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Sample records for pump suction filter

  1. Pump tank divider plate for sump suction sodium pumps

    DOEpatents

    George, John A.; Nixon, Donald R.

    1977-01-01

    A circular plate extends across the diameter of "sump suction" pump, with a close clearance between the edge of the plate and the wall of the pump tank. The plate is located above the pump impeller, inlet and outlet flow nozzles but below the sodium free surface and effectively divides the pump tank into two separate chambers. On change of pump speed, the close fitting flow restriction plate limits the rate of flow into or out of the upper chamber, thereby minimizing the rate of level change in the tank and permitting time for the pump cover gas pressure to be varied to maintain an essentially constant level.

  2. Centrifugal pumps: which suction specific speeds are acceptable

    SciTech Connect

    Hallam, J.L.

    1982-04-01

    Suction specific speed is an important consideration when purchasing or analyzing centrifugal pumps. There is a direct correlation between this parameter, pump reliability and maintenance expenses. This article demonstrates that in a large Gulf Coast oil refinery, centrifugal pumps with a suction specific speed greater than 11,000 failed at a frequency nearly twice that of centrifugal pumps with suction specific speed less than 11,000. This study consisted primarily of hydrocarbon pumps with an average horsepower of 150 hp. Results may vary some from those found if high energy water pumps are studied. 5 refs.

  3. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  4. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  5. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4780 - Powered suction pump.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4780 Powered suction pump. (a... support system. The device may be used during surgery in the operating room or at the patient's...

  8. Rotary blood pump control strategy for preventing left ventricular suction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Giridharan, Guruprasad A

    2015-01-01

    The risk for left ventricular (LV) suction while maintaining adequate perfusion over a range of physiologic conditions during continuous flow LV assist device (LVAD) support is a significant clinical concern. To address this challenge, we developed a suction prevention and physiologic control (SPPC) algorithm for use with axial and centrifugal LVADs. The SPPC algorithm uses two gain-scheduled, proportional-integral controllers that maintain a differential pump speed (ΔRPM) above a user-defined threshold to prevent LV suction, while maintaining an average reference differential pressure (ΔP) between the LV and aorta to provide physiologic perfusion. Efficacy and robustness of the proposed algorithm were evaluated in silico during simulated rest and exercise test conditions for (1) ΔP/ΔRPM excessive setpoint (ES); (2) rapid eightfold increase in pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR); and (3) ES and PVR. Hemodynamic waveforms (LV pressure and volume; aortic pressure and flow) were simulated and analyzed to identify suction event(s), quantify total flow output (pump + cardiac output), and characterize the performance of the SPPC algorithm. The results demonstrated that the proposed SPPC algorithm prevented LV suction while maintaining physiologic perfusion for all simulated test conditions, and warrants further investigation in vivo.

  9. High-Suction Hydride Sorption Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, Steven; Jones, Jack A.; Bowman, Robert C., Jr.; Dowling, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    Improved design provides high pumping speed at low pressure. Hydride-forming powder retained in thin layer in contact with inner surface of stainless-steel tube. Configuration provides large surface area and short path for efficient transfer of heat and small resistance to flow.

  10. An Ultrasonic Suction Pump with No Physically Moving Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Cheol-Ho; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Nakamura, Kentaro; Ueha, Sadayuki

    2004-05-01

    A new ultrasonic suction pump is described in this paper. The pump uses the suction force of a rigid cylinder tube vibrating at an ultrasonic frequency and has no physically moving parts. The pump consists of a longitudinal bolt-clamped Langevin transducer (BLT) combined with a stepped horn working at a resonance frequency of 24 kHz. A glass tube with the length of the half-wavelength-resonance is glued at the tip of the horn. To enhance pump performance, we introduced a reflection plate and a thin rod installed to the end of the glass tube with a small gap. Maximum pressures of 7.2 kPa and 23.5 kPa were recorded using the reflection plate and the thin rod, respectively. In this study, we experimentally investigate the characteristics of the pump and the operating physics. The maximum pressure is a function of the vibration velocity of the end surface of the glass tube and of the gap.

  11. Cavitation improvement of double suction centrifugal pump HPP Fuhren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Titzschkau, M.; Pavlin, R.; Vehar, F.; Mežnar, P.; Lipej, A.

    2012-11-01

    A double suction storage pump has been refurbished because of the strong cavitation which resulted in cavitation damage on blade and consequently in frequent repairs of the impeller. The analyses of the old and the new impeller were done by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), performing transient simulations with the commercial solver Ansys CFX. In the simulations, the scale-adaptive-simulation with the curvature correction (SAS-CC) turbulence model was used. No model tests were carried out. Additionally, observations with the digital camera were made through the specially designed plexi-glass window, mounted at the lid at the suction side. The predicted pump head at the operating point agrees well with the pump characteristics measurements, performed with the direct thermodynamic method. The extent of the cavitation predicted by CFD is smaller than the observed one because the cloud cavitation was not predicted. The observations of the cavitation extent show that the impeller design is better than the old one, which was also possible to anticipate based on the CFD results.

  12. Detection of ventricular suction in an implantable rotary blood pump using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Faragallah, George; Divo, Eduardo; Simaan, Marwan A

    2011-01-01

    A new suction detection algorithm for rotary Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVAD) is presented. The algorithm is based on a Lagrangian Support Vector Machine (LSVM) model. Six suction indices are derived from the LVAD pump flow signal and form the inputs to the LSVM classifier. The LSVM classifier is trained and tested to classify pump flow patterns into three states: No Suction, Approaching Suction, and Suction. The proposed algorithm has been tested using existing in vivo data. When compared to three existing methods, the proposed algorithm produced superior performance in terms of classification accuracy, stability, and learning speed. The ability of the algorithm to detect suction provides a reliable platform in the development of a pump speed controller that has the capability of avoiding suction.

  13. Evaluation of suction detection during different pumping states in an implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ng, Siew-Cheok; Lim, Einly; Mason, David G; Avolio, Alberto P; Lovell, Nigel H

    2013-08-01

    In recent times, the problem of noninvasive suction detection for implantable rotary blood pumps has attracted substantial research interest. Here, we compare the performance of various suction indices for different types of suction and non-suction events based on pump speed irregularity. A total of 171 different indices that consist of previously proposed as well as newly introduced suction indices are tested using regularized logistic regression. These indices can be classified as amplitude based (derived from the mean, maximum, and minimum values of a cycle), duration based (derived from the duration of a cycle), gradient based (derived from the first order as well as higher order differences) and frequency based (derived from the power spectral density). The non-suction event data consists of ventricular ejection with or without arrhythmia and intermittent and continuous non-opening of the aortic valve. The suction event data consists of partial ventricular collapse that occurs intermittently as well as continuously with or without arrhythmia. In addition, we also attempted to minimize the usage of multiple indices by applying the sequential forward floating selection method to find which combination of indices gives the best performance. In general, the amplitude-based and gradient-based indices performed quite well while the duration-based and frequency-based indices performed poorly. By having only two indices ([i] the maximum gradient change in positive slope; and [ii] the standard deviation of the maximum value in a cycle), we were able to achieve a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 99.7%.

  14. Effect of suction pipe leaning angle and water level on the internal flow of pump sump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.-M.; Lee, Y.-B.; Kim, K.-Y.; Park, S.-H.; Choi, Y.-D.

    2016-11-01

    The pump sump, which connects forebay and intake of pump station, supplies good flow condition for the intake of the pump. If suction sumps are improperly shaped or sized, air entraining vortices or submerged vortices may develop. This may greatly affect pump operation if vortices grow to an appreciable extent. Moreover, the noise and vibration of the pump can be increased by the remaining of vortices in the pump flow passage. Therefore, the vortices in the pump flow passage have to be reduced for a good performance of pump sump station. In this study, the effect of suction pipe leaning angle on the pump sump internal flow with different water level has been investigated by CFD analysis. Moreover, an elbow type pipe was also investigated. There are 3 leaning angles with 0°, 45° and 90° for the suction pipe. The suction pipe inlet centre is kept same for all the cases. In addition, the three different water levels of H/D=1.85, 1.54, and 1.31, is applied to different suction pipe types. The result shows that the amount of air sucked into the suction pipe increases with increasing the suction pipe leaning angle. Especially for the horizontal suction pipe, there is maximum air sucked into the suction pipe. However, there is certain effect of the elbow type bell mouth installation in the horizontal suction pipe on suppressing the amount of air sucked into the pipe. Moreover, vertical suction pipe plays an effective role on reducing the free surface vortex intake area.

  15. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  16. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  17. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  18. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  19. DETAIL OF DENVER DISC FILTER IN CO91107, SUCTION END. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DENVER DISC FILTER IN CO-91-107, SUCTION END. NOTE BEARING HOUSING WITH CAST LOGO, SUCTION PIPE GOING OFF TO THE RIGHT, AND FILTER DISC IN BACKGROUND. VACUUM INSIDE DISCS FURTHER DEWATERED CONCENTRATE. AS DISC SLOWLY ROTATED A BAR SCRAPED DRIED CONCENTRATE FROM OUTSIDE OF FILTER CLOTH. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  20. 21 CFR 870.4270 - Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... blood filter. 870.4270 Section 870.4270 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 870.4270 Cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass cardiotomy suction line blood filter is a device used as part of a gas exchange...

  1. Suction Filter in Endoscopic Endonasal Surgery: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Marucci, Gianluca; Milanese, Laura; Bonfatti, Rocco; Sturiale, Carmelo; Ernesto, Pasquini; Frank, Giorgio; Mazzatenta, Diego

    2016-11-01

    The collection of the greatest possible amount of pathologic tissue is of paramount importance in neurosurgery to achieve the most accurate histopathologic diagnosis, to perform all of the necessary biomolecular tests on the pathologic specimen, and to collect biological material for basic or translational science studies. This problem is particularly relevant in pituitary surgery because of the possible small size and soft consistency of tumors, which make them suitable for removal through suction, reducing the amount of available pathologic tissue. To solve this issue, we adopted a filter connected to the suction tube, which allows the surgeon to collect all of the tissue aspirated during surgery. Our experience of 1734 endoscopic endonasal procedures, performed adopting this device since 1998 to December 2015, has been revised to assess its advantages and limitations. This system is easy-to-use, does not impair the surgical maneuvers, and does not add any relevant cost to the surgery. The tissue collected through the filter proved useful for diagnostic histologic and biomolecular analyses and for research purposes, without any relevant artifacts as a result of this method of collection. The use of a filter has allowed us to obtain the greatest amount possible of pathologic tissue at each surgery. This surgical material has revealed to be helpful both for diagnostic and basic science purposes. The use of the filter has proven to be of particular importance for microadenomas, soft tumors, and supradiaphragmatic or skull base lesions with heterogeneous features, improving the accuracy of histopathologic diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A control system for rotary blood pumps based on suction detection.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Antonio; Boston, J Robert; Antaki, James F

    2009-03-01

    A control system for rotary ventricular assist devices was developed to automatically regulate the pumping speed of the device to avoid ventricular suction. The control system comprises a suction detector and a fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The suction detector can correctly classify pump flow patterns, using a discriminant analysis (DA) model that combines several indices derived from the pump flow signal, to classify the pump status as one of the following: no suction (NS), moderate suction (MS), and severe suction (SS). The discriminant scores, which are the output of the suction detector, were used as inputs to the FLC. Based on this information, the controller updates pump speed, providing adequate flow and pressure perfusion to the patient. The performance of the control system was tested in simulations over a wide range of physiological conditions, including hypertension, exercise, and strenuous exercising for healthy, sick, and very sick hearts, using a lumped parameter model of the circulatory system coupled with a left ventricular assist device. The controller was able to maintain cardiac output and mean arterial pressure within acceptable physiologic ranges, while avoiding suction, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed control system.

  3. Efficacy of new filter suction to decrease the rate of occlusion and total suction time in a simulated total hip replacement operation.

    PubMed

    Yuenyongviwat, Varah; Iamthanaporn, Khanin; Hongnaparak, Theerawit; Tangtrakulwanich, Boonsin

    2014-01-01

    During orthopedic operations, such as total hip replacement or total knee replacement, there is a lot of bone debris from bone cutting and reaming that commonly causes surgical suction devices to occlude many times, which can prolong the operative time and increase the amount of bleeding for the patient. We developed a surgical filter suction system that we call the VY suction tube. The suction tube assembly consists of a tube filter within a housing assembly. The filter pore size was designed to prevent tissue or bone debris from passing through the filter, though it allows fluid to pass through. A simulated total hip replacement operation was performed to test the efficacy of this new suction device when compared with two other types of tube suction devices. The VY suction tube showed that the mean duration to remove all fluid from a simulated field was significantly shorter than the Pool suction tube (P=0.0009) and Frazier suction tube (P=0.0012). The study also showed that the VY suction tube has a lower rate of occlusion when compared with the Pool suction tube (P≤0.0001) and Frazier suction tube (P≤0.0001). Our new suction tube design shows good efficacy when removing fluid and debris from a simulated operative field. However, further studies in real clinical settings are needed.

  4. The Newmarket pump: a new suction pump for external negative pressure ventilation.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnear, W J; Shneerson, J M

    1985-01-01

    A new electronically controlled pump has been developed for use with a cuirass in providing external negative pressure ventilation. It is smaller, lighter, and more versatile than currently available pumps and operates on a servo principle. A rotary valve between the pump and the cuirass varies the rate of extraction of air from the cuirass. The pressure within the cuirass is sensed by a pressure transducer, and the output of this is used to control the position of the rotary valve by means of a motor so that the pressure within the cuirass follows a predetermined half sine wave pattern. The respiratory rate varies from 10 to 30 per minute and the inspiratory to expiratory time (I/E) ratio from 3:2 to 2:3. Inspiratory pressure varies from 0 to -50 cm H2O and an expiratory pressure of 0 to +50 cm H2O can be imposed. The performance of the new pump was assessed in 21 patients with nocturnal hypoxaemia who were accustomed to external negative pressure ventilation. The mean tidal volume achieved increased with increase in cuirass suction pressure, and changing the I/E ratio from 1:1 to 3:2 produced a small increase at a cuirass negative pressure at 20 cm water. Comparison of the Newmarket pump with the Cape pump in 14 patients showed that similar tidal volumes were achieved. Overnight monitoring of cuirass pressure in one patient showed more even control of peak negative pressure with the Newmarket pump than with the Cape pump. Ten pumps are in use in patients' homes; five have been in service for more than six months and no important problems have been encountered. The new pump seems to offer advantages that make external negative pressure ventilation more acceptable. Images PMID:3864285

  5. The Newmarket pump: a new suction pump for external negative pressure ventilation.

    PubMed

    Kinnear, W J; Shneerson, J M

    1985-09-01

    A new electronically controlled pump has been developed for use with a cuirass in providing external negative pressure ventilation. It is smaller, lighter, and more versatile than currently available pumps and operates on a servo principle. A rotary valve between the pump and the cuirass varies the rate of extraction of air from the cuirass. The pressure within the cuirass is sensed by a pressure transducer, and the output of this is used to control the position of the rotary valve by means of a motor so that the pressure within the cuirass follows a predetermined half sine wave pattern. The respiratory rate varies from 10 to 30 per minute and the inspiratory to expiratory time (I/E) ratio from 3:2 to 2:3. Inspiratory pressure varies from 0 to -50 cm H2O and an expiratory pressure of 0 to +50 cm H2O can be imposed. The performance of the new pump was assessed in 21 patients with nocturnal hypoxaemia who were accustomed to external negative pressure ventilation. The mean tidal volume achieved increased with increase in cuirass suction pressure, and changing the I/E ratio from 1:1 to 3:2 produced a small increase at a cuirass negative pressure at 20 cm water. Comparison of the Newmarket pump with the Cape pump in 14 patients showed that similar tidal volumes were achieved. Overnight monitoring of cuirass pressure in one patient showed more even control of peak negative pressure with the Newmarket pump than with the Cape pump. Ten pumps are in use in patients' homes; five have been in service for more than six months and no important problems have been encountered. The new pump seems to offer advantages that make external negative pressure ventilation more acceptable.

  6. Numerical simulation and analysis of cavitation flows in a double suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, G.; Tan, L.; Cao, S. L.; Jian, W.; Liu, W. W.; Jiang, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation is an unsteady phenomenon, which is nearly inevitable in pumps. It would degrade the pump performance, generate vibrations and noises, and even erode pump flow passage components. The double suction centrifugal pump at design flow rate and large flow rate is numerically simulated using the k-ω turbulence model and the mass transport cavitation model. As a result, the calculated variation of pump head with pump inlet pressure agreed well with the experimental data. The results demonstrate that the numerical model and method can accurately predict the cavitation flows in a double suction centrifugal pump. The cavitation characteristics are analysed in great details. In addition, based on the calculation results, the reason that the plunge of pump head curve is revealed. It is found that the steep fall of pump head happens when the cavity reaches the blade to blade throat and the micro-vortex group appears at the back of the blade suction side. At the same time, this practice can provide guidance for the optimal design of double suction pumps.

  7. Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Flow Field Induced by a Symmetrical Suction Elbow at the Pump Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, S.; Bosioc, A. I.; Drăghici, I.; Anton, L. E.

    2016-11-01

    The paper investigates the hydrodynamic field generated by the symmetrical suction elbow at the pump impeller inlet. The full three-dimensional turbulent numerical investigation of the flow in the symmetrical suction elbow is performed using FLUENT then the flow non-uniformity generated by it is numerically computed. The numerical results on the annular cross section are qualitatively and quantitatively validated against LDV data. A good agreement between numerical results and experimental data is obtained on this cross section located downstream to the suction elbow and upstream to the pump impeller. The hydrodynamic flow structure with four vortices is identified plotting the vorticity field. The largest values of the vorticity magnitude are identified in the center of both vortices located behind the shaft. The vortex core location is plotted on four annular cross sections located along to the cylindrical part between the suction elbow and the pump inlet. Also, the three-dimensional distribution of the vortex core filaments is visualized and extracted. The shapes of vortex core filaments located behind the pump shaft agree well with its visualization performed on the test rig. As a result, the three-dimensional complex geometry of the suction elbow and the pump shaft are identified as the main sources of the flow non-uniformity at the pump inlet.

  8. Retrieval Pump Flexible Suction Hose Dynamic Response Induced by Impact of a Mixer Pump Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Enderlin, C.W.; Terrones, G.; Bamberger, J.A.; White, M.; Combs, W.H.

    1999-10-07

    Experiments were conducted to investigate whether it may be feasible to simultaneously mix and retrieve radioactive waste slurries that are stored in million-gallon, double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. Oscillating mixer pumps, located near the floor of these tanks, are used to mobilize and mix the slurry prior to retrieval. Operational scenarios that may be beneficial for retrieval may require simultaneous operation of a decant/transfer pump and the jet mixer pumps. The effects of jet-induced agitation and jet impingement upon the decant/transfer pump's flexible suction hose have not previously been experimentally evaluated. Possible effects of the jet impacting the hose include hose fatigue, hose collision or entanglement with other structures, and induced static and dynamic loads on the decant/transfer pump equipment. The objective of this work was to create operating conditions in a test tank that produce a dynamic response (in the flexible suction hose upon impingement from an above-floor jet) that is similar to that anticipated in the actual tank. A scaling analysis was conducted to define the interactions between the jet, the tank floor and the suction hose. The complexity of scaling the multi-layer flexible hose (matching its hydroelastic parameters at full and 1/4-scale) led to an alternate approach, that of matching the expected full-scale forces on the full-scale hose in the scaled tank. Two types of tests were conducted: characterization of the jet velocity profile in the test tank at two axial locations from the nozzle and observation of the motion induced in the flexible retrieval hose from impact by the jet. The velocity profile of the jet in the test tank was measured to compare the measured profiles with profile predictions for an above-floor jet. These data were used to obtain a refined estimate of the velocity profile and therefore, the force acting upon the test article at a particular location in the tank. The hose

  9. Design and Hemocompatibility Analysis of a Double-Suction Injection Suspension Blood Pump Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhu, Liangfan; Luo, Yun

    2017-07-26

    The blood pump has become a possible solution to heart diseases. For the prevention of device failure and hemocompatibility problems, a rotary pump with suspended bearing is a preferred solution. In our previous work, a novel injection suspension method has been introduced to levitate the rotor. The suspension method is totally passive. This study aims to apply this suspension method to a double-suction pump, and the property of the pump was investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The flow field of the pump is simulated based on the SST k-ω turbulent model. The characteristic curves of the pump were calculated. At the nominal working point of 5 L/min, 100 mm Hg, the suspension force acting on the rotor was detected, which could reach 0.46 N with a gap of 150 µm. We compared the pump with a previously developed single-suction injection pump to evaluate the blood compatibility of the double-suction design. The average scalar shear stress values were 3.13 Pa for the double-suction pump and 7.10 Pa for the single-suction pump. Larger volumes in the single-suction pump were exposed to shear stresses higher than 10 Pa. Thresholds for the von Willebrand factor cleavage, platelet activation, and hemolysis were defined to be 9 Pa, 50 Pa, and 150 Pa, respectively. The volume fractions for the double-suction pump are lower for all thresholds. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) values for the two pumps were calculated to be 0.008 g/100 L and 0.016 g/100 L. Results proved that the double-suction pump has a better hemocompatibility compared with the single-suction pump. © 2017 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Gastric suction

    MedlinePlus

    Gastric lavage; Stomach pumping; Nasogastric tube suction; Bowel obstruction - suction ... A tube is inserted through your nose or mouth, down the food pipe (esophagus), and into the stomach. Your ...

  11. 85,000-GPM, single-stage, single-suction LMFBR intermediate centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Fair, C.E.; Cook, M.E. Huber, K.A.; Rohde, R.

    1983-01-01

    The mechanical and hydraulic design features of the 85,000-gpm, single-stage, single-suction pump test article, which is designed to circulate liquid-sodium coolant in the intermediate heat-transport system of a Large-Scale Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LS-LMFBR), are described. The design and analytical considerations used to satisfy the pump performance and operability requirements are presented. The validation of pump hydraulic performance using a hydraulic scale-model pump is discussed, as is the featute test for the mechanical-shaft seal system.

  12. Statistical characteristics of suction pressure signals for a centrifugal pump under cavitating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojun; Yu, Benxu; Ji, Yucheng; Lu, Jiaxin; Yuan, Shouqi

    2017-02-01

    Centrifugal pumps are often used in operating conditions where they can be susceptible to premature failure. The cavitation phenomenon is a common fault in centrifugal pumps and is associated with undesired effects. Among the numerous cavitation detection methods, the measurement of suction pressure fluctuation is one of the most used methods to detect or diagnose the degree of cavitation in a centrifugal pump. In this paper, a closed loop was established to investigate the pump cavitation phenomenon, the statistical parameters for PDF (Probability Density Function), Variance and RMS (Root Mean Square) were used to analyze the relationship between the cavitation performance and the suction pressure signals during the development of cavitation. It is found that the statistical parameters used in this research are able to capture critical cavitation condition and cavitation breakdown condition, whereas difficult for the detection of incipient cavitation in the pump. At part-load conditions, the pressure fluctuations at the impeller inlet show more complexity than the best efficiency point (BEP). Amplitude of PDF values of suction pressure increased steeply when the flow rate dropped to 40 m3/h (the design flow rate was 60 m3/h). One possible reason is that the flow structure in the impeller channel promotes an increase of the cavitation intensity when the flow rate is reduced to a certain degree. This shows that it is necessary to find the relationship between the cavitation instabilities and flow instabilities when centrifugal pumps operate under part-load flow rates.

  13. Vortex cavitation and oscillation in a double-suction volute pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nagahara, T.; Tanaka, K.; Fuchiwaki, M.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes have been utilized actively in the early part of the product development cycle. Numerical analysis models have also been developed rapidly and have added cavitation flow analysis functions peculiar to hydraulic machines, in which the flow analysis has been developed remarkably with high-precision and high-reliability. On the other hand, it is well known that three kinds of cavitation, such as vortex cavitation, reverse flow cavitation and cloud cavitation appear in a double-suction volute pump. We have much interest in a relationship among the cavitating flows, pump oscillation and noise. In this study, full 3D numerical simulations have been performed using a commercial code inside the pump from the inlet of suction duct to the outlet of delivery duct. The numerical model is based on a combination of multiphase flow equations with the truncated version of the Rayleigh-Plesset model predicting the complicated growth and collapse process of cavity bubbles. This study highlights especially the mechanism of vortex cavitation occurrence from the end of the suction duct in the pump and pump oscillation which causes cavitation noise from the pump. The experimental investigations have also been performed on the cavitating flow with flow visualization to evaluate the numerical results.

  14. Suppression of the secondary flow in a suction channel of a large centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torii, D.; Nagahara, T.; Okihara, T.

    2013-12-01

    The suction channel configuration of a large centrifugal pump with a 90-degree bend was studied in detail to suppress the secondary flow at the impeller inlet for improving suction performance. Design of experiments (DOE) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of several primary design parameters of the suction channel. A DOE is a powerful tool to clarify the sensitivity of objective functions to design parameters with a minimum of trials. An L9 orthogonal array was adopted in this study and nine suction channels were designed, through which the flow was predicted by steady state calculation. The results indicate that a smaller bend radius with a longer straight nozzle, distributed between the bend and the impeller, suppresses the secondary flow at the impeller inlet. An optimum ratio of the cross sectional areas at the bend inlet and outlet was also confirmed in relationship to the contraction rate of the downstream straight nozzle. These findings were obtained by CFD and verified by experiments. The results will aid the design of large centrifugal pumps with better suction performance and higher reliability.

  15. Internal flow numerical simulation of double-suction centrifugal pump using DES model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, P. J.; Wang, F. J.; Yang, M.

    2012-11-01

    It is a challenging task for the flow simulation for a double-suction centrifugal pump, because the wall effects are strong in this type of pumps. Detached-eddy simulation (DES), referred as a hybrid RANS-LES approach, has emerged recently as a potential compromise between RANS based turbulence models and Large Eddy Simulation. In this approach, the unsteady RANS model is employed in the boundary layer, while the LES treatment is applied to the separated region. In this paper, S-A DES method and SST k-ω DES method are applied to the numerical simulation for the 3D flow in whole passage of a double-suction centrifugal pump. The unsteady flow field including velocity and pressure distributions is obtained. The head and efficiency of the pump are predicted and compared with experimental results. According to the calculated results, S-A DES model is easy to control the partition of the simulation when using near wall grid with 30 < y+<300 control approach. It also has better performance on efficiency and accuracy than SST k - ω DES method. S-A DES method is more suitable for solving the unsteady flow in double-suction centrifugal pump. S-A DES method can capture more flow phenomenon than SST k - ω DES method. In addition, it can accurately predict the power performance under different flow conditions, and can reflect pressure fluctuation characteristics.

  16. Numerical simulation of compressible fluid flow in an ultrasonic suction pump.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yuji; Koyama, Daisuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-08-01

    Characteristics of an ultrasonic suction pump that uses a vibrating piston surface and a pipe are numerically simulated and compared with experimental results. Fluid analysis based on the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) routine is performed, where the nonlinear term and the moving fluid-surface boundary condition are considered. As a result, the suction mechanism of the pump is found to be similar to that of a check valve, where the gap is open during the inflow phase, and it is nearly closed during the outflow phase. The effects of Reynolds number, vibration amplitude and gap thickness on the pump performance are analyzed. The calculated result is in good agreement with the previously measured results.

  17. Characterization of Underwater Sounds Produced by Trailing Suction Hopper Dredges During Sand Mining and Pump-out Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    that hydraulically remove sediment from the seafloor through dragheads. The dragheads are “trailed” beneath the dredge and held in contact with the...substrate as the dredge advances. Large suction pumps transport the sediment from the seafloor and deposit the dredged material into one or more... seafloor ; 2) sounds produced by suction pipes and pumps, and the movement of dredged material through the dragarm riser to the hopper; 3) deposition sounds

  18. Numerical investigation of sediment erosion to the impeller in a double-suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. X.; Dong, F. D.; Cheng, X. R.

    2013-12-01

    Based on Euler-Lagrange multiphase flow model and Finnie ductile material erosion model, using phase coupled SIMPLE algorithm, k-e RNG turbulence model and Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equation, the solid-liquid two-phase flows in a double-suction centrifugal pump is simulated. The erosion rate and solid mass concentration distribution on the pressure and suction surfaces of blades were obtained in different situations, which include different solid mass concentration (2.17kg/m3, 8.66kg/m3 and 14kg/m3) and different sediment diameter (0.019mm, 0.036mm, and 0.076mm). By comparisons of the test and numerical simulation values, the reliability of numerical calculation method has been verified. The numerical simulation result obtained show that the Finnie ductile material erosion model can accurately predict the erosion rate and erosion areas on the impeller. The erosion rate is increases with solid sediment diameter or solid mass concentration increasing. The main erosion areas on the pressure surface of blades near the blade inlet and outlet and close to the hub, and on the suction surface of blades near the blade inlet and close to the hub. For different sediment diameter or solid mass concentration, the erosion rate on the pressure surface of blades is always greater than that on its suction surface.

  19. Cooperative suction by vertical capillary array pump for controlling flow profiles of microfluidic sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Katsuyoshi; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-10-18

    A passive pump consisting of integrated vertical capillaries has been developed for a microfluidic chip as an useful component with an excellent flow volume and flow rate. A fluidic chip built into a passive pump was used by connecting the bottoms of all the capillaries to a top surface consisting of a thin layer channel in the microfluidic chip where the thin layer channel depth was smaller than the capillary radius. As a result the vertical capillaries drew fluid cooperatively rather than independently, thus exerting the maximum suction efficiency at every instance. This meant that a flow rate was realized that exhibited little variation and without any external power or operation. A microfluidic chip built into this passive pump had the ability to achieve a quasi-steady rather than a rapidly decreasing flow rate, which is a universal flow characteristic in an ordinary capillary.

  20. Cooperative Suction by Vertical Capillary Array Pump for Controlling Flow Profiles of Microfluidic Sensor Chips

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Tsutomu; Hayashi, Katsuyoshi; Seyama, Michiko; Inoue, Suzuyo; Tamechika, Emi

    2012-01-01

    A passive pump consisting of integrated vertical capillaries has been developed for a microfluidic chip as an useful component with an excellent flow volume and flow rate. A fluidic chip built into a passive pump was used by connecting the bottoms of all the capillaries to a top surface consisting of a thin layer channel in the microfluidic chip where the thin layer channel depth was smaller than the capillary radius. As a result the vertical capillaries drew fluid cooperatively rather than independently, thus exerting the maximum suction efficiency at every instance. This meant that a flow rate was realized that exhibited little variation and without any external power or operation. A microfluidic chip built into this passive pump had the ability to achieve a quasi-steady rather than a rapidly decreasing flow rate, which is a universal flow characteristic in an ordinary capillary. PMID:23202035

  1. The effect of resonant driving and damping on dynamic suction pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Nicholas; Miller, Laura

    2016-11-01

    Impedance pumping (or dynamic suction pumping) drives flow through a a flexible valveless tube with a single region of actuation. It is a profoundly complex pumping mechanism given that the flow velocities and directions generated depend nonlinearly upon the driving frequency, material properties, duty factor, and location of the actuation point. Given the simplicity of its actuation, it is used in biomedical devices and is thought to generate flow in a number of biological systems. In this study, we numerically simulate an elastic tube with mass using the immersed boundary method and explore the performance when it is driven over a range of frequencies and damping factors. Flow is maximized during resonance, and bulk transport is minimal when the tube is over-damped.

