induced by Long-Term Treatment with Proton-Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Janett, Simone; Camozzi, Pietro; Peeters, Gabriëlla G A M; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G; Milani, Gregorio P

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, hypomagnesemia was first described as a complication of proton-pump inhibitors. To address this issue, we systematically reviewed the literature. Hypomagnesemia, mostly associated with hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism and hypokalemia, was reported in 64 individuals on long-term proton-pump inhibitors. Hypomagnesemia recurred following replacement of one proton-pump inhibitor with another but not with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist. The association between proton-pump inhibitors and magnesium metabolism was addressed in 14 case-control, cross-sectional studies. An association was found in 11 of them: 6 reports found that the use of proton-pump inhibitors is associated per se with a tendency towards hypomagnesemia, 2 found that this tendency is more pronounced in patients concurrently treated with diuretics, carboplatin, or cisplatin, and 2 found a relevant tendency to hypomagnesemia in patients with poor renal function. Finally, findings likely reflecting decreased intestinal magnesium uptake were observed on treatment with proton-pump inhibitors. Three studies did not disclose any relationship between magnesium metabolism and treatment with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists. In conclusion, proton-pump inhibitors may cause hypomagnesemia. In these cases, switching to a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist is advised.

  15. Hypomagnesemia Induced by Long-Term Treatment with Proton-Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Janett, Simone; Camozzi, Pietro; Peeters, Gabriëlla G. A. M.; Lava, Sebastiano A. G.; Simonetti, Giacomo D.; Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Bianchetti, Mario G.; Milani, Gregorio P.

    2015-01-01

    In 2006, hypomagnesemia was first described as a complication of proton-pump inhibitors. To address this issue, we systematically reviewed the literature. Hypomagnesemia, mostly associated with hypocalcemic hypoparathyroidism and hypokalemia, was reported in 64 individuals on long-term proton-pump inhibitors. Hypomagnesemia recurred following replacement of one proton-pump inhibitor with another but not with a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist. The association between proton-pump inhibitors and magnesium metabolism was addressed in 14 case-control, cross-sectional studies. An association was found in 11 of them: 6 reports found that the use of proton-pump inhibitors is associated per se with a tendency towards hypomagnesemia, 2 found that this tendency is more pronounced in patients concurrently treated with diuretics, carboplatin, or cisplatin, and 2 found a relevant tendency to hypomagnesemia in patients with poor renal function. Finally, findings likely reflecting decreased intestinal magnesium uptake were observed on treatment with proton-pump inhibitors. Three studies did not disclose any relationship between magnesium metabolism and treatment with histamine type-2 receptor antagonists. In conclusion, proton-pump inhibitors may cause hypomagnesemia. In these cases, switching to a histamine type-2 receptor antagonist is advised. PMID:26064102

  16. [Bacterial efflux pumps - their role in antibiotic resistance and potential inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hricová, Kristýna; Kolář, Milan

    2014-12-01

    Efflux pumps capable of actively draining antibiotic agents from bacterial cells may be considered one of potential mechanisms of the development of antimicrobial resistance. The most important group of efflux pumps capable of removing several types of antibiotics include RND (resistance - nodulation - division) pumps. These are three proteins that cross the bacterial cell wall, allowing direct expulsion of the agent out from the bacterial cell. The most investigated efflux pumps are the AcrAB-TolC system in Escherichia coli and the MexAB-OprM system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, efflux pumps are able to export other than antibacterial agents such as disinfectants, thus decreasing their effectiveness. One potential approach to inactivation of an efflux pump is to use the so-called efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Potential inhibitors tested in vitro involve, for example, phenylalanyl-arginyl-b-naphthylamide (PAbN), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or agents of the phenothiazine class.

  17. Uses of proton pump inhibitors and serum potassium levels.

    PubMed

    Gau, Jen-Tzer; Heh, Victor; Acharya, Utkarsh; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kao, Tzu-Cheg

    2009-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may suppress adrenal cortical steroid synthesis and release, thereby leading to electrolyte disturbances. Both hyponatremia and hyperkalemia in the setting of PPI therapy have been documented in case reports. The objective of this study was to examine the association between serum potassium (K(+)) level and PPI use. A retrospective data analysis of hospitalized adults aged > or = 65 years during 2006, including PPI users (N = 257) and PPI non-users (N = 388), was conducted. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to assess the association between PPI use and serum K(+) level. PPI users [mean age (SD):79.7 (8.0) years; 70% female] had significantly higher serum K(+) levels than PPI non-users [80.2 (8.8) years; 64% female] on admission [4.13 (0.62) vs. 3.97 (0.57) mmol/L; p < 0.001]. The linear regression model revealed that > or = 2 defined daily dose (DDD) units of PPI use were a significantly positive contributor to serum K(+) levels (p = 0.021) after adjusting for age, serum creatinine levels, sex, history of diabetes, and uses of the following drugs: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, angiotensin receptor blocker, beta blocker, diuretics, spironolactone, K(+) supplement, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, atypical antipsychotics, and narcotics. However, multiple logistic regression model revealed that high dose PPI therapy was not associated with an increased risk for hyperkalemia occurrence (p = 0.762). Higher serum K(+) levels were observed among PPI users when compared to PPI non-users. High daily dose PPI therapy may be an independent positive predictor of serum potassium levels.

  18. A case series of proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Hoorn, Ewout J; van der Hoek, Joost; de Man, Rob A; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bolwerk, Clemens; Zietse, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia has been recognized since 2006. Our aim was to further characterize the clinical consequences and possible mechanisms of this electrolyte disorder using 4 cases. Two men (aged 63 and 81 years) and 2 women (aged 73 and 62 years) had been using a PPI (esomeprazole, pantoprazole, omeprazole, and rabeprazole, 20-40 mg) for 1-13 years. They developed severe hypomagnesemia (magnesium, 0.30 +/- 0.28 mEq/L; reference, 1.40-2.10 mEq/L) with hypocalcemia (calcium, 6.4 +/- 1.8 mg/dL), relative hypoparathyroidism (parathyroid hormone, 43 +/- 6 pg/mL), and extremely low urinary calcium and magnesium excretion. One patient was admitted with postanoxic encephalopathy after a collapse likely caused by arrhythmia. The others had electrocardiogram abnormalities (prolonged QT interval, ST depression, and U waves). Concomitant hypokalemia (potassium, 2.8 +/- 0.1 mEq/L) was considered the trigger for these arrhythmias. Hypomagnesemia-induced kaliuresis (potassium excretion, 65 +/- 24 mEq/L) was identified as the cause of hypokalemia. This series of PPI-induced hypomagnesemia shows that this is a generic effect. It also indicates that hypomagnesemia may occur within 1 year of PPI therapy initiation and can have serious clinical consequences, likely triggered by the associated hypokalemia. A high index of suspicion is required in PPI users for unexplained hypomagnesemia, hypocalcemia, hypokalemia, or associated symptoms.

  19. Metformin plus proton pump inhibitors therapy: the cobalamin deficiency challenge.

    PubMed

    Purchiaroni, F; Galli, G; Annibale, B

    2015-07-01

    It is known in literature that metformin and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are associated to cobalamin levels reduction independently but still very little is known about the combination of the two drugs in cobalamin levels decrease. Currently there are no published data concerning the management of patients with cobalamin deficiency related to the concomitant use of the aforementioned drugs. We present the case of a 65 year-old white man with an history of renal cell carcinoma, melanoma and hepatic nodular sclerosis Hodgkin's lymphoma, who was under treatment with metformin because of diabetes and with pantoprazole because of Barrett's esophagus. He came to our attention because of a progressive reduction of cobalamin levels without related anemia. We decided to continue metformin and pantoprazole therapy and we treated the patient with intramuscular injection of cobalamin to avoid the vitamin deficiency consequences. Up to now no published data are available concerning the management of patients with cobalamin deficiency related to the concomitant use of metformin and PPIs. Our case report faces this clinical problem in terms of therapeutic management.

  20. Hypomagnesemia Among Outpatient Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Users.

    PubMed

    Biyik, Murat; Solak, Yalcin; Ucar, Ramazan; Cifci, Sami; Tekis, Dilek; Polat, İlker; Göktepe, Mevlüt Hakan; Sakiz, Davut; Ataseven, Huseyin; Demir, Ali

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are extensively prescribed drugs usually used for a long period. Recent reports linked PPI use with development of hypomagnesemia. However, there is still uncertainty regarding risk of hypomagnesemia in outpatients who were on long-term PPI use. Thus, we aimed to evaluate frequency of hypomagnesemia among a well-defined outpatient patient cohort with no other possible risk factors affecting serum magnesium levels. This was a case-control study carried out at the outpatient gastroenterology clinic of a University hospital. Patients who were on PPI therapy for at least 6 months without diuretic use and chronic kidney disease were included. Patients who were subjected to the same inclusion and exclusion criteria and not using PPI were included as control subjects. One hundred fifty-four patients and 84 control subjects were included. The mean duration of PPI use was 27.5 ± 2.5 months. Mean serum magnesium levels of PPI users and nonusers were 2.17 ± 0.20 mg/dL and 2.19 ± 0.15 mg/dL, respectively. None of the patient had a serum magnesium level below laboratory lower range of 1.7 mg/dL. Our results showed that for typical gastroenterology outpatient clinic patients with no other risk factors affecting serum magnesium levels, long-term PPI use did not affect serum magnesium levels.

  1. Proton pump inhibitor-induced exfoliative dermatitis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihong; Liu, Hongtao; He, Lien; Ma, Yinling; Song, Haojing; Bai, Wanjun; Yu, Meiling

    2016-02-01

    A 74-year-old female patient was admitted to hospital following a road accident with pains in the chest, abdomen, waist, back, nose, left wrist and lower limbs. After 1 week, the patient presented with gastrointestinal bleeding, and thus was treated with protein pump inhibitors (PPIs), including lansoprazole, esomeprazole and omeprazole enteric-coated tablets, in order to inhibit acid secretion and attenuate bleeding. However, the patient developed skin rashes on the chest and right lower limb and foot 28 days following treatment initiation. The skin rashes spread and ulcerated after 3 days, and were associated with tracheal mucosal injury and hemoptysis. Subsequently, treatment of the patient with PPIs was terminated, after which the tracheal hemoptysis and skin rashes markedly improved. In addition, no new skin rashes appeared following termination of the PPI treatment. In the present case, long-term treatment of an elderly patient with PPIs may have induced exfoliative dermatitis, due to hepatic ischemia, hypoxia and acute renal failure, which may have decreased the metabolism of PPIs, resulting in the accumulation of PPI metabolites.

  2. Obscure bleeding colonic duplication responds to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Jérémie; Projetti, Fabrice; Legros, Romain; Valgueblasse, Virginie; Sarabi, Matthieu; Carrier, Paul; Fredon, Fabien; Bouvier, Stéphane; Loustaud-Ratti, Véronique; Sautereau, Denis

    2013-09-21

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male admitted to our academic hospital with massive rectal bleeding. Since childhood he had reported recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding and had two exploratory laparotomies 5 and 2 years previously. An emergency abdominal computed tomography scan, gastroscopy and colonoscopy, performed after hemodynamic stabilization, were considered normal. High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was initiated and bleeding stopped spontaneously. Two other massive rectal bleeds occurred 8 h after each cessation of PPI which led to a hemostatic laparotomy after negative gastroscopy and small bowel capsule endoscopy. This showed long tubular duplication of the right colon, with fresh blood in the duplicated colon. Obscure lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a difficult medical situation and potentially life-threatening. The presence of ulcerated ectopic gastric mucosa in the colonic duplication explains the partial efficacy of PPI therapy. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding responding to empiric anti-acid therapy should probably evoke the diagnosis of bleeding ectopic gastric mucosa such as Meckel's diverticulum or gastrointestinal duplication, and gastroenterologists should be aware of this potential medical situation.

  3. Tinidazole in treatment of acute amoebic dysentery in children.

    PubMed Central

    Scragg, J N; Rubidge, C J; Proctor, E M

    1976-01-01

    The excellent results obtained in this trial indicate that tinidazole is a drug worthy of extensive evaluation in the treatment of amoebiasis, as three single daily doses is a simple form of treatment. The drug was well tolerated and free from any toxic effects. PMID:779664

  4. Tinidazole in treatment of amoebic liver abscess in children.

    PubMed Central

    Scragg, J N; Proctor, E M

    1977-01-01

    Tinidazole as a single drug therapy given in a single dose daily for 5 or 3 days was put to rigorous test in malnourished children. Of 25 children with amoebic liver abscess, 23 were cured. The 2 remaining cases required surgical drainage followed by other amoebicides, one subsequently dying from complicating bronchopneumonia. PMID:869571

  5. Pharmacokinetic drug interaction profiles of proton pump inhibitors: an update.

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, Ralph-Steven; Blume, Henning

    2014-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the treatment of gastric acid-related disorders, often over the long term, which raises the potential for clinically significant drug interactions in patients receiving concomitant medications. These drug-drug interactions have been previously reviewed. However, the current knowledge is likely to have advanced, so a thorough review of the literature published since 2006 was conducted. This identified new studies of drug interactions that are modulated by gastric pH. These studies showed the effect of a PPI-induced increase in intragastric pH on mycophenolate mofetil pharmacokinetics, which were characterised by a decrease in the maximum exposure and availability of mycophenolic acid, at least at early time points. Post-2006 data were also available outlining the altered pharmacokinetics of protease inhibitors with concomitant PPI exposure. New data for the more recently marketed dexlansoprazole suggest it has no impact on the pharmacokinetics of diazepam, phenytoin, theophylline and warfarin. The CYP2C19-mediated interaction that seems to exist between clopidogrel and omeprazole or esomeprazole has been shown to be clinically important in research published since the 2006 review; this effect is not seen as a class effect of PPIs. Finally, data suggest that coadministration of PPIs with methotrexate may affect methotrexate pharmacokinetics, although the mechanism of interaction is not well understood. As was shown in the previous review, individual PPIs differ in their propensities to interact with other drugs and the extent to which their interaction profiles have been defined. The interaction profiles of omeprazole and pantoprazole sodium (pantoprazole-Na) have been studied most extensively. Several studies have shown that omeprazole carries a considerable potential for drug interactions because of its high affinity for CYP2C19 and moderate affinity for CYP3A4. In contrast, pantoprazole-Na appears to have

  6. Does Barrett's esophagus regress after surgery (or proton pump inhibitors)?

    PubMed

    Spechler, Stuart Jon

    2014-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus, the condition in which metaplastic columnar epithelium that predisposes to cancer development replaces the squamous epithelium that normally lines the distal esophagus, is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Metaplasia is a potentially reversible condition, and partial regression of Barrett's metaplasia has been documented with effective medical or surgical therapy for GERD. The important issue for patient management is not whether antireflux treatment causes Barrett's esophagus to regress, but rather whether antireflux therapy prevents cancer in Barrett's esophagus. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) would be expected to prevent this cancer because they heal reflux esophagitis, reduce exposure to a potential carcinogen (acid), and might prevent acid-induced proliferation and cancer-promoting cytokine secretion by esophageal epithelial cells. Furthermore, observational studies have shown that PPI use is associated with a decreased incidence of neoplasia in Barrett's esophagus. In theory, successful antireflux surgery, which eliminates the reflux of both acid and bile, should be better for cancer prevention than medical therapy, which only decreases the reflux of acid. However, high-quality studies show no significant difference in cancer incidence between medically and surgically treated patients with GERD and Barrett's esophagus. Furthermore, for individual patients with nondysplastic Barrett's metaplasia, the cancer risk is so small and the number needed to treat for cancer prevention with surgery so large, that it does not matter whether or not surgery provides a tiny margin of extra protection against cancer beyond that provided by medical therapy. The cost and risks of the operation overwhelm any small, additional cancer protective benefit. Antireflux surgery is very effective at controlling the endoscopic signs and symptoms of GERD, but the operation should not be recommended to patients solely with the rationale that it

  7. Inappropriate use of proton pump inhibitors in a local setting

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Christopher Tze Wei; Lim, Wan Peng; Vu, Charles Kien Fong

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There are growing concerns that the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may be inappropriate in instances that do not conform to evidence-based indications. This point-prevalence study aimed to investigate the frequency, indications and appropriateness of use of PPIs in hospitalised patients on a randomly chosen day. METHODS On a randomly chosen day, all inpatients were documented, and those on any form of PPIs on that day were determined. Indications for maintaining these patients on PPIs were obtained from the electronic medical records, which were then recorded and cross-referenced against a list of accepted indications adapted from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved list. RESULTS In all, 1,025 inpatients were documented. Of the 477 (46.5%) inpatients using PPIs, only 219 (45.9%) fulfilled the FDA-approved indications, while the majority (n = 258, 54.1%) did not. Overall, PPIs were not strictly indicated for use in 206 (43.2%) inpatients, according to FDA criteria. Of the 477 inpatients on PPIs, 52 (10.9%) had borderline indications based on expert consensus/guidelines other than FDA criteria. CONCLUSION Although the use of PPIs is prevalent in hospitals, less than half of the hospitalised patients using PPIs in our study had evidence-based indications that supported such use. The overuse of PPIs has a negative impact on healthcare costs and may lead to adverse effects. Steps to curb the inappropriate use of PPIs should address factors such as indications for the initiation of PPIs, and reassessment of the need for ongoing PPI use in inpatients upon discharge and during outpatient reviews. PMID:25091884

  8. Proton pump inhibitors prescribing following the introduction of generic drugs.

    PubMed

    Cammarota, Simona; Bruzzese, Dario; Sarnelli, Giovanni; Citarella, Anna; Menditto, Enrica; Riegler, Salvatore; Savino, Ivana G; Vozzella, Letizia; Piccinocchi, Gaetano; Napoli, Luigi; Arpino, Giovanni; Cuomo, Rosario

    2012-10-01

    In many countries, the introduction of generic proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) onto the pharmaceutical market increased the phenomenon of therapeutic substitution in acid-related disorders (ARDs). To investigate the treatment of ARDs in an Italian primary care setting from 2005 to 2008 by verifying: (i) dynamics of PPI prescribing; (ii) predictors of PPI switching; and (iii) healthcare resource consumption costs. This was a retrospective cohort study of 102 general practitioners (GPs) who managed an average of 150000 inhabitants in Naples. Multilevel logistic regression was used to assess the potential predictors of both PPI switching and termination. Primary care costs were expressed as the cost of ARD management per PPI user year. The percentage of PPI users with ARD increased from 5·5% (2005) to 7·0% (2008) (P<0·0001), especially for dyspepsia (from 9·5% to 13·7%; P<0·0001) and chronic treatments (from 23·4% to 29·4%; P<0·0001). PPI switching rose from 13·0% to 16·7% during the period observed (P<0·0001). Calendar years, long-term treatments and gastroesophageal reflux disease were positive predictors of PPI switching. Primary care costs relating to PPI switchers increased by 61·14€ compared with nonswitchers (P<0·0001). The introduction of generic PPIs onto the Italian market was associated with an increasing amount of PPI prescribing related to chronic treatments, unlicensed indications (e.g. dyspespsia) and therapeutic substitutions. Growing overall costs linked to the phenomenon of PPI switching was also found. Our data support the need to assess the effects of the introduction of generic drugs on both clinical outcomes and the cost management of ARDs. © 2012 The Authors. European Journal of Clinical Investigation © 2012 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  9. Bone density in proton pump inhibitors users: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ozdil, Kamil; Kahraman, Resul; Sahin, Abdurrahman; Calhan, Turan; Gozden, Erdem H; Akyuz, Umit; Erer, Burak; Sokmen, Mehmet H

    2013-09-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) receive long-term therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) agents. Several studies have recently been published suggesting that treatment with PPI may cause bone fractures, although the number of prospective studies in this regard is limited. The aim of this study is to prospectively investigate the effect of PPIs on bone density. Between March 2009 and January 2011, 114 GERD patients (18-56 years) and 110 healthy controls were included in the present study. Bone mineral densitometry (BMD) by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was assessed at lumbar spine and femur neck. BMD measurements were performed on all subjects at the beginning of the study. The patients were divided according to three drugs by their treatment with esomeprazole, lansoprazole, or pantoprazole. The study group was followed for at least 6 months on PPI therapy, and then BMD measurements were repeated. The mean duration of treatment with PPIs was 8.5 ± 2.3 months. In patients receiving PPIs, the mean reduction in total vertebra T score following treatment compared to pre-treatment values was 00.23 ± 0.42 units (95 % CI 0.15-0.30) (p < 0.01), while the mean reduction in the femur T score was 0.10 ± 0.40 units (95 % CI 0.03-0.18) (p = 0.03). Reduction following treatment in L4 and total vertebra T scores of lansoprazole group was significantly higher than of pantoprazole group (p = 0.04). Reduction in femur T score of esomeprazole group was higher than of lansoprazole group and pantroprazole group, but it is not statistically significant. Treatment with a PPI results in a significant reduction in bone density. Close monitoring is beneficial for patients who are to receive long-term treatment with PPI.

  10. Gastric neuroendocrine neoplasms and proton pump inhibitors: fact or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Cavalcoli, Federica; Zilli, Alessandra; Conte, Dario; Ciafardini, Clorinda; Massironi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Reporting on three cases of gastric neuroendocrine tumors (g-NETs) in patients taking long-term proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These tumors are not classifiable considering current criteria. g-NETs are currently grouped as: types 1 and 2, related to hypergastrinemia due to chronic atrophic gastritis and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome respectively, and type 3, normogastrinemic and more aggressive. Although the g-NETs onset in patients taking PPIs is biologically plausible, only a few cases have been reported so far. From January 2005 to July 2014, 31 g-NETs were referred to our Unit: 24 (77%), one (3%) and three (10%) resulted types 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Three cases (10%) did not meet the current classification criteria. The three patients were administered long-term PPIs for gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Patient 1: a 78-year-old man, with a 4-mm well-differentiated g-NET (Ki-67<1%) and marked hypergastrinemia. Patient 2: a 58-year-old man affected by a 6-mm well-differentiated (Ki-67 = 4%) g-NET, with normal gastrin levels. Patients 3: a 67-year-old woman with an 18-mm well-differentiated g-NET (Ki-67 <2%), with mild hypergastrinemia. In the three patients, histology and pertinent blood tests excluded chronic atrophic gastritis, Helicobacter pylori infection or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. The first two patients underwent endoscopic polypectomy; in the third case total gastrectomy was performed. Further clinical, endoscopic and imaging follow-up did not show any g-NET recurrence. The present data point to the existence and epidemiological relevance of g-NETs associated with PPIs intake. These neoplasms are not included in the current classification, thus their treatment and follow-up have not been established.

  11. Clinical predictors associated with proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunyong; Lee, Hyuk; Park, Chan Hyuk; Shim, Choong Nam; Lee, Hyun Jik; Park, Jun Chul; Shin, Sung Kwan; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Yong Chan; Kim, Ha Yan; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence and case reports regarding proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia. Our study aimed to clarify the relationship between PPI use and serum magnesium levels and to specify high-risk patients. We retrospectively studied 112 consecutive patients aged 20 years or older who were treated with PPI for ≥30 days and whose serum magnesium levels were available for the PPI treatment period. We compared the mean level of serum magnesium of the enrolled patients with PPI treatment with matched controls. There were no significant differences between the matched PPI users (n = 105) and nonusers (n = 210) in the magnesium levels (0.85 ± 0.09 vs. 0.86 ± 0.16 mM, P = 0.297). In a subgroup analysis of a PPI user group, hypomagnesemia could be observed in 32 patients but not in 80 patients. In multivariate analyses, PPI use for >1 year, age less than 45 years, and concurrent cisplatin or carboplatin use were significantly associated with PPI-induced hypomagnesemia {P = 0.042, odds ratio [OR; 95% confidence interval (CI)]: 5.388 [1.056-27.493]; P = 0.007, OR [95% CI]: 4.710 [1.523-14.571]; P = 0.007, OR [95% CI]: 13.404 [2.066-86.952], respectively} after adjusting for confounders. This study shows that long-term PPI use is associated with hypomagnesemia in hospitalized adult patients. Therefore, serum magnesium levels should be checked before the initiation of PPI treatment and during the treatment period in patients, particularly those concurrently using platinum-based chemotherapy or who are expected to use PPI for long periods.

  12. Effect of proton pump inhibitor on esophageal eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Shauna; Capocelli, Kelley E; Masterson, Joanne C; Harris, Rachel; Protheroe, Cheryl; Lee, James J; Furuta, Glenn T

    2013-02-01

    Differentiation between the common etiologies of dense esophageal eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and eosinophilic esophagitis can be difficult. We hypothesized that histologic features may provide diagnostic clues concerning the etiology of esophageal eosinophilia. : We performed a retrospective chart review of 204 children with the diagnosis of esophagitis characterized by ≥ 15 eosinophils (eos) per high-power field (HPF) in at least 1 biopsy. We then restricted our analysis to subjects who had received at least 8 weeks of only proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) followed by endoscopy and who had a clinicopathologic response to this treatment. Symptoms, endoscopic findings, and pathologic descriptions were reviewed and an eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) index was determined to assess for degranulation/eosinophil activation. Of the 204 identified charts, 7 subjects identified met the inclusion criteria. Five of these 7 patients showed a clinicopathologic response to PPIs after their follow-up endoscopy, (mean peak eosinophil count: 92 vs 5 eos/HPF, and EPX index: 39.2 vs 14.6, pre- and posttreatment, respectively). Two patients experienced initial resolution of symptoms and esophageal eosinophilia with PPI therapy; however, within 17-23 months they redeveloped symptoms and esophageal eosinophilia while receiving PPI therapy at the time of a third endoscopy (mean peak eosinophil count: 40 vs 11 vs 36 eos/HPF, and EPX index: 44 vs 21 vs 36.5, pre-, post- and posttreatment, respectively). No clinicopathologic features or degranulation patterns differentiated subjects with GERD/PPI responsive esophageal eosinophilia from those who had transient response to PPI treatment. No clinicopathologic features differentiated subjects who responded to PPI treatment. PPI treatment can be helpful to exclude GERD and PPI responsive esophageal eosinophilia but long-term follow-up is critical in the management of esophagitis.

  13. Natural and Synthetic Polymers as Inhibitors of Drug Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Inhibition of efflux pumps is an emerging approach in cancer therapy and drug delivery. Since it has been discovered that polymeric pharmaceutical excipients such as Tweens® or Pluronics® can inhibit efflux pumps, various other polymers have been investigated regarding their potential efflux pump inhibitory activity. Among them are polysaccharides, polyethylene glycols and derivatives, amphiphilic block copolymers, dendrimers and thiolated polymers. In the current review article, natural and synthetic polymers that are capable of inhibiting efflux pumps as well as their application in cancer therapy and drug delivery are discussed. PMID:17896100

  14. Proton pump inhibitors: perspectives of patients and their GPs.

    PubMed

    Grime, J; Pollock, K; Blenkinsopp, A

    2001-09-01

    There is growing concern with the rapid increase in prescribing proton pump inhibitor drugs (PPIs) for a variety of gastrointestinal disorders, and the escalating costs associated with this trend. Explanations have included that general practitioners (GPs) prescribe PPIs inappropriately and that patients demand PPIs and use them as a way of avoiding having to make lifestyle changes. To compare the perspectives of GPs and their patients on the need for PPIs, to examine the pressure to prescribe, and to examine the effect of PPIs on lifestyle. Qualitative comparative study based on semi-structured interviews. Twenty-six GPs in seven practices in the West Midlands and 82 of their patients on repeat prescriptions for PPIs. Interviews were conducted covering a wide range of topics, including: experience, cause, course, and outcome of stomach problems; effectiveness of PPIs; and role of lifestyle in controlling symptoms. The transcripts were studied repeatedly to look for the occurrence and distribution of material relating to these issues, as well as other responder-driven issues. Codebooks were devised to enable a simple categorisation and systematic comparison of cases. GPs and patients agreed about the severity and unpleasantness of stomach symptoms for which PPIs were prescribed. While GPs and patients regarded PPIs as a very effective treatment, GPs rated their efficacy more highly than patients. Half of the GP interviews reproduced the stereotype of the demanding patient and of patients using PPIs to support unhealthy lifestyles. There was little evidence from patient interviews to support either stereotype. Doctors underestimated patient concerns about side-effects, safety, and long-term use of PPIs, and the willingness of patients to achieve the minimum effective dose by experimenting with their treatment. GPs felt that the pressure to prescribe PPIs was outweighed by the pressure not to prescribe, and most GPs had responded to the call to cut the prescribing of

  15. Optimal use of proton pump inhibitors for treating acid peptic diseases in primary care.

    PubMed

    Tack, J; Louis, E; Persy, V; Urbain, D

    2013-12-01

    Heartburn, reflux and epigastric pain are frequently encountered symptoms in primary care medicine. Acid peptic diseases such as peptic ulcer and gastrointestinal reflux disease have a high prevalence, can have important impact on patient quality of life and represent a considerable health care cost. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most potent pharmacological inhibitors of gastric acid secretion currently available and are the mainstay medical therapy for acid peptic diseases. This review summarizes current evidence on treatment of acid-peptic diseases with proton pump inhibitors and provides primary care clinicians with best practice guidelines for optimal use of these drugs.

  16. Transcriptome analysis of proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia reveals proton pump inhibitor-reversible allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ting; Dellon, Evan S; Moawad, Fouad J; Furuta, Glenn T; Aceves, Seema S; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal eosinophilia can be proton pump inhibitor (PPI) resistant or responsive, representing 2 entities known as eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), respectively. Although they present with similar clinical features, EoE is accepted to be an antigen-driven, TH2-associated allergic disorder, whereas the cause of PPI-REE remains a mystery. In this study, our aim was to investigate the pathogenesis of PPI-REE by using a recently described EoE diagnostic panel (EDP) composed of a set of 94 esophageal transcripts and to determine whether PPI therapy reverses any esophageal transcriptional abnormalities. We evaluated the EDP signature in biopsy samples obtained from adult and pediatric patients with PPI-REE from 4 institutions and compared the pre- and post-PPI therapy expression profiles of these subjects with those of patients with active EoE. The EDP differentiated patients with EoE from control subjects with 100% accuracy among the 4 clinical sites. Bioinformatics analysis revealed largely overlapping transcriptomes between patients with PPI-REE and those with EoE, including the genes for eosinophil chemotaxis (eotaxin 3, CCL26), barrier molecules (desmoglein 1, DSG1), tissue remodeling (periostin, POSTN), and mast cells (carboxypeptidase A, CPA3). PPI monotherapy alone almost completely reversed the allergic inflammatory transcriptome of patients with PPI-REE. Furthermore, we identified a set of candidate genes to differentiate patients with EoE from those with PPI-REE before treatment. These findings provide definitive evidence that PPI-REE is a disease entity with significant molecular overlap with EoE, suggesting that many patients with PPI-REE represent a continuum of the same pathogenic allergic mechanisms that underlie EoE and thus might constitute a subphenotype of patients with EoE. The ability of PPI therapy to nearly entirely reverse gene expression associated with PPI-REE, particularly that associated

  17. Review article: immediate-release proton-pump inhibitor therapy--potential advantages.

    PubMed

    Howden, C W

    2005-12-01

    The absorption of most oral proton-pump inhibitors is delayed by the enteric coating required to protect the acid-labile proton-pump inhibitor from degradation in the stomach and, as a result, antisecretory effect is also delayed. This article provides an overview of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a new immediate-release omeprazole [(IR-OME) Zegerid power for oral suspension; Santarus Inc., San Diego, CA, USA] and its potential advantages over delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors. Immediate-release omeprazole has a higher mean peak plasma omeprazole concentration (C(max)) and a significantly shorter mean time to reach C(max) (t(max)) than delayed-release omeprazole. Immediate-release omeprazole 40 mg has a prolonged antisecretory effect with median intragastric pH above 4.0 for 18.6 h/day at steady-state, after 7 days of once daily dosing. The sodium bicarbonate in immediate-release omeprazole protects the uncoated omeprazole from degradation by gastric acid. The accelerated antisecretory action of immediate-release omeprazole compared with delayed-release omeprazole may be due to the activation of proton pumps by the rapid neutralization of intragastric acid by the sodium bicarbonate. The faster onset of action seen with immediate-release omeprazole is not achieved by using an antacid with a delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor, because administering antacids with conventional delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors does not significantly enhance absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor. In conclusion, immediate-release omeprazole is associated with rapid absorption of omeprazole and rapid onset of antisecretory effect, without compromising the duration of acid suppression.

  18. Review article: similarities and differences among delayed-release proton-pump inhibitor formulations.

    PubMed

    Horn, J R; Howden, C W

    2005-12-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors are acid-labile, and require an enteric coating to protect them from degradation in the stomach when given orally. However, this leads to delayed absorption and onset of action of the proton-pump inhibitor. This article aims to review the similarities and differences between the various formulations of delayed release proton-pump inhibitors. Delayed-release omeprazole and delayed-release lansoprazole have been suspended in sodium bicarbonate for tube administration; however, for omeprazole, absorption is further impaired and antisecretory effects are disappointing. Although such formulations may be more convenient for clinical use in certain patient groups, absorption of the proton-pump inhibitor is still influenced by residual enteric coating. There are few differences among the currently available delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors with respect to their pharmacodynamic effects during chronic administration. There are minor formulation-based pharmacokinetic differences among these agents, primarily reflected in their bioavailability following the first few doses. Differences in bioavailability may explain slight differences in the rate of onset of maximal antisecretory effect. However, minor pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences are not associated with meaningful differences in clinical outcomes.

  19. Hypomagnesaemia due to use of proton pump inhibitors--a review.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, M T; Thang, H D; Arntzenius, A B

    2009-05-01

    Magnesium homeostasis is essential for many intracellular processes and depends on the balance of intestinal absorption and renal excretion. Hypomagnesaemia may arise from various disorders. We review the literature on hypomagnesaemia due to the use of proton pump inhibitors, as illustrated by a case of a 76-year-old woman with muscle cramps and lethargy caused by hypomagnesaemia and hypocalcaemia with a low parathyroid hormone level while using esomeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). After oral magnesium repletion both abnormalities resolved. Fractional magnesium excretion was low, excluding excessive renal loss. A causal relation with PPI use was supported by the recurrence of hypomagnesaemia after rechallenge. In the past decade our understanding of transcellular magnesium transport was enhanced by the discovery of several gene mutations i.e. transient receptor potential melastin (TR PM) 6 and 7. In this light we discuss the possible aetiology of proton pump inhibitor related hypomagnesaemia.

  20. Use of proton pump inhibitors and risk of fragility hip fracture in a Mediterranean region.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Carlen; Formiga, Francesc; Coderch, Marta; Hoyo, Jordi; Ferriz, Gemma; Casanovas, Jordi; Monteserín, Rosa; Brotons, Carlos; Rojas, Marta; Moral, Irene

    2013-02-01

    To determine whether there is an increased risk of hip fracture associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors in a Mediterranean area after adjusting for other potential risk factors. Retrospective multicenter case-control study carried out in 6 primary health care centers in Catalonia, Spain. Cases were patients aged 50years and over with a fragility hip fracture registered between January 2007 and December 2010, matched with 2 controls by sex and age. use of proton pump inhibitors (type, dosage) in the 5years previous to the hip fracture, socio-demographic data, body mass index, alcohol and tobacco consumption as well as health conditions and drugs associated with an increase risk of fragility hip fracture. 358 cases were matched with 698 controls. The mean age was 82years old in both groups. Women represented 77.1% in the case group and 76.9% in the control group. Crude association between proton pump inhibitors and hip fracture was 1.44 (95% CI, 1.09-1.89) and adjusted OR was 1.24 (95% CI, 0.93-1.65). No association was found with the continuous or discontinuous use of proton pump inhibitors, OR 1.17 (95% CI, 0.77-1.79), and OR of 1.16 (95% CI, 0.85-1.60) respectively. No association was found when restricting the analysis by sex, OR of 1.19 (95% CI, 0.27-5.14) or by age, younger or older than 80years, OR of 0.72 (95% CI, 0.24-2.15). The use of proton pump inhibitors was not associated with an increased risk of hip fracture after adjusting for other risk factors in a Mediterranean area. This result suggests the existence of protective environmental factors linked to this southern area of Europe that eventually could compensate for the potential harm produced by proton pump inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Are higher doses of proton pump inhibitors better in acute peptic bleeding?

    PubMed

    Villalón, Alejandro; Olmos, Roberto; Rada, Gabriel

    2016-06-24

    Although there is broad consensus about the benefits of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper peptic bleeding, there is still controversy over their optimal dosing. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 27 randomized trials addressing this question. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded high-dose proton pump inhibitors probably result in little or no difference in re-bleeding rate or mortality. The risk/benefit and cost/benefit balance probably favor use of low-doses.

  2. A study on the relation between proton pump inhibitor and gastric giardiasis.

    PubMed

    Kader, S A; Mansour, A M; Mohran, Z; el-Taoil, A; Abdalla, K F

    1998-04-01

    Thirty patients treated with proton pump inhibitor and still having symptoms related to gastritis or peptic ulcers were subjected to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and gastric biopsy for detection of giardiasis in these cases. Results showed presence of 3 (10%) cases of gastric giardiasis, intestinal metaplasia and presence of H. pylori in these cases. It is concluded that there may be a relation between the presence of gastric giardiasis and the intake of proton pump inhibitor. The endoscopists have to search for gastric giardiasis especially in the presence of H. pylori and/or intestinal metaplasia.

  3. [Proton pump inhibitors in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: what is the further step?].

    PubMed

    Simon, Mireille; Zerbib, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Optimisation of proton pump inhibitors use may improve reflux symptoms in 20-25% of the patients. Pathological gastro-oesophageal reflux should be documented in a patient with refractory reflux symptoms using upper endoscopy and/or pH testing. While on proton pump inhibitors twice daily, persistent symptoms are not related to gastro-oesophageal refluxdisease(GERD) in 50% of the patients. The new anti-reflux compounds have yet a limited efficacy and side effects that currently limit their development.

  4. The PI-PLC inhibitor U-73122 is a potent inhibitor of the SERCA pump in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, M A; Sergeant, G P; Thornbury, K D; McHale, N G

    2010-07-01

    In this issue MacMillan and McCarron in 2010 demonstrated that the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122 can potently inhibit Ca(2+) release from isolated smooth muscle cells independent of its effect on PLC. Their data suggest that the PLC inhibitor can block the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump in smooth muscle and cast doubt on the reliability of U-73122 as the main pharmacological tool to assess the role of the phosphotidyl inositol-PLC pathway in cellular signalling.

  5. Nanoparticles as Efflux Pump and Biofilm Inhibitor to Rejuvenate Bactericidal Effect of Conventional Antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Divya; Singh, Ajeet; Khan, Asad U.

    2017-07-01

    The universal problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotic reflects a serious threat for physicians to control infections. Evolution in bacteria results in the development of various complex resistance mechanisms to neutralize the bactericidal effect of antibiotics, like drug amelioration, target modification, membrane permeability reduction, and drug extrusion through efflux pumps. Efflux pumps acquire a wide range of substrate specificity and also the tremendous efficacy for drug molecule extrusion outside bacterial cells. Hindrance in the functioning of efflux pumps may rejuvenate the bactericidal effect of conventional antibiotics. Efflux pumps also play an important role in the exclusion or inclusion of quorum-sensing biomolecules responsible for biofilm formation in bacterial cells. This transit movement of quorum-sensing biomolecules inside or outside the bacterial cells may get interrupted by impeding the functioning of efflux pumps. Metallic nanoparticles represent a potential candidate to block efflux pumps of bacterial cells. The application of nanoparticles as efflux pump inhibitors will not only help to revive the bactericidal effect of conventional antibiotics but will also assist to reduce biofilm-forming capacity of microbes. This review focuses on a novel and fascinating application of metallic nanoparticles in synergy with conventional antibiotics for efflux pump inhibition.

  6. What are the precautions with proton pump inhibitor use for reflux disease?

    PubMed

    Mospan, Cortney M

    2015-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) affects 10% to 20% of the western world's population. Current treatment guidelines recommend proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as first-line therapy. Although PPIs cause mild adverse reactions, they pose risks, particularly for older adults with comorbidities.

  7. Synthesis and evaluation of inhibitors of bacterial drug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily.

    PubMed

    Okandeji, Babajide O; Greenwald, Daniel M; Wroten, Jessica; Sello, Jason K

    2011-12-15

    Inhibitors of drug efflux pumps have great potential as pharmacological agents that restore the drug susceptibility of multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens. Most attention has been focused on the discovery of small molecules that inhibit the resistance nodulation division (RND) family drug efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria. The prototypical inhibitor of RND-family efflux pumps in Gram-negative bacteria is MC-207,110 (Phe-Arg-β-naphthylamide), a C-capped dipeptide. Here, we report that C-capped dipeptides inhibit two chloramphenicol-specific efflux pumps in Streptomyces coelicolor, a Gram-positive bacterium that is a relative of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Diversity-oriented synthesis of a library of structurally related C-capped dipeptides via an Ugi four component reaction and screening of the resulting compounds resulted in the discovery of a compound that is threefold more potent as a suppressor of chloramphenicol resistance in S. coelicolor than MC-207,110. Since chloramphenicol resistance in S. coelicolor is mediated by major facilitator superfamily drug efflux pumps, our findings provide the first evidence that C-capped dipeptides can inhibit drug efflux pumps outside of the RND superfamily.

  8. Multidrug Efflux Pumps Attenuate the Effect of MGMT Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Schirrmacher, Ralf; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-11-02

    Various mechanisms of drug resistance attenuate the effectiveness of cancer therapeutics, including drug transport and DNA repair. The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is a key factor determining the resistance against alkylating anticancer drugs inducing the genotoxic DNA lesions O(6)-methylguanine and O(6)-chloroethylguanine, and MGMT inactivation or depletion renders cells more susceptible to treatment with methylating and chloroethylating agents. Highly specific and efficient inhibitors of the repair protein MGMT were designed, including O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)BG) and O(6)-(4-bromothenyl)guanine (O(6)BTG) that are nontoxic on their own. Unfortunately, these inhibitors do not select between MGMT in normal and cancer cells, causing nontarget effects in the healthy tissue. Therefore, a targeting strategy for MGMT inhibitors is required. Here, we used O(6)BG and O(6)BTG conjugated to β-d-glucose (O(6)BG-Glu and O(6)BTG-Glu, respectively) in order to selectively inhibit MGMT in tumors, harnessing their high demand for glucose. Both glucose conjugates efficiently inhibited MGMT in several cancer cell lines, but with different extents of sensitization to DNA alkylating agents, with lomustine being more effective than temozolomide. We further show that the glucose conjugates are subject to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated efflux, involving P-glycoprotein, MRP1, and BCRP, which impacts the efficiency of MGMT inhibition. Surprisingly, also O(6)BG and O(6)BTG were subject to an active transport out of the cell. We also show that pharmacological inhibition of efflux transporters increases the induction of cell death following treatment with these MGMT inhibitors and temozolomide. We conclude that strategies of attenuating the efflux by ABC transporters are required for achieving successful MGMT targeting.

  9. ENDOGENOUS SODIUM PUMP INHIBITORS, DIABETES MELLITUS AND PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Bagrov, Yakov Y.; Manusova, Natalia B.; Frolova, Elena V.; Egorova, Irina A.; Kashkin, Vladimir A.; Tapilskaya, Natalia I.; Fedorova, Olga V.; Bagrov, Alexei Y.

    2007-01-01

    Endogenous inhibitors of the Na/K-ATPase (NKA) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are both risk factors for preeclampsia and NaCl sensitive hypertension. Our goal was to test the hypothesis that NaCl supplementation, induces preeclampsia-like symptoms in pregnant rats with DM via stimulation of marinobufagenin (MBG), a natriuretic and vasoconstrictor inhibitor of the NKA. Type 2 DM in female Sprague-Dawley rats was induced by administration of 65 mg/kg streptozotocin at day 4 post partum. In intact rats, pregnancy was associated with a 2-fold increase in MBG levels and a mild impairment in glucose tolerance. Pregnant rats with DM exhibited fetal macrosomia, greater impairment of glucose tolerance, and higher levels of MBG as compared to that in normal pregnant rats. As compared to intact pregnant rats, NaCl supplementation of diabetic pregnant rats (drinking 1.8% NaCl during days 12-19 of pregnancy) was associated with an increase in systolic blood pressure, decreased fetal and placental weight, five-fold elevation of MBG excretion, and 42% inhibition of NKA in erythrocytes. In nonpregnant rats, in vivo pretreatment with anti-MBG antibody produced an exaggerated response of plasma levels of glucose and insulin in oral glucose tolerance test. These results suggest that MBG is a common factor in the pathogenesis of DM and preeclampsia, and that regulation of glucose tolerance may be one of the physiological functions of endogenous cardiotonic steroids. PMID:17942287

  10. Current Advances in Developing Inhibitors of Bacterial Multidrug 
Efflux Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Hannah Y.; Jamshidi, Shirin; Sutton, J. Mark; Rahman, Khondaker M.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance represents a significant challenge to future healthcare provision. An acronym ESKAPEE has been derived from the names of the organisms recognised as the major threats although there are a number of other organisms, notably Neisseria gonorrhoeae, that have become equally challenging to treat in the clinic. These pathogens are characterised by the ability to rapidly develop and/or acquire resistance mechanisms in response to exposure to different antimicrobial agents. A key part of the armoury of these pathogens is a series of efflux pumps, which effectively exclude or reduce the intracellular concentration of a large number of antibiotics, making the pathogens significantly more resistant. These efflux pumps are the topic of considerable interest, both from the perspective of basic understanding of efflux pump function, and its role in drug resistance but also as targets for the development of novel adjunct therapies. The necessity to overcome antimicrobial resistance has encouraged investigations into the characterisation of resistance-modifying efflux pump inhibitors to block the mechanisms of drug extrusion, thereby restoring antibacterial susceptibility and returning existing antibiotics into the clinic. A greater understanding of drug recognition and transport by multidrug efflux pumps is needed to develop clinically useful inhibitors, given the breadth of molecules that can be effluxed by these systems. This review discusses different bacterial EPIs originating from both natural source and chemical synthesis and examines the challenges to designing successful EPIs that can be useful against multidrug resistant bacteria. PMID:26947776

  11. Blockage of intracellular proton extrusion with proton extrusions with proton pump inhibitor induces apoptosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Marie; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Hee Jin; Cho, Sung Won; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lee, Kwang Jae

    2008-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors have been used for treatment of acid-related gastroesophageal diseases and they act as potent inhibitors of gastric acid pump, H(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Since cancer cells in vivo often exist in an ischemic microenvironment with a lower pH, maintenance of cellular pH is important for cell survival. In this study, we evaluated whether blocking of proton extrusion with proton pump inhibitors could inhibit the viability of gastric cancer cells. Treatment of human gastric cancer cells with proton pump inhibitors significantly attenuated cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The pro-apoptotic activity of proton pump inhibitors was mediated by release of cytochrome c and caspases activation. Gastric cancer cells showed the resistance to acidity of culture medium, which was related with a remarkable increase of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation in the acidic condition. This ERK1/2 phosphorylation was completely inhibited by pretreatment with proton pump inhibitors, suggesting that its inhibitory action on phosphorylation of ERK1/2 might contribute to the induction of apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest novel therapeutic approaches for gastric cancer with proton pump inhibitors.

  12. Proton pump inhibitor-amoxicillin-clarithromycin versus proton pump inhibitor-amoxicillin-metronidazole as first-line Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Suzuki, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and tolerability of the first-line Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication regimen composed of proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin, with those of a regimen composed of proton pump inhibitor, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. Data of patients, who were administered the first-line H. pylori eradication regimen at Tokyo Medical Center between 2008 and 2011, were reviewed. All patients had H. pylori gastritis without peptic ulcer disease. The 7-day triple regimen composed of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin was administered to 55 patients, and that composed of omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin was administered to 55 patients. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol eradication rates were 74.5 and 80.4%, respectively, for the regimen of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin, whereas the corresponding rates were 96.4 and 100%, respectively, for the regimen of omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin. In conclusion, first-line H. pylori eradication therapy composed of omeprazole, metronidazole, and amoxicillin was significantly more effective than that composed of lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin, without differences in tolerability.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux in children: pathogenesis, prevalence, diagnosis, and role of proton pump inhibitors in treatment.

    PubMed

    Gold, Benjamin D; Freston, James W

    2002-01-01

    A substantial percentage of infants, children and adolescents experience gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its accompanying symptoms, as well as disease complications. The diagnosis of GERD in children is made based upon the child's history, and data derived primarily from pH monitoring tests and endoscopy. In those children with confirmed reflux disease, the options for management parallel those recommended in adult patients, with the first step consisting of lifestyle changes. Surgical procedures may also be performed; however, these are rarely recommended prior to an adequate course of pharmacologic therapy, and appropriate case selection is important. Among the current pharmacotherapeutic options available in the US, the prokinetic agents and the acid-inhibitory agents (histamine-2 receptor antagonists, proton pump inhibitors) are the most widely used. The clinical utility of the prokinetic agents has been limited by the recent withdrawal of cisapride from the US marketplace and the potential for irreversible central nervous system complications with metoclopramide. Numerous clinical studies performed in adults, and several studies involving children, have demonstrated that the proton pump inhibitors are more effective than the histamine-2 receptor antagonists in the relief of GERD symptoms and healing of erosive esophagitis. In children, omeprazole and lansoprazole may be administered as the intact oral capsule, or in those who are unable or unwilling to swallow, the granule contents of the capsule may be mixed with soft foods (e.g. apple sauce) or fruit drinks/liquid dietary supplements prior to oral administration with no detrimental effects on pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, or pharmacodynamics. Studies performed with omeprazole and lansoprazole in children have shown pharmacokinetic parameters that closely resemble those observed in adults. In over a decade of use in adults, the proton pump inhibitor class of agents has been found to have a

  14. The relationship between long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy and skeletal frailty.

    PubMed

    Lau, Arthur N; Tomizza, Michael; Wong-Pack, Matthew; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Adachi, Jonathan D

    2015-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a commonly prescribed class of medications. Their use has been associated with an increased rate of fractures, most notably hip fractures. However, there does not seem to be a clear association between PPI use and bone mineral density measurements, assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry. The mechanism by which PPI use increases the risk of fractures remains unclear. This review will summarize the current evidence on this topic.

  15. Implications of over-the-counter proton pump inhibitors for patient counseling by pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Simonson, William

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews the literature on the role of the pharmacist in patient counseling and discusses how that role may apply to patients with frequent heartburn who are seeking an over-the-counter (OTC) treatment. Searches of the National Library of Medicine PubMed database were conducted using the terms "heartburn," "nonprescription," "therapy," "pharmacist," and "counseling," supplemented by additional searches on counseling for prescription products, and by the author's knowledge of pharmacy practice and the scientific literature. Accurate recognition of the signs of heartburn are an important first step in counseling a patient on the appropriate OTC medication; immediate referral to a health care provider is mandatory if cardiac pain or certain gastrointestinal symptoms are present. When counseling a patient about treatments for heartburn, the pharmacist should practice effective listening in an environment that is conducive to communication by the patient. Proton pump inhibitors are effective for the treatment of heartburn; the histamine2 receptor antagonists and antacids should also be considered for appropriate patients. Adverse events have been noted with proton pump inhibitors; however, overall the benefits significantly outweigh the risks and problems are unlikely to arise during the 2-week duration of OTC treatment of heartburn. Pharmacists can provide valuable services to patients with frequent heartburn, particularly with regard to counseling about the condition and appropriate OTC therapy. The availability of numerous OTC products, including antacids, histamine2 receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors, enables pharmacists to fulfill an important clinical role and improve patient satisfaction.

  16. Comparative Study of Proton Pump Inhibitors on Dexamethasone Plus Pylorus Ligation Induced Ulcer Model in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thippeswamy, A. H. M.; Sajjan, M.; Palkar, M. B.; Koti, B. C.; Viswanathaswamy, A. H. M.

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to compare ulcer protective effect of proton pump inhibitors viz. omeprazole, rabeprazole and lansoprazole against dexamethasone plus pylorus ligation induced ulcer model. Dexamethasone (5 mg/kg) was used as an ulcerogen. Dexamethasone suspended in 1% CMC in water was given orally to all the rats 15 min after the pylorus ligation. Omeprazole (20 mg/kg), rabeprazole (20 mg/kg), and lansoprazole (20 mg/kg) were administered by oral route 30 min prior to ligation was used for ulcer protective studies, gastric secretion and mucosal studies. Effects of proton pump inhibitors were determined by the evaluation of various biochemical parameters such as ulcer index, free and total acidity, gastric pH, mucin, pepsin and total proteins. Oral administration of proton pump inhibitors showed significant reduction in gastric acid secretion and ulcer protective activity against dexamethasone plus pylorus ligation induced ulcer model. The % protection of omeprazole, rabeprazole and lansoprazole was 84.04, 89.36 and 79.78, respectively. Rabeprazole significantly inhibited the acid-pepsin secretion and increased the gastric mucin secretion. The observations made in the present study suggest that rabeprazole is the most effective gastric antisecretory and ulcer healing agent as compared to omeprazole and lansoprazole. PMID:21188049

  17. Effects of rikkunshito on quality of life in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease refractory to proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takashi; Hirayama, Yoji; Oguchi, Aiko; Ishii, Fumi; Matushita, Masanao; Kitayama, Naoya; Morishita, Shinji; Hiratsuka, Noboru; Ohata, Ken; Konishi, Hiroyuki; Kishino, Maiko; Nakamura, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of rikkunshito, in combination with a proton pump inhibitor, on symptoms and quality of life in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease. The subjects were 47 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with residual symptoms such as heartburn following 8 weeks of proton pump inhibitor therapy. We administered these subjects rikkunshito in combination with a proton pump inhibitor for 6–8 weeks. We scored their symptoms of heartburn, fullness, abdominal discomfort, and abdominal pain, and surveyed their quality of life using the Reflux Esophagitis Symptom Questionnaire, comprising questions concerning daily activities, meals (changes in amount and favorite foods), and sleep (getting to sleep and early morning waking). Improvement was seen in all symptoms, and quality of life scores for meals and sleep also improved. These results indicate that combination therapy with rikkunshito and a proton pump inhibitor improves quality of life related to eating and sleep in patients with patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  18. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on markers of risk for high-grade dysplasia and oesophageal cancer in Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Hillman, L C; Chiragakis, L; Shadbolt, B; Kaye, G L; Clarke, A C

    2008-02-15

    It has been shown that the presence on diagnosis of endoscopic macroscopic markers indicates a high-risk group for Barrett's oesophagus. To determine whether proton pump inhibitor therapy prior to diagnosis of Barrett's oesophagus influences markers for risk development of subsequent high-grade dysplasia/adenocarcinoma. A review of all patients with Barrett's oesophagus entering a surveillance programme was undertaken. Five hundred and two patients diagnosed with Barrett's oesophagus were assessed on diagnosis for endoscopic macroscopic markers or low-grade dysplasia. Subsequent development of high-grade dysplasia/adenocarcinoma was documented. The relationship between the initiation of proton pump inhibitor therapy prior to the diagnosis of BE and the presence of macroscopic markers or low-grade dysplasia at entry was determined. Fourteen patients developed high-grade dysplasia/adenocarcinoma during surveillance. Patients who entered without prior proton pump inhibitor therapy were 3.4 times (95% CI: 1.98-5.85) more likely to have a macroscopic marker or low-grade dysplasia than those patients already on a proton pump inhibitor. Use of proton pump inhibitor therapy prior to diagnosis of Barrett's oesophagus significantly reduced the presence of markers used to stratify patient risk. Widespread use of proton pump inhibitors will confound surveillance strategies for patients with Barrett's oesophagus based on entry characteristics but is justified because of the lower risk of neoplastic progression.

  19. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  20. Efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) as new antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Mottawea, Walid; Abujamel, Turki; Taher, Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen and one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections worldwide. The difficulty in treatment of pseudomonas infections arises from being multidrug resistant (MDR) and exhibits resistance to most antimicrobial agents due to the expression of different mechanisms overcoming their effects. Of these resistance mechanisms, the active efflux pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that belong to the resistance nodulation division (RND) plays a very important role in extruding the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells providing a protective means against their antibacterial activity. Beside its role against the antimicrobial agents, these pumps can extrude biocides, detergents, and other metabolic inhibitors. It is clear that efflux pumps can be targets for new antimicrobial agents. Peptidomimetic compounds such as phenylalanine arginyl β-naphthylamide (PAβN) have been introduced as efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs); their mechanism of action is through competitive inhibition with antibiotics on the efflux pump resulting in increased intracellular concentration of antibiotic, hence, restoring its antibacterial activity. The advantage of EPIs is the difficulty to develop bacterial resistance against them, but the disadvantage is their toxic property hindering their clinical application. The structure activity relationship of these compounds showed other derivatives from PAβN that are higher in their activity with higher solubility in biological fluids and decreased toxicity level. This raises further questions on how can we compact Pseudomonas infections. Of particular importance, the recent resurgence in the use of older antibiotics such as polymyxins and probably applying stricter control measures in order to prevent their spread in clinical sittings. PMID:21594004

  1. Influence of efflux pump inhibitors on the multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Tang, Fu-Ai; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) on multidrug resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: H. pylori strains were isolated and cultured on Brucella agar plates with 10% sheep’s blood. The multidrug resistant (MDR) H. pylori were obtained with the inducer chloramphenicol by repeated doubling of the concentration until no colony was seen, then the susceptibilities of the MDR strains and their parents to 9 antibiotics were assessed with agar dilution tests. The present study included periods before and after the advent of the EPIs, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP), reserpine and pantoprazole), and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined accordingly. In the same way, the effects of 5 proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), used in treatment of H. pylori infection, on MICs of antibiotics were evaluated. RESULTS: Four strains of MDR H. pylori were induced successfully, and the antibiotic susceptibilities of MDR strains were partly restored by CCCP and pantoprazole, but there was little effect of reserpine. Rabeprazole was the most effective of the 5 PPIs which could decrease the MICs of antibiotics for MDR H. pylori significantly. CONCLUSION: In vitro, some EPIs can strengthen the activities of different antibiotics which are the putative substrates of the efflux pump system in H. pylori. PMID:20222174

  2. Phenylpropanoids of Alpinia galanga as efflux pump inhibitors in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc² 155.

    PubMed

    Roy, Somendu K; Pahwa, Sonika; Nandanwar, Hemraj; Jachak, Sanjay M

    2012-10-01

    The first and second line drugs used for the treatment of tuberculosis are now becoming ineffective due to emergence of resistant strains. Efflux pump provokes resistance in mycobacterium and hence could be explored as a new target for the discovery of anti-TB agents. In search of efflux pump inhibitors, MIC and modulation factor of phenylpropanoids isolated from A. galanga rhizome were determined prior to the accumulation and efflux assay. Phenylpropanoid compounds viz. 1'-S-1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, trans-p-coumaryl diacetate and 1'-S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate were found to be potent modulators and decreased the MIC of ethidium bromide by 64 fold at the concentration of 2.5, 6.25 and 5.0 mg/L respectively. 1'-S-1'-acetoxyeugenol acetate enhanced the accumulation and inhibited the efflux of EtBr in Mycobacterium smegmatis mc² 155 cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Abdul.Hye, A.B.M.

    1983-10-25

    A pump for injecting chemicals into a well employs a pivot arm for synchronous movement with a well pump. The pivot arm causes reciprocation of a plunger within the body of the chemical pump. The plunger, during its upward stroke causes the entry of chemicals from an outside source into the pump body and, during its downward stroke, causes the exiting of the chemicals into the well. (2 claims.

  4. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii serum-associated antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn; Dunman, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca(2+) channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Identification of Acinetobacter baumannii Serum-Associated Antibiotic Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Catlyn; Barnett, Pamela; Perlmutter, Jessamyn

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive antibiotic resistance is a newly described phenomenon by which Acinetobacter baumannii induces efflux pump activity in response to host-associated environmental cues that may, in part, account for antibiotic treatment failures against clinically defined susceptible strains. To that end, during adaptation to growth in human serum, the organism induces approximately 22 putative efflux-associated genes and displays efflux-mediated minocycline tolerance at antibiotic concentrations corresponding to patient serum levels. Here, we show that in addition to minocycline, growth in human serum elicits A. baumannii efflux-mediated tolerance to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin, meropenem, tetracycline, and tigecycline. Moreover, using a whole-cell high-throughput screen and secondary assays, we identified novel serum-associated antibiotic efflux inhibitors that potentiated the activities of antibiotics toward serum-grown A. baumannii. Two compounds, Acinetobacter baumannii efflux pump inhibitor 1 (ABEPI1) [(E)-4-((4-chlorobenzylidene)amino)benezenesulfonamide] and ABEPI2 [N-tert-butyl-2-(1-tert-butyltetrazol-5-yl)sulfanylacetamide], were shown to lead to minocycline accumulation within A. baumannii during serum growth and inhibit the efflux potential of the organism. While both compounds also inhibited the antibiotic efflux properties of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, they did not display significant cytotoxicity toward human cells or mammalian Ca2+ channel inhibitory effects, suggesting that ABEPI1 and ABEPI2 represent promising structural scaffolds for the development of new classes of bacterial antibiotic efflux pump inhibitors that can be used to potentiate the activities of current and future antibiotics for the therapeutic intervention of Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:25114126

  6. TOPPITS: Trial Of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Throat Symptoms. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gillian; O'Hara, James; Carding, Paul; Lecouturier, Jan; Stocken, Deborah; Fouweather, Tony; Wilson, Janet

    2016-04-01

    Persistent throat symptoms and Extra Oesophageal Reflux (EOR) are among the commonest reasons for attendance at a secondary care throat or voice clinic. There is a growing trend to treat throat symptom patients with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to suppress stomach acid, but most controlled studies fail to demonstrate a significant benefit of PPI over placebo. In addition, patient views on PPI use vary widely. A UK multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial for adults with persistent throat symptoms to compare the effectiveness of treatment with the proton pump inhibitor (PPI) lansoprazole versus placebo. The trial includes a six-month internal pilot, during which three sites will recruit 30 participants in total, to assess the practicality of the trial and assess the study procedures and willingness of the patient population to participate. If the pilot is successful, three additional sites will be opened to recruitment, and a further 302 participants recruited across the six main trial sites. Further trial sites may be opened, as necessary. The main trial will continue for a further 18 months. Participants will be followed up for 12 months from randomisation, throughout which both primary and secondary outcome data will be collected. The primary outcome is change in Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) score, the 'area standard' for this type of assessment, after 16 weeks (four months) of treatment. Secondary outcomes are RSI changes at 12 months after randomisation, Quality of Life assessment at four and 12 months, laryngeal mucosal changes, assessments of compliance and side effects, and patient-reported satisfaction. TOPPITS is designed to evaluate the relative effectiveness of treatment with a proton pump inhibitor versus placebo in patients with persistent throat symptoms. This will provide valuable information to clinicians and GPs regarding the treatment and management of care for these patients, on changes in symptoms, and in Quality of Life, over time. ISRCTN

  7. Prescribing patterns and economic costs of proton pump inhibitors in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Alejandra; Castrillón, Juan Daniel; Campo, Carlos Felipe; Echeverri, Luis Felipe; Gaviria, Andrés; Londoño, Manuel José; Ochoa, Sergio Andrés; Ruíz, Joaquín Octavio

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prescribing patterns for proton pump inhibitors and to estimate the economic cost of their use in a group of patients affiliated with the Colombian Health System. Methods: This is a descriptive observational study. Data for analysis consisted of prescriptions dispensed between October 1st, 2010 and October 31st, 2010 and were collected from a systematic database of 4.2 million members. Socio-demographic variables were considered along with the defined daily dose,comedication, convenience of the indication for proton pump inhibitor use and costs. Results: In this study, 113,560 prescriptions were dispensed in 89 cities, mostly to women (57.6%) with a mean age of 54.4 ± 18.7 years; the drugs were omeprazole (n= 111.294; 97.81%),esomeprazole (n= 1.378; 1.2%), lansoprazole (n= 524; 0.4%), pantoprazole and rabeprazole. The indication for 87.349 of the formulas (76.9%) was justified and statistically associated with the use of NSAIDs, antithrombotics, corticosteroids, anti-ulcer, antibiotics and prokinetics. No justification was found for 26.211 (23.1%) of the prescriptions, which were associated with antidiabetics, antihypertensives, hypolipidemics and others (p <0.001).The annual justified cost was estimated to be US$ 1,654,701 and the unjustified cost was estimated to be U.S. $2,202,590, as calculated using the minimum reference prices. Discussion: Each month, the Colombian health system is overloaded by unjustified costs that include payments for non-approved indications of proton pump inhibitors and for drugs outside the list of essential medications. This issue is contributing to rising costs of healthcare in Colombia. PMID:24892316

  8. Improved Potency of Indole-Based NorA Efflux Pump Inhibitors: From Serendipity toward Rational Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Buonerba, Federica; Lepri, Susan; Goracci, Laura; Schindler, Bryan D; Seo, Susan M; Kaatz, Glenn W; Cruciani, Gabriele

    2017-01-12

    The NorA efflux pump is a potential drug target for reversal of resistance to selected antibacterial agents, and recently we described indole-based inhibitor candidates. Herein we report a second class of inhibitors derived from them but with significant differences in shape and size. In particular, compounds 13 and 14 are very potent inhibitors in that they demonstrated the lowest IC50 values (2 μM) ever observed among all indole-based compounds we have evaluated.

  9. Hypomagnesaemia associated with long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Toh, James Wei Tatt; Ong, Evonne; Wilson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Hypomagnesaemia and associated hypocalcaemia and hypoparathyroidism have been increasingly recognised as rare long-term side-effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The PPIs may inhibit active magnesium (Mg) absorption by interfering with transcellular transient receptor potential melastatin-6 and -7 (TRPM 6 and 7) channels. More recent cell culture studies have suggested concomitant inhibition of passive Mg absorption by omeprazole. After being treated with a range of PPIs, the four patients in our case series developed hypomagnesaemia, which responded to withdrawal of therapy and initiation of Mg replacement. Their clinical course and management demonstrate key aspects of hypomagnesaemia associated with long-term use of PPIs. PMID:25138239

  10. Proton Pump Inhibitor use in Hospitalized Patients: Is Overutilization Becoming a Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Cheryl; Willett, Kristine C.; Desilets, Alicia R.

    2012-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most common classes of medications prescribed. Though they were previously thought of as safe, recent literature has shown risks associated with their use including increased risk for Clostridium difficile infection, pneumonia, and fractures. Due to these risks, it is important to determine if PPIs are being used appropriately. This review evaluates seven studies in hospitalized patients. Additionally, this review evaluates literature pertaining to recently discovered adverse reactions; all studies found PPIs are being overutilized. Findings highlight the importance of evaluating appropriate therapy with these agents and recommending discontinuation if a proper indication does not exist. PMID:24833936

  11. Antagonism of Fluconazole and a Proton Pump Inhibitor against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ning; Köhler, Julia R

    2016-02-01

    Hospitalized ill patients, at risk for invasive candidiasis, often receive multiple medications, including proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The antifungal fluconazole perturbs the vacuolar proton ATPase. The PPI omeprazole antagonized Candida albicans growth inhibition by fluconazole. A C. albicans codon-adapted pHluorin, Ca.pHluorin, was generated to measure cytosolic pH. The fungal cytosol was acidified by omeprazole and realkalinized by coexposure to fluconazole. Vacuolar pH was alkalinized by fluconazole. Off-target effects of any medication on fungal pathogens may occur.