  2. Magnesium sulfate micro air pump suction for bronchiolitis treatment in infants under two years old.

    PubMed

    Kan, R-X; Zhang, C-L; Zhen, Q; Chen, J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the efficiency, clinical effects and nursing methods related to the use of magnesium sulfate micro air pump suction for treating infants under two years old suffering from bronchiolitis. From January 2014 to September 2014, ninety-six infants with capillary bronchitis were enrolled. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (n=49) and control group (n=47). All patients went through conventional anti-inflammatory therapy. Based on this, infants in the control group were additionally treated with intravenous drip of magnesium sulfate while patients in the experimental group were treated with magnesium sulfate micro air pump suction. We recorded all changes in blood gas and clinical scores, the residence time of symptoms and signs of bronchiolitis, and hospitalization time. Results obtained on clinical effects and adverse reactions were compared and analyzed. The Variations of PaO2, PaCO2, SaO2 before treatment in both groups did not show any statistically significant differences (p>0.05); while after treatment analyses demonstrated that in both groups we had an increase in PaO2 and SaO2 and a decrease in PaCO2. The increase in PaO2 and SaO2 values were more pronounced while the decrease observed in PaCO2 was more significant in our experimental group. The total effective rate was significantly higher while the total adverse reaction rate, the resolution time of clinical symptoms and hospitalization time were significantly lower in our experimental group. Magnesium sulfate micro air pump suction was safe and effective in treating with bronchiolitis of infants below 2 years old, and its adverse reaction rate was low, nursing procedure was simple, and nursing difficulty level was low.

  3. Unsteady and Three Dimensional PTV Measurements of Flow Structure in a Suction Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, J.; Inagaki, K.; Shintani, A.; Kawaguchi, R.; Hirata, K.

    2010-06-01

    We attempt to reveal the unsteady three-dimensional flow structure in a suction sump with the vertical-wet-pit-pump configuration. In the present study, we consider the simultaneous measurement of a three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) with another velocimetry, that is, an ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP), using common tracer particles. This simultaneous measurement is expected to be a suitable method for the accuracy check of the 3D-PTV. At first, we have successfully found the suitable condition for simultaneous measurements with high accuracy. Then, we have revealed the concerning unsteady three-dimensional flow structure at various instants, quantitatively.

  4. Optimization of a single-stage double-suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Morgut, M.; Jošt, D.; Nobile, E.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the objective of the optimization of a double-suction pump is the maximization of its hydraulic efficiency. The optimization is performed, by means of the modeFRONTIER optimization platform, in steps. At first, by means of a DOE (Design of Experiments) strategy, the design space is explored, using a parameterized CAD representation of the pump. Suitable metamodels (surrogates or Response Surfaces), which represent an economical alternative to the more expensive 3D CFD model, are built and tested. Among different metamodels, the evolutionary design, radial basis function and the stepwise regression models seem to be the most promising ones. Finally, the stepwise regression model, trained on a set of 200 designs and constructed with only five the most influential input design parameters, was chosen as a potentially applicable metamodel.

  5. Experimental findings from zero-tank net positive suction head operation of the J-2 hydrogen pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stinson, H. P.; Strickland, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a series of liquid hydrogen turbopump tests to demonstrate the feasibility of zero-tank net positive suction head are presented. A J-2 engine hydrogen pump and S-IVB stage fuel feed system were used for this investigation. The pump was operated at flows and speeds equivalent to normal J-2 engine operating conditions and at hydrogen bulk temperatures between 39 and 45 R. These tests show zero-tank not positive suction head to be a realistic operating mode that should be considered for future applications.

  6. Decoupled CFD-based optimization of efficiency and cavitation performance of a double-suction pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Škerlavaj, A.; Morgut, M.; Jošt, D.; Nobile, E.

    2017-04-01

    In this study the impeller geometry of a double-suction pump ensuring the best performances in terms of hydraulic efficiency and reluctance of cavitation is determined using an optimization strategy, which was driven by means of the modeFRONTIER optimization platform. The different impeller shapes (designs) are modified according to the optimization parameters and tested with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, namely ANSYS CFX. The simulations are performed using a decoupled approach, where only the impeller domain region is numerically investigated for computational convenience. The flow losses in the volute are estimated on the base of the velocity distribution at the impeller outlet. The best designs are then validated considering the computationally more expensive full geometry CFD model. The overall results show that the proposed approach is suitable for quick impeller shape optimization.

  7. Fine-particle filter prevents damage to vacuum pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlamert, P., Jr.

    1964-01-01

    A filter system for mechanical pumps is designed with a baffle assembly that rotates in a circulating oil bath which traps destructive particles. This prevents severe damage to the pump and is serviceable for long periods before it requires cleaning.

  8. Comparison between manual aspiration via polyethylene tubing and aspiration via a suction pump with a suction trap connection for performing bronchoalveolar lavage in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Woods, Katharine S; Defarges, Alice M N; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Dobson, Howard; Viel, Laurent; Brisson, Brigitte A; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2013-04-01

    To compare the diagnostic quality of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid acquired from healthy dogs by manual aspiration via polyethylene tubing (MAPT) and via suction pump aspiration (SPA) with a suction trap connection. 12 healthy adult Beagles. BAL was performed with bronchoscopic guidance in anesthetized dogs. The MAPT was performed with a 35-mL syringe attached to polyethylene tubing wedged in a bronchus via the bronchoscope's biopsy channel. The SPA was performed with 5 kPa of negative pressure applied to the bronchoscope's suction valve via a suction trap. The MAPT and SPA techniques were performed in randomized order on opposite caudal lung lobes of each dog. Two 1 mL/kg lavages were performed per site. Samples of BAL fluid were analyzed on the basis of a semiquantitative quality scale, percentage of retrieved fluid, and total nucleated and differential cell counts. Results were compared with Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Percentage of BAL fluid retrieved (median difference, 16.2%), surfactant score (median difference, 1), and neutrophil count (median difference, 74 cells/μL) were significantly higher for SPA than for MAPT. A higher BAL fluid epithelial cell score was obtained via MAPT, compared with that for samples obtained via SPA (median difference, 1). Results indicated that in healthy dogs, SPA provided a higher percentage of BAL fluid retrieval than did MAPT. The SPA technique may improve the rate of diagnostic success for BAL in dogs, compared with that for MAPT. Further evaluation of these aspiration techniques in dogs with respiratory tract disease is required.

  9. Effects of radial diffuser hydraulic design on a double-suction centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, H. C.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhang, J. Y.; Li, Z. L.

    2016-05-01

    In order to study effects of radial diffuser on hydraulic performance of crude oil pump, the steady CFD numerical method is applied and one large double-suction oil pump running in long-distance pipeline is considered. The research focuses on analysing the influence of its diffuser vane profile on hydraulic performance of oil pump. The four different types of cylindrical vane have been designed by in-house codes mainly including double arcs (DA), triple arcs (TA), equiangular spiral line (ES) and linear variable angle spiral line (LVS). During design process diffuser vane angles at inlet and outlet are tentatively given within a certain range and then the wrapping angle of the four types of diffuser vanes can be calculated automatically. Under the given inlet and outlet angles, the linear variable angle spiral line profile has the biggest wrapping angle and profile length which is good to delay channel diffusion but bring more friction hydraulic loss. Finally the vane camber line is thickened at the certain uniform thickness distribution and the 3D diffuser models are generated. The whole flow passage of oil pump with different types of diffusers under various flow rate conditions are numerically simulated based on RNG k-ɛ turbulent model and SIMPLEC algorithm. The numerical results show that different types of diffusers can bring about great difference on the hydraulic performance of oil pump, of which the ES profile diffuser with its proper setting angle shows the best hydraulic performance and its inner flow field is improved obviously. Compared with the head data from model sample, all designed diffusers can make a certain improvement on head characteristic. At the large flow rate conditions the hydraulic efficiency increases obviously and the best efficiency point shift to the large flow rate range. The ES profile diffuser embodies the better advantages on pump performance which can be explained theoretically that the diffuser actually acts as a diffusion

  10. Comparison of manual and suction pump aspiration techniques for performing bronchoalveolar lavage in 18 dogs with respiratory tract disease.

    PubMed

    Woods, K S; Defarges, A M N; Abrams-Ogg, A C G; Viel, L; Brisson, B A; Bienzle, D

    2014-01-01

    Different aspiration techniques to retrieve bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) affect sample quality in healthy dogs. Studies evaluating these techniques in dogs with respiratory disease are lacking. To compare sample quality of BALF acquired by manual aspiration (MA) and suction pump aspiration (SPA). Eighteen client-owned dogs with respiratory disease. Randomized, blinded prospective clinical trial. Manual aspiration was performed with a 35-mL syringe attached directly to the bronchoscope biopsy channel and SPA was performed with a maximum of 50 mmHg negative pressure applied to the bronchoscope suction valve using the suction trap connection. Both aspiration techniques were performed in each dog on contralateral lung lobes, utilizing 2 mL/kg lavage volumes per site. Samples of BALF were analyzed by percentage of retrieved infusate, total nucleated cell count (TNCC), differential cell count, semiquantitative assessment of slide quality, and diagnosis score. Data were compared by paired Student's t-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, chi-squared test, and ANOVA. Cohen's kappa coefficient was used to assess agreement. The percentage of retrieved BALF (P = .001) was significantly higher for SPA than MA. Substantial agreement was found between cytologic classification of BALF obtained with MA and SPA (kappa = 0.615). There was no significant difference in rate of definitive diagnosis achieved with cytologic assessment between techniques (P = .78). Suction pump aspiration, compared to MA, improved BALF retrieval, but did not significantly affect the rate of diagnostic success of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in dogs with pulmonary disease. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  11. Remotely operated submersible underwater suction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kristan, Louis L.

    1990-01-01

    A completely submersible, remotely operated underwater suction device for collection of irradiated materials in a nuclear pool is disclosed. The device includes a pump means for pumping water through the device, a filter means for capturing irradiated debris, remotely operated releasable connector means, a collection means and a means for remotely maneuvering the collection means. The components of the suction device may be changed and replaced underwater to take advantage of the excellent radiation shielding ability of water to thereby minimize exposure of personnel to radiation.

  12. An experimental study of rotor-filter pump performance

    SciTech Connect

    Marshek, K.M.; Naja, M.R.

    1982-09-01

    The performance of a rotor-filter pump has been studied experimentally. To develop an understanding of pump performance, and in particular to discern the mechanism of hydraulic pulsing, flow visualization in the rotor, vibration analyses of the pump, frequency analysis of the pump hydraulic pressure pulsation, and analyses of flow characteristics for different pick-up tubes in combination with different impellers and cover plates were conducted. The frequencies of the pump's hydraulic pulsation is shown to be a function of the number of pick-up arms and the motor speed. The pump vibration and its pulsation amplitude were reduced by increasing the number of pick-up arms or by adding a radial impeller. These actions increased the lowest frequency of pulsation and decreased the chance of excitation of the pump system parts.

  13. Fuel pump and fuel filter for a marine installation

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, G.F.; Butts, J.W.; Dayenian, P.M.

    1993-08-03

    An apparatus is described comprising a fuel pump having an inlet and having an outlet adapted for fluid communication with an internal combustion engine, a fuel filter including a housing having an inlet and an outlet, the fuel filter further defining a chamber adapted to house liquid fuel and fuel vapor, a tube threadedly connected to the fuel filter housing and having a first end connected to the inlet of the fuel pump, and a second end extending into the portion of the chamber that is adapted to house liquid fuel, the tube thereby providing for fluid communication between the outlet of the fuel filter and the inlet of the fuel pump, and the tube including a vapor bleed aperture.

  14. Optical Pumping / Spin Exchange ^3He Neutron Spin Filter Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Shenq-Rong; Coulter, Kevin P.; Chupp, Timothy E.; Welsh, Robert C.

    1998-04-01

    We have instrumented a thermal neutron beam line at the 2MW Ford reactor at the University of Michigan to develop a ^3He neutron spin filter test stand. Due to a large, spin depedent neutron cross section at low energies, polarized ^3He can be used as a neutron spin filter. Our ^3He spin filter is a 10 amagat-cm ^3He cell polarized via optical pumping/spin exchange with Rb. The filter is made of Corning 7056 glass filled with Rb , several atmosphere of ^3He and a few hundred torr nitrogen as buffer gas. We apply two 15W diode array lasers to optically pump Rb. In this presentation we will discuss some progress of this development, including a rotating oven design and a stepping motor driven neutron chopper. Preliminary results of the 10 amagat-cm filter will be presented and compared with theoretical calculations. A study of systematic errors from the data acquisition system and the neutron chopper will also be discussed.

  15. View of slow sand filters with pump house/chlorinator in foreground. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of slow sand filters with pump house/chlorinator in foreground. Clear well tank located behind pump house and trees. - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park Water Collection System, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  16. Application of a compressible flow solver and barotropic cavitation model for the evaluation of the suction head in a low specific speed centrifugal pump impeller channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limbach, P.; Müller, T.; Skoda, R.

    2015-12-01

    Commonly, for the simulation of cavitation in centrifugal pumps incompressible flow solvers with VOF kind cavitation models are applied. Since the source/sink terms of the void fraction transport equation are based on simplified bubble dynamics, empirical parameters may need to be adjusted to the particular pump operating point. In the present study a barotropic cavitation model, which is based solely on thermodynamic fluid properties and does not include any empirical parameters, is applied on a single flow channel of a pump impeller in combination with a time-explicit viscous compressible flow solver. The suction head curves (head drop) are compared to the results of an incompressible implicit standard industrial CFD tool and are predicted qualitatively correct by the barotropic model.

  17. Comparison of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained by manual aspiration with a handheld syringe with that obtained by automated suction pump aspiration from healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Woods, Katharine S; Defarges, Alice M N; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Dobson, Howard; Brisson, Brigitte A; Viel, Laurent; Bienzle, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    To compare bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained by manual aspiration (MA) with a handheld syringe with that obtained by suction pump aspiration (SPA) in healthy dogs. 13 adult Beagles. Each dog was anesthetized and bronchoscopic BAL was performed. The MA technique was accomplished with a 35-mL syringe attached to the bronchoscope biopsy channel. The SPA technique was achieved with negative pressure (5 kPa) applied to the bronchoscope suction valve with a disposable suction trap. Both aspiration techniques were performed in each dog in randomized order on opposite caudal lung lobes. Two 1 mL/kg aliquots of warm saline (0.9% NaCl) solution were infused per site. For each BAL fluid sample, the percentage of retrieved fluid was calculated, the total nucleated cell count (TNCC) and differential cell count were determined, and semiquantitative assessment of slide quality was performed. Comparisons were made between MA and SPA techniques for each outcome. 1 dog was removed from the study because of illness. The mean percentage of fluid retrieved (mean difference, 23%) and median TNCC (median distribution of differences, 100 cells/μL) for samples obtained by SPA were significantly greater than those for samples obtained by MA. In healthy dogs, BAL by SPA resulted in a significantly higher percentage of fluid retrieval and samples with a higher TNCC than did MA. Further evaluation of aspiration techniques in dogs with respiratory tract disease is required to assess whether SPA improves the diagnostic yield of BAL samples.

  18. Biomechanics and energy cost of the amphipod Corophium volutator filter-pump.

    PubMed

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2007-04-01

    The integrated function of the setal filter-basket and the pleopodal pump in the burrowing amphipod Corophium volutator was studied by video-microscopy in order to evaluate the energy costs of filter feeding. Video-microscope observations indicated that, in general, nine short, water-pumping beat cycles of the pleopods are succeeded by one slow cycle that coincides with cleaning of the setal filter and transient slowdown of inhalant water velocity. The position of the plumose setal filter on the second pair of gnathopods ensures that all water runs through the filter-basket. The fine V-shaped bristles on the setae enlarge the total filter area so that the velocity of water flowing through the filter is relatively slow, about 2.5 mm s(-1), giving rise to a resistance of about 2.9 mm H(2)O, which is the most important contribution to the total pressure drop in the system. In "standard" individuals of C. volutator with lengths of 3 and 6 mm, the normal operating pump pressure and pumping rate were, respectively, 2.6 and 3.1 mm H(2)O, and 18.3 and 85.5 ml h(-1); the overall pump efficiencies were 5.1% and 11.6%, respectively. These results show that the Corophium filter-pump is comparable to other low-pressure biological pumps in filter-feeding marine invertebrates, such as mussels, polychaetes, ascidians, and bryozoans.

  19. Effectiveness evaluation of different suction systems.

    PubMed

    Junevicius, Jonas; Surna, Algimantas; Surna, Rimas

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms of the patient's oral cavity and his/her blood and saliva may cause different air-borne and blood-borne infectious diseases among odontologists and their assistants who work with patients. Quantitative analysis and spatial distribution analysis of the environmental spread of oral liquid and cooling liquid mixture were performed during this study. Effectiveness of suction systems of four types was evaluated: without suction, using a small-size suction pump alone, using a small-size and large-size suction pumps, using a small-size suction pump together with an experimental extra-oral aspirator. Quantitative changes of the water aerosol, which enters the environment during the preparation of teeth, were determined in respect of the used suction systems. The small-size pump system together with an experimental extra-oral suction system eliminated best the aerosol formed during the preparation.

  20. Kinetics of physiological skin flora in a suction blister wound model on healthy subjects after treatment with water-filtered infrared-A radiation.

    PubMed

    Daeschlein, G; Alborova, J; Patzelt, A; Kramer, A; Lademann, J

    2012-01-01

    The effect of water-filtered infrared-A radiation (wIRA) on normal skin flora was investigated by generating experimental wounds on the forearms of volunteers utilizing the suction blister technique. Over 7 days, recolonization was monitored parallel to wound healing. Four groups of treatment were compared: no therapy (A), dexpanthenol cream once daily (B), 20 min wIRA irradiation at 30 cm distance (C), and wIRA irradiation for 30 min once daily together with dexpanthenol cream once daily (D). All treatments strongly inhibited the recolonization of the wounds. Whereas dexpanthenol completely suppressed recolonization over the test period, recolonization after wIRA without (C) and in combination with dexpanthenol (D) was suppressed, but started on day 5 with considerably higher amounts after the combination treatment (D). Whereas the consequence without treatment (A) was an increasing amount of physiological skin flora including coagulase-negative staphylococci, all treatments (B-D) led to a reduction in physiological skin flora, including coagulase-negative staphylococci. In healthy volunteers, wIRA alone and in combination with dexpanthenol strongly inhibited bacterial recolonization with physiological skin flora after artificial wound setting using a suction-blister wound model. This could support the beneficial effects of wIRA in the promotion of wound healing.

  1. Resolution enhancement of pump-probe microscopy with an inverse-annular spatial filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Kawasumi, K.; Miyazaki, J.; Nakata, K.

    2016-12-01

    We have introduced a pupil filter, an inverse-annular pupil filter in a pump-probe photothermal microscope, which provides resolution enhancement in three dimensions. The resolution is probed to be improved in lateral and axial resolution by imaging experiment using 20 nm gold nanoparticles. The improvement in X (perpendicular to the common pump and probe polarization direction), Y (parallel to the polarization direction), and Z (axial direction) are by 15±6, 8±8, and 21±2 % from the resolution without a pupil filter. The resolution enhancement is even better than the calculation using vector field, which predicts the corresponding enhancement of 11, 8, and 6 %. The discussion is made to explain the unexpected results. We also demonstrate the photothermal imaging of thick biological samples (cells from rabbit intestine and kidney) stained with hematoxylin and eosin dye with the inverse-annular filter.

  2. Cs 728 nm excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter with indirect pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhiming; Zhang, Xiaogang; Chen, Mo; Liu, Zhongzheng; Zhu, Chuanwen; Liu, Zhiwen; Chen, Jingbiao

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a Cs excited state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (ESFADOF) operating at 728 nm using a novel pump method, by which the pump beam and the probe beam in the ESFADOF realized here have no a common energy level. Using this method, the ESFADOF achieves a transmission of 2.39% with a bandwidth of 22.52 MHz, which can be applied to both laser frequency stabilization and future four-level active optical clocks. Under the 455 nm laser pump, in addition to 52D5/2, other states such as 72S1/2, 72P3/2, 62P3/2, 62P1/2 and 52D3/2 have also been populated effectively. Meanwhile, multiple wavelength filters exploiting atomic transitions to these states can be realized.

  3. The Influence of Swirl Brakes and a Tip Discharge Orifice on the Rotordynamic Forces Generated by Discharge-to-Suction Leakage Flows in Shrouded Centrifugal Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, Joseph M.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1993-01-01

    Recent experiments conducted in the Rotor Force Test Facility at the California Institute of Technology have examined the effects of a tip leakage restriction and swirl brakes on the rotordynamic forces due to leakage flows on an impeller undergoing a prescribed circular whirl. The experiments simulate the leakage flow conditions and geometry of the Alternate Turbopump Design (ATD) of the Space Shuttle High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump and are critical to evaluating the pump's rotordynamic instability problems. Previous experimental and analytical results have shown that discharge-to-suction leakage flows in the annulus of a shrouded centrifugal pump contribute substantially to the fluid induced rotordynamic forces. Also, previous experiments have shown that leakage inlet (pump discharge) swirl can increase the cross-coupled stiffness coefficient and hence increase the range of positive whirl for which the tangential force is destabilizing. In recent experimental work, the present authors demonstrated that when the swirl velocity within the leakage path is reduced by the introduction of ribs or swirl brakes, then a substantial decrease in both the destabilizing normal and tangential forces could be achieved. Motivation for the present research is that previous experiments have shown that restrictions such as wear rings or orifices at pump inlets affect the leakage forces. Recent pump designs such as the Space Shuttle Alternate Turbopump Design (ATD) utilize tip orifices at discharge for the purpose of establishing axial thrust balance. The ATD has experienced rotordynamic instability problems and one may surmise that these tip discharge orifices may also have an important effect on the normal and tangential forces in the plane of impeller rotation. The present study determines if such tip leakage restrictions contribute to undesirable rotordynamic forces. Additional motivation for the present study is that the widening of the leakage path annular clearance and the

  4. Syringe Pump Performance Maintained with IV Filter Use During Low Flow Rate Delivery for Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Chau, Destiny F; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Schoepf, Miriam; Zhang, Christina; Fahy, Brenda G

    2016-09-01

    Complex surgical and critically ill pediatric patients rely on syringe infusion pumps for precise delivery of IV medications. Low flow rates and in-line IV filter use may affect drug delivery. To determine the effects of an in-line filter to remove air and/or contaminants on syringe pump performance at low flow rates, we compared the measured rates with the programmed flow rates with and without in-line IV filters. Standardized IV infusion assemblies with and without IV filters (filter and control groups) attached to a 10-mL syringe were primed and then loaded onto a syringe pump and connected to a 16-gauge, 16-cm single-lumen catheter. The catheter was suspended in a normal saline fluid column to simulate the back pressure from central venous circulation. The delivered infusate was measured by gravimetric methods at predetermined time intervals, and flow rate was calculated. Experimental trials for initial programmed rates of 1.0, 0.8, 0.6, and 0.4 mL/h were performed in control and filter groups. For each trial, the flow rate was changed to double the initial flow rate and was then returned to the initial flow rate to analyze pump performance for titration of rates often required during medication administration. These conditions (initial rate, doubling of initial rate, and return to initial rate) were analyzed separately for steady-state flow rate and time to steady state, whereas their average was used for percent deviation analysis. Differences between control and filter groups were assessed using Student t tests with adjustment for multiplicity (using n = 3 replications per group). Mean time from 0 to initial flow (startup delay) was <1 minute in both groups with no statistical difference between groups (P = 1.0). The average time to reach steady-state flow after infusion startup or rate changes was not statistically different between the groups (range, 0.8-5.5 minutes), for any flow rate or part of the trial (initial rate, doubling of initial rate, and

  5. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  6. Industrial Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A flow inducer is a device that increases the pump intake capacity of a Worthington Centrifugal pump. It lifts the suction pressure sufficiently for the rotating main impeller of the centrifugal pump to operate efficiently at higher fluid intake levels. The concept derives from 1960's NASA technology which was advanced by Worthington Pump Division. The pumps are used to recirculate wood molasses, a highly viscous substance.

  7. Improved Automatic Filtered Power Control Pumping Method for Uniform Shortpass Band in Optical Fiber Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jyi-Lai; Huang, Hau-Min; Lee, Yueh-Chien; Huang, Chia-Chih; Lin, Huang-Cuang; Lin, Chin-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    To form a low noise figure and uniform shortpass band in optical fiber communications an improved automatic filtered power control (AFPC) pumping method is proposed here. A modulated single laser signal was entered in a closed feedback loop, in which the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) was used as a part of the AFPC loop. Owing to the constant filtered signal and the quadrature phase shift delay inside the feedback loop, an optical pass band was uniformly formed. This EDFA attains high performance with a low noise figure simultaneously. The method was successfully applied to the fabrication of practical 12.0 m length of erbium-doped fiber pumped at 980 nm wavelength and 20 dBm power. Experiments prove that the signal gain of the loop remain flat in the range of 18.2 to 22.4 dB with a worst case error of ±0.5 dB and the noise figure was reduced by 2.2 dB at optimal, which correspond to a shortpass range of 40 nm band pass from 1525 nm to 1565 nm in wavelength. Of course, it should be possible to extent the system performance to all pumping configurations for semiconductor optical amplifiers. This provides the simplest and most economical way to transmit a well-defined band of modulated laser signal and to reject all other unwanted radiation.

  8. Inpatient studies of a Kalman-filter-based predictive pump shutoff algorithm.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Fraser; Wilson, Darrell M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Arzumanyan, Hasmik; Clinton, Paula; Chase, H Peter; Lum, John; Maahs, David M; Calhoun, Peter M; Bequette, B Wayne

    2012-09-01

    An insulin pump shutoff system can prevent nocturnal hypoglycemia and is a first step on the pathway toward a closed-loop artificial pancreas. In previous pump shutoff studies using a voting algorithm and a 1 min continuous glucose monitor (CGM), 80% of induced hypoglycemic events were prevented. The pump shutoff algorithm used in previous studies was revised to a single Kalman filter to reduce complexity, incorporate CGMs with different sample times, handle sensor signal dropouts, and enforce safety constraints on the allowable pump shutoff time. Retrospective testing of the new algorithm on previous clinical data sets indicated that, for the four cases where the previous algorithm failed (minimum reference glucose less than 60 mg/dl), the mean suspension start time was 30 min earlier than the previous algorithm. Inpatient studies of the new algorithm have been conducted on 16 subjects. The algorithm prevented hypoglycemia in 73% of subjects. Suspension-induced hyperglycemia is not assessed, because this study forced excessive basal insulin infusion rates. The new algorithm functioned well and is flexible enough to handle variable sensor sample times and sensor dropouts. It also provides a framework for handling sensor signal attenuations, which can be challenging, particularly when they occur overnight. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  9. Measurement of suction and discharge pressure pulsations in waterflood facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzbach, W.M. Jr.; Happel, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    Recent mechanical problems with reciprocating water injection pumps prompted a study of suction and discharge pressure conditions in the Red River Bull Bayou Unit, Red River Parish, La. Frequent failures in plunger pump components and discharge lines were occurring at several injection sites within the unit. Electronic surveillance equipment consisting of an oscilloscope and pressure transducers was utilized to locate and identify large suction and discharge pressure pulses. The severity of these pulses could not be identified with standard pressure gages. The data obtained with the electronic equipment indicated that cavitation was occurring on the suction side of the pumps due to insufficient net positive suction head. The large pressure pulsations caused by this cavitation problem were carried through the pump and amplified on the discharge side. Changes in the suction and discharge piping design eliminated cavitation and effectively reduced the peak pressure pulses.

  10. Efficient atraumatic liquid suction by means of slit suction tubes combined with a pressure control unit.

    PubMed

    Vällfors, B

    1984-01-01

    In 1976 a modified suction system for neurosurgery and precision surgery was presented. It was developed to meet the need for efficient and atraumatic liquid suction. the system consists of suction tube ends provided with three vertical slits in the suction edge (W-tubes), a Pressure Control Unit (PCU) and an independent suction pump with an air capacity of 25-30 litres per min. This system has subsequently been modified for microsurgery. The PCU normally controls the negative pressure to 20 kPa (corresponding to 200 cm of water) for atraumatic suction of liquid, which is needed during most of the operating time. For suction of various tissues or cleaning the system, the surgeon can set the pressure limit to 50 or 90 kPa by means of a foot-operated IR-transmitter in a pedal with a kick-down function. The PCU and the W-tubes, which neutralize the pressure load on tissue and the sudden interruption of liquid flow that are inevitable with conventional suction tips, form a system with a high liquid suction capacity in spite of the atraumatic suction pressure. This is possible because the slits maintain a large active suction area. Crushed or soft tissues and coagulated blood are aspirated as and when required, if necessary by elevation of the negative pressure limit. The W-tubes are not provided with an air inlet hole on the tube because that method of pressure control proved unpredictable and variable and reduced the suction capacity by interfering with the flow.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Slow sand filters effectively reduce Phytophthora after a pathogen switch from Fusarium and a simulated pump failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric; Oki, Lorence R

    2013-09-15

    Slow sand filtration has been shown to effectively reduce Phytophthora zoospores in irrigation water. This experiment tested the reduction of Phytophthora colony forming units (CFUs) by slow sand filtration systems after switching the pathogen contaminating plant leachate from Fusarium to Phytophthora and the resilience of the system to a short period without water, as might be caused by a pump failure. The slow sand filtration system greatly reduced Phytophthora CFUs and transmission after switching the pathogens. In addition, Phytophthora reduction by the slow sand filter was equally effective before and after the simulated pump failure. Reduction of Fusarium was not seen by the SSFs, before or after the simulated pump failure. The results suggest that slow sand filters are effective at reducing larger organisms, such as Phytophthora zoospores, even after a pump failure or a change in pathogens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of Minimum Suction Level Necessary for Field Dental Units

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    MILITARY MEDICINE, 175, 4:285, 2010 Determination of Minimum Suction Level Necessary for Field Dental Units David G. Charlton, DDS ABSTRACT A...significant problem with most field dental units is that their suction is too weak to effectively remove debris from the mouth. The purpose of this study was...to determine the minimum clinically acceptable suction level for routine dentistry. A vacuum pump was connected to a high-volume dental evacuation

  13. BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BLAISDELL SLOW SAND FILTER WASHING MACHINE. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. THE SUCTION (INTAKE) HOSE IS SEEN AT THE LEFT RESTING ON THE FILTER BED SURFACE; THE DISCHARGE HOSE IS AT THE RIGHT, RUNNING FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE CENTRAL VERTICAL AXLE TO THE CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. FROM THE PUMP WATER IS DISCHARGED THROUGH THE HORIZONTAL PIPE LOCATED UNDER THE EDGE OF PLATFORM DECK INTO THE WASTE-WATER TROUGH (NOT SEEN IN THIS VIEW). - Yuma Main Street Water Treatment Plant, Blaisdell Slow Sand Filter Washing Machine, Jones Street at foot of Main Street, Yuma, Yuma County, AZ

  14. Reversible Sodium Pump Defect and Swelling in the Diabetic Rat Erythrocyte: Effects on Filterability and Implications for Microangiopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowluru, R.; Bitensky, M. W.; Kowluru, A.; Dembo, M.; Keaton, P. A.; Buican, T.