  12. The Ca2+ pump inhibitor, thapsigargin, inhibits root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Daniela C; Silva, Herman; Meisel, Lee A

    2006-01-01

    Thapsigargin, a specific inhibitor of most animal intracellular SERCA-type Ca2+ pumps present in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum, was originally isolated from the roots of the Mediterranean plant Thapsia gargancia L. Here, we demonstrate that this root-derived compound is capable of altering root gravitropism in Arabidopsis thaliana. Thapsigargin concentrations as low as 0.1 microM alter root gravitropism whereas under similar conditions cyclopiazonic acid does not. Furthermore, a fluorescently conjugated thapsigargin (BODIPY FL thapsigargin) suggests that target sites for thapsigargin are located in intracellular organelles in the root distal elongation zone and the root cap, regions known to regulate root gravitropism.

  13. [Chronic use of proton pump inhibitors: is the risk of osteoporosis and fractures real?].

    PubMed

    Martí-Cabrera, Miguel; Martí-Masanet, Miguel; Esplugues, Juan V

    2011-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are one of the most widely used groups of drugs and their potential toxicity is periodically reviewed, emphasizing aspects originally considered secondary. The present review analyzes the physiological and pharmacological bases and the scarce clinical evidence for a potential association between the continued administration of PPI and the development of osteoporosis and bone fractures. Both disorders are clearly related to calcium homeostasis and are highly important in elderly patients due to their poor general prognosis and disabling consequences. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [Adverse events associated with long-term use of proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2012-09-24

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) remain the leading therapy for acid-related disorders. Long-term PPI use increases the risk of pneumonia and enteric bacterial infections and of nosocomial Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea. PPIs do not lead to vitamin B12 or iron deficiencies and do not induce malignancies or increase the risk of major birth defects. Prolonged PPI use may be a weak risk factor for certain fractures and results in hypergastrinaemia and parietal cell hyperplasia leading to rebound acid hypersecretion, which may induce symptoms on withdrawal of therapy.

  15. Proton Pump Inhibitor Prophylaxis After Gastric Bypass Does Not Cause Hypomagnesemia.

    PubMed

    Boerlage, Thomas C C; van Hees, Charlotte L E; Huitema, Alwin D R; Lauw, Fanny N

    2016-03-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia is currently a major topic. Patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are generally prescribed PPI prophylaxis after surgery. We investigated the prevalence of hypomagnesemia in our bariatric population. We reviewed the files of 1000 postoperative patients for serum magnesium level during PPI use. We found only five cases of hypomagnesemia, none of which was evidently related to PPI use. We conclude that the risk of hypomagnesemia during 1 year of prophylactic PPI use after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is minimal and laboratory screening is probably not necessary.

  16. Evidence-based assessment of proton-pump inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori eradication: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Vinayak; Eslick, Guy D

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease continues to be issue especially due to its high prevalence in the developing world. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection associated duodenal ulcers should undergo eradication therapy. There are many regimens offered for H. pylori eradication which include triple, quadruple, or sequential therapy regimens. The central aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the evidence for H. pylori therapy from a meta-analytical outlook. The consequence of the dose, type of proton-pump inhibitor, and the length of the treatment will be debated. The most important risk factor for eradication failure is resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole. PMID:25356018

  17. Allosteric inhibitors of plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps: Invention and applications of caloxins

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Jyoti; Szewczyk, Magdalena M; Grover, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane Ca2+ pumps (PMCA) play a major role in Ca2+ homeostasis and signaling by extruding cellular Ca2+ with high affinity. PMCA isoforms are encoded by four genes which are expressed differentially in various cell types in normal and disease states. Therefore, PMCA isoform selective inhibitors would aid in delineating their role in physiology and pathophysiology. We are testing the hypothesis that extracellular domains of PMCA can be used as allosteric targets to obtain a novel class of PMCA-specific inhibitors termed caloxins. This review presents the concepts behind the invention of caloxins and our progress in this area. A section is also devoted to the applications of caloxins in literature. We anticipate that isoform-selective caloxins will aid in understanding PMCA physiology in health and disease. With strategies to develop therapeutics from bioactive peptides, caloxins may become clinically useful in cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, retinopathy, cancer and contraception. PMID:21537489

  18. Which is the best choice for gastroesophageal disorders: Melatonin or proton pump inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Torres, Joanna Dulce Favacho; de Souza Pereira, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is used in many countries to improve sleep disorders. Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland and enterochromaffin cells which control sleep and gastrointestinal motility. Low levels of melatonin lead to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Most of patients with GERD have a sleep disorder. So, low melatonin levels is the main cause of insomnia. Beyond this, it has an inhibitory action on gastric acid secretion and seems to control the lower esophageal sphincter. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a group of drugs whose main action is a pronounced and long-lasting reduction of gastric acid production. They are the most potent inhibitors of acid secretion available today. Omeprazole (one of the PPIs) and melatonin have similarities in their chemical structures. Therefore, we could consider omeprazole as a rough copy of melatonin. In this paper, we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the clinical use of melatonin and PPIs. PMID:21577303

  19. The role of the pharmacist in the selection and use of over-the-counter proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Helen F; Heeley, Gordon

    2015-10-01

    Heartburn and other symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux occur in ~30% of survey respondents in multiple countries worldwide. Heartburn and acid regurgitation are common complaints in the pharmacy, where patients frequently seek relief through medication and advice. The growing number of proton-pump inhibitors available in the over-the-counter setting provides an efficacious choice to patients experiencing frequent heartburn. Pharmacists can assist patients in their treatment decisions whilst inquiring about alarm symptoms that should prompt a physician referral. Aim of the review Provide pharmacists with a review of current clinical research and expert guidelines on use of over-the-counter proton-pump inhibitors. This narrative review was conducted to identify publications relevant to the following themes: overview of available treatments for frequent episodes of heartburn/acid regurgitation; treatment algorithms providing guidance on when to use over-the-counter proton-pump inhibitors; and the role of the pharmacist in the use of over-the-counter proton-pump inhibitors. Frequent symptoms of acid reflux, such as heartburn and acid regurgitation, can interfere substantially with daily life activities. Proton-pump inhibitors are the most efficacious treatment for frequent reflux symptoms and are recommended as an appropriate initial treatment in uncomplicated cases. Proton-pump inhibitors have varying pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics across the class; 20 mg esomeprazole has higher bioavailability and exposure than over-the-counter omeprazole, for example. However, differences in clinical efficacy for symptom relief have not been demonstrated. The safety and tolerability of proton-pump inhibitors have been well established in clinical trial and post-marketing settings, and use of a short regimen is associated with a very low likelihood of missing a more serious condition. Pharmacists can assist patients with accurate self-diagnosis by asking short, simple

  20. Review article: prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding with proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maton, P N

    2005-12-01

    Stress-related gastric mucosal bleeding occurs in a substantial number of critically ill patients, with clinically important gastrointestinal bleeding prolonging intensive care stay and increasing mortality. This paper reviews the role of proton-pump inhibitors in the prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding. Bleeding prophylaxis appears to be warranted in patients in intensive care units on mechanical ventilation or those who have coagulopathy. Intravenous histamine H2 receptor antagonists, particularly cimetidine, have demonstrated efficacy for the prevention of bleeding in critically ill patients. Standard delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors have not been extensively studied in this patient group, but there are some data to support their efficacy in increasing intragastric pH, and in the case of intravenous pantoprazole in preventing gastrointestinal bleeding. In a large, randomized controlled trial, immediate-release omeprazole [(IR-OME) Zegerid powder for oral suspension; Santarus Inc., San Diego, CA, USA] administered via gastric tube, was as effective as intravenous cimetidine in the prevention of clinically significant bleeding, and more effective in increasing gastric pH. Effective antisecretory therapy does not appear to increase the risk of nosocomial pneumonia. In conclusion, immediate-release omeprazole provides a safe and effective alternative to intravenous cimetidine for the prevention of stress-related mucosal bleeding in critically ill patients.

  1. Virtual screening for novel Staphylococcus Aureus NorA efflux pump inhibitors from natural products.

    PubMed

    Thai, Khac-Minh; Ngo, Trieu-Du; Phan, Thien-Vy; Tran, Thanh-Dao; Nguyen, Ngoc-Vinh; Nguyen, Thien-Hai; Le, Minh-Tri

    2015-01-01

    NorA is a member of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) drug efflux pumps that have been shown to mediate antibiotic resistance in Staphylococcus aureus (SA). In this study, QSAR analysis, virtual screening and molecular docking were implemented in an effort to discover novel SA NorA efflux pump inhibitors. Originally, a set of 47 structurally diverse compounds compiled from the literature was used to develop linear QSAR models and another set of 15 different compounds were chosen for extra validation. The final model which was estimated by statistical values for the full data set (n = 45, Q(2) = 0.80, RMSE = 0.20) and for the external test set (n = 15, R(2) = 0.60, |res|max = 0.75, |res|min = 0.02) was applied on the collection of 182 flavonoides and the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) database to screen for novel NorA inhibitors. Finally, 33 lead compounds that met the Lipinski's rules of five/three and had good predicted pIC50 values from in silico screening process were employed to analyze the binding ability by docking studies on NorA homology model in place of its unavailable crystal structures at two active sites, the central channel and the Walker B.

  2. Proton pump inhibitors as anti vacuolar-ATPases drugs: a novel anticancer strategy.

    PubMed

    Spugnini, Enrico P; Citro, Gennaro; Fais, Stefano

    2010-05-08

    The vacuolar ATPases are ATP-dependent proton pumps whose functions include the acidification of intracellular compartments and the extrusion of protons through the cell cytoplasmic membrane. These pumps play a pivotal role in the regulation of cell pH in normal cells and, to a much greater extent, in tumor cells. In fact, the glucose metabolism in hypoxic conditions by the neoplasms leads to an intercellular pH drift towards acidity. The acid microenvironment is modulated through the over-expression of H+ transporters that are also involved in tumor progression, invasiveness, distant spread and chemoresistance. Several strategies to block/downmodulate the efficiency of these transporters are currently being investigated. Among them, proton pump inhibitors have shown to successfully block the H+ transporters in vitro and in vivo, leading to apoptotic death. Furthermore, their action seems to synergize with conventional chemotherapy protocols, leading to chemosensitization and reversal of chemoresistance. Aim of this article is to critically revise the current knowledge of this cellular machinery and to summarize the therapeutic strategies developed to counter this mechanism.

  3. Randomized, double-blind, comparative study of oral metronidazole and tinidazole in treatment of bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Raja, Indu M; Basavareddy, Asha; Mukherjee, Deepali; Meher, Bikash Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and tolerability of oral metronidazole and tinidazole in patients with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using Amsel's criteria. This was a randomized double-blind study, conducted by the Departments of Pharmacology and Gynecology of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients diagnosed with BV received either tablet metronidazole 500 mg twice daily for 5 days or tablet tinidazole 500 mg once daily + one placebo for 5 days and instructed to come for follow-up at the 1(st) week and 4(th) week. They were categorized as cured, partially cured, and not cured based on Amsel's criteria at the end of the study and compared between two groups using Chi-square test. A total 120 women were enrolled in the study, of which 114 completed the study. The treatment arms were comparable. The cure rate with low-dose tinidazole was significantly more compared to metronidazole at 4(th) week (P = 0.0013), but not at 1(st) week (P = 0.242). The adverse drug reactions were less with tinidazole compared to metronidazole. Tinidazole at lower dose offers a better efficacy than metronidazole in long-term cure rates and in preventing relapses with better side effect profile.

  4. Randomized, double-blind, comparative study of oral metronidazole and tinidazole in treatment of bacterial vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Indu M.; Basavareddy, Asha; Mukherjee, Deepali; Meher, Bikash Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy and tolerability of oral metronidazole and tinidazole in patients with bacterial vaginosis (BV) using Amsel's criteria. Patients and Methods: This was a randomized double-blind study, conducted by the Departments of Pharmacology and Gynecology of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Patients diagnosed with BV received either tablet metronidazole 500 mg twice daily for 5 days or tablet tinidazole 500 mg once daily + one placebo for 5 days and instructed to come for follow-up at the 1st week and 4th week. They were categorized as cured, partially cured, and not cured based on Amsel's criteria at the end of the study and compared between two groups using Chi-square test. Results: A total 120 women were enrolled in the study, of which 114 completed the study. The treatment arms were comparable. The cure rate with low-dose tinidazole was significantly more compared to metronidazole at 4th week (P = 0.0013), but not at 1st week (P = 0.242). The adverse drug reactions were less with tinidazole compared to metronidazole. Conclusion: Tinidazole at lower dose offers a better efficacy than metronidazole in long-term cure rates and in preventing relapses with better side effect profile. PMID:28066102

  5. Specific proton pump inhibitors E3810 and lansoprazole affect the recovery process of gastric secretion in rats differently.

    PubMed

    Tomiyama, Y; Morii, M; Takeguchi, N

    1994-11-29

    After a single subcutaneous administration (30 mg/kg) of proton pump inhibitor 2-[(4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridin-2-yl)-methylsulfiny l]- 1H-benzimidazole sodium salt (E3810), or lansoprazole in rats, time courses of inhibitory and recovery processes of acid secretion in vivo and pump enzyme activity in isolated microsomes were measured. The acid secretion rate which reflects H+,K(+)-ATPase activity in the secretory canalicular (apical) membrane was compared with that in the microsomal fraction which consists mostly of resting, intracellularly-pooled tubulovesicles. We found that the canalicular pump was first inhibited, followed by slow inhibition of the microsomal pump enzyme activity, with the rate of the latter process depending on the inhibitors. It took 2.5 hr for the half-maximal inhibition of the microsomal pump in E3810-treated rats, and 6 hr in lansoprazole-treated rats. The acid secretion and the microsomal enzyme activity completely recovered within 48 hr after the administration of E3810, but recovered by only 20% even 96 hr after the administration of lansoprazole. Incubation with dithiothreitol of isolated microsomes obtained from E3810-treated rats reactivated the enzyme activity, but not from rats treated with lansoprazole. These results suggest that dissociation of inhibitor from the pump and/or intracellular transport of the pump is affected differently by these inhibitors. Furthermore, it is possible that the half life of the proton pump protein is much longer (greater than 96 hr) than the previously proposed value of 30-48 hr.

  6. [Impact of pharmacotherapeutic warnings on the prescription of clopidogrel and proton pump inhibitors in hospitalised patients].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Ruiz-Gordoa, M; Tenías Burillo, J M; Ruiz Martín de la Torre, R; Valenzuela Gámez, J C

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the frequency of clopidogrel prescriptions in association with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients hospitalised with circulatory pathologies, after the publication of several warnings about this association. To identify and quantify the magnitude of the factors related to the prescription of both drugs. Observational, analytical, longitudinal, and retrospective study assessing changes in prescription of clopidogrel-PPIs association after and before the first official warning (about these drugs' interactions) was published. We selected all patients with a code indicating a circulatory system disease in the Minimum Basic Data Set, who had been prescribed clopidogrel during hospital admission. We also evaluated proton pump inhibitor use in these patients (omeprazole and pantoprazole). 5678 patients diagnosed with circulatory diseases were admitted during 2009, and clopidogrel was prescribed in 13.6% of them. In the pre-warning period, clopidogrel-PPIs prescriptions were significantly higher than in the post-warning period (80, 8% vs 48, 6%), especially in omeprazole. The combined prescription was lower if the circulatory diagnosis was the main cause for hospitalisation, if the patient had heart disease, if the patient was admitted in Internal Medicine/Cardiology or Intensive care units, and if the period of time was further from warning. Combined prescription has decreased since the first warning, above all in patients with a primary circulatory heart disease. Omeprazole is a potent CYP2C19 inhibitor, so it was used in lower rates than pantoprazole in association with clopidogrel. Medical departments related to cardiovascular disease followed the warning more than others. Copyright © 2011 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. The use of metronidazole, tinidazole and dimetridazole in eliminating trichomonads from laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Roach, P D; Wallis, P M; Olson, M E

    1988-10-01

    Metronidazole, tinidazole and dimetridazole were administered in the drinking water for 5 days to mice experimentally infected with Tritrichomonas muris and Tetratrichomonas microta. Mice were successfully infected with T. muris and T. microta recovered from infected gerbils. The trichomonas infection was successfully eliminated in mice given a 1% sucrose solution containing 2.5 mg/ml metronidazole or tinidazole. Mice receiving 1.0 mg/ml metronidazole, 1.0 mg/ml tinidazole and 1.2, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/ml dimetridazole failed to eliminate the trichomonas organism. A reduction in water intake was only noted with mice receiving 10 mg/ml dimetridazole. In mice receiving only 1% sucrose the infection was not eliminated.

  8. [In vitro susceptibility of Trichomonas vaginalis to metronidazole, ornidazole and proton pump inhibitors pantoprazole and esomeprazole].

    PubMed

    Aksoy Gökmen, Ayşegül; Girginkardeşler, Nogay; Kilimcioğlu, Ali Ahmet; Şirin, Mümtaz Cem; Özbilgin, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of trichomoniasis is based on the use of 5-nitroimidazole derivatives. Although metronidazole is reliable, inexpensive and highly effective against anaerobic microorganisms and protozoa, the development of metronidazole-resistant T.vaginalis strains pose to an increasing problem. Nitroimidazoles are compounds having azomycin (2-nitroimidazole) chemical structure and are obtained from Streptomyces strains. Benzimidazole, which is found in the structure of proton pump inhibitors, is also present in the other components that have antiprotozoal activity. In this study, the in vitro susceptibility of T.vaginalis against metronidazole, ornidazole, and the proton pump inhibitors which are tested recently as antiprotozoal agents; pantoprazole and esomeprazole was investigated. For this purpose a clinical T.vaginalis strain which was formerly isolated and stored after cryopreservation process in our laboratory was used. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum lethal concentration (MLC) values of those agents against to this strain were determined in vitro by dilution method in 24-well cell culture plates. Trypticase yeast extract maltose medium, horse serum and antibiotic (penicillin + streptomycin) were distributed to each well of cell culture plates and after metronidazole, ornidazole, pantoprazole and esomeprazole solutions were added to two wells for each as 800, 400, 200, 100, 50 and 25 µg/ml, followed by the addition of 1 ml 5x10(3) T.vaginalis trophozoites into each well. Plates were incubated at 37°C, and viability and motility of the trophozoites were evaluated under light microscope at 24, 48 and 72 hours after incubation. MIC and MLC values of metronidazole/ornidazole in the 72(th) hour were found as 50 µg/ml and 100 µg/ml, respectively. MIC and MLC values for pantoprazole in the 72th hour were 200 µg/ml and 400 µg/ml, while the values for esomeprazole were 400 µg/ml ve 800 µg/ml, respectively. As a result, T

  9. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the serum concentrations of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline.

    PubMed

    Gjestad, Caroline; Westin, Andreas A; Skogvoll, Eirik; Spigset, Olav

    2015-02-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline are all metabolized by the cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme CYP2C19, which is inhibited by the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of these PPIs on the serum concentrations of citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline. Serum concentrations from patients treated with citalopram, escitalopram, or sertraline were obtained from a routine therapeutic drug monitoring database, and samples from subjects concomitantly using PPIs were identified. Dose-adjusted SSRI serum concentrations were calculated to compare data from those treated and those not treated with PPIs. Citalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+35.3%; P < 0.001), esomeprazole (+32.8%; P < 0.001), and lansoprazole (+14.7%; P = 0.043). Escitalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+93.9%; P < 0.001), esomeprazole (+81.8%; P < 0.001), lansoprazole (+20.1%; P = 0.008), and pantoprazole (+21.6%; P = 0.002). Sertraline concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with esomeprazole (+38.5%; P = 0.0014). The effect of comedication with PPIs on the serum concentration of SSRIs is more pronounced for omeprazole and esomeprazole than for lansoprazole and pantoprazole, and escitalopram is affected to a greater extent than are citalopram and sertraline. When omeprazole or esomeprazole are used in combination with escitalopram, a 50% dose reduction of the latter should be considered.

  10. Effect of Proton Pump Inhibitors on the Serum Concentrations of the Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Citalopram, Escitalopram, and Sertraline

    PubMed Central

    Gjestad, Caroline; Westin, Andreas A.; Skogvoll, Eirik

    2015-01-01

    Background: The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline are all metabolized by the cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme CYP2C19, which is inhibited by the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of these PPIs on the serum concentrations of citalopram, escitalopram, and sertraline. Methods: Serum concentrations from patients treated with citalopram, escitalopram, or sertraline were obtained from a routine therapeutic drug monitoring database, and samples from subjects concomitantly using PPIs were identified. Dose-adjusted SSRI serum concentrations were calculated to compare data from those treated and those not treated with PPIs. Results: Citalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+35.3%; P < 0.001), esomeprazole (+32.8%; P < 0.001), and lansoprazole (+14.7%; P = 0.043). Escitalopram concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with omeprazole (+93.9%; P < 0.001), esomeprazole (+81.8%; P < 0.001), lansoprazole (+20.1%; P = 0.008), and pantoprazole (+21.6%; P = 0.002). Sertraline concentrations were significantly higher in patients treated with esomeprazole (+38.5%; P = 0.0014). Conclusions: The effect of comedication with PPIs on the serum concentration of SSRIs is more pronounced for omeprazole and esomeprazole than for lansoprazole and pantoprazole, and escitalopram is affected to a greater extent than are citalopram and sertraline. When omeprazole or esomeprazole are used in combination with escitalopram, a 50% dose reduction of the latter should be considered. PMID:24887634

  11. Conessine as a novel inhibitor of multidrug efflux pump systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Siriyong, Thanyaluck; Srimanote, Potjanee; Chusri, Sasitorn; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek; Suaisom, Channarong; Tipmanee, Varomyalin; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2017-08-14

    conessine could be applied as a novel efflux pump inhibitor to restore antibiotic activity by inhibiting efflux pump systems in P. aeruginosa. The findings speculated that conessine may also have a potential to be active against homologous resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family in other Gram-negative pathogens.

  12. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  13. Proton Pump Inhibitors Inhibit Metformin Uptake by Organic Cation Transporters (OCTs)

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Anne T.; Hofmann, Ute; Resch, Claudia; Schaeffeler, Elke; Rius, Maria; Schwab, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Metformin, an oral insulin-sensitizing drug, is actively transported into cells by organic cation transporters (OCT) 1, 2, and 3 (encoded by SLC22A1, SLC22A2, or SLC22A3), which are tissue specifically expressed at significant levels in various organs such as liver, muscle, and kidney. Because metformin does not undergo hepatic metabolism, drug-drug interaction by inhibition of OCT transporters may be important. So far, comprehensive data on the interaction of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) with OCTs are missing although PPIs are frequently used in metformin-treated patients. Using in silico modeling and computational analyses, we derived pharmacophore models indicating that PPIs (i.e. omeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole, and tenatoprazole) are potent OCT inhibitors. We then established stably transfected cell lines expressing the human uptake transporters OCT1, OCT2, or OCT3 and tested whether these PPIs inhibit OCT-mediated metformin uptake in vitro. All tested PPIs significantly inhibited metformin uptake by OCT1, OCT2, and OCT3 in a concentration-dependent manner. Half-maximal inhibitory concentration values (IC50) were in the low micromolar range (3–36 µM) and thereby in the range of IC50 values of other potent OCT drug inhibitors. Finally, we tested whether the PPIs are also transported by OCTs, but did not identify PPIs as OCT substrates. In conclusion, PPIs are potent inhibitors of the OCT-mediated metformin transport in vitro. Further studies are needed to elucidate the clinical relevance of this drug-drug interaction with potential consequences on metformin disposition and/or efficacy. PMID:21779389

  14. Complete Resolution of Pseudomalignant Erosion in a Reflux Gastroesophageal Polyp with Proton Pump Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Takahiko; Yagi, Haruo; Baba, Hayato; Minamisaka, Takashi; Miwa, Shigeharu; Hayashi, Shinichi; Nishida, Takeshi; Hatta, Hideki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Imura, Johji

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomalignant erosion is a diagnostic pitfall for pathologists in the differential diagnosis of malignant neoplasms. Here, we present a challenging case of a biopsy specimen from the eroded head of a polyp at the esophagogastric junction. A malignant neoplasm could not be ruled out due to the presence of bizarre stromal cells. A second biopsy performed after the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) for 4 weeks revealed endoscopic resolution of the polyp along with the complete histological resolution of the bizarre stromal cells and led to the diagnosis of pseudomalignant erosion in a reflux gastroesophageal polyp. In conclusion, histological and endoscopic response to PPI therapy is an important clue for the correct diagnosis of reflux gastroesophageal polyps with pseudomalignant erosion. PMID:26688768

  15. Persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Daphne; How, Choon How; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    About one-third of patients with suspected gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not respond symptomatically to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Many of these patients do not suffer from GERD, but may have underlying functional heartburn or atypical chest pain. Other causes of failure to respond to PPIs include inadequate acid suppression, non-acid reflux, oesophageal hypersensitivity, oesophageal dysmotility and psychological comorbidities. Functional oesophageal tests can exclude cardiac and structural causes, as well as help to confi rm or exclude GERD. The use of PPIs should only be continued in the presence of acid reflux or oesophageal hypersensitivity for acid reflux-related events that is proven on functional oesophageal tests. PMID:27779277

  16. Clostridium difficile Infection and Proton Pump Inhibitor Use in Hospitalized Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Pohl, John F; Patel, Raza; Zobell, Jeffery T; Lin, Ellen; Korgenski, E Kent; Crowell, Kody; Mackay, Mark W; Richman, Aleesha; Larsen, Christian; Chatfield, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) often take proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which helps improve efficacy of fat absorption with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy. However, PPI use is known to be associated with Clostridium difficile-(C. diff-) associated diarrhea (CDAD). We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of C. diff infection from all pediatric hospital admissions over a 5-year period at a single tertiary children's hospital. We found significantly more C. diff-positive stool tests in hospitalized patients with CF compared to patients with no diagnosis of CF. However, use of a PPI was not associated with an increased risk of CDAD in hospitalized CF patients. In summary, C. diff infection is more common in hospitalized pediatric CF patients although PPI use may not be a risk factor for CDAD development in this patient population.

  17. Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: Current research and proposed mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-01-01

    Since the early reports nearly a decade ago, proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) has become a well-recognized phenomenon. While many observational studies in the inpatient and outpatient populations have confirmed the association of PPI exposure and serum magnesium concentrations, there are no prospective, controlled studies to support causation. Molecular mechanisms of magnesium transporters, including the pH-dependent regulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-6 transporters in the colonic enterocyte, have been proposed to explain the effect of PPIs on magnesium reabsorption, but may be a small part of a more complicated interplay of molecular biology, pharmacology, and genetic predisposition. This review explores the current state of research in the field of PPIH and the proposed mechanisms of this effect. PMID:26981439

  18. Proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of cancer in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Megan; Fais, Stefano; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Harguindey, Salvador; Abu Izneid, Tareq; Scacco, Licia; Williams, Paula; Allegrucci, Cinzia; Rauch, Cyril; Omran, Ziad

    2015-09-04

    The treatment of cancer presents a clinical challenge both in human and veterinary medicine. Chemotherapy protocols require the use of toxic drugs that are not always specific, do not selectively target cancerous cells thus resulting in many side effects. A recent therapeutic approach takes advantage of the altered acidity of the tumour microenvironment by using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to block the hydrogen transport out of the cell. The alteration of the extracellular pH kills tumour cells, reverses drug resistance, and reduces cancer metastasis. Human clinical trials have prompted to consider this as a viable and safe option for the treatment of cancer in companion animals. Preliminary animal studies suggest that the same positive outcome could be achievable. The purpose of this review is to support investigations into the use of PPIs for cancer treatment cancer in companion animals by considering the evidence available in both human and veterinary medicine.

  19. [Chronic use of proton-pump inhibitors associated with giardiasis: A rare cause of hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism?].

    PubMed

    François, M; Lévy-Bohbot, N; Caron, J; Durlach, V

    2008-11-01

    Hypomagnesemia is a rare cause of hypoparathyroidism that can have a very serious clinical presentation. We report the case of a 62-year-old woman hospitalized for exploration of acute tetraparesis with vomiting and swallowing disorders associated with a severe hypocalcemia. Biological explorations revealed hypoparathyroidism (PTH=16ng/L) related to low plasma and erythrocyte magnesium (0.32 and 1.32mmol/L, respectively) as well as hypocalciuria and hypomagnesuria linked to gastrointestinal malabsorption. Etiologic investigations led to the discovery of Giardiasis lamblia on duodenal biopsies and a long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) (omeprazole followed by esomeprazole), both being recently described as causal factors of hypomagnesemic hypoparathyroidism. After treatment of the parasite (by metronidazole) and discontinuation of the PPI, both calcium and magnesium levels returned to normal. Selective malabsorption has been previously reported in patients with giardiasis. The specific mechanism of PPI participation in the genesis of hypomagnesemia remains a subject of debate.

  20. Review of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling and safety of proton pump inhibitors and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Gesheff, Martin G; Franzese, Christopher J; Bliden, Kevin P; Contino, Chase J; Rafeedheen, Rahil; Tantry, Udaya S; Gurbel, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of aspirin in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases has been convincingly demonstrated. Gastrointestinal (GI) adverse effects with aspirin may lead to poor adherence and/or discontinuation of treatment. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been used for more than 20 years as the first choice for treating peptic ulcers and their bleeding complications, gastroesophageal reflux disease, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced GI lesions and dyspepsia. Adherence becomes a major concern when aspirin is co-prescribed with PPIs to prevent GI adverse effects. Combining aspirin and PPIs into one tablet is an effective approach to address aspirin-related GI adverse effects and increase adherence to aspirin therapy for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Magnesium Deficiency and Proton-Pump Inhibitor Use: A Clinical Review.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-06-01

    The association of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use and hypomagnesemia has garnered much attention over the last 5 years. A large body of observational data has linked chronic PPI use with hypomagnesemia, presumably due to decreased intestinal absorption and consequent magnesium deficiency. However, despite the increasing prevalence of this highly popular class of medicine, and despite potential significant risks associated with magnesium depletion, including cardiac arrhythmias and seizures, there are no well-designed studies to delineate the nature of this observed association. Consequently, providers must use best judgment to inform clinical decision making. This review summarizes the current body of evidence linking PPI use with hypomagnesemia, acknowledges the possibility of significant residual confounding in the observational data, explains potential physiologic mechanisms, and offers clinical recommendations. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  2. Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia: Current research and proposed mechanisms.

    PubMed

    William, Jeffrey H; Danziger, John

    2016-03-06

    Since the early reports nearly a decade ago, proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) has become a well-recognized phenomenon. While many observational studies in the inpatient and outpatient populations have confirmed the association of PPI exposure and serum magnesium concentrations, there are no prospective, controlled studies to support causation. Molecular mechanisms of magnesium transporters, including the pH-dependent regulation of transient receptor potential melastatin-6 transporters in the colonic enterocyte, have been proposed to explain the effect of PPIs on magnesium reabsorption, but may be a small part of a more complicated interplay of molecular biology, pharmacology, and genetic predisposition. This review explores the current state of research in the field of PPIH and the proposed mechanisms of this effect.

  3. Negative chronotropic effect of proton pump inhibitors on frog-heart preparation.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Chander Shekhar; Utreja, Amita; Goel, Divya; Sandhu, Gurpreet; Gogia, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been known to cause bradycardia. We evaluated the effect of three PPIs, i.e. omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole on the heart rate of frog. The in situ frog heart preparation was set up. Heart rate and amplitude of contraction were studied following administration of different doses of the three PPIs. Statistical analysis was done by using Graphpad statistical software system. After 1 mg of omeprazole and rabeprazole, and 2 mg pantoprazole, the heart rate was similar as compared to baseline (p >0.05). After 2 mg of omeprazole and rabeprazole, and 4 mg pantoprazole, the reduction in heart rate was significant (p <0.05). In addition, pantoprazole caused negative ionotropic effect. The three PPIs showed a dose-dependent negative chronotropic effect in the frog heart prepration.

  4. Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity Reactions to Proton Pump Inhibitors: Evaluation and Management.

    PubMed

    Otani, Iris M; Banerji, Aleena

    2016-03-01

    PPIs are among the most commonly administered medications in the USA and are generally well tolerated. Immediate and delayed immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions are rare but increasingly recognized adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Immediate hypersensitivity reactions can occur due to IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to PPIs and can be evaluated by immediate hypersensitivity skin testing and oral provocation challenge testing. A desensitization protocol can be used when PPI use cannot be avoided in an allergic patient. Delayed hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs have also been reported. Occupational exposures causing cutaneous reactions to PPIs are the most commonly reported delayed hypersensitivity reaction, followed by drug-induced subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus. This review presents a summary of the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to PPIs.

  5. Management of proton pump inhibitor responsive-esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: Controversies in treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kochar, Bharati; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune mediated clinicopathologic disease. The prevalence of EoE is approximately 1/2000 persons, EoE is now the most common cause of food impactions, and health care expenditures approach $1 billion annually. This paper will discuss challenges related to proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE), including distinguishing this condition from EoE and understanding mechanisms of the PPI response. For EoE, we will review multiple ongoing debates about treatment and monitoring strategies, including selecting treatment outcomes, optimizing medication formulations, approaching the steroid-refractory patient, conducting dietary elimination, prescribing long-term maintenance therapy, and performing esophageal dilation. PMID:26365201

  6. Management of proton pump inhibitor responsive-esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: controversies in treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kochar, Bharati; Dellon, Evan S

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated clinicopathologic disease. The prevalence of EoE is approximately 1/2000 persons, EoE is now the most common cause of food impactions, with healthcare expenditures approaching US$ 1 billion annually. This article will discuss challenges related to proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia, including distinguishing this condition from EoE and understanding the mechanisms behind the PPI response. For EoE, we will review multiple ongoing debates about treatment and monitoring strategies, including selecting treatment outcomes, optimizing medication formulations, approaching the steroid-refractory patient, conducting dietary elimination, prescribing long-term maintenance therapy and performing esophageal dilation.

  7. Molecular Mechanism of MBX2319 Inhibition of Escherichia coli AcrB Multidrug Efflux Pump and Comparison with Other Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Vargiu, Attilio V.; Ruggerone, Paolo; Opperman, Timothy J.; Nguyen, Son T.

    2014-01-01

    Efflux pumps of the resistance nodulation division (RND) superfamily, such as AcrB, make a major contribution to multidrug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. The development of inhibitors of the RND pumps would improve the efficacy of current and next-generation antibiotics. To date, however, only one inhibitor has been cocrystallized with AcrB. Thus, in silico structure-based analysis is essential for elucidating the interaction between other inhibitors and the efflux pumps. In this work, we used computer docking and molecular dynamics simulations to study the interaction between AcrB and the compound MBX2319, a novel pyranopyridine efflux pump inhibitor with potent activity against RND efflux pumps of Enterobacteriaceae species, as well as other known inhibitors (D13-9001, 1-[1-naphthylmethyl]-piperazine, and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide) and the binding of doxorubicin to the efflux-defective F610A variant of AcrB. We also analyzed the binding of a substrate, minocycline, for comparison. Our results show that MBX2319 binds very tightly to the lower part of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB, strongly interacting with the phenylalanines lining the hydrophobic trap, where the hydrophobic portion of D13-9001 was found to bind by X-ray crystallography. Additionally, MBX2319 binds to AcrB in a manner that is similar to the way in which doxorubicin binds to the F610A variant of AcrB. In contrast, 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine and phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide appear to bind to somewhat different areas of the distal pocket in the B protomer of AcrB than does MBX2319. However, all inhibitors (except D13-9001) appear to distort the structure of the distal pocket, impairing the proper binding of substrates. PMID:25114133

  8. Blood Pressure-Lowering Effect of Orally Ingested Nitrite Is Abolished by a Proton Pump Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Marcelo F; Sundqvist, Michaela L; Larsen, Filip J; Zhuge, Zhengbing; Carlström, Mattias; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O

    2017-01-01

    Inorganic nitrate and nitrite from dietary and endogenous sources are metabolized to NO and other bioactive nitrogen oxides that affect blood pressure. The mechanisms for nitrite bioactivation are unclear, but recent studies in rodents suggest that gastric acidity may influence the systemic effects of this anion. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we tested the effects of a proton pump inhibitor on the acute cardiovascular effects of nitrite. Fifteen healthy nonsmoking, normotensive subjects, aged 19 to 39 years, were pretreated with placebo or esomeprazole (3×40 mg) before ingesting sodium nitrite (0.3 mg kg(-1)), followed by blood pressure monitoring. Nitrite reduced systolic blood pressure by a maximum of 6±1.3 mm Hg when taken after placebo, whereas pretreatment with esomeprazole blunted this effect. Peak plasma nitrite, nitrate, and nitroso species levels after nitrite ingestion were similar in both interventions. In 8 healthy volunteers, we then infused increasing doses of sodium nitrite (1, 10, and 30 nmol kg(-1) min(-1)) intravenously. Interestingly, although plasma nitrite peaked at similar levels as with orally ingested nitrite (≈1.8 µmol/L), no changes in blood pressure were observed. In rodents, esomeprazole did not affect the blood pressure response to the NO donor, DEA NONOate, or vascular relaxation to nitroprusside and acetylcholine, demonstrating an intact downstream NO-signaling pathway. We conclude that the acute blood pressure-lowering effect of nitrite requires an acidic gastric environment. Future studies will reveal if the cardiovascular complications associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors are linked to interference with the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Delirium in the geriatric unit: proton-pump inhibitors and other risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Otremba, Iwona; Wilczyński, Krzysztof; Szewieczek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Background Delirium remains a major nosocomial complication of hospitalized elderly. Predictive models for delirium may be useful for identification of high-risk patients for implementation of preventive strategies. Objective Evaluate specific factors for development of delirium in a geriatric ward setting. Methods Prospective cross-sectional study comprised 675 consecutive patients aged 79.2±7.7 years (66% women and 34% men), admitted to the subacute geriatric ward of a multiprofile university hospital after exclusion of 113 patients treated with antipsychotic medication because of behavioral disorders before admission. Comprehensive geriatric assessments including a structured interview, physical examination, geriatric functional assessment, blood sampling, ECG, abdominal ultrasound, chest X-ray, Confusion Assessment Method for diagnosis of delirium, Delirium-O-Meter to assess delirium severity, Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale to assess sedation or agitation, visual analog scale and Doloplus-2 scale to assess pain level were performed. Results Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed five independent factors associated with development of delirium in geriatric inpatients: transfer between hospital wards (odds ratio [OR] =2.78; confidence interval [CI] =1.54–5.01; P=0.001), preexisting dementia (OR =2.29; CI =1.44–3.65; P<0.001), previous delirium incidents (OR =2.23; CI =1.47–3.38; P<0.001), previous fall incidents (OR =1.76; CI =1.17–2.64; P=0.006), and use of proton-pump inhibitors (OR =1.67; CI =1.11–2.53; P=0.014). Conclusion Transfer between hospital wards, preexisting dementia, previous delirium incidents, previous fall incidents, and use of proton-pump inhibitors are predictive of development of delirium in the geriatric inpatient setting. PMID:27103793

  10. Dietary Inulin Fibers Prevent Proton-Pump Inhibitor (PPI)-Induced Hypocalcemia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Mark W.; de Baaij, Jeroen H. F.; Gommers, Lisanne M. M.; Hoenderop, Joost G. J.; Bindels, René J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) is the most recognized side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). Additionally, PPIH is associated with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. It is hypothesized that PPIs reduce epithelial proton secretion and thereby increase the pH in the colon, which may explain the reduced absorption of and Mg2+ and Ca2+. Fermentation of dietary oligofructose-enriched inulin fibers by the microflora leads to acidification of the intestinal lumen and by this enhances mineral uptake. This study aimed, therefore, to improve mineral absorption by application of dietary inulin to counteract PPIH. Methods Here, C57BL/J6 mice were supplemented with omeprazole and/or inulin. Subsequently, Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis was assessed by means of serum, urine and fecal electrolyte measurements. Moreover, the mRNA levels of magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes were examined in the large intestine and kidney by real-time PCR. Results Treatment with omeprazole significantly reduced serum Mg2+ and Ca2+ levels. However, concomitant addition of dietary inulin fibers normalized serum Ca2+ but not serum Mg2+ concentrations. Inulin abolished enhanced expression of Trpv6 and S100g in the colon by omeprazole. Additionally, intestinal and renal mRNA levels of the Trpm6 gene were reduced after inulin intake. Conclusions This study suggests that dietary inulin counteracts reduced intestinal Ca2+ absorption upon PPI treatment. In contrast, inulin did not increase intestinal absorption of Mg2+ sufficiently to recover serum Mg2+. The clinical potential of dietary inulin treatment should be the subject of future studies. PMID:26397986

  11. Dietary Inulin Fibers Prevent Proton-Pump Inhibitor (PPI)-Induced Hypocalcemia in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hess, Mark W; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Gommers, Lisanne M M; Hoenderop, Joost G J; Bindels, René J M

    2015-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesemia (PPIH) is the most recognized side effect of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). Additionally, PPIH is associated with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. It is hypothesized that PPIs reduce epithelial proton secretion and thereby increase the pH in the colon, which may explain the reduced absorption of and Mg2+ and Ca2+. Fermentation of dietary oligofructose-enriched inulin fibers by the microflora leads to acidification of the intestinal lumen and by this enhances mineral uptake. This study aimed, therefore, to improve mineral absorption by application of dietary inulin to counteract PPIH. Here, C57BL/J6 mice were supplemented with omeprazole and/or inulin. Subsequently, Mg2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis was assessed by means of serum, urine and fecal electrolyte measurements. Moreover, the mRNA levels of magnesiotropic and calciotropic genes were examined in the large intestine and kidney by real-time PCR. Treatment with omeprazole significantly reduced serum Mg2+ and Ca2+ levels. However, concomitant addition of dietary inulin fibers normalized serum Ca2+ but not serum Mg2+ concentrations. Inulin abolished enhanced expression of Trpv6 and S100g in the colon by omeprazole. Additionally, intestinal and renal mRNA levels of the Trpm6 gene were reduced after inulin intake. This study suggests that dietary inulin counteracts reduced intestinal Ca2+ absorption upon PPI treatment. In contrast, inulin did not increase intestinal absorption of Mg2+ sufficiently to recover serum Mg2+. The clinical potential of dietary inulin treatment should be the subject of future studies.

  12. Effectiveness and safety of proton pump inhibitors in infantile gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Tanner W

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants <1 year of age. A literature search was conducted through PubMed (up to December 2009), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-December 2009), and The Cochrane Library (up to December 2009) using combinations of the following key search terms: proton pump inhibitor, GERD, infant, children, pediatric, omeprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, and pantoprazole. Reference citations from identified articles were also reviewed. All double-blind, placebo-controlled trials published in English that evaluated the safety and efficacy of PPIs in infants with GERD were included in this review. Trials involving children older than 12 months were not included. GERD is a source of pain and discomfort in adults; yet, in infants, symptoms that are thought to be indicative of painful stimuli have no clear cause-and-effect relationship with infant GERD. PPIs are beneficial in relieving symptoms of GERD in the adult population, but their usefulness in decreasing GERD-associated behaviors in infants is still questionable, despite a large increase in PPI prescribing for children <1 year of age. In all studies reviewed, infants treated with PPIs did not experience a significant decrease in behaviors perceived to be caused by GERD. The largest placebo-controlled trial to date found that rates of adverse events were increased in the PPI group compared with the placebo group, whereas the other trials reviewed reported no difference in adverse effects with the use of PPIs. Clinical trials reveal that PPI therapy is not an effective treatment for common infant GERD-associated symptoms. Evidence supporting safety of PPI use in infants is conflicting, and more large-scale, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are necessary to better establish the role of PPIs in infant GERD.

  13. The physiological background behind and course of development of the first proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Lundell, Lars

    2015-06-01

    Gastric acid secretion and its related diseases and their treatments have generated important contributions to gastroenterology and its development as an autonomous medical specialty. The discovery of histamine receptors and the subsequent H2-receptor antagonists (1972) changed the practice of gastroenterology forever. Gastric acid was effectively inhibited and ulcers could be healed to an extent which had not previously been seen. An additional milestone along the same avenue was offered by the identification of hydrogen potassium adenosine triphosphatase (H(+)K(+)-ATPase) as the proton pump of the parietal cell. Nowadays, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used. However, we need to reconsider the physiology and pathophysiology of acid secretion and its long-term inhibition to avoid potential negative effects on general health. PPIs are generally considered among the safest class of drugs. In the late 1960s, a research project was initiated to develop an antisecretory drug which could be used in acid hypersecretory disease states such as peptic ulcer disease based on the option to synthesize a local anesthetic drug that could be orally administered and therefore have its main action on the gastrin cells. This concept was soon found to be a blind track and further development of the basic compounds CMN131 by the synthesis of H77/67 were found to be active in the gastric acid secretion, and the benzimidazol analog of H77/67 was then synthesized a year later and was tested and found to exert powerful acid inhibitory effects. Binding studies with the substituted benzimidazoles clarified specific binding to H+/K+/ATPase in the secretory vesicles of the parietal cells. Since weak bases like aminopyrine accumulate in the acid compartment of the parietal cells, the chemists changed the substituents of the heterocyclic ring and obtained a compound with a weak base property with an optimal PkA value, thereby maximizing the accumulation of the compound at the site of

  14. An Unexpected Effect of Proton Pump Inhibitors: Elevation of the Cardiovascular Risk Factor ADMA

    PubMed Central

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; LePendu, Paea; Lee, Jerry C.; Erlanson, Daniel A.; Slaviero, Anna; Shah, Nigam H.; Leiper, James; Cooke, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are gastric acid suppressing agents widely prescribed for the treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Recently, several studies in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have raised the concern that use of PPIs in these patients may increase their risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). The mechanism of this possible adverse effect is not known. Whether the general population might also be at risk has not been addressed. Methods and Results Plasma ADMA is an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Elevated plasma ADMA is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease, likely due to its attenuation of the vasoprotective effects of endothelial NOS. We find that PPIs elevate plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) level and reduce nitric oxide (NO) levels and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in a murine model and ex vivo human tissues. PPIs increase ADMA because they bind to, and inhibit dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH), the enzyme that degrades ADMA. Conclusions We present a plausible biological mechanism to explain the association of PPIs with increased MACE in patients with unstable coronary syndromes. Of concern, this adverse mechanism is also likely to extend to the general population using PPIs. This finding compels additional clinical investigations and pharmacovigilance directed toward understanding the cardiovascular risk associated with use of the PPIs in the general population. PMID:23825361

  15. Liquid chromatographic assay for metronidazole and tinidazole: pharmacokinetic and metabolic studies in human subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson-Ehle, I; Ursing, B; Nilsson-Ehle, P

    1981-01-01

    We developed methods for measuring metronidazole, its two major metabolites, and tinidazole in serum and urine. After treatment of each sample with an equal volume of 5% perchloric acid, the drugs were separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (retention times, 6 to 18 min). Quantitation was based on spectrometry at 320 nm. These assays were sensitive, rapid, and specific, and recoveries from biological samples were quantitative. Metronidazole and tinidazole were given as rapid intravenous infusions to four healthy human volunteers. The biological half-lives of these two compounds were 5.4 and 11.1 h, respectively. The hydroxy metabolite of metronidazole appeared quickly in serum and was eliminated at a slow rate. The acetic acid metabolite of metronidazole was detected in serum at very low levels and only for a limited time. No metabolic products of tinidazole were found in serum samples. In urine, 43.7% of the administered dose of metronidazole was recovered over a period of 24 h (24.1% of the dose as the hydroxy metabolite, 12.0% as the acetic acid metabolite, and 7.6% as unchanged drug). Only 18.4% of the infused dose of tinidazole was eliminated in urine over a period of 72 h, and no metabolic products were detected. PMID:7294765

  16. Intravenous proton pump inhibitors for peptic ulcer bleeding: Clinical benefits and limits.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2011-03-16

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common disease and recurrent bleeding is an independent risk factor of mortality. Infusion with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) prevents recurrent bleeding after successful endoscopic therapy. A gastric acidic environment of less than pH 5.4 alters coagulation function and activates pepsin to disaggregate platelet plugs. Gastric acid is secreted by H(+), K(+)-ATPase, naming the proton pump. This update review focuses on the mechanism and the role of PPIs in the clinical management of patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. An intravenous omeprazole bolus followed by high-dose continuous infusion for 72 h after successful endoscopic therapy can prevent the recurrent bleeding. In the Asian, however, the infusion dosage can possibly be diminished whilst preserving favorable control of the intragastric pH and thereby still decreasing rates of recurrent bleeding. Irrespective of the infusion dosage of PPIs, rates of recurrent bleeding remain high in patients with co-morbidities. Because recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding may be prolonged in those with co-morbidities, a low-dose infusion of IV PPIs for up to 7-day may result in better control of recurrent bleeding of peptic ulcers. Due to the inter-patient variability in CYP2C19 genotypes, the infusion form of new generation PPIs, such as esomeprazole, should be promising for the prevention of recurrent bleeding. This article offers a comprehensive review of clinical practice, highlighting the indication, the optimal dosage, the duration, and the potential limitation of PPIs infusion for peptic ulcer bleeding.

  17. Proton pump inhibitors in GORD An overview of their pharmacology, efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Vincenzo; Di Mario, Francesco; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2009-03-01

    Gastric acid secretion is a complex phenomenon under nervous and hormonal influence. The stimulation of proton pump (H(+), K(+)-ATPase) in the parietal cell represents the final step of acid secretion and this knowledge has led to the development of a class of drugs, the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which are targeted at blocking this enzyme. Chemically, all the available PPIs consist of a benzimidazole ring and a pyridine ring, but vary in the specific side ring substitution. As a class, they are the most potent inhibitors of gastric acid secretion available. Although there are differences among PPIs concerning their pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, influence by food and antacids as well as potential for drug interactions, it is not always evident whether these often subtle differences are clinically relevant. A careful evaluation of the available studies reveals that rabeprazole and esomeprazole achieve more rapid acid inhibition than other PPIs. Also, the effect of rabeprazole is less dependent upon genetic make-up than all other PPIs, giving rise to less inter-subject variability and leading to a more predictable effect. Esomeprazole, by inhibiting its own catabolism, makes all patients slow metabolizers, but could expose them to potential drug interactions. PPIs are the mainstay of medical treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), in that they are able to provide 80-85% healing rate of oesophageal lesions, including ulcers, and to reduce the incidence of complications like strictures as well as dysplasia and adenocarcinoma in Barrett's oesophagus (BO). Also relief of symptoms can be achieved in about 80% of cases, even though this benefit is reduced by a factor of approximately 20% in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Their effect on Barrett's oesophagus and the extra-oesophageal manifestations of GORD is much less consistent. In general, the tolerability profile of PPIs is good in both short- and long-term clinical trials

  18. Identification and Characterization of Inhibitors of Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Novel Agents for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lomovskaya, Olga; Warren, Mark S.; Lee, Angela; Galazzo, Jorge; Fronko, Richard; Lee, May; Blais, Johanne; Cho, Deidre; Chamberland, Suzanne; Renau, Tom; Leger, Roger; Hecker, Scott; Watkins, Will; Hoshino, Kazuki; Ishida, Hiroko; Lee, Ving J.

    2001-01-01

    Whole-cell assays were implemented to search for efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) of the three multidrug resistance efflux pumps (MexAB-OprM, MexCD-OprJ, MexEF-OprN) that contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Secondary assays were developed to identify lead compounds with exquisite activities as inhibitors. A broad-spectrum EPI which is active against all three known Mex efflux pumps from P. aeruginosa and their close Escherichia coli efflux pump homolog (AcrAB-TolC) was discovered. When this compound, MC-207,110, was used, the intrinsic resistance of P. aeruginosa to fluoroquinolones was decreased significantly (eightfold for levofloxacin). Acquired resistance due to the overexpression of efflux pumps was also decreased (32- to 64-fold reduction in the MIC of levofloxacin). Similarly, 32- to 64-fold reductions in MICs in the presence of MC-207,110 were observed for strains with overexpressed efflux pumps and various target mutations that confer resistance to levofloxacin (e.g., gyrA and parC). We also compared the frequencies of emergence of levofloxacin-resistant variants in the wild-type strain at four times the MIC of levofloxacin (1 μg/ml) when it was used either alone or in combination with EPI. In the case of levofloxacin alone, the frequency was ∼10−7 CFU/ml. In contrast, with an EPI, the frequency was below the level of detection (<10−11). In summary, we have demonstrated that inhibition of efflux pumps (i) decreased the level of intrinsic resistance significantly, (ii) reversed acquired resistance, and (iii) resulted in a decreased frequency of emergence of P. aeruginosa strains that are highly resistant to fluoroquinolones. PMID:11120952

  19. Reviving Antibiotics: Efflux Pump Inhibitors That Interact with AcrA, a Membrane Fusion Protein of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump

    DOE PAGES

    Abdali, Narges; Parks, Jerry M.; Haynes, Keith M.; ...

    2016-10-21

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human welfare. Inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps (EPIs) are promising alternative therapeutics that could revive activities of antibiotics and reduce bacterial virulence. Identification of new druggable sites for inhibition is critical for developing effective EPIs, especially in light of constantly emerging resistance. We describe new EPIs that interact with and possibly inhibit the function of periplasmic membrane fusion proteins, critical components of efflux pumps that are responsible for the activation of the transporter and the recruitment of the outer-membrane channel. The discovered EPIs bind to AcrA, a component of the prototypical AcrAB-TolC pump,more » change its structure in vivo, inhibit efflux of fluorescent probes and potentiate the activities of antibiotics in Escherichia coli cells. These findings expand the chemical and mechanistic diversity of EPIs, suggest the mechanism for regulation of the efflux pump assembly and activity, and provide a promising path for reviving the activities of antibiotics in resistant bacteria.« less

  20. Reviving Antibiotics: Efflux Pump Inhibitors That Interact with AcrA, a Membrane Fusion Protein of the AcrAB-TolC Multidrug Efflux Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Abdali, Narges; Parks, Jerry M.; Haynes, Keith M.; Chaney, Julie L.; Green, Adam T.; Wolloscheck, David; Walker, John K.; Rybenkov, Valentin V.; Baudry, Jerome; Smith, Jeremy C.; Zgurskaya, Helen I.

    2016-10-21

    Antibiotic resistance is a major threat to human welfare. Inhibitors of multidrug efflux pumps (EPIs) are promising alternative therapeutics that could revive activities of antibiotics and reduce bacterial virulence. Identification of new druggable sites for inhibition is critical for developing effective EPIs, especially in light of constantly emerging resistance. We describe new EPIs that interact with and possibly inhibit the function of periplasmic membrane fusion proteins, critical components of efflux pumps that are responsible for the activation of the transporter and the recruitment of the outer-membrane channel. The discovered EPIs bind to AcrA, a component of the prototypical AcrAB-TolC pump, change its structure in vivo, inhibit efflux of fluorescent probes and potentiate the activities of antibiotics in Escherichia coli cells. These findings expand the chemical and mechanistic diversity of EPIs, suggest the mechanism for regulation of the efflux pump assembly and activity, and provide a promising path for reviving the activities of antibiotics in resistant bacteria.

  1. In Vitro Study of the Variable Effects of Proton Pump Inhibitors on Voriconazole

    PubMed Central

    Niece, Krista L.; Boyd, Natalie K.

    2015-01-01

    Voriconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent used for the treatment of severe fungal infections. Maintaining therapeutic concentrations of 1 to 5.5 μg/ml is currently recommended to maximize the exposure-response relationship of voriconazole. However, this is challenging, given the highly variable pharmacokinetics of the drug, which includes metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP450) isotypes CYP2C19, CYP3A4, and CYP2C9, through which common metabolic pathways for many medications take place and which are also expressed in different isoforms with various metabolic efficacies. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are also metabolized through these enzymes, making them competitive inhibitors of voriconazole metabolism, and coadministration with voriconazole has been reported to increase total voriconazole exposure. We examined the effects of five PPIs (rabeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, and esomeprazole) on voriconazole concentrations using four sets of human liver microsomes (HLMs) of different CYP450 phenotypes. Overall, the use of voriconazole in combination with any PPI led to a significantly higher voriconazole yield compared to that achieved with voriconazole alone in both pooled HLMs (77% versus 59%; P < 0.001) and individual HLMs (86% versus 76%; P < 0.001). The mean percent change in the voriconazole yield from that at the baseline after PPI exposure in pooled microsomes ranged from 22% with pantoprazole to 51% with esomeprazole. Future studies are warranted to confirm whether and how the deliberate coadministration of voriconazole and PPIs can be used to boost voriconazole levels in patients with difficult-to-treat fungal infections. PMID:26124167

  2. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors Usage with Risk of Pneumonia in Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sai-Wai; Teng, Ying-Hock; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Han-Wei; Wang, Yu-Hsun; Chou, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Chao-Bin

    2017-07-01

    To determine the association between usages of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and subsequent risk of pneumonia in dementia patients. Retrospective cohort study. Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort consisted of 786 dementia patients with new PPI usage and 786 matched dementia patients without PPI usage. The study endpoint was defined as the occurrence of pneumonia. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the pneumonia risk. Defined daily dose methodology was applied to evaluate the cumulative and dose-response relationships of PPI. Incidence of pneumonia was higher among patients with PPI usage (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 1.89; 95% CI = 1.51-2.37). Cox model analysis also demonstrated that age (adjusted HR = 1.05; 95% CI = 1.03-1.06), male gender (adjusted HR = 1.57; 95% CI = 1.25-1.98), underlying cerebrovascular disease (adjusted HR = 1.30; 95% CI = 1.04-1.62), chronic pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.09-1.76), congestive heart failure (adjusted HR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.11-2.13), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.54; 95% CI = 1.22-1.95), and usage of antipsychotics (adjusted HR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.03-1.61) were independent risk factors for pneumonia. However, usage of cholinesterase inhibitors and histamine receptor-2 antagonists were shown to decrease pneumonia risk. PPI usage in dementia patients is associated with an 89% increased risk of pneumonia. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. Introduction of proton pump inhibitors--consequences for surgical treatment of peptic ulcer.

    PubMed

    Tonus, C; Weisenfeld, E; Appel, P; Nier, H

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzes the influence of different factors on morbidity and mortality after surgical treatment of peptic ulcer. At the Municipal Hospital of Offenbach, Germany, from 1985-1996, 485 patients underwent surgery. Of the 485 patients, 70.7% (343) were diagnosed to have duodenal ulcer and 29.2% (142) had suffered from gastric ulcer. During this period, 79.2% (384) of the operations were performed under emergency conditions because of acute complications (56% of these with perforation, 20% with penetration, 24% with ulcer bleeding), whereas the rest was done electively. Two hundred and ninety-one (60%) patients were male, the average age was 59 years and 71.7% (348) of the patients had certain concomitant diseases. We observed complications in 48% of the cases with a total postoperative mortality of 21%. Between 1985 and 1996 the total number of ulcer surgeries performed at the Municipal Hospital Offenbach per year has stayed almost constant. However, a definite increase of acute operations in addition to a decrease of elective interventions was noticed. The dissatisfying results of surgical treatment of peptic ulcer after the introduction of proton pump inhibitors seems to be the consequence of the negative selection of patients mentioned above. A connection could be proved between the age and condition of the patient, the type of the surgical intervention (acute or elective) and the morbidity and mortality after the surgery.

  4. Drug-Induced Subacute Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus Associated with Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nitish

    2016-06-01

    Subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus (SCLE) is an autoimmune disease that may be induced by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in at-risk populations. The US FDA does not recognize SCLE as an adverse event associated with PPIs. We queried the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database, which contains adverse event case reports submitted by the public as well as by industry, and analyzed the data to quantify passive pharmacovigilance signals for SCLE associated with PPIs. A disproportionality analysis of the signals yielded a significant association between SCLE and PPIs. Discontinuation of PPI resulted in remission, with PPI re-challenge causing SCLE to reoccur. A follow-up analysis also yielded a significant association between SCLE and H2 receptor antagonists. We conducted a brief literature survey of published case reports and studies to discern the validity of PPI-induced SCLE signals. Healthcare prescribers and patients should be made aware that SCLE can be induced by PPIs. In such cases, PPIs should be discontinued and alternative clinical treatment sought. Regulatory bodies such as the FDA should incorporate the adverse reaction in PPI prescription labels.

  5. Increased health costs from mandated Therapeutic Substitution of proton pump inhibitors in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Skinner, B J; Gray, J R; Attara, G P

    2009-04-15

    In 2003, British Columbia's PharmaCare programme implemented a drug reimbursement policy called Therapeutic Substitution, which required patients with acid-related diseases, primarily gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), to make a medically unnecessary switch from their prescribed proton pump inhibitor (PPI) to the cheapest available brand name PPI (Pariet, rabeprazole sodium), comprising a different (nongeneric) chemical. To evaluate the independent effects of PPI Therapeutic Substitution on individual healthcare utilization among those complying with the policy. We used the BC Ministry of Health Services' individual-level linked data, allowing isolation of healthcare utilization for the entire population of PPI consumers from 2002 to 2005. After controlling for individual case variation in age, gender and a proxy for pre-existing health status, regression analysis revealed statistically significant greater overall use of PPIs, physician services and hospital services independently associated with patients who complied with Therapeutic Substitution. Over the 3-year period 2003-2005, this represented net healthcare expenditures totalling approximately C$43.51 million (C$9.11 million in total PPI drug expenditures, C$24.65 million for physician services and C$9.75 million for hospital services). Medically unnecessary drug switching caused by compliance with Therapeutic Substitution policy appears to be independently associated with higher overall healthcare utilization.

  6. Accumulating Evidence for a Drug–Drug Interaction Between Methotrexate and Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Ann Corken; Kluetz, Paul; Jappar, Dilara; Korvick, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Background. A number of medications are known to interact with methotrexate through various mechanisms. The aim of this article is to apprise practitioners of a new labeling change based on the accumulating evidence for a possible drug–drug interaction between methotrexate (primarily at high doses) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Methods. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS) database of spontaneous adverse event reports and the published literature were searched for cases reporting an interaction between methotrexate and PPIs. Results. A search of the AERS database and existing literature found several individual case reports of drug–drug interactions and three additional supportive studies that suggest potential underlying mechanisms for the interaction. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that concomitant use of methotrexate (primarily at high doses) with PPIs such as omeprazole, esomeprazole, and pantoprazole may decrease methotrexate clearance, leading to elevated serum levels of methotrexate and/or its metabolite hydroxymethotrexate, possibly leading to methotrexate toxicities. In several case reports, no methotrexate toxicity was found when a histamine H2 blocker was substituted for a PPI. Based on the reviewed data, the FDA updated the methotrexate label to include the possible drug–drug interaction between high-dose methotrexate and PPIs. Physicians should be alerted to this potential drug–drug interaction in patients receiving concomitant high-dose methotrexate and PPIs. PMID:22477728

  7. Comparative study and optimisation of the administration mode of three proton pump inhibitors by nasogastric tube.

    PubMed

    Messaouik, D; Sautou-Miranda, V; Bagel-Boithias, S; Chopineau, J

    2005-08-11

    Patients in intensive care often develop stress-induced ulcers. As a preventive measure, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are administered by nasogastric tube. However, some PPIs can block the tube. The aim of this study was to compare the behaviour of three PPIs (omeprazole, lanzoprazole and esomeprazole) during the transit of the granules through the tube and to optimise their modes of administration. For each IPP, the experiment was designed to study the influence of four variables: the tube material (silicone or polyurethane), the solvent used to dilute the granules (water or apple juice), the mode of administration (in two or three doses) and the rinse volume (10 or 20 ml). We counted the granules before transit and at the tube outlet, and assayed the active drug ingredient by UV spectrometry. The assay showed complete transit of esomeprazole through the tube, but average losses of omeprazole and lanzoprazole of 39 and 33%, respectively, were observed. No significant improvement was obtained by the variables 'diluent' and 'mode of administration'. The variable 'rinse' had a significant influence. For lanzoprazole, a polyurethane tube allowed recovery of on average 86% of the active ingredient. Esomeprazole is thus the choice PPI for the treatment of patients by nasogastric tube. Using a polyurethane tube and a rinse volume of 20 ml, the administration of lanzoprazole by tube can be considered. Use of omeprazole is not recommended because none of the modes of administration tested ensured that a sufficient concentration of active ingredient reached the stomach.

  8. Perils and pitfalls of long-term effects of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Sheila M; Rjater, Ryan G; Kale-Pradhan, Pramodini B

    2013-07-01

    This review summarizes the literature regarding long-term adverse effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). A PubMed search (1966 to February 2013) for English language studies was conducted using key terms PPI: omeprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole, dexlansoprazole, rabeprazole, pneumonia, Clostridium difficile, osteoporosis, risk of fractures, thrombocytopenia, rhabdomyolysis, anemia, iron deficiency, hypomagnesemia, vitamin B₁₂ and nephritis. The risk of pneumonia was increased 27-39% in short-term use of PPIs in three meta-analyses. C. difficile infections were also associated with the use of PPIs (odds ratio: 2.15; 95% CI: 1.81-2.55; p < 0.00001). This effect appears to be dose related. The US FDA has recently issued a warning regarding fractures and the impaired magnesium absorption associated with the use of PPI. Thrombocytopenia, iron deficiency, vitamin B12 deficiency, rhabdomyolysis and acute interstitial nephritis have also been reported with the use of PPIs. There is mounting evidence that PPIs are associated with serious adverse effects. Practitioners should be vigilant and counsel patients accordingly.

  9. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Magnesium Concentrations in Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Akio; Ohkido, Ichiro; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Mafune, Aki; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium concentration is a proven predictor of mortality in hemodialysis patients. Recent reports have indicated that proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use affects serum magnesium levels, however few studies have investigated the relationship between PPI use and magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients. This study aimed to clarify the association between PPI use and serum magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients. We designed this cross sectional study and included 1189 hemodialysis patients in stable condition. Associations between PPI and magnesium-related factors, as well as other possible confounders, were evaluated using a multiple regression model. We defined hypomagnesemia as a value < 2.0 mg/dL, and created comparable logistic regression models to assess the association between PPI use and hypomagnesemia. PPI use is associated with a significantly lower mean serum magnesium level than histamine 2 (H2) receptor antagonists or no acid-suppressive medications (mean [SD] PPI: 2.52 [0.45] mg/dL; H2 receptor antagonist: 2.68 [0.41] mg/dL; no acid suppressive medications: 2.68 [0.46] mg/dL; P = 0.001). Hypomagnesemia remained significantly associated with PPI (adjusted OR, OR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.14–3.69; P = 0.017). PPI use is associated with an increased risk of hypomagnesemia in hemodialysis patients. Future prospective studies are needed to explore magnesium replacement in PPI users on hemodialysis. PMID:26618538

  10. The impact of proton pump inhibitors on the human gastrointestinal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Abrams, Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Potent gastric acid suppression using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is common in clinical practice yet may have important effects on human health that are mediated through changes in the gastrointestinal microbiome. Acting through pH-dependent or pH-independent mechanisms, PPIs have the potential to alter the normal microbiota throughout the human gastrointestinal lumen. In the esophagus, PPIs change the normal bacterial milieu to decrease distal esophageal exposure to inflammatory Gram-negative bacteria which may lower the risk of Barrett's esophagus. In the stomach, PPIs alter the abundance and location of gastric Helicobacter pylori and other bacteria, which has implications for peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. In the small bowel, PPIs cause polymicrobial small bowel bacterial overgrowth and have been associated with the diagnosis of celiac disease. In the colon, PPIs associate with incident but not recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, putatively through alterations in commensal colonic anaerobes. Our understanding of the effect of gastric acid suppression on the human gastrointestinal microbiome is incomplete but is rapidly advancing. PMID:25439276

  11. Adverse effects of proton-pump inhibitor use in older adults: a review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Marina L.; Fixen, Danielle R.; Linnebur, Sunny Anne

    2017-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a widely prescribed class of medications used to treat acid-related disorders and use has significantly increased over the last few decades. PPIs are often inappropriately prescribed and since they have been on the market, a number of post-marketing studies have been published demonstrating associations between longer duration of PPI therapy and a number of adverse effects that are a concern in older adults. The objective of this review is to discuss the existing literature of potential adverse effects with long-term PPI use in older adults and to summarize the implications in clinical practice. A PubMed search was conducted to identify studies evaluating the potential long-term adverse effects of PPI therapy in older adults, and publications were selected based on relevant criteria. PPIs have been associated with an increased risk of a number of adverse effects including osteoporotic-related fractures, Clostridium difficile infection, community-acquired pneumonia, vitamin B12 deficiency, kidney disease, and dementia, demonstrated by a number of case-control, cohort studies, and meta-analyses. Older adults should be periodically evaluated for the need for continued use of PPI therapy given the number of potential adverse effects associated with long-term use. PMID:28861211

  12. Gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma after long-term use of proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Jianu, Constantin S; Lange, Ove J; Viset, Trond; Qvigstad, Gunnar; Martinsen, Tom C; Fougner, Reidun; Kleveland, Per M; Fossmark, Reidar; Hauso, Øyvind; Waldum, Helge L

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a gastric neuroendocrine carcinoma in a patient with a history of long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use. A 49-year-old man using PPI for the last 15 years due to gastroesophageal reflux disease developed progressive dysphagia, dyspepsia and weight loss. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography and abdominal CT diagnosed a malignant tumor localized to a hiatal hernia. Fasting serum chromogranin A and gastrin concentrations were elevated (32 nmol/l and 159 pmol/l, respectively). Helicobacter pylori PCR analysis of antral biopsies was negative. Biopsies from endoscopically normal oxyntic mucosa showed enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyperplasia. Tumor biopsies revealed a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Sevier-Munger staining, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy indicated ECL cell as origin of the tumor cells. Concerns have previously been raised about the safety of long-term PPI use due to a possible increased risk of cancer. This case illustrates a patient with a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma with ECL cell characteristics probably induced by hypergastrinemia secondary to long-term PPI use.

  13. Comparative safety and efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in paediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kierkus, Jaroslaw; Oracz, Grzegorz; Korczowski, Bartosz; Szymanska, Edyta; Wiernicka, Anna; Woynarowski, Marek

    2014-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is one of the most common reasons for referrals to paediatricians or paediatric gastroenterologists. Gastric acid-buffering agents, mucosal surface barriers and gastric anti-secretory agents are the main groups of medications currently used for treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. Recently, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for the treatment of GERD in children has increased considerably. Their effectiveness in healing erosive oesophagitis in paediatric subjects and in improving GERD symptoms has been established in many studies. However, the effectiveness in other clinical conditions and the long-term safety of PPIs for paediatric GERD have not been fully established yet and thus are still under debate. Therefore, the aim of this article is to provide a comparative review of the efficacy, safety and tolerability of PPIs in paediatric GERD. The available data suggest that short-term use of PPIs is well tolerated. Adverse events tend to be of a mild-to-moderate nature, with headache being the most frequently reported treatment-related adverse event. However, further well-designed trials and observational studies are still needed to clarify the efficacy and safety of PPIs in the paediatric population, especially in infants under the age of 12 months.

  14. [Safety and interactions of proton pump inhibitors: lessons learned in millions of patients].

    PubMed

    Esplugues, Juan V; Martí-Cabrera, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    After many years of widespread use, proton pump inhibitors (PPI) have been demonstrated to be relatively safe. The most frequently associated adverse reactions are mild with scarce clinical effects. These agents produce hypergastrinemia but this adverse effect has not been related to the development of malignancies. PPI seem to facilitate certain bacterial infections in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, these infections are easily treated and therefore do not limit the prescription of PPI. From the pharmacokinetic point of view, the possibility of interactions with other drugs metabolized by the cytochrome P450 system has been described but these interactions generally seem to have little clinical or therapeutic importance. However, regulatory agencies are currently stressing the hypothetical interaction between PPI (especially omeprazole) and clopidogrel, which reduces the latter's antiplatelet effect. Although this recommendation should be followed, this interaction should be specifically evaluated to determine its clinical effect and the possible alternatives in patients at risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Lastly, the present article reviews PPI administration in special, currently debated situations, such as in pregnant or breastfeeding women.

  15. Efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors in the management of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Tjon, James A; Pe, Michael; Soscia, Joanna; Mahant, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly prescribed to infants and children for managing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Recently published literature illustrates conflicting evidence on the efficacy of PPIs in infants and children. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated a lack of efficacy of PPIs, specifically in young infants. Furthermore, emerging evidence also suggests that PPIs are not as benign as once thought, with newer data implicating a potential association of PPIs with an increased risk of respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, bone fractures, hypomagnesemia, and the occurrence of rebound hyperacidity after discontinuation of PPI therapy. To summarize the emerging data in children, we reviewed the literature to assess the efficacy and safety of PPIs in managing pediatric GERD. Despite conflicting evidence on the efficacy of PPIs, most studies in children demonstrated some benefit when compared with placebo. With respect to the safety of PPIs in children, only a few small studies and case reports indicated a potential association of PPIs with an increased risk of respiratory tract or gastrointestinal infections, bone fractures, and hypomagnesemia; however, many of those studies had their own limitations. From the review, it is clear that further well-designed trials and observational studies are needed to shed more light on the efficacy and safety of PPIs in the pediatric population.

  16. Gastric juice for the diagnosis of H pylori infection in patients on proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yakoob, Javed; Rasool, Shahid; Abbas, Zaigham; Jafri, Wasim; Abid, Shahab; Islam, Muhammad; Ahmad, Zubair

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the efficacy of gastric juice polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of H pylori infection in comparison with histology and gastric antral biopsy PCR in patients on a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive patients with dyspeptic symptoms were enrolled. Gastric biopsies for histology, PCR and gastric juice were collected at endoscopy for PCR of the H pylori urease C gene (ure C). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), accuracy, positive and negative likelihood ratio for PCR of gastric juice for the H pylori ure C gene was compared to histology and gastric antral biopsy H pylori ure C PCR in patients with and without PPI. RESULTS: Gastric juice PCR was positive in 66 (78%) patients. Histology showed H pylori associated gastritis in 57 (67%). Gastric biopsy PCR was positive in 72 (85%). In patients not taking PPI, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, accuracy and positive and negative likelihood ratio for gastric juice PCR were 89%, 72%, 91%, 67%, 90%, 85%, 3.1 and 0.1 respectively. In patients on PPI these values were 86%, 100%%, 100%, 29%, 86%, 9.5 and 1.4, respectively. CONCLUSION: Gastric juice PCR for the diagnosis of H pylori infection has increased sensitivity compared to histology with PPI. The use of gastric juice PCR is recommended to confirm H pylori status in patients taking PPIs. PMID:18330944

  17. Proton pump inhibitor induced collagen expression in colonocytes is associated with collagenous colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shiori; Kadochi, Yui; Luo, Yi; Fujiwara-Tani, Rina; Nishiguchi, Yukiko; Kishi, Shingo; Fujii, Kiyomu; Ohmori, Hitoshi; Kuniyasu, Hiroki

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the role of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in collagenous disease, direct effect of PPI on colonocytes was examined. METHODS Collagenous colitis is a common cause of non-bloody, watery diarrhea. Recently, there has been increasing focus on the use of proton PPIs as a risk factor for developing collagenous colitis. Mouse CT26 colonic cells were treated with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media. Expression of fibrosis-associated genes was examined by RT-PCR. In human materials, collagen expression was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS CT26 cells expressed a Na+-H+ exchanger gene (solute carrier family 9, member A2). Treatment with PPI and/or PPI-induced alkaline media caused growth inhibition and oxidative stress in CT26 cells. The treatment increased expression of fibrosis inducing factors, transforming growth factor β and fibroblast growth factor 2. The treatment also decreased expression of a negative regulator of collagen production, replication factor C1, resulting in increased expression of collagen types III and IV in association with lipid peroxide. In biopsy specimens from patients with collagenous colitis, type III and IV collagen were increased. Increase of type III collagen was more pronounced in PPI-associated collagenous colitis than in non-PPI-associated disease. CONCLUSION From these findings, the reaction of colonocytes to PPI might participate in pathogenesis of collagenous colitis. PMID:28321159

  18. Effect of food or proton pump inhibitor treatment on the bioavailability of dacomitinib in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Garcia, Ana; Masters, Joanna C; Mendes da Costa, Laure; LaBadie, Robert R; Liang, Yali; Ni, Grace; Ellery, Craig A; Boutros, Tanya; Goldberg, Zelanna; Bello, Carlo L

    2016-02-01

    This phase 1, open-label crossover study evaluated the relative bioavailability of dacomitinib in healthy volunteers under fed and fasted conditions and following coadministration with rabeprazole, a potent acid-reducing proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Twenty-four male subjects received a single dacomitinib 45-mg dose under 3 different conditions separated by washout periods of ≥ 16 days: coadministered with rabeprazole 40 mg under fasting conditions; alone under fasting conditions; and alone after a high-fat, high-calorie meal. Increased peak exposure of 23.7% (90% confidence interval [CI], 5.3%-45.2%) was detected with dacomitinib taken after food versus fasting. The adjusted geometric mean ratio (fed/fasted) for area under the plasma concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUCinf ) was 114.2% (90%CI, 104.7%-124.5%) and not considered clinically meaningful. In the fasted state, a decrease in dacomitinib AUCinf was observed following rabeprazole versus dacomitinib alone (PPI+fasted/fasted alone): 71.1% (90%CI, 61.7%-81.8%). Dacomitinib was generally well tolerated. Dacomitinib may be taken with or without food. Use of long-acting acid-reducing agents, such as PPIs with dacomitinib should be avoided if possible. Shorter-acting agents such as antacids and H2-receptor antagonists may have lesser impact on dacomitinib exposure and may be preferable to PPIs if acid reduction is clinically required.

  19. Long-term pretreatment with proton pump inhibitor and Helicobacter pylori eradication rates

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seung Bae; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Jong-Yul; Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Soo; Cho, Yu Kyung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether proton pump inhibitor (PPI) pretreatment influences Helicobacter pylori eradication rate. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed H. pylori-infected patients who were treated with a standard triple regimen (PPI, amoxicillin 1 g, and clarithromycin 500 mg, all twice daily for 7 d). The diagnosis of H. pylori infection and its eradication was assessed with the rapid urease test, histological examination by silver staining, or the 13C-urea breath test. We divided the patients into two groups: one received the standard eradication regimen without PPI pretreatment (Group A), and the other received PPI pretreatment (Group B). The patients in Group B were reclassified into three groups based on the duration of PPI pretreatment: Group B-I (3-14 d), Group B-II (15-55 d), and Group B-III (≥ 56 d). RESULTS: A total of 1090 patients were analyzed and the overall eradication rate was 80.9%. The cure rate in Group B (81.2%, 420/517) was not significantly different from that in Group A (79.2%, 454/573). The eradication rates in Group B-I, B-II and B-III were 80.1% (117/146), 81.8% (224/274) and 81.4% (79/97), respectively. CONCLUSION: PPI pretreatment did not affect H. pylori eradication rate, regardless of the medication period. PMID:24574779

  20. Comparative risk of ischemic stroke among users of clopidogrel together with individual proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Bilker, Warren B.; Brensinger, Colleen M.; Flockhart, David A.; Freeman, Cristin P.; Kasner, Scott E.; Kimmel, Stephen E.; Hennessy, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose There is controversy and little information concerning whether individual proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) differentially alter the effectiveness of clopidogrel in reducing ischemic stroke risk. We therefore aimed to elucidate the risk of ischemic stroke among concomitant users of clopidogrel and individual PPIs. Methods We conducted a propensity score-adjusted cohort study of adult new users of clopidogrel, using 1999–2009 Medicaid claims from 5 large states. Exposures were defined by prescriptions for esomeprazole, lansoprazole, omeprazole, rabeprazole and pantoprazole—with pantoprazole serving as the referent. The endpoint was hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke, defined by International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision Clinical Modification codes in the principal position on inpatient claims, within 180 days of concomitant therapy initiation. Results Among 325,559 concomitant users of clopidogrel and a PPI, we identified 1,667 ischemic strokes for an annual incidence of 2.4% (95% confidence interval: 2.3–2.5). Adjusted hazard ratios for ischemic stroke vs. pantoprazole were: 0.98 (0.82–1.17) for esomeprazole; 1.06 (0.92–1.21) for lansoprazole; 0.98 (0.85–1.15) for omeprazole; and 0.85 (0.63–1.13) for rabeprazole. Conclusions PPIs of interest did not increase the rate of ischemic stroke among clopidogrel users when compared to pantoprazole, a PPI thought to be devoid of the potential to interact with clopidogrel. PMID:25657176

  1. Use of proton-pump inhibitors among adults: a Danish nationwide drug utilization study

    PubMed Central

    Pottegård, Anton; Broe, Anne; Hallas, Jesper; de Muckadell, Ove B. Schaffalitzky; Lassen, Annmarie T.; Lødrup, Anders B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The use of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) has increased over the last decade. The objective of this study was to provide detailed utilization data on PPI use over time, with special emphasis on duration of PPI use and concomitant use of ulcerogenic drugs. Methods: Using the nationwide Danish Prescription Registry, we identified all Danish adults filling a PPI between 2002 and 2014. Using descriptive statistics, we reported (i) the distribution of use between single PPI entities, (ii) the development in incidence and prevalence of use over time, (iii) measures of duration and intensity of treatment, and (iv) the prevalence of use of ulcerogenic drugs among users of PPIs. Results: We identified 1,617,614 adults using PPIs during the study period. The prevalence of PPI use increased fourfold during the study period to 7.4% of all Danish adults in 2014. PPI use showed strong age dependency, reaching more than 20% among those aged at least 80 years. The proportion of users maintaining treatment over time increased with increasing age, with less than10% of those aged 18–39 years using PPIs 2 years after their first prescription, compared with about 40% among those aged at least 80 years. The overall use of ulcerogenic drugs among PPI users increased moderately, from 35% of users of PPI in 2002 to 45% in 2014. Conclusions: The use of PPIs is extensive and increasing rapidly, especially among the elderly. PMID:27582879

  2. What are the effects of proton pump inhibitors on the small intestine?

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Shunji

    2015-06-14

    Generally, proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have great benefit for patients with acid related disease with less frequently occurring side effects. According to a recent report, PPIs provoke dysbiosis of the small intestinal bacterial flora, exacerbating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal injury. Several meta-analyses and systematic reviews have reported that patients treated with PPIs, as well as post-gastrectomy patients, have a higher frequency of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) compared to patients who lack the aforementioned conditions. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence that these conditions induce Clostridium difficile infection. At this time, PPI-induced dysbiosis is considered a type of SIBO. It now seems likely that intestinal bacterial flora influence many diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes mellitus, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune diseases. When attempting to control intestinal bacterial flora with probiotics, prebiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation, etc., the influence of acid suppression therapy, especially PPIs, should not be overlooked.

  3. Adverse Event Reporting for Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy: An Overview of Systematic Reviews.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Jason; Thakkar, Punam; Isa, Arton; Truong, Alan; Park, Connie; Rosenfeld, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    To assist clinicians in counseling patients regarding the risk of adverse events from proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), by synthesizing evidence from published systematic reviews of antireflux therapy. Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Knowledge. Overview based on PRISMA reporting standards (preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses) of English-language meta-analyses and systematic reviews of PPI therapy for reflux disease through December 2014. Two independent investigators assessed study eligibility, rated the review quality with AMSTAR criteria (assessing the methodological quality of systematic reviews), and abstracted data for adverse events. Thirty-three systematic reviews met inclusion criteria. The most commonly reported adverse events were community-acquired pneumonia (odds ratios, 1.04-1.92), with a greater association noted with shorter duration of therapy and higher doses. Hip fractures were also associated with PPI use (odds ratios, 1.16-1.50), especially with long-term therapy. Last, enteric infection with Clostridium difficile was more common with PPI therapy (odds ratios, 1.69-1.33). Other less commonly reported adverse events included electrolyte and vitamin deficiency. Risk factors for adverse events are reported in the text. Our overview shows that PPI therapy is associated with significant and potentially serious adverse events that should be discussed with patients. The effect sizes and risk factors provided should facilitate this discussion and promote shared decision making. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  4. Novel giardicidal compounds bearing proton pump inhibitor scaffold proceeding through triosephosphate isomerase inactivation.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ochoa, B; Navarrete-Vázquez, G; Nava-Zuazo, C; Castillo-Villanueva, A; Méndez, S T; Torres-Arroyo, A; Gómez-Manzo, S; Marcial-Quino, J; Ponce-Macotela, M; Rufino-González, Y; Martínez-Gordillo, M; Palencia-Hernández, G; Esturau-Escofet, N; Calderon-Jaimes, E; Oria-Hernández, J; Reyes-Vivas, H

    2017-08-10

    Giardiasis is a worldwide parasitic disease that affects mainly children and immunosuppressed people. Side effects and the emergence of resistance over current used drugs make imperative looking for new antiparasitics through discovering of new biological targets and designing of novel drugs. Recently, it has determined that gastric proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) have anti-giardiasic activity. The glycolytic enzyme, triosephosphate isomerase (GlTIM), is one of its potential targets. Therefore, we employed the scaffold of PPI to design new compounds aimed to increase their antigiardial capacity by inactivating GlTIM. Here we demonstrated that two novel PPI-derivatives (BHO2 and BHO3), have better anti-giardiasic activity than omeprazole in concentrations around 120-130 µM, without cytotoxic effect on mammal cell cultures. The derivatives inactivated GlTIM through the chemical modification of Cys222 promoting local structural changes in the enzyme. Furthermore, derivatives forms adducts linked to Cys residues through a C-S bond. We demonstrated that PPI can be used as scaffolds to design better antiparasitic molecules; we also are proposing a molecular mechanism of reaction for these novel derivatives.

  5. Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of Osseointegrated Dental Implant Failure: A Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xixi; Al-Abedalla, Khadijeh; Abi-Nader, Samer; Daniel, Nach G; Nicolau, Belinda; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have a negative impact on bone accrual. Because osseointegration is influenced by bone metabolism, this study investigates the association between PPIs and the risk of osseointegrated implant failure. This retrospective cohort study included a total of 1,773 osseointegrated dental implants in 799 patients (133 implants in 58 PPIs users and 1,640 in 741 non-users) who were treated at the East Coast Oral Surgery Clinic in Moncton, Canada, from January 2007 to September 2015. Kaplan-Meier estimator was used to describe the hazard function of dental implant failure by PPIs usage. Multilevel mixed effects parametric survival analyses were used to test the association between PPIs exposure and risk of implant failure adjusting for potential confounders. The failure rates were 6.8% for people using PPIs compared to 3.2% for non-users. Subjects using PPIs had a higher risk of dental implant failure (HR = 2.73; 95% CI = 1.10-6.78) compared to those who did not use the drugs. The findings suggest that treatment with PPIs may be associated with an increased risk of osseointegrated dental implant failure.

  6. Helicobacter pylori therapy in children: a focus on proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, Claudio; Anania, Caterina; Pacifico, Lucia; Olivero, Giuseppe; Osborn, John F

    2011-01-01

    Over the last two decades, there have been many studies on children who have sought an effective and safe treatment to eradicate Helicobacter pylori infection, but as yet, no therapy regimen has been found which is always effective and safe. Differences in drug response among pediatric patients are common. Such individual variability in drug response is multifactorial, including environmental, genetic, development and disease determinants that affect the disposition of a given drug. In pediatric efficacy studies for the management of H. pylori eradication in children, the most commonly tested regimen has contained a combination of proton pump inhibitor (PPI), clarithromycin and amoxicillin, followed by triple therapies containing PPI, clarithromycin and nitroimidazoles. Thus, PPIs are an integral part of triple therapy for H. pylori eradication in children with gastroduodenal disease. In this article, we comprehensively review, from a pediatric point of view, the literature on the clinical, pharmacologic and microbiologic properties of PPIs. We also discuss genetic, developmental and other host-related factors that may affect the efficacy of these drugs. Finally, we provide some guidance regarding their potential role and limitations for H. pylori eradication in children. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Protons pump inhibitor treatment and lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Balancing risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    Lué, Alberto; Lanas, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a milestone in the treatment of acid-related diseases, and are the mainstay in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin. However, this beneficial effect does not extend to the lower gastrointestinal tract. PPIs do not prevent NSAID or aspirin-associated lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB). PPIs may increase both small bowel injury related to NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin treatment and the risk of LGB. Recent studies suggested that altering intestinal microbiota by PPIs may be involved in the pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy. An increase in LGB hospitalization rates may occur more frequently in older patients with more comorbidities and are associated with high hospital resource utilization, longer hospitalization, and increased mortality. Preventive strategies for NSAID and aspirin-associated gastrointestinal bleeding should be directed toward preventing both upper and lower gastrointestinal damage. Future research should be directed toward identifying patients at low-risk for gastrointestinal events associated with the use of NSAIDs or aspirin to avoid inappropriate PPI prescribing. Alternatively, the efficacy of new pharmacologic strategies should be evaluated in high-risk groups, with the aim of reducing the risk of both upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients. PMID:28082800

  8. The therapeutic effectiveness of the coadministration of weekly risedronate and proton pump inhibitor in osteoporosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Mizue; Itoh, Soichiro; Yoshioka, Taro; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2014-01-01

    This trial was conducted to investigate the long-term effects of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) coadministration on the efficacy of weekly risedronate treatment for osteoporosis. Ninety-six women over 50 years old with low bone mineral density (BMD) participated in this trial. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: a 17.5 mg dose of sodium risedronate was administered weekly, with or without a daily 10 mg dose of sodium rabeprazole (n = 49 and 47 in the BP + PPI and BP groups, resp.). The following biomarkers were measured at the baseline and every 3 months: bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen corrected for creatinine, parathyroid hormone, BMD of the lumbar spine, and physical parameters evaluated according to the SF-36v2 Health Survey. Statistical comparisons of these parameters were performed after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The Δ values of improvement in physical functioning after 12 months and bodily pain after 6 and 12 months in the BP + PPI group were significantly larger than those in the BP group. These results suggest that PPI does not adversely affect bone metabolism. Alternatively, approved bone formation by concomitant PPI treatment may have had favorable effects on the improvement of bodily pain and physical functions.

  9. Liquid chromatographic resolution of proton pump inhibitors including omeprazole on a ligand exchange chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jin Joo; Choi, Hee Jung; Jin, Jong Sung; Jeong, Euh Duck; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2010-10-08

    A ligand exchange chiral stationary phase (CSP) developed previously in this laboratory by bonding (R)-phenylglycinol derivative, sodium N-[(R)-2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl]-N-undecylaminoacetate, to silica gel was successfully applied to the resolution of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) including omeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole. For example, the separation factors (α) for the resolution of omeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole were 4.27, 5.28, 2.77 and 4.06, respectively, and the resolutions (R(S)) were 2.53, 2.55, 1.93, and 2.01, respectively, when 65% acetonitrile aqueous solution containing 0.5mM CuSO(4) and 0.05mM triethylamine was used as a mobile phase. Based on the chromatographic behaviors for the resolution of PPI analogues on CSP 1, a chiral recognition mechanism utilizing the sulfoxide oxygen and the benzimidazole ring nitrogen of PPIs as bidentate coordination donors to form an enantioselective ternary complex with the central Cu(II) ion and the chiral stationary bidentate ligand was proposed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. CYP2C19 genotype and pharmacokinetics of three proton pump inhibitors in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Sakai, T; Aoyama, N; Kita, T; Sakaeda, T; Nishiguchi, K; Nishitora, Y; Hohda, T; Sirasaka, D; Tamura, T; Tanigawara, Y; Kasuga, M; Okumura, K

    2001-06-01

    To predict the CYP2C19 genotype-dependence in anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) therapy when lansoprazole or rabeprazole was used instead of omeprazole as a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). A comparative pharmacokinetic study with each PPI was designed as an open, randomized, and crossover study of 18 Japanese healthy volunteers who were classified into the homozygous, heterozygous extensive metabolizer and the poor metabolizer based on the CYP2C19 genotype determined by PCR-RFLP method. Each subject received a single oral dose of 20 mg omeprazole, 30 mg lansoprazole, or 20 mg sodium rabeprazole, with at least 1 week washout period between treatments. Plasma concentrations of PPIs and their metabolites were monitored until 12 h after medication. Pharmacokinetic profiles of omeprazole and lansoprazole were well correlated with the CYP2C19 genotype. The heterozygous extensive metabolizer was slightly different from the homozygote, but there was no statistically significant difference. The CYP2C19 genotype dependence found for lansoprazole was not obvious compared with omeprazole. As for rabeprazole, the pharmacokinetic profile was independent of the CYP2C19 genotype. CYP2C19 genotype dependence will be found in the anti-H. pylori therapy even when lansoprazole is used as the PPI.

  11. Gastric microbiota is altered in oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus and further modified by proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Amir, Itay; Konikoff, Fred M; Oppenheim, Michal; Gophna, Uri; Half, Elizabeth E

    2014-09-01

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux can cause inflammation, metaplasia, dysplasia and cancer of the oesophagus. Despite the increased use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to treat reflux, the incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased rapidly in Europe and in the United States in the last 25 years. The reasons for this increase remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the microbiota of the gastric refluxate and oesophageal biopsies differs between patients with heartburn and normal-appearing oesophageal mucosa versus patients with abnormal oesophageal mucosa [oesophagitis or Barrett's oesophagus (BE)] and to elucidate the effect of PPIs on the bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Significant differences in the composition of gastric fluid bacteria were found between patients with heartburn and normal oesophageal tissue versus patients with oesophagitis or BE, but in the oesophagus-associated microbiota differences were relatively modest. Notably, increased levels of Enterobacteriaceae were observed in the gastric fluid of oesophagitis and BE patients. In addition, treatment with PPIs had dramatic effects on microbial communities both in the gastric fluids and the oesophageal tissue. In conclusion, gastric fluid microbiota is modified in patients with oesophagitis and BE compared with heartburn patients with normal biopsies. Furthermore, PPI treatment markedly alters gastric and oesophageal microbial populations. Determining whether the changes in bacterial composition caused by PPIs are beneficial or harmful will require further investigation. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Additional Benefits of Routine Drugs on Gastrointestinal Cancer: Statins, Metformin, and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joo, Moon Kyung; Park, Jong-Jae; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2017-09-08

    Commonly used medications including statins, metformin, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) effectively reduce the risk of esophageal, gastric, and colorectal cancer (CRC). A number of observational studies and meta-analyses have shown that long-term statin use significantly reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. Moreover, statin use after GI cancer diagnosis has been significantly associated with better prognosis in large-scale cohort studies. Metformin was rigorously evaluated in a population-based study and meta-analysis, and was found to have an unexpected benefit in the prevention and prolonged survival of CRC patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In contrast, few studies have demonstrated the chemopreventive effect of metformin for esophageal and gastric cancer. Recent observational studies have demonstrated that PPIs effectively reduce the progression of nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus into esophageal adenocarcinoma in a dose-dependent manner. However, the association between chronic PPI use and CRC or gastric cancer risk is still controversial. It was expected that these 3 routinely used medicines would show a synergistic effect with conventional systemic chemotherapy in advanced GI cancers. However, recent phase III studies failed to show significantly better outcomes. Key Messages: Further studies are needed to identify "additional" anticancer effects of these commonly used medicines. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Bacterial Overgrowth and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Unifying Hypothesis or a Spurious Consequence of Proton Pump Inhibitors?

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Brennan M.R.; Chey, William D.; Chang, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Some studies indicate that small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), as measured by hydrogen breath tests (HBT), is more prevalent in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) vs. matched controls without IBS. Although the data are conflicting, this observation has led to the hypothesis that SIBO may be a primary cause of IBS. Yet, it remains unclear whether SIBO is truly fundamental to the pathophysiology of IBS, or is instead a mere epiphenomenon or bystander of something else altogether. We hypothesize that SIBO might be a byproduct of the disproportionate use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in IBS, as follows: (1) IBS patients are more likely than controls to receive PPI therapy; (2) PPI therapy may promote varying forms of SIBO by eliminating gastric acid; and (3) existing studies linking SIBO to IBS have not adjusted for or excluded the use of PPI therapy. When linked together, these premises form the basis for a simple and testable hypothesis: the relationship between SIBO and IBS may be confounded by PPIs. Our article explores these premises, lays out the argument supporting this “PPI hypothesis,” discusses potential implications, and outlines next steps to further investigate this possibility. PMID:19086951

  14. [Proton pump inhibitors: impact of professional practice evaluation on prescriptions pertinence].

    PubMed

    Fuzier, R; Maguès, J-P; Dupuis, E; Pomiès, S; Segui, S; Sénard, J-M

    2011-11-01

    To improve the quality of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) prescription in an orthopaedic department. Prospective professional practice evaluation study. A specific protocol concerning the best practice for using PPI in the perioperative period was established by anaesthesiologists and validated by all prescribers, according to recent recommendations published by French Afssaps. PPI prescription pertinence, mainly using the oral route, was based upon the presence of clearly identified risk factors. PPI mensual consumption and severe gastric complications were analyzed and compared with those obtained from the previous year. Ten months after the beginning of the protocol, the pertinence of PPI prescription was analyzed in 20 randomly selected medical records. Data are expressed in defined daily dose (DDD). After one year, a 35.5% decrease in oral PPI consumption was noted (901 ± 211 before vs 581 ± 235 DDD, after, P<0.05). A similar trend to a decrease in intravenous PPI consumption was observed (40 ± 23 vs 22 ± 26, P=0.06). During the same period, the overall incidence of severe gastric complication remained stable. The PPI prescription was pertinent in 85% of selected medical records. This study confirmed the interest of professional practice evaluation protocols to improve PPI prescription. A strong implication of all medical staff members is mandatory to maintain such benefits over time. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Addition of cranberry to proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedmajidi, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi, Anahita; Hajiebrahimi, Shahin; Seyedmajidi, Seyedali; Rajabikashani, Majid; Firoozabadi, Mona; Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Proton pump inhibitor-based triple therapy with two antibiotics for Helicobacter pylori eradication is widely accepted, but this combination fails in a considerable number of cases. Some studies have shown that cranberry inhibits the adhesion of a wide range of microbial pathogens, including H. pylori. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cranberry on H. pylori eradication with a standard therapy including lansoprazole, clarithromycin, and amoxicillin (LCA) in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Methods: In this study, H. pylori-positive patients with PUD were randomized into two groups: Group A: A 14-day LCA triple therapy with 30 mg lansoprazole bid, 1000 mg amoxicillin bid, and 500 mg clarithromycin bid; Group B: A 14-day 500 mg cranberry capsules bid plus LCA triple therapy. A 13C-urea breath test was performed for eradication assessment 6 weeks after the completion of the treatment. Findings: Two hundred patients (53.5% males, between 23 and 77 years, mean age ± standard deviation: 50.29 ± 17.79 years) continued treatment protocols and underwent 13C-urea breath testing. H. pylori eradication was achieved in 74% in Group A (LCA without cranberry) and 89% in Group B (LCA with cranberry) (P = 0.042). Conclusion: The addition of cranberry to LCA triple therapy for H. pylori has a higher rate of eradication than the standard regimen alone (up to 89% and significant). PMID:27843960

  16. One year treatment of Barrett's oesophagus with proton pump inhibitors (a multi-center study).

    PubMed

    Babic, Z; Bogdanovic, Z; Dorosulic, Z; Petrovic, Z; Kujundzic, M; Banic, M; Marusic, M; Heinzl, R; Bilić, B; Andabak, M

    2015-12-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the effects of 1-year therapy by different proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on epithelial tissue and surrounding inflammatory changes in Barrett's oesophagus, in patients who have abandoned invasive therapy. A group of 120 patients (sampled in 60-month period, from 61201 upper gastrointestinal endoscopies) who were diagnosed both, endoscopically and pathohistologically with Barrett's oesophagus, and who have abandoned invasive therapeutic approach were enrolled in study. Treatment with different PPIs was initiated and continued for a year. At the end of treatment, patients were reassessed by endoscopy with tissue biopsy and pathohistological analysis. No difference in regenerating squamous epithelium or degree of dysplasia was seen between different treatment groups. Interestingly, most patients receiving pantoprazole (94%) ended up with thinner squamous epithel (P<0.0001). The squamous epithel was consider thinner only if its total thickness, measured on histological specimen, was smaller for more than 50% of the thickness before therapy. Significantly less of difference (P<0.0014) was seen with patients receiving lansoprazole (65%) and (P<0.003) omeprazole (50%). Regeneration of the squamous epithel was the same for all PPIs but not good enough to stop the progression of the disease.

  17. The power of pharmacological sciences: the example of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spector, Reynold; Vesell, Elliot S

    2006-01-01

    Critics have questioned the foundational principles of pharmacological sciences and modern drug therapy; they also claim that drug therapy is often too expensive or of uncertain value. Contemporaneously, alternative medicine has bloomed. Yet the US government began to pay for drug therapy under Medicare in 2006, an explicit recognition of the value of modern drug therapy. To clarify this confusion, we review the philosophical and scientific foundations of pharmacology, drug discovery and development, the attendant strategies and successful results. We also review and answer the major attacks on the philosophical and scientific foundations of modern pharmacology and drug therapy. Finally, we define the characteristics of an ideal drug. As an example of the principles and strategies of modern pharmacological sciences and their successful application, we focus on the discovery and development of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) of stomach acid production. This class of drugs approaches the ideal and exemplifies successful application of modern pharmacological principles to drug discovery and development. Moreover, the use of PPIs as a pharmacological tool allowed the resolution of important scientific questions, e.g., the role of stomach acid in peptic diseases of the stomach, duodenum and esophagus.

  18. Double-dose, new-generation proton pump inhibitors do not improve Helicobacter pylori eradication rate.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Sun; Park, Dong Il; Hwang, Sang Jun; Park, Jung Sik; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Sohn, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2007-12-01

    Up to present, omeprazole plus two antibiotics are used for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy . Few studies have compared double-dose new-generation, proton pump inhibitors (PPI) with omeprazole. Therefore, we conducted a randomized, prospective study to evaluate differences in H. pylori eradication rates by PPI type. Between January 2006 and December 2006, 576 consecutive patients with proven H. pylori infection were enrolled prospectively. Four different PPIs [omeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. (old generation), or pantoprazole 40 mg b.i.d., rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d., or esomeprazole 40 mg b.i.d. (new generation)] were added to clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d.) and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.) for 1 week. By intention-to-treat analysis, no difference was found between the eradication rates of these four PPIs: 64.9% (omeprazole, n = 148), 69.3% (pantoprazole, n = 140), 69.3% (rabeprazole, n = 140), and 72.9% (esomoprazole, n = 148). When eradication rates were analyzed according to whether patients had an ulcer or not on a per-protocol basis, no difference was found between the eradication rates of the four PPIs. However, side-effects were more common in the esomeprazole-based triple therapy group than in the other groups (p < .05). No convincing evidence was obtained that double-dose new-generation PPIs have better H. pylori eradication rates and tolerability than omeprazole.

  19. Prenatal exposure to H2 blockers and to proton pump inhibitors and asthma development in offspring.

    PubMed

    Yitshak-Sade, Maayan; Gorodischer, Rafael; Aviram, Micha; Novack, Lena

    2016-01-01

    Fetal exposure to H2 blockers (H2 Bs) or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been reported to be associated with asthma in children. We evaluated the risk of asthma in offspring following prenatal H2 Bs. We enrolled 91 428 children and their mothers who resided in southern Israel during 1998-2011. The computerized medications database was linked with records from the district hospital. Of the eligible children, 11 227 developed asthma, and overall 5.5% had been exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs prenatally. The risk of developing asthma was slightly higher in the group exposed to H2 Bs or PPIs (RR, 1.09; P = .023). At greater risk were children whose mothers purchased these medications more than 3 times (RR, 1.22; P = .038) or exposed to >20 defined daily doses or prenatally exposed to lansoprazole. The statistical association was significant and depended on magnitude of exposure and specific medication, but the absolute risk was low. The association between maternal consumption of H2 Bs or PPIs and asthma and childhood remained statistically significant 2 years after delivery, raising the possibility of confounding by the indication phenomenon. In view of the findings, a causal relationship could not be ascertained, and an unidentified etiological factor could be operative.

  20. Prescribing patterns of proton pump inhibitors in older hospitalized patients in a Scottish health board.

    PubMed

    Jarchow-Macdonald, Anna Amrit; Mangoni, Arduino A

    2013-10-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) are extensively prescribed worldwide. However, little information is available on PPI prescribing patterns, associated clinical and demographic factors, and potential drug-drug interactions in frail older patients. Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, and full medication exposure were collected in a consecutive series of 361 older patients (age 84 ± 7 years) admitted to two acute geriatric admission units (Aberdeen, National Health Service Grampian) between 1 February 2010 and 30 June 2010. A set of predetermined criteria was used to assess appropriateness of PPI prescribing. PPI were prescribed in 148 patients (41.0%). Inappropriate overprescribing was observed in 127 patients (35.2% of the study population, 85.8% of patients prescribed PPI). PPI were inappropriately not prescribed in 20 patients (48.8% of patients with an indication for PPI treatment). Regression analysis showed that the total number of non-PPI prescribed drugs (OR 1.08; 95%CI 1.01-1.15) and a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (OR 1.08; 95%CI 1.001-1.16) were independently associated with inappropriate PPI overprescribing. Potential drug-drug interactions were found in 75 patients (22.8% of the study population), mainly in patients with PPI overprescribing. Inappropriate PPI prescribing is common in frail older hospitalized patients, and might increase the risk of drug-drug interactions. Polypharmacy and comorbidity were independently associated with inappropriate PPI prescribing in this group. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  1. Systematic review: symptoms of rebound acid hypersecretion following proton pump inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Lødrup, Anders Bergh; Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2013-05-01

    While the physiological existence of rebound acid hypersecretion (RAHS) after withdrawal of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) therapy is established, the clinical implications are less certain. It has been speculated that a clinical relevant rebound phenomenon may be responsible for difficulties in getting off acid-suppressive medication and partly explain the increase in long-term use of PPI. A number of studies addressing this issue have been published recently. The authors aimed to systematically review the existing evidence of clinically relevant symptoms caused by acid rebound following PPI treatment. PubMed was searched using the terms "rebound acid hypersecretion" and generic names of PPIs. Five studies were included. Two studies on asymptomatic volunteers found that 44% experienced acid-related symptoms up to 4 weeks after treatment was withdrawn. Symptoms were generally mild to moderate and mainly heartburn and regurgitation. Three studies, using patients with reflux disease, found no signs of symptoms caused by acid rebound. Gastric acid rebound hypersecretion following PPI therapy induces reflux-like symptoms post-treatment in asymptomatic volunteers, but the significance of this in patient populations is not clear. The studies in patients with reflux disease found no evidence of symptomatic RAHS, but these studies were hampered by severe methodological weaknesses.

  2. Inulin significantly improves serum magnesium levels in proton pump inhibitor-induced hypomagnesaemia.

    PubMed

    Hess, M W; de Baaij, J H F; Broekman, M; Bisseling, T M; Haarhuis, B; Tan, A; Te Morsche, R; Hoenderop, J G J; Bindels, R J M; Drenth, J P H

    2016-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are among the most widely prescribed drugs to treat gastric acid-related disorders. PPI-induced hypomagnesaemia, a defect in intestinal absorption of Mg(2+) , can be a severe side effect of chronic PPI use. To restore serum Mg(2+) concentrations in PPI-induced hypomagnesaemia patients by dietary supplementation with inulin fibres. Eleven patients with PPI-induced hypomagnesaemia and 10 controls were treated with inulin (20 g/day). Each trial consisted of two cycles of 14-day inulin treatment followed by a washout period of 14 days. Patients continued to use their PPI. Serum Mg(2+) levels served as the primary endpoint. Inulin significantly enhanced serum Mg(2+) levels from 0.60 to 0.68 mmol/L in PPI-induced hypomagnesaemia patients, and from 0.84 to 0.93 mmol/L in controls. As a consequence 24 h urinary Mg(2+) excretion was significantly increased in patients with PPI-induced hypomagnesaemia (0.3-2.2 mmol/day). Symptoms related to hypomagnesaemia, including muscle cramps and paraesthesia, were reduced during intervention with inulin. Inulin increases serum Mg(2+) concentrations under PPI maintenance in patients with PPI-induced hypomagnesaemia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed Central

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy. PMID:24719900

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    PubMed

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniques it has been shown that, in addition to acid reflux, the reflux of nonacid gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus may also induce GER symptoms. It remains unknown how weakly acidic or alkaline refluxate with a pH similar to a normal diet induces GER symptoms. Esophageal hypersensitivity or functional dyspepsia with superimposed heartburn may be other mechanisms of symptom generation, often completely unrelated to GER. Detailed studies investigating the pathophysiology of esophageal hypersensitivity are not conclusive, and definitions of the various disease states may overlap and are often confusing. The authors aim to clarify the pathophysiology, definition, diagnostic techniques and medical treatment of patients with heartburn symptoms who fail PPI therapy.

  5. Proton pump inhibitor prescribing and costs in a large outpatient clinic.

    PubMed

    Hood, William; McJunkin, Brittain; Warnock, Alicia; Girme, Aditi; Smith, Nelson; Robinson, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding potential adverse effects and high costs of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Our objective was to assess issues of PPI utilization and expense in a large outpatient clinic population. Two hundred-fifty-nine outpatient records were reviewed regarding PPI prescribing and indications during 2009. A cost analysis was performed to project cost differences if histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) were used as an alternative to PPIs in appropriate clinical situations. Eighty-three (32.0%) were taking PPIs. Problem-listed gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was the primary diagnosis in 69 (83.1%) of patients on PPIs. GERD was not apparent by documented history and/or endoscopy in 46.3% of problem-listed GERD patients. Symptom severity had been documented in only 36.2%. Cost analysis projected substantial savings if H2RAs had been used initially for mild to moderate symptoms. Outpatient PPI prescribing indications are not well documented and PPI use is probably excessive. H2RA therapy is likely underutilized.

  6. Proton pump inhibitor resistance, the real challenge in gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Cicala, Michele; Emerenziani, Sara; Guarino, Michele Pier Luca; Ribolsi, Mentore

    2013-10-21

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases. Although proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent the mainstay of treatment both for healing erosive esophagitis and for symptom relief, several studies have shown that up to 40% of GERD patients reported either partial or complete lack of response of their symptoms to a standard PPI dose once daily. Several mechanisms have been proposed as involved in PPIs resistance, including ineffective control of gastric acid secretion, esophageal hypersensitivity, ultrastructural and functional changes in the esophageal epithelium. The diagnostic evaluation of a refractory GERD patients should include an accurate clinical evaluation, upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry and ambulatory pH-impedance monitoring, which allows to discriminate non-erosive reflux disease patients from those presenting esophageal hypersensitivity or functional heartburn. Treatment has been primarily based on doubling the PPI dose or switching to another PPI. Patients with proven disease, not responding to PPI twice daily, are eligible for anti-reflux surgery.

  7. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Is Associated With a Reduced Risk of Infection with Intestinal Protozoa.

    PubMed

    Sheele, Johnathan M

    2017-09-11

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can kill some human protozoan parasites in cell culture better than the drug metronidazole. Clinical data showing an antiprotozoal effect for PPIs are lacking. The objective of the study is to determine if PPI use is associated with a reduced risk of having intestinal parasites. We obtained electronic medical record data for all persons who received a stool ova and parasite (O & P) examination at our tertiary care academic medical center in Cleveland, Ohio, between January 2000 and September 2014. We obtained the person's age, whether they were taking a PPI at the time of the O & P examination, and whether the pathology report indicated the presence of any parasites. χ(2) with Yates correction was used to determine if PPI use was associated with stool protozoa. Three intestinal protozoa were identified in 1199 patients taking a PPI (0.3%), and 551 intestinal parasites were identified in the 14,287 patients not taking a PPI (3.9%). There was a statistically significant lower likelihood of finding protozoa in the stool of a person taking a PPI compared with those not taking a PPI (P < .0001). Patients taking a PPI were statistically less likely to have an intestinal protozoa reported on stool O & P examination compared with those not taking a PPI. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The influence of proton pump inhibitors and other commonly used medication on the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Imhann, Floris; Vich Vila, Arnau; Bonder, Marc Jan; Lopez Manosalva, Ailine G; Koonen, Debby P Y; Fu, Jingyuan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Weersma, Rinse K

    2017-07-04

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), used to treat gastro-esophageal reflux and prevent gastric ulcers, are among the most widely used drugs in the world. The use of PPIs is associated with an increased risk of enteric infections. Since the gut microbiota can, depending on composition, increase or decrease the risk of enteric infections, we investigated the effect of PPI-use on the gut microbiota. We discovered profound differences in the gut microbiota of PPI users: 20% of their bacterial taxa were statistically significantly altered compared with those of non-users. Moreover, we found that it is not only PPIs, but also antibiotics, antidepressants, statins and other commonly used medication were associated with distinct gut microbiota signatures. As a consequence, commonly used medications could affect how the gut microbiota resist enteric infections, promote or ameliorate gut inflammation, or change the host's metabolism. More studies are clearly needed to understand the role of commonly used medication in altering the gut microbiota as well as the subsequent health consequences.

  9. Protons pump inhibitor treatment and lower gastrointestinal bleeding: Balancing risks and benefits.

    PubMed

    Lué, Alberto; Lanas, Angel

    2016-12-28

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a milestone in the treatment of acid-related diseases, and are the mainstay in preventing upper gastrointestinal bleeding in high-risk patients treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or low-dose aspirin. However, this beneficial effect does not extend to the lower gastrointestinal tract. PPIs do not prevent NSAID or aspirin-associated lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGB). PPIs may increase both small bowel injury related to NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin treatment and the risk of LGB. Recent studies suggested that altering intestinal microbiota by PPIs may be involved in the pathogenesis of NSAID-enteropathy. An increase in LGB hospitalization rates may occur more frequently in older patients with more comorbidities and are associated with high hospital resource utilization, longer hospitalization, and increased mortality. Preventive strategies for NSAID and aspirin-associated gastrointestinal bleeding should be directed toward preventing both upper and lower gastrointestinal damage. Future research should be directed toward identifying patients at low-risk for gastrointestinal events associated with the use of NSAIDs or aspirin to avoid inappropriate PPI prescribing. Alternatively, the efficacy of new pharmacologic strategies should be evaluated in high-risk groups, with the aim of reducing the risk of both upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients.

  10. Susceptibility of bacterial vaginosis (BV)-associated bacteria to secnidazole compared to metronidazole, tinidazole and clindamycin.

    PubMed

    Petrina, Melinda A B; Cosentino, Lisa A; Rabe, Lorna K; Hillier, Sharon L

    2017-05-15

    Secnidazole, a 5-nitroimidazole with a longer half-life, is structurally related to metronidazole and tinidazole. For treatment of bacterial vaginosis (BV), secnidazole is a suitable single-dose oral drug having a longer serum half-life than metronidazole. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of vaginal isolates of facultative and anaerobic bacteria to secnidazole, metronidazole, tinidazole and clindamycin. A total of 605 unique BV-related bacteria and 108 isolates of lactobacilli recovered from the human vagina of US women during the years 2009-2015 were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility by the agar dilution CLSI reference method to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC). The MIC90 (μg/mL) for secnidazole was similar to metronidazole and tinidazole for Anaerococcus tetradius (secnidazole: MIC90 2; metronidazole: MIC90 2; tinidazole: MIC90 4), Atopobium vaginae (32; >128; 128), Bacteroides species (2; 2; 2), Finegoldia magna (2; 2; 4), Gardnerella vaginalis (128; 64; 32), Mageeibacillus indolicus (2; 2; 2), Megasphaera-like bacteria (0.5; 0.25; 0.5), Mobiluncus curtisii (128; >128; >128) and Mobiluncus mulieris (>128; >128; >128), Peptoniphilus lacrimalis (4; 4; 4) and Peptoniphilus harei (2; 2; 4), Porphyromonas species (0.25; 0.5; 0.25), Prevotella bivia (8; 8; 8), Prevotella amnii (2; 1; 2) and Prevotella timonensis (2; 2; 2). In this evaluation, 14 (40%) of 35 P. bivia, 5 (14%) of 35 P. amnii and 21 (58%) of 36 P. timonensis isolates were resistant to clindamycin with MIC values of >128 μg/mL. Secnidazole, like metronidazole, was superior to clindamycin for Prevotella spp., Bacteroides spp., Peptoniphilus spp., Anaerococcus tetradius and Finegoldia magna. Clindamycin had greater activity against Atopobium vaginae, Gardnerella vaginalis and Mobiluncus spp. compared to the nitroimidazoles. All 27 Lactobacillus crispatus, 26 (96%) of 27 L. jensenii, 5 (19%) of 27 L. gasseri and 18 (67%) of 27 L

  11. Effect of putative efflux pump inhibitors and inducers on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Hannula, Minna; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2008-07-01

    The CmeABC efflux pump plays an important role in the antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli. The aim of this investigation was to study the effect of putative efflux pump inhibitors, phenyl-arginine-beta-naphthylamide (PAbetaN) and 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP), as well as the effect of putative efflux pump inducers, sodium salicylate and sodium deoxycholate, on the MIC levels of erythromycin, ciprofloxacin, kanamycin, tetracycline and rifampicin for C. jejuni and C. coli. Our results indicated that susceptibility to erythromycin and rifampicin increased, respectively, 8- to 32- and 8- to 64-fold in the presence of PAbetaN and to a lesser extent in the presence of NMP. Salicylate produced a 2- to 4-fold increase in ciprofloxacin MIC values, whereas little effect was observed in the presence of deoxycholate.

  12. Clinical pharmacology of proton pump inhibitors: what the practising physician needs to know.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Malcolm; Horn, John

    2003-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) [omeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole and esomeprazole] are widely utilised for the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, as well as other acid-related disorders. All PPIs suppress gastric acid secretion by blocking the gastric acid pump, H(+)/K(+)-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase), but the physicochemical properties of these drugs result in variations in the degree of acid suppression, as well as the speed of onset of acid inhibition. Such differences may impact on the clinical performance of PPIs, and this manuscript discusses data that may help clinicians choose between the available PPIs for specific clinical situations and indications. The characteristics of PPIs that have been developed subsequent to omeprazole offer several advantages over this prototype PPI, particularly with respect to the onset of acid suppression and reduced potential for inter-individual pharmacokinetic variation and drug interactions. Newer agents inhibit H(+)/K(+)-ATPase more rapidly than omeprazole and emerging clinical data support potential clinical benefits resulting from this pharmacological property. Although key pharmacokinetic parameters (time to maximum plasma concentration and elimination half-life) do not differ significantly among PPIs, differences in the hepatic metabolism of these drugs can produce inter-patient variability in acid suppression, in the potential for pharmacokinetic drug interactions and, quite possibly, in clinical efficacy. All PPIs undergo significant hepatic metabolism. Because there is no direct toxicity from PPIs, there is minimal risk from the administration of any of them - even to patients with significant renal or hepatic impairment. However, there are significant genetic polymorphisms for one of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes involved in PPI metabolism (CYP2C19), and this polymorphism has been shown to substantially increase plasma levels of omeprazole, lansoprazole and pantoprazole

  13. Proton Pump Inhibitor and Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonist Use and Iron Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jameson R; Schneider, Jennifer L; Quesenberry, Charles P; Corley, Douglas A

    2017-03-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) suppress gastric acid production, which can inhibit iron absorption. However, few data exist regarding whether these medications increase the risk of clinical iron deficiency. A community-based case-control study evaluated the association between acid-suppressing medication use and the subsequent risk of iron deficiency. It contrasted 77,046 patients with new iron deficiency diagnoses (January 1999-December 2013), with 389,314 controls. Medication exposures, outcomes, and potential confounders used electronic databases. We excluded patients with pre-existing risk factors for iron deficiency. Associations were estimated using conditional logistic regression. Among cases, 2343 (3.0%) received a prior ≥2-year supply of PPIs and 1063 (1.4%) received H2RAs (without PPI use). Among controls, 3354 (0.9%) received a prior ≥2-year supply of PPIs and 2247 (0.6%) H2RAs. Both ≥2 years of PPIs (adjusted odds ratio, 2.49; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-2.64) and ≥2 years of H2RAs (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.46-1.71) were associated with an increased subsequent risk for iron deficiency. Among PPI users, the associations were stronger for higher daily doses (>1.5 vs <0.75 PPI pills/d; P value interaction = .004) and decreased after medication discontinuation (P-trend < .001). Some of the strongest associations were among persons taking >1.5 pills per day for at least 10 years (odds ratio, 4.27; 95% CI, 2.53-7.21). No similar strong associations were found for other commonly used prescription medications. Among patients without known risk factors for iron deficiency, gastric acid inhibitor use for ≥2 years was associated with an increased subsequent risk of iron deficiency. The risk increased with increasing potency of acid inhibition and decreased after medication discontinuation. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Head-to-head comparison of H2-receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors in the treatment of erosive esophagitis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Hong; Huang, Jia-Qing; Zheng, Ge-Fan; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang; Wong, Wai-Man; Lam, Shiu-Kum; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To systematically evaluate the efficacy of H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and proton pump inhibitors in healing erosive esophagitis (EE). METHODS: A meta-analysis was performed. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases to include randomized controlled head-to-head comparative trials evaluating the efficacy of H2RAs or proton pump inhibitors in healing EE. Relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated under a random-effects model. RESULTS: RRs of cumulative healing rates for each comparison at 8 wk were: high dose vs standard dose H2RAs, 1.17 (95%CI, 1.02-1.33); standard dose proton pump inhibitors vs standard dose H2RAs, 1.59 (95%CI, 1.44-1.75); standard dose other proton pump inhibitors vs standard dose omeprazole, 1.06 (95%CI, 0.98-1.06). Proton pump inhibitors produced consistently greater healing rates than H2RAs of all doses across all grades of esophagitis, including patients refractory to H2RAs. Healing rates achieved with standard dose omeprazole were similar to those with other proton pump inhibitors in all grades of esophagitis. CONCLUSION: H2RAs are less effective for treating patients with erosive esophagitis, especially in those with severe forms of esophagitis. Standard dose proton pump inhibitors are significantly more effective than H2RAs in healing esophagitis of all grades. Proton pump inhibitors given at the recommended dose are equally effective for healing esophagitis. PMID:15996033

  15. The frequency of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphisms in Russian patients with peptic ulcers treated with proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sychev, D A; Denisenko, N P; Sizova, Z M; Grachev, A V; Velikolug, K A

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors, which are widely used as acid-inhibitory agents for the treatment of peptic ulcers, are mainly metabolized by 2C19 isoenzyme of cytochrome P450 (CYP2C19). CYP2C19 has genetic polymorphisms, associated with extensive, poor, intermediate or ultra-rapid metabolism of proton pump inhibitors. Genetic polymorphisms of CYP2C19 could be of clinical concern in the treatment of peptic ulcers with proton pump inhibitors. To investigate the frequencies of CYP2C19*2, CYP2C19*3, and CYP2C19*17 alleles and genotypes in Russian patients with peptic ulcers. We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 971 patients of Caucasian origin with Russian nationality from Moscow region with endoscopically and histologically proven ulcers, 428 males (44%) and 543 females (56%). The mean age was 44.6±11.9 years (range: 15-88 years). DNA was extracted from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid whole blood samples (10 mL). The polymorphisms CYP2C19 681G.A (CYP2C19*2, rs4244285), CYP2C19 636 G.A (CYP2C19*3, rs4986893) and CYP2C19 -806 C.T (CYP2C19*17, rs12248560) were evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Regarding CYP2C19 genotype, 317 patients (32.65%) out of 971 were CYP2C19*1/*1 carriers classified as extensive metabolizers. Three hundred and eighty-six (39.75%) with CYP2C19*1/*17 or CYP2C19*17/*17 genotype were ultra-rapid metabolizers. Two hundred and fifty-one people (25.85%) were intermediate metabolizers with CYP2C19*1/*2, CYP2C19*2/*17, CYP2C19*1/*3, CYP2C19*3/*17 genotypes. Seventeen patients (1.75%) with CYP2C19*2/*2, CYP2C19*3/*3, CYP2C19*2/*3 genotypes were poor metabolizers. The allele frequencies were the following: CYP2C19*2 - 0.140, CYP2C19*3 - 0.006, CYP2C19*17 - 0.274. There is a high frequency of CYP2C19 genotypes associated with modified response to proton pump inhibitors in Russian patients with peptic ulcers. Genotyping for CYP2C19 polymorphisms is suggested to be a useful tool for personalized dosing of proton pump inhibitors.

  16. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors. PMID:26212113

  17. Evaluation of a Proton Pump Inhibitor for Sleep Bruxism: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Ohmure, H; Kanematsu-Hashimoto, K; Nagayama, K; Taguchi, H; Ido, A; Tominaga, K; Arakawa, T; Miyawaki, S

    2016-12-01

    Bruxism is a repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterized by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or bracing or thrusting of the mandible. Recent advances have clarified the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and sleep bruxism (SB). However, the influence of pharmacological elimination of gastric acid secretion on SB has not been confirmed. The authors aimed to assess the efficacy of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on SB and to examine the gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and endoscopic findings of the upper GI tract in SB patients. The authors performed a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study at Kagoshima University Hospital. Twelve patients with polysomnography (PSG)-diagnosed SB underwent an assessment of GI symptoms using the frequency scale for the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (FSSG) and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. At baseline (i.e., before interventions), the mean frequencies of electromyography (EMG) bursts and rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) episodes were 65.4 ± 49.0 bursts/h and 7.0 ± 4.8 episodes/h, respectively, and at least 1 RMMA episode with grinding noise was confirmed in all participants. The mean FSSG score was 8.4 ± 5.6, and 41.7% of patients were diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mild reflux esophagitis was confirmed in 6 patients. PSG, including EMG of the left masseter muscle and audio-video recording, was performed on days 4 and 5 of administration of 10 mg of the PPI (rabeprazole) or placebo. PPI administration yielded a significant reduction in the frequency of EMG bursts, RMMA episodes, and grinding noise. No significant differences were observed regarding the swallowing events and sleep variables. Since the clinical application of PPI for SB treatment should remain on hold at present, the results of this trial highlight the potential application of pharmacological gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment for SB patients. Larger scale studies are warranted to

  18. Proton Pump Inhibitor Usage and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T.; Iyer, Srinivasan V.; Marcus, Jake; Nead, Kevin T.; Cooke, John P.; Leeper, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with adverse clinical outcomes amongst clopidogrel users after an acute coronary syndrome. Recent pre-clinical results suggest that this risk might extend to subjects without any prior history of cardiovascular disease. We explore this potential risk in the general population via data-mining approaches. Methods Using a novel approach for mining clinical data for pharmacovigilance, we queried over 16 million clinical documents on 2.9 million individuals to examine whether PPI usage was associated with cardiovascular risk in the general population. Results In multiple data sources, we found gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients exposed to PPIs to have a 1.16 fold increased association (95% CI 1.09–1.24) with myocardial infarction (MI). Survival analysis in a prospective cohort found a two-fold (HR = 2.00; 95% CI 1.07–3.78; P = 0.031) increase in association with cardiovascular mortality. We found that this association exists regardless of clopidogrel use. We also found that H2 blockers, an alternate treatment for GERD, were not associated with increased cardiovascular risk; had they been in place, such pharmacovigilance algorithms could have flagged this risk as early as the year 2000. Conclusions Consistent with our pre-clinical findings that PPIs may adversely impact vascular function, our data-mining study supports the association of PPI exposure with risk for MI in the general population. These data provide an example of how a combination of experimental studies and data-mining approaches can be applied to prioritize drug safety signals for further investigation. PMID:26061035

  19. Association Between Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Risk of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Klatte, Derk C F; Gasparini, Alessandro; Xu, Hong; de Deco, Pietro; Trevisan, Marco; Johansson, Anna L V; Wettermark, Björn; Ärnlöv, Johan; Janmaat, Cynthia J; Lindholm, Bengt; Dekker, Friedo W; Coresh, Josef; Grams, Morgan E; Carrero, Juan J

    2017-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) have been associated with acute kidney injury and recent studies suggest that they may be associated with the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a retrospective analysis using the Stockholm creatinine measurements database, which contains information on diagnoses, dispensation claims, and laboratory test results for all citizens in the Stockholm region from 2007 through 2010. We identified new users of PPIs (n = 105,305) and new users of H2 blockers (H2B; n = 9578); data on renal outcomes were collected for a median 2.7 years. The primary outcome was progression CKD, defined as doubling of creatinine or decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30% or more. Secondary outcomes were end-stage renal disease and acute kidney injury. Complete collection of repeated PPI and H2B dispensations at pharmacies in Sweden allowed modeling the time-dependent risk associated with cumulative PPI exposure. Users of PPIs, compared with users of H2Bs, had an increased risk for doubled levels of creatinine (1985 events; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.51) and decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate of 30% or more (11,045 events; 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.36). PPI use also associated with development of end-stage renal disease (HR, 2.40; 95% CI, 0.76-7.58) and acute kidney injury (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.00-1.69). There was a graded association between cumulative exposure to PPIs and risk of CKD progression. This was not the case for cumulative H2B use. Initiation of PPI therapy and cumulative PPI exposure is associate with increased risk of CKD progression in a large, North European healthcare system. Although consistent, the association was modest in magnitude, and cannot exclude residual confounding. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bone fracture and the interaction between bisphosphonates and proton pump inhibitors: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Wei, Hai-Kun; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Da-Long; Shen, Yong; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recent studies suggested an increased risk of fractures with interaction between bisphosphonates (BPs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We performed a meta-analysis of fractures between patients taking BPs/PPIs and those taking BPs only. Methods: We conducted a PubMed database and Ovid database search, as well as Cochrane Library search (up to July 2014) for studies assessing the association between fractures and BPs or/and PPIs. We performed random effects meta-analysis of odds ratios (OR) according to fracture type and conducted subgroup analyses by race and BP subtypes. Heterogeneity was assessed using Q statistics and I2 statistic. Results: After study selection, 4 unique studies (5 comparisons) including 57259 patients were available for this meta-analysis. Pooled analysis of overall fracture risk of BP+PPI group versus BP group showed a significant increase in risk of fractures (OR = 1.52, P = 0.025), with substantial heterogeneity. However, heterogeneity was drastically reduced in subgroup of Asian (I2 = 24% and P = 0.251), and fracture risk showed a significant increase (OR = 1.75, P = 0.026). In contrast, heterogeneity was little eliminated in subgroup of European, and fracture risk was no statistical difference (OR = 1.42, P = 0.068). Three studies including 4 comparisons reported on spine fracture were included in the pooled analysis demonstrating an increased spine fracture risk associated with BP/PPI interaction (OR = 1.60, 95% CI 1.13-2.26, P = 0.008, I2 = 58.6%). Conclusions: This meta-analysis suggests that there is an interaction associated with increased fracture risk (particularly for spine and Asian race) between BP and PPI use. Clinicians should carefully evaluate such risk factors for osteoporosis in patients taking BPs, before routinely prescribing PPIs, and make a careful judgment as to whether PPIs may be safe for patients at high risk of fractures. PMID:26131063

  1. Validation of the Reflux Symptom Questionnaire Electronic Diary in Partial Responders to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Vakil, Nimish; Björck, Karin; Denison, Hans; Halling, Katarina; Karlsson, Maria; Paty, Jean; Silberg, Debra G; Rydén, Anna

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We aimed to develop and validate the Reflux Symptom Questionnaire electronic Diary (RESQ-eD) for use in clinical trials in patients with a partial response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, using methods that meet US Food & Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory standards. METHODS: Patient interviews were performed to elicit new items and evaluate existing items from the Reflux Disease Questionnaire. The instrument's measurement properties were evaluated, based on data from two clinical trials of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with a partial response to PPIs who received lesogaberan or placebo as an add-on to PPI therapy. RESULTS: The content validity phase resulted in 13 RESQ-eD items. Principal component analysis supported a four-domain structure. All domains had a high inter-item correlation (Cronbach's alpha lower 95% confidence limit: 0.87–0.95). Test-retest reliability was good to excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.65–0.85). Convergent and discriminant validity was confirmed by correlation assessments referencing the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. The RESQ-eD demonstrated a good ability to capture change in mean intensity and proportion of symptom-free days. Confirmatory psychometric evaluation verified internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, and ability to capture change. CONCLUSIONS: The RESQ-eD demonstrated good content validity and psychometric properties in the clinical trial setting in patients with GERD who have a partial response to PPI therapy. To our knowledge, the RESQ-eD is the first electronic symptom diary for use in partial responders to PPI that has been developed in line with the FDA guidance on patient-reported outcomes. PMID:23238029

  2. Helicobacter gastritis induces changes in the oxyntic mucosa indistinguishable from the effects of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kirthi R; Iqbal, Ramiz; Coss, Elizabeth; Park, Christina; Cryer, Byron; Genta, Robert M

    2013-12-01

    A causal relationship between oxyntic glands dilatation with protruding parietal cells, referred to as proton pump inhibitor (PPI) effects, and PPI use has been suspected but not established. We designed this study to evaluate the association between these changes and the use of PPIs and histamine2-receptor blockers (H2-blockers). We obtained five Sydney System-compliant biopsy specimens from patients recruited into a therapeutic trial for H. pylori. Medication history with details on PPI and H2-blockers use was collected. Two blinded pathologists graded gastritis and the intensity of putative PPI effects using a 0 to 3 scale. PPI and H2-blocker use was then disclosed and the accuracy of pathologists' assessment was analyzed. There were 138 H. pylori-negative and 104 positive patients. In H. pylori-negative patients the histologic assessment for PPI use had 77.5% sensitivity and 51.8% specificity, with a positive predictive value of 86.9% and a negative predictive value of 35.9%. In H. pylori-positive patients, sensitivity was 74.1% and specificity 26.1%. Positive and negative predictive values were 55.8% and 44.4%, respectively. Neither glandular dilatations nor parietal cell protrusions related to H2-blocker use. We conclude that these changes are associated with PPI use only in H. pylori-negative subjects. In H. pylori gastritis, so-called PPI-effects were equally prevalent in PPI-users and non-users, indicating that other factors are involved in the induction of oxyntic cell hyperplasia. We suggest that comments regarding the supposed evidence of PPI use are too often wrong to be useful and should be avoided in the diagnosis of gastric biopsy specimens.