    1989-05-01

    We have found a defect in the ouabain-sensitive Na+,K+-ATPase (Na+ pump, EC 3.6.1.37) of erythrocytes from streptozotocin diabetic rats. This defect was accompanied by an increase in cell volume and osmotic fragility and a decrease in the cytosolic K+/Na+ ratio. There was also a doubling in the time needed for diabetic erythrocytes to pass through 4.7-μ m channels in a polycarbonate filter. Our data are consistent with a primary defect in the erythrocyte Na+ pump and secondary changes in cell volume, osmotic fragility, K+/Na+ ratio, and cell filterability. All were reversed or prevented in vivo by insulin or the aldose reductase inhibitor Sorbinil. Protein kinase C agonists (phorbol ester and diacylglycerol) and agonist precursor (myo-inositol) reversed the Na+ pump lesion, suggesting that protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of the 100-kDa subunit regulates Na+ pump activity and that insulin can influence erythrocyte protein kinase C activity. Ouabain inhibition of the erythrocyte Na+ pump also produced increases in cell size and reductions in rates of filtration. Theoretical treatment of the volume changes also predicts reduction in filterability as a consequence of cell swelling. We suggest that enlarged erythrocytes could play a role in the evolution of the microvascular changes of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.W.; Abdul.Hye, A.B.M.

    1983-10-25

    A pump for injecting chemicals into a well employs a pivot arm for synchronous movement with a well pump. The pivot arm causes reciprocation of a plunger within the body of the chemical pump. The plunger, during its upward stroke causes the entry of chemicals from an outside source into the pump body and, during its downward stroke, causes the exiting of the chemicals into the well. (2 claims.

  16. An Irrigation Suction System Using a Pressurized Fluid High-Flow Pump System in Comparison with a Standard Cuff Pressure System: Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Murai, Yasuo; Matano, Fumihiro; Toda, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Shiro; Morita, Akio

    2016-05-01

    In neurosurgical operations, such as clipping of ruptured cerebral aneurysms, irrigation of the operative field is a basic and extremely important surgical technique. Various irrigation-suction (IS) systems have been marketed for irrigation of operative fields in neurosurgery. However, with these devices, we often must increase the cuff pressure to maintain fluid power and change the fluid bag relatively frequently. We report the usefulness of pressurized irrigation fluid with the Niagara high-flow irrigation system (NI). Using both the NI system and an IS, we altered pressure and duration to investigate differences in flow rate. There was no change in flow rate 80 minutes after pressurization of the NI system, and flow rates decreased slightly. Additionally, flow rates using NI were sensitive to changes in pressure. This system has reduced the workload of assisting nurses and surgeons during surgery. Thus we consider the technique to be very useful for neurosurgical operations that require delicate procedures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Efficiency of an air filter at the drainage site in a closed circuit with a centrifugal blood pump: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mitsumaru, A; Yozu, R; Matayoshi, T; Morita, M; Shin, H; Tsutsumi, K; Iino, Y; Kawada, S

    2001-01-01

    In a closed circuit with a centrifugal blood pump, one of the serious obstacles to clinical application is sucking of air bubbles into the drainage circuit. The goal of this study was to investigate the efficiency of an air filter at the drainage site. We used whole bovine blood and the experimental circuit consisted of a drainage circuit, two air filters, a centrifugal blood pump, a membrane oxygenator, a return circuit, and a reservoir. Air was injected into the drainage circuit with a roller pump, and the number and size of air bubbles were measured. The air filter at the drainage site could remove the air bubbles (>40 microm) by itself, but adding a vacuum removed more bubbles (>40 microm) than without vacuum. Our results suggest that an air filter at the drainage site could effectively remove air bubbles, and that adding the filter in a closed circuit with a centrifugal blood pump would be safer.

  18. Energy saving pump and pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, K.C.

    1983-08-02

    A centrifugal pump and a pumping system are disclosed that recover hydraulic energy in response to flow capacity reduction and spontaneously provide a recirculating flow at low capacities when pump cooling is needed. From a upstream source the fluid is guided by two suction lines to two parallel pumping mechanisms housed by a common discharge casing. Said pumping mechanisms have a combined hydraulic characteristic that the first pumping mechanism will force a reverse flow through the second pumping mechanism, when pump discharge is reduced by the system below a certain low flow rate. The reverse flow will then return to the upstream fluid source through a suction line. The pump is the protected from overheating by a circulating flow at low flow capacities. At the same time, said reverse flow generates a turbine action on the second pumping mechanism and transmits the contained hydraulic energy back to the rotor and thereby results in power saving at low flow capacities.

  19. Hydroponic Feed With Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, William M.; Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Placing nutrient solution under suction increases growth. Foam plug seals growing stem of plant, making it possible to maintain suction in nutrient liquid around roots. Jar wrapped in black tape to keep out light. Potential use in terrestrial applications in arid climates or in labor-intensive agricultural situations.

  20. Hydroponic Feed With Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, William M.; Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Placing nutrient solution under suction increases growth. Foam plug seals growing stem of plant, making it possible to maintain suction in nutrient liquid around roots. Jar wrapped in black tape to keep out light. Potential use in terrestrial applications in arid climates or in labor-intensive agricultural situations.

  1. Measurement of suction and discharge pressure pulsations in waterflood facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wurzbach, W.M.; Happel, P.E.

    1983-10-01

    Recent mechanical problems with reciprocating water injection pumps prompted a study of suction and discharge pressure conditions in the Red River Bull Bayou Unit, Red River Parish, Louisiana. Frequent failures in plunger pump components and discharge lines were occurring at several injection sites within the unit. Electronic surveillance equipment consisting of an oscilloscope and pressure transducers was utilized to locate and identify large suction and discharge pressure pulses. The severity of these pulses could not be identified with standard pressure gauges. The data obtained with the electronic equipment indicated that cavitation was occurring on the suction side of the pumps due to insufficient net positive suction head. The large pressure pulsations caused by this cavitation problem were carried through the pump and amplified on the discharge side. This resulted in excessive vibration and equipment overload. Subsequent changes in the suction and discharge piping design eliminated cavitation and effectively reduced the peak pressure pulses. These piping changes were done systematically to measure the effect of each change individually. The resulting measurements gave better insight to future piping design for both suction and discharge installations.

  2. PUMPS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1959-03-24

    A pump is described for conveving liquids, particure it is not advisable he apparatus. The to be submerged in the liquid to be pumped, a conduit extending from the high-velocity nozzle of the injector,and means for applying a pulsating prcesure to the surface of the liquid in the conduit, whereby the surface oscillates between positions in the conduit. During the positive half- cycle of an applied pulse liquid is forced through the high velocity nozzle or jet of the injector and operates in the manner of the well known water injector and pumps liquid from the main intake to the outlet of the injector. During the negative half-cycle of the pulse liquid flows in reverse through the jet but no reverse pumping action takes place.

  3. Coronary artery surgery: cardiotomy suction or cell salvage?

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Kelvin; Shah, Hetul; Kelleher, Andrea; Moat, Neil

    2007-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) today results in what may be regarded as acceptable levels of blood loss with many institutions avoiding allogeneic red cell transfusion in over 60% of their patients. The majority of cardiac surgeons employ cardiotomy suction to preserve autologous blood during on-pump coronary artery bypass surgery; however the use of cardiotomy suction is associated with a more pronounced systemic inflammatory response and a resulting coagulopathy as well as exacerbating the microembolic load. This leads to a tendency to increased blood loss, transfusion requirement and organ dysfunction. Conversely, the avoidance of cardiotomy suction in coronary artery bypass surgery is not associated with an increased transfusion requirement. There is therefore no indication for the routine use of cardiotomy suction in on-pump coronary artery surgery. PMID:17961227

  4. Overcoming the problem of residual microbial contamination in dental suction units left by conventional disinfection using novel single component suction handpieces in combination with automated flood disinfection.

    PubMed

    Boyle, M A; O'Donnell, M J; Russell, R J; Galvin, N; Swan, J; Coleman, D C

    2015-10-01

    Decontaminating dental chair unit (DCU) suction systems in a convenient, safe and effective manner is problematic. This study aimed to identify and quantify the extent of the problems using 25 DCUs, methodically eliminate these problems and develop an efficient approach for reliable, effective, automated disinfection. DCU suction system residual contamination by environmental and human-derived bacteria was evaluated by microbiological culture following standard aspiration disinfection with a quaternary ammonium disinfectant or alternatively, a novel flooding approach to disinfection. Disinfection of multicomponent suction handpieces, assembled and disassembled, was also studied. A prototype manual and a novel automated Suction Tube Cleaning System (STCS) were developed and tested, as were novel single component suction handpieces. Standard aspiration disinfection consistently failed to decontaminate DCU suction systems effectively. Semi-confluent bacterial growth (101-500 colony forming units (CFU) per culture plate) was recovered from up to 60% of suction filter housings and from up to 19% of high and 37% of low volume suction hoses. Manual and automated flood disinfection of DCU suction systems reduced this dramatically (ranges for filter cage and high and low volume hoses of 0-22, 0-16 and 0-14CFU/plate, respectively) (P<0.0001). Multicomponent suction handpieces could not be adequately disinfected without prior removal and disassembly. Novel single component handpieces, allowed their effective disinfection in situ using the STCS, which virtually eliminated contamination from the entire suction system. Flood disinfection of DCU suction systems and single component handpieces radically improves disinfection efficacy and considerably reduces potential cross-infection and cross-contamination risks. DCU suction systems become heavily contaminated during use. Conventional disinfection does not adequately control this. Furthermore, multicomponent suction handpieces

  5. Cellular aggregation and trauma in cardiotomy suction systems.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, G; Sanderson, J M

    1979-01-01

    Experiments in dogs showed that the high levels of cellular aggregation and trauma caused by cariodtomy suction can be considerably reduced by the avoidance of air aspiration. A hypothesis is proposed to explain this on the basis of shear stresses in the inlet cannula. Roller pump suction was also found to be slightly more traumatic than vaccum suction, but contact of the blood with the pericardium had no effect so long as the pericardium and epicardium had been previously washed with saline. PMID:515984

  6. Air sampling by pumping through a filter: effects of air flow rate, concentration, and decay of airborne substances.

    PubMed

    Šoštarić, Marko; Petrinec, Branko; Babić, Dinko

    2016-12-01

    This paper tackles the issue of interpreting the number of airborne particles adsorbed on a filter through which a certain volume of sampled air has been pumped. This number is equal to the product of the pumped volume and particle concentration in air, but only if the concentration is constant over time and if there is no substance decomposition on the filter during sampling. If this is not the case, one must take into account the inconstancy of the concentration and the decay law for a given substance, which is complicated even further if the flow rate through the filter is not constant. In this paper, we develop a formalism which considers all of these factors, resulting in a single, compact expression of general applicability. The use of this expression is exemplified by addressing a case of sampling airborne radioactive matter, where the decay law is already well known. This law is combined with three experimentally observed time dependence of the flow rate and two models for the time dependence of the particle concentration. We also discuss the implications of these calculations for certain other situations of interest to environmental studies.

  7. Rescue strategy for acute carotid stent thrombosis during carotid stenting with distal filter protection using forced arterial suction thrombectomy with a reperfusion catheter of the Penumbra System: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Won; Kang, Dong-Hun; Hwang, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Jaechan; Hwang, Yang-Ha; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2013-08-01

    Among the procedural complications related to carotid artery stenting (CAS), internal carotid artery (ICA) flow arrest is one of the most drastic complications, as it can cause major ischemic stroke. Acute carotid stent thrombosis (ACST) is a rare etiology of ICA flow arrest during carotid artery stenting with distal filter protection, but the most devastating. Moreover, no definitive management strategy has been established so far for treating ACST. We introduce a rescue management strategy for differential diagnosis of ICA flow arrest and for recanalization of ACST with a simple endovascular mechanical thrombectomy technique. In three cases of ICA flow arrest caused by ACST, selective angiography with a 1.7 F microcatheter provided confirmative diagnosis. Recanalization was then achieved with a Penumbra System (PS) reperfusion catheter using the forced arterial suction thrombectomy (FAST) technique. Successful recanalization with a Thrombolysis In Cerebral Infarction score of 3 was achieved for all three patients. Recanalization was confirmed with follow-up angiography at least 24 h after the procedure. No complications associated with this technique occurred. Based on our preliminary experiences, selective microangiography can be helpful for rapid diagnosis of ACST, and the present mechanical thrombectomy technique, using a modification of the PS, can play a role in adjuvant management or as a last resort for the treatment of ACST during CAS.

  8. Electro-osmotic flow through a two-dimensional screen-pump filter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying-Hong; Kuo, Chih-Yu; Chang, Chien C; Wang, Chang-Yi

    2011-09-01

    The electro-osmotic flow driven by a screen pump, composed of a line array of evenly spaced identical rectangular solid blocks, is investigated under the Debye-Hückel approximation. The geometry of the screen pump is determined by the spacing and aspect ratio of the solid blocks. A constant surface zeta potential is assumed on the block surface. The method of eigenfunction series expansion is applied to solve analytically for the applied electric field, electric charge potential in the fluid, and flow field. Because of the low Reynolds number, Stokes equations are applied for the flow. The analytic result is first confirmed by comparing with the exact solution of the electro-osmotic flow in an infinite channel. Then different geometries of the screen pump and the effect of the electrokinetic width are computed for their influence on the flow rate. Recirculating eddies and reversing flow are found even though the applied electric driving field is unidirectional.

  9. Tm3+ cladding-doped fiber for selective wavelength filtering in high-power pump lasers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Monica K; Dejneka, Matthew J; Ainslie, Jim

    2004-04-01

    Scattering and reflection of transmission band power in a fiber amplifier cause increased bit-error rates through multiple path interference (MPI). We report a passive method for reducing MPI contributions from the front facet of a 980-nm fiber-Bragg-grating-stabilized pump laser by use of a Tm3+-doped fiber pigtail between the diode facet and the fiber Bragg grating. Optical return loss in the C band is reduced to below -30 dB.

  10. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: An asymmetric MOSFET-C band-pass filter with on-chip charge pump auto-tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fangxiong, Chen; Min, Lin; Heping, Ma; Hailong, Jia; Yin, Shi; Forster, Dai

    2009-08-01

    An asymmetric MOSFET-C band-pass filter (BPF) with on chip charge pump auto-tuning is presented. It is implemented in UMC (United Manufacturing Corporation) 0.18 μm CMOS process technology. The filter system with auto-tuning uses a master-slave technique for continuous tuning in which the charge pump outputs 2.663 V, much higher than the power supply voltage, to improve the linearity of the filter. The main filter with third order low-pass and second order high-pass properties is an asymmetric band-pass filter with bandwidth of 2.730-5.340 MHz. The in-band third order harmonic input intercept point (IIP3) is 16.621 dBm, with 50 Ω as the source impedance. The input referred noise is about 47.455 μVrms. The main filter dissipates 3.528 mW while the auto-tuning system dissipates 2.412 mW from a 1.8 V power supply. The filter with the auto-tuning system occupies 0.592 mm2 and it can be utilized in GPS (global positioning system) and Bluetooth systems.

  11. Portable suction unit failure in a rural EMS system.

    PubMed

    Risavi, Brian L; Sabotchick, K J; Heile, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    Portable suction units used by EMS personnel are utilized infrequently and often are powered by batteries. Lack of use and inspection often results in failure of the device when it is needed. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence of portable suction unit failure in a rural EMS system and to identify the reasons for failures. A convenience sample was obtained through both random inspections by the staff of a regional EMS council and data from twice monthly checks reported by respective EMS agencies following a standard protocol for each unit. A standard protocol was used, including checking the vacuum level on each suction unit and inspecting the tubing, canister, and battery. Each inspector assessed whether the unit was capable of achieving 300 mmHg of suction within four seconds. Also, the unit was inspected for any signs of misalignment or dry rot of the gasket, kinking of suction hose, damage to the suction canister, weak/dead battery, or defective pump. Findings were recorded. Over a two-year period, 9,631 suction unit inspections were completed. There were 233 failures (2.4%) noted. The majority (126, 54.1%) were due to battery failure. Seventy-three units failed due to other reasons (not recorded, switch failure, battery not seated). Ten inspections failed due to incorrect assembly. Nineteen inspections failed due to defects with the suction canister. Five inspections failed due to kinked/disconnected suction tubing. Only a relatively small percentage of inspections of suction units revealed failures (4.6% Advanced Life Support, 8.6% Basic Life Support) using the above-stated criteria. However, given the importance of airway management and potential complications associated with airway compromise, including aspiration pneumonia, hypoxia, and hemodynamic instability, this is of concern relative to the morbidity and mortality that could be related to airway failure. Due to the relative infrequency of use and the nature of portable suction units

  12. Controlling centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Driedger, W.C.

    1995-07-01

    Several options are available to match pump operating point to the process and still ensure system reliability. Assuming the pump is more than adequate for the process requirements at the moment, what is the best way to trim it to the desired operating point? There are three possible locations to place a valve: on the discharge, suction, or use a recycle valve. The paper discusses valve placement in all three options. Using the example of a pump drawing volatile hydrocarbons from a large surge vessel, the following features are discussed: a level/flow cascade loop on the pump discharge to provide process control; a check valve on the discharge downstream of the control valve to prevent reverse flow when the pump is shut down; a fire safe motor operated valve (MOV) in case of seal leakage and fires; an interlock from the MOV to stop the pump if the valve is not fully opened; a low level interlock from the vessel to stop the pump if the vessel loses its liquid seal; a pressure gauge on the suction to indicate adequate NPSHA; a thermometer on the suction to indicate potentially high vapor pressure; a minimum flow recycle loop back to the vessel; a check valve on the recycle line to prevent reverse flow when the pump is shut down, especially when the fire valve is closed; and a pressure gauge on the pump discharge to indicate that the pump is working.

  13. Pumps, Centrifugal and Reciprocating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-27

    reciprocating pumps. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Centrifugal pump Total discharge head Reciprocating pump Total suction head Head 16. SECURITY ... CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 40 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT B...Satisfy the needs of MIL-STD-4612. High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse ( HEMP ) Test Facility Satisfy the needs of MIL-STD-461. Rail Impact Test

  14. Bedforms as Biocatalytic Filters: A Pumping and Streamline Segregation Model for Nitrate Removal in Permeable Sediments.

    PubMed

    Azizian, Morvarid; Grant, Stanley B; Kessler, Adam J; Cook, Perran L M; Rippy, Megan A; Stewardson, Michael J

    2015-09-15

    Bedforms are a focal point of carbon and nitrogen cycling in streams and coastal marine ecosystems. In this paper, we develop and test a mechanistic model, the "pumping and streamline segregation" or PASS model, for nitrate removal in bedforms. The PASS model dramatically reduces computational overhead associated with modeling nitrogen transformations in bedforms and reproduces (within a factor of 2 or better) previously published measurements and models of biogeochemical reaction rates, benthic fluxes, and in-sediment nutrient and oxygen concentrations. Application of the PASS model to a diverse set of marine and freshwater environments indicates that (1) physical controls on nitrate removal in a bedform include the pore water flushing rate, residence time distribution, and relative rates of respiration and transport (as represented by the Damkohler number); (2) the biogeochemical pathway for nitrate removal is an environment-specific combination of direct denitrification of stream nitrate and coupled nitrification-denitrification of stream and/or sediment ammonium; and (3) permeable sediments are almost always a net source of dissolved inorganic nitrogen. The PASS model also provides a mechanistic explanation for previously published empirical correlations showing denitrification velocity (N2 flux divided by nitrate concentration) declines as a power law of nitrate concentration in a stream (Mulholland et al. Nature, 2008, 452, 202-205).

  15. Suction characteristics of compacted zeolite-bentonite and sand-bentonite mixtures.

    PubMed

    Durukan, Seda; Pulat, Hasan Firat; Yukselen-Aksoy, Yeliz

    2014-02-01

    Soil suction is one of the most important parameters describing soil moisture conditions for unsaturated soils used in landfill liners. However, few studies have been conducted on the suction characteristics of compacted zeolite-bentonite mixtures (ZBMs) and sand-bentonite mixtures (SBMs), which are proposed for use as liner materials. Nevertheless, zeolite is known for its microporous skeleton containing cages and tunnels and it has a great physical affiliation to water uptake. Zeolite and bentonite, in a mixture, are thought to be in competition for water uptake and this may alter the distribution of water content for each soil in the mixture. The present study investigated the suction properties of compacted ZBMs and SBMs for varying mixing ratios and compaction water contents. The soil suction measurement technique chosen was the filter-paper method. The suction characteristics of powdered, granular, and block zeolites, as well as 0, 10, and 20% bentonite in ZBMs and SBMs were measured and compared with each other. Contaminated compacted ZBMs are compared with those of uncontaminated compacted ones at the optimum water content for the 10% and 20% mixtures. The results show that suction capacity of zeolite increases with grain size. As bentonite content increases, both matric and total suction increase for both mixtures. ZBMs have higher matric suction values than SBMs, but not total suction values. Contaminated total suction values are found to be higher than those of uncontaminated samples due to an increase in dissolved ion concentration.

  16. Building a compact, low-cost, and portable peristaltic sampling pump.

    PubMed

    Woessner, William W

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogeologic research often involves obtaining water quality samples in field settings without vehicle access. Such conditions often require the use of a sampling pump. Researchers at The University of Montana have been using a handheld peristaltic pump powered by a rechargeable variable-speed drill. This Montana Drill Pump (MDP) is highly portable and can be inexpensively built for about $225 to $295 (US). Over the last two decades, the pump has been used to sample and filter (as appropriate) surface water and ground water for analyses of general inorganic and organic chemistry, stable and radioactive isotopes, pathogens, and trace pharmaceuticals and to develop small-diameter wells and sample suction lysimeters. The MDP provides researchers and educators with an economical tool to pump water in classrooms, laboratories, and field settings.

  17. 46 CFR 105.20-10 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... installed, it shall discharge back to the suction of the pump. (c) Where electric motors are installed with... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumps. 105.20-10 Section 105.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Specific Requirements-Cargo Tanks § 105.20-10 Pumps. (a) Pumps for...

  18. 46 CFR 105.20-10 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... installed, it shall discharge back to the suction of the pump. (c) Where electric motors are installed with... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumps. 105.20-10 Section 105.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Specific Requirements-Cargo Tanks § 105.20-10 Pumps. (a) Pumps for...

  19. 46 CFR 105.20-10 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... installed, it shall discharge back to the suction of the pump. (c) Where electric motors are installed with... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pumps. 105.20-10 Section 105.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Specific Requirements-Cargo Tanks § 105.20-10 Pumps. (a) Pumps for...

  20. 46 CFR 105.20-10 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... installed, it shall discharge back to the suction of the pump. (c) Where electric motors are installed with... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumps. 105.20-10 Section 105.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Specific Requirements-Cargo Tanks § 105.20-10 Pumps. (a) Pumps for...

  1. 46 CFR 105.20-10 - Pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... installed, it shall discharge back to the suction of the pump. (c) Where electric motors are installed with... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pumps. 105.20-10 Section 105.20-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... DISPENSING PETROLEUM PRODUCTS Specific Requirements-Cargo Tanks § 105.20-10 Pumps. (a) Pumps for...

  2. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  3. High pressure reciprocating pump

    SciTech Connect

    Besic, D.

    1990-05-01

    This patent describes an improvement in a reciprocating pump having a plunger and a pumping chamber. It comprises: the plunger having a bore communicating with an intersection opening and wherein the plunger incudes a central axis; a suction valve and a discharge valve, each having an axis of actuation parallel to a central axis of the plunger; the suction valve comprising a cylindrical core having a central passageway, and the core is slidably received by a seating member and resiliently biased to the seating member.

  4. Biorobotic adhesion in water using suction cups.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R; Hrubes, J Dana; Leinhos, Henry A

    2008-03-01

    Echeneid fish, limpets and octopi use suction cups for underwater adhesion. When echeneid fish use suckers to 'hitch a ride' on sharks (which have riblet-patterned skins), the apparent absence of any pump or plumbing may be an advantage over biorobotic suction cups. An intriguing question is: How do they achieve seemingly persistent leak-free contact at low energy cost over rough surfaces? The design features of their suckers are explored in a biorobotic context of adhesion in water over rough surfaces. We have carried out experiments to compare the release force and tenacity of man-made suction cups with those reported for limpets and echeneid fish. Applied tensile and shear release forces were monotonically increased until release. The effects of cup size and type, host surface roughness, curvature and liquid surface tension have been examined. The flow of water in the sharkskin-like host surface roughness has been characterized. The average tenacity is 5.28 N cm(-2) (sigma = 0.53 N cm(-2), N = 37) in the sub-ambient pressure range of 14.6-49.0 kPa, in man-made cups for monotonically increasing applied release force. The tenacity is lower for harmonically oscillating release forces. The dynamic structural interactions between the suction cup and the oscillating applied forcing are discussed. Inspired by the matching of sharkskin riblet topology in echeneid fish suckers, it was found that biorobotic sealed contact over rough surfaces is also feasible when the suction cup makes a negative copy of the rough host surface. However, for protracted, persistent contact, the negative topology would have to be maintained by active means. Energy has to be spent to maintain the negative host roughness topology to minute detail, and protracted hitch-riding on sharks for feeding may not be free for echeneid fish. Further work is needed on the mechanism and efficiency of the densely populated tiny actuators in the fish suckers that maintain leak-proof contact with minimal

  5. Origins, Innovations, and Diversification of Suction Feeding in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Peter C; McGee, Matthew D; Longo, Sarah J; Hernandez, L Patricia

    2015-07-01

    We review the origins, prominent innovations, and major patterns of diversification in suction feeding by vertebrates. Non-vertebrate chordates and larval lamprey suspension-feed by capturing small particles in pharyngeal mucous. In most of these lineages the gentle flows that transport particles are generated by buccal cilia, although larval lamprey and thaliacean urochordates have independently evolved a weak buccal pump to generate an oscillating flow of water that is powered by elastic recovery of the pharynx following compression by buccal muscles. The evolution of jaws and the hyoid facilitated powerful buccal expansion and high-performance suction feeding as found today throughout aquatic vertebrates. We highlight three major innovations in suction feeding. Most vertebrate suction feeders have mechanisms that occlude the corners of the open mouth during feeding. This produces a planar opening that is often nearly circular in shape. Both features contribute to efficient flow of water into the mouth and help direct the flow to the area directly in front of the mouth's aperture. Among several functions that have been identified for protrusion of the upper jaw, is an increase in the hydrodynamic forces that suction feeders exert on their prey. Protrusion of the upper jaw has evolved five times in ray-finned fishes, including in two of the most successful teleost radiations, cypriniforms and acanthomorphs, and is found in about 60% of living teleost species. Diversification of the mechanisms of suction feeding and of feeding behavior reveals that suction feeders with high capacity for suction rarely approach their prey rapidly, while slender-bodied predators with low capacity for suction show the full range of attack speeds. We hypothesize that a dominant axis of diversification among suction feeders involves a trade-off between the forces that are exerted on prey and the volume of water that is ingested. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press

  6. Slurry pumping: Pump performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Taccani, R.; Pediroda, V.; Reini, M.; Giadrossi, A.

    2000-07-01

    Centrifugal pumps are being used increasingly for transportation of slurries through pipelines. To design a slurry handling system it is essential to have a knowledge of the effects of suspended solids on the pump performance. A new test loop has been realized in the laboratory of the Energetics Department of the University of Trieste which allows pump performance to be determined at various pump speeds, with many different mixture concentrations and rheologies. The pump test rig consists of 150 mm diameter pipe with facilities for measuring suction and discharge pressure, flowrate, pump input power and speed, slurry density and temperature. In particular flowrate is measured by diverting flow into a weighing tank and timing a specified volume of slurry. An automatic PC based data acquisition system has been implemented. Preliminary tests with clear water show that performance can be measured with good repeatability and accuracy. The new test rig is used to verify the range of validity of the correlations to predict pump performance, available in literature and of that proposed by authors. This correlation, based on a Neural Network and not on a predefined analytical expression, can be easily improved with new experimental data.

  7. Routine oro/nasopharyngeal suction versus no suction at birth.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jann P; Dawson, Jennifer A; Davis, Peter G; Dahlen, Hannah G

    2017-04-18

    Oro/nasopharyngeal suction is a method used to clear secretions from the oropharynx and nasopharynx through the application of negative pressure via a suction catheter or bulb syringe. Traditionally, airway oro/nasopharyngeal suction at birth has been used routinely to remove fluid rapidly from the oropharynx and nasopharynx in vigorous and non-vigorous infants at birth. Concerns relating to the reported adverse effects of oro/nasopharyngeal suctioning led to a practice review and routine oro/nasopharyngeal suctioning is no longer recommended for vigorous infants. However, it is important to know whether there is any clear benefit or harm for infants whose oro/nasopharyngeal airway is suctioned compared to infants who are not suctioned. To evaluate the effect of routine oropharyngeal/nasopharyngeal suction compared to no suction on mortality and morbidity in newly born infants. We used the standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review group to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to April 18, 2016), Embase (1980 to April 18, 2016), and CINAHL (1982 to April 18, 2016). We also searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles for randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials. Randomised, quasi-randomised controlled trials and cluster randomised trials that evaluated the effect of routine oropharyngeal/nasopharyngeal suction compared to no suction on mortality and morbidity in newly born infants with and without meconium-stained amniotic fluid. The review authors extracted from the reports of the clinical trials, data regarding clinical outcomes including mortality, need for resuscitation, admission to neonatal intensive care, five minute Apgar score, episodes of apnoea and length of hospital stay. Eight randomised controlled trials met the inclusion criteria and only included term infants (n = 4011). Five studies

  8. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, R.T.; Middleton, M.G.

    1983-01-25

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell. 5 figs.

  9. Suction muffler for refrigeration compressor

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Richard T.; Middleton, Marc G.

    1983-01-01

    A hermetic refrigeration compressor includes a suction muffler formed from two pieces of plastic material mounted on the cylinder housing. One piece is cylindrical in shape with an end wall having an aperture for receiving a suction tube connected to the cylinder head. The other piece fits over and covers the other end of the cylindrical piece, and includes a flaring entrance horn which extends toward the return line on the sidewall of the compressor shell.

  10. Sensorless Suction Recognition in the Self-Regulating Cleveland Clinic Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, David; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry; Golding, Leonard; Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-01-01

    The Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart passively regulates itself in regard to the relative performance of systemic and pulmonary pumps. The system incorporates real-time monitoring to detect any indication of incipient left or right suction as input for automatic controller response. To recognize suction, the external controller compares the waveforms of modulating speed input and power feedback. Deviations in periodic waveforms indicate sudden changes to flow impedance, which are characteristic of suction events as the pump speed is modulating. Incipient suction is indicated within three seconds of being detected in the power wave form, allowing timely controller response before mean flow is affected. This article describes the results obtained from subjecting the system to severe hemodynamic manipulation during an acute study in a calf. PMID:26102177

  11. Use of apical suction to facilitate extra-anatomic bypass for recurrent coarctation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kuduvalli, Manoj; Monaghan, Colin; Fabri, Brian M

    2006-01-01

    The use of apical suction devices has been well described for maintaining satisfactory haemodynamics during off-pump surgical coronary revascularization. Its expanded use has been described in a few other situations. We describe here a case of recurrent coarctation where an extra-anatomic ascending to descending thoracic aorta bypass graft was constructed using cardiopulmonary bypass without arresting the heart, and access and exposure were facilitated by the use of an apical suction device. PMID:16722523

  12. Water vacuum suction curettage (WVSC): one year's experience.

    PubMed

    Woods, J R; Herrick, C N; White, R M

    1973-05-01

    At Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu abortion patients underwent suction curettage using either an electric pump unit (21, group A) or a simple water vacuum pump (WVSC) (28, group B). In both groups the use of the flexible 6 mm uterine curette and method of curettage were the same. For groups A and B the average blood losses were 40 ml and 39 ml. Average tissue volumes removed were 26 ml and 39 ml (greater yield reflects more patients at gestation of 9-10 weeks). From September 1971 to August 1972 400 patients of gestation of 10 weeks or less were curettaged using WVSC. Most of the operations were performed by first-year residents. Complications requiring readmission were not skewed towards largest gestations but distributed throughout the groups suggesting importance of individual technique in equipment use. The complications included retained products of conception (6), endometritis (2), endometritis with retained products of conception (3), and hermorrhage (1). Advantages of the WVSC unit are 1) quiet sound of running water rather than harsh sound of electric pump, 2) requirement of only a standard waterhead making method available to impoverished areas where electricity may be precious, 3) failsafe, unidirectional suction, 4) easy storage, transport, and assemblage, and 5) lack of need for safety pop-off valve because of intrinsic lag time from close of system to development of maximum suction. With its simplicity, safety, and flexibility WVSC is best suited for outpatients.

  13. Time management and nectar flow: flower handling and suction feeding in long-proboscid flies (Nemestrinidae: Prosoeca).

    PubMed

    Karolyi, Florian; Morawetz, Linde; Colville, Jonathan F; Handschuh, Stephan; Metscher, Brian D; Krenn, Harald W

    2013-11-01

    A well-developed suction pump in the head represents an important adaptation for nectar-feeding insects, such as Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. This pumping organ creates a pressure gradient along the proboscis, which is responsible for nectar uptake. The extremely elongated proboscis of the genus Prosoeca (Nemestrinidae) evolved as an adaptation to feeding from long, tubular flowers. According to the functional constraint hypothesis, nectar uptake through a disproportionately elongated, straw-like proboscis increases flower handling time and consequently lowers the energy intake rate. Due to the conspicuous length variation of the proboscis of Prosoeca, individuals with longer proboscides are hypothesised to have longer handling times. To test this hypothesis, we used field video analyses of flower-visiting behaviour, detailed examinations of the suction pump morphology and correlations of proboscis length with body length and suction pump dimensions. Using a biomechanical framework described for nectar-feeding Lepidoptera in relation to proboscis length and suction pump musculature, we describe and contrast the system in long-proboscid flies. Flies with longer proboscides spent significantly more time drinking from flowers. In addition, proboscis length and body length showed a positive allometric relationship. Furthermore, adaptations of the suction pump included an allometric relationship between proboscis length and suction pump muscle volume and a combination of two pumping organs. Overall, the study gives detailed insight into the adaptations required for long-proboscid nectar feeding, and comparisons with other nectar-sucking insects allow further considerations of the evolution of the suction pump in insects with sucking mouthparts.

  14. Time management and nectar flow: flower handling and suction feeding in long-proboscid flies (Nemestrinidae: Prosoeca)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karolyi, Florian; Morawetz, Linde; Colville, Jonathan F.; Handschuh, Stephan; Metscher, Brian D.; Krenn, Harald W.

    2013-11-01

    A well-developed suction pump in the head represents an important adaptation for nectar-feeding insects, such as Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera and Diptera. This pumping organ creates a pressure gradient along the proboscis, which is responsible for nectar uptake. The extremely elongated proboscis of the genus Prosoeca (Nemestrinidae) evolved as an adaptation to feeding from long, tubular flowers. According to the functional constraint hypothesis, nectar uptake through a disproportionately elongated, straw-like proboscis increases flower handling time and consequently lowers the energy intake rate. Due to the conspicuous length variation of the proboscis of Prosoeca, individuals with longer proboscides are hypothesised to have longer handling times. To test this hypothesis, we used field video analyses of flower-visiting behaviour, detailed examinations of the suction pump morphology and correlations of proboscis length with body length and suction pump dimensions. Using a biomechanical framework described for nectar-feeding Lepidoptera in relation to proboscis length and suction pump musculature, we describe and contrast the system in long-proboscid flies. Flies with longer proboscides spent significantly more time drinking from flowers. In addition, proboscis length and body length showed a positive allometric relationship. Furthermore, adaptations of the suction pump included an allometric relationship between proboscis length and suction pump muscle volume and a combination of two pumping organs. Overall, the study gives detailed insight into the adaptations required for long-proboscid nectar feeding, and comparisons with other nectar-sucking insects allow further considerations of the evolution of the suction pump in insects with sucking mouthparts.

  15. Suction patterns in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Martínez, G; González, M; Díaz Rosselló, J L

    1993-01-01

    The suction pattern for breast and bottle feeding in two groups of preterm infants is described. The time elapsed between birth and the moment of suction was longer in preterm neonates born at lower gestational ages for both groups studied, breast and bottle fed (figure 1). The evolution of suckling in breastfeeding was analyzed in a composite study (longitudinal and transverse) in a group of 16 neonates starting from 32 weeks of gestation. The velocity of milk extraction during suckling varied with gestational age. It was uniform at lower gestational ages, then it became faster in the first minutes and at the 36th week, it was very similar to that of mature neonates (figure 2 and table I). The evaluation of bottle feeding was performed in a transverse study in 46 preterm neonates which had been exclusively bottle fed during 1 or 2 weeks. All of them had previously been fed using an orogastric tube. Nourishing time was shorter than in breastfeeding; the average duration was 3.7 minutes (table II). The greatest volume was ingested in the first minute, 40% (range between 44 and 25%) (figure 3). The frequency of suction did not change the duration of feeding, but it was found that the efficiency of suction (number of suctions to ingest 1 cc) was significantly lower in the first minute (Anova, p < 0.05) (figure 4).

  16. Continuous-wave 532 nm pumped MgO:PPLN optical parametric oscillator with external power regulation and spatial mode filtering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Seung Kwan; Park, Seung-Nam; Park, Hee Su; Lee, Jae Yong; Choi, Sang-Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We report a continuous-wave (CW) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) based on a MgO-doped periodically poled LiNbO(3) (MgO:PPLN) crystal. The 532 nm pump generates coherent radiation that is tunable from 800 to 920 nm for the signal and from 1250 to 1580 nm for the idler, respectively. The OPO output power exhibits a slowly varying instability that we attribute to a thermal effect induced by the pump. This instability is truncated by means of a low-pass servo that includes a single-mode fiber that filters the beam into a single spatial mode. The resulting output characteristics are promising for radiometric applications in the near infrared including most fiber-optic communication bands.

  17. Suction detection for the MicroMed DeBakey Left Ventricular Assist Device.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Oliver; Benkowski, Robert J; Morello, Gino F

    2005-01-01

    The MicroMed DeBakey Ventricular Assist Device (MicroMed Technology, Inc., Houston, TX) is a continuous axial flow pump designed for long-term circulatory support. The system received CE approval in 2001 as a bridge to transplantation and in 2004 as an alternative to transplantation. Low volume in the left ventricle or immoderate pump speed may cause ventricular collapse due to excessive suction. Suction causes decreased flow and may result in patient discomfort. Therefore, detection of this critical condition and immediate adaptive control of the device is desired. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and validate system parameters suitable for the reliable detection of suction. In vitro studies have been performed with a mock loop allowing pulsatile and nonpulsatile flow. Evidence of suction is clearly shown by the flow waveform reported by the implanted flow probe of the system. For redundancy to the implanted flow probe, it would be desirable to use the electronic motor signals of the pump for suction detection. The continuously accessible signals are motor current consumption and rotor/impeller speed. The influence of suction on these parameters has been investigated over a wide range of hydrodynamic conditions, and the significance of the respective signals individually or in combination has been explored. The reference signal for this analysis was the flow waveform of the ultrasonic probe. To achieve high reliability under both pulsatile and nonpulsatile conditions, it was determined that motor speed and current should be used concurrently for suction detection. Using the amplified differentiated current and speed signals, a suction-detection algorithm has been optimized, taking into account two different working points, defined by the value of the current input. The safety of this algorithm has been proven in vitro under pulsatile and nonpulsatile conditions over the full spectrum of possible speed and differential pressure variations. The algorithm

  18. Design and measurement of a Cu L-edge x-ray filter for free electron laser pumped x-ray laser experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.; London, R. A.; Rohringer, N.; Cone, K. V.; Rocca, J. J.

    2010-10-15

    An inner-shell photoionized x-ray laser pumped by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron laser has been proposed recently. The measurement of the on-axis 849 eV Ne K{alpha} laser and protection of the x-ray spectrometer from damage require attenuation of the 1 keV LCLS beam. An Al/Cu foil combination is well suited, serving as a low energy bandpass filter below the Cu L-edge at 933 eV. A high resolution grating spectrometer is used to measure the transmission of a candidate filter with an intense laser-produced x-ray backlighter developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jupiter Laser Facility Janus. The methodology and discussion of the observed fine structure above the Cu L-edge will be presented.

  19. 46 CFR 32.52-5 - Bilge piping for pump rooms and adjacent cofferdams on tank vessels constructed or converted on...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... drainage from the pumproom bilges and adjacent cofferdams. A separate bilge pump, ejector, or bilge suction... are normally present. (b) Where a bilge suction is provided from a cargo or stripping pump, a stopcheck valve shall be fitted in the suction branch, and an additional stop valve shall be fitted also if...

  20. The use of the motor as a transducer to monitor pump conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.A.; Bunch, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Motor current and power analysis methods have been developed to assist in the condition monitoring of a variety of motor-driven devices. The successful implementation of motor current signature analysis (MCSA) as a diagnostic for valves led to its application to other devices and to refinements in the methodologies used. A variety of pump applications, ranging from 5 to over 1200 horsepower have been analyzed, including low and high specific speed and suction specific speed pumps. For some of the pumps, the full range of flow conditions from shutoff to runout has been studied. Motor current and power analysis have been found to provide information that is complementary to that available from conventional diagnostics, such as vibration and pressure pulsation analysis. Inherent signal filtering associated with rotor to stator magnetic field coupling does limit the high frequency response capability of the motor as a transducer; as a result certain phenomena, such as vane pass energy, is not readily apparent in the motor electrical signals. On the other hand, the motor-monitored parameters have often been found to be much more sensitive than vibration transducers in detecting the effects of unsteady flow conditions resulting from both system and pump specific sources such as suction cavitation. By combining motor equivalent circuit models with pump performance characteristics, shaft power and torque fluctuation estimates have been assessed. The usefulness of motor data in assessing some common sources of pump problems, such as mechanical and hydraulic imbalance, misalignment, and unstable flow conditions is shown. The results of testing several motor-driven pumps, including comparisons with vibration and pressure pulsation analysis are discussed. The development of a single figure of merit for pump load stability (as a function of pump flow rate and type) is presented.

  1. Optimizing the closed suction surgical drainage system.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Katherine H; Eisemann, Bradley S; Lamp, Susan; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    Closed suction drains are indicated in a wide array of postoperative settings, with many distinct drainage systems available to the surgeon. The purpose of this study was to compare the suction gradients achieved using 2 different sizes of suction reservoirs and 2 different techniques for generating negative pressure. Drainage reservoirs of 100 and 400 ml were chosen to evaluate their ability to achieve suction. Suction was established in both sizes of drains by pressing the sides of the reservoir together or by pushing the bottom of the reservoir toward the top. Negative pressures were recorded with the reservoir empty, and after every 10-ml addition of saline. Averages were graphed to illustrate the applied suction over a range of drain volumes. The 100-ml drainage system reached a peak suction of -117.6 mmHg, while the 400-ml drainage system reached only a peak suction of -71.4 mmHg. Both of the maximum suction readings were achieved using the full-squeeze technique. The bottom-pushed-in technique did not result in any sustained measurable levels of suction using either of the reservoir volumes. Smaller drain reservoirs are more successful in generating a high initial suction than larger reservoirs, especially when the volume of fluid in the drain is relatively low. In all sizes of drains, compressing the sides of the reservoir is a far better technique for establishing negative pressure than pressing the bottom of the drain up toward the top.

  2. Suction is kid's play: extremely fast suction in newborn seahorses

    PubMed Central

    Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Roos, Gert; Genbrugge, Annelies; Leysen, Heleen; Aerts, Peter; Adriaens, Dominique; Herrel, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing anatomical development typically results in a gradual maturation of the feeding movements from larval to adult fishes. Adult seahorses are known to capture prey by rotating their long-snouted head extremely quickly towards prey, followed by powerful suction. This type of suction is powered by elastic recoil and requires very precise coordination of the movements of the associated feeding structures, making it an all-or-none phenomenon. Here, we show that newborn Hippocampus reidi are able to successfully feed using an extremely rapid and powerful snout rotation combined with a high-volume suction, surpassing that observed in adult seahorses. An inverse dynamic analysis shows that an elastic recoil mechanism is also used to power head rotation in newborn H. reidi. This illustrates how extreme levels of performance in highly complex musculoskeletal systems can be present at birth given a delayed birth and rapid development of functionally important structures. The fact that the head skeleton of newborn seahorses is still largely cartilaginous may not be problematic because the hydrodynamic stress on the rotating snout appeared considerably lower than in adult syngnathids. PMID:19324657

  3. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  4. Vortex Lift Augmentation by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, A. H.; Jackson, L. R.; Huffman, J. K.

    1983-01-01

    Lift performance is improved on a 60 degrees swept Gothic wing. Vortex lift at moderate to high angles of attack on highly swept wings used to improve takeoff performance and maneuverability. New design proposed in which suction of propulsion system augments vortex. Turbofan placed at down stream end of leading-edge vortex system induces vortex to flow into inlet which delays onset of vortex breakdown.

  5. Fluid sampling pump

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, P.V.; Nimberger, S.M.; Ward, R.L.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes a pump for pumping a preselected quantity of fluid with each pump driving stroke from a fluid inlet port to a fluid outlet port, an inlet valve for selectively controlling fluid flow through the fluid inlet port, a pump body defining a pump bore therein, a piston slidably movable within the pump bore and having a fluid inlet end and an opposing operator end, an operator unit for reciprocating the piston within the pump bore, and a manifold interconnect with the pump body. It comprises a flow path therein extending from a manifold inlet port to a manifold outlet port, flow path being in communication with the fluid outlet port in the pump body, a purge passageway extending from the flow path to the outlet passageway, a purge valve for regulating fluid flow through the purge passageway, and a filter positioned within the manifold and extending across a portion of the flow path, the filter defining a filtered zone within the flow path adjoining the inlet port in the pump body, and an unfiltered zone within the flow path extending from the manifold inlet to the manifold outlet, such that filtered fluid enters the pump bore while unfiltered fluid bypasses the filter and passes out the manifold outlet port.

  6. Optimum Suction Distribution for Transition Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Hall, P.

    1996-01-01

    The optimum suction distribution which gives the longest laminar region for a given total suction is computed. The goal here is to provide the designer with a method to find the best suction distribution subject to some overall constraint applied to the suction. We formulate the problem using the Lagrangian multiplier method with constraints. The resulting non-linear system of equations is solved using the Newton-Raphson technique. The computations are performed for a Blasius boundary layer on a flat-plate and crossflow cases. For the Blasius boundary layer, the optimum suction distribution peaks upstream of the maximum growth rate region and remains flat in the middle before it decreases to zero at the end of the transition point. For the stationary and travelling crossflow instability, the optimum suction peaks upstream of the maximum growth rate region and decreases gradually to zero.

  7. Method for maintaining precise suction strip porosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Frank H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to a masking method generally and, more particularly to a method of masking perforated titanium sheets having laminar control suction strips. As illustrated in the drawings, a nonaerodynamic surface of a perforated sheet has alternating suction strip areas and bonding land areas. Suction strip tapes overlie the bonding land areas during application of a masking material to an upper surface of the suction strip tapes. Prior to bonding the perforated sheet to a composite structure, the bonding land tapes are removed. The entire opposite aerodynamic surface is masked with tape before bonding. This invention provides a precise control of suction strip porosities by ensuring that no chemicals penetrate the suction strip areas during bonding.

  8. Theoretical simulations of protective thin film Fabry-Pérot filters for integrated optical elements of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Quarrie, L. E-mail: lindsay.o.quarrie@gmail.com

    2014-09-15

    The lifetime of Diode-Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPALs) is limited by damage initiated by reaction of the glass envelope of its gain medium with rubidium vapor. Rubidium is absorbed into the glass and the rubidium cations diffuse through the glass structure, breaking bridging Si-O bonds. A damage-resistant thin film was developed enhancing high-optical transmission at natural rubidium resonance input and output laser beam wavelengths of 780 nm and 795 nm, while protecting the optical windows of the gain cell in a DPAL. The methodology developed here can be readily modified for simulation of expected transmission performance at input pump and output laser wavelengths using different combination of thin film materials in a DPAL. High coupling efficiency of the light through the gas cell was accomplished by matching the air-glass and glass-gas interfaces at the appropriate wavelengths using a dielectric stack of high and low index of refraction materials selected to work at the laser energies and protected from the alkali metal vapor in the gain cell. Thin films as oxides of aluminum, zirconium, tantalum, and silicon were selected allowing the creation of Fabry-Perot optical filters on the optical windows achieving close to 100% laser transmission in a solid optic combination of window and highly reflective mirror. This approach allows for the development of a new whole solid optic laser.

  9. 46 CFR 182.520 - Bilge pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... portable hand bilge pump must be: (1) Capable of pumping water, but not necessarily simultaneously, from all watertight compartments; and (2) Provided with suitable suction hose capable of reaching the bilge... simultaneously. (f) A flexible tube or hose may be used instead of fixed pipe for the discharge line of a...

  10. 46 CFR 182.520 - Bilge pumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... portable hand bilge pump must be: (1) Capable of pumping water, but not necessarily simultaneously, from all watertight compartments; and (2) Provided with suitable suction hose capable of reaching the bilge... simultaneously. (f) A flexible tube or hose may be used instead of fixed pipe for the discharge line of a...

  11. Appropriate suction device in rescue medicine.

    PubMed

    Dahlgren, B E; Nilsson, H; Bjorn, P; Skedevik, C

    1987-12-01

    In rescue medicine, a suction apparatus must function in a variety of environmental conditions. To find an appropriate device for the Swedish Air Force air rescue service the Laerdal suction device 790,000 was selected for further testing according to international standards for aviation safety. Tests showed that vibrations had deleterious effects on the internal construction of the suction device. In addition, an electromagnetic field was generated affecting the navigation, autopilot, and communication systems. We conclude that the suction apparatus and probably other devices as well must be tested for their functioning in adverse environments and their ability to meet international aviation safety regulations.

  12. On an ESFADOF edge-filter for a range resolved Brillouin-lidar: The high vapor density and high pump intensity regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, A.; Walther, T.

    2010-03-01

    The temperature profile in the upper ocean mixed layer is of great interest for oceanography, weather forecast and climate studies—especially regarding the strong coupling between the atmosphere and the ocean. A lidar system based on Brillouin-scattering can provide such data over an extended region of the ocean. In this paper we report on studies of an excited-state Faraday anomalous dispersion optical (ESFADOF) edge-filter that, when employed as a receiver in a Brillouin-lidar, will enable range-resolved remote measurements from mobile platforms. We focus on the transmission of such a filter operating on the 5 P 3/2→8 D 5/2 Rb transition (543.30 nm), and its dependence on the vapor density in the high pump intensity regime. Due to quenching processes such as energy-pooling enhanced by nonlinear radiation trapping, as well as plasma formation, a limit on the lower ESFADOF level number density exists. Beyond this threshold the achievable ESFADOF transmission is limited to a few percent. However, our studies show for the first time measured ESFADOF spectra with steep transmission edges with a transmission change of 15% within a few gigahertz.

  13. All-optical four-wavelength 2R regeneration based on data-pump four-wave-mixing with offset filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Feng; Wu, Bao-Jian; Zhou, Xing-Yu; Yuan, Hao; Qiu, Kun

    2014-06-01

    A simultaneous all-optical 2R regeneration of 4 × 12.5 Gb/s return-to-zero (RZ) signals is demonstrated based on the data-pump four-wave-mixing in a single highly nonlinear fiber, in which the channel spacing and duty cycle are 200 GHz and 50%. Both the bidirectional configuration and time-interleaved technology are used to reduce the crosstalk from other channels. For further improving the performance of the multichannel regenerator, an offset filtering (OF) method is employed to minimize the influence from the opposite input signal. Our experiments show that the extinction ratio (ER) of regenerated signals is about two times larger than that of the degraded signals and the maximum ER improvement is about 6.5 dB. By using the offset filtering method, the sensitivity improvements of four-wavelength regenerated signals are 2.05 dB, 2.53 dB, 3.57 dB and 2.8 dB, respectively.

  14. Capillary Suction Time. Operational Control Tests for Wastewater Treatment Facilities. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooley, John F.

    Capillary suction time is time required for the liquid phase of a treated sludge to travel through 1 centimeter of media (blotter or filter paper). Designed for individuals who have completed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) level 1 laboratory training skills, this module provides waste water treatment plant operators with…

  15. Can pharmacologic hyperprolactinemia and breast-suction induce lactation in women with normal menstrual cycles?

    PubMed

    Polatti, F; Brambilla, A; Mandelli, B; Forgione, A

    1984-01-01

    Six women--age range 21/24--with regular ovulatory cycles, voluntarily underwent with L-Sulpiride (100 mg/die) from the 5th to the 19th day of the cycle. On the 13th, 14th and 15th day of therapy breast suction by syringe breast-pump was performed on each woman every 6 hours and for 4' from either breast. Milk secretion was poor and showed no noticeable increase in the three days of breast suction. L-Sulpiride-induced hyperprolactinemia combined with nipple stimulation-induced increased PRL secretion failed to stimulate milk secretion at a level comparable with physiologic lactation in puerperium.

  16. Test specification for decant pump and winch assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Staehr, T.W.

    1994-12-07

    This specification provides the requirements for testing of the vertical turbine decant pump including the floating suction arm with load sensing winch control, instrumentation and the associated PLC/PC control system.

  17. 49 CFR 178.337-15 - Pumps and compressors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suction or to the cargo tank. (b) A liquid chlorine pump may not be installed on a cargo tank intended for the transportation of chlorine. [Amdt. 178-89, 54 FR 25018, June 12, 1989, as amended by Amdt....

  18. Alignment and operability analysis of a vertical sodium pump

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, V.K.; Fair, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    With the objective of identifying important alignment features of pumps such as FFTF, HALLAM, EBR II, PNC, PHENIX, and CRBR, alignment of the vertical sodium pump for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is investigated. The CRBRP pump includes a flexibly coupled pump shaft and motor shaft, two oil-film tilting-pad hydrodynamic radial bearings in the motor plus a vertical thrust bearing, and two sodium hydrostatic bearings straddling the double-suction centrifugal impeller in the pump.

  19. Selecting multiphase pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Prang, A.J.

    1997-02-01

    Multiphase pumps in petroleum applications today must handle liquid products containing large amounts of gas, and often including water and sand as well. In the past, gas was commonly separated and flared off at the well head, and only liquid product was piped along for further processing. Using this setup, processing the gas as well as the liquid requires separators, compressors and dual pipelines. Rotary two-screw units are ideal for multiphase use, as they can pump any product that can be introduced into the suction passages of their screws. These devices also effectively handle heat generation from compressed gases. To select units for multiphase applications, an engineer should be familiar with these pumps and how they work. This article discusses rotary-screw pumps and how to effectively select a unit for multiphase service.

  20. Performance in He II of a centrifugal pump with a jet pump inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daney, D. E.; Ludtke, P. R.; Kashani, A.

    1989-05-01

    The tendency of turbopumps operating in He II to cavitate makes their use in zero gravity questionable because of the zero net positive suction head (NPSH) available at the pump inlet. This paper investigates a jet pump, positioned at the inlet of a centrifugal pump with a screw inducer, as a means of operating a centrifugal pump at zero or lower NPSH. Pump performance in He II was measured as a function of NPSH for six different combinations of primary and secondary nozzles. Suction heads down to -91 mm were measured for a 3-percent reduction in developed head. These are referenced to the leading edge of the screw inducer, which is 100 mm above the jet pump inlet. Because cavitation at the primary jet always precedes cavitation in the jet pump secondary nozzle, the reverse (pressure driven) flow through a porous plug as a means of obtaining a subcooled primary jet was also tested. These tests were inconclusive.

  1. Stokes Instability in Inhomogeneous Membranes: Application to Lipoprotein Suction of Cholesterol-Enriched Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Amar, M.; Allain, J.-M.; Puff, N.; Angelova, M. I.

    2007-07-01

    We examine the time-dependent distortion of a nearly circular viscous domain in an infinite viscous sheet when suction occurs. Suction, the driving force of the instability, can occur everywhere in the two phases separated by an interface. The model assumes a two-dimensional Stokes flow; the selection of the wavelength at short times is determined by a variational procedure. Contrary to the viscous fingering instability, undulations of the boundary may be observed for enough pumping, whatever the sign of the viscosity contrast between the two fluids involved. We apply our model to the suction by lipoproteins of cholesterol-enriched domains in giant unilamellar vesicles. Comparison of the number of undulations given by the model and by the experiments gives reasonable values of physical quantities such as the viscosities of the domains.

  2. LOX/LH2 vane pump for auxiliary propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemminger, J. A.; Ulbricht, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    Positive displacement pumps offer potential efficiency advantages over centrifugal pumps for future low thrust space missions. Low flow rate applications, such as space station auxiliary propulsion or dedicated low thrust orbiter transfer vehicles, are typical of missions where low flow and high head rise challenge centrifugal pumps. The positive displacement vane pump for pumping of LOX and LH2 is investigated. This effort has included: (1) a testing program in which pump performance was investigated for differing pump clearances and for differing pump materials while pumping LN2, LOX, and LH2; and (2) an analysis effort, in which a comprehensive pump performance analysis computer code was developed and exercised. An overview of the theoretical framework of the performance analysis computer code is presented, along with a summary of analysis results. Experimental results are presented for pump operating in liquid nitrogen. Included are data on the effects on pump performance of pump clearance, speed, and pressure rise. Pump suction performance is also presented.

  3. Estimating soil suction from electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.

    2013-09-01

    Soil suction and resistivity strongly depend on the degree of soil saturation and, therefore, both are used for estimating water content variations. The main difference between them is that soil suction is measured using tensiometers, which give point information, while resistivity is obtained by tomography surveys, which provide distributions of resistivity values in large volumes, although with less accuracy. In this paper, we have related soil suction to electrical resistivity with the aim of obtaining information about soil suction changes in large volumes, and not only for small areas around soil suction probes. We derived analytical relationships between soil matric suction and electrical resistivity by combining the empirical laws of van Genuchten and Archie. The obtained relationships were used to evaluate maps of soil suction values in different ashy layers originating in the explosive activity of the Mt Somma-Vesuvius volcano (southern Italy). Our findings provided a further example of the high potential of geophysical methods in contributing to more effective monitoring of soil stress conditions; this is of primary importance in areas where rainfall-induced landslides occur periodically.

  4. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Pressure Losses at Suction of a Twin Screw Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjeneh, M.; Kovacevic, A.; Rane, S.; Manolis, M.; Stosic, N.

    2015-08-01

    Rotary twin screw machines are used in the wide range of industrial applications and are capable of handling single and multiphase fluids as compressors, expanders and pumps. Concentration of liquid in the inlet flow can influence the performance of the machine significantly. Characteristics of the multiphase flow at the suction of a screw compressor depend on the local flow velocities and concentration. Local flow velocity measurements inside the screw compressors are difficult to obtain. However other flow properties such as local pressures are easier to attain. It is therefore useful to carry out experiments with local pressure variations in the suction which can be used to validate the 3D numerical Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models that could help in studying the single and multiphase flow behaviour in screw compressors. This paper presents experimental efforts to measure the local pressure losses inside the suction plenum of the screw compressor. Pressure variations are measured at 23 locations in the suction port at various operating conditions and compared with 3D CFD model. The grid generator SCORGTM was used for generating numerical mesh of rotors. The flow calculations were carried out using commercial 3D solver ANSYS CFX. It was found that the local pressure changes predicted by the CFD model are in the good agreement with measured pressures. This validated the use of CFD for modelling of the single phase flows in suction of screw machines.

  5. 21 CFR 880.5740 - Suction snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suction snakebite kit. 880.5740 Section 880.5740... Devices § 880.5740 Suction snakebite kit. (a) Identification. A suction snakebite kit is a device consisting of a knife, suction device, and tourniquet used for first-aid treatment of snakebites by removing...