  3. Proton pump inhibitors enhance the effects of cytotoxic agents in chemoresistant epithelial ovarian carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ji Eun; Cho, Young Jae; Ryu, Ji Yoon; Choi, Jung-Joo; Lee, Sang Hoon; Yoon, Gun; Kim, Woo Young; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Tae-Joong; Choi, Chel Hun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Bae, Duk-Soo; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether proton pump inhibitors (PPI, V-ATPase blocker) could increase the effect of cytotoxic agents in chemoresistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Expression of V-ATPase protein was evaluated in patients with EOC using immunohistochemistry, and patient survival was compared based on expression of V-ATPase mRNA from a TCGA data set. In vitro, EOC cell lines were treated with chemotherapeutic agents with or without V-ATPase siRNA or PPI (omeprazole) pretreatment. Cell survival and apoptosis was assessed using MTT assay and ELISA, respectively. In vivo experiments were performed to confirm the synergistic effect with omeprazole and paclitaxel on tumor growth in orthotopic and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models. Expression of V-ATPase protein in ovarian cancer tissues was observed in 44 patients (44/59, 74.6%). Higher expression of V-ATPase mRNA was associated with poorer overall survival in TCGA data. Inhibition of V-ATPase by siRNA or omeprazole significantly increased cytotoxicity or apoptosis to paclitaxel in chemoresistant (HeyA8-MDR, SKOV3-TR) and clear cell carcinoma cells (ES-2, RMG-1), but not in chemosensitive cells (HeyA8, SKOV3ip1). Moreover, the combination of omeprazole and paclitaxel significantly decreased the total tumor weight compared with paclitaxel alone in a chemoresistant EOC animal model and a PDX model of clear cell carcinoma. However, this finding was not observed in chemosensitive EOC animal models. These results show that omeprazole pretreatment can increase the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in chemoresistant EOC and clear cell carcinoma via reduction of the acidic tumor microenvironment. PMID:26418900

  4. Proton pump inhibitors use in hemodialysis patients and serum magnesium levels

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Emre

    2015-01-01

    Hypomagnesemia is reported in patients who use proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We investigated the effect of PPIs use on serum magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients. Our study was conducted in a hemodialysis center including 75 end stage renal disease patients. PPI use and duration were investigated. All patients were dialyzed using a dialysate magnesium level of 0.5-0.75 mmol/L. After at least one month of hemodialysis with the mentioned dialysate, laboratory tests were performed. Fifty-four patients (72%) used PPIs while 21 (28%) did not. The mean duration of PPI use was 42.5 ± 35 months. There was no significant difference between serum magnesium levels of patients who used and did not use PPIs (2.73 ± 0.3 vs. 2.88 ± 0.3 mg/dL, P = ns). There were 15 patients (20%) with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.5 mmol/l and 60 patients (80%) with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.75 mmol/L. The mean serum magnesium levels of patients with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.5 mmol/L was 2.45 ± 0.3 mg/dL while that of patients with a dialysate magnesium level of 0.75 mmol/L was 2.85 ± 0.3 mg/dL (P<0.0001). In hemodialysis patients, PPI use did not affect serum magnesium levels. The most important factor affecting the serum magnesium levels in hemodialysis patients is the dialysate magnesium concentration. PMID:26885127

  5. Proton pump inhibitors reduce the size and acidity of the acid pocket in the stomach.

    PubMed

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roelof J; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2014-07-01

    The gastric acid pocket is believed to be the reservoir from which acid reflux events originate. Little is known about how changes in position, size, and acidity of the acid pocket contribute to the therapeutic effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Thirty-six patients with GERD (18 not taking PPIs, 18 taking PPIs; 19 men; age, 55 ± 2.1 y) were analyzed by concurrent high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring after a standardized meal. The acid pocket was visualized using scintigraphy after intravenous administration of (99m)technetium-pertechnetate. The size of the acid pocket was measured and its position was determined, relative to the diaphragm, using radionuclide markers on a high-resolution manometry catheter. At the end of the study, the acid pocket was aspirated, and its pH level was measured. The number of reflux episodes was comparable between patients on and off PPIs, but the number of acid reflux episodes was reduced significantly in patients on PPIs. In patients on PPIs, the acid pocket was smaller and more frequently located below the diaphragm. The mean pH of the acid pocket was significantly lower in patients not taking PPIs (n = 6) than in those who were (n = 16) (0.9; range, 0.7-1.2 vs 4.0; range, 1.6-5.9; P < .001). The pH of acid pockets correlated significantly with the lowest pH values measured for refluxate (r = 0.72; P < .01). Based on analyses of acid pockets in patients with GERD, the acid pocket appears to be a reservoir from which reflux occurs when patients are receiving PPIs. PPIs might affect the size, acidity, or position of the acid pocket, which contributes to the efficacy in patients with GERD. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Guidelines for proton pump inhibitor prescriptions in paediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Joret-Descout, P; Dauger, S; Bellaiche, M; Bourdon, O; Prot-Labarthe, S

    2017-02-01

    Background Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is recommended in some situations to prevent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a component of standard care for patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), already among the most widely prescribed drug classes, are being increasingly used. Objective To describe PPI prescribing patterns and their changes after the dissemination of guidelines. Setting Paediatric ICU (PICU), Robert-Debré Teaching Hospital, Paris, France, which admits about 800 patients annually, from full-term neonates to 18-year-olds. Method Prospective observational study with two 6-week observation periods (July-August and September-October, 2013), before and after dissemination in the PICU of PPI prescribing guidelines. Main outcome measure Changes in PPI prescribing patterns (prevalence, dosage, and indication) after the guidelines. Results The number of patients admitted to the PICU was 77 (mean age 4.6 years [range 1 day-18 years]) before and 70 (mean age 3.8 years [range 1 day-17 years]) after the guidelines. During both periods, SUP was the most common reason for PPI prescribing. The proportion of patients prescribed PPIs dropped significantly, from 51% before the guidelines to 30% after the guidelines (p < 0.001). Mean daily dosage also decreased significantly, from 1.5 mg/kg/(range 0.5-4.4) to 1.1 mg/kg (range 0.7-1.8) (p < 0.002). None of the patients experienced upper gastrointestinal bleeding during either period. Conclusion Off-label PPI prescribing for SUP was common in our PICU. The introduction of guidelines was associated with a significant decrease in PPI use and dosage. This study confirms that guidelines can change PPI prescribings patterns in paediatric practice.

  7. Delayed release film coating applications on oral solid dosage forms of proton pump inhibitors: case studies.

    PubMed

    Missaghi, Shahrzad; Young, Cara; Fegely, Kurt; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali R

    2010-02-01

    Formulation of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) into oral solid dosage forms is challenging because the drug molecules are acid-labile. The aim of this study is to evaluate different formulation strategies (monolithic and multiparticulates) for three PPI drugs, that is, rabeprazole sodium, lansoprazole, and esomeprazole magnesium, using delayed release film coating applications. The core tablets of rabeprazole sodium were prepared using organic wet granulation method. Multiparticulates of lansoprazole and esomeprazole magnesium were prepared through drug layering of sugar spheres, using powder layering and suspension layering methods, respectively. Tablets and drug-layered multiparticulates were seal-coated, followed by delayed release film coating application, using Acryl-EZE(R), aqueous acrylic enteric system. Multiparticulates were then filled into capsules. The final dosage forms were evaluated for physical properties, as well as in vitro dissolution testing in both compendial acid phase, 0.1N HCl (pH 1.2), and intermediate pH, acetate buffer (pH 4.5), followed by phosphate buffer, pH 6.8. The stability of the delayed release dosage forms was evaluated upon storage in accelerated conditions [40 degrees C/75% relative humidity] for 3 months. All dosage forms demonstrated excellent enteric protection in the acid phase, followed by rapid release in their respective buffer media. Moreover, the delayed release dosage forms remained stable under accelerated stability conditions for 3 months. Results showed that Acryl-EZE enteric coating systems provide excellent performance in both media (0.1N HCl and acetate buffer pH 4.5) for monolithic and multiparticulate dosage forms.

  8. Single enantiomer versus racemate: chiral distinction in the proton pump inhibitors omeprazole and esomeprazole.

    PubMed

    Marom, Hili; Pogodin, Sergey; Agranat, Israel

    2014-04-01

    Chiral distinction in the proton pump inhibitor drugs omeprazole and in its chiral-switch esomeprazole magnesium was studied employing the Density Functional Theory (DFT) method. At B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), the 6-methoxy∙∙∙6-methoxy and 5-methoxy∙∙∙5-methoxy homochiral and heterochiral dimers were calculated. The chiral distinction free energies (ΔΔG(298,(RS-SS))) between the cyclic C2-(S,S)- and Ci-(R,S)-dimers with two intermolecular hydrogen bonds are 3.8, 1.9 (with BSSE counterpoise correction), and -6.9 (with D3 dispersion and BSSE counterpoise corrections) kJ/mol. Adding water as an implicit solvent (polarized continuum model [PCM] model) resulted in a chiral distinction energy of -3.3 kJ/mol, indicating a reversal of the order of the relative stabilities of C2-(S,S)- and Ci-(R,S)-dimers. The chiral distinction free energies between the corresponding (less stable) C1-dimers with one intermolecular hydrogen bond are -9.3, -5.8 (with BSSE CC), 17.6 (D3 + BSSE CC), and -3.2 (H2O) kJ/mol. The results highlight the contention that omeprazole is not just a superposition of its enantiomer constituents. They are consistent with the pharmacological evidence of enantiomer-enantiomer interactions in omeprazole versus esomeprazole and the differences between the drugs omeprazole and esomeprazole magnesium and support the lodged application for regulatory supplementary protection certificate (SPC) exclusivity for the esomeprazole-related combination drug Vimovo. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Usefulness of baseline impedance in patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory nonerosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Kohata, Yukie; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-03-01

    Approximately more than half of patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) do not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. Although NERD is a heterogeneous entity, previous study showed that multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII)-pH monitoring could distinguish reflux-related disease from PPI-refractory NERD. The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of baseline impedance in PPI-refractory NERD patients. We used MII-pH monitoring to analyze reflux parameters, symptom index (SI), and baseline impedance in 37 PPI-refractory NERD patients on PPI. Reflux was divided into acid (nadir pH ≤ 4) and non-acid (nadir pH > 4). Subjects were classified as having reflux-related disease based on abnormal reflux parameters or positive SI (≥ 50%), or non-reflux-related disease, including functional heartburn, based on negative SI with normal reflux parameters. A total of 26 of the 37 subjects were diagnosed with reflux-related disease, including eight with acid-reflux type and 18 with non-acid-reflux type, and nine with functional heartburn and two with pseudohypersalivation. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics of the acid-reflux type, non-acid-reflux type, and functional heartburn groups. The baseline impedance value in the acid-reflux type (1245 ± 392 Ω) was significantly lower than that in the non-acid-reflux type (2824 ± 1160 Ω) and functional heartburn (3546 ± 1353 Ω) groups. Baseline impedance values inversely correlated with reflux percent time, acid-reflux time, and acid exposure time. Among patients with PPI-refractory NERD, acid-reflux type was associated with lower baseline impedance compared with non-acid-reflux type and functional heartburn. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Survey of findings in patients having persistent heartburn on proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Mandaliya, R; DiMarino, A J; Cohen, S

    2016-01-01

    In patients with refractory heartburn while on proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, changing drugs or increasing treatment to a twice a day (b.i.d.) dose has become a common practice. This study aims to study patients with persistent heartburn while on PPI therapy and to determine if persistent symptom indicates the need for more aggressive or different therapy. A retrospective review of impedance-pH tracings on PPI therapy (q.d. or b.i.d.) for patients with persistent heartburn was performed. DeMeester score, impedance, and symptom sensitive index (SSI) were used as indices. Statistical analyses were performed using chi-squared test with Yates correction and paired t-test. One hundred consecutive patients, (female 50%, male 50%, mean age 54 [range 16-83] years) were studied on q.d. (n = 45) or b.i.d. PPI (n = 55). Only 20% of the patients had abnormal DeMeester score; 41% had an abnormal impedance score and 56% had abnormal SSI; 29% had all indices normal. There was no difference between patients taking q.d. versus b.i.d. PPI for abnormal DeMeester score (22 vs. 18%), impedance (38 vs. 44%) and SSI (53 vs. 58%); P = 0.80, 0.69, and 0.77, respectively. In 56 patients with positive SSI, symptoms were due to acid reflux in 8 (14%) patients, nonacid reflux in 31 (55%) patients, and combined acid and nonacid reflux in 17 (30%) patients. Patients with persistent heartburn on PPI therapy show a variety of disorders: (i) acid reflux (20%); (ii) nonacid reflux (26%); (iii) positive SSI (56%); (iv) all normal indices (29%). These studies indicate that persistent heartburn on PPI therapy is a complex problem that may not respond to simply increasing acid inhibition. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  11. Can proton pump inhibitors reduce rebleeding following Histoacryl sclerotherapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage?

    PubMed

    Kim, Ka Rham; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Kyu Man; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in reducing rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates after endoscopic gastric variceal obliteration (GVO) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC). This study enrolled 341 patients who were consecutively diagnosed with and treated for bleeding gastric varices. The patients were divided into PPI and non-PPI groups, and their endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis outcomes, rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates, and treatment-related complications were analyzed. The rate of initial hemostasis was 97.1%. rebleeding occurred in 2.2% of patients within 2 weeks, 3.9% of patients within 4 weeks, 18.9% of patients within 6 months, and 27.6% of patients within 12 months of the GVO procedure. A previous history of variceal bleeding (relative risk [RR], 1.955; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.263 to 3.028; p = 0.003) and use of PPIs (RR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.352 to 0.873; p = 0.011) were associated with rebleeding. Child-Pugh class C (RR, 10.914; 95% CI, 4.032 to 29.541; p < 0.001), failure of initial hemostasis (RR, 13.329; 95% CI, 2.795 to 63.556; p = 0.001), and the presence of red-colored concomitant esophageal varices (RR, 4.096; 95% CI, 1.320 to 12.713; p = 0.015) were associated with bleeding-related death. The prophylactic use of PPIs reduces rebleeding after GVO using NBC in patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, prophylactic use of PPIs does not reduce bleeding-related death.

  12. A retrospective analysis of the role of proton pump inhibitors in colorectal cancer disease survival

    PubMed Central

    Graham, C.; Orr, C.; Bricks, C.S.; Hopman, W.M.; Hammad, N.; Ramjeesingh, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Proton pump inhibitors (ppis) are a commonly used medication. A limited number of studies have identified a weak-to-moderate association between ppi use and colorectal cancer (crc) risk, but none to date have identified an effect of ppi use on crc survival. We therefore postulated that an association between ppi use and crc survival might potentially exist. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 1304 crc patients diagnosed from January 2005 to December 2011 and treated at the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario. Kaplan–Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate overall survival (os). Results We identified 117 patients (9.0%) who were taking ppis at the time of oncology consult. Those taking a ppi were also more often taking asa or statins (or both) and had a statistically significantly increased rate of cardiac disease. No identifiable difference in tumour characteristics was evident in the two groups, including tumour location, differentiation, lymph node status, and stage. Univariate analysis identified a statistically nonsignificant difference in survival, with those taking a ppi experiencing lesser 1-year (82.1% vs. 86.7%, p = 0.161), 2-year (70.1% vs. 76.8%, p = 0.111), and 5-year os (55.2% vs. 62.9%, p = 0.165). When controlling for patient demographics and tumour characteristics, multivariate Cox regression analysis identified a statistically significant effect of ppi in our patient population (hazard ratio: 1.343; 95% confidence interval: 1.011 to 1.785; p = 0.042). Conclusions Our results suggest a potential adverse effect of ppi use on os in crc patients. These results need further evaluation in prospective analyses. PMID:28050148

  13. Influence of proton pump inhibitor treatment on Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Masaaki; Murakami, Kazunari; Okimoto, Tadayoshi; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Shimoyama, Tadashi; Okuda, Masumi; Kato, Chieko; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Fujioka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment on stool antigen test using the TestMate pylori enzyme immunoassay. METHODS: This study assessed 28 patients [16 men and 12 women; mean age (63.1 ± 5.9) years; range, 25-84 years] who underwent stool antigen test and urea breath test (UBT) before and after PPI administration. RESULTS: Using the UBT as the standard, the sensitivity, specificity and agreement of the stool antigen test in all 28 patients were 95.2%, 71.4%, and 89.3%, respectively, before PPI administration, and 88.9%, 90.9%, and 89.3%, respectively, after PPI treatment. Mean UBT values were 23.98% ± 5.33% before and 16.19% ± 4.75% after PPI treatment and, in 15 patients treated for ≥ 4 wk, were significantly lower after than before 4 wk of PPI treatment (12.58% ± 4.49% vs 24.53% ± 8.53%, P = 0.048). The mean optical density (A450/630) ratios on the stool antigen test were 1.16 ± 0.20 before and 1.17 ± 0.24 after PPI treatment (P = 0.989), and were 1.02 ± 0.26 and 0.69 ± 0.28, respectively, in the group treated for > 4 wk (P = 0.099). CONCLUSION: The stool antigen test was equally sensitive to the UBT, making it a useful and reliable diagnostic method, even during PPI administration. PMID:22228969

  14. Can proton pump inhibitors reduce rebleeding following Histoacryl sclerotherapy for gastric variceal hemorrhage?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Rham; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Kyu Man; Wi, Jin Woo; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Lee, Wan Sik; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in reducing rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates after endoscopic gastric variceal obliteration (GVO) using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBC). Methods: This study enrolled 341 patients who were consecutively diagnosed with and treated for bleeding gastric varices. The patients were divided into PPI and non-PPI groups, and their endoscopic findings, initial hemostasis outcomes, rebleeding and bleeding-related death rates, and treatment-related complications were analyzed. Results: The rate of initial hemostasis was 97.1%. rebleeding occurred in 2.2% of patients within 2 weeks, 3.9% of patients within 4 weeks, 18.9% of patients within 6 months, and 27.6% of patients within 12 months of the GVO procedure. A previous history of variceal bleeding (relative risk [RR], 1.955; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.263 to 3.028; p = 0.003) and use of PPIs (RR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.352 to 0.873; p = 0.011) were associated with rebleeding. Child-Pugh class C (RR, 10.914; 95% CI, 4.032 to 29.541; p < 0.001), failure of initial hemostasis (RR, 13.329; 95% CI, 2.795 to 63.556; p = 0.001), and the presence of red-colored concomitant esophageal varices (RR, 4.096; 95% CI, 1.320 to 12.713; p = 0.015) were associated with bleeding-related death. Conclusions: The prophylactic use of PPIs reduces rebleeding after GVO using NBC in patients with gastric variceal hemorrhage. However, prophylactic use of PPIs does not reduce bleeding-related death. PMID:26354053

  15. Proton-pump inhibitor therapy and vitamin B12 status in an inpatient hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Brenda; Donnelly-VanderLoo, Mary; Watson, Tiffany; O'Connor, Colleen; Madill, Janet

    2016-06-23

    The risk for impaired vitamin B12 status increases with age, as does the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI). Long-term use of PPIs is associated with several nutritional deficiencies including B12. Currently, there are no recommendations for B12 screening among patients taking PPIs. Data were abstracted on B12 concentrations, B12-containing supplement use, medications, and select hematological values from a retrospective chart review of 658 adults, 391 with serum B12 concentrations, admitted to 6 different medical units at 2 regional hospitals in Southwestern Ontario between 2010 and 2012. We found no difference between PPI users and nonusers and serum B12 concentrations (404 ± 224 vs 369 ± 213 pmol/L; P = 0.0690). This may be due to use of B12 containing multivitamins in 41% of PPI users. Regression modelling found that aging increases the odds of having an impaired B12 status (<220 pmol/L) by 1.4 times and those using B12 supplements are almost 4 times more likely to have an impaired status. Mean corpuscular volume was not related to B12 status. In this population, older PPI users are more likely to be using multivitamins, which may delay nutritional deficiencies. However, the lower B12 concentrations of PPI users taking only B12 supplements is a concern and requires further research. Finally, physicians need to be aware that mean corpuscular volume is no longer recommended as an effective biomarker for B12 screening and updated screening protocols need to be used to reduce the possibility of adverse neurological effects from impaired B12 status.

  16. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on glycemic control in patients with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin is a linear peptide hormone which is secreted mostly in the stomach pyloric antrum G cells. Although the main role of this hormone is the promotion of the secretion of gastric acid from the stomach parietal cells, gastrin can also behave as a growth factor and stimulate gastric cell proliferation. It is also reported that gastrin promotes β cell neogenesis in the pancreatic ductal complex, modest pancreatic β cell replication, and improvement of glucose tolerance in animal models, in which the remodeling of pancreatic tissues is promoted. These findings suggest the possibility that gastrin has the potential to promote an increase of β cell mass in pancreas, and therefore that gastrin may improve glucose tolerance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are wildly used clinically for the therapy of gastro-esophageal reflex disease, gastritis due to excess stomach acid, and gastric ulcers. PPIs indirectly elevate serum gastrin levels via a negative feedback effect. Recent evidence has revealed the beneficial effect of PPIs on glycemic control especially in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), probably via the elevation of the levels of serum gastrin, although the detailed mechanism remains unclear. In addition, the beneficial effects of a combination therapy of gastrin or a PPI with a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist on glycemic control in animal models have been demonstrated. Although PPIs may be possible candidates for a new approach in the therapy of diabetes, a prospective, long-term, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study is needed to establish the effect of PPIs on glycemic control in a large number of patients with T2DM. PMID:26322158

  17. Aspirin and proton pump inhibitor combination therapy for prevention of cardiovascular disease and Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Peura, David A; Wilcox, C Mel

    2014-01-01

    Aspirin, used at low doses (75-325 mg daily), prevents aggregation of platelets and is prescribed for patients as pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease. Despite the well-documented beneficial effects of aspirin, prolonged use is associated with damage to the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa in the upper and lower GI tract. Patient risk of hemorrhage and peptic ulcer formation is increased with older age, previous ulcer history, Helicobacter pylori infection, and concomitant use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids, or antithrombotic agents. As termination of aspirin therapy can precipitate a cardiovascular event, patients at risk need co-therapy with gastroprotective agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), to reduce the GI side effects of aspirin treatment. Fixed-dose combinations of low-dose aspirin and gastroprotective agents have been designed to increase medication compliance, improve clinical outcomes, and reduce the overall cost of therapy. Prolonged use of PPIs may, however, lead to serious adverse effects or, in some cases, reduce the cardioprotective effects of aspirin. Hence, physicians need to carefully consider the benefits and risks associated with the condition of each patient to optimize clinical outcomes of combination therapy. A growing body of clinical evidence indicates that aspirin may decrease the risk of colorectal and other GI cancers, as well as reduce progression from Barrett's esophagus (BE) to esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, PPIs have recently been shown to reduce neoplastic transformation in patients with BE. Thus, the use of a fixed-dose aspirin/PPI combination could potentially provide chemopreventive benefit to patients with BE, and, at the same time, treat the underlying gastroesophageal reflux responsible for the condition.

  18. Proton pump inhibitor administration via nasogastric tube in pediatric practice: comparative analysis with protocol optimization.

    PubMed

    Ponrouch, M P; Sautou-Miranda, V; Boyer, A; Bourdeaux, D; Montagner, A; Chopineau, J

    2010-05-10

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are largely prescribed to children because their efficacy and tolerance are now well-established. One disadvantage resides in the absence of liquid form which causes problems for their administration in nasogastric tubes. Indeed, the absence of use recommendations involves many misuses responsible for inefficiency and/or tube obstruction. We tried to evaluate if PPIs can be administered through pediatric nasogastric tubes. We administered four PPIs (Omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole and lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet) through nasogastric tubes. For each PPI a study plan was drawn up to assess the influence of different variables: the volume of water to dissolve or put in suspension the PPIs (2ml or 5ml), the volume of tube flush-through water post-PPI administration (2ml, 5ml or 10ml), the length (50cm or 125cm) and the diameter (6 or 8 French) of the polyurethane tubes. For each assay an analysis of each active ingredient at the tube outlet by UV spectrometry was carried out. All 6 F tubes were obstructed by PPIs. Through 8 F tubes, we observed a mean recovery of active ingredient of 86.2% for lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet, 36.9% for esomeprazole but only 7.1% for lansoprazole and 3.9% for omeprazole. It is disadvised using omeprazole and lansoprazole through 8 F nasogastric tubes because no condition ensures the transit of an efficient concentration of active ingredient. For esomeprazole, the best conditions of administration were a water volume of 5ml and a rinse volume of 5ml but only a half of the microgranules administered were recovered. The most satisfactory results were obtained with lansoprazole orally disintegrating tablet. A 5ml volume of water diluent for suspension and a 10ml volume of flush-through water made it possible to deliver the full lansoprazole dose administered.

  19. Proton pump inhibitor-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia: an entity challenging current diagnostic criteria for eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    PubMed

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Bredenoord, Albert J; Cheng, Edaire; Dellon, Evan S; Furuta, Glenn T; Gupta, Sandeep K; Hirano, Ikuo; Katzka, David A; Moawad, Fouad J; Rothenberg, Marc E; Schoepfer, Alain; Spechler, Stuart J; Wen, Ting; Straumann, Alex; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2016-03-01

    Consensus diagnostic recommendations to distinguish GORD from eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) by response to a trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) unexpectedly uncovered an entity called 'PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia' (PPI-REE). PPI-REE refers to patients with clinical and histological features of EoE that remit with PPI treatment. Recent and evolving evidence, mostly from adults, shows that patients with PPI-REE and patients with EoE at baseline are clinically, endoscopically and histologically indistinguishable and have a significant overlap in terms of features of Th2 immune-mediated inflammation and gene expression. Furthermore, PPI therapy restores oesophageal mucosal integrity, reduces Th2 inflammation and reverses the abnormal gene expression signature in patients with PPI-REE, similar to the effects of topical steroids in patients with EoE. Additionally, recent series have reported that patients with EoE responsive to diet/topical steroids may also achieve remission on PPI therapy. This mounting evidence supports the concept that PPI-REE represents a continuum of the same immunological mechanisms that underlie EoE. Accordingly, it seems counterintuitive to differentiate PPI-REE from EoE based on a differential response to PPI therapy when their phenotypic, molecular, mechanistic and therapeutic features cannot be reliably distinguished. For patients with symptoms and histological features of EoE, it is reasonable to consider PPI therapy not as a diagnostic test, but as a therapeutic agent. Due to its safety profile, ease of administration and high response rates (up to 50%), PPI can be considered a first-line treatment before diet and topical steroids. The reasons why some patients with EoE respond to PPI, while others do not, remain to be elucidated. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Race affects healing of erosive oesophagitis in patients treated with proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P; Johnson, D A; Monyak, J T; Illueca, M

    2011-08-01

    Erosive oesophagitis appears to be more common in white vs. nonwhite patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD). To evaluate the association between race and erosive oesophagitis healing in patients with GERD treated with once-daily proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Data from five double-blind trials of once-daily treatment with esomeprazole 40mg vs. omeprazole 20mg or lansoprazole 30mg for erosive oesophagitis healing (evaluated at weeks 4 and 8 by endoscopy) were pooled and stratified by baseline race and Los Angeles (LA) severity grade. Multiple logistic regression models were fit with erosive oesophagitis healing (dependent variable) and race (independent variable), with adjustments for treatment, study, baseline LA grade, age, gender, BMI, Helicobacter pylori status, hiatal hernia and interactions of these factors with race. Of 11,027 patients, 91% were white. Nonwhite (n=978) and black (n=613) patients were less likely to have severe baseline erosive oesophagitis (LA grade C or D) than white patients [adjusted OR: 0.69 (95% CI, 0.61-0.79) and 0.67 (0.57-0.78), respectively; P<0.0001]. At week 8, nonwhite and black patients had lower healing rates than white patients [OR: 0.75 (0.63-0.89) and 0.67 (0.54-0.83), respectively; P≤0.001]. Greater odds of healing were associated with less severe baseline LA grade, increasing age, hiatal hernia, esomeprazole treatment (vs. lansoprazole or omeprazole) and lansoprazole treatment (vs. omeprazole) (all P≤0.0009); no factor interacted significantly with race. Nonwhite patients with GERD had less severe baseline erosive oesophagitis, but were less likely than white patients to have erosive oesophagitis healing after 8-week PPI therapy. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Proton Pump Inhibitor-Responsive Oesophageal Eosinophilia: An Entity Challenging Current Diagnostic Criteria for Eosinophilic Oesophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Infante, Javier; Bredenoord, Albert J.; Cheng, Edaire; Dellon, Evan S.; Furuta, Glenn T.; Gupta, Sandeep K.; Hirano, Ikuo; Katzka, David A.; Moawad, Fouad J.; Rothenberg, Marc E.; Schoepfer, Alain; Spechler, Stuart; Wen, Ting; Straumann, Alex; Lucendo, Alfredo J.

    2016-01-01

    Consensus diagnostic recommendations to distinguish gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) from eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) by response to a trial of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) unexpectedly uncovered an entity called “PPI-responsive oesophageal eosinophilia” (PPI-REE). PPI-REE refers to patients with clinical and histologic features of EoE that remit with PPI treatment. Recent and evolving evidence, mostly from adults, shows that PPI-REE and EoE patients at baseline are clinically, endoscopically and histologically indistinguishable, and have significant overlap in terms of features of Th2 immune-mediated inflammation and gene expression. Furthermore, PPI therapy restores oesophageal mucosal integrity, reduces Th2 inflammation and reverses the abnormal gene expression signature in PPI-REE patients, similar to the effects of topical steroids in EoE patients. Additionally, recent series have reported that EoE patients responsive to diet/topical steroids may also achieve remission on PPI therapy. This mounting evidence supports the concept that PPI-REE represents a continuum of the same immunologic mechanisms that underlie EoE. Accordingly, it seems counterintuitive to differentiate PPI-REE from EoE based on a differential response to PPI therapy when their phenotypic, molecular, mechanistic, and therapeutic features cannot be reliably distinguished. For patients with symptoms and histologic features of EoE, it is reasonable to consider PPI therapy not as a diagnostic test, but as a therapeutic agent. Due to its safety profile, ease of administration and high response rates (up to 50%), PPI can be considered a first-line treatment, before diet and topical steroids. The reasons why some EoE patients respond to PPI, while others do not, remain to be elucidated. PMID:26685124

  2. Comparative study: Vonoprazan and proton pump inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Kouichi; Suda, Hiroko; Ido, Yumi; Takeichi, Takayuki; Okuda, Ayako; Hasuda, Kiwamu; Hattori, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the effectiveness and safety of vonoprazan-based therapy with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based therapies to treat Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS We retrospectively analysed data from first-line (vonoprazan or PPI with 200 mg clarithromycin and 750 mg amoxicillin twice daily for 7 d) (n = 1353) and second-line (vonoprazan or PPI with 250 mg metronidazole and 750 mg amoxicillin twice daily for 7 d) (n = 261) eradication treatments for H. pylori -positive patients with associated gastrointestinal diseases from April 2014 to December 2015 at Hattori Clinic, Japan. The primary endpoint was the eradication rate, which was assessed with a full analysis set. The secondary endpoints were adverse events and related factors. RESULTS After the first-line treatments, the eradication rates for vonoprazan, esomeprazol, rabeprazole, and lansoprazole were 87.9% (95%CI: 84.9%-90.5%), 71.6% (95%CI: 67.5%-75.5%), 62.9% (95%CI: 52.0%-72.9%), and 57.3% (95%CI: 50.4%-64.1%), respectively. The vonoprazan eradication rate was significantly higher than that of the PPIs (P < 0.01). Interestingly, smoking did not affect the H. pylori eradication rate in the vonoprazan group (P = 0.34), whereas it decreased the rates in the PPI groups (P = 0.013). The incidence of adverse events in the vonoprazan group was not different from the PPI group (P = 0.054), although the vonoprazan group exhibited a wider range of adverse events. Vonoprazan-based triple therapy was highly effective as a second-line treatment, with an eradication rate similar to that of PPI-based therapy. CONCLUSION Vonoprazan might be superior to PPIs in first-line H. pylori therapy, particularly for smokers. However, caution is required due to possible adverse events. PMID:28216974

  3. Safety of the long-term use of proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Alan BR; Sauve, Michel D; Kassam, Narmin; Kamitakahara, Holly

    2010-01-01

    The proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) as a class are remarkably safe and effective for persons with peptic ulcer disorders. Serious adverse events are extremely rare for PPIs, with case reports of interstitial nephritis with omeprazole, hepatitis with omeprazole and lansoprazole, and disputed visual disturbances with pantoprazole and omeprazole. PPI use is associated with the development of fundic gland polyps (FGP); stopping PPIs is associated with regression of FGP. In the absence of Helicobacter pylori infection, the long-term use of PPIs has not been convincingly proven to cause or be associated with the progression of pre-existing chronic gastritis or gastric atrophy or intestinal metaplasia. Mild/modest hypergastrinemia is a physiological response to the reduction in gastric acid secretion due to any cause. The long-term use of PPIs has not been convincingly proven to cause enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia or carcinoid tumors. PPIs increase the risk of community acquired pneumonia, but not of hospital acquired (nosocomial) pneumonia. There is no data to support particular care in prescribing PPI therapy due to concerns about risk of hip fracture with the long-term use of PPIs. Long-term use of PPIs does not lead to vitamin B12 deficiencies, except possibly in the elderly, or in persons with Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome who are on high doses of PPI for prolonged periods of time. There is no convincingly proven data that PPIs increase the risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in persons in the community. The discontinuation of PPIs may result in rebound symptoms requiring further and even continuous PPI use for suppression of symptoms. As with all medications, the key is to use PPIs only when clearly indicated, and to reassess continued use so that long-term therapy is used judiciously. Thus, in summary, the PPIs are a safe class of medications to use long-term in persons in whom there is a clear need for the maintenance of extensive acid inhibition

  4. Trends in the coprescription of proton pump inhibitors with clopidogrel: an ecological analysis

    PubMed Central

    Juurlink, David N.; Gomes, Tara; Paterson, J. Michael; Hellings, Chelsea; Mamdani, Muhammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In early 2009, 2 observational studies and a US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory addressed the drug interaction between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel. One study suggested that pantoprazole could be used safely in this setting, whereas the other study and the FDA advisory did not distinguish among PPIs. We examined trends in PPI prescribing among clopidogrel recipients in the period following these events. Methods: We conducted a population-based time series analysis of Ontario residents aged 66 years or older for whom clopidogrel was prescribed between Apr. 1, 1999, and Sept. 30, 2013. We determined the proportion of clopidogrel recipients dispensed a PPI during each quarter and the proportions who received pantoprazole or other PPIs. The outcome of interest was change in the use of pantoprazole. Results: In the final quarter of 2008, pantoprazole represented 23.7% of all PPI prescriptions dispensed to patients receiving clopidogrel. Following the publications and FDA advisory in early 2009, pantoprazole use increased substantially. By the end of 2009, this medication accounted for 52.5% of all PPI prescriptions issued to patients receiving clopidogrel; by the end of the study period, it accounted for 71.0% of all PPI prescriptions dispensed to such patients (p < 0. 001). We also observed a modest drop in overall PPI use among clopidogrel recipients beginning in early 2009. Interpretation: In 2009, the prescribing of PPIs with clopidogrel changed substantially in Ontario, with pantoprazole rapidly becoming the most commonly prescribed agent in its class. However, a modest decline in overall PPI use also occurred that may reflect suboptimal translation of emerging drug safety information to clinical practice. PMID:26770965

  5. Proton pump inhibitors in prevention of low-dose aspirin-associated upper gastrointestinal injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Chen; Sun, Gang; Lu, Ming-Liang; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yan-Zhi; Sun, Xi; Yang, Yun-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the preventive effect and safety of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in low-dose aspirin (LDA)-associated gastrointestinal (GI) ulcers and bleeding. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register from inception to December 2013, and checked conference abstracts of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the effect of PPIs in reducing adverse GI events (hemorrhage, ulcer, perforation, or obstruction) in patients taking LDA. The preventive effects of PPIs were compared with the control group [taking placebo, a cytoprotective agent, or an H2 receptor antagonist (H2RA)] in LDA-associated upper GI injuries. The meta-analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1 software. RESULTS: We evaluated 8780 participants in 10 RCTs. The meta-analysis showed that PPIs decreased the risk of LDA-associated upper GI ulcers (OR = 0.16; 95%CI: 0.12-0.23) and bleeding (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.16-0.43) compared with control. For patients treated with dual anti-platelet therapy of LDA and clopidogrel, PPIs were able to prevent the LDA-associated GI bleeding (OR = 0.36; 95%CI: 0.15-0.87) without increasing the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) (OR = 1.00; 95%CI: 0.76-1.31). PPIs were superior to H2RA in prevention of LDA-associated GI ulcers (OR = 0.12; 95%CI: 0.02-0.65) and bleeding (OR = 0.32; 95%CI: 0.13-0.79). CONCLUSION: PPIs are effective in preventing LDA-associated upper GI ulcers and bleeding. Concomitant use of PPI, LDA and clopidogrel did not increase the risk of MACE. PMID:25954113

  6. [Clopidogrel--proton pump inhibitors drug interaction: implications to clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Aníbal

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have raised the concern that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) could potentially interfere with clopidogrel antiplatelet effect. This association is frequent in clinical practice and is recommended by recent consensus guidelines in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Clopidogrel is a pro-drug which needs to be metabolized into its active metabolite, by cytochrome P450, especially by CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Various PPIs can inhibit CYP2C19, which could possibly decrease clopidogrel bioactivation process and, therefore, its antiplatelet effect. Various platelet function studies have shown that omeprazol can significantly decrease clopidogrel inhibitory effect on platelet P2Y12 receptor, leading to an increase in the number of patients who are "nonresponders" to clopidogrel. These pharmacokinetic studies also shown that this is not probably a class effect of PPIs, because they are metabolized to varying degrees by CYP2C19. The clinical impact of these observations remains uncertain, because various observational studies have shown conflicting results, and remains to demonstrate if PPIs can really increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients taking clopidogrel. In this review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic basis underlying this drug interaction, the effect of different PPIs on platelet function tests and we will analyze in detail the potential clinical implications of using this association, both on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events. Until further data is available, some clinical strategies can be recommended: (1) individual gastrointestinal risk assessment, with PPIs administration only to patients on dual anti-platelet therapy with additional GI risk factors; (2) preferential use of PPIs that have shown less interference with clopidogrel efficacy; (3) wide separation of PPI and clopidogrel dosing to minimize the risk of interaction (PPI may be given before breakfast and clopidogrel at

  7. Proton pump inhibitors for reflux therapy in infants: effectiveness determined by impedance pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Christoph; Huber-Zeyringer, Andrea; Bachmaier, Gerhard; Saxena, Amulya K; Höllwarth, Michael E

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the influence of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in predominantly milk-fed infants with symptoms of GERD by 24-h pH-multichannel intraluminal impedance (24-h pH-MII). Ten infants (8 males and 2 females) with a mean gestational age of 39 weeks (28-40) were included. 24-h pH-MII was performed before prescription and during intake of PPI. Total acid exposure time, bolus exposure time (acidic/non-acidic/total) and the number of refluxes (acidic/non-acidic/total) were determined. Clinical symptoms were recorded and used to calculate the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI) and the Symptom Severity Index (SSI). There was a significant decrease in the number of acidic refluxes, total acid exposure and acidic bolus exposure time. However, this went along with a significant increase in non-acidic bolus exposure time. The total number of refluxes and the total bolus exposure time remained unchanged. Under PPI, a decrease of SSI and RSI for pain-related symptoms could be observed. For respiratory symptoms and vomiting however no significant changes could be demonstrated. Under PPI, an improvement of pain-related symptoms could be shown. The decrease of acid exposure went along with an increase of non-acidic refluxes resulting in almost constant total reflux numbers. This finding is interpreted as main reason for some persisting symptoms despite adequate PPI dosage. Concluding from our data PPI therapy should only be indicated in case of pain, but has no effect in case of vomiting or recurrent respiratory symptoms.

  8. Effect of Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy on Nutritional Status in Elderly Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Nakamichi, Mariko; Wakabayashi, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and nutritional status in elderly hospitalized patients. Participants were 190 elderly patients admitted to the long-term care wards, convalescence rehabilitation wards, and community integrated care wards in January 2015. Nutritional status was assessed using the mini nutritional assessment short-form (MNA-SF). The PPI use group was compared with the PPI non-use group regarding nutrition status. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine whether the period of PPI therapy was associated independently with malnutrition following adjustment for covariates including gender, age, and serum albumin level. Forty-one patients were male (22%) and 149 patients were female (78%), with a mean age of 85.4±8.4. Fifty-three patients (28%) took PPIs (with a median prescription period of 91 d, ranging from 51 to 227). With a MNA-SF score of 7 points or lower designated as malnutrition, there was no significant difference in nutritional status between the PPI and non-PPI groups (p=0.172). The median MNA-SF scores in the PPI and non-PPI groups were 9 vs 7 points, respectively. Logistic regression analysis showed that long-term PPI therapy (odds ratio, 0.994; 95% confidence interval 0.990-0.999) was significantly associated with improved nutritional status. The presence or absence of PPI therapy is not associated with malnutrition in elderly hospitalized patients. Longer-term PPI therapy may improve nutritional status.

  9. Influence of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole on distribution and activity of doxorubicin in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Man; Lee, Carol; Wang, Marina; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-01

    Cellular causes of resistance and limited drug distribution within solid tumors limit therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Acidic endosomes in cancer cells mediate autophagy, which facilitates survival of stressed cells, and may contribute to drug resistance. Basic drugs (e.g. doxorubicin) are sequestered in acidic endosomes, thereby diverting drugs from their target DNA and decreasing penetration to distal cells. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may raise endosomal pH, with potential to improve drug efficacy and distribution in solid tumors. We determined the effects of the PPI lansoprazole to modify the activity of doxorubicin. To gain insight into its mechanisms, we studied the effects of lansoprazole on endosomal pH, and on the spatial distribution of doxorubicin, and of biomarkers reflecting its activity, using in vitro and murine models. Lansoprazole showed concentration-dependent effects to raise endosomal pH and to inhibit endosomal sequestration of doxorubicin in cultured tumor cells. Lansoprazole was not toxic to cancer cells but potentiated the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and enhanced its penetration through multilayered cell cultures. In solid tumors, lansoprazole improved the distribution of doxorubicin but also increased expression of biomarkers of drug activity throughout the tumor. Combined treatment with lansoprazole and doxorubicin was more effective in delaying tumor growth as compared to either agent alone. Together, lansoprazole enhances the therapeutic effects of doxorubicin both by improving its distribution and increasing its activity in solid tumors. Use of PPIs to improve drug distribution and to inhibit autophagy represents a promising strategy to enhance the effectiveness of anticancer drugs in solid tumors.

  10. COST-UTILITY OF ASPIRIN AND PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS FOR PRIMARY PREVENTION

    PubMed Central

    Earnshaw, Stephanie R.; Scheiman, James; Fendrick, A. Mark; McDade, Cheryl; Pignone, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Aspirin reduces myocardial infarction but increases gastrointestinal bleeding. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may reduce upper gastrointestinal bleed. We estimate the cost-utility of aspirin treatment with or without PPI for coronary heart disease (CHD) prevention among men at different risks for CHD and gastrointestinal bleed. Methods We updated a Markov model to compare costs and outcomes of low-dose aspirin+PPI (omeprazole 20-mg daily), low-dose aspirin alone, or no treatment for CHD prevention. We performed lifetime analyses in men with different risks for cardiovascular events and gastrointestinal bleed. Aspirin reduced nonfatal myocardial infarction by 30%, increased total stroke by 6%, and increased gastrointestinal bleed risk 2-fold. Adding PPI reduced upper gastrointestinal bleed by 80%. Annual aspirin cost was $13.99; generic PPI was $200. Results In 45-year-old men with 10-year CHD risk of 10% and 0.8/1,000 annual gastrointestinal bleed risk, aspirin ($17,571 and 18.67 quality-adjusted life years [QALYs]) was more effective and less costly than no treatment ($18,483 and 18.44 QALYs). Compared with aspirin alone, aspirin+PPI ($21,037 and 18.68 QALYs) had an incremental cost/QALY of $447,077. Results were similar in 55- and 65-year-old men. The incremental cost/QALY of adding PPI was less than $50,000/QALY at annual gastrointestinal bleed probabilities greater than 4–6/1,000. Conclusion Aspirin for CHD prevention is less costly and more effective than no treatment in men over 45 with greater than 10-year, 10% CHD risks. Adding PPI is not cost-effective for men with average gastrointestinal bleed risk but may be cost-effective for selected men at increased risk for gastrointestinal bleed. PMID:21325111

  11. Black Spot, a Novel Gastric Finding Potentially Induced by Proton Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Yu; Haruma, Ken; Ayaki, Maki; Kamada, Tomoari; Ohtani, Hiroshi; Murao, Takahisa; Manabe, Noriaki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Shiotani, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective We have recently discovered new gastric lesions with black spots. There have been no reports about black spots and their clinicopathological features. We therefore report the clinicopathological features of black spots and assess their causes and mechanisms. Methods Sixty-four patients with black spots among 26,620 Japanese patients that underwent endoscopy between May 2012 and October 2014 were enrolled. Endoscopic findings of black spots were defined as black pigmentations in the gastric mucosa by conventional endoscopy. We investigated the clinicopathological characteristics, including gender, age, underlying diseases and medications, endoscopic and pathologic findings of patients with black spots. Results The prevalence of patients with black spots was 0.24%. Of sixty-four cases, 44 (68.8%) were taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Eight (12.5%) were taking corticosteroids. There were 10 cases (15.6%) with decreased renal function. All black spots were identified only in the fundic gland region. Forty-one (64.1%) patients had multiple (more than ten) black spots. There were two different types: black spots on the flat mucosa and black spots on fundic gland polyps. Pathologically, parietal cell protrusions, fundic gland cysts and brownish pigmentation in fundic gland cysts were seen in 26 (76.5%), 23 (67.6%) and 6 (17.6%) patients, respectively. Conclusion We herein describe gastric black spots as a new gastric mucosal finding that arises only in the fundic gland region. The black spots are pathologically brownish pigmentations in fundic gland cysts. Adverse events of PPIs and parietal cell protrusion caused by PPI use are strongly considered to be one of the etiologies of black spots. PMID:27803398

  12. Proton Pump Inhibitors and Risk of Incident CKD and Progression to ESRD.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Balasubramanian, Sumitra; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2016-10-01

    The association between proton pump inhibitors (PPI) use and risk of acute interstitial nephritis has been described. However, whether exposure to PPI associates with incident CKD, CKD progression, or ESRD is not known. We used Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a primary cohort of new users of PPI (n=173,321) and new users of histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2 blockers; n=20,270) and followed these patients over 5 years to ascertain renal outcomes. In adjusted Cox survival models, the PPI group, compared with the H2 blockers group, had an increased risk of incident eGFR<60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) and of incident CKD (hazard ratio [HR], 1.22; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.18 to 1.26; and HR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.34, respectively). Patients treated with PPI also had a significantly elevated risk of doubling of serum creatinine level (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.42 to 1.65), of eGFR decline >30% (HR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.28 to 1.37), and of ESRD (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.18). Furthermore, we detected a graded association between duration of PPI exposure and risk of renal outcomes among those exposed to PPI for 31-90, 91-180, 181-360, and 361-720 days compared with those exposed for ≤30 days. Examination of risk of renal outcomes in 1:1 propensity score-matched cohorts of patients taking H2 blockers versus patients taking PPI and patients taking PPI versus controls yielded consistent results. Our results suggest that PPI exposure associates with increased risk of incident CKD, CKD progression, and ESRD.

  13. Proton pump inhibitors increase the incidence of bone fractures in hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michael; Weideman, Rick A; Little, Bertis B; Weideman, Mark W; Cryer, Byron; Brown, Geri R

    2012-09-01

    While proton pump inhibitors (PPI) may increase the risk of bone fractures, the incidence of new bone fractures in a chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected cohort, with or without PPI exposure, has not been explored. A retrospective cohort study of the incidence of bone fractures over 10 years in 9,437 HCV antibody positive patients in the Dallas VA Hepatitis C Registry was performed. The study endpoint was the incidence of verified new bone fractures per patient-years (pt-yrs) in PPI users compared to non-PPI users. PPI use was defined as those taking a PPI for ≥360 days. Pt-yrs of exposure for PPI users began on the first PPI prescription date, and pt-yrs of exposure for non-PPI users began with first date of any non-PPI prescription. For both HCV groups, the final date of patients' study duration was defined by end of PPI exposure, bone fracture occurrence, death or end of study evaluation period. Exclusion criteria included use of bone health modifying medications ≥30 days. Statistical differences in fracture incidence between groups were determined by multivariate regression analysis. Among the total study population analyzed (n = 2,573), 109 bone fractures occurred. Unadjusted bone fracture incidences were 13.99/1,000 pt-yrs vs. 5.86/1,000 pt-yrs in PPI and non-PPI users, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratio for new bone fractures was 3.87 (95 % CI 2.46-6.08) (p < 0.001) in PPI users. In patients with chronic HCV, use of PPI for >1 year increased the risk of new bone fractures by more than threefold.

  14. The appropriate use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): Need for a reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Vincenzo; Dulbecco, Pietro; de Bortoli, Nicola; Ottonello, Andrea; Savarino, Edoardo

    2017-01-01

    The advent of powerful acid-suppressive drugs, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), has revolutionized the management of acid-related diseases and has minimized the role of surgery. The major and universally recognized indications for their use are represented by treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease, eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in combination with antibiotics, therapy of H. pylori-negative peptic ulcers, healing and prophylaxis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-associated gastric ulcers and control of several acid hypersecretory conditions. However, in the last decade, we have witnessed an almost continuous growth of their use and this phenomenon cannot be only explained by the simple substitution of the previous H2-receptor antagonists, but also by an inappropriate prescription of these drugs. This endless increase of PPI utilization has created an important problem for many regulatory authorities in terms of increased costs and greater potential risk of adverse events. The main reasons for this overuse of PPIs are the prevention of gastro-duodenal ulcers in low-risk patients or the stress ulcer prophylaxis in non-intensive care units, steroid therapy alone, anticoagulant treatment without risk factors for gastro-duodenal injury, the overtreatment of functional dyspepsia and a wrong diagnosis of acid-related disorder. The cost for this inappropriate use of PPIs has become alarming and requires to be controlled. We believe that gastroenterologists together with the scientific societies and the regulatory authorities should plan educational initiatives to guide both primary care physicians and specialists to the correct use of PPIs in their daily clinical practice, according to the worldwide published guidelines. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use and Risk of Hip Fracture in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Lenihan, Colin R; Sukumaran Nair, Sumi; Vangala, Chandan; Ramanathan, Venkat; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-05-01

    Posttransplantation bone disease is a significant problem, with few well-evidenced therapeutic options. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are associated with hip fracture in the general population and are widely prescribed for kidney transplant recipients. A case-control study. From the US Renal Data System, we identified from diagnoses and procedures 231 kidney transplant recipients with a first hip fracture. Cases were matched at the hip fracture index date with 15,575 controls on age, sex, race, and transplantation year. PPI use. First hip fracture. In the year prior to the index date, a PPI was prescribed to 65.4% of cases and 57.4% of controls. Additionally, in 34.6% of cases and 28.9% of controls, a PPI was prescribed for >80% of the year preceding the index date (higher PPI users). Unadjusted ORs of hip fracture associated with any and higher PPI use were 1.55 (95% CI, 1.18-2.05) and 1.65 (95% CI, 1.2-2.27), respectively. When adjusted for baseline demographic, clinical, and pharmacologic covariables, any and higher PPI use remained associated with hip fracture, with ORs of 1.39 (95% CI, 1.04-1.84) and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.02-1.95), respectively. Potential residual confounding through either incorrectly ascertained or unavailable confounders; cohort limited to Medicare beneficiaries receiving low-income subsidy. In summary, PPI use was associated with hip fracture risk in the US kidney transplant population. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Is there a relationship between hypomagnesemia and proton-pump inhibitors in patients on chronic hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Stimac, D; Zaputovic, L; Lukenda Zanko, V; Gulin, T; Jakopcic, I; Klaric, D; Gulin, M; Orlic, L

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the association among long-term proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) use with serum magnesium (Mg) levels in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients, as well as possible association among PPI use and increased risk of cardiovascular (CVD) morbidity in HD patients. Of 418 HD patients that were screened for inclusion, 136 were excluded due to incomplete medical data, duration of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for less than 12months, use of Mg-based-phosphate binders or other Mg-based medications or either to presence of chronic increased GI losses. Among 282 patients included in the study, 170 patients were on PPIs. Serum Mg levels were significantly lower among PPI users vs. non-users (0.94±0.2 vs. 1.03±0.2mmol/L; p<0.0001). The median duration of PPI use was 27±9.6months (range from 12 to 108) and it was not significantly associated with Mg levels (r=0.116; p=0.167). Additionally, residual renal function didn't show a significant correlation with Mg concentration (r=-0.102; p=NS) in both groups of patients. The use of PPIs was an independent and strong predictor of low Mg concentrations even in multivariate analysis (OR 3.05; 95% CI 1.2498-7.4594, p=0.01). On the other hand, the daily dose of PPIs was not associated with low Mg levels. PPI users had a higher rate of adverse CVD events during the 1 year of follow-up in comparison to non-PPI users but that difference wasn't statistically significant (17.6% vs. 10.7%; p=0.110). We have found a significant association between PPI use and lower serum Mg levels in chronic HD patients. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Proton Pump Inhibitors Are Not Associated With Acute Kidney Injury in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon; Mark, Roger G; Celi, Leo Anthony; Danziger, John

    2016-12-01

    Recent epidemiologic data linking proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use to acute and chronic kidney dysfunction is yet to be validated in other populations, and mechanisms have not been explored. Using a large, well phenotyped inception cohort of 15 063 critically ill patients, we examined the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI), as defined by the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes criteria guidelines, according to prior use of a PPI, histamine-2 receptor antagonist (H2 RA), or neither. A total of 3725 (24.7%) patients reported PPI use prior to admission, while 905 (6.0%) patients reported H2 RA use. AKI occurred in 747 (20.0%) and 163 (18.0%) of PPI and H2 RA users respectively, compared to 1712 (16.2%) of those not taking acid suppressive medications. In unadjusted analysis, PPI and H2 RA users had a 28% (95%CI 1.17-1.41, P < .001) and 10% (95%CI 0.91-1.30, P = .31) higher risk of AKI compared to those taking neither class of medication. However, in sequential models that included adjustment for demographics, cardiovascular comorbidities, indications for PPI use, and severity of illness, the effect of PPI on the risk of AKI was attenuated, and in the adjusted analysis, PPI was not associated with AKI (OR 1.02; 95%CI 0.91-1.13, P = .73). The presence of sterile pyuria and hypomagnesemia did not modify the association between PPI use and AKI. In summary, after adjustment for demographics, illness severity, and the indication for PPI use, PPI use prior to admission is not associated with critical illness AKI. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  18. [Proton Pump Inhibitor-responsive Esophageal Eosinophilia: An Overview of Cases from One University Hospital Center].

    PubMed

    Ahn, Byungkyu; Lee, Dong Ho; Lee, Chang Min; Hwang, Jae Jin; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Kim, Nayoung

    2016-04-25

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease, with eosinophilic infiltration limited to the esophagus. A minority of EoE patients respond well to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy alone, and that condition is labelled PPI-responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE). The prevalence of PPI-REE among EoE cases is unknown. We aimed to identify clinical manifestations of PPI-REE, and the proportion of PPI-REE among all EoE cases. We reviewed pathology of the 4,075 patients who underwent esophageal biopsy at an institution from March 2003 to July 2015. EoE was diagnosed based on esophageal symptoms and eosinophilic infiltration limited to the esophagus, with ≥15 eosinophils per high-power field. We collected endoscopic and pathologic findings, and clinical features for these patients. Thirteen (0.3%) patients were diagnosed with EoE. Clinical manifestations were dysphagia (30.8%), foreign body sensation (23.1%), regurgitation (23.1%), cough (15.4%), heartburn (15.4%), nausea (7.7%), dyspepsia (7.7%). The endoscopic findings noted were polypoid lesion (23.1%), whitish plaque or exudate (23.1%), linear furrow (7.7%), concentric ring (7.7%), nodularity (7.7%), erosion (7.7%), and normal (30.8%). Of these patients, five had a favorable course with PPI as monotherapy. The proportion of EoE among all patients undergoing endoscopic biopsy was 0.3%. Of those, PPI-REE comprised 38%. Most of the endoscopic findings were atypical or normal when compared to the typical findings in EoE. In conclusion, patients who present with symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction need esophageal biopsy, regardless of the endoscopic findings. Moreover, patients diagnosed with EoE need to be treated first with PPI alone.

  19. Predictive Factors of Response to Proton Pump Inhibitors in Korean Patients With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Sooyeon; Kim, Hee Man; Park, Moo In; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some patients fail to respond to PPI therapy. We investigated the efficacy of response to PPI therapy in patients with GERD symptoms. Methods A total of 179 subjects with GERD symptoms were prospectively enrolled and diagnosed with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD, n = 100) and erosive reflux disease (n = 79) by gastroscopy and Bernstein test and/or 24-hour esophageal pH testing. Subjects then received a standard dose of daily PPI therapy for at least 4 weeks. PPI therapy response was evaluated using questionnaires including questions about demographics, GERD symptoms, GERD impact scale, Epworth sleepiness scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), hospital anxiety and depression scale, and abbreviated version of the World Health Organization quality of life scale. Results The rates of complete (≥ 80%), satisfactory (≥ 50%), partial (< 50%), and refractory response in the 179 participants were 41.3%, 30.2%, 18.4%, and 10.1%, respectively. Thus, overall response rate (complete and satisfactory responses) was 71.5%. Multivariate analysis showed body mass index < 23 kg/m2 (OR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.12–4.34), higher total PSQI score (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05–1.35), history of psychotherapy or neuropsychiatric medication (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.23–4.85), and NERD (OR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.54–7.11) were associated with poor response to PPI therapy. Conclusions Psychological factors, sleep dysfunction, body mass index < 23 kg/m2, and NERD seem to be the major factors that lead to a poor response to PPI treatment in patients with GERD symptoms. PMID:25537676

  20. The association of proton pump inhibitors and hypomagnesemia in the community setting.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Noa; Loebstein, Ronen; Halkin, Hillel; Bialik, Martin; Landes-Westerman, Janet; Lomnicky, Joseph; Kurnik, Daniel

    2014-08-01

    Evidence for the association between hypomagnesemia and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), highlighted by the 2011 FDA Drug Safety Communication, rests mainly on studies in hospitalized patients. Our objectives were to determine the prevalence of hypomagnesemia and its association with PPIs in the community setting. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of a large health maintenance organization administrative database, including ambulatory patients with ≥1 serum magnesium concentrations between 2008 and 2011, the lowest referred to as "index magnesium." In cases with any (index magnesium ≤0.7 mmol/L) or severe (≤0.55 mmol/L) hypomagnesemia, we analyzed (vs. controls, >0.7 mmol/L) the association with PPI or H2 -blocker use during the 4-12 months preceding the index magnesium by logistic regression analysis, adjusting for confounders. Among 95,205 subjects, 5,696 (6.0%) had any hypomagnesemia, which was severe in 454 (0.5%), with twofold higher prevalences in those with established risk factors. PPI use during the 4 months preceding the index magnesium was more common in cases of any hypomagnesemia (adjusted OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.55-1.78) and severe hypomagnesemia (adjusted OR = 3.79; 2.99-4.82) than in controls without acid suppression. Hypomagnesemia remained significantly associated with PPI use when using H2 -blocker-users as reference (adjusted OR = 1.25 [P = 0.003] and 2.65 [P < 0.001] for any and severe hypomagnesemia, respectively). We conclude that hypomagnesemia is associated with PPI use in ambulatory patients.

  1. The Proton Pump Inhibitor Lansoprazole Improves the Skeletal Phenotype in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Arpana; Many, Gina M.; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; van der Meulen, Jack H.; Phadke, Aditi; Spurney, Christopher F.; Cnaan, Avital; Hoffman, Eric P.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2013-01-01

    Background In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), loss of the membrane stabilizing protein dystrophin results in myofiber damage. Microinjury to dystrophic myofibers also causes secondary imbalances in sarcolemmic ion permeability and resting membrane potential, which modifies excitation-contraction coupling and increases proinflammatory/apoptotic signaling cascades. Although glucocorticoids remain the standard of care for the treatment of DMD, there is a need to investigate the efficacy of other pharmacological agents targeting the involvement of imbalances in ion flux on dystrophic pathology. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed a preclinical trial to investigate the effects of lansoprazole (LANZO) administration, a proton pump inhibitor, on the dystrophic muscle phenotype in dystrophin deficient (mdx) mice. Eight to ten week-old female mice were assigned to one of four treatment groups (n = 12 per group): (1) vehicle control; (2) 5 mg/kg/day LANZO; (3) 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone; and (4) combined treatment of 5 mg/kg/day prednisolone (PRED) and 5 mg/kg/day LANZO. Treatment was administered orally 5 d/wk for 3 months. At the end of the study, behavioral (Digiscan) and functional outcomes (grip strength and Rotarod) were assessed prior to sacrifice. After sacrifice, body, tissue and organ masses, muscle histology, in vitro muscle force, and creatine kinase levels were measured. Mice in the combined treatment groups displayed significant reductions in the number of degenerating muscle fibers and number of inflammatory foci per muscle field relative to vehicle control. Additionally, mice in the combined treatment group displayed less of a decline in normalized forelimb and hindlimb grip strength and declines in in vitro EDL force after repeated eccentric contractions. Conclusions/Significance Together our findings suggest that combined treatment of LANZO and prednisolone attenuates some components of dystrophic pathology in mdx mice. Our findings warrant

  2. Role of Acid and Weakly Acidic Reflux in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Off Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Moon, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin Su; Lim, Chul Hyun; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gye

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Available data about reflux patterns and symptom determinants in the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) subtypes off proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy are lacking. We aimed to evaluate reflux patterns and determinants of symptom perception in patients with GERD off PPI therapy by impedance-pH monitoring. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the impedance-pH data in patients diagnosed as GERD based on results of impedance-pH monitoring, endoscopy and/or typical symptoms. The characteristics of acid and weakly acidic reflux were evaluated. Symptomatic and asymptomatic reflux were compared according to GERD subtypes and individual symptoms. Results Forty-two patients (22 males, mean age 46 years) were diagnosed as GERD (17 erosive reflux disease, 9 pH(+) non-erosive reflux disease [NERD], 9 hypersensitive esophagus and 7 symptomatic NERD). A total of 1,725 reflux episodes were detected (855 acid [50%], 857 weakly acidic [50%] and 13 weakly alkaline reflux [< 1%]). Acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and bolus clearance was longer compared with weakly acidic reflux. In terms of globus, weakly acidic reflux was more symptomatic. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed reflux; these associations were more pronounced in erosive reflux disease and symptomatic NERD. The perception of regurgitation was related to acid reflux, while that of globus was more related to weakly acidic reflux. Conclusions In patients not taking PPI, acid reflux was more frequently symptomatic and had longer bolus clearance. Symptomatic reflux was more frequently acid and mixed type; however, weakly acidic reflux was associated more with globus. These data suggest a role for impedance-pH data in the evaluation of globus. PMID:22837877

  3. Factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor maintenance therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kawara, Fumiaki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Morita, Yoshinori; Uda, Atsushi; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Saito, Masaya; Ooi, Makoto; Ishida, Tsukasa; Kondo, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Shiei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Hayakumo, Takanobu; Yamashita, Kazuhiko; Hirano, Takeshi; Hirai, Midori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate the factors associated with residual gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in patients receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) maintenance therapy in clinical practice. METHODS The study included 39 GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy. Residual symptoms were assessed using the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) questionnaire and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). The relationships between the FSSG score and patient background factors, including the CYP2C19 genotype, were analyzed. RESULTS The FSSG scores ranged from 1 to 28 points (median score: 7.5 points), and 19 patients (48.7%) had a score of 8 points or more. The patients’ GSRS scores were significantly correlated with their FSSG scores (correlation coefficient = 0.47, P < 0.005). In erosive esophagitis patients, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 rapid metabolizers (RMs) were significantly higher than the scores of the poor metabolizers and intermediate metabolizers (total scores: 16.7 ± 8.6 vs 7.8 ± 5.4, P < 0.05; acid reflux-related symptom scores: 12 ± 1.9 vs 2.5 ± 0.8, P < 0.005). In contrast, the FSSG scores of the CYP2C19 RMs in the non-erosive reflux disease patients were significantly lower than those of the other patients (total scores: 5.5 ± 1.0 vs 11.8 ± 6.3, P < 0.05; dysmotility symptom-related scores: 1.0 ± 0.4 vs 6.0 ± 0.8, P < 0.01). CONCLUSION Approximately half of the GERD patients receiving maintenance PPI therapy had residual symptoms associated with a lower quality of life, and the CYP2C19 genotype appeared to be associated with these residual symptoms. PMID:28373773

  4. Influence of Proton-Pump Inhibitors on the Luminal Microbiota in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Ayumi; Suda, Wataru; Morita, Hidetoshi; Takanashi, Kageyasu; Takagi, Atsushi; Koga, Yasuhiro; Hattori, Masahira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate comparatively the influence of proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) administration on three bacterial communities in the oral cavity, stomach, and colon along the alimentary tract. Methods: Forty-five subjects including 18 patients taking PPI were enrolled. Stimulated saliva, gastric fluid (GF), and feces were obtained from each subject for the microbiota analysis through bacterial 16S rRNA gene profiling using the pyrosequencing method. Results: The species richness (alpha diversity) was similar among these three microbiota, whereas the interindividual diversity (beta diversity) was much higher in the fecal microbiota compared with that in the others. The UniFrac analysis indicated that the salivary and GF microbiota were similar to one another; however, both differed greatly from the fecal microbiota in the overall bacterial community structure. In the comparison between PPI-users and PPI-nonusers, a bacterial cell number increase of ~1,000 times was found in the GF of PPI-users using culturing methods, whereas the bacterial number and composition were nearly identical between the two groups using quantitative PCR and a similarity search based on 16S profiling. The beta diversity significantly increased in both the salivary and GF microbiota of PPI-users compared with PPI-nonusers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the GF microbiota has recently moved from the saliva. Bacterial overgrowth in the GF by PPI administration may be due to a lack of killing rather than proliferation of the bacteria in the acid-suppressed stomach. The biological significance of the increase in beta diversity by PPI administration remains unclear. PMID:26065717

  5. Pantoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, increases orthodontic tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mohsen; Alimoradi, Houman; Kheirandish, Yasaman; Etemad-Moghadam, Shahroo; Alaeddini, Mojgan; Meysamie, Alipasha; Fatahi Meybodi, Seyed Amir Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Pantoprazole, is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prescribed for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal disorders, which in high doses has been suggested to decrease calcium absorption leading to hypocalcaemia and therefore osteoporosis. The aim of this study was to assess whether pantoprazol, could alter the rate of orthodontic tooth movement (OTM) in rats. Materials and Methods: A time course study was established using 72 rats which were divided into six groups of 12 samples each (four: vehicle; eight: pantoprazole + vehicle). Pantoprazole at a dose of 200 mg/kg suspended in carboxymethyl cellulose (0.25 percent) was administered by a gastric tube. The upper incisors and first molars were ligated by a 5 mm nickel-titanium closed-coil spring to deliver an initial force of 60 g. Animals were euthanized two weeks after orthodontic treatment followed by assessment of tooth movement and histomorphometric evaluation of the detached maxillae. Lateral skull radiographs were obtained once a week, starting from the first day to the 6th week of the study. OTM and bone density data were analyzed using independent sample t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: No significant changes in OTM measurements and optical density were observed in vehicle-receiving animals during the study (P=0.994). OTM was significantly increased after six weeks pantoprazole therapy which continued until the 7th week of the experiment (P=0.007). Optical density significantly increased in the pantoprazole-treated rats after six weeks. Conclusion: Long term PPI therapy at high doses could lead to osteoporosis and enhanced OTM. PMID:25140207

  6. Proton pump inhibitor chemosensitization in human osteosarcoma: from the bench to the patients’ bed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major goals in translational oncology are to reduce systemic toxicity of current anticancer strategies and improve effectiveness. An extremely efficient cancer cell mechanism to avoid and/or reduce the effects of highly cytotoxic drugs is the establishment of an acidic microenvironment, an hallmark of all malignant tumors. The H + −rich milieu that anticancer drugs meet once they get inside the tumor leads to their protonation and neutralization, therefore hindering their access into tumor cells. We have previously shown that proton pump inhibitors (PPI) may efficiently counterattack this tumor advantage leading to a consistent chemosensitization of tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of PPI in chemosensitizing osteosarcoma. Method MG-63 and Saos-2 cell lines were used as human osteosarcoma models. Cell proliferation after pretreatment with PPI and subsequent treatment with cisplatin was evaluated by using erythrosin B dye vital staining. Tumour growth was evaluated in xenograft treated with cisplatin after PPI pretreatment. Subsequently, a multi-centre historically controlled trial, was performed to evaluate the activity of a pre-treatment administration of PPIs as chemosensitizers during neoadjuvant chemotherapy based on methotrexate, cisplatin, and adriamycin. Results Preclinical experiments showed that PPI sensitize both human osteosarcoma cell lines and xenografts to cisplatin. A clinical study subsequently showed that pretreatment with PPI drug esomeprazole leads to an increase in the local effect of chemotherapy, as expressed by percentage of tumor necrosis. This was particularly evident in chondroblastic osteosarcoma, an histological subtype that normally shows a poor histological response. Notably, no significant increase in toxicity was recorded in PPI treated patients. Conclusion This study provides the first evidence that PPI may be beneficially added to standard regimens in combination to conventional chemotherapy. PMID

  7. Comparison of infusion or low-dose proton pump inhibitor treatments in upper gastrointestinal system bleeding.

    PubMed

    Songür, Yildiran; Balkarli, Ayşe; Acartürk, Gürsel; Senol, Altug

    2011-04-01

    The most effective schedule of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration following endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding ulcers remains uncertain. To compare the treatment effects of continuous infusion and low-dose esomeprazole therapies in patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. This prospective clinical study compared continuous infusion of esomeprazole (80 mg bolus followed by 8 mg∕h continuous infusion for 72 h) and low-dose esomeprazole (40 mg twice daily IV) treatments in GI bleeding patients with peptic ulcer presenting a high risk of re-bleeding, who were administered a successful endoscopic homeostasis. The primary end point was the occurrence of re-bleeding during hospitalization and within one month of discharge. Secondary outcomes were defined as duration of hospitalization, need of transfusion, surgical treatment, and mortality rate. After 72 h, both groups were switched to oral esomeprazole therapy for one-month. A hundred thirty-two subjects were enrolled. Re-bleeding occurred in 11 (16.7%) patients in the infusion therapy group and in 12 (18.2%) patients in the low-dose group (P=0.819) within the first 72 h. No patient experienced re-bleeding in the first month following discharge. There was no statistical significant difference between the two groups in terms of transfusion need, durations of hospitalization, need for surgery and mortality rate. PPI infusion therapy following endoscopic hemostasis treatment was not found superior to low-dose PPI therapy in the terms of re-bleeding, need of surgery and mortality. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Development and validation of a UPLC method for rapid and simultaneous analysis of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Addo, Richard T; Davis, Kenneth; Ubale, Ruhi; Owen, Joel S; Watkins, E Blake

    2015-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used extensively for the relief of gastroesophageal reflux, peptic ulcers, and other hypersecretory conditions. Some of the commonly used PPIs-omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole, and rabeprazole-were used in this study with the aim of developing a rapid ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) method for detecting each and allowing separation and quantification of a mixture of PPIs. An analysis of samples was performed on a UPLC system equipped with a quaternary solvent delivery system, a refrigerated sample manager, a column heater, a photo diode array detector scanning from 210 to 400 nm, and a C18 analytical column (50 mm × 3.0 mm, 1.7-μm particle size). The chromatographic analysis of the PPI samples and standards was performed using gradient elution with acetonitrile and water. The calibration curve range varied for each of the PPIs ranging from a lower limit of 0.75-1.78 μg/mL to a maximum concentration of 200 μg/mL with a regression coefficient (r (2)) of ≥0.98. The accuracy and precision were calculated, and the %RSD was determined to be ≤0.21% (intraday) and ≤5% (interday). The LOD was 0.23-0.59 μg/mL and the LOQ was 0.71-1.78 μg/mL for each of the drugs analyzed. The method was capable of detecting and quantifying each drug in a mixture with good resolution and a total run time of less than 5 min. Herein, we report an efficient and rapid analytical method for the simultaneous detection of multiple PPIs in a mixture.

  9. Treatment of asymptomatic amebiasis in homosexual men. Clinical trials with metronidazole, tinidazole, and diloxanide furoate.

    PubMed

    Thorén, K; Håkansson, C; Bergström, T; Johanisson, G; Norkrans, G

    1990-01-01

    In a randomized trial, the authors treated 42 asymptomatic homosexual men who had Entamoeba histolytica in fecal specimens with either metronidazole or tinidazole (study 1). They treated both groups initially with 2,000 mg in a single dose, and in case of failure with 2,000 mg daily for 5 days. In cases of repeated failure, the authors prescribed a dosage of 500 mg of diloxanide furoate three times per day (TID) for 10 days. In a subsequent study (study 2) the authors treated 49 asymptomatic homosexual men who had E. histolytica in fecal specimens with 500 mg of diloxanide furoate TID for 10 days. In study 1, the parasitological cure rates (PCR) for metronidazole and tinidazole were 29%-56%. Among the men treated with diloxanide furoate, the PCR was 93%. In study 2 the PCR with diloxanide furoate was 88%, which was significantly better (P less than .05) than metronidazole/tinidazole treatment in study 1. The present studies show that diloxanide furoate is an effective treatment of amebiasis in asymptomatic patients.

  10. A comparative study of oral single dose of metronidazole, tinidazole, secnidazole and ornidazole in bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Thulkar, Jyoti; Kriplani, Alka; Agarwal, Nutan

    2012-03-01

    To compare the cure rates of oral single dose of metronidazole (2 g), tinidazole (2 g), secnidazole (2 g), and ornidazole (1.5 g) in cases of bacterial vaginosis. This was a prospective, comparative, randomized clinical trial on 344 Indian women (86 women in each group) who attended a gynecology outpatient department with complaint of abnormal vaginal discharge or who had abnormal vaginal discharge on Gynecological examination but they did not complaint of it. For diagnosis and cure rate of bacterial vaginosis, Amsel's criteria were used. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test of proportions. The cure rate was compared considering metronidazole cure rate as gold standard. At 1 week, the cure rate of tinidazole and ornidazole was 100% and at 4 weeks, it was 97.7% for both drugs (P<0.001). Secnidazole had cure rate of 80.2% at 4 weeks (P=NS). Metronidazole showed a cure rate of 77.9% at 4 weeks, which is the lowest of all four drugs. Tinidazole and ornidazole have better cure rate as compared to metronidazole in cases of bacterial vaginosis.

  11. Challenging delivery of VLHL NS plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 by osmotic pumps in diabetic mouse: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jankun, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    ALZET(®) osmotic pumps are implantable devices used in animals for the continuous infusion of drugs or proteins at controlled rates from 1 day to 4 weeks. Pumps have been used successfully in a number of studies on the effects of controlled delivery of a wide range of experimental agents, independent of their properties. In the present study, use of these pumps was made in mice with diabetic nephropathy. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) mediates diabetic nephropathy, which is characterized by the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the kidney. Disproportionate PAI-1 inactivates tissue plasminogen activator, which is one of the proteolytic enzymes in a cascade responsible for ECM remodeling in the kidney. The decrease of PAI-1 in the kidney has been shown to arrest the progression of nephropathy in experimental animals. This was achieved using inactive PAI-1R which increased the clearance of wild-type PAI-1 in order to protect net proteolytic activity and ECM clearance. However, this protein has a brief half-life in vivo, therefore, high and frequent doses are required. Thus, VLHL NS PAI-1 protein with a long half-life of over 700 h (Gln197Cys, Gly355Cys) inactivated by single point mutation (Arg369Ala) was used. Following the sacrifice of animals the tips of the flow moderators of the osmotic pumps in the treated animals were found to be clogged. In addition, from each pump from the treatment group, but not controls, we collected 50-150 μl of clear liquid containing VLHL NS PAI-1, cellular and serum proteins suggesting early pump sealing by cellular material. In conclusion, despite encouraging results obtained for the PAI-1R protein, the method of VLHL PAI-1 delivery should be ameliorated.

  12. Proton Pump Inhibitors Do Not Increase Risk for Clostridium difficile Infection in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Faleck, David M; Salmasian, Hojjat; Furuya, E Yoko; Larson, Elaine L; Abrams, Julian A; Freedberg, Daniel E

    2016-11-01

    Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) frequently receive proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and have high rates of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). PPIs have been associated with CDI in hospitalized patients, but ICU patients differ fundamentally from non-ICU patients and few studies have focused on PPI use exclusively in the critical care setting. We performed a retrospective cohort study to determine the associations between PPIs and health-care facility-onset CDI in the ICU. We analyzed data from all adult ICU patients at three affiliated hospitals (14 ICUs) between 2010 and 2013. Patients were excluded if they had recent CDI or an ICU stay of <3 days. We parsed electronic medical records for ICU exposures, focusing on PPIs and other potentially modifiable exposures that occurred during ICU stays. Health-care facility-onset CDI in the ICU was defined as a newly positive PCR for the C. difficile toxin B gene from an unformed stool, with subsequent receipt of anti-CDI therapy. We analyzed PPIs and other exposures as time-varying covariates and used Cox proportional hazards models to adjust for demographics, comorbidities, and other clinical factors. Of 18,134 patients who met the criteria for inclusion, 271 (1.5%) developed health-care facility-onset CDI in the ICU. Receipt of antibiotics was the strongest risk factor for CDI (adjusted HR (aHR) 2.79; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.50-5.19). There was no significant increase in risk for CDI associated with PPIs in those who did not receive antibiotics (aHR 1.56; 95% CI, 0.72-3.35), and PPIs were actually associated with a decreased risk for CDI in those who received antibiotics (aHR 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48-0.83). There was also no evidence of increased risk for CDI in those who received higher doses of PPIs. Exposure to antibiotics was the most important risk factor for health-care facility-onset CDI in the ICU. PPIs did not increase risk for CDI in the ICU regardless of use of antibiotics.

  13. A therapeutic substitution policy for proton pump inhibitors: clinical and economic consequences.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Maclure, Malcolm; Dormuth, Colin R; Glynn, Robert J; Canning, Claire; Avorn, Jerry

    2006-04-01

    With the growing need to provide prescription drug benefits to older patients and to contain costs, it will be necessary to direct that coverage so as to make expenditures as efficient as possible. We evaluated the clinical and economic consequences of coverage restriction for 3 leading proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in a large-scale natural experiment. The study design was a time-trend analysis in the setting of a provincial drug benefits program in British Columbia, Canada. We studied all British Columbia residents aged 66 or older (N = 501,104) using linked data on all prescription drug dispensings, physician services, and hospitalizations between January 2002 and June 2004. The new policy restricted coverage to rabeprazole and required treatment failure with a histamine H2 blocker. More widely used PPIs (omeprazole, pantoprazole, and lansoprazole) had to be paid for out of pocket, unless the physician requested an exemption. The main outcome measures were utilization of PPIs, drug discontinuation rates, gastrointestinal hemorrhage rates, and drug expenditures. Utilization of the restricted PPIs declined sharply after the policy change (-14,850 daily doses per month per 10,000 residents, P < .0001), whereas use of the covered PPI increased sharply (+19,300, P < .0001), with 45% of all PPI users switching to the covered agent within 6 months. We found no increased use of H2 blockers or stopping of gastroprotective drugs. There was no increase in the monthly rate of hospitalization for gastrointestinal hemorrhage after the PPI restriction (P = .35) even though the study had the power to detect increases of 24 events per 10,000 residents with 95% confidence. There was a slight increase in physician visits 3 months after the policy change (P = .01) for a 2-month period when 9% of new rabeprazole users were switched back to a restricted PPI. In the first 6 months of the policy change, the provincial health plan saved at least 2.9 million Canadian dollars as a result

  14. Proton pump inhibitor-associated hypomagnesemia: what do FDA data tell us?

    PubMed

    Luk, Chee Phun; Parsons, Richard; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2013-06-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are a class of medications indicated for the treatment of gastric acid-related diseases. Hypomagnesemia is a rare but serious adverse effect of PPIs. To address the association between the use of different PPIs and hypomagnesemia by examining the frequency of occurrence of hypo magnesemia among the reported adverse drug reactions from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Adverse Event Reporting System database. We conducted a cross-sectional study of PPI-associated adverse effect cases reported to the FDA between November 1, 1997, and April 1, 2012. Logistic regression was used to examine the association of sex, age, and different PPIs with hypomagnesemia. χ² analysis was conducted to investigate the association of PPI-associated hypomagnesemia with hypocalcemia and hypokalemia. Among 66,102 subjects identified as experiencing 1 or more adverse effects while taking a PPI, 1.0% (n = 693) were reported to have hypomagnesemia. The mean (SD) age of PPI users presenting with hypomagnesemia was 64.4 (12.9) years. Results from logistic regression indicated that, compared with esomeprazole, all other PPIs had a higher rate of hypomagnesemia, with pantoprazole having the highest rate (OR 4.3; 95% CI 3.3-5.7; p < 0.001). The risk of female subjects having hypo magnesemia (OR 0.83; 95% CI 0.71-0.97; p = 0.016) was significantly lower than that of males. Elderly subjects (age >65 years) were at increased risk of PPI-associated hypomagnesemia (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.2-1.7; p < 0.001). χ² analysis showed strong association between hypomagnesemia and both hypocalcemia (p < 0.001) and hypokalemia (p < 0.001). All PPIs were associated with hypomagnesemia, with esomeprazole having the lowest risk and pantoprazole having the highest risk. The risk of PPI-associated hypomagnesemia was higher in males and the elderly population. Hypocalcemia and hypokalemia commonly coexisted with PPI-associated hypomagnesemia.

  15. Long-term kidney outcomes among users of proton pump inhibitors without intervening acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Bowe, Benjamin; Li, Tingting; Xian, Hong; Yan, Yan; Al-Aly, Ziyad

    2017-02-20

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use is associated with an increased risk of acute kidney injury (AKI), incident chronic kidney disease (CKD), and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). PPI-associated CKD is presumed to be mediated by intervening AKI. However, whether PPI use is associated with an increased risk of chronic renal outcomes in the absence of intervening AKI is unknown. To evaluate this we used the Department of Veterans Affairs national databases to build a cohort of 144,032 incident users of acid suppression therapy that included 125,596 PPI and 18,436 Histamine H2 receptor antagonist (H2 blockers) consumers. Over 5 years of follow-up in survival models, cohort participants were censored at the time of AKI occurrence. Compared with incident users of H2 blockers, incident users of PPIs had an increased risk of an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) under 60 ml/min/1.73m(2) (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.24), incident CKD (1.26; 1.20-1.33), eGFR decline over 30% (1.22; 1.16-1.28), and ESRD or eGFR decline over 50% (1.30; 1.15-1.48). Results were consistent in models that excluded participants with AKI either before chronic renal outcomes, during the time in the cohort, or before cohort entry. The proportion of PPI effect mediated by AKI was 44.7%, 45.47%, 46.00%, and 46.72% for incident eGFR under 60 ml/min/1.73m(2), incident CKD, eGFR decline over 30%, and ESRD or over 50% decline in eGFR, respectively. Thus, PPI use is associated with increased risk of chronic renal outcomes in the absence of intervening AKI. Hence, reliance on antecedent AKI as warning sign to guard against the risk of CKD among PPI users is not sufficient as a sole mitigation strategy.

  16. Association between baseline impedance values and response proton pump inhibitors in patients with heartburn.

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Savarino, Edoardo; Tutuian, Radu; Frazzoni, Marzio; Piaggi, Paolo; Bertani, Lorenzo; Furnari, Manuele; Franchi, Riccardo; Russo, Salvatore; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino

    2015-06-01

    Esophageal impedance measurements have been proposed to indicate the status of the esophageal mucosa, and might be used to study the roles of the impaired mucosal integrity and increased acid sensitivity in patients with heartburn. We compared baseline impedance levels among patients with heartburn who did and did not respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, along with the pathophysiological characteristics of functional heartburn (FH). In a case-control study, we collected data from January to December 2013 on patients with heartburn and normal findings from endoscopy who were not receiving PPI therapy and underwent impedance pH testing at hospitals in Italy. Patients with negative test results were placed on an 8-week course of PPI therapy (84 patients received esomeprazole and 36 patients received pantoprazole). Patients with more than 50% symptom improvement were classified as FH/PPI responders and patients with less than 50% symptom improvement were classified as FH/PPI nonresponders. Patients with hypersensitive esophagus and healthy volunteers served as controls. In all patients and controls, we measured acid exposure time, number of reflux events, baseline impedance, and swallow-induced peristaltic wave indices. FH/PPI responders had higher acid exposure times, numbers of reflux events, and acid refluxes compared with FH/PPI nonresponders (P < .05). Patients with hypersensitive esophagus had mean acid exposure times and numbers of reflux events similar to those of FH/PPI responders. Baseline impedance levels were lower in FH/PPI responders and patients with hypersensitive esophagus, compared with FH/PPI nonresponders and healthy volunteers (P < .001). Swallow-induced peristaltic wave indices were similar between FH/PPI responders and patients with hypersensitive esophagus. Patients with FH who respond to PPI therapy have impedance pH features similar to those of patients with hypersensitive esophagus. Baseline impedance measurements might allow for

  17. Current Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Reflux Symptoms Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Richter, Joel E

    2014-09-01

    Suspected reflux symptoms that are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are rapidly becoming the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients seen in gastroenterology clinics. These patients are a heterogeneous group, differing in symptom frequency and severity, PPI dosing regimens, and responses to therapy (from partial to absent). Before testing, the physician needs to question the patient carefully about PPI compliance and the timing of drug intake in relation to meals. Switching PPIs or doubling the dose is the next step, but only 20% to 25% of the group refractory to PPIs will respond. The first diagnostic test should be upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In more than 90% of cases, the results will be normal, but persistent esophagitis may suggest pill esophagitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, or rarer diseases, such as lichen planus, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, or genotype variants of PPI metabolism. If the endoscopy results are normal, esophageal manometry and especially reflux testing should follow. Whether patients should be tested on or off PPI therapy is controversial. Most physicians prefer to test patients off PPIs to identify whether abnormal acid reflux is even present; if it is not, PPIs can be stopped and other diagnoses sought. Testing patients on PPI therapy allows nonacid reflux to be identified, but more than 50% of patients have a normal test result, leaving the clinician with a conundrum-whether to stop PPIs or continue them because the GERD is being treated adequately. Alternative diagnoses in patients with refractory GERD and normal reflux testing include achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, rumination, and aerophagia. However, more than 50% will be given the diagnosis of functional heartburn, a visceral hypersensitivity syndrome. Treating patients with PPI-refractory GERD-like symptoms can be difficult and frustrating. Any of the following may help: a histamine-2 receptor antagonist at

  18. Influence of proton pump inhibitors on gastritis diagnosis and pathologic gastric changes

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Soumana C; Slim, Mahmoud; Nassif, Jeanette G; Nasser, Selim M

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influence of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exposure on the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. METHODS: Chronic PPI use is associated with masking of H. pylori infection. Patients with H. pylori infection are predisposed to gastric and duodenal ulcers, and long-term infection with this organism has been associated with gastric mucosal atrophy and serious long-term complications, such as gastric lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Three hundred patients diagnosed with gastritis between January 2008 and April 2010 were included in our study. The computerized medical database of these patients was reviewed retrospectively in order to assess whether the type of gastritis diagnosed (H. pylori vs non-H. pylori gastritis) is influenced by PPI exposure. H. pylori density was graded as low, if corresponding to mild density following the Updated Sydney System, or high, if corresponding to moderate or severe densities in the Updated Sydney System. RESULTS: Patients were equally distributed between males and females with a median age at the time of diagnosis of 50 years old (range: 20-87). The histological types of gastritis were classified as H. pylori gastritis (n = 156, 52%) and non-H. pylori gastritis (n = 144, 48%). All patients with non-H. pylori gastritis had inactive chronic gastritis. Patients with no previous PPI exposure were more likely to be diagnosed with H. pylori gastritis than those with previous PPI exposure (71% vs 34.2%, P < 0.001). Intestinal metaplasia was more likely to be detected in the latter patients (1.4% vs 6.5%, P = 0.023). Multivariate analysis has also demonstrated that in the presence of previous PPI exposure (OR = 0.217, 95%CI: 0.123-0.385), GERD (OR = 0.317, 95%CI: 0.132-0.763, P = 0.01), alcohol intake (OR = 0.396, 95%CI: 0.195-0.804, P = 0.01), the detection of H. pylori was less likely. Chronic use of PPIs may mask H. pylori infections promoting the diagnosis of non-H. pylori

  19. Influence of proton pump inhibitors on gastritis diagnosis and pathologic gastric changes.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Soumana C; Slim, Mahmoud; Nassif, Jeanette G; Nasser, Selim M

    2015-04-21

    To investigate the influence of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exposure on the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Chronic PPI use is associated with masking of H. pylori infection. Patients with H. pylori infection are predisposed to gastric and duodenal ulcers, and long-term infection with this organism has been associated with gastric mucosal atrophy and serious long-term complications, such as gastric lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Three hundred patients diagnosed with gastritis between January 2008 and April 2010 were included in our study. The computerized medical database of these patients was reviewed retrospectively in order to assess whether the type of gastritis diagnosed (H. pylori vs non-H. pylori gastritis) is influenced by PPI exposure. H. pylori density was graded as low, if corresponding to mild density following the Updated Sydney System, or high, if corresponding to moderate or severe densities in the Updated Sydney System. Patients were equally distributed between males and females with a median age at the time of diagnosis of 50 years old (range: 20-87). The histological types of gastritis were classified as H. pylori gastritis (n = 156, 52%) and non-H. pylori gastritis (n = 144, 48%). All patients with non-H. pylori gastritis had inactive chronic gastritis. Patients with no previous PPI exposure were more likely to be diagnosed with H. pylori gastritis than those with previous PPI exposure (71% vs 34.2%, P < 0.001). Intestinal metaplasia was more likely to be detected in the latter patients (1.4% vs 6.5%, P = 0.023). Multivariate analysis has also demonstrated that in the presence of previous PPI exposure (OR = 0.217, 95%CI: 0.123-0.385), GERD (OR = 0.317, 95%CI: 0.132-0.763, P = 0.01), alcohol intake (OR = 0.396, 95%CI: 0.195-0.804, P = 0.01), the detection of H. pylori was less likely. Chronic use of PPIs may mask H. pylori infections promoting the diagnosis of non-H. pylori gastritis and leads to a

  20. Pleiotropic effect of the proton pump inhibitor esomeprazole leading to suppression of lung inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Cooke, John P; Gerhart, William; Griego, Carol; Brower, Jeremy B; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Moeller, Benjamin C; Zhou, Qingtao; Ho, Lawrence; de Andrade, Joao; Raghu, Ganesh; Peterson, Leif; Rivera, Andreana; Rosen, Glenn D

    2015-08-01

    The beneficial outcome associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has been reported in retrospective studies. To date, no prospective study has been conducted to confirm these outcomes. In addition, the potential mechanism by which PPIs improve measures of lung function and/or transplant-free survival in IPF has not been elucidated. Here, we used biochemical, cell biological and preclinical studies to evaluate regulation of markers associated with inflammation and fibrosis. In our in vitro studies, we exposed primary lung fibroblasts, epithelial and endothelial cells to ionizing radiation or bleomycin; stimuli typically used to induce inflammation and fibrosis. In addition, we cultured lung fibroblasts from IPF patients and studied the effect of esomeprazole on collagen release. Our preclinical study tested efficacy of esomeprazole in a rat model of bleomycin-induced lung injury. Furthermore, we performed retrospective analysis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) databases to examine the effect of PPIs on transplant-free survival. The cell culture studies revealed that esomeprazole controls inflammation by suppressing the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules including vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, inducible nitric oxide synthase, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukins (IL-1β and IL-6). The antioxidant effect is associated with strong induction of the stress-inducible cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) and the antifibrotic effect is associated with potent inhibition of fibroblast proliferation as well as downregulation of profibrotic proteins including receptors for transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), fibronectin and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, esomeprazole showed robust effect in mitigating the inflammatory and fibrotic responses in a murine model of acute lung injury. Finally, retrospective analysis of two ILD databases was performed to assess the effect

  1. Proton pump inhibitor for non-erosive reflux disease: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Ji, Meng-Yao; Song, Jia; Lei, Hong-Bo; Qiu, Shi; Wang, Jing; Ai, Ming-Hua; Wang, Jun; Lv, Xiao-Guang; Yang, Zi-Rong; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy, safety and influential factors of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). METHODS: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library were searched up to April 2013 to identify eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that probed into the efficacy, safety and influential factors of PPI treatment for NERD. The rates of symptomatic relief and adverse events were measured as the outcomes. After RCT selection, assessment and data collection, the pooled RRs and 95%CI were calculated. This meta-analysis was performed using the Stata 12.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas, United States). The level of evidence was estimated by the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. RESULTS: Seventeen RCTs including 6072 patients met the inclusion criteria. The results of the meta-analysis showed that PPI treatment was significantly superior to H2 receptor antagonists (H2RA) treatment (RR = 1.629, 95%CI: 1.422-1.867, P = 0.000) and placebo (RR = 1.903, 95%CI: 1.573-2.302, P = 0.000) for the symptomatic relief of NERD. However, there were no obvious differences between PPI and H2RA (RR = 0.928, 95%CI: 0.776-1.110, P = 0.414) or PPI and the placebo (RR = 1.000, 95%CI: 0.896-1.116, P = 0.997) regarding the rate of adverse events. The overall rate of symptomatic relief of PPI against NERD was 51.4% (95%CI: 0.433-0.595, P = 0.000), and relief was influenced by hiatal hernia (P = 0.030). The adverse rate of PPI against NERD was 21.0% (95%CI: 0.152-0.208, P = 0.000), and was affected by hiatal hernia (P = 0.081) and drinking (P = 0.053). CONCLUSION: PPI overmatched H2RA on symptomatic relief rate but not on adverse rate for NERD. Its relief rate and adverse rate were influenced by hiatal hernia and drinking. PMID:24363534

  2. Inappropriate Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Elderly Patients Discharged from Acute Care Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Schepisi, R; Fusco, S; Sganga, F; Falcone, B; Vetrano, D L; Abbatecola, A; Corica, F; Maggio, M; Ruggiero, C; Fabbietti, P; Corsonello, A; Onder, G; Lattanzio, F

    2016-01-01

    Proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) are extensively prescribed in older patients. However, little information is available on factors associated to PPI prescribing patterns among older patients discharged from hospital. To evaluate the appropriateness and clinical correlates of PPI prescription at discharge in a population of 1081 older patients discharged from acute care Italian hospitals. We used data from the CRiteria to Assess Appropriate Medication Use among Elderly Complex Patients (CRIME) study, a multicenter observational study. The appropriateness of PPI prescriptions was defined according to the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA) rules. Correlates of overprescribing (i.e prescribing without recognized AIFA indications) and underprescribing (i.e. not prescribing despite the presence of recognized AIFA indications) were investigated by logistic regression analysis. Overprescribing was observed in 30% of patients receiving PPIs at discharge. Underprescribing was observed in 11% of patients not receiving PPIs at discharge. Overprescribing of PPIs at discharge was negatively associated with age (OR=0.88, 95%CI=0.85-0.91), depression (OR=0.58, 95%CI=0.35-0.96), use of aspirin (OR=0.03, 95%CI=0.02-0.06) and systemic corticosteroids (OR=0.02, 95%CI=0.01-0.04). The negative association with number of medications (OR=0.95, 95%CI=0.88-1.03) and overall comorbidities (OR=0.92, 95%CI=0.83-1.02) was nearly significant. Conversely, older age (OR=1.09, 95%CI=1.04-1.14), use of aspirin (OR=24.0, 95%CI=11.5-49.8) and systemic corticosteroids (OR=19.3, 95%CI=11.5-49.8) and overall comorbidities (OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.04-1.42) were independent correlates of underprescribing. Overprescribing of PPIs is more frequent in younger patients with lower burden of depression, whilst underprescribing is characterized by older age and greater burden of comorbidity and polypharmacy. Hospitalization should be considered as a clue to identify inappropriate use of PPIs and improve appropriateness of

  3. Current Diagnosis and Management of Suspected Reflux Symptoms Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Suspected reflux symptoms that are refractory to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are rapidly becoming the most common presentation of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients seen in gastroenterology clinics. These patients are a heterogeneous group, differing in symptom frequency and severity, PPI dosing regimens, and responses to therapy (from partial to absent). Before testing, the physician needs to question the patient carefully about PPI compliance and the timing of drug intake in relation to meals. Switching PPIs or doubling the dose is the next step, but only 20% to 25% of the group refractory to PPIs will respond. The first diagnostic test should be upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. In more than 90% of cases, the results will be normal, but persistent esophagitis may suggest pill esophagitis, eosinophilic esophagitis, or rarer diseases, such as lichen planus, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, or genotype variants of PPI metabolism. If the endoscopy results are normal, esophageal manometry and especially reflux testing should follow. Whether patients should be tested on or off PPI therapy is controversial. Most physicians prefer to test patients off PPIs to identify whether abnormal acid reflux is even present; if it is not, PPIs can be stopped and other diagnoses sought. Testing patients on PPI therapy allows nonacid reflux to be identified, but more than 50% of patients have a normal test result, leaving the clinician with a conundrum—whether to stop PPIs or continue them because the GERD is being treated adequately. Alternative diagnoses in patients with refractory GERD and normal reflux testing include achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, gastroparesis, rumination, and aerophagia. However, more than 50% will be given the diagnosis of functional heartburn, a visceral hypersensitivity syndrome. Treating patients with PPI-refractory GERD–like symptoms can be difficult and frustrating. Any of the following may help: a histamine-2 receptor antagonist

  4. Use of proton pump inhibitors is associated with lower trabecular bone density in older individuals.

    PubMed

    Maggio, Marcello; Lauretani, Fulvio; Ceda, Gian Paolo; De Vita, Francesca; Bondi, Giuliana; Corsonello, Andrea; Cattabiani, Chiara; Lattanzio, Fabrizia; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Nouvenne, Antonio; Meschi, Tiziana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2013-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are highly effective in the treatment of upper gastrointestinal acid-related conditions and are fast becoming one of the most frequently prescribed treatments in adult or older persons. Recent data show that long-term use of PPIs in older subjects is associated with important undesirable effects, including a higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. The mechanisms of this association are unclear and the relationship between the use of PPIs and parameters of bone mass and geometry has never been fully explored. This study investigates the relationship between the chronic use of PPIs and the parameters of bone mass (cortical and trabecular bone mineral density - vBMDc and vBMDt) and bone geometry (cortical and trabecular cross sectional area - tCSA and cCSA) in older individuals. The study population consisted of 1038 subjects (452 men and 586 women) 65years or older, selected from the InCHIANTI study, with complete information on computerized tomography performed at tibial level (pQCT) and on medications. Participants were classified as PPI users and nonusers based on self-report of PPI use over the last 15days, with PPI users (36 subjects, 14 men and 22 women) making up 3.4% of the study population (mean age 75.7±7.4years). The relationship between use of PPIs and pQCT bone parameters was tested by multivariate linear regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and several clinical factors and/or statistically confounding variables identified by partial correlation coefficient and Spearman partial rank order correlation coefficients, as appropriate (age, sex, BMI, caloric intake, IGF-1, IL-6, calcium, estradiol, bioavailable testosterone, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, cross-sectional muscle area, and level of physical activity). PPI users showed age- and sex-adjusted lower vBMDt than nonusers (180.5±54.8 vs. 207.9±59.4, p=0.001). The inverse association between PPI use and vBMDt remained almost unchanged after adjustment for multiple

  5. [What is the utility of proton pump inhibitor testing in non-cardiac chest pain?].

    PubMed

    Huamán, José Wálter; Aliaga, Verónica; Domenech, Gemma; Videla, Sebastián; Saperas, Esteban

    2014-10-01

    Noncardiac chest pain (NCCP) often represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Given that gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common cause of NCCP, initial treatment with proton-pump inhibitors (PPI) has been proposed for all patients (PPI testing), reserving esophageal function testing solely for non-responders. The aim of the present study was to provide evidence on the clinical utility of PPI testing with high-dose pantoprazole in patients with NCCP. We carried out a study of diagnostic performance with a cohort design in patients with NCCP, who had been assessed by the Cardiology Service. All patients underwent upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and 24h esophageal pH monitoring before PPI testing with pantoprazole 40 mg every 12h for 1 month. Before and after treatment, we assessed the severity (intensity and frequency) of chest pain, quality of life, and anxiety and depression by means of specific questionnaires. The diagnosis of GERD was based on a pathological finding of esophageal pH monitoring. A positive response to PPI testing was defined as an improvement in chest pain >50% compared with the baseline score after 1 month of PPI therapy. We included 30 consecutive patients (17 men/13 women) with a mean age of 49 years. Of these 30 patients, 20 with NCCP had GERD (67%, 95%CI: 47%-83%). A positive response to PPI therapy was observed in 13 of the 30 (43%) patients with NCCP: 11 of the 20 (55%) patients in the GERD-positive group and 2 of the 10 (20%) in the GERD-negative group. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of PPI testing was 55%, 80%, 85%, 47% and 63%, respectively. A significant reduction in chest pain after pantoprazole therapy (P=.003) and a slight non significant improvement in anxiety and depression was achieved in the GERD-positive group as compared to the GERD-negative group. In NCCP, PPI testing with pantoprazole has a low sensitivity for the diagnosis of

  6. Proton pump inhibitor-associated pneumonia: Not a breath of fresh air after all?

    PubMed

    Fohl, Alexander L; Regal, Randolph E

    2011-06-06

    Over the past two decades, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have emerged as highly effective and relatively safe agents for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Unfortunately, this desirable pharmacological profile has also contributed to superfluous and widespread use in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. While generally well-tolerated, research published over the last decade has associated these agents with increased risks of Clostridium difficile disease, fractures likely due to calcium malabsorption and both community-acquired (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonias (HAP). The mechanism behind PPI-associated pneumonia may be multifactorial, but is thought to stem from compromising the stomach's "acid mantle" against gastric colonization of acid-labile pathogenic bacteria which then may be aspirated. A secondary postulate is that PPIs, through their inhibition of extra-gastric H(+)/K(+)-ATPase enzymes, may reduce the acidity of the upper aerodigestive tract, thus resulting in increased bacterial colonization of the larynx, esophagus and lungs. To date, several retrospective case control studies have been published looking at the association between PPI use and CAP. Some studies found a temporal relationship between PPI exposure and the incidence of pneumonia, but only two could define a dose-response relationship. Furthermore, other studies found an inverse correlation between duration of PPI use and risk of CAP. In terms of HAP, we reviewed two retrospective cohort studies and one prospective study. One retrospective study in a medical ICU found no increased association of HAP in PPI-exposed patients compared to no acid-lowering therapy, while the other in cardiothoracic surgery patients showed a markedly increased risk compared to those receiving H(2)RAs. The one prospective study in ICU patients showed an increased risk of HAP with PPIs, but not with H(2)RAs. In conclusion, the current literature shows a slight trend toward an

  7. Synthesis of a DOTA(Gd3+)-conjugate of proton-pump inhibitor pantoprazole for gastric wall imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Maharvi, Ghulam M.; Bharucha, Adil E.; Fauq, Abdul H.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used to evaluate gastrointestinal (GI) structure and functions in humans. Despite filling the viscus lumen with a contrast agent, visualization of the viscus wall is limited. To overcome this limitation, we de novo synthesized a conjugate that covalently combines a Gd-based MRI contrast agent, encaged with a chelating agent (DOTA), with pantoprazole, which is a widely used proton pump inhibitor that binds to proton pumps in the stomach and colon. The DOTA linkage was installed at a mechanism-based strategic location in the pantoprazole molecule to minimize a possible negative effect of the structural modification on the drug. It is anticipated that by defining the wall of the stomach and colon, this compound will facilitate functional MRI of the GI tract in humans. PMID:23511016

  8. Homology modeling, molecular dynamics, and virtual screening of NorA efflux pump inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Baki Vijaya; Babu, Tirumalasetty Muni Chandra; Reddy, Netala Vasudeva; Rajendra, Wudayagiri

    2016-01-01

    Emerging drug resistance in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus might be implicated to the overexpression of NorA efflux pump which is capable of extruding numerous structurally diverse compounds. However, NorA efflux pump is considered as a potential drug target for the development of efflux pump inhibitors. In the present study, NorA model was constructed based on the crystal structure of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (PDBID: 1PW4). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was performed using NAMD2.7 for NorA which is embedded in the hydrated lipid bilayer. Structural design of NorA unveils amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-terminal domains which are connected by long cytoplasmic loop. N and C domains are composed of six transmembrane α-helices (TM) which exhibits pseudo-twofold symmetry and possess voluminous substrate binding cavity between TM helices. Molecular docking of reserpine, totarol, ferruginol, salvin, thioxanthene, phenothiazine, omeprazole, verapamil, nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and acridine to NorA found that all the molecules were bound at the large hydrophobic cleft and indicated significant interactions with the key residues. In addition, structure-based virtual screening was employed which indicates that 14 potent novel lead molecules such as CID58685302, CID58685367, CID5799283, CID5578487, CID60028372, ZINC12196383, ZINC72140751, ZINC72137843, ZINC39227983, ZINC43742707, ZINC12196375, ZINC66166948, ZINC39228014, and ZINC14616160 have highest binding affinity for NorA. These lead molecules displayed considerable pharmacological properties as evidenced by Lipinski rule of five and prophecy of toxicity risk assessment. Thus, the present study will be helpful in designing and synthesis of a novel class of NorA efflux pump inhibitors that restore the susceptibilities of drug compounds. PMID:27757014

  9. A Proton Pump Inhibitor in the Reformulation Setting: Bioequivalence and Potential Implications for Long‐Term Safety

    PubMed Central

    Beers‐Block, PM; Kim, LP; Schotland, P; Levine, JG; McCloskey, CA; Bashaw, ED

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have become known for both their therapeutic effect and good safety profile. An application was submitted to the US Food and Drug Administration for approval of a reformulated PPI product that failed bioequivalence testing, but was submitted on the basis of the long history of PPI use as a “surrogate” for equivalence. This review evaluates the safety data for PPIs, discuss variability of pharmacokinetic parameters of PPIs in the reformulation setting, and potential implications of those changes for long‐term safety. PMID:28618191

  10. Proton-pump inhibitor as palliative care for chemotherapy-induced gastroesophageal reflux disease in pancreatic cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Uwagawa, Tadashi; Misawa, Takeyuki; Iida, Tomonori; Sakamoto, Taro; Gocho, Takeshi; Wakiyama, Shigeki; Hirohara, Shoichi; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2010-07-01

    Relief of adverse events induced by chemotherapy is an important issue for patients, especially those with a poor prognosis, such as with pancreatic cancer. There are no reports of the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chemotherapy, so we investigated the incidence of chemotherapy-induced GERD in patients undergoing treatment with gemcitabine or S-1 for pancreatic cancer and the effect of sodium rabeprazole (RPZ), a proton-pump inhibitor. GERD was diagnosed in 40% of the patients according to the Frequency Scale for Symptoms of GERD score, and RBZ therapy significantly improved their symptoms.

  11. Inhibitors of Vacuolar ATPase Proton Pumps Inhibit Human Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion and Prostate-Specific Antigen Expression and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Vera; Licon-Munoz, Yamhilette; Trujillo, Kristina; Bisoffi, Marco; Parra, Karlett J.

    2012-01-01

    Vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases) comprise specialized and ubiquitously distributed pumps that acidify intracellular compartments and energize membranes. To gain new insights into the roles of V-ATPases in prostate cancer (PCa) we studied the effects of inhibiting V-ATPase pumps in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (C4-2B) cells of a human PCa progression model. Treatment with nanomolar concentrations of the V-ATPase inhibitors bafilomycin A or concanamycin A reduced the in vitro invasion in both cell types by 80%, regardless that V-ATPase was prominent at the plasma membrane of C4-2B cells and only traces were detected in the low-metastatic LNCaP parental cells. In both cell types intracellular V-ATPase was excessive and co-localized with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the Golgi compartment. V-ATPase inhibitors reversibly excluded PSA from the Golgi and led to the accumulation of largely dispersed PSA-loaded vesicles of lysosomal composition. Inhibition of acridine orange staining and transferrin receptor recycling suggested defective endosomal and lysosomal acidification. The inhibitors, additionally, interfered with the AR-PSA axis under conditions that reduced invasion. Bafilomycin A significantly reduced steady-state and R1881-induced PSA mRNA expression and secretion in the LNCaP cells which are androgen-dependent, but not in the C4-2B cells which are androgen ablation-resistant. In the C4-2B cells, an increased susceptibility to V-ATPase inhibitors was detected after longer treatments, as proliferation was reduced and reversibility of bafilomycin-induced responses impaired. These findings make V-ATPases attractive targets against early and advanced PCa tumors. PMID:22945374

  12. Concomitant Administration of a Histamine2 Receptor Antagonist and Proton Pump Inhibitor Enhances Gastric Acid Suppression.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Hussein, Mustafa; Freeman, Janice; Castell, Donald

    2015-12-01

    Because it has been hypothesized that histamine2 receptor antagonists (H2 RAs) might interfere with the action of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) when the drugs are given concomitantly, we sought to compare the pharmacodynamic effects of simultaneous administration of a PPI and an H2 RA with the effects of each drug administered alone. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study. Esophageal motility laboratory at a large teaching hospital. Twenty-one healthy volunteers. Subjects were randomized to one of three treatment arms: an H2 RA (ranitidine 300 mg) plus placebo, a PPI (omeprazole 40 mg) plus placebo, or ranitidine 300 mg plus omeprazole 40 mg, all given once/day at 8 a.m., 30 minutes before a standard breakfast, for 1 week. The subjects then received the other two treatments, with each treatment period separated by a 1-week washout period. The primary outcome was length of time that the gastric pH remained higher than 4. Secondary outcomes were median gastric pH higher than 4 and percentage of time that the gastric pH remained higher than 4. On day 7, ambulatory intragastric pH was recorded over an 8-hour period in each treatment arm. The combination of ranitidine and omeprazole resulted in a significantly longer time that the gastric pH remained higher than 4 (median 410.5 min [interquartile range (IQR) 298.5-454.25 min]) versus either omeprazole alone (median 356.7 min [IQR 254.9-419.2 min], p=0.023) or ranitidine alone (134.1 min [IQR 99.9-302.5 min], p<0.0001). Median gastric pH was also significantly higher when omeprazole and ranitidine were given in combination (pH 5.92 [IQR 4.75-6.46]) than either omeprazole alone (pH 4.88 [IQR 4.27-6.11], p=0.001) or ranitidine alone (pH 2.31 [IQR 2.04-5.27], p=0.0003). Likewise, the percentage of time that the gastric pH remained higher than 4 was significantly higher when omeprazole and ranitidine were given in combination (median 85.52%) than either omeprazole alone (74.31%, p=0.027) or

  13. Novel antihelmintic activity of tinidazole coordination compounds. Relevance of the metal ion and structural properties.

    PubMed

    Alfaro-Fuentes, Israel; Castro-Ramírez, Rodrigo; Ortiz-Pastrana, Naytzé; Medina-Guerrero, Rosa María; Soler-Jiménez, Lilia Catherinne; Martínez-Rodríguez, Irma; Betancourt-Lozano, Miguel; Ibarra-Castro, Leonardo; Barba-Behrens, Norah; Fajer-Ávila, Emma Josefina

    2017-11-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antihelmintic activity of cobalt(II), copper(II) and zinc(II) coordination compounds of tinidazole (tnz) were investigated in cultivated spotted rose snapper, infested with dactylogyrid monogeneans. The tinidazole coordination compounds [Co(tnz)2Cl2], [Co(tnz)2Br2], [Cu(tnz)2Cl2], [Cu(tnz)2Br2], [Zn(tnz)2Cl2] and [Zn(tnz)2Br2] were synthesized and spectroscopically characterized. Their molecular structures were determined by their single crystal X-ray diffraction. The metal ions presented distorted tetrahedral geometries, with an intramolecular bifurcated lone pair SO⋯π, from the sulfone group with the imidazolic ring, which contributed to the stability of the compounds in solid state and in solution. Adults of dactylogyrids were exposed in vitro to tinidazole and its coordination compounds. The effective median concentrations of copper(II) coordination compounds were lower than those of cobalt(II) and zinc(II), tnz showed no activity. In vivo oral intubation tests were carried out with [Cu(tnz)2Br2], [Zn(tnz)2Br2] and tnz on snappers infected with dactylogyrids, where the copper(II) compound showed better activity. The absorption and distribution assessment for the [Cu(tnz)2Br2], showed that copper concentrations in liver were significantly higher than in blood and gills, indicating bioaccumulation in this organ. In vivo baths of [Cu(tnz)2Br2] at 25mg/L showed an effective (95% at 8h) antihelmintic effect, while [Zn(tnz)2Br2] had low antihelmintic efficacy. This study indicates that [Cu(tnz)2Br2] has an effective antihelmintic activity towards dactylogyrids monogeneans affecting cultivated spotted red snapper. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors, and gastrointestinal injury: contrasting interactions in the stomach and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Marlicz, Wojciech; Loniewski, Igor; Grimes, David S; Quigley, Eamonn M

    2014-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most frequently prescribed groups of drugs worldwide. The use of NSAIDs is associated with a high number of significant adverse effects. Recently, the safety of PPIs has also been challenged. Capsule endoscopy studies reveal that even low-dose NSAIDs are responsible for gut mucosal injury and numerous clinical adverse effects, for example, bleeding and anemia, that might be difficult to diagnose. The frequent use of PPIs can exacerbate NSAID-induced small intestinal injury by altering intestinal microbiota. Thus, the use of PPI is considered to be an independent risk factor associated with NSAID-associated enteropathy. In this review, we discuss this important clinical problem and review relevant aspects of epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management. We also present the hypothesis that even minor and subclinical injury to the intestinal mucosa can result in significant, though delayed, metabolic consequences, which may seriously affect the health of an individual. PubMed was searched using the following key words (each key word alone and in combination): gut microbiota, microbiome, non-steroidal anti inflammatory drugs, proton pump inhibitors, enteropathy, probiotic, antibiotic, mucosal injury, enteroscopy, and capsule endoscopy. Google engine search was also carried out to identify additional relevant articles. Both original and review articles published in English were reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure-Activity Relationships of a Novel Pyranopyridine Series of Gram-negative Bacterial Efflux Pump Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Son T.; Kwasny, Steven M.; Ding, Xiaoyuan; Cardinale, Steven C.; McCarthy, Courtney T.; Kim, Hong-Suk; Nikaido, Hiroshi; Peet, Norton P.; Williams, John D.; Bowlin, Terry L.; Opperman, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Recently we described a novel pyranopyridine inhibitor (MBX2319) of RND-type efflux pumps of the Enterobacteriaceae. MBX2319 (3,3-dimethyl-5-cyano-8-morpholino-6-(phenethylthio)-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrano[3,4-c]pyridine) is structurally distinct from other known Gram-negative efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs), such as 1-(1-naphthylmethyl)-piperazine (NMP), phenylalanylarginine-β-naphthylamide (PAβN), D13-9001, and the pyridopyrimidine derivatives. Here, we report the synthesis and biological evaluation of 60 new analogs of MBX2319 that were designed to probe the structure activity relationships (SARs) of the pyranopyridine scaffold. The results of these studies produced a molecular activity map of the scaffold, which identifies regions that are critical to efflux inhibitory activities and those that can be modified to improve potency, metabolic stability and solubility. Several compounds, such as 22d–f, 22i and 22k, are significantly more effective than MBX2319 at potentiating the antibacterial activity of levofloxacin and piperacillin against Escherichia coli. PMID:25818767

  16. Air swallowing can be responsible for non-response of heartburn to high-dose proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zentilin, P; Accornero, L; Dulbecco, P; Savarino, E; Savarino, V

    2005-06-01

    Intraluminal electrical impedance is a novel technique, which is able for the first time to provide a qualitative assessment of refluxed material moving from the stomach to the oesophagus. In other words, the presence of air can be differentiated from that of liquid, because the former is characterised by high and the latter by low impedance compared with baseline. Moreover, the combined measurement of electrical impedance and pH-metry permits to distinguish acid from non-acid liquid reflux. One of the most important clinical applications of this method is to assess the reasons for poor response of GORD patients to high-dose proton pump inhibitors. This case report describes the results of impedance in the evaluation of a young woman, who did not respond to twice-daily doses of rabeprazole. She continued to complain of heartburn as major symptom and impedance allowed us to clarify that it was not related to acid or non-acid reflux, but to air swallowing. Therefore, this technique identified aerophagia to be responsible for persistent heartburn despite high-dose proton pump inhibitor and prevented the adoption of more aggressive, but probably unuseful therapies, such as the surgical one.

  17. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family. PMID:27029290

  18. Recent Advances in Multi-Drug Resistance (MDR) Efflux Pump Inhibitors of Gram-Positive Bacteria S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Handzlik, Jadwiga; Matys, Anna; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2013-02-05

    The paper focuses on recent achievements in the search for new chemical compounds able to inhibit multidrug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Gram-positive pathogens. An analysis of the results of the search for new efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) for Gram-positive bacteria, which have been performed over the last decade, indicates that almost all efforts are focused on the NorA (MFS) efflux pump in S. aureus. Considering the chemical structures of the NorA EPIs that have been identified, it can be observed that the most active agents belong to the families of compounds possessing conjugated double bonds, e.g., chalcones, piperine-like compounds, N-cinnamoylphenalkylamides or citral amide derivatives. Indole-, dihydronaphthyl-, 2-chloro-5-bromo-phenyl- or piperidine moieties seem to be profitable for the EPI properties, as well. These results, together with an increasing knowledge about a variety of efflux pumps that are involved in MDR of Gram-positive pathogens underline that further search for new EPIs should pay more attention to develop MDR efflux protein targets, including SMR, MATE, ABC or other members of the MFS family.

  19. Structure based classification for bile salt export pump (BSEP) inhibitors using comparative structural modeling of human BSEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sankalp; Grandits, Melanie; Richter, Lars; Ecker, Gerhard F.

    2017-06-01

    The bile salt export pump (BSEP) actively transports conjugated monovalent bile acids from the hepatocytes into the bile. This facilitates the formation of micelles and promotes digestion and absorption of dietary fat. Inhibition of BSEP leads to decreased bile flow and accumulation of cytotoxic bile salts in the liver. A number of compounds have been identified to interact with BSEP, which results in drug-induced cholestasis or liver injury. Therefore, in silico approaches for flagging compounds as potential BSEP inhibitors would be of high value in the early stage of the drug discovery pipeline. Up to now, due to the lack of a high-resolution X-ray structure of BSEP, in silico based identification of BSEP inhibitors focused on ligand-based approaches. In this study, we provide a homology model for BSEP, developed using the corrected mouse P-glycoprotein structure (PDB ID: 4M1M). Subsequently, the model was used for docking-based classification of a set of 1212 compounds (405 BSEP inhibitors, 807 non-inhibitors). Using the scoring function ChemScore, a prediction accuracy of 81% on the training set and 73% on two external test sets could be obtained. In addition, the applicability domain of the models was assessed based on Euclidean distance. Further, analysis of the protein-ligand interaction fingerprints revealed certain functional group-amino acid residue interactions that could play a key role for ligand binding. Though ligand-based models, due to their high speed and accuracy, remain the method of choice for classification of BSEP inhibitors, structure-assisted docking models demonstrate reasonably good prediction accuracies while additionally providing information about putative protein-ligand interactions.

  20. Qualitative analysis of anatomopathological changes of gastric mucosa due to long term therapy with proton pump inhibitors: experimental studies x clinical studies.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Iure Kalinine Ferraz; da Silva, Alcino Lázaro; de Araújo, Alex; Santos, Fernanda Carolina Barbosa; Mendonça, Bernardo Pinto Coelho Keuffer

    2013-01-01

    For a few decades the long-term use of proton pump inhibitors has had wide application in the treatment of several gastrointestinal diseases. Since then, however, several studies have called attention to the possible development of anatomical and pathological changes of gastric mucosa, resulting from the long term use of this therapeutic modality. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that these changes have connection not only to the development of precancerous lesions, but also of gastric tumors. To present a qualitative analysis of anatomical and pathological changes of gastric mucosa resulting from the long-term use of proton pump inhibitors. The headings used were: proton pump inhibitors, precancerous lesions and gastric neoplasms for a non systematic review of the literature, based on Medline, Lillacs and Scielo. Twelve articles were selected from clinical (9) and experimental (3) studies, for qualitative analysis of the results. The gastric acid suppression by high doses of proton pump inhibitors induces hypergastrinemia and the consequent emergence of neuroendocrine tumors in animal models. Morphological changes most often found in these experimental studies were: enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia, neuroendocrine tumor, atrophy, metaplasia and adenocarcinoma. In the studies in humans, however, despite enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia, the other effects, neuroendocrine tumor and gastric atrophy, gastric metaplasia and or adenocarcinoma, were not identified. Although it is not possible to say that the long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitors induces the appearance or accelerates the development of gastric cancer in humans, several authors have suggested that prolonged administration of this drug could provoke the development of gastric cancer. Thus, the evidence demonstrated in the animal model as well as the large number of patients who do or will do a long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitors, justifies the maintenance of

  1. Hypoalbuminemia is a predictor of mortality and rebleeding in peptic ulcer bleeding under proton pump inhibitor use.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Yang, Er-Hsiang; Wu, Chung-Tai; Wang, Wen-Lun; Chen, Po-Jun; Lin, Meng-Ying; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-07-24

    Peptic ulcer bleeding remains a deadly disease, and a simple indicator of long-term outcomes is crucial. This study validated whether hypoalbuminemia and its related factors in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding can indicate long-term mortality and rebleeding under proton pump inhibitor use. The prospective cohort study enrolled 426 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who had high risk stigmata at endoscopy and had received endoscopic hemostasis. They were divided into 79 patients in the hypoalbuminemia group (Hypo-AG, serum albumin <28 g/L), 135 in the marginal hypoalbuminemia group (Margin-AG, serum albumin 28-34.9 g/L), and 212 in the normal albuminemia group (Normal-AG, serum albumin ≥35 g/L). Each subject received 72-h of intravenous infusion and then the oral form of proton pump inhibitors and were monitored for 84 days to assess all-cause mortality and recurrent bleeding. The primary outcome of all-cause mortality rates were increased in a stepwise fashion in a trend from Normal-AG, Margin-AG, to Hypo-AG (0-28th day: 1.9%, 2.2%, 12.8%, p < 0.001; 29th-84th day: 2.5%, 8.0%, 10.6%, p < 0.01). The secondary outcome of recurrent bleeding rates were also increased in the same fashion (0-28th day: 6.4%, 15.4%, 24.6%, p < 0.001; 29th-84th day: 0%, 3.0%, 4.2%, p = 0.01). Abnormal albuminemia was <30 g/L related to hemoglobin levels <70 g/L, nosocomial bleeding, cirrhosis, age ≥70 years, shock, and ulcer size ≥1.0 cm independently (p < 0.05). Hypoalbuminemia in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding can be an alarm indicator of all-cause mortality and recurrent bleeding in a long-term follow-up situation under proton pump inhibitor use (NCT01591083). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole, but not lansoprazole or pantoprazole, is a metabolism-dependent inhibitor of CYP2C19: implications for coadministration with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, Brian W; Yerino, Phyllis; Kazmi, Faraz; Buckley, David B; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Paris, Brandy L; Toren, Paul; Parkinson, Andrew

    2011-11-01

    As a direct-acting inhibitor of CYP2C19 in vitro, lansoprazole is more potent than omeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but lansoprazole does not cause clinically significant inhibition of CYP2C19 whereas omeprazole does. To investigate this apparent paradox, we evaluated omeprazole, esomeprazole, R-omeprazole, lansoprazole, and pantoprazole for their ability to function as direct-acting and metabolism-dependent inhibitors (MDIs) of CYP2C19 in pooled human liver microsomes (HLM) as well as in cryopreserved hepatocytes and recombinant CYP2C19. In HLM, all PPIs were found to be direct-acting inhibitors of CYP2C19 with IC(50) values varying from 1.2 μM [lansoprazole; maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) = 2.2 μM] to 93 μM (pantoprazole; C(max) = 6.5 μM). In addition, we identified omeprazole, esomeprazole, R-omeprazole, and omeprazole sulfone as MDIs of CYP2C19 (they caused IC(50) shifts after a 30-min preincubation with NADPH-fortified HLM of 4.2-, 10-, 2.5-, and 3.2-fold, respectively), whereas lansoprazole and pantoprazole were not MDIs (IC(50) shifts < 1.5-fold). The metabolism-dependent inhibition of CYP2C19 by omeprazole and esomeprazole was not reversed by ultracentrifugation, suggesting that the inhibition was irreversible (or quasi-irreversible), whereas ultracentrifugation largely reversed such effects of R-omeprazole. Under various conditions, omeprazole inactivated CYP2C19 with K(I) (inhibitor concentration that supports half the maximal rate of inactivation) values of 1.7 to 9.1 μM and k(inact) (maximal rate of enzyme inactivation) values of 0.041 to 0.046 min(-1). This study identified omeprazole, and esomeprazole, but not R-omeprazole, lansoprazole, or pantoprazole, as irreversible (or quasi-irreversible) MDIs of CYP2C19. These results have important implications for the mechanism of the clinical interaction reported between omeprazole and clopidogrel, as well as other CYP2C19 substrates.

  3. Changes in Practice Patterns of Clopidogrel in Combination with Proton Pump Inhibitors after an FDA Safety Communication

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Annie; Mody, Reema; Carter, Valerie; Ayas, Charles; Patel, Haridarshan; Lasch, Karen; Wu, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In 2009, the FDA issued a warning that omeprazole–a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)–reduces the antithrombotic effect of clopidogrel by almost half when taken concomitantly. This study aims to analyze the impact of the FDA Safety Communications on prescribing clopidogrel together with PPIs. Methods This retrospective study identified clopidogrel users from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Databases (01/2006–12/2012). Rates of clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy were estimated in 6-month intervals for patients with ≥1 clopidogrel prescription fill, then were analyzed pre- and post-safety communication (11/17/2009). Analyses were also conducted by grouping PPIs into CYP2C19 inhibitors (omeprazole and esomeprazole) and CYP2C19 non-inhibitors (pantoprazole, lansoprazole, dexlansoprazole, and rabeprazole). Results Overall, 483,074 patients met the selection criteria; of these, 157,248 used a clopidogrel-PPI combination. On average, 30.5% of patients in the pre- and 19.9% in the post-communication period used a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Among clopidogrel users, the probability of using clopidogrel-PPI combinations fell by over 40% in the post-communication period (OR = 0.57; p<0.001); the proportion of patients using esomeprazole fell from 12.9% to 5.3%, and the proportion using omeprazole fell from 10.1% to 6.3%. Among combination therapy users, the probability of patients using a combination with a CYP2C19 inhibitor decreased by 53% (OR = 0.47; p<0.001); however, 31.5% of patients were still prescribed a clopidogrel-PPI combination therapy. Trends were similar for all and newly treated patients, regardless of clopidogrel indication and physician specialty. Conclusions The FDA Safety Communication resulted in a reduction in the number of patients undergoing combination therapy; however approximately one-third of patients still used combination therapy post-communication. PMID:26727382

  4. Proton pump inhibitors while belonging to the same family of generic drugs show different anti-tumor effect.

    PubMed

    Lugini, Luana; Federici, Cristina; Borghi, Martina; Azzarito, Tommaso; Marino, Maria Lucia; Cesolini, Albino; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Fais, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Tumor acidity represents a major cause of chemoresistance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can neutralize tumor acidity, sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy. To compare the anti-tumor efficacy of different PPIs in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments PPIs anti-tumor efficacy in terms of cell proliferation and cell death/apoptosis/necrosis evaluation were performed. In vivo PPIs efficacy experiments were carried out using melanoma xenograft model in SCID mice. Lansoprazole showed higher anti-tumor effect when compared to the other PPIs. The lansoprazole effect lasted even upon drug removal from the cell culture medium and it was independent from the lipophilicity of the PPIs formulation. These PPIs have shown different anti-tumoral efficacy, and the most effective at low dose was lansoprazole. The possibility to contrast tumor acidity by off-label using PPIs opens a new field of oncology investigation.

  5. Proton pump inhibitor failure in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease: a perspective aided by the Gartner hype cycle.

    PubMed

    Heading, Robert C

    2017-04-01

    Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) experience symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. In the early years of their availability, these drugs were thought to be a highly effective treatment for GORD and realisation that symptom relief was often incomplete came as a disappointment. This review considers the evolution of thinking with the aid of the Gartner hype cycle - a graphical depiction of the process of innovation, evolution and adoption of new technologies. Acknowledging that over-simplistic concepts of GORD have been largely responsible for inflated expectations of PPI therapy is an important step forward in establishing how patients with persistent symptoms, despite PPIs, should be assessed and treated. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  6. The Influence of Efflux Pump Inhibitors on the Activity of Non-Antibiotic NSAIDS against Gram-Negative Rods

    PubMed Central

    Laudy, Agnieszka E.; Mrowka, Agnieszka; Krajewska, Joanna; Tyski, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Most patients with bacterial infections suffer from fever and various pains that require complex treatments with antibiotics, antipyretics, and analgaesics. The most common drugs used to relieve these symptoms are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which are not typically considered antibiotics. Here, we investigate the effects of NSAIDs on bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics and the modulation of bacterial efflux pumps. Methodology The activity of 12 NSAID active substances, paracetamol (acetaminophen), and eight relevant medicinal products was analyzed with or without pump inhibitors against 89 strains of Gram-negative rods by determining the MICs. Furthermore, the effects of NSAIDs on the susceptibility of clinical strains to antimicrobial agents with or without PAβN (Phe-Arg-β-naphtylamide) were measured. Results The MICs of diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, in the presence of PAβN, were significantly (≥4-fold) reduced, decreasing to 25–1600 mg/L, against the majority of the studied strains. In the case of acetylsalicylic acid only for 5 and 7 out of 12 strains of P. mirabilis and E. coli, respectively, a 4-fold increase in susceptibility in the presence of PAβN was observed. The presence of Aspirin resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of ofloxacin against only two strains of E. coli among 48 tested clinical strains, which included species such as E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, and S. maltophilia. Besides, the medicinal products containing the following NSAIDs, diclofenac, mefenamic acid, ibuprofen, and naproxen, did not cause the decrease of clinical strains’ susceptibility to antibiotics. Conclusions The effects of PAβN on the susceptibility of bacteria to NSAIDs indicate that some NSAIDs are substrates for efflux pumps in Gram-negative rods. Morever, Aspirin probably induced efflux-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones in a few E. coli strains. PMID:26771525

  7. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by chemical stimulation of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, V A; Khropycheva, R P

    2013-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors were shown to affect the sensitivity of the gastric mucosa to chemical agents. This effect is associated with inhibition of proton back-diffusion and increase in the permeability of the gastric epithelium. We studied the effect of omeprazole on gastric secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by irritation of the gastric mucosa in narcotized rats with a hypertonic solution of high acidity (500 mM NaCl, pH 2.0). Irritation of the gastric mucosa increased the basal secretion of bicarbonates and potentiated the secretion of HCO3(-)and pepsinogen induced by electrostimulation of the vagus nerve. Omeprazole stimulated the prostaglandin-induced increase in the basal secretion of HCO3(-)and pepsinogen. By contrast, bicarbonate production in response to vagal stimulation was suppressed in the presence of omeprazole. Our results indicate that proton pump blockade has a modulatory effect on gastric secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by chemical stimulation of the gastric mucosa.

  8. A D-octapeptide drug efflux pump inhibitor acts synergistically with azoles in a murine oral candidiasis infection model.

    PubMed

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishibashi, Hiroko; Ishijima, Sanae A; Niimi, Kyoko; Tansho, Shigeru; Ono, Yasuo; Monk, Brian C; Holmes, Ann R; Harding, David R K; Cannon, Richard D; Abe, Shigeru

    2012-03-01

    Clinical management of patients undergoing treatment of oropharyngeal candidiasis with azole antifungals can be impaired by azole resistance. High-level azole resistance is often caused by the overexpression of Candida albicans efflux pump Cdr1p. Inhibition of this pump therefore represents a target for combination therapies that reverse azole resistance. We assessed the therapeutic potential of the D-octapeptide derivative RC21v3, a Cdr1p inhibitor, in the treatment of murine oral candidiasis caused by either the azole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate MML611 or its azole-susceptible parental strain MML610. RC21v3, fluconazole (FLC), or a combination of both drugs were administered orally to immunosuppressed ICR mice at 3, 24, and 27 h after oral inoculation with C. albicans. FLC protected the mice inoculated with MML610 from oral candidiasis, but was only partially effective in MML611-infected mice. The co-application of RC21v3 (0.02 μmol per dose) potentiated the therapeutic performance of FLC for mice infected with either strain. It caused a statistically significant decrease in C. albicans cfu isolated from the oral cavity of the infected mice and reduced oral lesions. RC21v3 also enhanced the therapeutic activity of itraconazole against MML611 infection. These results indicate that RC21v3 in combination with azoles has potential as a therapy against azole-resistant oral candidiasis.

  9. Evaluation of a series of 2-napthamide derivatives as inhibitors of the drug efflux pump AcrB for the reversal of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinhu; Mowla, Rumana; Guo, Liwei; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Rahman, Taufiq; De Barros Lopes, Miguel A; Ma, Shutao; Venter, Henrietta

    2017-02-15

    Drug efflux pumps confer multidrug resistance to dangerous pathogens which makes these pumps important drug targets. We have synthesised a novel series of compounds based on a 2-naphthamide pharmacore aimed at inhibiting the efflux pumps from Gram-negative bacteria. The archeatypical transporter AcrB from Escherichia coli was used as model efflux pump as AcrB is widely conserved throughout Gram-negative organisms. The compounds were tested for their antibacterial action, ability to potentiate the action of antibiotics and for their ability to inhibit Nile Red efflux by AcrB. None of the compounds were antimicrobial against E. coli wild type cells. Most of the compounds were able to inhibit Nile Red efflux indicating that they are substrates of the AcrB efflux pump. Three compounds were able to synergise with antibiotics and reverse resistance in the resistant phenotype. Compound A3, 4-(isopentyloxy)-2-naphthamide, reduced the MICs of erythromycin and chloramphenicol to the MIC levels of the drug sensitive strain that lacks an efflux pump. A3 had no effect on the MIC of the non-substrate rifampicin indicating that this compound acts specifically through the AcrB efflux pump. A3 also does not act through non-specific mechanisms such as outer membrane or inner membrane permeabilisation and is not cytotoxic against mammalian cell lines. Therefore, we have designed and synthesised a novel chemical compound with great potential to further optimisation as inhibitor of drug efflux pumps.