  6. Evaluation of three portable suction devices.

    PubMed

    Simon, E J; Davidson, J A; Boom, S J

    1993-09-01

    Three portable suction devices were evaluated and compared with a wall-mounted vacuum driven suction unit. The Repro-med Res-Q-Vac, the Dräger Sujector 2000 and the Laerdal suction unit were assessed by measuring the time taken to aspirate 140 ml of mock gastric contents. The respective times for each device, expressed as mean and (range) were 7.39 (4.3-10.4), 8.6 (7.8-9.4) and 11.4 (9.4-12.6) s. These compare favourable with the Ohmeda suction unit (7.27 (6.2-8.9)). Each type of device has advantages and disadvantages when factors such as size, power supply and portability are considered, and each will be the most suitable for a particular situation.

  7. Assuring Precise LFC-Suction-Strip Porosities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    Masking technique in bonding perforated titanium sheets to substructures. Technique to obtain precise control of widths of perforated titanium suction strips. Precision required for successful laminar-flow control, (LFC) in flight environments.

  8. Study on cavitation influence for pump head in an axial flow pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, K.; Kajie, Y.; Saito, S.; Miyagawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    The size of axial flow pumps used in drainage pump stations has recently decreased, and their rotation speeds have increased, causing an increase in the risk of cavitation. Therefore, to provide highly reliable pumps, it is important to understand the internal flow of pumps under cavitating conditions. In this study, high-speed camera measurements and computational fluid dynamics analysis were performed to understand the cavitation performance of an axial flow pump. The mechanism that causes the head to change as a result of cavitation under low net positive suction head values is shown to be the balance between the increasing angular momentum and the loss indicated by the changing streamlines.

  9. Assessment of capillary suction time (CST) test methodologies.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, O; Scholz, M

    2007-12-01

    The capillary suction time (CST) test is a commonly used method to measure the filterability and the easiness of removing moisture from slurry and sludge in numerous environmental and industrial applications. This study assessed several novel alterations of both the test methodology and the current standard capillary suction time (CST) apparatus. Twelve different papers including the standard Whatman No. 17 chromatographic paper were tested. The tests were run using four different types of sludge including a synthetic sludge, which was specifically developed for benchmarking purposes. The standard apparatus was altered by the introduction of a novel rectangular funnel instead of a standard circular one. A stirrer was also introduced to solve the problem of test inconsistency (e.g. high CST variability) particularly for heavy types of sludge. Results showed that several alternative papers, which are cheaper than the standard paper, can be used to estimate CST values accurately, and that the test repeatability can be improved in many cases and for different types of sludge. The introduction of the rectangular funnel demonstrated an obvious enhancement of test repeatability. The use of a stirrer to avoid sedimentation of heavy sludge did not have statistically significant impact on the CST values or the corresponding data variability. The application of synthetic sludge can support the testing of experimental methodologies and should be used for subsequent benchmarking purposes.

  10. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  11. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  12. Atraumatic suction tip for microneurosurgery--clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Mariak, Z; Lyson, T

    2007-12-01

    Our two-year experience with a new atraumatic tip for the neurosurgical suction tube is described. During microneurosurgical procedures the tip reduces injury to fragile vital brain structures and protects them from being aspirated into the suction tube. The perforated membrane of the appended suction tip does not impede evacuation of blood in any situation and can be easily cleaned off without demounting. The device can be immediately attached to the tube and disconnected. The neurosurgeon need not concentrate on its use, in contrast to those systems with active suction pressure control. The atraumatic suction tip is available in several sizes to fit different callibers of suction tubes.

  13. S-102 Transfer Pump Restriction Modeling Results

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Rector, David R.; Trent, Donald S.

    2008-03-27

    It was determined that a radioactive waste leak in the Hanford S Farm in the vicinity of the S-102 retrieval pump discharge occurred because of over-pressurization and failure of the S-102 dilution water supply hose while operating the retrieval pump in reverse with an obstructed suction cavity and an unobstructed flow path to the dilution water supply hose. This report describes efforts to identify plausible scenarios for the waste leak to occur.

  14. Mechanical suction for clot evacuation: experience with "suction bridge" for safe and effective clot removal.

    PubMed

    Goel, Apul; Dalela, Diwakar

    2015-05-01

    To present the experience with the use of a "suction bridge" for removal of bladder clots. In all patients presenting with bladder clots, mechanical suction was done using a "suction bridge". This bridge has a luer lock that is fixed to the cystoscope sheath, and the other end is connected to suction tube. The suction pressure was started at 250 mmHg and was increased up to 400 mmHg if needed. Twenty patients with a mean age of 59.4 years were included. The etiologies of bladder clots included bladder tumor in nine, benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) in two, BPH with bladder stone in one, hematochyluria in three, and post-transurethral prostate resection in 10. Eighteen patients presented in clot retention. The estimated clot size ranged from 50 mL to more than 1 L. The mean duration for clot removal was 15 min (range 5-60). The procedure was successful in all patients. There was no bladder injury. The limitations include the small number of recruits, the non-randomized nature of study, and no control group for comparison. Mechanical suction is another safe, fast, and effective option of clot removal from the urinary bladder. The suction bridge is useful while using this method.

  15. Suction evacuation of hemothorax: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Savage, Stephanie A; Cibulas, George A; Ward, Tyler A; Davis, Corinne A; Croce, Martin A; Zarzaur, Ben L

    2016-07-01

    Although tube thoracostomy is a common procedure after thoracic trauma, incomplete evacuation of fluid places the patient at risk for retained hemothorax. As little as 300 to 500 cm of blood may result in the need for an additional thoracostomy tube or, in more severe cases, lung entrapment and empyema. We hypothesized that suction evacuation of the thoracic cavity before tube placement would decrease the incidence of late complications. Patients requiring tube thoracostomy within 96 hours of admission were prospectively identified and underwent suction evacuation of the pleural space (SEPS) before tube placement. These patients were compared to historical controls without suction evacuation. Demographics, admission vital signs, laboratory values, details of chest tube placement, and outcomes were collected on all patients. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare outcomes between groups. A total of 199 patients were identified, consisting of 100 retrospective controls and 99 SEPS patients. There were no differences in age, sex, admission injury severity score or chest abbreviated injury score, admission laboratory values or vital signs, or hospital length of stay. Mean (SD) volume of hemothorax in SEPS patients was 220 (297) cm; with only 48% having a volume greater than 100 cm at the time of tube placement. Three patients developed empyema, and 19 demonstrated retained blood; there was no difference between SEPS and control patients. Suction evacuation of the pleural space was significantly protective against recurrent pneumothorax after chest tube removal (odds ratio, 0.332; 95% confidence interval, 0.148-0.745). Preemptive suction evacuation of the thoracic cavity did not have a significant impact on subsequent development of retained hemothorax or empyema. Suction evacuation of the pleural space significantly decreased incidence of recurrent pneumothorax after thoracostomy removal. Although the mechanism is unclear, such a benefit may make this

  16. Gravity separation of pericardial fat in cardiotomy suction blood: an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Kinard, M Rhett; Shackelford, Anthony G; Sistino, Joseph J

    2009-06-01

    Fat emboli generated during cardiac surgery have been shown to cause neurologic complications in patients postoperatively. Cardiotomy suction has been known to be a large generator of emboli. This study will examine the efficacy of a separation technique in which the cardiotomy suction blood is stored in a cardiotomy reservoir for various time intervals to allow spontaneous separation of fat from blood by density. Soybean oil was added to heparinized porcine blood to simulate the blood of a patient with hypertriglyceridemia (> 150 mg/dL). Roller pump suction was used to transfer the room temperature blood into the cardiotomy reservoir. Blood was removed from the reservoir in 200-mL aliquots at 0, 15, 30 45, and 60 minutes. Samples were taken at each interval and centrifuged to facilitate further separation of liquid fat. Fat content in each sample was determined by a point-of-care triglyceride analyzer. Three trials were conducted for a total of 30 samples. The 0-minute group was considered a baseline and was compared to the other four times. Fat concentration was reduced significantly in the 45- and 60-minute groups compared to the 0-, 15-, and 30-minute groups (p < .05). Gravity separation of cardiotomy suction blood is effective; however, it may require retention of blood for more time than is clinically acceptable during a routing coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

  17. Transport suction apparatus and absorption materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives were as follows. The effectiveness and function was evaluated of the hand held, manually powered v-vac for suction during microgravity. The function was evaluated of the battery powered laerdal suction unit in microgravity. The two units in control of various types of simulated bodily fluids were compared. Various types of tubing and attachments were evaluated which are required to control the collection of bodily fluids during transport. Various materials were evaluated for absorption of simulated bodily fluids. And potential problems were identified for waste management and containment of secretions and fluids during transport. Test procedures, results, and conclusions are briefly discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for...

  19. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for menstrual...

  20. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for menstrual...

  1. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for menstrual...

  2. 21 CFR 884.1175 - Endometrial suction curette and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... suction curette is a device used to remove material from the uterus and from the mucosal lining of the uterus by scraping and vacuum suction. This device is used to obtain tissue for biopsy or for menstrual...

  3. Integrated heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, W.R.

    1988-03-01

    An integrated heat pump and hot water system is described that includes: a heat pump having an indoor heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger that are selectively connected to the suction line and the discharge line respectively of a compressor by a flow reversing means, and to each other by a liquid line having an expansion device mounted therein, whereby heating and cooling is provided to an indoor comfort zone by cycling the flow reversing means, a refrigerant to water heat exchanger having a hot water flow circuit in heat transfer relation with a first refrigerant condensing circuit and a second refrigerant evaporating circuit, a connection mounted in the liquid between the indoor heat exchanger and the expansion device, control means for regulating the flow of refrigerant through the refrigerant to water heat exchanger to selectively transfer heat into and out of the hot water flow circuit.

  4. Use of Suction Piles for Mooring of Mobile Offshore Bases.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-11

    ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT Title: Use of Suction Piles for Mooring of Mobile Offshore Bases (ONR Grant No. N00014-97-1-0887) Period: June...Literature Review The literature study on suction piles has been completed and the final report has been submitted to the Naval Facilities Engineering...Analytical Performance Study of Suction Piles The suction pile performance study using linear elastic soil material properties has been completed. Results

  5. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with...

  6. 21 CFR 870.5050 - Patient care suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient care suction apparatus. 870.5050 Section 870.5050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A patient care suction apparatus is a device used with...

  7. 21 CFR 868.6810 - Tracheobronchial suction catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheobronchial suction catheter. 868.6810... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6810 Tracheobronchial suction catheter. (a) Identification. A tracheobronchial suction catheter is a device used to aspirate liquids or...

  8. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction....4430 Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return sucker...

  9. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device. (a) Identification. A suction antichoke device is a device intended to be used in an emergency situation to remove... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section...

  10. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device. (a) Identification. A suction antichoke device is a device intended to be used in an emergency situation to remove... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section...

  11. Reversed flow above a plate with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Tobak, M.

    1986-01-01

    A minor extension is developed for Kovasznay's (1948) solution, and an exact solution is presented for Navier-Stokes equations that may represent the reversed flow about a flat plate with suction. This exact solution is the result of a search for a solution that may serve as an exact basic flow for a model stability analysis of nonparallel flows involving flow reversal.

  12. Control of centrifugal blood pump based on the motor current.

    PubMed

    Iijima, T; Inamoto, T; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    1997-07-01

    In this study, centrifugal pump performance was examined in a mock circulatory loop to derive an automatic pump rotational speed (rpm) control method. The pivot bearing supported sealless centrifugal pump was placed in the left ventricular apex to aorta bypass mode. The pneumatic pulsatile ventricle was used to simulate the natural ventricle. To simulate the suction effect in the ventricle, a collapsible rubber tube was placed in the inflow port of the centrifugal pump in series with the apex of the simulated ventricle. Experimentally, the centrifugal pump speed (rpm) was gradually increased to simulate the suction effect. The pump flow through the centrifugal pump measured by an electromagnetic flowmeter, the aortic pressure, and the motor current were continuously digitized at 100 Hz and stored in a personal computer. The analysis of the cross-spectral density between the pump flow and motor current waveforms revealed that 2 waveforms were highly correlated at the frequency range between 0 and 4 Hz, with the coherence and phase angles being close to 1.0 and 0 degree, respectively. The fast Fourier transform analysis of the motor current indicated that the second harmonic component of the motor current power density increased with the occurrence of the suction effect in the circuit. The ratio of the fundamental to the second harmonic component decreased less than 1.3 as the suction effect developed in the circuit. It is possible to detect and prevent the suction effect of the centrifugal blood pump in the natural ventricle through analysis of the motor current waveform.

  13. Can vacuum assisted venous drainage be achieved using a roller pump in an emergency? A pilot study using neonatal circuitry.

    PubMed

    Hill, S L; Holt, D W

    2007-12-01

    There has been much advancement in perfusion technology over its 50 years of progression. One of these techniques is vacuum-assisted venous drainage (VAVD). Many perfusionists augment venous drainage using VAVD, typically from a wall vacuum source. This study explores alternates to providing VAVD if the wall vacuum fails. In two porcine laboratories, approximately 36 in. of 3/16-in. tubing was connected to a sucker return port and placed into the roller head next to the arterial pump. The vacuum was monitored with a DLP pressure monitoring system (Medtronic). This system was connected to small-bore tubing and attached to a stopcock on top of the reservoir. The vacuum was regulated using another stopcock connected to a non-filtered luer lock port on top of the reservoir or by a segment of 3 x 0.25-in.-diameter tubing attached to the vent port with a c-clamp. Vacuum drainage was achieved, ranging from -18 mmHg to -71 mmHg by manipulating the stopcock or c-clamp. Changes in venous drainage were seen by volume fluctuations in the venous reservoir. The vacuum was adjusted to account for dramatic changes. Augmented venous drainage using a roller pump can be achieved successfully during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This method of active drainage can be used in lieu of wall suction or during times of emergency if wall suction fails.

  14. Can Vacuum Assisted Venous Drainage be Achieved using a Roller Pump in an Emergency? A Pilot Study using Neonatal Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Hill, S. L.; Holt, D. W.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: There has been much advancement in perfusion technology over its 50 years of progression. One of these techniques is vacuum-assisted venous drainage (VAVD). Many perfusionists augment venous drainage using VAVD, typically from a wall vacuum source. This study explores alternates to providing VAVD if the wall vacuum fails. In two porcine laboratories, ∼36 in. of 3/16-in. tubing was connected to a sucker return port and placed into the roller head next to the arterial pump. The vacuum was monitored with a DLP pressure monitoring system (Medtronic). This system was connected to small-bore tubing and attached to a stopcock on top of the reservoir. The vacuum was regulated using another stopcock connected to a non-filtered luer lock port on top of the reservoir or by a segment of 3 × 0.25-in.-diameter tubing attached to the vent port with a c-clamp. Vacuum drainage was achieved, ranging from −18 mmHg to −71 mmHg by manipulating the stopcock or c-clamp. Changes in venous drainage were seen by volume fluctuations in the venous reservoir. The vacuum was adjusted to account for dramatic changes. Augmented venous drainage using a roller pump can be achieved successfully during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). This method of active drainage can be used in lieu of wall suction or during times of emergency if wall suction fails. PMID:18293812

  15. Multiphase rotodynamic pumps extend their operating capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Falcimaigne, J.; Durando, P.; Loupias, M.; Vilagines, R.

    1994-12-31

    The paper describes the main features of the P302 multiphase pump and presents some results of bench tests carried out to check its hydraulic performances. The P302 is a rotodynamic helico-axial pump based on the Poseidon pumping technology. It is equipped with water lubricated bearings and driven by a high speed electrical motor. The pump was designed to work with a suction pressure much lower than the P300 prototype and to deliver a higher compression ratio. It has fifteen stages of compression cells, in three different series. Before installing the pump on an onshore production site for endurance tests with actual field fluids, the steady-state behavior and the transient responses of the pump were characterized on the IFP multiphase loop at Solaize (France). The pump was tested both with single phase fluids (liquid or gas) and a diphasic mixture (fuel-oil and nitrogen) at various GVF and suction pressures. In the paper, theoretical predictions are compared to measured data. The good results of these tests confirmed the soundness and versatility of the Poseidon hydraulics and also the calculation model ability to predict accurately the performances of rotodynamic pump over a wide range of operating conditions.

  16. Cavitation behavior of liquid rocket pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.

    1994-12-31

    Liquid rocket pumps were released and tested for obtaining the cavitation and non-cavitation performance. Two pumps, one each for fuel and oxidizer were tested for obtaining the critical Net Positive Suction Head for ensuring the cavitation free operation of these pumps in flight. The experimentally obtained values of NPSH have been compared with the theoretical values obtained using the model developed by Stripling (1962). Based on this comparison it is possible to predict the propellant tank pressure in advance with some confidence. The final value of tank pressure can be revised later when more comprehensive experimental values are available.

  17. How to select and apply positive-displacement rotary pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Neerken, R.F.

    1980-04-07

    The advantages of rotary pumps for process applications are promoted by these practical guidelines concerning the types available, facts about their operation and performance, and the fluid systems in which they can be used. Basic types of rotary pumps discussed include internal gear, sliding vane, single-screw (progressing cavity), cam and piston, flexible tube, flexible liner, external gear, circumferential piston, twin screw, triple screw, single lobe, and 3 lobe. Factors which are examined to make pump selection include suction requirements, viscosity of fluids, temperature at which process fluid is handled, working and allowable pressures, pump capacity, pump horsepower, materials of construction, and intended applications.

  18. Classification of physiologically significant pumping states in an implantable rotary blood pump: patient trial results.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Dean M; Mason, David G; Salamonsen, Robert F; Ayre, Peter J; Cloherty, Shaun L; Lovell, Nigel H

    2007-01-01

    An integral component in the development of a control strategy for implantable rotary blood pumps is the task of reliably detecting the occurrence of left ventricular collapse due to overpumping of the native heart. Using the noninvasive pump feedback signal of impeller speed, an approach to distinguish between overpumping (or ventricular collapse) and the normal pumping state has been developed. Noninvasive pump signals from 10 human pump recipients were collected, and the pumping state was categorized as either normal or suction, based on expert opinion aided by transesophageal echocardiographic images. A number of indices derived from the pump speed waveform were incorporated into a classification and regression tree model, which acted as the pumping state classifier. When validating the model on 12,990 segments of unseen data, this methodology yielded a peak sensitivity/specificity for detecting suction of 99.11%/98.76%. After performing a 10-fold cross-validation on all of the available data, a minimum estimated error of 0.53% was achieved. The results presented suggest that techniques for pumping state detection, previously investigated in preliminary in vivo studies, are applicable and sufficient for use in the clinical environment.

  19. Aerodynamic control using forebody blowing and suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. Terry; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamic control using pneumatic forebody flow control was studied. Three methods of control were investigated: (1) blowing from a localized jet, (2) blowing from a slot, and (3) surface suction. Flow visualization and yawing moment measurements were performed on F/A-18 models in a water tunnel. The results show that all the methods were effective in controlling the forebody flow over a wide range of angles of attack and sideslip. The advantages and limitations of each of the control methods were discussed. The experiments suggested that all the control methods work basically on the principle of separation control. Based on the results of the water tunnel tests, the blowing or suction mass flow requirements appear to be within the limits of typical engine-bleed available from a modern fighter engine.

  20. Bernoulli Suction Effect on Soap Bubble Blowing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, John; Ryu, Sangjin

    2015-11-01

    As a model system for thin-film bubble with two gas-liquid interfaces, we experimentally investigated the pinch-off of soap bubble blowing. Using the lab-built bubble blower and high-speed videography, we have found that the scaling law exponent of soap bubble pinch-off is 2/3, which is similar to that of soap film bridge. Because air flowed through the decreasing neck of soap film tube, we studied possible Bernoulli suction effect on soap bubble pinch-off by evaluating the Reynolds number of airflow. Image processing was utilized to calculate approximate volume of growing soap film tube and the volume flow rate of the airflow, and the Reynolds number was estimated to be 800-3200. This result suggests that soap bubbling may involve the Bernoulli suction effect.

  1. Electronically controlled distributor type fuel injection pump for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Nozaki, S.; Yamada, K.

    1986-08-12

    A distributor type fuel injection pump is described for an internal combustion engine, comprising: a suction space filled with fuel under pressure variable as a function of the rotational speed of the engine; a plunger driven by the engine for concurrent reciprocating and rotative motion to effect suction of fuel from the suction space into a pump working chamber defined by the plunger at one end thereof, pressure delivery of fuel from the pump working chamber and distribution of the fuel into cylinders of the engine; suction ports formed in the plunger and identical in number with the cylinders of the engine. The suction ports with the pump working chamber; a first communication passageway communicating the suction space with the pump working chamber; a second communication passageway having a restriction therein. The second communication passageway is disposed to sequentially register with the suction ports as the plunger rotates for communicating the suction space with each of the suction ports that registers with the second communication passageway; a solenoid valve disposed to selectively open and close the first communication passageway; a selector valve operable to assume, independently of the opening and closing action of the solenoid valve, a first valve position wherein the first communication passageway is closed and simultaneously the second communication passageway is opened, at the start of the engine, and a second valve position wherein the second communication passageway is closed and simultaneously the first communication passageway is is opened, during operation of the engine other than at the start of the engine; and control means operable in response to operating conditions of the engine to control the solenoid valve to alternately open and close so as to achieve required fuel injection quantity and required injection timing.

  2. [Contusion-suction trauma after globe injuries].

    PubMed

    Kroll, P; Stoll, W; Kirchhoff, E

    1983-06-01

    An analysis of ball injuries treated during the last 3 years at Münster University Eye Hospital revealed a difference in the kind of traumata caused by air-filled balls and by solid, inelastic balls. The pathomechanism of a "contusion-suction trauma" is discussed; this would offer a satisfactory explanation not only for injuries of the anterior segment, but also for retinal changes at the outer periphery and the posterior pole.

  3. The use of bacteriophage as tracers of aerosols liberated by sludge suction appliances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, D; Skilton, H E; Carroll, R F

    1988-11-01

    Three bacteriophage tracers were added to 600-1 containers of water and simulated latrine sludge to provide high titres of tracer in aqueous and semi-aqueous media. After a period of mixing and stabilization, media were removed from the containers with suction hoses coupled to the vacuum pump of one of two sludge suction tankers. Exhaust air from the appliances was sampled by cyclone sampler and assayed for the presence of tracer organisms carried over during the emptying process. In the experiments the appliances were operated at different vacuum pump speeds, drawing both aqueous and semi-aqueous (simulated sludge) media. Air around one tanker was also sampled during the emptying, under pressure, of the vacuum vessel. The degree of aerosolization and expulsion of tracer bacteriophage by the vacuum appliances was consistently low, regardless of medium and pump air flow. In contrast, the proportion of tracer retained within the appliances was very high, exceeding the proportion expelled by a minimum of 8 log10 orders of magnitude and a maximum of greater than 11 log10 orders. The highest total of tracer bacteriophage was recovered during the pressure emptying of the vacuum vessel of one tanker. The results may be used for assessing and comparing potential public health hazards associated with the handling of wastewater sludge by vacuum appliances.

  4. [Pressure-volume analysis of wound suction drainage containers and suction capacity of drainage tubes].

    PubMed

    Mohadjer, C; Siegert, R; Jäger, H; Weidauer, H

    1994-01-01

    Four low-vacuum systems and eight high-vacuum systems were examined with special reference to the pressure-volume relations. The maximum filling volume for adequate transport of wound secretion was determined for each type. The use of a synthetic wound fluid instead of water resulted in a smaller aspiration volume. Enlargement of the tube diameter resulted in a reduced initial vacuum for the low-vacuum systems, whereas the high-vacuum systems were not affected. Normal drain tubes were compared with "Ulm drains" and silicon tubes for suction capacity. The suction maximum of normal tubes and silicon tubes was located at the proximal holes of the perforated tubes. The "Ulm drain," with perforation diameter increasing continuously to the distal end of the tube, was found to exert suction even at the more distal part of the tube. It is estimated that this tube allows locally more balanced vacuum in the wound.

  5. Haemolysis during cardiopulmonary bypass: an in vivo comparison of standard roller pumps, nonocclusive roller pumps and centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Hansbro, S D; Sharpe, D A; Catchpole, R; Welsh, K R; Munsch, C M; McGoldrick, J P; Kay, P H

    1999-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) involves the use of either an occlusive roller pump or centrifugal pump. Damage to blood elements, including haemolysis, may arise from occlusion when using a roller pump; the appropriate degree of occlusion has not yet been determined scientifically. Centrifugal and nonocclusive roller pumps are reputed to reduce haemolysis. The objective of this study was to compare haemolysis caused by a standard roller pump with a dynamically set nonocclusive roller pump and with a centrifugal pump. We prospectively randomized 60 patients undergoing routine coronary artery surgery into three groups: standard roller pump (STD, n = 20), dynamically set roller pump (DYN, n = 20), or centrifugal pump (CEN, n = 20). The level of plasma free haemoglobin (FHb) was measured preoperatively, and the rate of formation of FHb (in mg/dl/min) was determined at the end of the ischaemic phase and at the end of CPB. Cardiotomy suction blood was isolated for the ischaemic phase and returned before the end of CPB. It was found that there were no differences between the groups in demographic or operative variables. The rate of formation of FHb at the end of the ischaemic phase was similar for all groups (STD 0.108 +/- 0.10, DYN 0.117 +/- 0.08, CEN 0.129 +/- 0.07). At the end of CPB, after return of the cardiotomy suction blood, there was a significant (< 0.001) increase in the rate of formation of FHb in all groups. The increase was similar for each of the groups (STD 0.424 +/- 0.17, DYN 0.481 +/- 0.20, CEN 0.471 +/- 0.18). We conclude that the rates of haemolysis are similar for each of the pump types, and no benefit is conferred by the use of either a dynamically set roller pump or a centrifugal pump compared with the standard roller pump. The return of the cardiotomy suction blood to the circulation is the principal source of plasma free haemoglobin.

  6. Evaluation of hypopharyngeal suction to eliminate aspiration: the Retro-Esophageal Suction (REScue) catheter.

    PubMed

    Belafsky, Peter C; Mehdizadeh, O B; Ledgerwood, L; Kuhn, M

    2015-02-01

    Profound oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) is common and costly. Treatment options are limited. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the utility of hypopharyngeal suction at the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) to eliminate aspiration. Five different catheters were passed retrograde up the esophagus and positioned at the UES in a cadaver model of profound OPD. Suction was affixed to each catheter. 10 cc of barium was administered into the pyriform sinus, and videofluoroscopy was utilized to evaluate the presence of aspiration. 6 trials were administered per catheter and for a no catheter control. The outcome measures were the incidence of aspiration, the NIH Swallow Safety Scale (NIH-SSS), and UES opening. Control trials with no suction resulted in an aspiration rate of 100 % (6/6 trials). Negative pressure through 16, 18, 24, and 30 Fr catheter resulted in an aspiration rate of 0 % (0/24 trials; p < 0.001), and suction through a 12-Fr catheter resulted in an aspiration rate of 33 % (2/6 trials; p > 0.05). The mean NIH-SSS improved from 7.0 (±0.0) in the control to 0 (±0.0) with hypopharyngeal suction (18 Fr nasogastric catheter; p < 0.001). Mean UES opening improved from 0.0 (±0.0) mm in the control condition to 8.6 (±0.2) mm with a hypopharyngeal catheter (16 Fr Foley catheter; p < 0.001). Negative pressure applied through retro-esophageal suction catheters (>12 Fr) at the level of the UES reduced aspiration by 100 % and significantly increased UES opening in a cadaveric model of profound oropharyngeal dysphagia.

  7. Penis Pump

    MedlinePlus

    Penis pump Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A penis pump is one of a few treatment options ... an erection sufficient for sex (erectile dysfunction). A penis pump consists of a plastic tube that fits ...

  8. Preliminary Analysis on Matric Suction for Barren Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azhar, A. T. S.; Fazlina, M. I. S.; Aziman, M.; Fairus, Y. M.; Azman, K.; Hazreek, Z. A. M.

    2016-11-01

    Most research conducted on slope failures can broadly be attributed to the convergence of three factors, i.e. rainfall, steepness of slope, and soil geological profile. The mechanism of the failures is mainly due to the loss of matric suction of soils by rainwater. When rainwater infiltrates into the slopes, it will start to saturate the soil, i.e., reduce the matric suction. A good understanding of landslide mechanisms and the characteristics of unsaturated soil and rock in tropical areas is crucial in landslide hazard formulation. Most of the slope failures in unsaturated tropical residual soil in Malaysia are mainly due to infiltration, especially during intense and prolonged rainfall, which reduces the soil matric suction and hence decreases the stability of the slope. Therefore, the aim of this research is to determine the matric suction for barren soil and to model an unsaturated slope with natural rainfall to evaluate the effects of matric suction on rainfall intensity. A field test was carried out using the Watermark Soil Moisture Sensor to determine the matric suction. The sensor was connected to a program called SpecWare 9 Basic which also used Data Logging Rain gauge Watermark 1120 to measure the intensity and duration of rainfall. This study was conducted at the Research Centre for Soft Soil which is a new Research and Development (R & D) initiative by Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Parit Raja. Field observation showed that the highest daily suction was recorded during noon while the lowest suction was obtained at night and early morning. The highest matric suction for loose condition was 31.0 kPa while the highest matric suction for compacted condition was 32.4 kPa. The results implied that the field suction variation was not only governed by the rainfall, but also the cyclic evaporation process. The findings clearly indicated that the changes in soil suction distribution patterns occurred due to different weather conditions.

  9. Method of producing suction manifolds for automobile engines

    SciTech Connect

    Enomoto, M.; Shimizu, Y.

    1984-05-29

    A method of producing suction manifolds for automobile engines is disclosed. In forming an exhaust gas re-circulating pipe passage integrally with a suction manifold for re-circulating exhaust gases from the engine to the suction manifold, a curved pipe of aluminum having a high-temperature resistant film formed on its surface is molded into a manifold of aluminum alloy at a suitable place on the latter.

  10. Transition Flight Experiments on a Swept Wing with Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  11. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30-degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  12. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Putnam, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Flight boundary-layer transition experiments were conducted on a 30-degree swept wing with a perforated leading-edge suction panel. The transition location on the panel was changed by systematically varying the location and amount of suction. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading-edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on flight condition and suction variation. Amplification factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations using a state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility.