  10. Proton pump inhibitors suppress iNOS-dependent DNA damage in Barrett's esophagus by increasing Mn-SOD expression

    SciTech Connect

    Thanan, Raynoo; Ma, Ning; Iijima, Katsunori; Abe, Yasuhiko; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Pinlaor, Somchai; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Murata, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2012-05-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inflammation by Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a risk factor of its adenocarcinoma (BEA). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 8-Nitroguanine and 8-oxodG are inflammation-related DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions and iNOS expression were higher in the order, BEA > BE > normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton pump inhibitors suppress DNA damage by increasing Mn-SOD via Nrf2 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA lesions can be useful biomarkers to predict risk of BEA in BE patients. -- Abstract: Barrett's esophagus (BE), an inflammatory disease, is a risk factor for Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEA). Treatment of BE patients with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is expected to reduce the risk of BEA. We performed an immunohistochemical study to examine the formation of nitrative and oxidative DNA lesions, 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxygaunosine (8-oxodG), in normal esophageal, BE with pre- and post-treatment by PPIs and BEA tissues. We also observed the expression of an oxidant-generating enzyme (iNOS) and its transcription factor NF-{kappa}B, an antioxidant enzyme (Mn-SOD), its transcription factor (Nrf2) and an Nrf2 inhibitor (Keap1). The immunoreactivity of DNA lesions was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues. iNOS expression was significantly higher in the order of BEA > BE > normal tissues, while Mn-SOD expression was significantly lower in the order of BEA < BE < normal tissues. Interestingly, Mn-SOD expression and the nuclear localization of Nrf2 were significantly increased, and the formation of DNA lesions was significantly decreased in BE tissues after PPIs treatment for 3-6 months. Keap1 and iNOS expression was not significantly changed by the PPIs treatment in BE tissues. These results indicate that 8-nitroguanine and 8-oxodG play a role in BE-derived BEA. Additionally, PPIs treatment may trigger the activation and nuclear translocation

  11. Sources of heterogeneity in case-control studies on associations between statins, ACE-inhibitors, and proton pump inhibitors and risk of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Mark C H; Klungel, Olaf H; Leufkens, Hubert G M; van Dijk, Liset; Grobbee, Diederick E; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W

    2014-10-01

    The heterogeneity in case-control studies on the associations between community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and ACE-inhibitors (ACEi), statins, and proton pump inhibitors (PPI) hampers translation to clinical practice. Our objective is to explore sources of this heterogeneity by applying a common protocol in different data settings. We conducted ten case-control studies using data from five different health care databases. Databases varied on type of patients (hospitalised vs. GP), level of case validity, and mode of exposure ascertainment (prescription or dispensing based). Identified CAP patients and controls were matched on age, gender, and calendar year. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR) for the associations between the drugs of interest and CAP. Associations were adjusted by a common set of potential confounders. Data of 38,742 cases and 118,019 controls were studied. Comparable patterns of variation between case-control studies were observed for ACEi, statins and PPI use and pneumonia risk with adjusted ORs varying from 1.04 to 1.49, 0.82 to 1.50 and 1.16 to 2.71, respectively. Overall, higher ORs were found for hospitalised CAP patients matched to population controls versus GP CAP patients matched to population controls. Prevalence of drug exposure was higher in dispensing data versus prescription data. We show that case-control selection and methods of exposure ascertainment induce bias that cannot be adjusted for and to a considerable extent explain the heterogeneity in results obtained in case-control studies on statins, ACEi and PPIs and CAP. The common protocol approach helps to better understand sources of variation in observational studies.

  12. Validated spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous determination of Omeprazole, Tinidazole and Doxycycline in their ternary mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hayam M.; Hegazy, Maha A.; Mowaka, Shereen; Mohamed, Ekram Hany

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study of smart spectrophotometric techniques for the simultaneous determination of Omeprazole (OMP), Tinidazole (TIN) and Doxycycline (DOX) without prior separation steps is developed. These techniques consist of several consecutive steps utilizing zero/or ratio/or derivative spectra. The proposed techniques adopt nine simple different methods, namely direct spectrophotometry, dual wavelength, first derivative-zero crossing, amplitude factor, spectrum subtraction, ratio subtraction, derivative ratio-zero crossing, constant center, and successive derivative ratio method. The calibration graphs are linear over the concentration range of 1-20 μg/mL, 5-40 μg/mL and 2-30 μg/mL for OMP, TIN and DOX, respectively. These methods are tested by analyzing synthetic mixtures of the above drugs and successfully applied to commercial pharmaceutical preparation. The methods that are validated according to the ICH guidelines, accuracy, precision, and repeatability, were found to be within the acceptable limits.

  13. Role of proton pump inhibitors in preventing hypergastrinemia-associated carcinogenesis and in antagonizing the trophic effect of gastrin.

    PubMed

    Han, Y-M; Park, J-M; Kangwan, N; Jeong, M; Lee, S; Cho, J Y; Ko, W J; Hahm, K B

    2015-04-01

    Gastrin is the main hormone stimulating gastric acid secretion, but it exerts proliferative and anti-apoptotic actions on various cancer cell types, in addition to its well-known trophic effect on enterochromaffin-like cells. As treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) increases the biosynthesis and secretion of gastrin, it has been postulated that treatment with PPIs could increase the risk of cancer, especially in Barrett's esophagus, gastric carcinoids, and colorectal cancer (CRC). Some tumors produce gastrin of their own, which can act in an autocrine manner to promote tumor growth. In addition, gastrin is known to foster the tumor microenvironment. However, in spite of these potentially increased cancer risks due to PPI-induced hypergastrinemia, prospective, large-scale cohort studies did not show an increase in CRC prevalence. The question as to why the long-term use of PPIs was not associated with an increased cancer risk of CRC might be answered by the fact that the PPIs antagonized the trophic effects of hypergastrinemia. Furthermore, the blockade of proton pumps or potassium channels in cancer cells could limit the abnormal glycolytic energy metabolism of cancer cells. Apart from their suppressive effect on gastric acids, PPIs exert an anti-tumor effect through the selective induction of apoptosis as well as an anti-inflammatory effect, and they protect cells from developing chemo- or radiotherapeutic resistance. Moreover, the anti-carcinogenic actions of PPIs were augmented with PPI-induced hypergastrinemia. Together with their potential targeted killing of cancer stem cells, these effects demonstrate their potential anti-cancer actions.

  14. Therapy with proton-pump inhibitors for gastroesophageal reflux disease does not reduce the risk for severe exacerbations in COPD.

    PubMed

    Baumeler, Luzia; Papakonstantinou, Eleni; Milenkovic, Branislava; Lacoma, Alicia; Louis, Renaud; Aerts, Joachim G; Welte, Tobias; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Blasi, Francesco; Boersma, Wim; Torres, Antoni; Rohde, Gernot G U; Boeck, Lucas; Rakic, Janko; Scherr, Andreas; Tamm, Michael; Stolz, Daiana

    2016-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms are associated with a higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation. We hypothesize that treatment with proton pump inhibitors reduces the risk of exacerbation in patients with stable COPD. A total of 638 patients with stable COPD for ≥6 weeks, ≥10 pack-years of smoking and Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease II-IV seeking care in tertiary hospitals in eight European countries in the Predicting Outcome using Systemic Markers in Severe Exacerbations-COPD cohort was prospectively evaluated by us. Comorbidities including associated medical treatment were assessed at baseline, at exacerbation and at biannual visits. Median observation time was 24 months. The primary study outcomes were exacerbation and/or death. A total of 85 (13.3%) of COPD patients were on anti-GERD therapy. These patients had higher annual and higher severe exacerbation rates (P = 0.009 and P = 0.002), decreased quality of life (SF-36: activity score P = 0.004, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire: physical functioning P = 0.013 and social functioning P = 0.007), higher body mass airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise capacity index (P = 0.033) and Modified Medical Research Council scores (P = 0.002), shorter 6-min walking distance (P = 0.0004) and a higher adjusted Charlson score (P < 0.0001). Anti-GERD therapy was associated with a shorter time to severe exacerbation (HR 2.05 95% CI 1.37-3.08). Using three multivariable Cox-regression models, this association was independent of the following: (i) adjusted Charlson score and FEV1% predicted (HR 1.91 95% CI 1.26-2.90); (ii) adjusted Charlson score, body mass, airflow obstruction, dyspnea and exercise capacity index and Modified Medical Research Council (HR 1.62 95% CI 1.04-2.54); and (iii) adjusted Charlson score, FEV1% predicted and nine classes of medication for comorbidities (HR 1.63 95% CI 1

  15. Proton pump inhibitors versus histamine 2 receptor antagonists for stress ulcer prophylaxis in critically ill patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Alenezi, Farhan; Jaeschke, Roman Z; Moayyedi, Paul; Cook, Deborah J

    2013-03-01

    Critically ill patients may develop bleeding caused by stress ulceration. Acid suppression is commonly prescribed for patients at risk of stress ulcer bleeding. Whether proton pump inhibitors are more effective than histamine 2 receptor antagonists is unclear. To determine the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors vs. histamine 2 receptor antagonists for the prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the ICU. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, ACPJC, CINHAL, online trials registries (clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN Register, WHO ICTRP), conference proceedings databases, and reference lists of relevant articles. Randomized controlled parallel group trials comparing proton pump inhibitors to histamine 2 receptor antagonists for the prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill patients, published before March 2012. Two reviewers independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed quality, and extracted data. The primary outcomes were clinically important upper gastrointestinal bleeding and overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding; secondary outcomes were nosocomial pneumonia, ICU mortality, ICU length of stay, and Clostridium difficile infection. Trial authors were contacted for additional or clarifying information. Fourteen trials enrolling a total of 1,720 patients were included. Proton pump inhibitors were more effective than histamine 2 receptor antagonists at reducing clinically important upper gastrointestinal bleeding (relative risk 0.36; 95% confidence interval 0.19-0.68; p = 0.002; I = 0%) and overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding (relative risk 0.35; 95% confidence interval 0.21-0.59; p < 0.0001; I = 15%). There were no differences between proton pump inhibitors and histamine 2 receptor antagonists in the risk of nosocomial pneumonia (relative risk 1.06; 95% confidence interval 0.73-1.52; p = 0.76; I = 0%), ICU mortality (relative risk 1.01; 95% confidence interval 0.83-1.24; p = 0.91; I = 0

  16. Review of proton pump inhibitors for the initial treatment of heartburn: is there a dose ceiling effect?

    PubMed

    Kushner, Pamela R; Peura, David A

    2011-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used in clinical practice. However, concerns have been expressed about their long-term use, particularly with regard to bone health, Clostridium difficile infections, and drug interactions with platelet aggregation inhibitors. There has been limited guidance for clinicians concerning appropriate dose selection of PPIs for the initial treatment of heartburn. This review explored whether published clinical trials provide evidence of a ceiling above which higher PPI doses do not provide additional clinical benefit over the lowest approved dose. All articles of randomized, controlled clinical trials in nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in which the effects of two or more doses of the same PPI on symptomatic relief of heartburn were quantified as a study endpoint were identified and analyzed through PubMed searches up to the end of September 2010. The majority of trials evaluated provided no evidence that higher PPI doses were superior to the lowest approved dose for the initial treatment of heartburn. There were no clinically relevant findings with respect to dose dependence and safety outcomes in these studies. Efficacy outcomes from the trials suggest there may be a dose ceiling effect and highlight the need for further research on the use of the lowest effective PPI doses as an appropriate strategy in the initial treatment of uncomplicated heartburn. Observational studies and some meta-analyses have suggested that long-term PPI pharmacotherapy might be associated with safety concerns, which necessitate the periodic evaluation of therapeutic benefit in terms of symptom resolution and regimen tolerability. However, evidence to date suggests that use of the lowest effective dose for the indication is not associated with significant adverse events, particularly in the short term. Clinical practice suggests that patients requiring long-term treatment should be maintained on the lowest dose necessary to control

  17. Identification of inhibitors of vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase pumps in yeast by high-throughput screening flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca M; Allen, Chris; Melman, Sandra D; Waller, Anna; Young, Susan M; Sklar, Larry A; Parra, Karlett J

    2010-03-15

    Fluorescence intensity of the pH-sensitive carboxyfluorescein derivative 2,7-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) was monitored by high-throughput flow cytometry in living yeast cells. We measured fluorescence intensity of BCECF trapped in yeast vacuoles, acidic compartments equivalent to lysosomes where vacuolar proton-translocating ATPases (V-ATPases) are abundant. Because V-ATPases maintain a low pH in the vacuolar lumen, V-ATPase inhibition by concanamycin A alkalinized the vacuole and increased BCECF fluorescence. Likewise, V-ATPase-deficient mutant cells had greater fluorescence intensity than wild-type cells. Thus, we detected an increase of fluorescence intensity after short- and long-term inhibition of V-ATPase function. We used yeast cells loaded with BCECF to screen a small chemical library of structurally diverse compounds to identify V-ATPase inhibitors. One compound, disulfiram, enhanced BCECF fluorescence intensity (although to a degree beyond that anticipated for pH changes alone in the mutant cells). Once confirmed by dose-response assays (EC(50)=26 microM), we verified V-ATPase inhibition by disulfiram in secondary assays that measured ATP hydrolysis in vacuolar membranes. The inhibitory action of disulfiram against V-ATPase pumps revealed a novel effect previously unknown for this compound. Because V-ATPases are highly conserved, new inhibitors identified could be used as research and therapeutic tools in cancer, viral infections, and other diseases where V-ATPases are involved. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of the AcrAB-TolC efflux pump in determining susceptibility of Haemophilus influenzae to the novel peptide deformylase inhibitor LBM415.

    PubMed

    Dean, Charles R; Narayan, Shubha; Daigle, Denis M; Dzink-Fox, JoAnn L; Puyang, Xiaoling; Bracken, Kathryn R; Dean, Karl E; Weidmann, Beat; Yuan, Zhengyu; Jain, Rakesh; Ryder, Neil S

    2005-08-01

    Haemophilus influenzae isolates vary widely in their susceptibilities to the peptide deformylase inhibitor LBM415 (MIC range, 0.06 to 32 microg/ml); however, on average, they are less susceptible than gram-positive organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Insertional inactivation of the H. influenzae acrB or tolC gene in strain NB65044 (Rd strain KW20) increased susceptibility to LBM415, confirming a role for the AcrAB-TolC pump in determining resistance. Consistent with this, sequencing of a PCR fragment generated with primers flanking the acrRA region from an LBM415-hypersusceptible H. influenzae clinical isolate revealed a genetic deletion of acrA. Inactivation of acrB or tolC in several clinical isolates with atypically reduced susceptibility to LBM415 (MIC of 16 microg/ml or greater) significantly increased susceptibility, confirming that the pump is also a determinant of decreased susceptibility in these clinical isolates. Examination of acrR, encoding the putative repressor of pump gene expression, from several of these strains revealed mutations introducing frameshifts, stop codons, and amino acid changes relative to the published sequence, suggesting that loss of pump repression leads to decreased susceptibility. Supporting this, NB65044 acrR mutants selected by exposure to LBM415 at 8 microg/ml had susceptibilities to LBM415 and other pump substrates comparable to the least sensitive clinical isolates and showed increased expression of pump genes.

  19. Regional differences in Clostridium difficile infections in relation to fluoroquinolone and proton pump inhibitor use, Finland, 2008-2011.

    PubMed

    Kanerva, Mari; Ollgren, Jukka; Voipio, Tinna; Mentula, Silja; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2015-08-01

    Several antimicrobial agents and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been identified as risk factors for Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs). Nationwide laboratory-based surveillance of CDIs in Finland since 2008 has shown variation in regional CDI rates. We evaluated whether regional differences in CDI rates were associated with antibacterial and PPI use. Data on mean annual incidence rates of CDIs during 2008-2011 in 21 healthcare districts (HDs) were obtained from the National Infectious Disease Register, consumption (median annual use) of antimicrobials and PPIs from the Finnish Medical Agency, availability of molecular diagnostics by a laboratory survey and data on ribotypes from the national reference laboratory. The association over the 4 years was measured by incidence rate ratio (IRR) and we performed both bivariate and multivariate analyses. During 2008-2011, PPI use increased 27% but fluoroquinolone use was stable. The level of fluoroquinolone use was strongly associated with the mean annual CDI incidence rate in different HDs over the 4-year period, but PPI use had less effect. The molecular diagnostics methodology and PCR ribotype 027 were not independently associated with CDI rate. The final multivariable model only included fluoroquinolone and PPI use; IRR for fluoroquinolones was 2.20 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.32-3.67; p = 0.003). Fluoroquinolone use may play a role in regional differences in CDI rates. Although the use has not recently increased, regionally targeted antimicrobial stewardship campaigns promoting appropriate use of fluoroquinolones should still be encouraged since they may decrease the incidence of CDIs.

  20. Effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the pharmacokinetics of extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine.

    PubMed

    Dmochowski, Roger; Chen, Andrew; Sathyan, Gayatri; MacDiarmid, Scott; Gidwani, Shalini; Gupta, Suneel

    2005-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the bioavailability of the extended-release formulations of oxybutynin and tolterodine. Forty-four healthy volunteers received each of 4 treatments in a 4-period crossover design. The treatments consisted of osmotically controlled extended-release oxybutynin chloride tablets at 10 mg/d or extended-release tolterodine tartrate capsules at 4 mg/d, with and without preceding treatment with 20 mg omeprazole daily for 4 days. Blood samples collected predose and at scheduled time points for 36 hours postdose were analyzed for oxybutynin and its active metabolite, N-desethyloxybutynin, or tolterodine and its active 5-hydroxymethyl metabolite, as appropriate. The AUCinfinity ratios for oxybutynin and its metabolite with and without prior omeprazole fell within the 80% to 125% range (accepted as the criterion for bioequivalence), as did those for tolterodine and its active moiety. The peak concentration ratios for oxybutynin and metabolite also conformed to this range; those for tolterodine did not. Increasing gastric pH with omeprazole does not substantially alter the pharmacokinetic properties of extended-release oxybutynin but may alter those of extended-release tolterodine.

  1. Analysis, occurrence, fate and risks of proton pump inhibitors, their metabolites and transformation products in aquatic environment: A review.

    PubMed

    Kosma, Christina I; Lambropoulou, Dimitra A; Albanis, Triantafyllos A

    2016-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) which include omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole, are extensively used for the relief of gastro-intestinal disorders. Despite their high worldwide consumption, PPIs are extensively metabolized in human bodies and therefore are not regularly detected in monitoring studies. Very recently, however, it has been shown that some omeprazole metabolites may enter and are likely to persist in aquatic environment. Hence, to fully assess the environmental exposures and risks associated with PPIs, it is important to better understand and evaluate the fate and behavior not only of the parent compound but also of their metabolites and their transformation products arising from biotic and abiotic processes (hydrolysis, photodegradation, biodegradation etc.) in the environment. In this light, the purpose of this review is to summarize the present state of knowledge on the introduction and behavior of these chemicals in natural and engineering systems and highlight research needs and gaps. It draws attention to their transformation, the increase contamination by their metabolites/TPs in different environmental matrices and their potential adverse effects in the environment. Furthermore, existing research on analytical developments with respect to sample treatment, separation and detection of PPIs and their metabolites/TPs is provided.

  2. In vitro Approaches to Support Bioequivalence and Substitutability of Generic Proton Pump Inhibitors via Nasogastric Tube Administration.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ping; Cui, Minglei; Anand, Om; Xia, Li; Zhao, Zhuojun J; Sun, Dajun; Sharp, Trueman; Conner, Dale P; Peters, John; Jiang, Wenlei; Stier, Ethan; Jiang, Xiaojian

    2017-09-06

    Administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) through nasogastric tubes may present risks. If the PPI drug products are not prepared properly, clogging or obstruction of nasogastric tubes can pose a safety concern. In addition, the integrity of the enteric coating of the drug product may be damaged resulting in reduced bioavailability of the active moiety. From the perspective of administration of generic PPIs when compared to the reference drug product, differences in formulation can potentially result in a greater relative risk for the generic drug product. As part of the assessment of bioequivalence, the Office of Generic Drugs (OGD) has developed a suite of in vitro testing to compare the delivery of the generic and reference products via nasogastric tubes. These in vitro tests assess essential attributes associated with the likelihood of clogging and maintenance of the enteric coating. These in vitro tests include studies evaluating sedimentation, granule size distribution, drug recovery, and acid resistance. One of the challenges is that while the administration of PPIs through nasogastric tubes is common in clinical practice, this issue is not uniformly addressed in the FDA approved label of the reference drug products. This paper discusses the design and rationale for in vitro testing of PPI formulations with respect to bioequivalence via nasogastric tube administration and in addition, it summarizes commonly occurring deficiencies in the in vitro nasogastric tube testing of 14 recent Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDA) submitted for five generic PPI drug products.

  3. Therapeutic and cost effectiveness of proton pump inhibitor regimens for idiopathic or drug-induced peptic ulcer complication.

    PubMed

    Nam, Doo Hyun; Park, So Young; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Sung Chull

    2011-03-01

    Peptic ulcer (PU) disease has a high rate of occurrence and recurrence in Korean and the selection of drug for treatment is diverse. In this study, the therapeutical effectiveness of regimens including proton pump inhibitors (PPI) was compared with the single PPI therapy. The clinical data were collected from 1,658 patients having idiopathic or drug-induced PU complication from a Medical Center in Daegu, Korea, and analyzed retrospectively based on the results of endoscopic examination, the drug history and the therapeutic cost depending on drugs used. The comparison of complete healing rate and recurrence rate showed no significant differences between the single PPI groups and the combination group with antacids, prokinetic agent or mucosa protectants. However, the combination therapy of PPI with mucosa protectants gave a slightly better therapeutic outcome than single PPI treatment in gastric ulcer patients. Comparatively, the combination of PPI with antacids significantly reduced the therapeutic effectiveness in duodenal ulcer patients. The analysis of cost-based therapeutic effectiveness reveals that any economic benefits in PU treatment were not gained by the combination of other class of ulcer drugs. Even though the rapidity of healing rate was not considered, it can be concluded that the PPI combination therapy might be not desirable in PU treatment. Particularly triplet or quartet combination therapy in PPI regimen was absolutely economically ineffective therapy in spite of the increase of medication costs.

  4. Gastrointestinal symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and their relapses after treatment with proton pump inhibitors: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mousalreza; Salari, Roshanak; Shariatmaghani, Somayeh; Birjandi, Batul; Salari, Masoumeh

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder with significant effects on the quality of life. The burden of GERD is soaring in Asia. Preventing symptom relapse is a therapeutic goal in GERD patients. Since proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are the first-line treatment of GERD, drug failure has become a major problem in the treatment procedure. We reviewed the literature in order to find articles related to comorbidities and symptoms affecting GERD from 1980 to 2015 via PubMed and Google Scholar using keywords such as ‘Gastroesophageal reflux disease’, ‘Gastrointestinal symptoms’ and Boolean operators (such as AND, OR, NOT). Due to the cost of PPI therapy and the high rate of GERD relapse after PPI therapy, demand for continuing this type of treatment is decreasing. Thus, we need to discover new approaches to treat the disease and also investigate the relationship between the treatment of GERD and its comorbidities and symptoms such as functional constipation. PMID:28848636

  5. A study on the efficacy of rebamipide for patients with proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Kyoichi; Furuta, Kenji; Miwa, Hiroto; Oshima, Tadayuki; Miki, Masaharu; Komazawa, Yoshinori; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Furuta, Takahisa; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimatani, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2012-06-01

    Reflux symptoms in patients with non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) cannot be easily controlled by treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The anti-inflammatory function of rebamipide may be effective for protecting the esophageal mucosa. This prospective randomized multicenter placebo-controlled study was performed to clarify the efficacy of rebamipide for NERD patients whose reflux symptoms were refractory to PPI treatment. One hundred forty-nine patients were enrolled on the basis of a QUEST score of over 6 and absence of endoscopically proven esophageal mucosal breaks. All the patients were initially administered 15 mg of lansoprazole for 4 weeks, and the symptoms were then assessed using QUEST and GSRS. PPI-refractory patients were randomly assigned to administration of rebamipide or placebo t.i.d. for 4 weeks. Three of the 149 patients were lost to follow-up, and 60 among the remaining 146 patients were found to be PPI-refractory. Among these PPI-refractory patients, 31 were randomly assigned to a rebamipide group and 29 to a placebo group. At the end of drug administration, the QUEST and GSRS scores did not differ between the rebamipide and placebo groups, although a significantly higher proportion of patients in the rebamipide group showed amelioration of abdominal pain and diarrhea. Administration of rebamipide cannot effectively control reflux symptoms in NERD patients whose symptoms are refractory to PPI therapy.

  6. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons are involved in bicarbonate secretion induced by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Inada, I; Satoh, H

    1996-04-01

    Lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, exerts prominent antiulcer activity via both antisecretory and mucosal protective actions. Although the antisecretory action has been explained by inactivation of (H+, K+)-ATPase in parietal cells, the mode of mucosal protective action remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effect of lansoprazole on duodenal bicarbonate secretion was studied in anesthetized rats to clarify the mode of the mucosal protective action. Lansoprazole (0.1 mM) applied topically to the duodenum significantly (P < 0.01) increased bicarbonate secretion by 0.36 +/- 0.11 microeq/15 min (21 +/- 5%) compared with the value in the vehicle control. Topical administration of capsaicin (10 mg/ml) in the duodenum and intravenous infusion of vasoactive intestinal peptide (10 micrograms/kg/hr) increased bicarbonate secretion. Five-minute perfusion of the duodenal loop with 100 mM HCl increased bicarbonate secretion. Administration of lansoprazole (0.3 and 1 mg/kg, intravenously) 60 min before luminal acidification enhanced the acid-induced bicarbonate secretion dose-dependently and significantly (P < 0.01). In the capsaicin-pretreated rats, the effects of lansoprazole on basal and acid-induced bicarbonate secretion were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with that of control group. These results indicate that lansoprazole increases basal and acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in the duodenum in rats and that capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons may be involved in the mode of action for these effects.

  7. Proton pump inhibitors protect mice from acute systemic inflammation and induce long-term cross-tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Balza, E; Piccioli, P; Carta, S; Lavieri, R; Gattorno, M; Semino, C; Castellani, P; Rubartelli, A

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of sepsis is increasing, representing a tremendous burden for health-care systems. Death in acute sepsis is attributed to hyperinflammatory responses, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. We report here that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which block gastric acid secretion, selectively inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion by Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated human monocytes in vitro, in the absence of toxic effects. Remarkably, the oversecretion of IL-1β that represents a hallmark of monocytes from patients affected by cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome is also blocked. Based on these propaedeutic experiments, we tested the effects of high doses of PPIs in vivo in the mouse model of endotoxic shock. Our data show that a single administration of PPI protected mice from death (60% survival versus 5% of untreated mice) and decreased TNF-α and IL-1β systemic production. PPIs were efficacious even when administered after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. PPI-treated mice that survived developed a long-term cross-tolerance, becoming resistant to LPS- and zymosan-induced sepsis. In vitro, their macrophages displayed impaired TNF-α and IL-1β to different TLR ligands. PPIs also prevented sodium thioglycollate-induced peritoneal inflammation, indicating their efficacy also in a non-infectious setting independent of TLR stimulation. Lack of toxicity and therapeutic effectiveness make PPIs promising new drugs against sepsis and other severe inflammatory conditions. PMID:27441656

  8. Modeling and simulation of the effect of proton pump inhibitors on magnesium homeostasis. 1. Oral absorption of magnesium.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jane P F; Hausman, Ethan; Lionberger, Robert; Zhang, Xinyuan

    2012-12-03

    Prolonged use of proton pump inhibitors has reportedly caused rare clinically symptomatic hypomagnesemia. A review of the literature suggests PPI drugs may impair intestinal magnesium absorption. With the goal of preventing PPI-induced hypomagnesemia, an oral absorption-centric model was developed by referencing literature data. Our modeling with human data reveals that magnesium absorption is substantial in the distal intestine. We then perform simulations by referring to the reported reduction in mid to distal intestinal pH caused by one week of oral esomeprazole, and to reported reduction of the divalent cation-sensitive current when the carboxyl side chains of glutamic and aspartic residues in the binding channels of TRPM6/TRPM7 were neutralized. Our simulations reveal that short-term PPI therapy may cause a very small reduction (5%) in the serum magnesium level, which is qualitatively consistent with the reported 1% reduction in magnesium absorption following 1 week of omeprazole in humans. Simulations provide insight into the benefit of frequent but small dose of magnesium supplementation in maintaining the serum magnesium level when magnesium deficiency occurs.

  9. Successful treatment of radiation-induced mucositis with proton pump inhibitor administration: A report of two laryngeal cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Masami; Ida, Shota; Kudo, Shigehiro; Ando, Ken; Ebara, Takeshi; Higuchi, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    Presently, the relationship between laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and radiation-induced mucositis has not been fully explored. In the present study, we report 2 cases of laryngeal cancer in which radiation-induced mucositis ameliorated after proton pump inhibitor (PPI) administration. Case 1 was diagnosed with T1aN0M0 right glottis carcinoma and was treated with radiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 46Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of radiation therapy. Case 2 was diagnosed with T2N0M0 supraglottic cancer and was treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Grade 3 mucositis occurred after administration of 44Gy irradiation. PPI was administered and mucositis ameliorated quickly without cessation of chemoradiation therapy. In both cases, a remarkable therapeutic effect of PPI was observed in the perilaryngeal areas including the epiglottic vallecula, arytenoid, and postcricoid area. In both cases, LPR involvement was suspected before the onset of radiation therapy. The two cases presented here, indicated a causal relationship between LPR and radiation-induced mucositis. In cases of severe mucositis in the perilaryngeal area in patients with LPR prior to radiation therapy, PPI administration may be an effective therapeutic option.

  10. Association between Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy and Clostridium difficile Infection: A Contemporary Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tleyjeh, Imad M.; Alasmari, Faisal A.; Garbati, Musa A.; AlGhamdi, Mushabab; Khan, Abdur Rahman; Tannir, Mohamad Al; Erwin, Patricia J.; Ibrahim, Talal; AlLehibi, Abed; Baddour, Larry M.; Sutton, Alex J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Emerging epidemiological evidence suggests that proton pump inhibitor (PPI) acid-suppression therapy is associated with an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Methods Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science, and Scopus were searched from 1990 to January 2012 for analytical studies that reported an adjusted effect estimate of the association between PPI use and CDI. We performed random-effect meta-analyses. We used the GRADE framework to interpret the findings. Results We identified 47 eligible citations (37 case-control and 14 cohort studies) with corresponding 51 effect estimates. The pooled OR was 1.65, 95% CI (1.47, 1.85), I2 = 89.9%, with evidence of publication bias suggested by a contour funnel plot. A novel regression based method was used to adjust for publication bias and resulted in an adjusted pooled OR of 1.51 (95% CI, 1.26–1.83). In a speculative analysis that assumes that this association is based on causality, and based on published baseline CDI incidence, the risk of CDI would be very low in the general population taking PPIs with an estimated NNH of 3925 at 1 year. Conclusions In this rigorously conducted systemic review and meta-analysis, we found very low quality evidence (GRADE class) for an association between PPI use and CDI that does not support a cause-effect relationship. PMID:23236397

  11. Impact of Long-Term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy on Gut Microbiota in F344 Rats: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Yong Sung; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Park, Ji Hyun; Lee, Dong Ho; Seok, Yeong-Jae; Kim, Yeon-Ran; Kim, Joo-Hyon; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims To evaluate changes in gut microbiota composition following long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment. Methods Twenty-four-week-old F344 rats were fed diets with (n=6) or without (n=5) lansoprazole for 50 weeks. Profiles of luminal microbiota in the terminal ileum were then analyzed. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was performed using an FLX genome sequencer (454 Life Sciences/Roche). Results Rats treated with lansoprazole showed significantly reduced body weights compared to controls (lansoprazole-treated rats and controls, 322.3±15.3 g vs 403.2±5.2 g, respectively, p<0.001). However, stool frequencies and consistencies did not differ between the two groups. The composition of the gut microbiota in lansoprazole-treated rats was quite different from that of the controls. In the controls, the microbiota profiles obtained from the terminal ileum showed a predominance of Proteobacteria (93.9%) due to the abundance of Escherichia and Pasteurella genera. Conversely, lansoprazole-treated rats showed an elevated population of Firmicutes (66.9%), which was attributed to an increased ratio of Clostridium g4 to Lactobacillus genera. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that long-term administration of PPI may cause weight loss and changes to the microbiota in the terminal ileum. PMID:27458177

  12. Intermittent and on-demand use of proton pump inhibitors in the management of symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Bardhan, Karna Dev

    2003-03-01

    The epidemic of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in industrialized nations is currently spreading to less-developed ones, with more than half of the patients having symptomatic or mild erosive GERD. The long-term management of GERD has been dominated by daily maintenance treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) to prevent relapse. It is common, however, for many patients with mild disease and infrequent symptom relapses to use a PPI only when symptoms demand. Patients with symptomatic or mild erosive GERD are therefore ideal for on-demand or intermittent treatment. The efficacy of such a strategy of intermittent treatment, or treatment of symptoms on demand, has recently been evaluated in four randomized controlled studies. These trials demonstrate that such therapeutic strategies reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and are cost effective. In clinical practice, the author has found these treatment strategies suitable for approximately 60% of newly diagnosed patients with GERD for the long-term management of symptomatic GERD of mild or moderate severity.

  13. Development of an improved ligand exchange chiral stationary phase based on leucinol for the resolution of proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ha, Jin Joo; Han, Hye Jee; Kim, Hee Eun; Jin, Jong Sung; Jeong, Euh Duck; Hyun, Myung Ho

    2014-11-01

    As an effort to develop improved ligand exchange chiral stationary phases (CSPs) for the resolution of chiral drugs, the residual silanol groups on the silica surface of a CSP based on sodium N-[(S)-1-hydroxymethyl-3-methylbutyl]-N-undecylaminoacetate, a (S)-leucinol derivative, were protected with n-octyl groups. The residual silanol group-protected CSP was applied to the resolution of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) such as omeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole and rabeprazole. The resolution of PPIs on the residual silanol group-protected CSP was excellent with the separation factors (α) in the range of 4.32-6.42 and the resolution factors (RS) in the range of 6.70-7.15. The improved chiral recognition ability of the residual silanol group-protected CSP was rationalized to be originated from the protection of the non-enantioselective interaction sites on the silica surface and the improved lipophilicity of the stationary phase. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The effects of risedronate administered in combination with a proton pump inhibitor for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Soichiro; Sekino, Yohichi; Shinomiya, Ken-ichi; Takeda, Shu

    2013-03-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of the co-administration of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on the efficacy of bisphosphonate (BP) treatment for osteoporosis. A total of 180 women with low bone mineral density were randomly divided into four groups, one in which sodium risedronate was administered with sodium rabeprazole and one in which only risedronate was administered (BP + PPI and BP groups, respectively). The biomarkers were measured at the baseline and every 3 months, inlcuding: N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen corrected for creatinine, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP), parathyroid hormone, bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine and physical parameters evaluated according to the SF-36v2™ Health Survey. Statistical comparisons of these parameters were performed after 9 months. Data were available for a total of 137 patients (62 in the BP group and 75 in the BP + PPI group). The Δ % value of increase in BMD and improvement of physical functioning in the BP + PPI group were significantly larger, and its decrease in BAP in the BP + PPI group was significantly smaller than that in the BP group. It is expected that risedronate administration in combination with a PPI may be more effective not only for treating osteoporosis but also improving physical fitness than treatment with risedronate alone.

  15. Effects of two benzimidazoles as proton pump inhibitors on water immersion stress-induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Goto, H; Sugiyama, S; Tsukamoto, Y; Kuroiwa, M; Ohara, A; Hoshino, H; Nakazawa, S; Ozawa, T

    1991-06-01

    This study was designed to clarify effects of proton pump inhibitors, E-3810(2-([4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3methylpyridine-2-yl]methyl- sulfinyl)-1H-benzimidazol sodium salt) and omeprazole (CAS 73590-58-6), on water immersion stress-induced gastric ulcers in relation to mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs). Mucosal PGs were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In untreated rats, 4 kinds of PGs, i.e., 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and PGD2 were detected in gastric mucosa, but no LTs were detected. Water immersion stress for 6 h caused severe hemorrhagic lesions in the fundic portion and, concomitantly, significant decreases in mucosal PG levels. On the other hand, LTC4 and LTD4 were detected after 6 h stress treatment, though LTB4 and LTE4 were not detected throughout the experiments. Peptide-LT (the sum of LTC4 and LTD4) levels were 23.5 +/- 3.2 ng/g tissue 6 h after water immersion stress. Administration of 20 mg/kg of E-3810 or 20 mg/kg of omeprazole mitigated gastric lesions and increases in the mucosal peptide-LT levels, but dit not improve the decrease in mucosal PGs.

  16. Retention behavior of proton pump inhibitors using immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases with organic-aqueous mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Cirilli, Roberto; Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; Zanitti, Leo

    2013-08-23

    In the present study, the chromatographic behavior of two immobilized polysaccharide-derived chiral stationary phases (CSPs), the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3, under aqueous mobile phases conditions is presented. Four proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) (omeprazole, lansoprazole, pentaprazole and rabeprazole) were selected as test compounds. The effect of the concentration of water in the mobile phase was investigated with respect to its contribution to enantioselectivity and retention. Under acetonitrile-water mobile phase conditions, retention behavior evidenced an interesting pattern. At lower water content, the retention factors decreased with increasing water and at higher water content a reversed trend was observed. These findings support the hypothesis that two retention mechanisms operated successively on the same CSP: the HILIC (with water-poor eluents) and RPLC (with water-rich eluents) modes. The retention factors were minimum in the intermediate region, corresponding to a water concentration of about 20%. Interestingly, the baseline separation of all PPIs investigated was optimized under organic-aqueous mobile phases containing a high water content (from about 50 to 65%). Thus, the dual retention behavior of the PPIs on the Chiralpak ID-3 and Chiralpak IE-3 made it possible to reach greener and harmless enantioselective conditions in a short analysis time.

  17. Drug-Induced Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A Focus on Proton Pump Inhibitors and Histamine-2 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Linder, Lauren; Tamboue, Cynthia; Clements, Jennifer N

    2016-08-12

    To review primary literature of gastric acid suppressive agents and vitamin B12 deficiency. From the published articles, proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are associated with a higher risk of inducing vitamin B12 deficiency than histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs). Literature suggests that there is an increased risk of developing vitamin B12 deficiency in patients who are exposed to extended durations of therapy with PPIs. There are, however, some conflicting data in elderly patients suggesting that the PPI use for more than 3 years does not increase the risk of vitamin B12 deficiency. No evidence was found to support the extended use of H2RA monotherapy causing vitamin B12 deficiency. The inconsistency of results reported could be due to the differing patient populations studied, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) and elderly patients. Overall, the lack of consistent evidence shows the need for more research in this area. To investigate the clinical significance of vitamin B12 deficiency caused by acid suppression with PPIs and H2RAs, longer prospective studies are needed. These studies should focus on patient-centered outcomes to accurately determine the extended usage of PPI and H2RA and the true effects on vitamin B12 deficiency. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Timing or Dosing of Intravenous Proton Pump Inhibitors in Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Has Low Impact on Costs.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Adam, Viviane; Teich, Vanessa; Barkun, Alan

    2016-10-01

    High-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) post endoscopy are recommended in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), as they improve outcomes of patients with high-risk lesions. Determine the budget impact of using different PPI regimens in treating non-variceal UGIB, including pre- and post-endoscopic use, continuous infusion (high dose), and intermittent bolus (twice daily) dosing. A budget impact analysis using a decision model informed with data from the literature adopting a US third party payer's perspective with a 30-day time horizon was used to determine the total cost per patient (US$2014) presenting with acute UGIB. The base-case employing high-dose pre- and post-endoscopic IV PPI was compared with using only post-endoscopic PPI. For each, continuous or intermittent dosing regimens were assessed with associated incremental costs. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. The overall cost per patient is $11,399 when high-dose IV PPIs are initiated before endoscopy. The incremental costs are all inferior in alternate-case scenarios: $106 less if only post-endoscopic high-dose IVs are used; with intermittent IV bolus dosing, the savings are $223 if used both pre and post endoscopy and $191 if only administered post endoscopy. Subgroup analysis suggests cost savings in patients with clean-base ulcers who are discharged early after endoscopy. Results are robust to sensitivity analysis. The incremental costs of using different IV PPI regimens are modest compared with total per patient costs.

  19. Proton Pump Inhibitors versus Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Risk of Pneumonia in Patients with Acute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Momosaki, Ryo; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Pneumonia is a serious complication of stroke. Several studies have indicated that certain gastric acid suppressants may be associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in hospitalized patients. However, the association between type of acid suppressant and pneumonia in acute stroke patients remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to clarify the association between the type of acid suppressant and the occurrence of pneumonia in acute stroke patients. This retrospective observational study used data from the national Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination inpatient database. We identified patients who were admitted to acute-care hospitals with stroke. The outcome was the occurrence of pneumonia assessed using diagnostic codes. We performed propensity score-matched analysis to compare the outcome between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) users and histamine-2 receptor antagonist (H2RA) users. A total of 77,890 stroke patients were identified, of whom 63,980 were prescribed H2RAs and 13,910 were prescribed PPIs. Overall, 1490 (10.7%) of the patients receiving PPIs and 6401 (10.0%) of the patients receiving H2RAs developed pneumonia after stroke. After propensity score matching, the incidence of pneumonia in PPI users was not different from that in H2RA users (odds ratio: 1.10, 95% confidence interval: .99-1.21). No significant difference in the incidence of pneumonia was seen between users of PPIs and H2RAs after acute stroke. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Proton pump inhibitors for the treatment of patients with erosive esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease: current evidence and safety of dexlansoprazole.

    PubMed

    Mermelstein, Joseph; Mermelstein, Alanna Chait; Chait, Maxwell M

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is the most common upper gastroenterology disorder in the US. It is associated with a variety of complications and significantly impacts quality of life. Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective treatment. Dexlansoprazole modified release (MR) is a proton pump inhibitor that employs a novel release formulation that prolongs its absorption and allows for more flexibility in dosing. Dexlansoprazole MR can be dosed without regard to food intake or time of day, and once-daily dosing may replace twice-daily dosing of other agents. Dexlansoprazole MR is effective for healing and maintenance of erosive esophagitis, and for the treatment of nonerosive disease, including nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux disease. Dexlansoprazole MR is safe and well tolerated, and can improve quality of life.

  1. An evaluation of the CYP1A induction potential of pantoprazole in primary rat hepatocytes: a comparison with other proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Masubuchi, N; Okazaki, O

    1997-11-06

    The ability of pantoprazole to affect the induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A subfamily was evaluated and compared with two other proton pump inhibitors, omeprazole and lansoprazole, in primary cultured hepatocytes from female Sprague-Dawley rats. The hepatocytes were cultured for 2 days, followed by treatment for 2 days with the proton pump inhibitors at 2, 5 and 10 microM, concentrations that are similar to plasma concentrations found in rats in vivo. The CYP1A inducer 3-methylcholanthrene (at 1 microM) was also evaluated as a positive control. Induction potentials of these chemicals for CYP1A were determined by 7-ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity and isozyme contents. The results showed that for CYP1A induction, the rank ordering in induction potential was consistently lansoprazole > omeprazole > pantoprazole. The results are consistent with the existing rat in vivo data, i.e. pantoprazole has lower CYP1A induction potential than omeprazole and lansoprazole.

  2. In Vitro Activities of Rabeprazole, a Novel Proton Pump Inhibitor, and Its Thioether Derivative Alone and in Combination with Other Antimicrobials against Recent Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Yoshiyuki; Akahane, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Oana, Kozue; Takahashi, Yuko; Okimura, Yukie; Okabe, Tadashi; Gotoh, Akira; Katsuyama, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    The MICs of rabeprazole sodium (RPZ), a newly developed benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), against 133 clinical Helicobacter pylori strains revealed a higher degree of activity than the another two PPIs, lansoprazole and omeprazole. Time-kill curve assays of RPZ, when combined with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, or metronidazole, disclosed that synergistic effects were demonstrated in combination with each antibiotic examined. Moreover, no apparent antagonistic effect appeared among all of the strains tested. PMID:10639386

  3. In vitro activities of rabeprazole, a novel proton pump inhibitor, and its thioether derivative alone and in combination with other antimicrobials against recent clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Y; Akahane, T; Yamaguchi, M; Oana, K; Takahashi, Y; Okimura, Y; Okabe, T; Gotoh, A; Katsuyama, T

    2000-02-01

    The MICs of rabeprazole sodium (RPZ), a newly developed benzimidazole proton pump inhibitor (PPI), against 133 clinical Helicobacter pylori strains revealed a higher degree of activity than the another two PPIs, lansoprazole and omeprazole. Time-kill curve assays of RPZ, when combined with amoxicillin, clarithromycin, or metronidazole, disclosed that synergistic effects were demonstrated in combination with each antibiotic examined. Moreover, no apparent antagonistic effect appeared among all of the strains tested.

  4. Efficacy of a proton pump inhibitor given in the early postoperative period to relieve symptoms of hiatal hernia after open heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Hata, Mitsumasa; Shiono, Motomi; Sekino, Hisakuni; Furukawa, Hidekazu; Sezai, Akira; Iida, Mitsuru; Yoshitake, Isamu; Hattori, Tsutomu; Wakui, Shinji; Taoka, Makoto; Negishi, Nanao; Sezai, Yukiyasu

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a proton pump inhibitor, we retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent gastric fiberscopy (GFS) in the early phase after cardiac surgery. The subjects were 103 patients who underwent GFS for poor appetite, gastric pain, heartburn, or hematemesis after cardiac surgery. We divided the patients into two groups: group I consisted of 49 patients who received an H2-receptor antagonist (ranitidine hydrochloride 300 mg/day), and group II consisted of 54 patients who received a proton pump inhibitor (PPI; sodium rabeprazole 10 mg/day) as prophylactic treatment. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) disease was compared in the two groups. Gastric fiberscopy confirmed that 82.5% of the patients had type I hiatal hernia. The incidences of gastric pain and heartburn were significantly higher in group I (12.2% and 83.7%) than in group II (0% and 37.0%). Moreover, gastric bleeding occurred in two patients from group I, one [corrected] of whom died of coagulopathy. The incidences of hemorrhagic gastritis, active ulcer, and reflux esophagitis were significantly higher in group I than in group II, at 22.4%, 22.4%, and 24.5% vs 1.9%, 0%, and 7.4%. Early postcardiotomy GFS confirmed a high incidence of type I hiatal hernia. However, the proton pump inhibitor given in the early postoperative period proved more effective than the H2-receptor antagonist for relieving GI symptoms and preventing upper GI disorders after cardiac surgery.

  5. Ongoing measures to enhance the efficiency of prescribing of proton pump inhibitors and statins in The Netherlands: influence and future implications.

    PubMed

    Woerkom, Menno van; Piepenbrink, Hans; Godman, Brian; Metz, Joost de; Campbell, Stephen; Bennie, Marion; Eimers, Marietta; Gustafsson, Lars L

    2012-11-01

    Multiple reforms have recently been introduced in The Netherlands to improve prescribing efficiency. These include preference pricing policies for multiple sourced products, guidelines, and quality and efficiency targets, as well as regular pharmacotherapy meetings. Assess the influence of these multiple measures on prescribing efficiency. Retrospective observational study of all reimbursed prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors and statins between 2000 and 2010 using the Genees-en hulpmiddelen Informatie Project (Health Insurance) database. Utilization measured in defined daily doses. Narrative review of reforms. Reimbursed expenditure for the proton pump inhibitors fell by 58% in 2010 versus 2000 despite a threefold increase in utilization, helped by increasing utilization of generic omeprazole at only 2% of the prepatent loss price in 2010. Similarly, reimbursed expenditure for the statins fell by 14% in 2010 versus 2000 despite a 3.8-fold increase in utilization. Again, this was helped by increasing utilization of generic simvastatin at only 2% of the prepatent loss originator price. Multiple supply and demand measures, including the preference pricing policy, appear to have appreciably enhanced proton pump inhibitor and statin prescribing efficiency, providing examples to other countries.

  6. Risk of dementia from proton pump inhibitor use in Asian population: A nationwide cohort study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Shu-Yu; Chien, Chen-Yu; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Lin, Kun-Der; Ho, Bo-Lin; Chang, Yu-Han

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Concerns have been raised regarding the potential association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and dementia. Objective This study aimed to examine this association in an Asian population. Methods Patients initiating PPI therapy between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2003 without a prior history of dementia were identified from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. The outcome of interest was all-cause dementia. Cox regression models were applied to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of dementia. The cumulative PPI dosage stratified by quartiles of defined daily doses and adjusted for baseline disease risk score served as the primary variables compared against no PPI use. Results We analyzed the data of 15726 participants aged 40 years or older and free of dementia at baseline. PPI users (n = 7863; average follow-up 8.44 years) had a significantly increased risk of dementia over non—PPI users (n = 7863; average follow-up 9.55 years) (adjusted HR [aHR] 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.05–1.42). A significant association was observed between cumulative PPI use and risk of dementia (P for trend = .013). Subgroup analysis showed excess frequency of dementia in PPI users diagnosed with depression (aHR 2.73 [1.91–3.89]), hyperlipidemia (aHR 1.81 [1.38–2.38]), ischemic heart disease (aHR 1.55 [1.12–2.14]), and hypertension (aHR 1.54 [1.21–1.95]). Conclusions An increased risk for dementia was identified among the Asian PPI users. Cumulative PPI use was significantly associated with dementia. Further investigation into the possible biological mechanisms underlying the relationship between dementia and PPI use is warranted. PMID:28199356

  7. Impact of proton pump inhibitor use on magnesium homoeostasis: a cross-sectional study in a tertiary emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lindner, G; Funk, G-C; Leichtle, A B; Fiedler, G M; Schwarz, C; Eleftheriadis, T; Pasch, A; Mohaupt, M G; Exadaktylos, A K; Arampatzis, S

    2014-11-01

    To date, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been associated with a low risk of hypomagnesaemia and associated adverse outcomes. We hypothesised that a better risk estimate could be derived from a large cohort of outpatients admitted to a tertiary emergency department (ED). A cross-sectional study was performed in 5118 patients who had measurements of serum magnesium taken on admission to a large tertiary care ED between January 2009 and December 2010. Hypomagnesaemia was defined as a serum magnesium concentration < 0.75 mmol/l. Demographical data, serum electrolyte values, data on medication, comorbidities and outcome with regard to length of hospital stay and mortality were analysed. Serum magnesium was normally distributed where upon 1246 patients (24%) were hypomagnesaemic. These patients had a higher prevalence of out-of-hospital PPI use and diuretic use when compared with patients with magnesium levels > 0.75 mmol/l (both p < 0.0001). In multivariable regression analyses adjusted for PPIs, diuretics, renal function and the Charlson comorbidity index score, the association between use of PPIs and risk for hypomagnesaemia remained significant (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.54-2.85). While mortality was not directly related to low magnesium levels (p = 0.67), the length of hospitalisation was prolonged in these patients even after adjustment for underlying comorbid conditions (p < 0.0001). Use of PPIs predisposes patients to hypomagnesaemia and such to prolonged hospitalisation irrespective of the underlying morbidity, posing a critical concern. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Acute Coronary Syndromes, Gastrointestinal Protection, and Recommendations Regarding Concomitant Administration of Proton-Pump Inhibitors (Omeprazol/Esomeprazole) and Clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Iñigo; Sanchez-Insa, Esther; de Leiras, Sergio Rodríguez; Carrillo, Pilar; Ruiz-Quevedo, Valeriano; Pinar, Eduardo; Gopar-Gopar, Silvia; Bayon, Jeremías; Mañas, Pilar; Lasa, Garikoitz; CruzGonzalez, Ignacio; Hernandez, Felipe; Fernandez-Portales, Javier; Fernandez-Fernandez, Javier; Pérez-Serradilla, Ana; de la Torre Hernandez, José M; Gomez-Jaume, Alfredo

    2016-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency sent a warning in 2010 discouraging the concomitant use of clopidogrel with omeprazole or esomeprazole. The purpose is to know the gastroprotective approach in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and the level of follow-up of the alert. In 17 hospitals with catheterization laboratory in Spain, 1 per region, we studied 25 consecutive patients per hospital whose diagnosis of discharge since October 1, 2013, had been any type of ACS. We analyzed their baseline clinical profile, the gatroprotective agents at admission and discharge and the antiplatelet therapy at discharge. The number of patients included was 425: age 67.2 ± 12.5 years, women 29.8%, diabetes 36.5%. The patients presented unstable angina in 21.6%, non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 35.3% and ST-elevation myocardial infarction in 43.1%. Conservative approach was chosen in 17.9%, bare-metal stents 32.2%, ≥ 1 drug-eluting stent 48.5%, and surgery 1.4%. Aspirin was indicated in 1.9%, aspirin + clopidogrel 73.6%, aspirin + prasugrel 17.6%, and aspririn + ticagrelor 6.8%. Gastroprotective agents were present in 40.2% patients at admission and this percentage increased to 93.7% at discharge. Of the 313 (73.6%) on clopidogrel in 96 (30.6%) was combined with omeprazole and 3 (0.95%) with esomeprazole, whereas the most commonly used was pantoprazole with 190 patients (44.7%). In conclusion, almost the totality of the patients with an ACS receive gastroprotective agents at the moment of discharge, most of them with proton-pump inhibitors. In one every 3 cases of the patients who are on clopidogrel, the recommendation of the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency is not followed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Potential Mechanisms of Hematological Adverse Drug Reactions in Patients Receiving Clozapine in Combination With Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wiciński, Michał; Węclewicz, Mateusz M; Miętkiewicz, Mateusz; Malinowski, Bartosz; Grześk, Elżbieta; Klonowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Clozapine is a second-generation antipsychotic which has proven efficacy in treating the symptoms of schizophrenia. Although clozapine therapy is associated with a number of adverse drug reactions, it is frequently used. One of the most common adverse drug reactions is gastroesophageal reflux disease which is an indication for treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Coadministration of clozapine and PPIs increases the risk of hematological adverse drug reactions, including neutropenia and agranulocytosis. The mechanism in idiosyncratic agranulocytosis is not dose related and involves either a direct toxic or an immune-allergic effect. It is suspected that the clozapine metabolites nitrenium ion and N-desmethylclozapine may cause apoptosis or impair growth of granulocytes. Formation of N-desmethylclozapine is correlated with activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes 1A2 and 3A4 (CYP1A2 and CYP3A4). Nitrenium ion is produced by the flavin-containing monooxygenase system of leukocytes. A drug interaction between clozapine and a PPI is a consequence of the induction of common metabolic pathways either by the PPI or clozapine. Findings to date suggest that indirect induction of flavin-containing monooxygenase by omeprazole through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor increases the expression of the enzyme mRNA and in the long term may cause the increase in activity. Moreover, induction of CYP1A2, especially by omeprazole and lansoprazole, may increase the serum concentration of N-desmethylclozapine, which can accumulate in lymphocytes and may achieve toxic levels. Another hypothesis that may explain hematological adverse drug reactions is competitive inhibition of CYP2C19, which may contribute to increased serum concentrations of toxic metabolites.

  10. Novel application of proton pump inhibitor for the prevention of colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis beyond acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Hong, Kyung Sook; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2010-08-01

    Colitis-associated cancers arise in the setting of chronic inflammation wherein an "inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma" sequence prevails. Based on our previous findings in which the proton pump inhibitor could impose significant levels of anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and selective apoptosis induction beyond gastric acid suppression, we investigated whether omeprazole could prevent the development of colitis-associated cancer in a mouse model induced by repeated bouts of colitis. Omeprazole, 10 mg/kg, was given i.p. all through the experimental periods for colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Molecular changes regarding inflammation and carcinogenesis were compared between control groups and colitis-associated cancer groups treated with omeprazole in addition to chemopreventive outcome. Nine of 12 (75.0%) mice in the control group developed multiple colorectal tumors, whereas tumors were noted in only 3 of 12 (25.0%) mice treated with daily injections of omeprazole. The cancer-preventive results of omeprazole treatment was based on significant decreases in the levels of nitric oxide, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance, and interleukin-6 accompanied with attenuated expressions of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-11, and MT1-MMMP were significantly decreased in mice treated with omeprazole in accordance with significant decreases in the number of beta-catenin-accumulated crypts. A significant induction of apoptosis was observed in tumor tissue treated with omeprazole. Omeprazole could block the trophic effect of gastrin in colon epithelial cells. The significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antimutagenic activities of omeprazole played a cancer-preventive role against colitis-induced carcinogenesis, and our novel in vivo evidence is suggestive of chemopreventive action independent of gastric acid suppression.

  11. Use of Proton-Pump Inhibitors Predicts Heart Failure and Death in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pello Lázaro, Ana María; Cristóbal, Carmen; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Tarín, Nieves; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Huelmos, Ana; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Fuentes-Antras, Jesús; Martínez-Millá, Juan; Alonso, Joaquín; Lorenzo, Óscar; Egido, Jesús; López-Bescós, Lorenzo; Tuñón, José

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) seem to increase the incidence of cardiovascular events in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), mainly in those using clopidogrel. We analysed the impact of PPIs on the prognosis of patients with stable CAD. Methods We followed 706 patients with CAD. Primary outcome was the combination of secondary outcomes. Secondary outcomes were 1) acute ischaemic events (any acute coronary syndrome, stroke, or transient ischaemic attack) and 2) heart failure (HF) or death. Results Patients on PPIs were older [62.0 (53.0–73.0) vs. 58.0 (50.0–70.0) years; p = 0.003] and had a more frequent history of stroke (4.9% vs. 1.1%; p = 0.004) than those from the non-PPI group, and presented no differences in any other clinical variable, including cardiovascular risk factors, ejection fraction, and therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel. Follow-up was 2.2±0.99 years. Seventy-eight patients met the primary outcome, 53 developed acute ischaemic events, and 33 HF or death. PPI use was an independent predictor of the primary outcome [hazard ratio (HR) = 2.281 (1.244–4.183); p = 0.008], along with hypertension, body-mass index, glomerular filtration rate, atrial fibrillation, and nitrate use. PPI use was also an independent predictor of HF/death [HR = 5.713 (1.628–20.043); p = 0.007], but not of acute ischaemic events. A propensity score showed similar results. Conclusions In patients with CAD, PPI use is independently associated with an increased incidence of HF and death but not with a high rate of acute ischaemic events. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:28103324

  12. Daytime intragastric acid control: post hoc analyses of esomeprazole 20 mg and over-the-counter proton-pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Philip; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Johnson, David A.; Lind, Tore; Röhss, Kerstin; Traxler, Barry; Hugo, Vincent; Dent, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In mild gastroesophageal reflux disease, which accounts for the great majority of cases, the major burden of reflux occurs during daytime hours, after food intake. The aim of these analyses was to evaluate intragastric pH control during the typical 14-hour daytime awake period by proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) given at over-the-counter (OTC) dosages. Methods: In one double-blind and three open-label, randomized, crossover studies, intragastric pH was monitored for 24 hours on day 5 of treatment. The 24-hour data have been reported previously. Post hoc analyses reassessed these studies for the 14-hour daytime period, comparing esomeprazole 20 mg with currently available OTC PPIs omeprazole, pantoprazole (not available in the US) and lansoprazole. Results: Subjects maintained intragastric pH >4 for a significantly greater mean percentage of the 14-hour daytime period with esomeprazole 20 mg compared with any of the PPI comparators at OTC dosages. Geometric mean ratios (95% confidence intervals) for esomeprazole 20 mg versus the comparators were: 1.45 (1.14–1.85; p = 0.003) versus omeprazole 20 mg; 2.50 (2.01–3.11; p < 0.0001) versus pantoprazole 20 mg; and 1.69 (1.46–1.97; p < 0.0001) and 1.89 (1.05–3.37; p = 0.03) versus lansoprazole 15 mg. A greater proportion of subjects had better pH control with esomeprazole than with the other PPIs (range: 69–97%). Conclusions: Across the 14-hour daytime period, esomeprazole 20 mg once daily given 30 minutes before breakfast for 5 days provided acid control for a significantly greater average proportion of time versus the PPI comparators omeprazole, pantoprazole and lansoprazole at currently available OTC dosages. PMID:26557888

  13. Unexplained abdominal pain as a driver for inappropriate therapeutics: an audit on the use of intravenous proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Pauline Siew Mei; Wong, Yin Yen; Low, Yong Chia; Lau, Hui Ling; Chin, Kin-Fah; Mahadeva, Sanjiv

    2014-01-01

    Background. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the most effective agents for acid-related disorders. However, studies show that 25-75% of patients receiving intravenous PPIs had no appropriate justification, indicating high rates of inappropriate prescribing. Objective. To examine the appropriate use of intravenous PPIs in accordance with guidelines and the efficacy of a prescribing awareness intervention at an Asian teaching institution. Setting. Prospective audit in a tertiary hospital in Malaysia. Method. Every 4th intravenous PPI prescription received in the pharmacy was screened against hospital guidelines. Interventions for incorrect indication/dose/duration were performed. Patients' demographic data, medical history and the use of intravenous PPI were collected. Included were all adult inpatients prescribed intravenous PPI. Main Outcome Measure. Proportion of appropriate IV PPI prescriptions. Results. Data for 106 patients were collected. Most patients were male [65(61.3%)], Chinese [50(47.2%)], with mean age ± SD = 60.3 ± 18.0 years. Most intravenous PPI prescriptions were initiated by junior doctors from the surgical [47(44.3%)] and medical [42(39.6%)] departments. Only 50/106(47.2%) patients had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy/surgery performed to verify the source of bleeding. Unexplained abdominal pain [81(76.4%)] was the main driver for prescribing intravenous PPIs empirically, out of which 73(68.9%) were for suspected upper gastrointestinal bleed. Overall, intravenous PPI was found to be inappropriately prescribed in 56(52.8%) patients for indication, dose or duration. Interventions on the use of intravenous PPI were most effective when performed by senior doctors (100%), followed by clinical pharmacists (50%), and inpatient pharmacists (37.5%, p = 0.027). Conclusion. Inappropriate intravenous PPI usage is still prevalent despite the enforcement of hospital guidelines. The promotion of prescribing awareness and evidence-based prescribing

  14. The effect of endoscopic fundoplication and proton pump inhibitors on baseline impedance and heartburn severity in GERD patients.

    PubMed

    Rinsma, N F; Farré, R; Bouvy, N D; Masclee, A A M; Conchillo, J M

    2015-02-01

    Antireflux therapy may lead to recovery of impaired mucosal integrity in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients as reflected by an increase in baseline impedance. The study objective was to evaluate the effect of endoscopic fundoplication and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) PPI therapy on baseline impedance and heartburn severity in GERD patients. Forty-seven GERD patients randomized to endoscopic fundoplication (n = 32) or PPI therapy (n = 15), and 29 healthy controls were included. Before randomization and 6 months after treatment, baseline impedance was obtained during 24-h pH-impedance monitoring. Heartburn severity was evaluated using the GERD-HRQL questionnaire. Before treatment, baseline impedance in GERD patients was lower than in healthy controls (p < 0.001). Antireflux therapy increased baseline impedance (from 1498 [IQR 951-2472] to 2393 [IQR 1353-3027] Ω, p = 0.001), however it only led to a partial recovery when compared to healthy controls (2393 [IQR 1353-3027] vs 2983 [2335-3810] Ω, p < 0.01). The effect of both treatment options was not significantly different (p = 0.13) despite the increased number of non-acid reflux events in the PPI group. No correlation was found between baseline impedance and GERD symptoms before or after treatment. Reduction in acid reflux by endoscopic fundoplication or PPI therapy leads to an increase in baseline impedance in GERD patients, likely to reflect recovery of mucosal integrity. The impact of non-acid reflux events on esophageal mucosal integrity may be limited as no difference in the increase in baseline impedance was observed after both treatment options. The lack of association between impedance baseline and heartburn severity indicates that other factors may contribute to heartburn perception in GERD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Non-prescription proton-pump inhibitors for self-treating frequent heartburn:the role of the Canadian pharmacist

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, David; Nakhla, Nardine

    2016-01-01

    Heartburn and acid regurgitation are the cardinal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and occur commonly in the Canadian population. Multiple non-prescription treatment options are available for managing these symptoms, including antacids, alginates, histamine-H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). As a result, pharmacists are ideally positioned to recommend appropriate treatment options based upon an individual’s needs and presenting symptoms, prior treatment response, comorbid medical conditions, and other relevant factors. Individuals who experience mild heartburn and/or have symptoms that occur predictably in response to known precipitating factors can manage their symptoms by avoiding known triggers and using on-demand antacids and/or alginates or lower-dose non-prescription H2RAs (e.g. ranitidine 150 mg). For those with moderate symptoms, lifestyle changes, in conjunction with higher-dose non-prescription H2RAs, may be effective. However, for individuals with moderate-to-severe symptoms that occur frequently (i.e. ≥2 days/week), the non-prescription (Schedule II) PPI omeprazole 20 mg should be considered. The pharmacist can provide important support by inquiring about the frequency and severity of symptoms, identifying an appropriate treatment option, and recognizing other potential causes of symptoms, as well as alarm features and atypical symptoms that would necessitate referral to a physician. After recommending an appropriate treatment, the pharmacist can provide instructions for its correct use. Additionally, the pharmacist should inquire about recurrences, respond to questions about adverse events, provide monitoring parameters, and counsel on when referral to a physician is warranted. Pharmacists are an essential resource for individuals experiencing heartburn; they play a crucial role in helping individuals make informed self-care decisions and educating them to ensure that therapy is used in an optimal, safe, and

  16. Non-prescription proton-pump inhibitors for self-treating frequent heartburn:the role of the Canadian pharmacist.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, David; Nakhla, Nardine

    2016-01-01

    Heartburn and acid regurgitation are the cardinal symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux and occur commonly in the Canadian population. Multiple non-prescription treatment options are available for managing these symptoms, including antacids, alginates, histamine-H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). As a result, pharmacists are ideally positioned to recommend appropriate treatment options based upon an individual's needs and presenting symptoms, prior treatment response, comorbid medical conditions, and other relevant factors. Individuals who experience mild heartburn and/or have symptoms that occur predictably in response to known precipitating factors can manage their symptoms by avoiding known triggers and using on-demand antacids and/or alginates or lower-dose non-prescription H2RAs (e.g. ranitidine 150 mg). For those with moderate symptoms, lifestyle changes, in conjunction with higher-dose non-prescription H2RAs, may be effective. However, for individuals with moderate-to-severe symptoms that occur frequently (i.e. ≥2 days/week), the non-prescription (Schedule II) PPI omeprazole 20 mg should be considered. The pharmacist can provide important support by inquiring about the frequency and severity of symptoms, identifying an appropriate treatment option, and recognizing other potential causes of symptoms, as well as alarm features and atypical symptoms that would necessitate referral to a physician. After recommending an appropriate treatment, the pharmacist can provide instructions for its correct use. Additionally, the pharmacist should inquire about recurrences, respond to questions about adverse events, provide monitoring parameters, and counsel on when referral to a physician is warranted. Pharmacists are an essential resource for individuals experiencing heartburn; they play a crucial role in helping individuals make informed self-care decisions and educating them to ensure that therapy is used in an optimal, safe, and

  17. Partnership in optimizing management of reflux symptoms: a treatment algorithm for over-the-counter proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Helen F; Delaney, Brendan C; Haag, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Uncomplicated heartburn and acid regurgitation are increasingly treated and managed using over-the-counter medications. However, with over-the-counter availability of antacids, alginates, histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs), consumers need guidance as to appropriate options and how to use them. Relevant guidelines, studies, and reviews were identified via literature searches of PubMed/Medline and Google Scholar, as well as cross-referencing from the identified papers. Antacids, alginates, and H2RAs are best suited to management of occasional heartburn, taken either before provocative meals or other triggers or on demand when symptoms arise. Over-the-counter PPIs are appropriate options across the range of symptom severity/frequency typically encountered in the pharmacy, but may be particularly appropriate for treatment of those with frequent and/or very bothersome heartburn. A 2-4 week course of daily PPIs can lead to complete resolution of frequent heartburn. Counseling is important to ensure that patients understand that failure of symptoms to resolve or a rapid return of symptoms while taking a PPI is an indication to consult a doctor, whereas a return of symptoms after a period of months may be an indication for just another course of treatment. The need for effective communication and for ensuring use of the correct medication in the over-the-counter setting puts much of the responsibility for management of heartburn and acid regurgitation on the pharmacist. A proposed algorithm that details when and how to use available over-the-counter medications is presented. This algorithm also highlights alarm features and atypical symptoms indicative of other underlying conditions that should be referred directly to a physician. Implementation of a simple algorithm will empower pharmacists and consumers alike and ensure consistent and appropriate care.

  18. Effects of administration of a proton pump inhibitor before endoscopic submucosal dissection for differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer.

    PubMed

    Myung, Yu Sik; Hong, Su Jin; Han, Jae Pil; Park, Kyung Woo; Ko, Bong Min; Lee, Moon Sung

    2017-01-01

    In ulcerative early gastric cancer, improvement and exacerbation of ulceration repeat as a malignant cycle. Moreover, early gastric cancer combined with ulcer is associated with a low curative resection rate and high risk of adverse events. The aim of this study was to investigate the ulcer healing rate and clinical outcomes with the administration of a proton pump inhibitor before endoscopic submucosal dissection for differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer. A total of 136 patients with differentiated early gastric cancer with ulcer who met the expanded indications for endoscopic submucosal dissection were reviewed between June 2005 and June 2014. Eighty-one patients were given PPI before endoscopic submucosal dissection and 55 patients were not given PPI. The complete ulcer healing rate was significantly different between the two groups (59.3 % vs. 23.6 %, P < 0.001). The procedure time was 38.1 ± 35.7 and 50.8 ± 50.2 min (P = 0.047). However, no significant differences were detected in the en bloc resection rate, complete resection rate, and adverse events including bleeding and perforation. Multivariate analysis showed that administration of PPI (OR = 10.83, P < 0.001) and mucosal invasion (OR = 24.43, P < 0.001) were independent factors that predicted complete healing of ulceration. The calculated accuracy for whether complete healing of the ulcer after PPI administration can differentiate mucosal from submucosal invasion was 75.3 %. Administration of PPI before ESD in differentiated EGC meeting the expanded criteria is effective to heal the ulcer lesion and reduce the mean procedure time. Complete healing of the ulcer after PPI administration suggests mucosal cancer.

  19. Use of Proton Pump inhibitors is Associated with Fractures in Young Adults: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Freedberg, Daniel E.; Haynes, Kevin; Denburg, Michelle R.; Zemel, Babette S.; Leonard, Mary B.; Abrams, Julian A.; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are associated with fracture in adults with osteoporosis. Because PPI therapy may interfere with bone accrual and attainment of peak bone mineral density, we studied the association between use of PPIs and fracture in children and young adults. Methods We conducted a population-based, case-control study nested within records from general medical practices from 1994 to 2013. Participants were 4–29 years old with ≥1 year of follow-up who lacked chronic conditions associated with use of long-term acid suppression. Cases of fracture were defined as the first incident fracture at any site. Using incidence density sampling, cases were matched with up to 5 controls by age, sex, medical practice, and start of follow-up. PPI exposure was defined as 180 or more cumulative doses of PPIs. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio and confidence interval for use of PPIs and fracture. Results We identified 124,799 cases and 605,643 controls. The adjusted odds ratio for the risk of fracture associated with PPI exposure was 1.13 (95% CI 0.92 to 1.39) among children aged < 18 years old and 1.39 (95% CI 1.26 to 1.53) among young adults aged 18–29 years old. In young adults but not children, we observed a dose-response effect with increased total exposure to PPIs (p for trend <.001). Conclusions PPI use was associated with fracture in young adults but overall evidence did not support a PPI-fracture relationship in children. Young adults who use PPIs should be cautioned regarding potentially increased risk for fracture, even if they lack traditional fracture risk factors. PMID:25986385

  20. Characteristics of symptomatic reflux episodes in Japanese proton pump inhibitor-refractory non-erosive reflux disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Kenichiro; Koike, Tomoyuki; Iijima, Katsunori; Saito, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Uno, Kaname; Asano, Naoki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) patients. METHODS: Thirty-five NERD patients with persistent symptoms, despite taking rabeprazole 10 mg twice daily for at least 8 wk, were included in this study. All patients underwent 24 h combined impedance - pH on rabeprazole. The symptom index (SI) was considered to be positive if ≥ 50%, and proximal reflux episodes were determined when reflux reached 15 cm above the proximal margin of the lower esophageal sphincter. RESULTS: In 14 (40%) SI-positive patients, with liquid weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms was significantly more frequent in proximal reflux episodes (46.7%) than in distal ones (5.7%) (P < 0.001). With liquid acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (38.5%) and distal ones (20.5%) (NS). With mixed liquid-gas weakly acid reflux, the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms in proximal reflux episodes was significantly more frequent (31.0%) than in distal reflux ones (3.3%) (P < 0.001). With mixed liquid-gas acid reflux, there were no significant differences in the occurrence rate of reflux symptoms between proximal reflux episodes (29.4%) and distal ones (14.3%) (NS). CONCLUSION: The proximal extent of weakly acidic liquid and mixed liquid-gas reflux is a major factor associated with reflux perception in SI-positive patients on proton pump inhibitor therapy. PMID:26715820

  1. In vitro dissolution of proton-pump inhibitor products intended for paediatric and geriatric use in physiological bicarbonate buffer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Shokrollahi, Honaz

    2015-05-15

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) products based on enteric coated multiparticulates are design to meet the needs of patients who cannot swallow tablets such as children and older adults. Enteric coated PPI preparations exhibit delays in in vivo absorption and onset of antisecretory effects, which is not reflected by the rapid in vitro dissolution in compendial pH 6.8 phosphate buffer commonly used for assessment of these products. A more representative and physiological medium, pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer, was used in this study to evaluate the in vitro dissolution of enteric coated multiparticulate-based PPI products. Commercially available omeprazole, lansoprazole and esomeprazole products were subject to dissolution tests using USP-II apparatus in pH 4.5 phosphate buffer saline for 45 min (acid stage) followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer or pH 6.8 mHanks bicarbonate buffer. In pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, all nine tested products displayed rapid and comparable dissolution profiles meeting the pharmacopeia requirements for delayed release preparations. In pH 6.8 mHanks buffer, drug release was delayed and failed the pharmacopeia requirements from most enteric coated preparations. Despite that the same enteric polymer, methacrylic acid-ethyl acrylate copolymer (1:1), was applied to all commercial multiparticulate-based products, marked differences were observed between dissolution profiles of these preparations. The use of pH 6.8 physiological bicarbonate (mHanks) buffer can serve as a useful tool to provide realistic and discriminative in vitro release assessment of enteric coated PPI preparations and to assist rational formulation development of these products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Specific Gastric Inflammation in Children is Associated with Proton Pump Inhibitor Treatment for More than 6 Weeks

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Blum, Eduardo; Tatevian, Nina; Hashmi, Syed Shahrukh; Rhoads, Jon Marc; Navarro, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Non-specific gastric inflammation (NSGI) is a commonly reported pathological finding. We investigated if it is associated with the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in children at a single tertiary center. Methods: We performed an IRB-approved chart review of all endoscopy and biopsy reports of patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy between July 2009 and July 2010 (n = 310). Demographic data, dose, duration of exposure to PPI, and biopsy results were collected and analyzed. All esophageal, gastric, and duodenal biopsies were independently reviewed by a pathologist. Patients with acute gastritis, moderate/severe chronic gastric inflammation, or Helicobacter pylori infection were excluded. The presence of NSGI was compared between patients exposed and not exposed to PPI as well as between patients with different doses and durations of PPI exposure to assess for potential associations. Results: A total of 193 patients were included: 88 (46%) had a history of PPI use and 48 (25%) were found to have NSGI. Compared to patients not exposed to PPI, the odds ratio of NSGI in patients exposed to PPIs was 2.81 (95% CI: 1.36–5.93). The odds ratio of NSGI in patients exposed to PPI for >3 months was 4.53 (95% CI: 1.69–11.97). Gender, ethnicity, and age were not associated with NSGI. No histological differences were found in the esophagus and duodenum between patients exposed and not exposed to PPI. Conclusion: This study found that PPI exposure is associated with NSGI with a higher risk for those exposed for >3 months. As the clinical implications of NSGI are not known, judicious use of PPIs is needed. Prospective studies are required to confirm and to determine the etiologic factors (i.e., alteration of the gastric pH, serum gastrin) that may be related with the presence of NGSI. PMID:24479108

  3. The use of proton pump inhibitors in an Italian hospital: focus on oncologic and critical non-ICU patients.

    PubMed

    Meli, Maria; Raffa, Maria Pia; Malta, Renato; Morreale, Ilaria; Aprea, Luigi; D'Alessandro, Natale

    2015-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are among the most misused drugs both at the community and hospital level. Recently, possible risks have been underscored, suggesting the importance of limiting PPI use to proven indications. To survey the appropriateness of PPI use in a University hospital in Italy. Setting Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Policlinico 'P. Giaccone', in Palermo, Italy. A one day-observational study, reviewing patients' medical records to identify treatments with PPIs and the indications for their use. After discharge, a subgroup of the cohort was followed up to assess the continuation of therapy at home. Appropriateness was evaluated according to the indications stated in the official product information sheet and supported by the AIFA notes. Prevalence and appropriateness of PPI use in the hospital and after discharge. In the index day 62.9 % of 343 evaluable patients received a PPI. In only 29.1 % of these, the treatment could be considered appropriate. The most frequent reasons for inappropriate treatment were stress ulcer prophylaxis in low risk patients and unwarranted gastro-protection in drug treated patients. 30.9 % of patients received PPIs for uncertain indications: of these, 25.7 % were "critical" patients admitted in non-ICU wards. Furthermore, as much as 88.2 % of anticancer drug treated patients received PPIs as gastroprotective agents. At discharge 48.6 % of patients received a prescription to continue PPI therapy at home and 75.9 % of the 83 followed up patients were found to be still taking these drugs after on average 3 months from discharge. This study confirms a high proportion of inappropriate PPI therapy into the hospital that translates in a prolonged unnecessary administration in the community setting. Further studies are needed to assess the cost-effectiveness of PPI therapy in subgroups of patients at moderate risk for gastric complications to optimize current guidelines.

  4. Interaction Between Low-Dose Methotrexate and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs, Penicillins, and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jill J; Bolina, Monika; Chatterley, Trish; Jamali, Fakhreddin

    2017-02-01

    To review the potential drug interactions between low-dose methotrexate (LD-MTX) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), penicillins, and proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) given the disparity between interactions reported for high-dose and low-dose MTX to help guide clinicians. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE (1946 to September 2016), EMBASE (1974 to September 2016), and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970 to January 2015) to identify reports describing potential drug interactions between LD-MTX and NSAIDS, penicillins, or PPIs. Reference lists of included articles were reviewed to find additional eligible articles. All English-language observational, randomized, and pharmacokinetic (PK) studies assessing LD-MTX interactions in humans were analyzed to determine clinical relevance in making recommendations to clinicians. Clinical case reports were assigned a Drug Interaction Probability Scale score. A total of 32 articles were included (28 with NSAIDs, 3 with penicillins, and 2 with PPIs [1 including both PPI and NSAID]). Although there are some PK data to describe increased LD-MTX concentrations when NSAIDs are used concomitantly, the clinical relevance remains unclear. Based on the limited data on LD-MTX with penicillins and PPIs, no clinically meaningful interaction was identified. Given the available evidence, the clinical importance of the interaction between LD-MTX and NSAIDs, penicillins, and PPIs cannot be substantiated. Health care providers should assess the benefit and risk of LD-MTX regardless of concomitant drug use, including factors known to predispose patients to MTX toxicity, and continue to monitor clinical and laboratory parameters per guideline recommendations.

  5. Characterizing Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Older People in Primary Care in Ireland from 1997 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Frank; Bennett, Kathleen; Cahir, Caitriona; Fahey, Tom

    2016-12-01

    To characterize prescribing of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and medicines that increase gastrointestinal bleeding risk (ulcerogenic) in older people from 1997 to 2012 and assess factors associated with maximal-dose prescribing in long-term PPI users. Repeated cross-sectional study of pharmacy claims data. Eastern Health Board region of Ireland. Individuals aged 65 and older from a means-tested health plan in 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012 (range 78,489-133,884 individuals). PPI prescribing prevalence was determined per study year, categorized according to duration (≤8 or >8 weeks), dosage (maximal or maintenance), and co-prescribed drugs. Logistic regression in long-term PPI users was used to determine whether age, sex, polypharmacy, and ulcerogenic medicine use were associated with being prescribed a maximal dose rather than a maintenance dose. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are presented. Half of this older population received a PPI in 2007 and 2012. Long-term use (>8 weeks) of maximal doses rose from 0.8% of individuals in 1997 to 23.6% in 2012. Although some ulcerogenic medicines and polypharmacy were significantly associated with maximal PPI doses, any nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use was significantly associated with lower odds of maximal PPI dose (adjusted OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.85-0.89), as were aspirin use and older age. Adjusting for medication and demographic factors, odds of being prescribed a maximal PPI dose were significantly higher in 2012 than in 1997 (adjusted OR = 6.30, 95% CI = 5.76-6.88). Long-term maximal-dose PPI prescribing is highly prevalent in older adults and is not consistently associated with gastrointestinal bleeding risk factors. Interventions involving prescribers and patients may promote appropriate PPI use, reducing costs and adverse effects of PPI overprescribing. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Concomitant Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors and Clopidogrel Is Not Associated with Adverse Outcomes after Ischemic Stroke in Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xingyang; Zhou, Qiang; Wang, Chun; Lin, Jing; Cheng, Wen; Chi, Lifen

    2016-12-01

    Conflicting data exist as to whether proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) diminish the efficacy of clopidogrel. We, therefore, assessed the effect of concomitant PPI use in ischemic stroke (IS) patients receiving clopidogrel. We consecutively enrolled 535 IS patients receiving clopidogrel, 166 of whom were concomitantly taking PPIs. Platelet aggregation was measured before and after 7-10 days of treatment with clopidogrel. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP2C19*2, and CYP2C19*3 were examined. The primary outcome was a composite of recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS), myocardial infarction (MI), and vascular death occurring during the 6-month follow-up. The secondary outcome was the modified Rankin Scale score at the end of follow-up. The primary outcome occurred in 45 patients and the frequency did not differ in patients with or without PPI treatment. The percentage inhibition of platelet aggregation and the frequency of clopidogrel resistance were similar between patients treated with or without PPIs after clopidogrel treatment. However, for patients carrying a reduced-function CYP2C19*2 (AG/AA genotype) or CYP3A5 (GG/AG genotype), the inhibition of platelet aggregation was significantly lower in patients treated with PPIs. Cox regression analysis showed that diabetes mellitus, clopidogrel resistance, CYP2C19*2 AG/AA genotype, and patients carrying two loss-of-function variant alleles were independent risk factors for the primary outcome, but not the use of PPIs. The concomitant use of PPIs and clopidogrel in patients with IS may not be associated with an increased risk of RIS, MI, or vascular death. Further well-designed randomized controlled studies are necessary to confirm our current results. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of low-dose proton pump inhibitors administered concomitantly or separately on the anti-platelet function of clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Kodaira, Chise; Nishino, Masafumi; Yamade, Mihoko; Uotani, Takahiro; Sahara, Shu; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Kagami, Takuma; Iwaizumi, Moriya; Hamaya, Yasushi; Osawa, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Ken; Umemura, Kazuo

    2017-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) at low doses can effectively prevent gastrointestinal bleeding due to aspirin and are widely used in Japan for gastroprotection in patients taking anti-platelet agents. We examined the influence of different PPIs at low doses administered concomitantly or separately on anti-platelet functions of clopidogrel. In 41 healthy Japanese volunteers with different CYP2C19 genotypes who took clopidogrel 75 mg in the morning alone, or with omeprazole 10 mg, esomeprazole 10 mg, lansoprazole 15 mg, or rabeprazole 10 mg, either concomitantly in the morning or separately in the evening, we measured the inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA, %) using VerifyNow P2Y12 assay at 4 h after the last clopidogrel dose on Day 7 of each regimen. IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime, approximately 4 h after clopidogrel, was also measured. Mean IPAs in those concomitantly receiving omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole or rabeprazole (47.2 ± 21.1%, 43.2 ± 20.2%, 46.4 ± 18.8%, and 47.3 ± 19.2%, respectively) were significantly decreased compared with those receiving clopidogrel alone (56.0%) (all ps < 0.001). This decrease was observed when PPIs were administered separately in the evening. However, IPA by clopidogrel with rabeprazole administered at lunchtime was 51.6%, which was markedly similar to that of clopidogrel alone (p = 0.114). All tested PPIs reduce the efficacy of clopidogrel when administered concomitantly. Our preliminary data suggest that administration of rabeprazole 4 h following clopidogrel may minimize potential drug-drug interactions.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Proton Pump Inhibitor Co-Therapy in Patients Taking Aspirin for Secondary Prevention of Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Murata, Kyoko; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin (ASA) is effective for secondary prevention of ischemic stroke but can increase the risks of hemorrhagic stroke, upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB), and dyspepsia. Prophylactic administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) reduces the risks of these digestive symptoms. We investigated the cost effectiveness of adding a PPI to ASA therapy for ischemic stroke patients in Japan. A Markov state-transition model was developed to compare the cost effectiveness of ASA monotherapy with ASA plus PPI co-therapy in patients with histories of upper gastrointestinal ulcers and ischemic stroke. The model takes into account ASA adherence rate and adverse effects due to ASA, including hemorrhagic stroke and UGIB. The analysis was performed from the perspective of healthcare payers in 2013. In the base case, total life-years by PPI co-therapy and monotherapy were 16.005 and 15.932, respectively. The difference in duration of no therapy (no ASA or PPI) between the therapies was 558.5 days, which would prevent 30.3 recurrences of ischemic stroke per 1000 person-years. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of PPI co-therapy relative to monotherapy was ¥1,191,665 (US$11,458) per life-year gained. In a one-way sensitivity analysis, PPI co-therapy was consistently cost effective at a willingness to pay of ¥5,000,000 (US$48,077) per life-year gained. In a probabilistic sensitivity analysis, the probability that PPI co-therapy was cost effective was 89.74% at the willingness to pay. Co-therapy with ASA plus PPI appears to be cost-effective compared with ASA monotherapy. The addition of PPI also appeared to prolong the duration of ASA therapy, thereby reducing the risk of ischemic stroke.

  9. Prevalence and predictors of non-evidence based proton pump inhibitor use among elderly nursing home residents in the US.

    PubMed

    Rane, Pratik P; Guha, Sushovan; Chatterjee, Satabdi; Aparasu, Rajender R

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can lead to several adverse effects among the elderly, particularly when used inappropriately or in contrast to evidence suggested protocols. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and predictors of non-evidence based PPI use in elderly nursing home residents. A cross-sectional study was conducted using data from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS). The study sample included nursing home residents 65 years and older. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the prevalence of non-evidence based PPI use. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the patient and facility-level factors associated with non-evidence based PPI use among the elderly nursing home residents. A total of 355,600 elderly nursing home residents received at least one PPI for an overall prevalence of 26.99%. Among those elderly receiving PPIs, 48.59% of the use was not evidence based. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that residents with osteoporosis (Odds Ratio (OR): 0.55, 95% CI: 0.45-0.68), SSRI users (OR: 0.81, 95% CI: 0.68-0.97) and those residing in micropolitan area (OR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.63-0.98) were negatively associated with prescription of PPIs without an indication. Patients with chronic cough (OR: 2.10, 95% CI: 1.12-3.96) and Medicare insurance (OR: 1.23, 95% CI: 1.01-1.50) were positively associated with prescription of PPIs without an indication. The current study found that almost half of the elderly nursing home residents used PPIs for non-evidence based indications. Given the safety concerns and high non-evidence based use of PPIs in nursing homes, there is an urgent need to optimize PPI use in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A non-interventional retrospective cohort study of the interaction between methotrexate and proton pump inhibitors or aspirin.

    PubMed

    Boerrigter, E; Crul, M

    2017-09-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an antifolate drug, which is frequently used in the treatment of cancer. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) could delay the elimination of plasma MTX in high-dose MTX therapy by inhibition of tubular secretion, which could lead to MTX toxicity. However, the evidence of the clinical relevance of this drug-drug interaction is inconsistent. No previous studies into the effect of low dose aspirin on the elimination of MTX in high-dose therapy have been performed. Therefore, we evaluated the interaction between MTX and PPIs or aspirin. We conducted a non-interventional retrospective cohort study in patients treated with high dose MTX (≥500mg/m(2) or >1000mg), between 2009 and 2016 at the OLVG ("Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Oost") in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Patients were included if MTX concentrations were determined at 24, 48 or 72hours after high dose MTX treatment. We categorised the cycles of high dose MTX therapy into delayed elimination or normal elimination. Differences in patient characteristics and MTX dosing regimen were compared between all groups by X2-test, Fisher's exact probability test or Mann-Whitney U-test. In total, 89 high dose MTX cycles were included. Delayed MTX elimination was observed in 27 (30.3%) cycles. Co-administration of a PPI was significantly more frequent in the delayed elimination group than in the normal elimination group (P<0.001). There was no statistical effect observed by co-administration of aspirin. The use of PPIs during high dose MTX treatment can lead to delayed MTX elimination. Discontinuation of PPIs during high dose MTX treatment is recommended. Co-administration of aspirin did not influence the elimination of MTX, but further research is needed. Copyright © 2017 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Individual Proton Pump Inhibitors and Outcomes in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Matthew W; Melloni, Chiara; Jones, W Schuyler; Washam, Jeffrey B; Hasselblad, Vic; Dolor, Rowena J

    2015-10-29

    Observational studies evaluating the possible interaction between proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and clopidogrel have shown mixed results. We conducted a systematic review comparing the safety of individual PPIs in patients with coronary artery disease taking clopidogrel. Studies performed from January 1995 to December 2013 were screened for inclusion. Data were extracted, and study quality was graded for 34 potential studies. For those studies in which follow-up period, outcomes, and multivariable adjustment were comparable, meta-analysis was performed.The adjusted odds or hazard ratios for the composite of cardiovascular or all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and stroke at 1 year were reported in 6 observational studies with data on individual PPIs. Random-effects meta-analyses of the 6 studies revealed an increased risk for adverse cardiovascular events for those taking pantoprazole (hazard ratio 1.38; 95% CI 1.12-1.70), lansoprazole (hazard ratio 1.29; 95% CI 1.09-1.52), or esomeprazole (hazard ratio 1.27; 95% CI 1.02-1.58) compared with patients on no PPI. This association was not significant for omeprazole (hazard ratio 1.16; 95% CI 0.93-1.44). Sensitivity analyses for the coronary artery disease population (acute coronary syndrome versus mixed) and exclusion of a single study due to heterogeneity of reported results did not have significant influence on the effect estimates for any PPIs. Several frequently used PPIs previously thought to be safe for concomitant use with clopidogrel were associated with greater risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Although the data are observational, they highlight the need for randomized controlled trials to evaluate the safety of concomitant PPI and clopidogrel use in patients with coronary artery disease. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  12. Comparison of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms and Proton Pump Inhibitor Response Using Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jo, So Young; Lim, Ji Hwan; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Lee, Dong Ho; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims To compare gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) in patients with erosive esophagitis (EE), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) or functional heartburn (FH) using GERD impact scale (GIS) questionnaire. Methods Total 126 patients with GERD symptoms were diagnosed as EE (n = 62), NERD (n = 34) and FH (n = 30) by endoscopy, 24-hour esophageal pH testing and Bernstein test, prospectively. Analysis of risk factors and GIS questionnaire for GERD symptoms and quality of life were performed before and 8 weeks after PPI treatment. Results EE group had a higher proportion of men, frequent alcohol consumption, smoking, hiatal hernia, body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2 and triglyceride levels (≥ 150 mg/dL) than the other groups (all P < 0.05). On the other hand, both psychiatric treatment and psychopharmacotherapy were more frequent in patients with FH than in those with EE and NERD (both P < 0.05). Among GERD symptoms, chest pain was more frequent in FH group than in EE and NERD groups (P < 0.05). Eating problems and limitation of productive daily activities occurred frequently in FH group and NERD group, respectively. GIS after 8 week PPI treatment showed improvement in all of the GERD symptoms in EE (all P < 0.05) and in acid regurgitation, epigastric pain and hoarseness in NERD group (all P < 0.05). In terms of quality of life, PPI treatment improved sleep disturbance in EE (P = 0.031) and limitation of productive activity in the NERD group (P = 0.001). Conclusions GIS questionnaire showed that different characteristics and symptoms improved after PPI therapy among patients with EE, NERD and FH, demonstrating the usefulness of the GIS questionnaire. PMID:23350049

  13. Electrical potential oscillations--movement relations in circumnutating sunflower stem and effect of ion channel and proton pump inhibitors on circumnutation.

    PubMed

    Kurenda, Andrzej; Stolarz, Maria; Zdunek, Artur

    2015-02-01

    The physiological control and molecular mechanism of circumnutation (CN) has not yet been fully understood. To gain information on the CN mechanism, the relationship between the changes of electrical potential and movement in the circumnutating sunflower stem and effect of ion channels and proton pump inhibitors on CN parameters were evaluated. Long-term electrophysiological measurements and injection of solutions of ion channel inhibitors (ICI) into sunflower stem with the simultaneous time-lapse recording of the movement were made. The oscillations of electrical potential (OEP) - movement relations - consist of cells depolarization on the deflected side of the stem and, at this same time, cells hyperpolarization on the opposite side of the stem. The delay of organ movement in relation to electrical changes of approximately 28 min (22% of the period) may indicate that the ionic fluxes causing the OEP are the primary phenomenon. The biggest decrease of CN period was observed after injection of proton pump (approximately 26%) and cation channel (approximately 25%) inhibitors, while length and amplitude were reduced mainly by calcium channel inhibitors (approximately 67%). Existence of OEP only in circumnutating part of sunflower stem and reduction of CN parameters and OEP amplitude after application of ICI prove that the CN cellular mechanism is associated with transmembrane ion transport.

  14. Simultaneous quantification of metronidazole, tinidazole, ornidazole and morinidazole in human saliva.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongqing; Zhang, Peipei; Jiang, Ningling; Gong, Xiaojian; Meng, Ling; Wang, Dewang; Ou, Ning; Zhang, Haibo

    2012-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a rapid and sensitive method for the simultaneous quantification of metronidazole (MEZ), tinidazole (TNZ), ornidazole (ONZ) and morinidazole (MNZ) in human saliva. A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet (UV) detection at 318 nm was carried out on a C18 column, using a mixture of potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer, acetonitrile, and methanol (55:15:30, v/v/v) as a mobile phase with a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min. The saliva samples (100 μl) were firstly deproteinized by precipitation with methanol (400 μl), after which they were centrifuged and the supernatants were directly injected into the HPLC system. This method produced linear responses in the concentration ranges of 25.2-5040.0, 23.9-4790.0, 25.4-5080.0, 25.0-5000.0 ng/ml with detection limits of 6.0, 17.6, 10.0 and 11.3 ng/ml for MEZ, TNZ, ONZ and MNZ (S/N=3), respectively. The methods were validated in terms of intra- and inter-batch precision (within 7.3% and 9.1%, respectively), accuracy, linearity, recovery and stability. The study proved that HPLC is both sensitive and selective for the simultaneous quantification of MEZ, TNZ, ONZ and MNZ in human saliva using a single mobile phase. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis for the determination of norfloxacin and tinidazole in pharmaceuticals with multi-response optimization.

    PubMed

    Alnajjar, Ahmed; Abuseada, Hamed H; Idris, Abubakr M

    2007-04-30

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) with UV photo-diode array detection technique was utilized to adopt new method for the analysis of norfloxacin and tinidazole in pharmaceuticals. Many CE aspects including separation, rapidity, sensitivity, ruggedness as well as the repeatability of qualitative and quantitative analyses were considered simultaneously for the purpose of optimization. Experimental design approach including factorial design and response surface methods were applied to optimize electrolyte concentration and the pH while injection time, voltage and column temperature were optimized using the univariate method. Successful results were obtained using 32.5mmoll(-l) phosphate electrolyte at pH 2.5, injection time 8.0s, voltage 25kV and column temperature 25 degrees C with detection at wavelength 301nm. The analytical characteristics including recovery, intermediate precision, linear dynamic ranges, linearity and selectivity as well as limits of detection and quantification were demonstrated and the applicability to pharmaceuticals was studied. The newly provided method enjoys the advantages of CE over HPLC with respect to rapidity, ruggedness, simplicity in reagents and sample preparation as well as saving in reagents and samples.

  16. A PCR blood test outperforms chromogranin A in carcinoid detection and is unaffected by proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Modlin, Irvin M; Aslanian, Harry; Bodei, Lisa; Drozdov, Ignat; Kidd, Mark

    2014-12-01

    A critical requirement in neuroendocrine tumor (NET) management is a blood biomarker test that is sensitive, specific and reproducible. We evaluated a PCR-based 51-transcript signature to detect tumors, compared it with chromogranin A (CgA) and examined the confounding effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which cause falsely elevated CgA levels. The multigene signature was evaluated in two groups. Group 1: 125 prospectively collected NETs: gastroenteropancreatic NETs (n=91, including 42 pancreatic and 40 small intestinal), carcinoids of unknown primary (n=18) and other sites (n=16). Group 2: prospectively collected non-NET patients receiving PPIs (>1 month; dyspepsia, n=19; GERD, n=6; and pancreatitis, n=4) and 50 controls. All samples were analyzed by PCR (marker genes) and ELISA (DAKO-CgA). Sensitivity comparisons included χ(2), non-parametric measurements, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Group 1: 123 NETs were PCR-positive (98.4%) compared with 50 (40%) CgA-positive (χ(2)=97.3, P<10(-26)). Significant differences (P<0.001) were noted between pancreas: PCR 95% vs CgA 29.2% (P<10(-9)) and small intestine: 100 vs 58% (P<10(-4)). The multigene test was elevated in all grades (G1-G3), in both local and disseminated disease, and was not normalized by somatostatin analog therapy. It was also elevated in 97% of CgA normal NETs. Group 2: PPI administration increased CgA in 83% and CgA was elevated in 26% of controls. PCR values were not elevated in either group. PCR performance metrics were as follows: sensitivity 98.4%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 97.8%, and the ROC-derived area under the curve (AUC) was 0.997. These were significantly better than CgA (all metrics <60%; AUC, 0.54; Z-statistic, 10.44, P<0.0001). A 51-panel multigene blood transcript analysis is significantly more sensitive than plasma CgA for NET detection and is unaffected by acid suppression therapy.

  17. Influence of age on treatment with proton pump inhibitors in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux disease: a prospective multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Chan; Lee, Jun Seok; Kim, Seung Woo; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Eun, Young Gyu

    2013-12-01

    Several trials on the predictors of response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) have shown conflicting results. Furthermore, the influence of age in disease severity and response to PPI therapy is unclear. To assess the difference in disease severity and response to PPI therapy according to age in patients with LPR. Prospective multicenter study at 3 tertiary medical centers of 264 consecutive patients with LPR who were referred to the otolaryngology clinic from November 2010 to February 2012. Participants were prescribed 15 mg of lansoprazole (PPI) twice daily for 3 months. Reflux Symptom Index (RSI), Reflux Finding Score (RFS), and laryngopharyngeal reflux-health-related quality of life (LPR-HRQOL) were collected at baseline and at 1 and 3 months postbaseline. After 3 months, 35 patients were lost to follow-up and excluded; the remaining 229 patients included 135 men and 94 women. The oldest group (60-79 years; n = 111) showed higher baseline RSI (P < .001) and LPR-HRQOL (P < .001) scores than the 18- to 39-year-old (n = 35) and 40- to 59-year-old (n = 83) groups. However, baseline RFS scores showed no significant difference among age groups (P = .44). Within each age group, the RSI, RFS, and LPR-HRQOL improved significantly with PPI therapy (all P < .001); however, no significant difference in improvement of RSI (P = .59), RFS (P = .50), or LPR-HRQOL (P = .09) was seen among the groups. At 3-month follow-up, significantly more responders, defined as those whose RSI score improved by more than 50%, were found in the 18- to 39-year-old and 40- to 59-year-old groups (86% and 75%, respectively) than in the oldest group (57%) (P = .002), but there was no significant difference in proportion of responders among age groups at 1-month follow-up (P = .69). In patients with LPR, age seems to affect the subjective symptoms and resulting impact on quality of life but not the laryngeal

  18. Changes in serum magnesium concentration after use of a proton pump inhibitor in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Ho; Lee, Sun-hyo; Lee, Ji-Sung; Shin, Won-Yong; Gil, Hyo-Wook; Yang, Jong-Oh; Lee, Eun-Young; Hong, Sae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Although cross-sectional studies have suggested a relationship between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and hypomagnesemia, no large-scale cohort study has been conducted to date. Here, we examined the changes in serum magnesium levels in response to PPI use. We hypothesized that PPI use might change the serum magnesium concentration. Methods Of the 2,892 patients hospitalized for percutaneous coronary intervention between January 2007 and May 2012, 1,076 patients with normal baseline (1.6–2.5 mg/dL) and follow-up serum magnesium concentrations were enrolled. These patients were divided into two groups: the PPI group and the control group. Results The mean follow-up period was 9.51 ± 2.94 months. The incidence of hypomagnesemia (< 1.6 mg/dL) was 0.4% (3/834) in the PPI group and 0.4% (1/242) in the control group (P = 0.904). The change in magnesium levels did not differ between the two groups, and this result was maintained in the analysis of covariance after adjusting for confounding factors (P = 0.381). Moreover, magnesium levels did not significantly differ between the long-term (duration of use ≥ 12 months, n = 71) and short-term PPI groups (duration of use < 12 months, n = 763), and the control group (n = 242; P = 0.620). The effect of PPI use on change in serum magnesium concentration was affected by the use of multiple diuretics (−0.01 ± 0.25 mg/dL; P = 0.025), although a single diuretic use with PPI did not alter the change in magnesium level (0.12 ± 0.27 mg/dL). Conclusion Changes in magnesium levels might be subtle after PPI use in patients with normal baseline magnesium values. PMID:26484029

  19. Mealtime-related dosing directions for proton-pump inhibitors in gastroesophageal reflux disease: physician knowledge, patient adherence.

    PubMed

    Solem, Caitlyn; Mody, Reema; Stephens, Jennifer; Macahilig, Cynthia; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe physicians' knowledge, patients' adherence, and perceptions of both regarding mealtime-related dosing directions for proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). DESIGN Chart review and survey of patients and physicians. SETTING United States, with data collected between January and July 2011. PARTICIPANTS Patients being treated for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with PPIs and their prescribing physicians. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Patient- and physician-reported perception of PPI mealtime-related directions as important/inconvenient (seven-point Likert scale; 7 = very important/very inconvenient); physician-reported knowledge of PPI mealtime-related dosing directions based on whether the agent is labeled to be taken 30-60 minutes before eating (DIR-esomeprazole magnesium [Nexium-AstraZeneca], lansoprazole, and omeprazole) or labeled to be taken regardless of meals (NoDIR-dexlansoprazole [Dexilant-Takeda], rabeprazole, and pantoprazole); and patient-reported PPI mealtime-related directions received and adherence to directions. RESULTS Physicians (n = 262) recruited 501 patients who had been prescribed PPIs (262 DIR/239 NoDIR; mean age 51 years, 37% men, 56% nonerosive GERD [29% undocumented]). Across PPIs, physicians frequently reported incorrect directions or "did not know directions" (29% for esomeprazole to 69% for pantoprazole). While 98% of patients reported receiving directions from their physicians and 55% from their pharmacists, only 65% of DIR patients and 18% of NoDIR received directions consistent with product labeling. Physicians perceived greater inconvenience than patients (4.4 vs. 1.6, P < 0.001) and greater importance (5.2 vs. 4.5, P < 0.001) of mealtime-related directions. Overall, 81% of patients reported taking their PPI as directed. CONCLUSION While this patient cohort was adherent to directions given, physicians' directions were often inconsistent with product labeling. Understanding physician and patient knowledge gaps may

  20. Algorithmic approach to patients presenting with heartburn and epigastric pain refractory to empiric proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Roorda, Andrew K; Marcus, Samuel N; Triadafilopoulos, George

    2011-10-01

    Reflux-like dyspepsia (RLD), where predominant epigastric pain is associated with heartburn and/or regurgitation, is a common clinical syndrome in both primary and specialty care. Because symptom frequency and severity vary, overlap among gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), and RLD, is quite common. The chronic and recurrent nature of RLD and its variable response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy remain problematic. To examine the prevalence of GERD, NERD, and RLD in a community setting using an algorithmic approach and to assess the potential, reproducibility, and validity of a multi-factorial scoring system in discriminating patients with RLD from those with GERD or NERD. Using a novel algorithmic approach, we evaluated an outpatient, community-based cohort referred to a gastroenterologist because of epigastric pain and heartburn that were only partially relieved by PPI. After an initial symptom evaluation (for epigastric pain, heartburn, regurgitation, dysphagia), an endoscopy and distal esophageal biopsies were performed, followed by esophageal motility and 24-h ambulatory pH monitoring to assess esophageal function and pathological acid exposure. A scoring system based on presence of symptoms and severity of findings was devised. Data was collected in two stages: subjects in the first stage were designated as the derivation cohort; subjects in the second stage were labeled the validation cohort. The total cohort comprised 159 patients (59 males, 100 females; mean age 52). On endoscopy, 30 patients (19%) had complicated esophagitis (CE) and 11 (7%) had Barrett's esophagus (BE) and were classified collectively as patients with GERD. One-hundred and eighteen (74%) patients had normal esophagus. Of these, 94 (59%) had one or more of the following: hiatal hernia, positive biopsy, abnormal pH, and/or abnormal motility studies and were classified as patients with NERD. The remaining 24 patients (15%) had normal functional

  1. Are proton pump inhibitors associated with the development of community-acquired pneumonia? A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Christopher; Wilhelm, Sheila M; Kale-Pradhan, Pramodini B

    2012-05-01

    This study was presented at the American College of Chest Physicians meeting in Pittsburgh (PA, USA) in October 2011. The study objective was to evaluate the association of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The design was a meta-analysis of nine case-controlled and cohort studies. 120,863 pneumonia cases from 1987 to 2006 were included in the meta-analysis. PubMed and Ovid Medline were searched from inception through May 2011 by two investigators independently using keywords: PPI, pneumonia, CAP, anti-ulcer, antacid, omeprazole, esomeprazole, lansoprazole, pantoprazole and rabeprazole. This meta-analysis only included case-controlled and cohort studies that were published in full in English and evaluated PPI use and CAP incidence. Studies were excluded if they included the following patients: pediatric, Helicobacter pylori treatment and critically ill. Bibliographies of recent review articles and systematic reviews were hand-searched. Quality of studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Two investigators independently extracted data into standardized data collection forms that were confirmed by a third investigator. Data were analyzed based on current use of PPIs, duration of PPI use (<30 days or >180 days) and PPI dose (high vs low). Overall association of PPI and CAP was analyzed using the random effects model (Comprehensive Meta analysis(®) Version 2.0). Nine studies met all criteria for the primary outcome. Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale scores ranged from 4 to 8 out of 9. Current use of PPIs (odds ratio [OR]: 1.39; 95% CI: 1.09-1.76), PPI use <30 days (OR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.25-2.19), PPI high dose (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.33-1.68) and PPI low dose (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.11-1.24) were significantly associated with CAP. There was no association between CAP and PPI use >180 days (OR: 1.10; 95% CI: 1.00-1.21). In conclusion, patients currently receiving PPIs, particularly <30 days or high dose

  2. Doubly charged trimeric cluster ions: effective in mutual chiral recognition of tadalafil and three proton pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Chai, Yunfeng; Zhu, Wenquan; Pan, Yuanjiang; Sun, Cuirong; Zeng, Su

    2017-02-27

    Mutual chiral recognition of four stereoisomers of tadalafil and three pairs of enantiomers of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) including pantoprazole, lansoprazole, and omeprazole, as well as quantitative analysis of enantiomeric excess is achieved on the basis of the competitive fragmentation of doubly charged trimeric Ni(II) cluster ions. Compared with a singly charged trimeric cluster ion, a doubly charged trimeric cluster ion was proved efficient in the recognition of chiral drugs with one or multiple chiral centers, due to its rich fragmentation ions. Upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), the cluster ion [Ni(II)(PPIs)(tadalafil)2](2+) yielded two diagnostic ions [tadalafil + H](+) and [tadalafil - benzo[d][1,3]dixoloe](+) through electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The abundance ratio of the two fragment ions relied mainly on the configuration of PPIs and tadalafil, and therefore the chiral selectivity (Rchiral) of one enantiomer relative to the others is different. The chiral recognition of all four stereoisomers of tadalafil was achieved by using S configuration PPIs as references, and S-omeprazole showed the best selectivity. The Rchiral values for R,R/S,S, R,S/S,R, R,R/R,S and R,R/S,R-tadalafils were 1.47, 1.17, 2.37, and 2.10, respectively. In a reciprocal process, the Rchiral was 1.36 and 1.31 for R/S-pantoprazole and R/S-lansoprazole, respectively, by using R,R-tadalafil as a reference. Although omeprazole is a racemic drug, it can also be discriminated with S-omeprazole. Calibration curves were constructed with favorable correlation coefficients (r(2) > 0.991) by relating the ln(Rchiral) values to the isomeric composition in a mixture. The sensitivity of the methodology allows mixtures to be analyzed for the enantiomeric excess (ee) by recording the ratios of fragment ion abundances in a mass spectrum. The sensitivity of the methodology allowed the determination of enantiomeric impurities of 5% molar composition in

  3. Increased dietary potassium and magnesium attenuate experimental volume dependent hypertension possibly through endogenous sodium-potassium pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Pamnani, Motilal B; Bryant, Howard J; Clough, David L; Schooley, James F

    2003-02-01

    We and others have shown that inhibition of cardiovascular muscle (CVM) cell Na+,K-ATPase activity (NKPTA) due to increased level of endogenous sodium potassium pump inhibitor (SPI) is involved in the mechanism of volume expanded (VE) experimental and human essential hypertension (HT). Since diets fortified with very high potassium (K) or very high magnesium (Mg) decrease blood pressure (BP), we have examined the effect of a moderate increase in dietary K alone and a moderate increase in dietary K and Mg on plasma levels of SPI, CVM cell NKPTA, and BP in reduced renal mass (RRM)-salt HT rats, a classical model of VE HT. Seventy Percent-RRM rats were divided in four dietary groups, (1) Na free and normal K and Mg (0Na-K-Mg); (2) normal Na, K and Mg (Na-K-Mg); (3) normal Na and high K (2 x normal), and normal Mg (Na-2K-Mg); and (4) normal Na and high K (2 x normal), and high Mg (2 x normal) (Na-2K-2Mg). As expected, compared to control 0Na-K-Mg rats, Na-K-Mg rats developed HT. Blood pressure increased significantly less in Na-2K-Mg rats whereas, BP did not increase in Na-2K-2Mg rats. Hypertension in NA-K-Mg rats was associated with an increase in plasma SPI and digitalis like factor (DIF) and a decrease in renal and myocardial NKPTA. However, doubling the Mg along with K in the diet (Na-2K-2Mg) normalized SPI and DIF and increased myocardial and renal NKPTA, compared to control 0Na-K-Mg rats. Also, compared to 0Na-K-Mg rats, water consumption, urine excretion, urinary sodium excretion urinary potassium excretion (U(Na)V), and (U(K)V) increased in the other three groups, more so in Na-2K-2Mg rats. These data show that K and Mg have additive effects in preventing an increase in SPI, thus probably preventing the BP increase in RRM rats.

  4. Risk factors associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease relapse in primary care patients successfully treated with a proton pump inhibitor.

    PubMed

    López-Colombo, A; Pacio-Quiterio, M S; Jesús-Mejenes, L Y; Rodríguez-Aguilar, J E G; López-Guevara, M; Montiel-Jarquín, A J; López-Alvarenga, J C; Morales-Hernández, E R; Ortiz-Juárez, V R; Ávila-Jiménez, L

    There are no studies on the factors associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) relapse in primary care patients. To identify the risk factors associated with GERD relapse in primary care patients that responded adequately to short-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. A cohort study was conducted that included GERD incident cases. The patients received treatment with omeprazole for 4 weeks. The ReQuest questionnaire and a risk factor questionnaire were applied. The therapeutic success rate and relapse rate were determined at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment suspension. A logistic regression analysis of the possible risk factors for GERD relapse was carried out. Of the 83 patient total, 74 (89.16%) responded to treatment. Symptoms recurred in 36 patients (48.64%) at 4 weeks and in 13 patients (17.57%) at 12 weeks, with an overall relapse rate of 66.21%. The OR multivariate analysis (95% CI) showed the increases in the possibility of GERD relapse for the following factors at 12 weeks after treatment suspension: basic educational level or lower, 24.95 (1.92-323.79); overweight, 1.76 (0.22-13.64); obesity, 0.25 (0.01-3.46); smoking, 0.51 (0.06-3.88); and the consumption of 4-12 cups of coffee per month, 1.00 (0.12-7.84); citrus fruits, 14.76 (1.90-114.57); NSAIDs, 27.77 (1.12-686.11); chocolate, 0.86 (0.18-4.06); ASA 1.63 (0.12-21.63); carbonated beverages, 4.24 (0.32-55.05); spicy food 7-16 times/month, 1.39 (0.17-11.17); and spicy food ≥ 20 times/month, 4.06 (0.47-34.59). The relapse rate after short-term treatment with omeprazole was high. The consumption of citrus fruits and NSAIDs increased the possibility of GERD relapse. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Cost Effectiveness of Gastroprotection with Proton Pump Inhibitors in Older Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid Users in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Chau, Sek Hung; Sluiter, Reinier L; Kievit, Wietske; Wensing, Michel; Teichert, Martina; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2017-05-01

    The present study aimed to assess the cost effectiveness of concomitant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) treatment in low-dose acetylsalicylic acid (LDASA) users at risk of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) adverse effects as compared with no PPI co-medication with attention to the age-dependent influence of PPI-induced adverse effects. We used a Markov model to compare the strategy of PPI co-medication with no PPI co-medication in older LDASA users at risk of UGI adverse effects. As PPIs reduce the risk of UGI bleeding and dyspepsia, these risk factors were modelled together with PPI adverse effects for LDASA users 60-69, 70-79 (base case) and 80 years and older. Incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs) were calculated as cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained per age category. Furthermore, a budget impact analysis assessed the expected changes in expenditure of the Dutch healthcare system following the adoption of PPI co-treatment in all LDASA users potentially at risk of UGI adverse effects. PPI co-treatment of 70- to 79-year-old LDASA users, as compared with no PPI, resulted in incremental costs of €100.51 at incremental effects of 0.007 QALYs with an ICUR of €14,671/QALY. ICURs for 60- to 69-year-old LDASA users were €13,264/QALY and €64,121/QALY for patients 80 years and older. Initiation of PPI co-treatment for all Dutch LDASA users of 60 years and older at risk of UGI adverse effects but not prescribed a PPI (19%) would have cost €1,280,478 in the first year (year 2013 values). PPI co-medication in LDASA users at risk of UGI adverse effects is generally cost effective. However, this strategy becomes less cost effective with higher age, particularly in patients aged 80 years and older, mainly due to the increased risks of PPI-induced adverse effects.

  6. Impact of oesophagitis classification in evaluating healing of erosive oesophagitis after therapy with proton pump inhibitors: a pooled analysis.

    PubMed

    Yaghoobi, Mohammad; Padol, Sara; Yuan, Yuhong; Hunt, Richard H

    2010-05-01

    The results of clinical trials with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are usually based on the Hetzel-Dent (HD), Savary-Miller (SM), or Los Angeles (LA) classifications to describe the severity and assess the healing of erosive oesophagitis. However, it is not known whether these classifications are comparable. The aim of this study was to review systematically the literature to compare the healing rates of erosive oesophagitis with PPIs in clinical trials assessed by the HD, SM, or LA classifications. A recursive, English language literature search in PubMed and Cochrane databases to December 2006 was performed. Double-blind randomized control trials comparing a PPI with another PPI, an H2-RA or placebo using endoscopic assessment of the healing of oesophagitis by the HD, SM or LA, or their modified classifications at 4 or 8 weeks, were included in the study. The healing rates on treatment with the same PPI(s), and same endoscopic grade(s) were pooled and compared between different classifications using Fisher's exact test or chi2 test where appropriate. Forty-seven studies from 965 potential citations met inclusion criteria. Seventy-eight PPI arms were identified, with 27 using HD, 29 using SM, and 22 using LA for five marketed PPIs. There was insufficient data for rabeprazole and esomeprazole (week 4 only) to compare because they were evaluated by only one classification. When data from all PPIs were pooled, regardless of baseline oesophagitis grades, the LA healing rate was significantly higher than SM and HD at both 4 and 8 weeks (74, 71, and 68% at 4 weeks and 89, 84, and 83% at 8 weeks, respectively). The distribution of different grades in study population was available only for pantoprazole where it was not significantly different between LA and SM subgroups. When analyzing data for PPI and dose, the LA classification showed a higher healing rate for omeprazole 20 mg/day and pantoprazole 40 mg/day (significant at 8 weeks), whereas healing by SM classification

  7. Use of proton pump inhibitors and risk of hip/femur fracture: a population-based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pouwels, S.; Lalmohamed, A.; Souverein, P.; Cooper, C.; Veldt, B. J.; Leufkens, H. G.; de Boer, A.; van Staa, T.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Previous studies evaluated the association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. Therefore, the objective was to evaluate this association in a different study population. Our findings show that there is probably no causal relationship between PPI use and hip fracture risk. Introduction Previous studies evaluated the association between PPI use and subsequent fracture risk, but they showed ambiguous results. To further test these conflicting results, the objective of this study was to evaluate the association between the use of PPIs and the risk of hip/femur fracture in a different study population. Methods A case-control study was conducted using data from the Dutch PHARMO record linkage system. The study population included 6,763 cases aged 18 years and older with a first hip/femur fracture during enrolment and 26,341 age-, gender- and region-matched controls. Results Current users of PPIs had an increased risk of hip/femur fracture yielding an adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of 1.20 (95% CI 1.04–1.40). Fracture risk attenuated with increasing durations of use, resulting in AORs of 1.26 (95% CI 0.94–1.68) in the first 3 months, 1.31 (95% CI 0.97–1.75) between 3 and 12 months, 1.18 (95% CI 0.92–1.52) between 13 and 36 months and 1.09 (95% CI 0.81–1.47) for use longer than 36 months. Conclusion Our findings show that there is probably no causal relationship between PPI use and hip fracture risk. The observed association may be the result of unmeasured distortions: although current use of PPIs was associated with a 1.2-fold increased risk of hip/femur fracture, the positive association was attenuated with longer durations of continuous use. Our findings do not support that discontinuation of PPIs decreases risk of hip fracture in elderly patients. PMID:20585937

  8. Association of Proton Pump Inhibitors With Reduced Risk of Warfarin-Related Serious Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wayne A; Chung, Cecilia P; Murray, Katherine T; Smalley, Walter E; Daugherty, James R; Dupont, William D; Stein, C Michael

    2016-12-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might reduce the risk of serious warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding, but the evidence of their efficacy for this indication is limited. A gastroprotective effect of PPIs would be particularly important for patients who take warfarin with antiplatelet drugs or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which further increase the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. This retrospective cohort study of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample identified 97,430 new episodes of warfarin treatment with 75,720 person-years of follow-up. The study end points were hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding potentially preventable by PPIs and for bleeding at other sites. Patients who took warfarin without PPI co-therapy had 119 hospitalizations for upper gastrointestinal bleeding per 10,000 person-years of treatment. The risk decreased by 24% among patients who received PPI co-therapy (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.63-0.91). There was no significant reduction in the risk of other gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 0.94-1.22) or non-gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.84-1.15) in this group. Among patients concurrently using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs, those without PPI co-therapy had 284 upper gastrointestinal bleeding hospitalizations per 10,000 person-years of warfarin treatment. The risk decreased by 45% (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.39-0.77) with PPI co-therapy. PPI co-therapy had no significant protective effect for warfarin patients not using antiplatelet drugs or NSAIDs (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70-1.06). Findings were similar in both study populations. In an analysis of patients beginning warfarin treatment in Tennessee Medicaid and the 5% National Medicare Sample, PPI co-therapy was associated with reduced risk of warfarin-related upper gastrointestinal bleeding; the

  9. Evaluation of proton pump inhibitor use on treatment outcomes with ledipasvir and sofosbuvir in a real-world cohort study.

    PubMed

    Tapper, Elliot B; Bacon, Bruce R; Curry, Michael P; Dieterich, Douglas T; Flamm, Steven L; Guest, Lauren E; Kowdley, Kris V; Lee, Yoori; Tsai, Naoky C; Younossi, Zobair M; Afdhal, Nezam H

    2016-12-01

    Many patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are on prolonged proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and wish to remain on PPI therapy once treatment for HCV starts. A preliminary report recently suggested decrease rates of sustained virological response (SVR) for patients taking concomitant PPI and ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF). We sought to determine the effect of PPI use on the rate of SVR in a real-world cohort of 1,979 patients with chronic HCV treated with LDV/SOF. We collected clinical data and pharmacy dispensing records on patients taking 8, 12, or 24 weeks of LDV/SOF ± ribavirin (RBV). The primary outcome was sustained virological response at 12 weeks after treatment completion (SVR12) in a per-protocol analysis in order to determine the effect of PPI use adjusted for confounders. Statistical adjustment was performed in propensity-matched analysis. Among treatment completers, SVR12 was achieved in 441 (97.1%) of PPI recipients compared with 1,497 (98.2%) in PPI nonrecipients (P = 0.19). Neither low- nor high-dose PPI was associated with decreased SVR, although patients taking twice-daily PPI achieved a lower SVR12 rate (91.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 77.0-97.0; P = 0.046). After propensity matching for PPI use, there were no significant associations between SVR12 and any dose or frequency of PPI use. However, in a sensitivity analysis focusing on patients with cirrhosis, twice-daily PPI use was associated with lower odds ratio for SVR12 (0.11; 95% CI, 0.02-0.59). These data from a cohort of real-world patients receiving hepatitis C antibody therapy with LDF/SOF ± RBV support the prescription labeling suggesting that patients take no more than low-dose (20-mg omeprazole equivalents) PPI daily. (Hepatology 2016;64:1893-1899). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Nissen fundoplication vs proton pump inhibitors for laryngopharyngeal reflux based on pH-monitoring and symptom-scale.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Yan, Chao; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Ji-Min; Du, Xing; Liu, Dian-Gang; Luo, Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhong-Gao

    2017-05-21

    To compare the outcomes between laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and type I hiatal hernia diagnosed by oropharyngeal pH-monitoring and symptom-scale assessment. From February 2014 to January 2015, 70 patients who were diagnosed with LPR and type I hiatal hernia and referred for symptomatic assessment, oropharyngeal pH-monitoring, manometry, and gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled in this study. All of the patients met the inclusion criteria. All of the patients underwent LNF or PPIs administration, and completed a 2-year follow-up. Patients' baseline characteristics and primary outcome measures, including comprehensive and single symptoms of LPR, PPIs independence, and satisfaction, and postoperative complications were assessed. The outcomes of LNF and PPIs therapy were analyzed and compared. There were 31 patients in the LNF group and 39 patients in the PPI group. Fifty-three patients (25 in the LNF group and 28 in the PPI group) completed reviews and follow-up. Oropharyngeal pH-monitoring parameters were all abnormal with high acid exposure, a large amount of reflux, and a high Ryan score, associated reflux symptom index (RSI) score. There was a significant improvement in the RSI and LPR symptom scores after the 2-year follow-up in both groups (P < 0.05), as well as typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Improvement in the RSI (P < 0.005) and symptom scores of cough (P = 0.032), mucus (P = 0.011), and throat clearing (P = 0.022) was significantly superior in the LNF group to that in the PPI group. After LNF and PPIs therapy, 13 and 53 patients achieved independence from PPIs therapy (LNF: 44.0% vs PPI: 7.14%, P < 0.001) during follow-up, respectively. Patients in the LNF group were more satisfied with their quality of life than those in the PPI group (LNF: 62.49 ± 28.68 vs PPI: 44.36 ± 32.77, P = 0.004). Body mass index was significantly lower in

  11. Nissen fundoplication vs proton pump inhibitors for laryngopharyngeal reflux based on pH-monitoring and symptom-scale

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Yan, Chao; Wu, Qiong; Wu, Ji-Min; Du, Xing; Liu, Dian-Gang; Luo, Tao; Li, Fei; Wang, Zhong-Gao

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the outcomes between laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy in patients with laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and type I hiatal hernia diagnosed by oropharyngeal pH-monitoring and symptom-scale assessment. METHODS From February 2014 to January 2015, 70 patients who were diagnosed with LPR and type I hiatal hernia and referred for symptomatic assessment, oropharyngeal pH-monitoring, manometry, and gastrointestinal endoscopy were enrolled in this study. All of the patients met the inclusion criteria. All of the patients underwent LNF or PPIs administration, and completed a 2-year follow-up. Patients’ baseline characteristics and primary outcome measures, including comprehensive and single symptoms of LPR, PPIs independence, and satisfaction, and postoperative complications were assessed. The outcomes of LNF and PPIs therapy were analyzed and compared. RESULTS There were 31 patients in the LNF group and 39 patients in the PPI group. Fifty-three patients (25 in the LNF group and 28 in the PPI group) completed reviews and follow-up. Oropharyngeal pH-monitoring parameters were all abnormal with high acid exposure, a large amount of reflux, and a high Ryan score, associated reflux symptom index (RSI) score. There was a significant improvement in the RSI and LPR symptom scores after the 2-year follow-up in both groups (P < 0.05), as well as typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Improvement in the RSI (P < 0.005) and symptom scores of cough (P = 0.032), mucus (P = 0.011), and throat clearing (P = 0.022) was significantly superior in the LNF group to that in the PPI group. After LNF and PPIs therapy, 13 and 53 patients achieved independence from PPIs therapy (LNF: 44.0% vs PPI: 7.14%, P < 0.001) during follow-up, respectively. Patients in the LNF group were more satisfied with their quality of life than those in the PPI group (LNF: 62.49 ± 28.68 vs PPI: 44.36 ± 32.77, P = 0.004). Body mass index was

  12. Multimodality evaluation of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms who have failed empiric proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Galindo, G; Vassalle, J; Marcus, S N; Triadafilopoulos, G

    2013-07-01

    Patients with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), such as chest pain, heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia, are typically treated initially with a course of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). The evaluation of patients who have either not responded at all or partially and inadequately responded to such therapy requires a more detailed history and may involve an endoscopy and esophageal biopsies, followed by esophageal manometry, ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring, and gastric emptying scanning. To assess the merits of a multimodality 'structural' and 'functional' assessment of the esophagus in patients who have inadequately controlled GERD symptoms despite using empiric PPI, a retrospective cohort study of patients without any response or with poor symptomatic control to empiric PPI (>2 months duration) who were referred to an Esophageal Studies Unit was conducted. Patients were studied using symptom questionnaires, endoscopy (+ or - for erosive disease, or Barrett's metaplasia) and multilevel esophageal biopsies (eosinophilia, metaplasia), esophageal motility (aperistalsis, dysmotility), 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring (+ if % total time pH < 4 > 5%), and gastric emptying scanning (+ if >10% retention at 4 hours and >70% at 2 hours). Over 3 years, 275 patients (147 men and 128 women) aged 16-89 years underwent complete multimodality testing. Forty percent (n= 109) had nonerosive reflux disease (esophagogastroduodenoscopy [EGD]-, biopsy-, pH+); 19.3% (n= 53) had erosive esophagitis (EGD+); 5.5% (n= 15) Barrett's esophagus (EGD+, metaplasia+); 5.5% (n= 15) eosinophilic esophagitis (biopsy+); 2.5% (n= 7) had achalasia and 5.8% (n= 16) other dysmotility (motility+, pH-); 16% (n= 44) had functional heartburn (EGD-, pH-), and 5.8% (n= 16) had gastroparesis (gastric scan+). Cumulative symptom scores for chest pain, heartburn, regurgitation, and dysphagia were similar among the groups (mean range 1.1-1.35 on a 0-3 scale

  13. Long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy and falls and fractures in elderly women: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Joshua R; Barre, Deka; Zhu, Kun; Ivey, Kerry L; Lim, Ee Mun; Hughes, Jeff; Prince, Richard L

    2014-11-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used in the elderly. Recent studies have suggested that long-term PPI therapy is associated with fractures in the elderly, however the mechanism remains unknown. We investigated the association between long-term PPI therapy ≥1 year and fracture risk factors including bone structure, falls, and balance-related function in a post hoc analysis of a longitudinal population-based prospective cohort of elderly postmenopausal women and replicated the findings in a second prospective study of falling in elderly postmenopausal women. Long-term PPI therapy was associated with increased risk of falls and fracture-related hospitalizations; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.17; 95% CI, 1.25-3.77; p = 0.006 and 1.95; 95% CI, 1.20-3.16; p = 0.007, respectively. In the replication study, long-term PPI use was associated with an increased risk of self-reported falling; AOR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.00-2.27; p = 0.049. No association of long-term PPI therapy with bone structure was observed; however, questionnaire-assessed falls-associated metrics such as limiting outdoor activity (p = 0.002) and indoor activity (p = 0.001) due to fear of falling, dizziness (p < 0.001) and numbness of feet (p = 0.017) and objective clinical measurement such as Timed Up and Go (p = 0.002) and Romberg eyes closed (p = 0.025) tests were all significantly impaired in long-term PPI users. Long-term PPI users were also more likely to have low vitamin B12 levels than non-users (50% versus 21%, p = 0.003). In conclusion, similar to previous studies, we identified an increased fracture risk in subjects on long-term PPI therapy. This increase in fracture risk in elderly women, already at high risk of fracture, appears to be mediated via increased falls risk and falling rather than impaired bone structure and should be carefully considered when prescribing long-term PPI therapy. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  14. Intermittent vs continuous proton pump inhibitor therapy for high-risk bleeding ulcers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sachar, Hamita; Vaidya, Keta; Laine, Loren

    2014-11-01

    Current guidelines recommend an intravenous bolus dose of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) followed by continuous PPI infusion after endoscopic therapy in patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers. Substitution of intermittent PPI therapy, if similarly effective as bolus plus continuous-infusion PPI therapy, would decrease the PPI dose, costs, and resource use. To compare intermittent PPI therapy with the currently recommended bolus plus continuous-infusion PPI regimen for reduction of ulcer rebleeding. Searches included MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases through December 2013; US and European gastroenterology meeting abstracts from 2009 to 2013; and bibliographies of systematic reviews. Randomized trials of patients with endoscopically treated high-risk bleeding ulcers (active bleeding, nonbleeding visible vessels, and adherent clots) comparing intermittent doses of PPIs and the currently recommended regimen (80-mg intravenous bolus dose of a PPI followed by an infusion of 8 mg/h for 72 hours). Duplicate independent data extraction and risk-of-bias assessment were performed. Data were pooled using a fixed-effects model or a random effects model if statistical heterogeneity was present. The primary outcome was rebleeding within 7 days; additional predefined outcomes included rebleeding within 3 and 30 days, need for urgent intervention, mortality, red blood cell transfusion, and length of hospital stay. The primary hypothesis, defined before initiation of the literature review, was that intermittent use of PPIs was noninferior to bolus plus continuous infusion of PPIs, with the noninferiority margin predefined as an absolute risk difference of 3%. The risk ratio of rebleeding within 7 days for intermittent vs bolus plus continuous infusion of PPIs was 0.72 (upper boundary of 1-sided 95% CI, 0.97) and the absolute risk difference was -2.64% (upper boundary of 1-sided 95% CI, -0.28%, which is well below the predefined

  15. Comparison of the kinetic disposition and metabolism of E3810, a new proton pump inhibitor, and omeprazole in relation to S-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation status.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, S; Horai, Y; Tomono, Y; Nakai, H; Yamato, C; Manabe, K; Kobayashi, K; Chiba, K; Ishizaki, T

    1995-08-01

    We studied the kinetic disposition and metabolism of E3810 [(+/-)-sodium 2-[[4-(3-methoxypropoxy)-3-methylpyridin-2-yl]methylsulfinyl ]-1H- benzimidazole], a new proton pump inhibitor, and omeprazole in 15 Japanese male volunteers, six of whom were poor metabolizers and nine of whom were extensive metabolizers of S-mephenytoin. All received once-daily 20 mg doses of E3810 or omeprazole for 7 days in a randomized crossover manner, with a 3-week washout period between the two trial phases. The parent drugs and their principal metabolites in plasma and urine were measured on days 1 and 7 after drug administration. The mean values for area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of omeprazole were 6.3- and 4.4-fold greater, whereas those of E3810 were 1.8- and 1.9-fold greater in poor metabolizers than in extensive metabolizers after the first and final doses, respectively. Although the mean AUC values for both drugs were significantly (p < 0.01 or p < 0.05) greater in poor metabolizers than in extensive metabolizers, the difference in the AUC between the two groups was smaller after E3810 than after omeprazole administration. The AUC of omeprazole tended to increase with the repeated doses in extensive metabolizers, whereas no such change was observed for E3810. The urinary excretions of the principal metabolite(s) of two proton pump inhibitors also reflected the data derived from plasma samples in relation to S-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation status. We conclude that the metabolism of two proton pump inhibitors is under coregulatory control of S-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylase (CYP2C19), but that the magnitude of CYP2C19-mediated metabolism appears to differ between the two drugs. In contrast to omeprazole, the metabolism of E3810 is less saturable in extensive metabolizers during the repetitive dosings.