  13. Ridge suction drives plume-ridge interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Y.; Hékinian, R.

    2003-04-01

    Deep-sourced mantle plumes, if existing, are genetically independent of plate tectonics. When the ascending plumes approach lithospheric plates, interactions between the two occur. Such interactions are most prominent near ocean ridges where the lithosphere is thin and the effect of plumes is best revealed. While ocean ridges are mostly passive features in terms of plate tectonics, they play an active role in the context of plume-ridge interactions. This active role is a ridge suction force that drives asthenospheric mantle flow towards ridges because of material needs to form the ocean crust at ridges and lithospheric mantle in the vicinity of ridges. This ridge suction force increases with increasing plate separation rate because of increased material demand per unit time. As the seismic low-velocity zone atop the asthenosphere has the lowest viscosity that increases rapidly with depth, the ridge-ward asthenospheric flow is largely horizontal beneath the lithosphere. Recognizing that plume materials have two components with easily-melted dikes/veins enriched in volatiles and incompatible elements dispersed in the more refractory and depleted peridotitic matrix, geochemistry of some seafloor volcanics well illustrates that plume-ridge interactions are consequences of ridge-suction-driven flow of plume materials, which melt by decompression because of lithospheric thinning towards ridges. There are excellent examples: 1. The decreasing La/Sm and increasing MgO and CaO/Al_2O_3 in Easter Seamount lavas from Salas-y-Gomez Islands to the Easter Microplate East rift zone result from progressive decompression melting of ridge-ward flowing plume materials. 2. The similar geochemical observations in lavas along the Foundation hotline towards the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge result from the same process. 3. The increasing ridge suction force with increasing spreading rate explains why the Iceland plume has asymmetric effects on its neighboring ridges: both topographic and

  14. Acoustic Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Pump uses acoustic-radiation forces. Momentum transferred from sound waves to sound-propagating material in way resulting in net pumping action on material. Acoustic pump is solid-state pump. Requires no moving parts, entirely miniaturized, and does not invade pumped environment. Silent, with no conventional vibration. Used as pump for liquid, suspension, gas, or any other medium interacting with radiation pressure. Also used where solid-state pump needed for reliability and controllability. In microgravity environment, device offers unusual control for low flow rates. For medical or other applications in which contamination cannot be allowed, offers noninvasive pumping force.

  15. Transition control by periodic suction-blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.; Nutt, W. E.; Caruso, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of active control of transition by period suction-blowing is investigated via direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The time-evolution of finite-amplitude disturbances in plane channel flow is compared in detail with and without control. The analysis indicates that for relatively small three-dimensional amplitudes, a two-dimensional control effectively reduces disturbance growth rates even for linearly unstable Reynolds numbers. After the flow goes through secondary instability, three-dimensional control seems necessary to stabilize the flow. An investigation of the temperature field suggests that passive temperature contamination is operative to reflect the vorticity dynamics during transition.

  16. Fluids vertical transfer utilizing VFD based centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiruchelvam, Vinesh; Hong, Lim Min

    2017-04-01

    Efficiency of centrifugal pumps has been consistently improving with technology enhancements. Pump manufacturers have increased the variety of pump dimension. Pump selection is based on application selection primarily on energy conversation. In a conventional pumping system, the pump will be driven at the same speed even though the output usage is below the actual demand. As a result, energy is wasted and the pump could have been driven at a lower speed for the same operational function. One of the ideal solutions is to vary the pump speed based on real-time demand. The paper illustrates the system simulation for a high rise building water transfer and the relevant design calculations such as the volumetric flow rate and net positive suction head. Supporting this operational function, the variable frequency device (VFD) has also been designed and simulated by using the Proteus software.

  17. Suction power output and the inertial cost of rotating the neurocranium to generate suction in fish.

    PubMed

    Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Day, Steven W; Hernández, L Patricia; Higham, Timothy E; Skorczewski, Tyler

    2015-05-07

    To expand the buccal cavity, many suction-feeding fishes rely on a considerable contribution from dorsal rotation of the dorsal part of the head including the brains, eyes, and several bones forming the braincase and skull roof (jointly referred to as the neurocranium). As the neurocranium takes up a large part of the total mass of the head, this rotation may incur a considerable inertial cost. If so, this would suggest a significant selective pressure on the kinematics and mass distribution of the neurocranium of suction feeders. Here, an inverse dynamic model is formulated to calculate the instantaneous power required to rotate the neurocranium, approximated by a quarter ellipsoid volume of homogeneous density, as well as to calculate the instantaneous suction power based on intra-oral pressure and head volume quantifications. We applied this model to largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and found that the power required to rotate the neurocranium accounts for only about 4% of the power required to suck water into the mouth. Furthermore, recovery of kinetic energy from the rotating neurocranium converted into suction work may be possible during the phase of neurocranial deceleration. Thus, we suggest that only a negligible proportion of the power output of the feeding muscles is lost as inertial costs in the largemouth bass. Consequently, the feeding performance of piscivorous suction feeders with generalised morphology, comparable to our model species, is not limited by neurocranial motion during head expansion. This suggests that it is thus not likely to be a factor of importance in the evolution of cranial shape and size. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Concentric Split Flow Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A concentric split flow filter may be configured to remove odor and/or bacteria from pumped air used to collect urine and fecal waste products. For instance, filter may be designed to effectively fill the volume that was previously considered wasted surrounding the transport tube of a waste management system. The concentric split flow filter may be configured to split the air flow, with substantially half of the air flow to be treated traveling through a first bed of filter media and substantially the other half of the air flow to be treated traveling through the second bed of filter media. This split flow design reduces the air velocity by 50%. In this way, the pressure drop of filter may be reduced by as much as a factor of 4 as compare to the conventional design.

  19. Numerical simulation of pump-intake vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolf, Pavel; Klas, Roman

    2015-05-01

    Pump pre-swirl or uneven flow distribution in front of the pump can induce pump-intake vortices. These phenomena result in blockage of the impeller suction space, deterioration of efficiency, drop of head curve and earlier onset of cavitation. Real problematic case, where head curve drop was documented, is simulated using commercial CFD software. Computational simulation was carried out for three flow rates, which correspond to three operating regimes of the vertical pump. The domain consists of the pump sump, pump itself excluding the impeller and the delivery pipe. One-phase approach is applied, because the vortex cores were not filled with air during observation of the real pump operation. Numerical simulation identified two surface vortices and one bottom vortex. Their position and strength depend on the pump flow rate. Paper presents detail analysis of the flow field on the pump intake, discusses influence of the vortices on pump operation and suggests possible actions that should be taken to suppress the intake vortices.

  20. PUMP CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Strickland, G.; Horn, F.L.; White, H.T.

    1960-09-27

    A pump which utilizes the fluid being pumped through it as its lubricating fluid is described. This is achieved by means of an improved bearing construction in a pump of the enclosed or canned rotor type. At the outlet end of the pump, adjacent to an impeller mechanism, there is a bypass which conveys some of the pumped fluid to a chamber at the inlet end of the pump. After this chamber becomes full, the pumped fluid passes through fixed orifices in the top of the chamber and exerts a thrust on the inlet end of the pump rotor. Lubrication of the rotor shaft is accomplished by passing the pumped fluid through a bypass at the outlet end of the rotor shaft. This bypass conveys Pumped fluid to a cooling means and then to grooves on the surface of the rotor shait, thus lubricating the shaft.

  1. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suction lipoplasty system. 878.5040 Section 878.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.5040 Suction lipoplasty...

  2. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suction lipoplasty system. 878.5040 Section 878.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.5040 Suction lipoplasty...

  3. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suction lipoplasty system. 878.5040 Section 878.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.5040 Suction lipoplasty...

  4. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suction lipoplasty system. 878.5040 Section 878.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.5040 Suction lipoplasty...

  5. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  6. 21 CFR 870.4430 - Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary bypass intracardiac suction control. 870.4430 Section 870.4430 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... intracardiac suction control is a device which provides the vacuum and control for a cardiotomy return...

  7. Effectiveness of closed suction drainage tip culture in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Park, Jai Hyung; Shon, Hyun Chul; Kim, Ji Wan; Park, Se Jin; Ko, Taeg Su; Park, Jong Hyon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between bacterial growth in closed suction drainage tip culture and periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). Retrospective review included 256 patients who had undergone hip arthroplasty in which the closed suction drainage tip was cultured. Follow-up periods were longer than a year. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were calculated in order to determine the significance of closed suction drainage tip culture in early diagnosis of infection. Patients with positive culture test were monitored to determine the effect of change in antibiotics on treatment of early infection. Eight of the 13 infections showed positive results from closed suction drainage tip culture. Eleven of the 243 non-infectious cases showed positive results after closed suction drainage tip culture (p<0.001). Sensitivity of closed suction drainage tip culture was 61.5%, with a specificity of 95.5%. Positive and negative predictive values were 42.1% and 97.9%, respectively. Systemic antibiotics were administered according to in vitro sensitivity of bacteria cultured from closed suction drainage tip in 13 of 19 positive culture cases. No statistically significant difference in infection risk was observed between the antibiotics group and the group to which antibiotics were not administered (p=0.51). Closed suction drainage tip culture can aid in the early detection of infection.

  8. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. A suction antichoke device is a device intended to be used in an emergency situation to remove, by the application of suction, foreign objects that obstruct a patient's airway to prevent asphyxiation to the patient. (b) Classification. Class III. (c) Date PMA or notice of completion of PDP...

  9. 21 CFR 878.5040 - Suction lipoplasty system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (a) Identification. A suction lipoplasty system is a device intended for aesthetic body contouring... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suction lipoplasty system. 878.5040 Section 878.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...

  10. Swimming muscles power suction feeding in largemouth bass.

    PubMed

    Camp, Ariel L; Roberts, Thomas J; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2015-07-14

    Most aquatic vertebrates use suction to capture food, relying on rapid expansion of the mouth cavity to accelerate water and food into the mouth. In ray-finned fishes, mouth expansion is both fast and forceful, and therefore requires considerable power. However, the cranial muscles of these fishes are relatively small and may not be able to produce enough power for suction expansion. The axial swimming muscles of these fishes also attach to the feeding apparatus and have the potential to generate mouth expansion. Because of their large size, these axial muscles could contribute substantial power to suction feeding. To determine whether suction feeding is powered primarily by axial muscles, we measured the power required for suction expansion in largemouth bass and compared it to the power capacities of the axial and cranial muscles. Using X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM), we generated 3D animations of the mouth skeleton and created a dynamic digital endocast to measure the rate of mouth volume expansion. This time-resolved expansion rate was combined with intraoral pressure recordings to calculate the instantaneous power required for suction feeding. Peak expansion powers for all but the weakest strikes far exceeded the maximum power capacity of the cranial muscles. The axial muscles did not merely contribute but were the primary source of suction expansion power and generated up to 95% of peak expansion power. The recruitment of axial muscle power may have been crucial for the evolution of high-power suction feeding in ray-finned fishes.

  11. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section 874.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device....

  12. 21 CFR 874.5350 - Suction antichoke device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suction antichoke device. 874.5350 Section 874.5350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5350 Suction antichoke device....

  13. Rear semicircular section of the highlift pumping station basement with ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Rear semi-circular section of the high-lift pumping station basement with remnants of the piping systems and suction wells at rear wall. - Robert B. Morse Water Filtration Plant, 10700 and 10701 Columbia Pike, Silver Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  14. Electronically controlled distributor type fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Nozaki, S.; Kobayashi, T.

    1986-05-06

    A distributor type fuel injection pump is described which consists of: a plunger barrel; a plunger received within the plunger barrel for concurrent reciprocating and rotative motion for suction, pressure delivery and distribution of fuel; a pair of cut-off ports formed in the plunger and the plunger barrel at a predetermined axial location and registrable with each other to spill pressurized fuel in the plunger into a zone under lower pressure; a communication passageway communicating a pump working chamber defined by the plunger at one end thereof with the zone under lower pressure; a fuel suction passage extending between the pump working chamber and the zone under lower pressure; the communication passageway extending between the pump working chamber and an intermediate portion of the fuel suction passage; a solenoid valve arranged across the communication passageway for blocking same; and control means for controlling means for controlling the solenoid valve to cause same to selectively assume an open position and a closed position; wherein while the plunger moves toward the pump working chamber, the solenoid valve is closed by the control means to start injection of fuel present in the pump working chamber, and upon registration of the cut-off ports with each other, the fuel injection is terminated; the solenoid valve including a valve body disposed opposite an end face of the one end of the plunger; the control means including means for selectively energizing or deenergizing the solenoid for causing the valve body to selectively assume the closed position or the open position.

  15. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Land, C. K.; Collier, F. S.; Montoya, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  16. Transition Flight Experiments on a Swept Wing With Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Collier, F. S., Jr.; Montoya, L. C.; Land, C. K.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth-depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  17. Transition flight experiments on a swept wing with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.; Land, C. K.; Collier, F. S.; Montoya, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a 30 degree swept wing with a perforated leading edge by systematically varying the location and amount of suction over a range of Mach number and Reynolds number. Suction was varied chordwise ahead of the front spar from either the front or rear direction by sealing spanwise perforated strips. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow was due to leading edge turbulence contamination or crossflow disturbance growth and/or Tollmien-Schlichting disturbance growth, depending on the test configuration, flight condition, and suction location. A state-of-the-art linear stability theory which accounts for body and streamline curvature and compressibility was used to study the boundary layer stability as suction location and magnitude varied. N-factor correlations with transition location were made for various suction configurations.

  18. Normetex Pump Alternatives Study

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Elliot A.

    2013-04-25

    A mainstay pump for tritium systems, the Normetex scroll pump, is currently unavailable because the Normetex company went out of business. This pump was an all-metal scroll pump that served tritium processing facilities very well. Current tritium system operators are evaluating replacement pumps for the Normetex pump and for general used in tritium service. An all-metal equivalent alternative to the Normetex pump has not yet been identified. 1. The ideal replacement tritium pump would be hermetically sealed and contain no polymer components or oils. Polymers and oils degrade over time when they contact ionizing radiation. 2. Halogenated polymers (containing fluorine, chlorine, or both) and oils are commonly found in pumps. These materials have many properties that surpass those of hydrocarbon-based polymers and oils, including thermal stability (higher operating temperature) and better chemical resistance. Unfortunately, they are less resistant to degradation from ionizing radiation than hydrocarbon-based materials (in general). 3. Polymers and oils can form gaseous, condensable (HF, TF), liquid, and solid species when exposed to ionizing radiation. For example, halogenated polymers form HF and HCl, which are extremely corrosive upon reaction with water. If a pump containing polymers or oils must be used in a tritium system, the system must be designed to be able to process the unwanted by-products. Design features to mitigate degradation products include filters and chemical or physical traps (eg. cold traps, oil traps). 4. Polymer components can work in tritium systems, but must be replaced regularly. Polymer components performance should be monitored or be regularly tested, and regular replacement of components should be viewed as an expected normal event. A radioactive waste stream must be established to dispose of used polymer components and oil with an approved disposal plan developed based on the facility location and its regulators. Polymers have varying

  19. Effects of Alternate Leading Edge Cutback on the Space Shuttle Main Engine Low Pressure Fuel Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A higher order cavitation oscillation observed in the SSME low pressure fuel pump has been eliminated in water flow testing of a modified subscale replica of the inducer. The low pressure pump was modified by removing the outboard sections of two opposing blades of the four-bladed inducer, blending the "cutback" regions into the blades at the leading edge and tip, and removing material on the suction sides to decrease the exposed leading edge thickness. The leading edge tips of the cutback blades were moved approximately 25 degrees from their previous locations, thereby increasing one blade to blade spacing, decreasing the second, while simultaneously moving the cutback tips downstream. The test was conducted in MSFC's inducer test loop at scaled operating conditions in degassed and filtered water. In addition to eliminating HOC across the entire scaled operating regime, rotating cavitation was suppressed while the range of both alternate blade and asymmetric cavitation were increased. These latter phenomena, and more significantly, the shifts between these cavitation modes also resulted in significant changes to the head coefficient at low cavitation numbers. Reverse flow was detected at a slightly larger flow coefficient with the cutback inducer and suction capability was reduced by approximately 1 velocity head at and above approximately 90% of the reference flow coefficient. These performance changes along with more intense reverse flow are consistent with poor flow area management and increased incidence in the cutback region. Although the test demonstrated that the inducer modification was successful at eliminating the higher order cavitation across the entire scaled operating regime, different, previously unobserved, cavitation oscillations were introduced and significant performance penalties were imposed.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Tubular Pumping Systems with Different Regulation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Honggeng; Zhang, Rentian; Deng, Dongsheng; Feng, Xusong; Yao, Linbi

    2010-06-01

    Since the flow in tubular pumping systems is basically along axial direction and passes symmetrically through the impeller, most satisfying the basic hypotheses in the design of impeller and having higher pumping system efficiency in comparison with vertical pumping system, they are being widely applied to low-head pumping engineering. In a pumping station, the fluctuation of water levels in the sump and discharge pool is most common and at most time the pumping system runs under off-design conditions. Hence, the operation of pump has to be flexibly regulated to meet the needs of flow rates, and the selection of regulation method is as important as that of pump to reduce operation cost and achieve economic operation. In this paper, the three dimensional time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are closed by RNG κ-ɛ turbulent model, and two tubular pumping systems with different regulation methods, equipped with the same pump model but with different designed system structures, are numerically simulated respectively to predict the pumping system performances and analyze the influence of regulation device and help designers make final decision in the selection of design schemes. The computed results indicate that the pumping system with blade-adjusting device needs longer suction box, and the increased hydraulic loss will lower the pumping system efficiency in the order of 1.5%. The pumping system with permanent magnet motor, by means of variable speed regulation, obtains higher system efficiency partly for shorter suction box and partly for different structure design. Nowadays, the varied speed regulation is realized by varied frequency device, the energy consumption of which is about 3˜4% of output power of the motor. Hence, when the efficiency of variable frequency device is considered, the total pumping system efficiency will probably be lower.

  1. Experimental analysis of the flow pattern of a pump turbine model in pump mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, Mark; Senn, Florian; Jaberg, Helmut; Gehrer, Arno; Sallaberger, Manfred; Widmer, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Reversible pump turbines are the only means to store primary energy in an highly efficient way. Within a short time their operation can be switched between the different operational regimes thus enhancing the stabilization of the electric grid. These qualities in combination with the operation even at off-design conditions offer a high flexibility to the energy market. However, pump turbines pass through operational regimes where their behaviour becomes unstable. One of these effects occurs when the flowrate is decreased continuously down to a minimum. This point is the physical limitation of the pump operation and is very difficult to predict properly by numerical design without a model test. The purpose of the present study is to identify the fluid mechanical phenomena leading to the occurrence of instabilities of pump turbines in pump mode. A reduced scale model of a ANDRITZ pump turbine was installed on a 4-quadrant test rig for the experimental investigation of unstable conditions in pump mode. The performed measurements are based on the IEC60193-standard. Characteristic measurements at a single guide vane opening were carried out to get a detailed insight into the instabilities in pump mode. The interaction between runner and guide vane was analysed by Particle Image Velocimetry. Furthermore, high-speed visualizations of the suction side part load flow and the suction recirculation were performed. Like never before the flow pattern in the draft tube cone became visible with the help of a high-speed camera by intentionally caused cavitation effects which allow a qualitative view on the flow pattern in the draft tube cone. Suction recirculation is observed in form of single vortices separating from each runner blade and stretching into the draft tube against the main flow direction. To find an explanation for the flow phenomena responsible for the appearance of the unstable head curve also characteristic velocity distributions on the pressure side were combined

  2. The impact analysis of the connecting pipe length and diameter on the operation of a piston hybrid power machine of positive displacement with gas suction capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherba, V. E.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Averyanov, G. S.; Surikov, V. I.; Vedruchenko, V. P.; Galdin, N. S.; Trukhanova, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The article analyzes the impact of the connecting liquid pipe length and diameter on consumables and power characteristics of the piston hybrid power machine with gas suction capacity. The following operating characteristics of the machine were constructed and analyzed: the average height of the liquid column in the jacket space; instantaneous velocity and height of the liquid column in the jacket space; the relative height of the liquid column in the jacket space; volumetric efficiency; indicator isothermal efficiency; flowrate in the pump section; relative pressure losses during suction; relative flowrate. The dependence of the instantaneous pressure in the work space and the suction space of the compressor section on the rotation angle of the crankshaft is determined for different values of the length and diameter of the connecting pipeline.

  3. The impact analysis of jacket-space geometric parameters on the characteristics of a reciprocating processor with cooling system using gas pressure fluctuations in the suction line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherba, V. E.; Grigoriev, A. V.; Vedruchenko, V. P.; Galdin, N. S.; Rybak, A. T.; Trukhanova, D. A.

    2017-08-01

    The article analyzes the impact of the jacket-space diameter and length on characteristics of a reciprocating compressor with liquid cooling system using liquid circulation gas pressure fluctuations in the suction line. The following operating characteristics of the machine were constructed and analyzed: the average height of the liquid column in the jacket space; instantaneous velocity and height of the liquid column in the jacket space; the relative height of the liquid column in the jacket space; volumetric efficiency; indicator isothermal efficiency; flowrate in the pump section; relative pressure losses during suction; relative flowrate. The dependence of the instantaneous pressure in the work space and the suction space of the compressor section on the rotation angle of the crankshaft is determined for different values of the external diameter of the jacket space.

  4. Music therapy following suctioning: four case studies.

    PubMed

    Burke, M; Walsh, J; Oehler, J; Gingras, J

    1995-10-01

    This descriptive study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of music, presented both aurally and vibrotactilely, in reducing agitation and physiological instability following a stress-producing intervention (suctioning) in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Heart rate, oxygen saturation levels, level of arousal, stressful facial expressions, and autonomic indicators were recorded for each of four preterm infants. All infants experienced a reduction in the level of arousal during the taped music intervention when compared with the control condition. Three infants spent an increased amount of time in a quiet alert state and had improved oxygen saturation levels during the vibrotactile intervention. All infants spent more time sleeping during the taped music condition than without music or with the vibrotactile intervention. Results suggest that music is effective in reducing stress-related behaviors for some infants.

  5. BMP FILTERS: UPFLOW VS. DOWNFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration methods have been found to be effective in reducing pollutant levels in stormwater. The main drawback of these methods is that the filters get clogged frequently and require periodical maintenance. In stormwater treatment, because of the cost of pumping, the filters ar...

  6. BMP FILTERS: UPFLOW VS. DOWNFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Filtration methods have been found to be effective in reducing pollutant levels in stormwater. The main drawback of these methods is that the filters get clogged frequently and require periodical maintenance. In stormwater treatment, because of the cost of pumping, the filters ar...

  7. Body ram, not suction, is the primary axis of suction-feeding diversity in spiny-rayed fishes.

    PubMed

    Longo, Sarah J; McGee, Matthew D; Oufiero, Christopher E; Waltzek, Thomas B; Wainwright, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Suction-feeding fishes exhibit diverse prey-capture strategies that vary in their relative use of suction and predator approach (ram), which is often referred to as the ram-suction continuum. Previous research has found that ram varies more than suction distance among species, such that ram accounts for most differences in prey-capture behaviors. To determine whether these findings hold at broad evolutionary scales, we collected high-speed videos of 40 species of spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha) feeding on live prey. For each strike, we calculated the contributions of suction, body ram (swimming) and jaw ram (mouth movement relative to the body) to closing the distance between predator and prey. We confirm that the contribution of suction distance is limited even in this phylogenetically and ecologically broad sample of species, with the extreme suction area of prey-capture space conspicuously unoccupied. Instead of a continuum from suction to ram, we find that variation in body ram is the major factor underlying the diversity of prey-capture strategies among suction-feeding fishes. Independent measurement of the contribution of jaw ram revealed that it is an important component of diversity among spiny-rayed fishes, with a number of ecomorphologies relying heavily on jaw ram, including pivot feeding in syngnathiforms, extreme jaw protruders and benthic sit-and-wait ambush predators. A combination of morphological and behavioral innovations has allowed fish to invade the extreme jaw ram area of prey-capture space. We caution that while two-species comparisons may support a ram-suction trade-off, these patterns do not speak to broader patterns across spiny-rayed fishes.

  8. Development of Advanced Centrifugal Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.

    2009-09-30

    A CRADA project was performed between BNL and Flowserve, California, under the auspices of Initiative for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) with the DOE support. The purpose was to jointly support a team of Russian institutes led by Kurchatov Institute to develop technology to increase operating life of centrifugal pumps. The work was performed from March 1, 2002 to September 30, 2009. The project resulted in development and validation the total cost of the sub-contract with Kurchatov Institute was $700,000, with matching fund from the industrial partner, Flowserve. The technical objective of this project is to develop advanced centrifugal pumps for the power, petroleum, chemical and water services industries by increasing the reliability of pumping equipment without a corresponding increase in life cycle cost. This major market need can be served by developing centrifugal pumps that generate only modest forces on the mechanical system even when operating under significant off-design conditions. This project is focused towards understanding the origin of hydraulic forces (both radial and axial, steady and time-dependent) and to develop design options, which reduce these forces over a broad flow range. This focus will include the force generation due to cavitation inside the pump as the operating conditions extend to low suction pressures. The results of research will reduce the inception of cavitation that leads to surface erosion and to find passive method of reducing peaks in axial thrust during whole range of flow rates.

  9. Empirical evaluation of pump inlet compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghahremani, F. G.; Rubin, S.

    1972-01-01

    Cavitation compliance was determined experimentally from pulsing tests on a number of rocket turbopumps. The primary test data used for this study are those for the Rocketdyne H-1, F-1, and J-2 oxidizer and fuel pumps employed on Saturn vehicles. The study shows that these data can be correlated by a particular form of nondimensionalization, the key feature of which is to divide the operating cavitation number or suction specific speed by its value at head breakdown. An expression is obtained for a best-fit curve for these data. Another set of test data for the Aerojet LR87 and 91 pumps can be correlated by a somewhat different nondimensional pump performance parameter, specifically by relating the cavitation number to its position between the head breakdown point and the point of zero slope of the head coefficient versus cavitation number. Recommendations are given for the estimation of the cavitation compliance for new designs in the Rocketdyne family of pumps.

  10. Dynamical effects of suction/heating on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackwelder, Ron

    1992-01-01

    The main emphasis of this quarter has been to test the effects of suction in a controlled environment with the emulated wall eddy structure. A study of the curved working wall of the test section in the Goertler Wind Tunnel showed that there were sufficient stresses within the plexiglas that cutting elongated slits for suction would probably cause the surface to develop step-type roughnesses. Thus several individual holes were initially drilled along the streamline direction in a spanwise region between two vortices. Air was withdrawn through this series of holes to provide a semi-continuous region of suction. Differing rates of suction through these holes were used to explore the effects upon the eddy structure. These preliminary results were obtained using visualization; i.e., smoke as introduced via a smoke wire into the boundary layer. Images were captured using a video camera and analyzed to determine the best suction rates. The preliminary results showed that suction has a large effect upon individual streaks of low speed fluid. Without the suction, the low speed region lying in the upwelling zone between two streamwise vortices was broken down by a secondary instability. This instability typically caused the low speed fluid marked with the smoke to oscillate from side to side in a manifestation of an inflectional instability in the spanwise direction as found and reported earlier in this research. With increasing distance downstream, the oscillation amplitude grew very rapidly until it broke down into complete turbulence.

  11. How to perform open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube.

    PubMed

    Credland, Nicola

    2016-04-27

    Rationale and key points Tracheal suction involves the removal of pulmonary secretions from the respiratory tract using negative pressure under sterile conditions. Practitioners should be aware of the indications for, and risks associated with, open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube. ▶ Respiratory assessment of the patient should be carried out to identify when tracheal suction is required. ▶ A suction pressure of 80-120mmHg is recommended, and suction should last no longer than 15 seconds. ▶ Reassurance and support should be given to the patient to minimise any discomfort and distress that might result from tracheal suction. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence-based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How you think this article will change your practice when performing open tracheal suction via an endotracheal tube. 2. How you could use this resource to educate your colleagues. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio .

  12. A Usability Comparison of Laser Suction Handpieces for Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Dauw, Casey A; Borofsky, Michael S; York, Nadya; Lingeman, James E

    2016-11-01

    The holmium laser has revolutionized the practice of minimally invasive endoscopy for kidney stones. Recently, a novel, rigid handpiece for use in percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) that couples the holmium laser with suction has been developed. To date, limited data exist regarding the usability and ergonomics of such treatment systems. We thus sought to compare surgeon-rated usability with three different suction laser handpieces in a porcine model. We performed bilateral reverse PCNL on four female domestic farm pigs. After induction of general anesthesia, percutaneous access was obtained into each kidney by using biplanar fluoroscopy and 8 mm stones (plaster of Paris) were inserted into the calix or renal pelvis for treatment. Four surgeons tested the LASER Suction Tube (Karl Storz(®), Germany), LithAssist™ (Cook(®) Medical), and Suction Handpiece (HP) (Lumenis(®), Israel) by using a combination of fragmentation (5 Joules/20 Hertz) and dusting (0.8 Joules/80 Hertz) settings on the Lumenis pulse 120 H laser. The primary outcome assessed was the ease of use of the three devices as measured by a surgeon questionnaire. A total of 15 stones were treated in 8 renal units. The mean time required for stone fragmentation was 8 min. The mean handling and suction efficiency scores were similar between devices. The Suction HP offered the best laser fiber visibility during lithotripsy. Suction laser handpieces offer an option to treat renal stones via PCNL, with limited differences noted in most surgeon ratings between devices.

  13. Heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilli, P. V.

    1982-11-01

    Heat pumps for residential/commercial space heating and hot tap water make use of free energy of direct or indirect solar heat and save from about 40 to about 70 percent of energy if compared to a conventional heating system with the same energy basis. In addition, the electrically driven compressor heat pump is able to substitute between 40% (bivalent alternative operation) to 100% (monovalent operation) of the fuel oil of an oilfired heating furnace. For average Central European conditions, solar space heating systems with high solar coverage factor show the following sequence of increasing cost effectiveness: pure solar systems (without heat pumps); heat pump assisted solar systems; solar assisted heat pump systems; subsoil/water heat pumps; air/water heat pumps; air/air heat pumps.

  14. Magnetocaloric pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1973-01-01

    Very cold liquids and gases such as helium, neon, and nitrogen can be pumped by using magnetocaloric effect. Adiabatic magnetization and demagnetization are used to alternately heat and cool slug of pumped fluid contained in closed chamber.