  16. Lactobacillus paracasei F19 versus placebo for the prevention of proton pump inhibitor-induced bowel symptoms: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Compare, Debora; Rocco, Alba; Sgamato, Costantino; Coccoli, Pietro; Campo, Salvatore Maria Antonio; Nazionale, Immacolata; Larussa, Tiziana; Luzza, Francesco; Chiodini, Paolo; Nardone, Gerardo

    2015-04-01

    Proton pump inhibitors may foster intestinal dysbiosis and related bowel symptoms. To evaluate the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei F19 on bowel symptom onset in patients on long-term proton pump inhibitors. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, patients with typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms receiving pantoprazole 40 mg/d for six months were randomly assigned to receive: (A) Lactobacillus paracasei F19 bid for three days/week for six months; (B) placebo bid for three days/week for six months; (C) Lactobacillus paracasei F19 bid for three days/week for three months and placebo bid for three days/week for the following three months; (D) placebo bid for three days/week for three months and Lactobacillus paracasei F19 bid for three days/week for the following three months. Bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain and bowel habit were assessed monthly. 100/312 patients were enrolled. In the parallel groups, the treatment-by-time interaction affected bloating (p = 0.015), while Lactobacillus paracasei F19 treatment alone affected flatulence (p = 0.011). Moreover, the treatment-by-time interaction significantly affected the mean score of bloating (p = 0.01) and flatulence (p < 0.0001), the mean stool form (p = 0.03) and mean stool frequency/week (p = 0.016). Analysis of the cross-over groups, limited to the first three months because of carry-over effect, confirmed these results. Lactobacillus paracasei F19 supplementation prevents bowel symptom onset in patients on long-term proton pump inhibitors. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Proton Pump Inhibitor Use Is Associated With Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Rectal Carriage at Hospital Admission: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, Pepijn; van den Bergh, Marjolein Kluytmans-; van Rijen, Miranda; Willemsen, Ina; van 't Veer, Nils; Kluytmans, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In this cross-sectional study, 8.5% of patients using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were rectal carriers of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E), compared with 2.9% of non-PPI users. In multivariable analysis, PPI use was independently associated with ESBL-E rectal carriage at hospital admission (adjusted odds ratio, 3.89; 95% confidence interval, 1.65 - 9.19). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. NO Metabolites Levels in Human Red Blood Cells are Affected by Palytoxin, an Inhibitor of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase Pump.

    PubMed

    Carelli-Alinovi, Cristiana; Tellone, Ester; Russo, Anna Maria; Ficarra, Silvana; Pirolli, Davide; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno; Misiti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Palytoxin (PTX), a marine toxin, represents an increasing hazard for human health. Despite its high toxicity for biological systems, the mechanisms triggered by PTX, are not well understood. The high affinity of PTX for erythrocyte Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump is largely known, and it indicates PTX as a sensitive tool to characterize the signal transducer role for Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump. Previously, it has been reported that in red blood cells (RBC), probably via a signal transduction generated by the formation of a PTX-Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase complex, PTX alters band 3 functions and glucose metabolism. The present study addresses the question of which other signaling pathways are regulated by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in RBC. Here it has been evidenced that PTX following its interaction with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump, alters RBC morphology and this event is correlated to decreases by 30% in nitrites and nitrates levels, known as markers of plasma membrane eNOS activity. Orthovanadate (OV), an antagonist of PTX binding to Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump, was able to reverse the effects elicited by PTX. Finally, current investigation firstly suggests that Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase pump, following its interaction with PTX, triggers a signal transduction involved in NO metabolism regulation.

  19. Long-term proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use and the development of gastric pre-malignant lesions.

    PubMed

    Song, Huan; Zhu, Jianwei; Lu, DongHao

    2014-12-02

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective drugs to reduce gastric acid secretion. PPIs are one of the most commonly prescribed classes of medications worldwide. Apart from short-term application, maintenance therapy with PPIs is recommended and increasingly used in certain diseases, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease, especially for people with erosive oesophagitis or Barrett's oesophagus. Although PPIs are generally safe, their efficacy and safety of long-term use remains unclear. The question of whether the long-term use of PPIs could promote the development of gastric pre-malignant lesions has been widely investigated, but results are inconsistent. Limited insight on this problem leads to a dilemma in decision making for long-term PPI prescription. To compare the development or progression of gastric pre-malignant lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hyperplasia, and dysplasia, in people taking long-term (six months or greater) PPI maintenance therapy. We searched the following databases (from inception to 6 August 2013): the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL. In addition, we searched the reference lists of included trials and contacted experts in the field. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in adults (aged 18 years or greater) concerning the effects of long-term (six months or greater) PPI use on gastric mucosa changes, confirmed by endoscopy or biopsy sampling (or both). Two review authors independently performed selection of eligible trials, assessment of trial quality, and data extraction. We calculated odds ratios (OR) for analysis of dichotomous data and mean differences for continuous data, with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included seven trials (1789 participants). Four studies had high risk of bias and the risk of bias in the other three trials was unclear. In addition, it was

  20. Effect of electrical stimulation of the lower esophageal sphincter in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients refractory to proton pump inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Edy; Rodríguez, Leonardo; Rodriguez, Patricia; Gómez, Beatriz; Neto, Manoel G; Crowell, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of lower esophageal sphincter (LES)-electrical stimulation therapy (EST) in a subgroup of patients that reported only partial response to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) therapy, compared to a group of patient with complete response. METHODS: Bipolar stitch electrodes were laparoscopically placed in the LES and connected to an implantable pulse generator (EndoStim BV, the Hague, the Netherlands), placed subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. Stimulation at 20 Hz, 215 μsec, 3-8 mAmp in 30 min sessions was delivered starting on day 1 post-implant. Patients were evaluated using gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-HRQL, symptom diaries; esophageal pH and esophageal manometry before and up to 24 mo after therapy and results were compared between partial and complete responders. RESULTS: Twenty-three patients with GERD on LES-EST were enrolled and received continuous per-protocol stimulation through 12 mo and 21 patients completed 24 mo of therapy. Of the 23 patients, 16 (8 male, mean age 52.1 ± 12 years) had incomplete response to PPIs prior to LES-EST, while 7 patients (5 male, mean age 52.7 ± 4.7) had complete response to PPIs. In the sub-group with incomplete response to PPIs, median (IQR) composite GERD-HRQL score improved significantly from 9.5 (9.0-10.0) at baseline on-PPI and 24.0 (20.8-26.3) at baseline off-PPI to 2.5 (0.0-4.0) at 12-mo and 0.0 (0.0-2.5) at 24-mo follow-up (P < 0.05 compared to on-and off-PPI at baseline). Median (IQR) % 24-h esophageal pH < 4.0 at baseline in this sub-group improved significantly from 9.8% (7.8-11.5) at baseline to 3.0% (1.9-6.3) at 12 mo (P < 0.001) and 4.6% (2.0-5.8) at 24 mo follow-up (P < 0.01). At their 24-mo follow-up, 9/11 patients in this sub-group were completely free of PPI use. These results were comparable to the sub-group that reported complete response to PPI therapy at baseline. No unanticipated implantation or stimulation-related adverse events, or any untoward sensation

  1. The Efflux Pump Inhibitor Reserpine Selects Multidrug-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Strains That Overexpress the ABC Transporters PatA and PatB▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, Mark I.; Piddock, Laura J. V.

    2008-01-01

    One way to combat multidrug-resistant microorganisms is the use of efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs). Spontaneous mutants resistant to the EPI reserpine selected from Streptococcus pneumoniae NCTC 7465 and R6 at a frequency suggestive of a single mutational event were also multidrug resistant. No mutations in pmrA (which encodes the efflux protein PmrA) were detected, and the expression of pmrA was unaltered in all mutants. In the reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant mutants, the overexpression of both patA and patB, which encode ABC transporters, was associated with accumulation of low concentrations of antibiotics and dyes. The addition of sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of ABC efflux pumps, or the insertional inactivation of either gene restored wild-type antibiotic susceptibility and wild-type levels of accumulation. Only when patA was insertionally inactivated were both multidrug resistance and reserpine resistance lost. Strains in which patA was insertionally inactivated grew significantly more slowly than the wild type. These data indicate that the overexpression of both patA and patB confers multidrug resistance in S. pneumoniae but that only patA is involved in reserpine resistance. The selection of reserpine-resistant multidrug-resistant pneumococci has implications for analogous systems in other bacteria or in cancer. PMID:18362193

  2. Do proton pump inhibitors increase the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia and related infectious complications when compared with histamine-2 receptor antagonists in critically ill trauma patients?

    PubMed

    Mallow, Stephanie; Rebuck, Jill A; Osler, Turner; Ahern, John; Healey, Mark A; Rogers, Frederick B

    2004-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) may increase the risk of nosocomial pneumonia caused by profound irreversible gastric acid suppression. The study purpose was to characterize differences in nosocomial pneumonia and related infections in trauma patients administered either histamine2-receptor antagonists (H2RA) or PPI. Observational evaluation of consecutive critically ill adult trauma patients administered either omeprazole or famotidine during a 22-month period. Nosocomial infection was evaluated daily based on published CDC definitions. Eighty of 269 patients fulfilled study criteria. The PPI group (n = 40) exhibited increased baseline risk for infection, demonstrated by higher ISS (p = 0.020), more chest tube placements (p = 0.031), and increased chest trauma (p = 0.025). Overall number of patients infected per group included 33% and 40% of patients administered PPI and H2RA, respectively (p = 0.64). Despite baseline differences, the incidence of nosocomial infection was similar (p = 0.87), and extrapolation of pneumonia based on 1000 patient days revealed a ratio 51.7 vs 52.2 in the PPI vs H2RA groups, respectively, which was not significant (p = 0.99). Proton pump inhibitor administration does not increase risk of nosocomial pneumonia or other nosocomial infections compared with H2RA therapy in the critically ill trauma patient.

  3. Micro-osmotic pumps for continuous release of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib in juvenile rats and its impact on bone growth

    PubMed Central

    Tauer, Josephine Tabea; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; Jung, Roland; Erben, Reinhold G.; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2013-01-01

    Background Bosutinib is a third-generation dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) inhibiting Abl and Src kinases. It was developed to act on up-regulated tyrosine kinases (TKs) like BCR-ABL in Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) when resistance to first- and second-generation TKIs developed. However, first- and second-generation TKIs show off-target effects on bone metabolism, whereas studies on skeletal adverse effects of bosutinib are still lacking. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to continuously expose juvenile rats to bosutinib and to analyze its influence on the growing bone. Material/Methods Starting after weaning, 4-week-old Wistar rats were chronically exposed over a 28-day period to varying concentrations of bosutinib, which were continuously administered subcutaneously via implanted Alzet® micro-osmotic pumps. After necropsy, the length of the femora and tibiae were analyzed. Results Continuous administration of bosutinib by micro-osmotic pumps led to serum drug levels in the lower therapeutic range, was well tolerated, and exhibited only minor adverse effects on the growing skeleton. Conclusions Micro-osmotic pumps represent a convenient system for continuous TKI release in young growing rats. Compared to first- and second-generation TKIs, bosutinib seems to exert fewer adverse effects on the growing bone. PMID:24185529

  4. Micro-osmotic pumps for continuous release of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor bosutinib in juvenile rats and its impact on bone growth.

    PubMed

    Tauer, Josephine Tabea; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Jung, Rolang; Erben, Reinhold G; Suttorp, Meinolf

    2013-11-04

    Bosutinib is a third-generation dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) inhibiting Abl and Src kinases. It was developed to act on up-regulated tyrosine kinases (TKs) like BCR-ABL in Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) when resistance to first- and second-generation TKIs developed. However, first- and second-generation TKIs show off-target effects on bone metabolism, whereas studies on skeletal adverse effects of bosutinib are still lacking. Therefore, it was the aim of this study to continuously expose juvenile rats to bosutinib and to analyze its influence on the growing bone. Starting after weaning, 4-week-old Wistar rats were chronically exposed over a 28-day period to varying concentrations of bosutinib, which were continuously administered subcutaneously via implanted Alzet® micro-osmotic pumps. After necropsy, the length of the femora and tibiae were analyzed. Continuous administration of bosutinib by micro-osmotic pumps led to serum drug levels in the lower therapeutic range, was well tolerated, and exhibited only minor adverse effects on the growing skeleton. Micro-osmotic pumps represent a convenient system for continuous TKI release in young growing rats. Compared to first- and second-generation TKIs, bosutinib seems to exert fewer adverse effects on the growing bone.

  5. Development of microbial trigger based oral formulation of Tinidazole and its Gamma Scintigraphy Evaluation: A promising tool against anaerobic microbes associated GI problems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Braj Gaurav; Kumar, Neeraj; Nishad, Dhruv Kumar; Khare, Naveen K; Bhatnagar, Aseem

    2016-06-30

    Tinidazole is a versatile anti-amoebic and anti-anaerobic drug used in treatment of intestinal infection. The aim of present study was to develop and evaluate a guar gum based novel target release Tinidazole matrix tablet in animal models and healthy human volunteer using Gamma Scintigraphy technique. Anti-anaerobic and anti-protozoal activity of the developed formulation was studied in vitro against Bacteroides fragilis and Dentamoeba fragilis. Tinidazole was successful radiolabelled with (99m)Tc-pertechnetate using stannous chloride as a reducing agent and stable up to 24h in normal saline and serum. Radiolabeled formulation was evaluated in 6 Newzealand white rabbits by gamma Scintigraphy in static manner up to 24h for its retention in gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Similar set of study was conducted in 12 healthy human volunteers for similar objective Scintigraphy images of healthy human volunteer showed retention of optimized formulations in stomach up to 60min, from where it moved to duodenum further and reached ileum in around 5h. However, initiation of drug release was observed from intestine at 7h. Complete dissociation and release of drug was observed at 24h in colon due to anaerobic microbial rich environment. Results drawn from Scintigraphy images indicate that radiolabeled (99m)Tc-Tinidazole tablet transit through upper part of GI without disintegration. Hence the developed matrix tablet may have a role in treatment of intestinal infection caused by anaerobic bacteria.

  6. Identification of the binding sites for ubiquinone and inhibitors in the Na+-pumping NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae by photoaffinity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takeshi; Ninokura, Satoshi; Kitazumi, Yuki; Mezic, Katherine G.; Cress, Brady F.; Koffas, Mattheos A. G.; Morgan, Joel E.; Barquera, Blanca; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2017-01-01

    The Na+-pumping NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) is the first enzyme of the respiratory chain and the main ion transporter in many marine and pathogenic bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae. The V. cholerae Na+-NQR has been extensively studied, but its binding sites for ubiquinone and inhibitors remain controversial. Here, using a photoreactive ubiquinone PUQ-3 as well as two aurachin-type inhibitors [125I]PAD-1 and [125I]PAD-2 and photoaffinity labeling experiments on the isolated enzyme, we demonstrate that the ubiquinone ring binds to the NqrA subunit in the regions Leu-32–Met-39 and Phe-131–Lys-138, encompassing the rear wall of a predicted ubiquinone-binding cavity. The quinolone ring and alkyl side chain of aurachin bound to the NqrB subunit in the regions Arg-43–Lys-54 and Trp-23–Gly-89, respectively. These results indicate that the binding sites for ubiquinone and aurachin-type inhibitors are in close proximity but do not overlap one another. Unexpectedly, although the inhibitory effects of PAD-1 and PAD-2 were almost completely abolished by certain mutations in NqrB (i.e. G140A and E144C), the binding reactivities of [125I]PAD-1 and [125I]PAD-2 to the mutated enzymes were unchanged compared with those of the wild-type enzyme. We also found that photoaffinity labeling by [125I]PAD-1 and [125I]PAD-2, rather than being competitively suppressed in the presence of other inhibitors, is enhanced under some experimental conditions. To explain these apparently paradoxical results, we propose models for the catalytic reaction of Na+-NQR and its interactions with inhibitors on the basis of the biochemical and biophysical results reported here and in previous work. PMID:28298441

  7. Identification of the Binding Sites for Ubiquinone and Inhibitors in the Na(+)-Pumping NADH-Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase of Vibrio cholerae by Photoaffinity Labeling.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takeshi; Murai, Masatoshi; Ninokura, Satoshi; Kitazumi, Yuki; Mezic, Katherine G; Cress, Brady F; Koffas, Mattheos A G; Morgan, Joel E; Barquera, Blanca; Miyoshi, Hideto

    2017-03-15

    The Na(+)-pumping NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) is the first enzyme of the respiratory chain and the main ion transporter in many marine and pathogenic bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae The V. cholerae Na(+)-NQR has been extensively studied, but its binding sites for ubiquinone and inhibitors remain controversial. Here, using a photoreactive ubiquinone PUQ-3 as well as two aurachin-type inhibitors [(125)I]PAD-1 and [(125)I]PAD-2 and photoaffinity labeling experiments on the isolated enzyme, we demonstrate that the ubiquinone ring binds to the NqrA subunit in the regions Leu32-Met39 and Phe131-Lys138, encompassing the rear wall of a predicted ubiquinone-binding cavity. The quinolone ring and alkyl side chain of aurachin bound to the NqrB subunit in the regions Arg43-Lys54 and Trp23-Gly89, respectively. These results indicate that the binding sites for ubiquinone and aurachin-type inhibitors are in close proximity but do not overlap with one another. Unexpectedly, while the inhibitory effects of PAD-1 and PAD-2 were almost completely abolished by certain mutations in NqrB (i.e. Gly140Ala and Glu144Cys), the binding reactivities of [(125)I]PAD-1 and [(125)I]PAD-2 to the mutated enzymes were unchanged compared to those of the wild-type enzyme. We also found that photoaffinity labeling by [(125)I]PAD-1 and [(125)I]PAD-2 rather than being competitively suppressed in the presence of other inhibitors, is enhanced under some experimental conditions. To explain these apparently paradoxical results, we propose models for the catalytic reaction of Na(+)-NQR and its interactions with inhibitors on the basis of the biochemical and biophysical results reported here and in previous work.

  8. Systematic reviews of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Leontiadis, G I; Sreedharan, A; Dorward, S; Barton, P; Delaney, B; Howden, C W; Orhewere, M; Gisbert, J; Sharma, V K; Rostom, A; Moayyedi, P; Forman, D

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the prevention and treatment of acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI) haemorrhage, as well as to compare this with H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA), Helicobacter pylori eradication (in infected patients) or no therapy, for the prevention of first and/or subsequent bleeds among patients who continue to use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Also to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of PPI therapy, compared with other treatments, for the prevention of subsequent bleeds in patients who had previously experienced peptic ulcer (PU) bleeding. Electronic databases and major conference proceedings were searched up to February 2006. Data were collected from the systematic reviews addressing each research objective. These were then entered into an economic model to compare the costs and quality-adjusted life-days of alternative management strategies over a 28-day period for patients who have had UGI bleeding. A Markov model with a Monte Carlo simulation used data from the systematic reviews to identify the most cost-effective treatment strategy for the prevention of UGI bleeding (first and subsequent) among NSAID users using an outcome of costs per quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) over a lifetime from age 50 years. PPI treatment initiated after endoscopic diagnosis of PU bleeding significantly reduced re-bleeding and surgery compared with placebo or H2RA. Although there was no evidence of an overall effect of PPI treatment on all-cause mortality, PPIs significantly reduced mortality in subgroups when studies conducted in Asia were examined in isolation or when the analysis was confined to patients with high-risk endoscopic findings. PPI treatment initiated prior to endoscopy in UGI bleeding significantly reduced the proportion of patients with stigmata of recent haemorrhage (SRH) at index endoscopy compared with placebo or H2RA, but there was no evidence that PPI

  9. [Clinical efficacy of fluconazole, tinidazole and clindamycin vs fluconazole, tinidazole and azithromycin in the treatment of mixed cervical-vaginal infections, included those caused by Mycoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis].

    PubMed

    Villagrana-Zesati, Jesús Roberto; Guerra-Infante, Fernando M; Sosa-González, Irma Elena

    2013-05-01

    In the United States 19 million people acquire a sexually transmitted disease every year. Sexually transmitted diseases impact in gynecological terms because they may cause sterility, infertility and ectopic pregnancy. To compare the effectiveness of two combinations of three oral antimicrobial drugs in the treatment of mixed cervical-vaginal infections, included those caused by Mycoplasma and Chlamydia trachomatis. Aclinical, random, comparative, double-blind study included 50 patients assisting to infectology consult with diagnosis of mixed cervical-vaginal infection. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A (n = 25): fluconazole 37.5 mg, tinidazole 500 mg and azithromycin 250 mg; group B (n = 25): fluconazole 37.5 mg, tinidazole 500 mg and clindamycin 312.5 mg. Patients of both groups received two tablets twice p.o. for one day. Cultures were performed to corroborate the diagnosis and then to demonstrate effectiveness of the schemes studied. For the analysis of the data we used measures of central tendency, dispersion and inferential statistics for comparison of proportions by c2 and Fisher's exact tests with a significance level of p < 0.05. All patient got clinical cure; however, regarding the microbiologic eradication a positive case was identified in group A, requiring rescue treatment. The compliance in both groups was of 100%. In both groups, statistical analysis did not show significant differences. Three patients in group A had mild adverse effects. Patients mean age was 33.4 +/- 5.3 years. Both treatments showed similar effectiveness against mixed cervical-vaginal infections. Microbiological efficacy was of 96% and 100% in group A and B, respectively, besides, scheme of group B was better tolerated.

  10. In vitro inhibition of methadone and oxycodone cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism: reversible inhibition by H2-receptor agonists and proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Liu, Fenyun; Fang, Wenfang B

    2013-10-01

    In vitro inhibition of oxycodone metabolism to noroxycodone and oxymorphone and R- and S-methadone metabolism to R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was measured for four H2-receptor antagonists and five proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) using human liver microsomes (HLM) and cDNA-expressed human cytochrome P450s (rCYPs). Inhibitors were first incubated with HLM at three concentrations with and without preincubation of inhibitor, enzyme source and reducing equivalents to also screen for time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Cimetidine and famotidine (10-1,000 µM) inhibited all the four pathways >50%. Nizatidine and ranitidine did not. All the five PPIs (1-200 µM) inhibited one or more pathways >50%. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were then determined using rCYPs. Cimetidine and famotidine both inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of noroxycodone and CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone, and famotidine inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of R- and S-EDDP, but IC50s were so high that only >10× therapeutic concentrations may have potential for reversible in vivo inhibition. The PPIs were more potent inhibitors; many have the potential for reversible in vivo inhibition at therapeutic concentrations. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and pantoprazole had greater effects on CYP3A4-mediated reactions, whereas lansoprazole was selective for CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone. Preincubation enhanced cimetidine inhibition of noroxycodone formation and rabeprazole inhibition of all pathways. Future studies will explore irreversible TDI.

  11. Comparative study of novel spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra: An application on pharmaceutical ternary mixture of omeprazole, tinidazole and clarithromycin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hayam Mahmoud; Abdel-Monem Hagazy, Maha

    2012-10-01

    Three simple, specific, accurate and precise spectrophotometric methods manipulating ratio spectra are developed for simultaneous determination of omeprazole (OM), tinidazole (TN) and clarithromycin (CL) in tablets. Method A, is an extended ratio subtraction one (EXRSM). Method B is a ratio difference spectrophotometric one (RDSM), while method C is mean centering of ratio spectra (MCR). The calibration curves are linear over the concentration range of 1-20 μg/mL, 10-60 μg/mL and 0.25-1.0 mg/mL for OM, TN and CL, respectively. The specificity of the developed methods is investigated by analyzing laboratory prepared mixtures of the three drugs and their combined dosage form. Standard deviation values are less than 1.5 in the assay of raw materials and tablets. The three methods are validated as per ICH guidelines and accuracy, precision, repeatability and robustness are found to be within the acceptable limits.

  12. Stronger inhibition of gastric acid secretion by lafutidine, a novel H2 receptor antagonist, than by the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Hatsushi; Koike, Tomoyuki; Ohara, Shuichi; Horii, Toru; Kikuchi, Ryousuke; Kobayashi, Shigeyuki; Abe, Yasuhiko; Iijima, Katsunori; Imatani, Akira; Suzuki, Kaori; Hishinuma, Takanori; Goto, Junichi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To compare the antisecretory activity and plasma drug concentrations of a single oral dose of 10 mg lafutidine, a novel H2 receptor antagonist, with those of the proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole (LPZ) 30 mg. METHODS: Ten volunteers without H pylori infection participated in this crossover study comparing lafutidine 10 mg with LPZ 30 mg. Intragastric pH was monitored for 6 h in all participants, and blood samples were collected from four randomly selected individuals after single-dose administration of each drug. RESULTS: The median intragastric pH was significantly higher in individuals who received lafutidine 10 mg than in those who received LPZ 30 mg 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h after administration. Maximal plasma drug concentration was reached more promptly with lafutidine 10 mg than with LPZ 30 mg. CONCLUSION: In H pylori-negative individuals, gastric acid secretion is more markedly inhibited by lafutidine than by LPZ. PMID:18416470

  13. Quantitation of glandular gastric changes in rats given a proton pump inhibitor for 3 months with emphasis on sampling scheme selection.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Smith, W C; Fisher, L F; Gatlin, C L; Hanasono, G K; Jordan, W H

    1998-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors and H2-receptor antagonists suppress gastric acid secretion and secondarily induce hypergastrinemia. Sustained hypergastrinemia has a trophic effect on stomach fundic mucosa, including enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Histomorphometric quantitation of the pharmacologic gastric effects was conducted on 10 male and 10 female rats treated orally with LY307640 sodium, a proton pump inhibitor, at daily doses of 25, 60, 130, or 300 mg/kg for 3 mo. Histologic sections of glandular stomach, stained for chromogranin A, were evaluated by image analysis to determine stomach mucosal thickness, mucosal and nonmucosal (submucosa and muscularis) area, gastric glandular area, ECL cell number/area and cross-sectional area. Total mucosal and nonmucosal tissue volumes per animal were derived from glandular stomach volumetric and area data. Daily oral doses of compound LY307640 sodium caused slight to moderate dose-related mucosal hypertrophy and ECL cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia in all treatment groups as compared with controls. All observed effects were prominent in both sexes but were generally greater in females. The morphometric sampling schemes were explored to optimize the data collection efficiency for future studies. A comparison between the sampling schemes used in this study and alternative schemes was conducted by estimating the probability of detecting a specific percentage of change between the male control and high-dose groups based on Tukey's trend test. The sampling scheme analysis indicated that mucosal thickness and mass had been oversampled. ECL cell density quantitation efficiency would have been increased by sampling the basal mucosa only for short-term studies. The ECL cell size sampling scheme was deemed appropriate for this type of study.

  14. Partial purification of a sodium pump inhibitor from bovine adenohypophysis. Its comparison with the natriuretic factor isolated from hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Illescas, M; Ricote, M; Méndez, E; Robles, R G; Sancho, J M

    1988-01-01

    Adenohypophysis and hypothalamic bovine tissues were homogenized, lipid extracted, salt removed and loaded onto 2 successive mu Bondapak HPLC columns, semipreparative and analytic, respectively. In vitro sodium-pump inhibitory activity, recovered from each tissue, showed similar chromatographic patterns, but hypothalamus seems to contain a major hydrophobic material which appears at the end of the run, when acetonitrile gradient raised 40% approximately. Digitalis-like activity disappears along the purification procedure, and this fact suggests a clear dissociation between (Na/K)ATPase inhibition and digoxin-like activity, measured as crossing with digoxin antibodies.

  15. Repurposing of Proton Pump Inhibitors as first identified small molecule inhibitors of endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (ENGase) for the treatment of NGLY1 deficiency, a rare genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yiling; Might, Matthew; Vankayalapati, Hariprasad; Kuberan, Balagurunathan

    2017-07-01

    N-Glycanase deficiency, or NGLY1 deficiency, is an extremely rare human genetic disease. N-Glycanase, encoded by the gene NGLY1, is an important enzyme involved in protein deglycosylation of misfolded proteins. Deglycosylation of misfolded proteins precedes the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) process. NGLY1 patients produce little or no N-glycanase (Ngly1), and the symptoms include global developmental delay, frequent seizures, complex hyperkinetic movement disorder, difficulty in swallowing/aspiration, liver dysfunction, and a lack of tears. Unfortunately, there has not been any therapeutic option available for this rare disease so far. Recently, a proposed molecular mechanism for NGLY1 deficiency suggested that endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (ENGase) inhibitors may be promising therapeutics for NGLY1 patients. Herein, we performed structure-based virtual screening utilizing FDA-approved drug database on this ENGase target to enable repurposing of existing drugs. Several Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs), a series of substituted 1H-benzo [d] imidazole, and 1H-imidazo [4,5-b] pyridines, among other scaffolds, have been identified as potent ENGase inhibitors. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay was employed to assess the inhibition of ENGase activity by these PPIs. Our efforts led to the discovery of Rabeprazole Sodium as the most promising hit with an IC50 of 4.47±0.44μM. This is the first report that describes the discovery of small molecule ENGase inhibitors, which can potentially be used for the treatment of human NGLY1 deficiency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alterations in the force-frequency relationship by tert-butylbenzohydroquinone, a putative SR Ca2+ pump inhibitor, in rabbit and rat ventricular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Baudet, S.; Do, E.; Noireaud, J.; Le Marec, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of 2,5 di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone (TBQ), a putative inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pump, on twitch tension, time course and SR Ca2+ content have been studied at different stimulation frequencies (0.5-3 Hz) in isolated preparations from the rabbit and rat right ventricle, at 37 degrees C. 2. At 0.5Hz, 30 microM TBQ induced a marked negative inotropic effect in both species (-57% in the rabbit and -68% in the rat) and decreased the rate of rise and fall of twitch tension. In parallel, SR Ca2+ content (assessed by rapid cooling contractures) was depressed in the rabbit by 42%. The force-frequency relationship (positive for the rabbit and negative for the rat) was significantly attenuated. In the rabbit, this alteration was shown to rely on insufficient SR Ca2+ reloading with increasing frequencies. 3. Exposure of TBQ-treated preparations to 8 mM extracellular Ca2+ or 5 microM isoprenaline were effective in reloading the SR with Ca2+ whereas 20 mM caffeine emptied this compartment. 4. In the rabbit ventricle, increase in stimulation frequency shortened control twitch time course by decreasing both the time to peak tension (TTP) and the time to half relaxation (t1/2). TBQ did not differentially affect the pattern for t1/2 but significantly attenuated the frequency-induced decrease of TTP. 5. In rabbit ventricular muscle, the action potential duration increased between 0.5 and 3 Hz whether or not TBQ was present. However, TBQ induced a small but significant additional action potential shortening. 6. TBQ decreased twitch tension in the rat ventricle between 0.5 and 3 Hz but the negative staircase was not differentially affected by the SR Ca2+ pump inhibitor. In control conditions and in the presence of 30 microM TBQ, t1/2 was frequency-independent but TBQ consistently increased this parameter (by approximately 29%). 7. These data argue in favour of a specific and partial inhibition of the SR Ca2+ pump by 30 microM TBQ in the

  17. [Do proton pump inhibitors after endoscopic control of acute ulcer hemorrhage have an advantage over H2 receptor antagonists?].

    PubMed

    Prassler, R; Hendrich, H; Barnert, J; Richter, G; Fleischmann, R; Wienbeck, M

    1995-08-01

    During a two year period (1992-1993) we investigated whether or not, after endoscopic therapy of bleeding ulcers, the suppression of gastric acid secretion with an administration of a proton pump blocker (Omeprazol) is more effective than the administration of H2-receptor antagonist (Ranitidin) with respect to prevention of recurrent bleeding episodes, frequency of surgical intervention and mortality. 106 patients (64 men, 42 women) were treated with the proton pump blocker and 126 patients (82 men, 44 women) received the H2-receptor antagonist. Patients were treated either with an initial dose of 80 mg Omeprazol followed by 3 x 40 mg Omeprazol i.v. or with a daily dose of 3 mg/kg body weight Ranitidin i.v. No significant differences could be detected between the two treatment regimes with respect to the parameters mentioned above. Rebleeding which could be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis occurred in 19.8% vs. 17.5% (Omeprazol/Ranitidin) of patients. Surgical intervention because of rebleeding was necessary on 8.5% vs. 8.7% of the patients. Mortality due to hemorrhage was 5.7% vs. 4.0%. From these results we conclude that, following endoscopic hemostasis of bleeding ulcers, Omeprazol has no advantage over Ranitidin using our dosage regimes.

  18. Microbial Light-Activatable Proton Pumps as Neuronal Inhibitors to Functionally Dissect Neuronal Networks in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Husson, Steven J.; Liewald, Jana F.; Schultheis, Christian; Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Lu, Hang; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Essentially any behavior in simple and complex animals depends on neuronal network function. Currently, the best-defined system to study neuronal circuits is the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, as the connectivity of its 302 neurons is exactly known. Individual neurons can be activated by photostimulation of Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) using blue light, allowing to directly probe the importance of a particular neuron for the respective behavioral output of the network under study. In analogy, other excitable cells can be inhibited by expressing Halorhodopsin from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR) and subsequent illumination with yellow light. However, inhibiting C. elegans neurons using NpHR is difficult. Recently, proton pumps from various sources were established as valuable alternative hyperpolarizers. Here we show that archaerhodopsin-3 (Arch) from Halorubrum sodomense and a proton pump from the fungus Leptosphaeria maculans (Mac) can be utilized to effectively inhibit excitable cells in C. elegans. Arch is the most powerful hyperpolarizer when illuminated with yellow or green light while the action spectrum of Mac is more blue-shifted, as analyzed by light-evoked behaviors and electrophysiology. This allows these tools to be combined in various ways with ChR2 to analyze different subsets of neurons within a circuit. We exemplify this by means of the polymodal aversive sensory ASH neurons, and the downstream command interneurons to which ASH neurons signal to trigger a reversal followed by a directional turn. Photostimulating ASH and subsequently inhibiting command interneurons using two-color illumination of different body segments, allows investigating temporal aspects of signaling downstream of ASH. PMID:22815873

  19. Multiobjective optimization strategy based on desirability functions used for the microemulsion liquid chromatographic separation and quantification of norfloxacin and tinidazole in plasma and formulations.

    PubMed

    Abou-Taleb, Noura Hemdan; El-Wasseef, Dalia Rashad; El-Sherbiny, Dina Tawfik; El-Ashry, Saadia Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to optimize a microemulsion liquid chromatography method for the simultaneous determination of norfloxacin and tinidazole binary mixture using a chemometric protocol. Optimization experiments were conducted through a process of screening and optimization. A 2(7-4) fractional factorial design was used as screening design. While the location of optimum conditions was established by applying Derringer's desirability function. The optimal mobile phase composition was predicted to be: 3.5% w/v SDS, 10.03% v/v 1-propanol, 0.5% v/v 1-octanol, and 0.3% triethylamine in 0.02 M phosphoric acid at pH 6.5. The mobile phase was delivered isocratically at a flow rate of 1 mL/min with UV detection at 290 nm. Tinidazole and norfloxacin were eluted with retention times of 1.8 and 5.8 min, respectively. The calibration plots displayed good linear relationships in the concentration ranges of 0.5-50 and 0.75-75 μg/mL for norfloxacin and tinidazole, respectively. The method was successfully applied for determination of both drugs in pharmaceutical dosage forms and real human plasma. Where the accuracy was proved by the low values of % error and high values of recovery, also the relative standard deviation for the results did not exceed 1.5%, proving the precision of the method. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Inconsistency in the Diagnosis of Functional Heartburn: Usefulness of Prolonged Wireless pH Monitoring in Patients With Proton Pump Inhibitor Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Penagini, Roberto; Sweis, Rami; Mauro, Aurelio; Domingues, Gerson; Vales, Andres; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-03-30

    The diagnosis of functional heartburn is important for management, however it stands on fragile pH monitoring variables, ie, acid exposure time varies from day to day and symptoms are often few or absent. Aim of this study was to investigate consistency of the diagnosis of functional heartburn in subsequent days using prolonged wireless pH monitoring and its impact on patients' outcome. Fifty proton pump inhibitotor refractory patients (11 male, 48 years [range, 38-57 years]) with a diagnosis of functional heartburn according to Rome III in the first 24 hours of wireless pH monitoring were reviewed. pH variables were analysed in the following 24-hour periods to determine if tracings were indicative of diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease (either acid exposure time > 5% or normal acid exposure time and symptom index ≥ 50%). Outcome was assessed by review of hospital files and/or telephone interview. Fifteen out of 50 patients had a pathological acid exposure time after the first day of monitoring (10 in the second day and 5 in subsequent days), which changed their diagnosis from functional heartburn to non-erosive reflux disease. Fifty-four percent of non-erosive reflux disease vs 11% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.003) increased the dose of proton pump inhibitors or underwent fundoplication after the pH test. Outcome was positive in 77% of non-erosive reflux disease vs 43% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.05). One-third of patients classified as functional heartburn at 24-hour pH-monitoring can be re-classified as non-erosive reflux disease after a more prolonged pH recording period. This observation has a positive impact on patients' management.

  1. The association between the use of proton pump inhibitors and the risk of hypomagnesemia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Eun Hye; Roh, Yun Ho; Kim, Ha Yan; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-01-01

    Although many case reports have described patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia, the impact of PPI use on hypomagnesemia has not been fully clarified through comparative studies. We aimed to evaluate the association between the use of PPI and the risk of developing hypomagnesemia by conducting a systematic review with meta-analysis. We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library using the primary keywords "proton pump," "dexlansoprazole," "esomeprazole," "ilaprazole," "lansoprazole," "omeprazole," "pantoprazole," "rabeprazole," "hypomagnesemia," "hypomagnesaemia," and "magnesium." Studies were included if they evaluated the association between PPI use and hypomagnesemia and reported relative risks or odds ratios or provided data for their estimation. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the random effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed with Cochran's Q test and I2 statistics. Nine studies including 115,455 patients were analyzed. The median Newcastle-Ottawa quality score for the included studies was seven (range, 6-9). Among patients taking PPIs, the median proportion of patients with hypomagnesemia was 27.1% (range, 11.3-55.2%) across all included studies. Among patients not taking PPIs, the median proportion of patients with hypomagnesemia was 18.4% (range, 4.3-52.7%). On meta-analysis, pooled odds ratio for PPI use was found to be 1.775 (95% confidence interval 1.077-2.924). Significant heterogeneity was identified using Cochran's Q test (df = 7, P<0.001, I2 = 98.0%). PPI use may increase the risk of hypomagnesemia. However, significant heterogeneity among the included studies prevented us from reaching a definitive conclusion.

  2. The Association between the Use of Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Risk of Hypomagnesemia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hyuk; Kim, Eun Hye; Roh, Yun Ho; Kim, Ha Yan; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-01-01

    Background Although many case reports have described patients with proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-induced hypomagnesemia, the impact of PPI use on hypomagnesemia has not been fully clarified through comparative studies. We aimed to evaluate the association between the use of PPI and the risk of developing hypomagnesemia by conducting a systematic review with meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a systematic search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library using the primary keywords “proton pump,” “dexlansoprazole,” “esomeprazole,” “ilaprazole,” “lansoprazole,” “omeprazole,” “pantoprazole,” “rabeprazole,” “hypomagnesemia,” “hypomagnesaemia,” and “magnesium.” Studies were included if they evaluated the association between PPI use and hypomagnesemia and reported relative risks or odds ratios or provided data for their estimation. Pooled odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the random effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was assessed with Cochran’s Q test and I2 statistics. Results Nine studies including 115,455 patients were analyzed. The median Newcastle-Ottawa quality score for the included studies was seven (range, 6–9). Among patients taking PPIs, the median proportion of patients with hypomagnesemia was 27.1% (range, 11.3–55.2%) across all included studies. Among patients not taking PPIs, the median proportion of patients with hypomagnesemia was 18.4% (range, 4.3–52.7%). On meta-analysis, pooled odds ratio for PPI use was found to be 1.775 (95% confidence interval 1.077–2.924). Significant heterogeneity was identified using Cochran’s Q test (df = 7, P<0.001, I2 = 98.0%). Conclusions PPI use may increase the risk of hypomagnesemia. However, significant heterogeneity among the included studies prevented us from reaching a definitive conclusion. PMID:25394217

  3. Inconsistency in the Diagnosis of Functional Heartburn: Usefulness of Prolonged Wireless pH Monitoring in Patients With Proton Pump Inhibitor Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penagini, Roberto; Sweis, Rami; Mauro, Aurelio; Domingues, Gerson; Vales, Andres; Sifrim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The diagnosis of functional heartburn is important for management, however it stands on fragile pH monitoring variables, ie, acid exposure time varies from day to day and symptoms are often few or absent. Aim of this study was to investigate consistency of the diagnosis of functional heartburn in subsequent days using prolonged wireless pH monitoring and its impact on patients’ outcome. Methods Fifty proton pump inhibitotor refractory patients (11 male, 48 years [range, 38–57 years]) with a diagnosis of functional heart-burn according to Rome III in the first 24 hours of wireless pH monitoring were reviewed. pH variables were analysed in the following 24-hour periods to determine if tracings were indicative of diagnosis of non-erosive reflux disease (either acid exposure time > 5% or normal acid exposure time and symptom index ≥ 50%). Outcome was assessed by review of hospital files and/or telephone interview. Results Fifteen out of 50 patients had a pathological acid exposure time after the first day of monitoring (10 in the second day and 5 in subsequent days), which changed their diagnosis from functional heartburn to non-erosive reflux disease. Fifty-four percent of non-erosive reflux disease vs 11% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.003) increased the dose of proton pump inhibitors or underwent fundoplication after the pH test. Outcome was positive in 77% of non-erosive reflux disease vs 43% of functional heartburn patients (P < 0.05). Conclusions One-third of patients classified as functional heartburn at 24-hour pH-monitoring can be re-classified as non-erosive reflux disease after a more prolonged pH recording period. This observation has a positive impact on patients’ management. PMID:25843078

  4. Complexity generation in fungal peptidyl alkaloid biosynthesis: a two-enzyme pathway to the hexacyclic MDR export pump inhibitor ardeemin

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Stuart W.; Gao, Xue; Tang, Yi; Walsh, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Ardeemins are hexacyclic peptidyl alkaloids isolated from Aspergillus fischeri as agents that block efflux of anticancer drugs by (MultiDrug Resistance) MDR export pumps. To evaluate the biosynthetic logic and enzymatic machinery for ardeemin framework assembly, we sequenced the A. fischeri genome and identified the ardABC gene cluster. Through both genetic deletions and biochemical characterizations of purified ArdA and ArdB we show this ArdAB enzyme pair is sufficient to convert anthranilate (Ant), l-Ala and l-Trp to ardeemin. ArdA is a 430 kDa trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) that converts the three building blocks into a fumiquinazoline (FQ) regioisomer termed ardeemin FQ. ArdB is a prenyltransferase that takes tricyclic ardeemin FQ and dimethylallyl diphosphate to the hexacyclic ardeemin scaffold via prenylation at C2 of the Trp-derived indole moiety with intramolecular capture by an amide NH of the fumiquinazoline ring. The two-enzyme ArdAB pathway reveals remarkable efficiency in construction of the hexacyclic peptidyl alkaloid scaffold. PMID:23330675

  5. Cytotoxic effects of the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole on the non-target marine microalga Tetraselmis suecica.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Marta; Esperanza, Marta; Cid, Ángeles

    2017-10-01

    Omeprazole (OMP) is one of the most commonly used drugs for the treatment of gastro-intestinal disorders. Although it is daily consumed in high quantities and commonly detected in waters worldwide, relatively little is known about its ecotoxicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential acute toxicity of increasing concentrations of OMP on the marine microalga Tetraselmis suecica analysing several cytotoxicity biomarkers by flow cytometry after 24h of exposure. Results showed that OMP caused a decrease in growth and autofluorescence, an increase in cellular volume and intracellular complexity, hyperpolarization of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial membranes and intracellular acidification. In addition, large amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated which resulted in a decrease in the percentage of the viable population. However, the viable population showed an increase in their metabolic activity as an early response to overcome the stress. In conclusion, OMP may affect proton pumps in non-target organisms such as microalgae; it disturbed pH homeostasis and provoked an early accumulation of ROS that resulted in a rapid cell death in cells exposed to the highest concentration assayed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Negative Effect of Proton-pump Inhibitors (PPIs) on Helicobacter pylori Growth, Morphology, and Urease Test and Recovery after PPI Removal--An In vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Saniee, Parastoo; Shahreza, Somayeh; Siavoshi, Farideh

    2016-04-01

    Proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) consumption does lead to false-negative results of Helicobacter pylori diagnostic tests such as biopsy culture and rapid urease test (RUT). Helicobacter pylori isolates from 112 dyspeptic patients with (56.5%) or without (43.5%) PPI consumption were recruited for examining the negative effects of omeprazole (OMP), lansoprazole (LPZ), and pantoprazole (PAN) on H. pylori viability, morphology, and urease, in vitro. The effect of a sublethal concentration of OMP on bacterial features and their recovery after removal of OMP was also assessed. Of 112 culture-positive gastric biopsies, 87.5% were RUT positive and 12.5% RUT negative. There was a significant correlation between negative RUT results and PPI consumption (p < .05). OMP (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC 32 μg/mL) and LPZ (MIC 8 μg/mL) inhibited the growth of 78.6% of H. pylori isolates. OMP and LPZ inhibited urease of 90.3% of isolates between 0 and 40 minutes and 54.4% between 20 and 40 minutes, respectively. PAN did not inhibit H. pylori growth and urease. Three 3-day (9 days) consecutive subcultures of H. pylori on brucella blood agar (BBA) supplemented with OMP resulted in reduced bacterial viability (1+), compared with control (4+), change of spiral morphology to coccoid, and reduction in pink color intensity in urea agar. Bacterial growth (1+), morphology, and urease test did not improve after the first 3-day and second 3-day (6 days) subcultures on BBA. However, relative recovery occurred after the third 3-day (9 days) subculture and complete recovery was observed after the fourth 3-day (12 days) subculture, as confluent growth (4+), 100% spiral cells, and strong urease test. Proton-pump Inhibitors exert transient negative effects on H. pylori viability, morphology, and urease test. Accordingly, cessation of PPI consumption at least 12 days before endoscopy could help avoiding false-negative results of H. pylori diagnostic tests. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Proton pump inhibitor responders who are not confirmed as GERD patients with impedance and pH monitoring: who are they?

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Bellini, M; Bredenoord, A J; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Furnari, M; Savarino, V; Blandizzi, C; Marchi, S

    2014-01-01

    A short-course of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) is often used to confirm gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, some patients with PPI responsive heartburn do not seem to have evidence of GERD on impedance-pH monitoring (MII-pH). The aim of the study was to evaluate patients with reflux symptoms and a negative endoscopy, who well respond to PPIs with MII-pH. We enrolled 312 patients with GERD symptoms and negative endoscopy: 144 reported well-controlled symptoms after 8-week PPIs and 155 were non-responders. Symptom relief was evaluated with GERD Impact Scale and visual analog scale score. All patients underwent MII-pH off-therapy. Thirteen patients were excluded from analysis. Patients were grouped as follows: non-erosive reflux disease (NERD; increased acid exposure time, AET); hypersensitive esophagus (HE; normal AET, positive symptom association, SI/SAP); MII-pH-/PPI+ (normal AET, negative SI/SAP) in the responder group; MII-pH-/PPI- in non-responders. MII-pH in PPI responders (symptom relief during PPI therapy > 75%) showed: 79/144 NERD (54.9%); 37/144 HE (25.7%); 28/144 MII-pH-/PPI+ (19.4%). MII-pH-/PPI+ patients reported the same symptom relief when compared with NERD and HE. In non-responder (symptom relief during PPI therapy < 50%) group, 27/155 patients were NERD (17.4%); 53/155 were HE (34.2%); 75/155 were MII-pH-/PPI- (48.4%). NERD diagnosis was significantly higher in responder group (p < 0.01). In a substantial subgroup of patients responding to PPI with typical reflux symptoms, the diagnosis of GERD cannot be confirmed with pH-impedance monitoring. Proton pump inhibitor response and presence of typical symptoms are thus not reliable predictors of the diagnosis and antireflux surgery should always be preceded by reflux monitoring. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Synthesis of Omeprazole Analogues and Evaluation of These as Potential Inhibitors of the Multidrug Efflux Pump NorA of Staphylococcus aureus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Vidaillac, Céline; Guillon, Jean; Arpin, Corinne; Forfar-Bares, Isabelle; Ba, Boubakar B.; Grellet, Jean; Moreau, Stéphane; Caignard, Daniel-Henri; Jarry, Christian; Quentin, Claudine

    2007-01-01

    A series of 11 pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives, 1a to 1k, sharing structural analogies with omeprazole, a eukaryotic efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) used as an antiulcer agent, was synthesized. Their inhibitory effect was evaluated using Staphylococcus aureus strain SA-1199B overexpressing NorA. By determinations of the MIC of norfloxacin in the presence of these EPIs devoid of intrinsic antibacterial activity and used at 128 μg/ml, and by the checkerboard method, compound 1e (MIC decrease, 16-fold; fractional inhibitory concentration index [ΣFIC], 0.18) appeared to be more active than compounds 1b to 1d, reserpine, and omeprazole (MIC decrease, eightfold; ΣFIC, 0.31), followed by compounds 1a and 1f (MIC decrease, fourfold; ΣFIC, 0.37) and 1g to 1k (MIC decrease, twofold; ΣFIC, 0.50 to 0.56). By time-kill curves combining norfloxacin (1/4 MIC) and the most efficient EPIs (128 μg/ml), compound 1e persistently restored the bactericidal activity of norfloxacin (inoculum reduction, 3 log10 CFU/ml at 8 and 24 h), compound 1f led to a delayed but progressive decrease in the number of viable cells, and compounds 1b to 1d and omeprazole acted synergistically (inoculum reduction, 3 log10 CFU/ml at 8 h but further regrowth), while compound 1a and reserpine slightly enhanced norfloxacin activity. The bacterial uptake of norfloxacin monitored by high-performance liquid chromatography confirmed that compounds 1a to 1f increased antibiotic accumulation, as did reserpine and omeprazole. Since these EPIs did not disturb the Δψ and ΔpH, they might directly interact with the pump. A structure-activity relationships study identified the benzimidazole nucleus of omeprazole as the main structural element involved in efflux pump inhibition and highlighted the critical role of the chlorine substituents in the stability and efficiency of compounds 1e to 1f. However, further pharmacomodulation is required to obtain therapeutically applicable derivatives. PMID:17101679

  9. Combination of a cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor and a proton-pump inhibitor for prevention of recurrent ulcer bleeding in patients at very high risk: a double-blind, randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Chan, Francis Ka Leung; Wong, Vincent Wai Sun; Suen, Bing Yee; Wu, Justin Che Yuen; Ching, Jessica Yuet Ling; Hung, Lawrence Cheung Tsui; Hui, Aric Josun; Leung, Vincent King Sun; Lee, Vivian Wing Yan; Lai, Larry Hin; Wong, Grace Lai Hung; Chow, Dorothy Kai Lai; To, Ka Fa; Leung, Wai Keung; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Lee, Yuk Tong; Lau, James Yun Wong; Chan, Henry Lik Yuen; Ng, Enders Kwok Wai; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2007-05-12

    Guidelines on pain management recommend that patients at risk of ulcers receive either a cyclo-oxygenase (COX 2) inhibitor or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI). These two treatments have similar effectiveness, but they are insufficient for protection of patients at very high risk for ulcer bleeding. We aimed to test the hypothesis that in patients with previous ulcer bleeding induced by non-selective NSAIDs, combined treatment with the COX 2 inhibitor celecoxib and the PPI esomeprazole would be better than celecoxib alone for prevention of recurrent ulcer bleeding. 441 consecutively presenting patients who were taking non-selective NSAIDs for arthritis were recruited to our single-centre, prospective, randomised, double-blind trial after admission to hospital with upper-gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients were enrolled after their ulcers had healed and a histological test for Helicobacter pylori was negative. All patients were given 200 mg celecoxib twice daily. 137 patients were randomly assigned to receive 20 mg esomeprazole twice daily (combined-treatment group), and 136 to receive a placebo (control group) for 12 months. The primary endpoint was recurrent ulcer bleeding during treatment or within 1 month of the end of treatment. Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00365313. Combination treatment was more effective than celecoxib alone for prevention of ulcer bleeding in patients at high risk. The 13-month cumulative incidence of the primary endpoint was 0% in the combined-treatment group and 12 (8.9%) in the controls (95% CI difference, 4.1 to 13.7; p=0.0004). The median follow-up was 13 months (range 0.4-13.0). Discontinuation of treatment and the incidence of adverse events were similar in the two treatment groups. Patients at very high risk for recurrent ulcer bleeding who need anti-inflammatory analgesics should receive combination treatment with a

  10. Prevention by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, of indomethacin -induced small intestinal ulceration in rats through induction of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Y; Amagase, K; Kato, S; Tokioka, S; Murano, M; Kakimoto, K; Nishio, H; Umegaki, E; Takeuchi, K; Higuchi, K

    2010-06-01

    The effect of lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), on indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration was examined in rats, particularly in relation to heme oxygenase (HO)-1. The animals were administered indomethacin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) and killed 24 h later. Lansoprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) and omeprazole (30-100 mg/kg, p.o.) were given 30 min before the administration of indomethacin, while tin-protoporphyrin IX (SnPP: 30 mg/kg, i.v.), an inhibitor of HO-1, was injected 10 min before indomethacin or lansoprazole. Indomethacin produced hemorrhagic lesions in the small intestine, accompanied with an increase of mucosal invasion of enterobacteria, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the mucosa. Pretreatment with lansoprazole dose- dependently reduced the severity of the indomethacin-induced intestinal lesions, with suppression of the increased MPO activity, while omeprazole had no effect. Pretreatment with SnPP significantly exacerbated these intestinal lesions and almost totally abolished the protective effect of lansoprazole. The up-regulation of iNOS mRNA expression following indomethacin was suppressed by lansoprazole in a SnPP-inhibitable manner, although the enhanced enterobacterial invasion remained unaffected. The amount of HO-1 protein in the intestinal mucosa was significantly increased by lansoprazole but not by omeprazole. Prior administration of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2; 10 mg/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the severity of these lesions and the enhancement of mucosal iNOS mRNA expression induced in the small intestine by indomethacin. These results suggest that lansoprazole prevents indomethacin-induced small intestinal ulceration, and this effect is associated with inhibition of iNOS expression, through up-regulation of HO-1/CO production in the mucosa.

  11. [Evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug-drug-interactions. Critical considerations of the relevance of pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of proton pump inhibitors in self medication].

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karl-Uwe

    2011-08-01

    Mechanisms and evaluation of pharmacokinetic drug interactions are discussed in general, including mechanisms beyond the hepatic phase-I reactions, and especially for the example of proton pump inhibitors (PPI), preferentially omeprazole. Particular attention is paid to the use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs. The sequelae of pharmacokinetic drug interactions can be serious. However, only the evidence of clinical consequences will convert such an interaction from a laboratory finding into a possible adverse effect. Without this, interacting drugs can still be co-administered if the specific characteristics of the concerned drugs, quantitative aspects of the interaction, and especially severity and frequency of possible clinical correlates are taken into consideration. It is encouraging that the laboratory findings reported for the PPI--in vitro or ex vivo from volunteer studies--have hardly found equivalents in clinical consequences. As of today, this is also true of the widely discussed interaction with clopidogrel. Regarding the safety of use of PPI as self-prescribed drugs, it also needs to be emphasized that a sizable number of interactions reported for omeprazole and/or pantoprazole were observed at higher dose levels than the 20 mg licensed for self medication. In conjunction with the temporal limitation of PPI self-prescription (14 days), it can be expected that pharmacokinetic drug interactions will generally be no critical factor in the usage of PPI in self-medication. However clinically relevant interactions can occur, e.g. when PPI are combined with extracts from St. John's wort, methotrexat or some inhibitors of HIV-protease with pH-dependent absorption.

  12. Can Helicobacter pylori be eradicated with high-dose proton pump inhibitor in extensive metabolizers with the CYP2C19 genotypic polymorphism?

    PubMed

    Ormeci, A; Emrence, Z; Baran, B; Soyer, O M; Gokturk, S; Evirgen, S; Akyuz, F; Karaca, C; Besisik, F; Kaymakoglu, S; Ustek, D; Demir, K

    2016-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) metabolism and pharmacokinetics are regulated by cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) polymorphism plays an import role in the metabolism of PPIs. The three possible genotypes for CYP2C19 each has a distinct effect on the pharmacodynamics of PPIs. Homozygote extensive metabolizers (HomEM) are the most frequent genotype and have two wild-types (non-mutant) (*1/*1) alleles. HomEM is associated with increased enzyme activity, which increases the rate of PPI metabolism. Intragastric pH, which is required for eradication, is lowest in HomEM. In HomEMs, an insufficient increase in intragastric pH results in decreased anti-Helicobacter pylori (HP) efficacy of the antibiotics and, therefore, lower eradication rates. We determined whether the HP eradication rate would increase after high-dose PPI treatment of extensive PPI metabolizers who had been treated unsuccessfully with a standard PPI dose. In our report, increasing the PPI dosage in patients with genotype polymorphisms may be effective on eradication rates. Eradication rates are directly affected by CYP2C19 polymorphisms, and eradication treatments should be planned considering such genotypic polymorphisms. Hence, CYP2C19 genotyping prior to treatment may facilitate determination of the optimum PPI dose to improve the therapeutic outcome. However, further researches are required to confirm this hypothesis.

  13. Pharmacological and Safety Profile of Dexlansoprazole: A New Proton Pump Inhibitor – Implications for Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Khean Lee; Choi, Myung Gyu; Hsu, Ping I; Chun, Hoon Jai; Mahachai, Varocha; Kachintorn, Udom; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kim, Nayoung; Rani, Abdul Aziz; Wong, Benjamin C Y; Wu, Justin; Chiu, Cheng Tang; Shetty, Vikram; Bocobo, Joseph C; Chan, Melchor M; Lin, Jaw-Town

    2016-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux disease is not as common in Asia as in western countries, the prevalence has increased substantially during the past decade. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is associated with considerable reductions in subjective well-being and work productivity, as well as increased healthcare use. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are currently the most effective treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, there are limitations associated with these drugs in terms of partial and non-response. Dexlansoprazole is the first PPI with a dual delayed release formulation designed to provide 2 separate releases of medication to extend the duration of effective plasma drug concentration. Dexlansoprazole has been shown to be effective for healing of erosive esophagitis, and to improve subjective well-being by controlling 24-hour symptoms. Dexlansoprazole has also been shown to achieve good plasma concentration regardless of administration with food, providing flexible dosing. Studies in healthy volunteers showed no clinically important effects on exposure to the active metabolite of clopidogrel or clopidogrel-induced platelet inhibition, with no dose adjustment of clopidogrel necessary when coprescribed. This review discusses the role of the new generation PPI, dexlansoprazole, in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asia. PMID:26932927

  14. Cost and burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease among patients with persistent symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy: an observational study in France

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder that negatively impacts health-related quality of life (HRQL) and work productivity. Many patients have only a partial response to proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and continue to experience GERD symptoms despite optimized treatment. This observational study aimed to provide information on symptoms, HRQL, resource usage, costs and treatment pathways associated with partial response to PPI therapy in French patients with GERD. Methods Patients with partial response to PPI therapy, defined as persistent GERD symptoms ≥3 days/week despite optimized treatment with a PPI, were recruited for this 12-month observational study. GERD symptoms, HRQL, work productivity and resource use were assessed by patient surveys. Costs were calculated based on lost work productivity and resource use. Results The patient population (n=262; mean age, 54 years; 40% men) carried a significant symptom burden, with 98% of patients having moderate-to-severe GERD symptoms and 65% of patients experiencing daily symptoms at baseline. HRQL and work productivity were significantly impaired, with a greater degree of impairment in patients with higher symptom burden. The mean total cost per patient over the 12-month follow-up period was €5237, of which €4674 (89%) was due to lost work productivity. Conclusions Partial response to PPI therapy for GERD is associated with a high symptom burden, significant impairment of HRQL and work productivity, and substantial GERD-related costs. PMID:23448382

  15. Proton pump inhibitor pantoprazole abrogates adriamycin-resistant gastric cancer cell invasiveness via suppression of Akt/GSK-β/β-catenin signaling and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Yang, Yan; Shi, Xiaoting; Liao, Wanyu; Chen, Min; Cheng, Alfred Sze-Lok; Yan, Hongli; Fang, Cheng; Zhang, Shu; Xu, Guifang; Shen, Shanshan; Huang, Shuling; Chen, Guangxia; Lv, Ying; Ling, Tingsheng; Zhang, Xiaoqi; Wang, Lei; Zhuge, Yuzheng; Zou, Xiaoping

    2015-01-28

    The effect of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) on cancer risk has received much attention recently. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying multidrug resistance and the effect of a PPI pantoprazole using an adriamycin-resistant gastric cancer cell model (SGC7901/ADR). Compared with the parental cell line, SGC7901/ADR cells showed reduced proliferation rate, but higher resistance to adriamycin under both anchorage-dependent and -independent conditions. Notably, SGC7901/ADR cells underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and showed increased migrating and invading capabilities. At molecular level, SGC7901/ADR cells showed strong activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway compared with parental sensitive cells. Interestingly, we found that a PPI pantoprazole can effectively reverse the aggressiveness and EMT marker expression of SGC7901/ADR cells. Furthermore, pantoprazole treatment resulted in a profound reduction of both total and phosphorylated forms of Akt and GSK-3β, which in turn suppressed the adriamycin-induced Wnt/β-catenin signaling in SGC7901/ADR cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that the aggressive phenotype of adriamycin-resistant SGC7901/ADR cells is mediated by induction of EMT and activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. And for the first time, we show that it is possible to suppress the invasiveness of SGC7901/ADR cells by pantoprazole which targets the EMT and Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling.

  16. Review article: putting immediate-release proton-pump inhibitors into clinical practice--improving nocturnal acid control and avoiding the possible complications of excessive acid exposure.

    PubMed

    Katz, P O

    2005-12-01

    Nocturnal gastro-oesphageal reflux is an under-appreciated clinical challenge. This condition may cause symptoms such as nocturnal heartburn, or it may be asymptomatic. In addition, patients may experience sleep disturbances that can potentially lead to complications such as erosive oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus, and may be a risk factor for development of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Delayed-release proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) have traditionally been effective in treating both daytime and night-time reflux symptoms, but are limited in control of nocturnal acidity by their pharmacodynamic characteristics. This narrative review addresses the prevalence, impact and pharmacologic approaches used to control nocturnal acidity. Methods to optimize nocturnal acid control include careful attention to dosing schedule, using higher doses of PPIs, adding an histamine H2-receptor antagonist at bedtime to once or twice daily delayed-release PPI, or using immediate-release omeprazole (Zegerid powder for oral suspension; Santarus, Inc., San Diego, CA, USA). This new formulation appears to provide sustained control of intragastric pH at steady state, and when dosed at bedtime, and may be effective in improving control of nocturnal pH and treating night-time GERD.

  17. [Comparison of Helicobacter pylori eradication rate in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia and peptic ulcer diseases according to proton pump inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Hong, Eun Jung; Park, Dong Il; Oh, Suk Joong; Song, Min Jun; Choi, Woo Hyuk; Hong, Cheul Ho; Park, Jung Ho; Kim, Hong Joo; Cho, Yong Kyun; Shon, Chong Il; Jeon, Woo Kyu; Kim, Byung Ik

    2008-08-01

    Conflicting results have been reported whether patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) respond differently to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication treatment compared with patients with peptic ulcer diseases (PUD). The aim of this study was to evaluate any difference in H. pylori eradication rates between patients with NUD and PUD according to each proton pump inhibitor (PPI). From September, 2004 to April, 2007, we retrospectively reviewed 2,297 patients with NUD (1,050 patients) or PUD (1,247 patients) infected with H. pylori. All patients received a standard 1 week triple therapy comprising of one of the five PPIs (pantoprazole, esomeprazole, omeprazole, lansoprazole, rabeprazole), clarithromycin and amoxicillin. The follow-up H. pylori test was performed 4 weeks after the completion of therapy. There was no significant difference in the eradication rates between the two groups. In comparison of eradication rates according to PPI, omeprazole- based triple therapy group showed higher eradication rate than other groups in patients with NUD, but not in patients with PUD. This study failed to show any difference in H. pylori eradication rate between patients with NUD and PUD. There is no convincing evidence that the eradication rate may be affected by different PPI.

  18. Addition of clidinium-C to the 14-day proton-pump inhibitor-based triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    PubMed Central

    Seyyedmajidi, Mohammadreza; Homapoor, Saba; Zanganeh, Elahe; Dadjou, Mohammad; Eskandari Nejad, Shahab; Tajik Galayeri, Mohammad Hadi; Vafaeimanesh, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics in Helicobacter pylori (HP) eradication is widely accepted, but this combination fails in a considerable number of cases. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of clidinium-C addition on HP eradication and to investigate the efficacy and safety of clidinium-C in prevention of drugs' side effects. Methods: A total of 200 histopathologically confirmed HP positive peptic ulcer enrolled in this study which were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: OAC (20 mg omeprazole bid, 1000 mg amoxicillin bid and 500 mg clarithromycin bid) and OAC + clidinium-C. The effect of treatment and adverse effects were compared 6 weeks after completion of treatment. A13C-urea breath test was performed to confirm HP eradication. Results: A total of 184 patients (90 in group A and 94 in group B) completed the treatment protocols. HP eradication was achieved in 71.1% in OAC versus 72.3% in OCA+clidinium-C, (P=0.73). The frequencies of abdominal pain and stool abnormality, among the side effects recorded during the therapy period, were significantly lower in group B (OCA+clidinium-C) (P=0.01 and P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion: Addition of clidinium-C to OCA triple therapy decreases abdominal pain and frequency of stool abnormalities without affecting HP eradication rate. Based on these findings addition of clidinium-C may increase patient's compliance. PMID:27386057

  19. Association of Long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy with Bone Fractures and effects on Absorption of Calcium, Vitamin B12, Iron, and Magnesium

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Jensen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) are now one of the most widely used classes of drugs. PPIs have proven to have a very favorable safety profile and it is unusual for a patient to stop these drugs because of side effects. However, increasing numbers of patients are chronically taking PPIs for gastroesophageal reflux disease and a number of other common persistent conditions, therefore the long-term potential adverse effects are receiving increasing attention. One area that is receiving much attention and generally has been poorly studied, is the long-term effects of chronic acid suppression on the absorption of vitamins and nutrients. This area has received increased attention because of the reported potential adverse effect of chronic PPI treatment leading to an increased occurrence of bone fractures. This has led to an increased examination of the effects of PPIs on calcium absorption/metabolism as well as numerous cohort, case control and prospective studies of their ability to affect bone density and cause bone fractures. In this article these studies are systematically examined, as well as the studies of the effects of chronic PPI usage on VB12, iron and magnesium absorption. In general the studies in each of thee areas have led to differing conclusions, but when examined systematically, a number of the studies are showing consistent results that support the conclusion that long-term adverse effects on these processes can have important clinical implications. PMID:20882439

  20. A Study on the Efficacy of Proton Pump Inhibitors in Helicobacter pylori-Negative Primary Care Patients with Dyspepsia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Fujimura, Yoshinori; Gotoh, Kensuke; Imamura, Hiroshi; Manabe, Noriaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Shiotani, Akiko; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims There have been few studies on the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors and the doses required to treat dyspeptic symptoms observed in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of different doses of omeprazole and different administration methods in Helicobacter pylori-negative, dyspeptic patients. Methods Patients with chronic upper abdominal symptoms within the previous 3 months were randomly divided into three groups: a daily, omeprazole 20 mg treatment group (OPZ20, n=61); a daily, omeprazole 10 mg treatment group (OPZ10, n=72); and an on-demand omeprazole 20 mg treatment group (on-demand, n=62). After 4 weeks of administration of the drug, symptom improvement rates were evaluated based on the Overall Global Severity score. Results The rates of symptom improvement after 4 weeks of treatment were 65.6% (40/61) in the OPZ20 group, 47.2% (34/72) in the OPZ10 group, and 50.0% (31/62) in the on-demand group. The OPZ20 group exhibited a significantly higher improvement rate (p=0.034) than the OPZ10 group. The OPZ20 group had significant improvements in regurgitation, postprandial fullness, vomiting, and bloating compared with the OPZ10 group. Conclusions Daily treatment with 20 mg of omeprazole was efficient in treating upper abdominal symptoms. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, number UMIN000002621. PMID:23423422