  15. Report of experience in 190 patients with the use of closed suction drainage in arthroscopic knee procedures.

    PubMed

    Tatari, Hasan; Dervişbey, Mahmut; Muratli, Kivanç; Ergör, Alp

    2005-09-01

    The goal of this study is to report our experience with the use of suction drainage for various arthroscopic knee procedures. One hundred and ninety patients who underwent arthroscopic knee procedures participated in the study, and were divided into two groups (Group 1: Suction drainage, Group 2: No suction drainage). For every patient, the following parameters were recorded: age, gender, operative time, tourniquet or pump use, the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain, presence of meniscal tear, type of the operative procedure, date of the operation, and presence of effusion at the follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed to detect any significant statistical difference between the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain and the other mentioned parameters in Group 1; and these patients were divided into four subgroups to facilitate the statistical evaluation between the procedures and the amount of fluid collected in the hemovac drain. The partial meniscectomy subgroup had significantly lower amounts of collected fluid when compared to the subtotal meniscectomy subgroup. Drilling of the osteochondral faces led to significantly higher amounts of fluid when compared to non-drilling cases. Use of an infusion pump during surgery and shorter operation time led to lower amounts of fluid to be collected. No case in either main group suffered from effusion at the follow-up. Our investigation demonstrated that in different arthroscopic interventions, variable amounts of fluid can be collected in the hemovac drains. Subtotal meniscal resection, drilling of the osteochondral faces and longer duration of the operation increase the amount of fluid. In cases of partial meniscal resection and/or chondral debridement, limited synovial and plica resection, suction drainage is unnecessary.

  16. ELECTROMAGNETIC PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Pulley, O.O.

    1954-08-17

    This patent reiates to electromagnetic pumps for electricity-conducting fluids and, in particular, describes several modifications for a linear conduction type electromagnetic interaction pump. The invention resides in passing the return conductor for the current traversing the fiuid in the duct back through the gap in the iron circuit of the pump. Both the maximum allowable pressure and the efficiency of a linear conduction electromagnetic pump are increased by incorporation of the present invention.

  17. Nature's pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Steven

    1994-10-01

    Although diverse in both form and function, the fluid-forcing devices in organisms have many of the capabilities and limitations of pumps of human design. Nature's pumps certainly look quite different from those of our technology, but all of them perform the same task. The author examines a few of these with an eye toward technological parallels and the two functional classes -- positive-displacement pumps and fluid-dynamic pumps.

  18. [The value of wound drainage with or without suction].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J; Hasselbach, A; Schnorr, W; Baranek, T; Letsch, R

    2005-11-01

    Even though the discussion for desisting from wound drainage has arisen, this is not reflected in the reality of surgical treatment. In more than 90% of all procedures wound drainage is used. It remains to be proven whether suction drainage actually is superior to gravity drainage in everyday use. In a random study with 200 patients it was proven that suction drainage shows no significant advantage in liquid quantum, haematoma and the frequency of complications. We conclude that the economically favourable gravity drainage can replace the more expensive suction drainage in most cases.

  19. Solar Pumped Laser

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-09-01

    conductively cooled solar pumped laser, de- signed to prototype space qualiflable level and structurally compatible with the... xenon short-arc lamp and an ellipsoidal reflector. Lamp 1 is the original lamp, obtained and used on the last program and for the first part of this...apertured to about 5 . Two neutral density filters prevent saturation of the detector and provide electrical output compatible with the meter. A reading

  20. Development of Cutting and Suction Device with Twist Blade Screw for Minimally Invasive Surgery: Evaluation of Suction Performance

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a narrow-diameter and long-bore device for minimally invasive surgery that achieves the simultaneous cutting and suction of body tissue such as the diseased part of an organ. In this paper, we propose a screw made of a thin metal plate, and we developed a prototype device using this screw. For smooth operation, the suction performance must be superior to the cutting performance. Therefore, we performed experiments and evaluated the suction performance of the developed device assuming the crushed tissue pieces correspond to a highly viscous fluid. From the results, we confirmed that the suction volume is almost proportional to the rotation speed of the screw in the low speed range, and the device has an upper limit of suction volume at a certain rotation speed. Considering practical use, its proportional speed range is suitable for the device controllability of cutting and suction volume, and the size of the device tip needs to be 1 mm or more. Based on these conditions, we are planning to examine the shape of the cutting edge for realizing efficient cutting and suction and we will complete the device. PMID:26132592

  1. Development of Cutting and Suction Device with Twist Blade Screw for Minimally Invasive Surgery: Evaluation of Suction Performance.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yusuke; Suzuki, Takashi; Tamura, Manabu; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to develop a narrow-diameter and long-bore device for minimally invasive surgery that achieves the simultaneous cutting and suction of body tissue such as the diseased part of an organ. In this paper, we propose a screw made of a thin metal plate, and we developed a prototype device using this screw. For smooth operation, the suction performance must be superior to the cutting performance. Therefore, we performed experiments and evaluated the suction performance of the developed device assuming the crushed tissue pieces correspond to a highly viscous fluid. From the results, we confirmed that the suction volume is almost proportional to the rotation speed of the screw in the low speed range, and the device has an upper limit of suction volume at a certain rotation speed. Considering practical use, its proportional speed range is suitable for the device controllability of cutting and suction volume, and the size of the device tip needs to be 1 mm or more. Based on these conditions, we are planning to examine the shape of the cutting edge for realizing efficient cutting and suction and we will complete the device.

  2. Research of the cavitation performance of the condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H. F.; Pan, Z. B.; He, M. H.; Ji, K.; Zhou, W. C.; Min, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    Condensate pump is an important part of power plant circulation systems, which is used to pump condensate water. Because the condensate water pressure is very low, the first impeller of the condensate pump must have a good cavitation performance. Numerical simulation was employed to study the first impeller cavitation performance. The first impeller was set in the condensate pump barrel, and the double suction casing was kept, the parts after the double suction casing was simplified as tube. The simplicity can guarantee the inlet and outlet conditions of the impeller. Based on the RANS and SST k - ω turbulence model, CFD software was used to simulate the condensate pump at different working conditions. The numerical simulation shows that cavitation occurred at the suction side of the blades closing to the leading edge. The cavitation performance of the impeller was predicted based on the numerical calculation. Comparing with the experimental results, the numerical simulation result is smaller than that of the experiment in small flux, and the cavitation performance trend is agreed with that of the experiments.

  3. Numerical study of cavitation flows inside a tubular pumping station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. L.; Huang, W.; Wang, F. J.; Yang, W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-11-01

    Based on RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the full cavitation model, the cavitation flows inside a low-head tubular-pump model were predicted by using the FLUENT software. For a operating case of given flow rate, cavitation happens near the inlet on the suction surfaces of the impeller blades at the initial cavitating stage, and the cavitating area spreads to the impeller passage and hub as NPSH (net positive suction head) decreases, which will affect energy transformation. For various operating cases of cavitation flows at the given flow rates, the predicted velocity and pressure distributions as well as the vapor volumetric fraction are systematically analyzed. Finally, the cavitation performance curve of the tubular-pump model is obtained by means of the further post-processing. All the comparisons and analysis can be further employed to optimize the hydraulic and structural design of the tubular pump and to guide its safe operation.

  4. OSCILLATORY PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, N.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to a pump suitable fur pumping highly corrosive gases wherein no lubricant is needed in the pumping chamber thus eliminating possible contamination sources. The chamber contains a gas inlet and outlet in each side, with a paddle like piston suspended by a sylphon seal between these pcrts. An external arrangement causes the paddle to oscillate rapidly between the ports, alternately compressing and exhausting the gas trapped on each side of the paddle. Since the paddle does nnt touch the chamber sides at any point, no lubricant is required. This pump is useful for pumping large quantities of uranium hexafluorine.

  5. Influence of localised double suction on a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of localised suction applied through a pair of porous wall strips on a turbulent boundary layer have been quantified through the measurements of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses. The results indicate that the use of second strip extends the pseudo-relaminarisation zone but also reduces the overshoot in the longitudinal and normal r.m.s. velocities. While the minimum r.m.s. occurs at x/δo=3.0 (one strip) and x/δo=12 (two strips), the reduction observed for the latter case is larger. Relative to no suction, the turbulence level is modified by suction and the effect is enhanced with double suction. This increased effectiveness reflects the fact that the second strip acts on a boundary layer whose near-wall active motion has been seriously weakened by the first strip.

  6. Flow Measurements in a Suction Sump by UVP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funaki, Jiro; Neya, Masashi; Hattori, Masakatsu; Tanigawa, Hirochika; Hirata, Katsuya

    In the present study, to reveal the air entrainment mechanism into a suction pipe in a suction sump, the authors conduct flow-velocity measurements by UDM (Ultrasonic Doppler Method). Here, we consider the simplest geometry as a suction sump, that is, a straight channel with rectangle-cross section and a simple suction pipe near the end of the channel. Ultrasonic transducers are fixed outside the side, bottom and back walls with right/near-right angles and, we get three-dimensional time-mean velocity distributions and equi-vorticity contours. At first, measurement accuracy is checked by comparing velocity profiles by UDM with hydrogen bubble method. As a result, the authors show typical flow fields in the sump, and show the relation between flow pattern and air entrainment. Especially, we compare two cases where the air entrainment is often observed.

  7. Cost-effectiveness and safety of reusable tracheal suction tubes.

    PubMed

    Nanta, Penjan; Senarat, Wilawan; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Danchaivijitr, Somwang

    2005-12-01

    To evaluate whether the repetitive use of disposable tracheal suction tubes is cost-effective and safe over the single use. The cost intrinsic to the washing, cleaning, re-sterilization by ethylene oxide gas, and processing was determined and compared to the cost generated by disposable tubes. The reused disposable suction tubes were also determined for their properties in physical characters and probable contamination and damages. The evaluation showed that cost from single-use disposable suction tubes (8.66 baht) was cheaper than expenses generated from processing steps for recycling of disposable tubes (9.92 baht). The use of a disposable tube only once should minimize the risks posed by the use of the potentially unsafe reused disposable tubes both to the patients and health care workers. Recycling of tracheal suction tubes was neither cost-effective nor safe.

  8. FILTERED WATER RESERVOIR, LOOKING NORTHWEST. A CORNER OF THE NEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FILTERED WATER RESERVOIR, LOOKING NORTHWEST. A CORNER OF THE NEW PUMPING STATION IS VISIBLE AT RIGHT. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  9. Radial Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) Guided Suction Catheter-Biopsy in Histological Diagnosis of Peripheral Pulmonary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Carapic, Vladimir; Kovacevic, Tomi; Stojanovic, Goran; Panjkovic, Milana; Kioumis, Ioannis; Darwiche, Kaid; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Stratakos, Grigoris; Tsavlis, Drosos; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Pitsiou, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Sachpekidis, Nikos; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Perin, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Background: EBUS guided trans-bronchial biopsy became routine in diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPL). Suction catheter-biopsy is a technique for obtaining a tissue sample from peripheral lung parenchyma. Aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic efficiency, feasibility and safety of EBUS guided suction catheter-biopsy (SCB) in comparison to trans-bronchial biopsy (TBB) in diagnosis of PPL. The main intention was to demonstrate non-inferiority of the technique over trans-bronchial biopsy, especially when used under navigation of the EBUS. Methods: Radial EBUS probe (UM-3R, Olympus Co, Japan.) without guiding sheath was used to navigate suction catheter and TBB forceps to the PPL. The catheter was connected to the collection canister via vacuum pump. The SCB specimens were fixed with 10% buffered formalin. Results: There were 168 patients enrolled in this study; 69.9% males and 30.1% females. Main lesion diameter was 4.1±1.9 cm. Majority of patients, 131(77.9%) were diagnosed with lung cancer. Per-biopsy calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for EBUS-SCB were 92.4%, 100%, 100% and 67.7%, respectively. Corresponding values for EBUS-TBB were 92.3%, 100%, 100% and 69.7%. Only the size of the lesion significantly influenced (p=0.005) diagnostic performance. Complications occurred in 2 patients; one pneumothorax and one excessive bleeding. Conclusion: EBUS guided SCB is efficient, feasible and safe in diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer. The technique is complementary to trans-bronchial biopsy. PMID:26722354

  10. Displacement of oropharyngeal structures during suction-swallowing cycles.

    PubMed

    Engelke, W; Glombek, J; Psychogios, M; Schneider, S; Ellenberger, D; Santander, P

    2014-07-01

    Suction ability plays an important role in supporting oral nutrition and needs special care following neurological disorders and tumor-associated defects. However, the details of suction are still poorly understood. The present study evaluates displacement of orofacial structures during suction and deglutition based on manometric controlled MRI. Nine healthy subjects were scanned wearing an intraoral mouthpiece for water intake by suction and subsequent swallowing. Suction-swallowing cycles were identified by intraoral negative pressure. Midsagittal MRI slices (3 T; temporal resolution 0.53 s) were analyzed at rest, suction and pharyngeal swallowing. The mandibular displacement was measured as the distance between the anterior nasal spine and the inferior point of the mandible. Following areas were defined: subpalatal compartment (SCA), retrolingual (RLA), epipharyngeal (EPA) and mouth floor area (MFA). During rest, an average distance of 7 cm was observed between the mandibular measurement points. The measured SCA was 3.67 cm(2), the RLA 6.98 cm(2), the EPA 9.00 cm(2) and the MFA 15.21 cm(2) (average values). At the end of suction, the mandibular distance reduces (to 6.88 cm), the SCA increases significantly (to 5.96 cm(2); p = 0.0002), the RLA decreases (to 6.45 cm(2)), the EPA increases (to 10.59 cm(2)) and the MFA decreases (to 15.02 cm(2)). During deglutition, the mandible lifted significantly (to 6.81 cm; p = 0.0276), the SCA reduced to zero, the RLA was not measurable, the EPA reduces significantly (to 3.01 cm(2); p < 0.0001) and the MFA increases (to 16.36 cm(2)). According to these observations, a combined displacement of the tongue in an anteroposterior direction with active tongue dorsum-velum contact appears to be the predominant activity during suction and responsible for the expansion of the subpalatal area.

  11. Incidence and management of suction loss in refractive lenticule extraction.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chee Wai; Chan, Cordelia; Tan, Donald; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-12-01

    To describe the incidence, management, and outcomes of suction loss in refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx). Tertiary eye hospital. Retrospective case series. All patients who experienced suction loss during refractive lenticule extraction from March 9, 2010, to August 5, 2013, were evaluated preoperatively, including slitlamp biomicroscopy, fundoscopy, corneal topography, ultrasound pachymetry, manifest and cycloplegic refractions, and measurement of uncorrected (UDVA) and corrected (CDVA) distance visual acuities. Patients were followed at predetermined timepoints. At each follow-up visit, the UDVA and CDVA were measured and slitlamp biomicroscopy was performed. Manifest refraction was measured 1 and 3 months postoperatively. During the study period, 340 refractive lenticule extractions were performed. The overall cumulative incidence of suction loss was 3.2%. The incidence of suction loss was 4.3% (2/46) for femtosecond lenticule extraction, 4.4% (8/183) for small-incision lenticule extraction, and 0.9% (1/109) for pseudo small-incision lenticule extraction. Of the 11 eyes in which suction loss occurred, 8 (72.7%) had a UDVA of 20/30 or better and 9 (81.8%) had a spherical equivalent within ± 0.5 diopter of emmetropia at 3 months. Suction loss occurred in 4 eyes during the posterior lenticule cut, in 5 eyes during the anterior lenticule cut, and in 2 eyes during the lamellar flap cut. In 9 of these (81.8%), suction was reapplied and the procedure was completed without further complications. The incidence of suction loss during refractive lenticule extraction was relatively low. Good visual outcomes were achieved with appropriate management. Copyright © 2014 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The generation of side force by distributed suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Leonard; Hong, John

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an approximate analysis of the generation of side force on a cylinder placed horizontal to the flow direction by the application of distributed suction on the rearward side of the cylinder. Relationships are derived between the side force coefficients and the required suction coefficients necessary to maintain attached flow on one side of the cylinder, thereby inducing circulation around the cylinder and a corresponding side force.

  13. Swimming muscles power suction feeding in largemouth bass

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Ariel L.; Roberts, Thomas J.; Brainerd, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    Most aquatic vertebrates use suction to capture food, relying on rapid expansion of the mouth cavity to accelerate water and food into the mouth. In ray-finned fishes, mouth expansion is both fast and forceful, and therefore requires considerable power. However, the cranial muscles of these fishes are relatively small and may not be able to produce enough power for suction expansion. The axial swimming muscles of these fishes also attach to the feeding apparatus and have the potential to generate mouth expansion. Because of their large size, these axial muscles could contribute substantial power to suction feeding. To determine whether suction feeding is powered primarily by axial muscles, we measured the power required for suction expansion in largemouth bass and compared it to the power capacities of the axial and cranial muscles. Using X-ray reconstruction of moving morphology (XROMM), we generated 3D animations of the mouth skeleton and created a dynamic digital endocast to measure the rate of mouth volume expansion. This time-resolved expansion rate was combined with intraoral pressure recordings to calculate the instantaneous power required for suction feeding. Peak expansion powers for all but the weakest strikes far exceeded the maximum power capacity of the cranial muscles. The axial muscles did not merely contribute but were the primary source of suction expansion power and generated up to 95% of peak expansion power. The recruitment of axial muscle power may have been crucial for the evolution of high-power suction feeding in ray-finned fishes. PMID:26100863

  14. Optically transparent multi-suction electrode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Nagarah, John M.; Stowasser, Annette; Parker, Rell L.; Asari, Hiroki; Wagenaar, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Multielectrode arrays (MEAs) allow for acquisition of multisite electrophysiological activity with submillisecond temporal resolution from neural preparations. The signal to noise ratio from such arrays has recently been improved by substrate perforations that allow negative pressure to be applied to the tissue; however, such arrays are not optically transparent, limiting their potential to be combined with optical-based technologies. We present here multi-suction electrode arrays (MSEAs) in quartz that yield a substantial increase in the detected number of units and in signal to noise ratio from mouse cortico-hippocampal slices and mouse retina explants. This enables the visualization of stronger cross correlations between the firing rates of the various sources. Additionally, the MSEA's transparency allows us to record voltage sensitive dye activity from a leech ganglion with single neuron resolution using widefield microscopy simultaneously with the electrode array recordings. The combination of enhanced electrical signals and compatibility with optical-based technologies should make the MSEA a valuable tool for investigating neuronal circuits. PMID:26539078

  15. A review of contamination related hydraulic pump problems in Japanese injection molding, extrusion and rubber molding industries

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Akira

    1997-12-31

    It is known that contamination of hydraulic oil is one of the major factors causing hydraulic pump problems. Many test reports on contaminant sensibility of hydraulic pumps have been published with new oil and standard dusts but the results of these tests could not guarantee to predict in-service performance. This report describes three cases investigated. The first investigation was done on hydraulic pumps used for injection molding machines application. The causes of pump problems were examined by analysis of maintenance records. The second investigation was performed to determine overhaul frequency of hydraulic pumps used for aluminum extruders. By introducing a new method of hydraulic oil management which reduces oil oxidation products, pump life was extended from 3,000 to 15,000 hours. The third investigation was done to determine the relationship between pump problems and contamination levels of hydraulic oils of 411 rubber molding machines for 20 months. The results showed that pump problems appeared at half the recommended oil lifetimes for these fluids. These studies showed that the cause of pump problems was clogging of suction strainers leading to pump cavitation. The clogged strainers were washed with several different solvents to identify the causes of suction strainer clogging. Clogging of suction strainers was attributable to sticky oxidation products of hydraulic oils. Electrostatic oil cleaners removed not only micron range solid particles bu also submicron size particles. Hydraulic pump problems have been substantially reduced by introducing this new method of contamination control.

  16. Suction blister fluid as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins.

    PubMed

    Kool, Jeroen; Reubsaet, Léon; Wesseldijk, Feikje; Maravilha, Raquel T; Pinkse, Martijn W; D'Santos, Clive S; van Hilten, Jacobus J; Zijlstra, Freek J; Heck, Albert J R

    2007-10-01

    Early diagnosis is important for effective disease management. Measurement of biomarkers present at the local level of the skin could be advantageous in facilitating the diagnostic process. The analysis of the proteome of suction blister fluid, representative for the interstitial fluid of the skin, is therefore a desirable first step in the search for potential biomarkers involved in biological pathways of particular diseases. Here, we describe a global analysis of the suction blister fluid proteome as potential body fluid for biomarker proteins. The suction blister fluid proteome was compared with a serum proteome analyzed using identical protocols. By using stringent criteria allowing less than 1% false positive identifications, we were able to detect, using identical experimental conditions and amount of starting material, 401 proteins in suction blister fluid and 240 proteins in serum. As a major result of our analysis we construct a prejudiced list of 34 proteins, relatively highly and uniquely detected in suction blister fluid as compared to serum, with established and putative characteristics as biomarkers. We conclude that suction blister fluid might potentially serve as a good alternative biomarker body fluid for diseases that involve the skin.

  17. Control of Supersonic Boundary Layers Using Steady Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2006-01-01

    Control of supersonic boundary layers using steady suction through a series of very small two-dimensional strips is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 1.8. The mean flow induced by rows of suction holes is also computed. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variationdiminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations for the two-dimensional cases are performed at suction coefficients 0.001 and 0.002 to investigate the stabilizing effects of suction. The simulation showed that a series of shock waves are generated at the slots. The stability results showed that the total amplification is reduced up to the end of the computational domain. However, the growth rates become larger at downstream distances away from the suction region. The computations for the suction holes showed the generation of Mach waves from each hole and the formation of longitudinal vortices.

  18. Effect of Feeding and Suction on Gastric Impedance Spectroscopy Measurements.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Nohra E; Sánchez-Miranda, Gustavo; Sacristan, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    A specific device and system has been developed and tested for clinical monitoring of gastric mucosal reactance in the critically ill as an early warning of splanchnic hypoperfusion associated with shock and sepsis. This device has been proven effective in clinical trials and is expected to become commercially available next year. The system uses a combination nasogastric tube and impedance spectroscopy probe as a single catheter. Because this device has a double function, the question is: Does enteral feeding or suction affect the gastric reactance measurements? This study was designed to evaluate the effect of feeding and suction on the measurement of gastric impedance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers. Impedance spectra were obtained from the gastric wall epithelia of 18 subjects. The spectra were measured for each of the following conditions: postinsertion of gastric probe, during active suction, postactive suction, and during enteral feeding (236 ml of nutritional supplement). Impedance spectra were reproducible in all volunteers under all conditions tested. There was a slight increase in impedance parameters after suction, and a decrease in impedance after feeding; however, these observed differences were insignificant compared to patient-to-patient variability, and truly negligible compared with previously observed changes associated with splanchnic ischemia in critically ill patients. Our results demonstrate that suction or feeding when using the impedance spectro-metry probe/nasogastric tube does not significantly interfere with gastric impedance spectrometer measurements.

  19. Endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns: an integrative literature review

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Roberta Lins; Tsuzuki, Lucila Midori; Carvalho, Marcos Giovanni Santos

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based practices search for the best available scientific evidence to support problem solving and decision making. Because of the complexity and amount of information related to health care, the results of methodologically sound scientific papers must be integrated by performing literature reviews. Although endotracheal suctioning is the most frequently performed invasive procedure in intubated newborns in neonatal intensive care units, few Brazilian studies of good methodological quality have examined this practice, and a national consensus or standardization of this technique is lacking. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to review secondary studies on the subject to establish recommendations for endotracheal suctioning in intubated newborns and promote the adoption of best-practice concepts when conducting this procedure. An integrative literature review was performed, and the recommendations of this study are to only perform endotracheal suctioning in newborns when there are signs of tracheal secretions and to avoid routinely performing the procedure. In addition, endotracheal suctioning should be conducted by at least two people, the suctioning time should be less than 15 seconds, the negative suction pressure should be below 100 mmHg, and hyperoxygenation should not be used on a routine basis. If indicated, oxygenation is recommended with an inspired oxygen fraction value that is 10 to 20% greater than the value of the previous fraction, and it should be performed 30 to 60 seconds before, during and 1 minute after the procedure. Saline instillation should not be performed routinely, and the standards for invasive procedures must be respected. PMID:26465249

  20. Liquid helium centrifugal pump characteristics from 80 g/s to 1200 g/s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pengo, R.; Junker, S.; ten Kate, H. H. J.

    2010-01-01

    The large amount of data collected from three different centrifugal liquid helium pumps tested, namely with 80, 600 and 1200 g/s nominal mass flow are reviewed. The data include the analysis of the characteristic curves, their total efficiencies, their Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) and the slip factor. The 1200 g/s pumps tested are of the full emission type, with curved blades, whilst the other pumps have straight blades. The pumps were also tested at different rotary speeds. The pumps were manufactured by Barber & Nichols (Denver, USA).

  1. In Vitro Testing of a Novel Blood Pump Designed for Temporary Extracorporeal Support

    PubMed Central

    Spurlock, DJ; Ranney, DN; Fracz, E; Mazur, DE; Bartlett, RH; Haft, JW

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal blood pumps are used as temporary ventricular assist devices or for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The ideal pump would be intrinsically self-regulating, carry no risk of cavitation or excessive inlet suction, be afterload insensitive, and valveless thus reducing thrombogenicity. Currently used technology, including roller, centrifugal, and pneumatic pulsatile pumps, does not meet these requirements. We studied a non-occlusive peristaltic pump (M-Pump) in two mock circulatory loops, and compared the performance to a frequently used centrifugal pump and a modified prototype of the M-Pump (the BioVAD). The simple resistance loop consisted of the investigated pump, a fixed height reservoir at 150 mmHg, and a variable inflow reservoir. The pulsatile circulation utilized a mock patient simulator with adjustable resistance elements connected to a pneumatic pulsatile pump. The M-Pump intrinsically regulated flow with changing preload, was afterload insensitive, and did not cavitate, unlike the centrifugal pump. The BioVAD also demonstrated these features, and could augment output with use of vacuum assistance. A non-occlusive peristaltic pump may be superior for short term extracorporeal circulatory assist by mitigating risks of excessive inlet suction, afterload sensitivity, and thrombosis. PMID:22236624

  2. In vitro testing of a novel blood pump designed for temporary extracorporeal support.

    PubMed

    Spurlock, David J; Ranney, David N; Fracz, Emilia M; Mazur, Daniel E; Bartlet, R H; Haft, Jonathan W

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal blood pumps are used as temporary ventricular assist devices or for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The ideal pump would be intrinsically self-regulating, carry no risk of cavitation or excessive inlet suction, be afterload insensitive, and valveless thus reducing thrombogenicity. Currently used technology, including roller, centrifugal, and pneumatic pulsatile pumps, does not meet these requirements. We studied a nonocclusive peristaltic pump (M-Pump) in two mock circulatory loops and compared the performance to a frequently used centrifugal pump and a modified prototype of the M-Pump (the BioVAD). The simple resistance loop consisted of the investigated pump, a fixed height reservoir at 150 mm Hg, and a variable inflow reservoir. The pulsatile circulation used a mock patient simulator with adjustable resistance elements connected to a pneumatic pulsatile pump. The M-Pump intrinsically regulated flow with changing preload, was afterload insensitive, and did not cavitate, unlike the centrifugal pump. The BioVAD also demonstrated these features and could augment output with the use of vacuum assistance. A nonocclusive peristaltic pump may be superior for short-term extracorporeal circulatory assist by mitigating risks of excessive inlet suction, afterload sensitivity, and thrombosis.

  3. Results of investigations of failures of geothermal direct-use well pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1994-12-01

    Failures of 13 geothermal direct-use well pumps were investigated and information obtained about an additional 5 pumps that have been in service up to 23 years, but have not failed. Pumps with extra long lateral and variable-speed drives had the highest correlation with reduced time in service. There appears to be at least circumstantial evidence that recirculation may be a cause of reduced pump life. If recirculation is a cause of pump failures, pump specifiers will need to be more aware of minimum flow conditions as well as maximum flow conditions when specifying pumps. Over-sizing pumps and the tendency to specify pumps with high flow and low Net Positive Suction Head (NPSH) could lead to increased problems with recirculation.

  4. Thermally Actuated Hydraulic Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack; Ross, Ronald; Chao, Yi

    2008-01-01

    Thermally actuated hydraulic pumps have been proposed for diverse applications in which direct electrical or mechanical actuation is undesirable and the relative slowness of thermal actuation can be tolerated. The proposed pumps would not contain any sliding (wearing) parts in their compressors and, hence, could have long operational lifetimes. The basic principle of a pump according to the proposal is to utilize the thermal expansion and contraction of a wax or other phase-change material in contact with a hydraulic fluid in a rigid chamber. Heating the chamber and its contents from below to above the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to expand significantly, thus causing a substantial increase in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid out of the chamber. Similarly, cooling the chamber and its contents from above to below the melting temperature of the phase-change material would cause the material to contract significantly, thus causing a substantial decrease in hydraulic pressure and/or a substantial displacement of hydraulic fluid into the chamber. The displacement of the hydraulic fluid could be used to drive a piston. The figure illustrates a simple example of a hydraulic jack driven by a thermally actuated hydraulic pump. The pump chamber would be a cylinder containing encapsulated wax pellets and containing radial fins to facilitate transfer of heat to and from the wax. The plastic encapsulation would serve as an oil/wax barrier and the remaining interior space could be filled with hydraulic oil. A filter would retain the encapsulated wax particles in the pump chamber while allowing the hydraulic oil to flow into and out of the chamber. In one important class of potential applications, thermally actuated hydraulic pumps, exploiting vertical ocean temperature gradients for heating and cooling as needed, would be used to vary hydraulic pressures to control buoyancy in undersea research

  5. Suction-generated noise in an anatomic silicon ear model.

    PubMed

    Luxenberger, Wolfgang; Lahousen, T; Walch, C

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate noise levels generated during micro-suction aural toilet using an anatomic silicon ear model. It is an experimental study. In an anatomic ear model made of silicone, the eardrum was replaced by a 1-cm diameter microphone of a calibrated sound-level measuring device. Ear wax was removed using the sucker of a standard ENT treatment unit (Atmos Servant 5(®)). Mean and peak sound levels during the suction procedure were recorded with suckers of various diameters (Fergusson-Frazier 2.7-4 mm as well as Rosen 1.4-2.5 mm). Average noise levels during normal suction in a distance of 1 cm in front of the eardrum ranged between 97 and 103.5 dB(A) (broadband noise). Peak noise levels reached 118 dB(A). During partial obstruction of the sucker by cerumen or dermal flakes, peak noise levels reached 146 dB(A). Peak noise levels observed during the so-called clarinet phenomena were independent of the diameter or type of suckers used. Although micro-suction aural toilet is regarded as an established, widespread and usually safe method to clean the external auditory canal, some caution seems advisable. The performance of long-lasting suction periods straight in front of the eardrum without sound-protecting earwax between sucker and eardrum should be avoided. In particular, when clarinet phenomena are occurring (as described above), the suction procedure should be aborted immediately. In the presence of dermal flakes blocking the auditory canal, cleaning with micro-forceps or other non-suctioning instruments might represent a reasonable alternative.

  6. Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fang C [Knoxville, TN; Mei, Viung C [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-10-22

    A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

  7. Impulse Pump

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-17

    APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention relates to an impulse pump for generating...impulse pump 15. The sleeve bearings 98 are affixed to the head block 90 to ease axial motion while the plunger 72 is under torsional loads. [0041

  8. Dielectric elastomer actuators for octopus inspired suction cups.

    PubMed

    Follador, M; Tramacere, F; Mazzolai, B

    2014-09-25

    Suction cups are often found in nature as attachment strategy in water. Nevertheless, the application of the artificial counterpart is limited by the dimension of the actuators and their usability in wet conditions. A novel design for the development of a suction cup inspired by octopus suckers is presented. The main focus of this research was on the modelling and characterization of the actuation unit, and a first prototype of the suction cup was realized as a proof of concept. The actuation of the suction cup is based on dielectric elastomer actuators. The presented device works in a wet environment, has an integrated actuation system, and is soft. The dimensions of the artificial suction cups are comparable to proximal octopus suckers, and the attachment mechanism is similar to the biological counterpart. The design approach proposed for the actuator allows the definition of the parameters for its development and for obtaining a desired pressure in water. The fabricated actuator is able to produce up to 6 kPa of pressure in water, reaching the maximum pressure in less than 300 ms.

  9. Octopus-like suction cups: from natural to artificial solutions.

    PubMed

    Tramacere, F; Follador, M; Pugno, N M; Mazzolai, B

    2015-05-13

    Octopus suckers are able to attach to all nonporous surfaces and generate a very strong attachment force. The well-known attachment features of this animal result from the softness of the sucker tissues and the surface morphology of the portion of the sucker that is in contact with objects or substrates. Unlike artificial suction cups, octopus suckers are characterized by a series of radial grooves that increase the area subjected to pressure reduction during attachment. In this study, we constructed artificial suction cups with different surface geometries and tested their attachment performances using a pull-off setup. First, smooth suction cups were obtained for casting; then, sucker surfaces were engraved with a laser cutter. As expected, for all the tested cases, the engraving treatment enhanced the attachment performance of the elastomeric suction cups compared with that of the smooth versions. Moreover, the results indicated that the surface geometry with the best attachment performance was the geometry most similar to octopus sucker morphology. The results obtained in this work can be utilized to design artificial suction cups with higher wet attachment performance.

  10. [Is suction drainage necessary in elective total hip arthroplasty?].

    PubMed

    Major, Tibor; Bikov, András; Holnapy, Gergely; Bejek, Zoltán; Bakos, Bernadett; Szendrői, Miklós; Skaliczki, Gábor

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have been published which questioned the use of suction drain during elective hip arthroplasty. In this prospective study the authors examined how the use of suction drainage affected complications related to perioperative blood loss and hemorrhage in patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty. Eighty-six patients undergoing elective hip arthroplasty were divided into two groups. In 54 patients ("drain" group) suction drains were used during operation, whereas in 32 patients no suction drain was applied. Perioperative blood loss, use of tranexamic acid, method of thrombosis prophylaxis, transfusion requirement, incidental postoperative hemorrhage, septic complications, and all other postoperative complications were recorded. Perioperative blood loss was affected with the use of tranexamic acid but not with the use of drainage (p = 0.94). Patients without the use of drain showed a tendency of lower transfusion requirement (p = 0.08). There was no correlation between any complications and the use of drainage. In accordance with published results the authors conclude that the routine use of suction drainage during elective hip arthroplasty is not definitely necessary. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(29), 1171-1176.

  11. Effect of suction and blowing on boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, W. S.; Reed, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of wall blowing and suction on boundary-layer stability and transition are studied on a flat plate. Titanium panels, in which 0.063 mm diameter holes were drilled on 0.635 mm centers, are inserted on the plate. Suction level and distribution are variable. Disturbances are introduced by means of a vibrating ribbon and measurements of both mean-flow and disturbance-flow velocities are made with a hot wire. Disturbance amplitudes are measured as a function of Reynolds number, frequency, and suction characteristics and compared with the previous Dynapore results of Reynolds and Saric. Transition measurements under natural and forced conditions are also made. The stabilizing effects of suction are documented. It is also shown that very high local flow rates through the suction holes (which approach a hole Reynolds number of 300) do not destabilize the flow. On the other hand, weak blowing lowers the transition Reynolds number but is found not to cause serious problems.

  12. Pumping system

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a gas-oil production system for pumping formation fluid in a well through a tubing string within which a down hole pump connects to a hydraulic stroking device through a rod string providing the pump including a plunger reciprocally driven by the hydraulic stroking device toward an upper terminal position during a plunger upstroke. The rod string normally supports the weight of a column of fluid and toward a lower terminal position at the end of a plunger downstroke during which the weight of the column fluid is normally transferred to the tubing string through fluid within the pump. The method for detecting when the well is pumped off comprises: supplying working fluid to the hydraulic stroking device to raise the hydraulic stroking device and thereby move the plunger from the lower terminal position to the upper terminal position; and removing the working fluid at a controlled rate from the hydraulic stroking device.

  13. Ferroelectric Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalink, Antony, Jr. (Inventor); Hellbaum, Richard F. (Inventor); Rohrbach, Wayne W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A ferroelectric pump has one or more variable volume pumping chambers internal to a housing. Each chamber has at least one wall comprising a dome shaped internally prestressed ferroelectric actuator having a curvature and a dome height that varies with an electric voltage applied between an inside and outside surface of the actuator. A pumped medium flows into and out of each pumping chamber in response to displacement of the ferroelectric actuator. The ferroelectric actuator is mounted within each wall and isolates each ferroelectric actuator from the pumped medium, supplies a path for voltage to be applied to each ferroelectric actuator, and provides for positive containment of each ferroelectric actuator while allowing displacement of the entirety of each ferroelectric actuator in response to the applied voltage.

  14. Axial Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor); Akkerman, James W. (Inventor); Aber, Gregory S. (Inventor); VanDamm, George Arthur (Inventor); Bacak, James W. (Inventor); Svejkovsky, Paul A. (Inventor); Benkowski, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A rotary blood pump includes a pump housing for receiving a flow straightener, a rotor mounted on rotor bearings and having an inducer portion and an impeller portion, and a diffuser. The entrance angle, outlet angle, axial and radial clearances of blades associated with the flow straightener, inducer portion, impeller portion and diffuser are optimized to minimize hemolysis while maintaining pump efficiency. The rotor bearing includes a bearing chamber that is filled with cross-linked blood or other bio-compatible material. A back emf integrated circuit regulates rotor operation and a microcomputer may be used to control one or more back emf integrated circuits. A plurality of magnets are disposed in each of a plurality of impeller blades with a small air gap. A stator may be axially adjusted on the pump housing to absorb bearing load and maximize pump efficiency.

  15. Development of a reliable automatic speed control system for rotary blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Vollkron, Michael; Schima, Heinrich; Huber, Leopold; Benkowski, Robert; Morello, Gino; Wieselthaler, Georg

    2005-11-01

    Axial blood pumps have been very successfully introduced into the arena of prolonged clinical support. However, they do not offer inherent load-responsive mechanisms for adjusting pumping performance to venous return and changes in physiologic requirements of the patient. To provide for these adjustments we developed an algorithm for demand-responsive pump control based on a reliable suction detection system. A PC-based system that analyzes pump performance based on available flow, heart rate and short-term performance history was developed. The physician defines levels of "desired flow" at rest and during exercise, depending on heart rate. In case this desired flow cannot be maintained due to limited venous return, the maximal available flow level is determined from an analysis of the actual pump data (flow, speed and power consumption). An expert system continuously checks the flow signal for any indication of suction. Periodic speed variations then adapt pump performance to the patient's condition. First, stability and functionality were proven under various settings in vitro. The algorithms were then tested in 15 patients in intensive care, in the standard ward, and during bicycle exercise. The system reacted properly to demand changes, at exercise level, in response to coughing and at various Valsalva maneuvers. Suction could also be successfully prevented during severe arrhythmia and in patients with critical cardiac geometry. Exercise tests showed decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure (-22 +/- 9.9%) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (-42 +/- 18.54%), and an increase in pump flow (19 +/- 9.5%) and workload (8 +/- 6.1%), all when compared with constant-speed pumping. A closed-loop control system equipped with an expert system for reliable suction detection was developed that improves response to change in venous return for rotary pump recipients. The system was robust, stable and safe under a wide range of everyday living conditions.

  16. Safety System for Controlling Fluid Flow into a Suction Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A safety system includes a sleeve fitted within a pool's suction line at the inlet thereof. An open end of the sleeve is approximately aligned with the suction line's inlet. The sleeve terminates with a plate that resides within the suction line. The plate has holes formed therethrough. A housing defining a plurality of distinct channels is fitted in the sleeve so that the distinct channels lie within the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels has a first opening on one end thereof and a second opening on another end thereof. The second openings reside in the sleeve. Each of the distinct channels is at least approximately three feet in length. The first openings are in fluid communication with the water in the pool, and are distributed around a periphery of an area of the housing that prevents coverage of all the first openings when a human interacts therewith.

  17. The Effect of Air Exposure and Suction on Blood Cell Activation & Hemolysis in an In-Vitro Cardiotomy Suction Model

    PubMed Central

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed M; Toomasian, Cory J; Toomasian, John M; Ulysse, Guerlain; Major, Terry; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) elicits a systemic inflammatory response. The cause may include surface-induced leucocyte activation and hemolysis. An in-vitro study was designed to describe the effects of both suction and an air-blood interface independently, and in combination on leucocyte and platelet activation, and hemolysis in an in-vitro model. Fresh human blood was drawn and tested under 4 different conditions including: control (A), 10 minutes of − 600 mmHg suction (B), 10 minutes of blood exposure to room air at 100 ml/min (C), and 10 min of simultaneous suction and air flow (D). Samples were analyzed by flow cytometry (platelets and leucocytes) and plasma free hemoglobin (PFHb). Leucocyte CD11b expression and platelet P-selectin (CD62P) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Compared to baseline, granulocytes were significantly activated by air (Group C, p=0.0029), and combination (Group D, p=.0123) but not by suction alone (Group B). Monocytes and platelets were not significantly activated in any group. The PFHb increased significantly in Group C (p<0.001) and Group D (p<0.001). This study suggests that the inflammatory response and associated hemolysis during CPB may be related to air exposure, which could be reduced by minimizing the air exposure of air to blood during cardiotomy suction. PMID:23896771

  18. Effect of air exposure and suction on blood cell activation and hemolysis in an in vitro cardiotomy suction model.

    PubMed

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed M; Toomasian, Cory J; Toomasian, John M; Ulysse, Guerlain; Major, Terry; Bartlett, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) elicits a systemic inflammatory response. The cause may include surface-induced leukocyte activation and hemolysis. A study was designed to describe the effects of both suction and an air-blood interface independently and in combination on leukocyte and platelet activation, and hemolysis in an in vitro model. Fresh human blood was drawn and tested in four different conditions including control (A), 10 minutes of -600 mm Hg suction (B), 10 minutes of blood exposure to room air at 100 ml/min (C), and 10 minutes of simultaneous suction and air flow (D). Samples were analyzed by flow cytometry (platelets and leukocytes) and plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb). Leukocyte CD11b expression and platelet P-selectin (CD62P) were analyzed by flow cytometry. In comparison with baseline, granulocytes were significantly activated by air (group C, p = 0.0029) and combination (group D, p = 0.0123) but not by suction alone (group B). Monocytes and platelets were not significantly activated in any group. The PFHb increased significantly in group C (p < 0.001) and group D (p < 0.001). This study suggests that the inflammatory response and associated hemolysis during CPB may be related to air exposure, which could be reduced by minimizing the air exposure of air to blood during cardiotomy suction.

  19. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  20. Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Flow in an Axial Rotor and Impeller for Large Storage Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosioc, A. I.; Muntean, S.; Draghici, I.; Anton, L. E.

    2016-11-01

    In hydropower systems among hydropower plants there are integrated pumping stations (PS). In order to ensure higher flow rate, the pumps have constructive differences besides regular. Consequently, the complex shape of the suction-elbow with symmetric inlet generates an unsteady flow which is ingested by impeller. These phenomena's also generate stronger unsteady flow conditions, such as stall, wakes, turbulence and pressure fluctuations, which affect the overall mechanical behaviour of the pump with vibration, noise and radial and axial forces on the rotor. Alternatively, an axial rotor can be installed in front of the impeller. In this case, the flow non-uniformity will be decreased and the static pressure will be increased at the impeller inlet. Consequently, the efficiency behaviour practically remains unchanged while the cavitational behaviour is improved. From the assembly between axial rotor and centrifugal impeller, the axial rotor usually works in cavitation and is often replaced. The paper investigates experimentally and numerically the comparison between pump impeller without and with axial rotor hydrodynamics taking into account the flow given by the symmetrical suction elbow. Full three-dimensional turbulent numerical investigation of the symmetrical suction elbow, with axial rotor and without, pump impeller and volute are performed. The hydrodynamic analysis confirms that once the axial rotor is mounted in front of the pump impeller increase the static pressure and the incidence angle is improved at the inlet of the pump impeller.

  1. [The ultrastructure changes of rabbit retina after periodical vacuum suction].

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-shan; Zhou, Xiao-dong; Chu, Ren-yuan

    2005-12-01

    To study the effects of periodical vacuum-suction of different pressures on the ultrastructure of rabbits' retina. Rabbits involved in the present study were divided into a control group and four treatment groups, which were treated with vacuum-suction of different pressures through scleral suction ring. The suction pressure was increased at a rate of 100 mm Hg/3 sec (1 mm Hg = 0.133 kPa) and reached (200 +/- 20) mm Hg (group I), (300 +/- 20) mm Hg (group II); (400 +/- 20) mm Hg (group III) and (500 +/- 20) mm Hg (group IV). The suction pressure was maintained for 5 seconds before released to zero. The corresponding intraocular pressure examined by Tonopen was 35 mm Hg, 45 mm Hg, 55 mm Hg and 75 mm Hg in these 4 groups, respectively. This circle was repeated for 10 times with 1 minute interval. The test was repeated every other day. The retina was examined by electron microscope after 2 weeks. There was no obvious difference in the retina ultrastructure between the control group and group I. The retina ultrastructure changed slightly in group II which showed more active metabolism. Some significant changes were found in group III and group IV with cell necrosis in group IV. Different elevations of intraocular pressure following periodical vacuum-suction have different effects on the retina of rabbit. Pressure less than 45 mm Hg has almost no effect, but some effects appear at 55 mm Hg pressure, and obviously damages are caused by 75 mm Hg pressure.

  2. Liver suction-mediated transfection in mice using a pressure-controlled computer system.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Zhang, Guangyuan; Kawakami, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Yota; Hayashi, Kouji; Hashida, Mitsuru; Konishi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed an in vivo tissue suction-mediated transfection method (denoted as the tissue suction method) for naked nucleic acids, such as plasmid DNA (pDNA) and small interfering RNA (siRNA), in mice. However, it remains unclear whether the suction pressure conditions affect the results of this method. Therefore, in the present study, we assembled a computer system to control the suction pressure and investigate the effects of the suction pressure conditions on the efficiency of the liver suction transfection of naked pDNA that encodes luciferase in mice. Using the developed system, we examined the effects of the minimum magnitude of the suction pressure, suction pressure waveform, and suction times of the luciferase expression level in mice livers. We determined that the liver suction method at 5 kPa was not only effective but also caused the lowest hepatic toxicity in mice. Additionally, the results indicated that the suction pressure waveform affects the luciferase expression levels, and a single period of suction on the targeted portion of the liver is sufficient for transfection. Thus, the developed system is useful for performing the tissue suction method with high accuracy and safety.

  3. Submersible pump

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, D. B.

    1985-08-27

    A method and apparatus for using a submersible pump to lift reservoir fluids in a well while having the tubing/casing annulus isolated from the produced fluids. The apparatus allows the submersible pump to be positioned above the annular packoff device. The apparatus comprises an outer shield that encloses the pump and can be attached to the production tubing. The lower end of the shield attaches to a short tubing section that seals with the annular packoff device or a receptacle above the annular packoff device.

  4. Filter arrays

    DOEpatents

    Page, Ralph H.; Doty, Patrick F.

    2017-08-01

    The various technologies presented herein relate to a tiled filter array that can be used in connection with performance of spatial sampling of optical signals. The filter array comprises filter tiles, wherein a first plurality of filter tiles are formed from a first material, the first material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a first wavelength band pass therethrough. A second plurality of filter tiles is formed from a second material, the second material being configured such that only photons having wavelengths in a second wavelength band pass therethrough. The first plurality of filter tiles and the second plurality of filter tiles can be interspersed to form the filter array comprising an alternating arrangement of first filter tiles and second filter tiles.

  5. Acceptance criteria for reactor coolant pumps and valves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.; Miller, R.F.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1993-05-01

    Each of the six primary coolant loop systems of the Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactors contains one reactor coolant pump, one PUMP suction side motor operated valve, and other smaller valves. The pumps me double suction, double volute, and radially split type pumps. The valves are different size shutoff and control valves rated from ANSI B16.5 construction class 150 to class 300. The reactor coolant system components, also known as the process water system (PWS), are classified as nuclear Safety Class I components. These components were constructed in the 1950`s in accordance with the then prevailing industry practices. No uniform construction codes were used for design and analysis of these components. However, no pressure boundary failures or bolting failures have ever been recorded throughout their operating history. Over the years, the in-service inspection (ISI) was limited to visual inspection of the pressure boundaries, and surface and volumetric examination of the pressure retaining bolts. Efforts are now underway to implement ISI requirements similar to the ASME Section XI requirements for pumps and valves. This report discusses the new ISI requirements which also call for volumetric examination of the pump casing and valve body welds.

  6. Further solutions in streamwise corner flow with wall suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, W. H.; El-Gamal, H. A.

    1984-08-01

    Following Barclay and El-Gamal's (1983) solutions for the boundary layer flow along a rectangular, streamwise corner, when the flow is subjected to a uniform suction at the walls, attention is given to the reconsideration of the boundary layer problem for the simpler case of suction that is proportional to the square root of the reciprocal of the local Reynolds number. The conclusions drawn from the results of the approximate solution are exactly the same as for the case of arbitrary sigma value.

  7. Successful femtosecond LASIK flap creation despite multiple suction losses

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Zeba A.; Melki, Samir A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary We present a case of successful completion of a laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) procedure despite 5 episodes of suction loss during femtosecond flap creation in a 30-year-old man with no risk factors. The patient had an uncorrected distance visual acuity of 20/20 in both eyes at his 2-month follow-up visit. Our experience in this case shows that multiple suction losses during femtosecond LASIK flap creation do not preclude completion of a successful procedure with excellent visual outcomes. Caution and technique modification are advised if multiple laser passes are applied to avoid creating multiplanar flaps. PMID:25097457

  8. Suction laminarization of highly swept supersonic laminar flow control wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, W.; Vemuru, C. S.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of a suction-based method for the laminarization of highly-swept supersonic wings at cruise Mach numbers in the 2.0-2.5 range, in the interest of the reduction of wave drag due to lift. The laminar boundary layer development, as well as Tollmien-Schlichting and crossflow instabilities, have been analyzed for the case of an X66 supercritical airfoil at 60 and 72 deg sweep, for Mach numbers of 1.56 and 2.52, respectively. Strong suction is found to be needed at the front part of the upper surface and both the upper and lower rear pressure-rise areas.

  9. Pumping Performance or RBCC Engine under Sea Level Static Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouchi, Toshinori; Tomioka, Sadatake; Kanda, Takeshi

    Numerical simulations were conducted to predict the ejector pumping performance of a rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine under a take-off condition. The numerical simulations revealed that the suction airflow was chocked at the exit of the engine throat when the ejector rocket was driven by cold N2 gas at the chamber pressure of 3MPa. When the ejector-driving gas was changed from cold N2 gas to hot combustion gas, the suction performance decreased remarkably. Mach contours in the engine revealed that the rocket plume constricted when the driving gas was the hot combustion gas. The change of the area of the stream tube area seemed to induce the pressure rise in the duct and decreasing in the pumping performance.

  10. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, W.

    1985-01-09

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  11. Disk filter

    DOEpatents

    Bergman, Werner

    1986-01-01

    An electric disk filter provides a high efficiency at high temperature. A hollow outer filter of fibrous stainless steel forms the ground electrode. A refractory filter material is placed between the outer electrode and the inner electrically isolated high voltage electrode. Air flows through the outer filter surfaces through the electrified refractory filter media and between the high voltage electrodes and is removed from a space in the high voltage electrode.

  12. Trim or Replace Impellers on Oversized Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2006-09-01

    One in a series of tip sheets to help manufacturers optimize their industrial pumping systems. As a result of conservative engineering practices, pumps are often substantially larger than they need to be for an industrial plant's process requirements. Centrifugal pumps can often be oversized because of ''rounding up'', trying to accommodate gradual increases in pipe surface roughness and flow resistance over time, or anticipating future plant capacity expansions. In addition, the plant's pumping requirements might not have been clearly defined during the design phase. Because of this conservative approach, pumps can have operating points completely different from their design points. The pump head is often less than expected, while the flow rate is greater. This can cause cavitation and waste energy as the flow rate typically must be regulated with bypass or throttle control. Oversized and throttled pumps that produce excess pressure are excellent candidates for impeller replacement or ''trimming'', to save energy and reduce costs. Trimming involves machining the impeller to reduce its diameter. Trimming should be limited to about 75% of a pump's maximum impeller diameter, because excessive trimming can result in a mismatched impeller and casing. As the impeller diameter decreases, added clearance between the impeller and the fixed pump casing increases internal flow recirculation, causes head loss, and lowers pumping efficiency. For manufacturing standardization purposes, pump casings and shafts are designed to accommodate impellers in a range of sizes. Many pump manufacturers provide pump performance curves that indicate how various models will perform with different impeller diameters or trims. The impeller should not be trimmed any smaller than the minimum diameter shown on the curve. Net positive suction head requirements (NPSHR) usually decrease at lower flow rates and can increase at the higher end of the pump head curve. The NPSHR at a given flow rate will

  13. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Patel, Kamlesh D.

    2007-11-20

    A method for altering the surface properties of a particle bed. In application, the method pertains particularly to an electrokinetic pump configuration where nanoparticles are bonded to the surface of the stationary phase to alter the surface properties of the stationary phase including the surface area and/or the zeta potential and thus improve the efficiency and operating range of these pumps. By functionalizing the nanoparticles to change the zeta potential the electrokinetic pump is rendered capable of operating with working fluids having pH values that can range from 2-10 generally and acidic working fluids in particular. For applications in which the pump is intended to handle highly acidic solutions latex nanoparticles that are quaternary amine functionalized can be used.

  14. ION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Milleron, N.

    1961-01-01

    An ion pump and pumping method are given for low vacuum pressures in which gases introduced into a pumping cavity are ionized and thereafter directed and accelerated into a quantity of liquid gettering metal where they are absorbed. In the preferred embodiment the metal is disposed as a liquid pool upon one electrode of a Phillips ion gauge type pump. Means are provided for continuously and remotely withdrawing and degassing the gettering metal. The liquid gettering metal may be heated if desired, although various combinations of gallium, indium, tin, bismuth, and lead, the preferred metals, have very low melting points. A background pressure of evaporated gettering metal may be provided by means of a resistance heated refractory metal wick protruding from the surface of the pcol of gettering metal.

  15. Overview of the experimental setup for the visualization of a cryogenic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Teiichi

    2016-11-01

    An experimental setup for the visualization of a cryogenic pump, which is to investigate the relationship between the flowfield in a pump and the thermodynamic effect of a cavitation, was constructed. The experimental setup with the cryogenic pump is a closed loop and is consisted of a tank, a suction pipe, a visualization section, a test pump and a flow mater. There are two visualization sections in this system. One is the visualization section for the pump impeller cavitation using liquid nitrogen and this section is established on the pump casing. Another is the visualization section for the blade cavitation using liquid nitrogen and this section is inserted in the pump suction side. These sections are set up individually for the object of the visualization. From pilot study using this visualization system with the cryogenic pump, it was shown that the subcooled liquid nitrogen could be generated by this system and this liquid nitrogen could be circulated in this pump system with the visualization section. And it was indicated that various visualization experiments of the cavitating pump and blade using the subcooled liquid nitrogen can be conducted by using the developed setup.

  16. Fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, P.D.; Nesselrode, F.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a fuel pump. It includes: a fuel reservoir member, the fuel reservoir member being formed with fuel chambers, the chambers comprising an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, means to supply fuel to the inlet chamber, means to deliver fuel from the outlet chamber to a point of use, the fuel reservoir member chambers also including a bypass chamber, means interconnecting the bypass chamber with the outlet chamber; the fuel pump also comprising pump means interconnecting the inlet chamber and the outlet chamber and adapted to suck fuel from the fuel supply means into the inlet chamber, through the pump means, out the outlet chamber, and to the fuel delivery means; the bypass chamber and the pump means providing two substantially separate paths of fuel flow in the fuel reservoir member, bypass plunger means normally closing off the flow of fuel through the bypass chamber one of the substantially separate paths including the fuel supply means and the fuel delivery means when the bypass plunger means is closed, the second of the substantially separate paths including the bypass chamber when the bypass plunger means is open, and all of the chambers and the interconnecting means therebetween being configured so as to create turbulence in the flow of any fuel supplied to the outlet chamber by the pump means and bypassed through the bypass chamber and the interconnecting means.

  17. Multiphase pump field trials demonstrate practical applications for the technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dal Porto, D.F.; Larson, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    The results of two multiphase pump field trials are presented. One field trial was conducted offshore on a platform in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). It is a low pressure boost (100 psi) application involving gas lifted wells. The other field trial was conducted onshore in an oil field in Alberta, Canada. This multiphase pump was designed for a high pressure boost (850 psi) capability with primarily rod pumped wells feeding the suction of the pump. The offshore pump was sized to handle the flow from one well. By lowering the back-pressure on the well, increased production was realized. The increased flow from one of the wells far surpassed the predicted quantity. Early problems with the double mechanical seal system were overcome and a new, simplified single mechanical seal system has been designed and installed. The onshore multiphase pump clearly demonstrated that a twin screw pump can operate reliably in a field environment, even under severe slug flow conditions. The trial indicated that a considerable portion of the liquid in the recycle stream (required because of the high gas fraction of the multiphase fluid from the field) flashes into gas which occupies more volume in the pump than if it remained liquid. This decreased the capability of the pump to handle net flow from the field. These conditions motivated a re-evaluation of the pump sizing techniques. Performance data and lessons learned information are presented for both field trials.

  18. Study of unsteady cavitation flow of a pump-turbine at pump mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. T.; Wu, Y. L.; Liu, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Three dimensional, unsteady, cavitating flows in a pump-turbine at pump mode were numerically studied using SST k-ω turbulence model and the mixture model. The unsteady cavitating flow and pressure fluctuations at different positions were analysed with two openings of guide vanes. Calculation results are in good agreement with experimental data. Results show that the opening of guide vanes has great effect on the cavitation phenomenon. The cavitating region gradually decreases with the increase of the relative opening, and it locates at the inlet of the suction side. The amplitude of the pressure fluctuation reduces as the cavitating region decreases. The numerical study of unsteady cavitating flow can provide a basic understanding for the improvement of stable operation of a pump-turbine.

  19. Numerical analysis on the cavitation and unsteady flow in a scroll hydraulic pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. H.; Guo, P. C.; Huang, Y.; Zuo, J. L.; Luo, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents numerical analysis of unsteady flow in a scroll hydraulic pump to discover its flow mechanism. The dynamic mesh model has to be used to simulate the flow field unsteadily. The unsteady flow patterns and pressure distributions in the suction, squeezing and discharge chamber are analysed. The suction process continues until the crank angle reaches the 320 degree. Then the pressure in the chamber rises instantaneously, and the fluid begins to flow out from the chamber. Because of the high pressure difference at the clearance, the jet flow and the vortex appear, and the large flow losses generates with them. In addition, the velocity and static pressure distribution in the two symmetry crescent suction chamber is different remarkably. One reason is that the location of suction port cannot be set symmetrically for the simplification of the pump structure. Another reason for that is the fluid is impelled by different part of the orbiting scroll. The asymmetric pressure distribution will result in the extra force on the scroll. The cavitation generates at the negative pressure region. Therefore, the unsteady simulation shows some important phenomena. The structure of the scroll pump need to be optimized to reduce the maximum pressure, weaken the jet flow, vortex and the uneven pressure distribution to ensure the pump working safely and efficiently.

  20. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  1. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  2. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  4. 21 CFR 880.6740 - Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6740 Vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A vacuum-powered body fluid suction apparatus is a device used to aspirate, remove, or...

  5. Analytical study of suction boundary layer control for subsonic V/STOL inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boles, M. A.; Ramesh, K.; Hwang, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical procedures used to evaluate the application of suction boundary-layer control (BLC) to subsonic V/STOL inlets are presented. These procedures have been used to analytically predict the optimum (minimum suction power required) location and extent for a suction slot of two different surface resistances within a subsonic V/STOL inlet. Results of this analytical study are presented.

  6. 21 CFR 880.5740 - Suction snakebite kit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suction snakebite kit. 880.5740 Section 880.5740 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use...

  7. Active control of transition by periodic suction-blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biringen, S.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical study is conducted to investigate a new method of transition control by periodic suction-blowing. It is shown that significant reduction in the amplitudes of two- and three-dimensional finite-amplitude disturbances can be obtained by the application of this method to transition in plane channel flow.

  8. The benefits of planar circular mouths on suction feeding performance.

    PubMed

    Skorczewski, Tyler; Cheer, Angela; Wainwright, Peter C

    2012-08-07

    Suction feeding is the most common form of prey capture across aquatic feeding vertebrates and many adaptations that enhance efficiency and performance are expected. Many suction feeders have mechanisms that allow the mouth to form a planar and near-circular opening that is believed to have beneficial hydrodynamic effects. We explore the effects of the flattened and circular mouth opening through computational fluid dynamics simulations that allow comparisons with other mouth profiles. Compared to mouths with lateral notches, we find that the planar mouth opening results in higher flow rates into the mouth and a region of highest flow that is positioned at the centre of the mouth aperture. Planar mouths provide not only for better total fluid flow rates through the mouth but also through the centre of the mouth near where suction feeders position their prey. Circular mouths are shown to provide the quickest capture times for spherical and elliptical prey because they expose the prey item to a large region of high flow. Planar and circular mouths result in higher flow velocities with peak flow located at the centre of the mouth opening and they maximize the capacity of the suction feeders to exert hydrodynamic forces on the prey.

  9. Teaching Self-Administration of Suctioning to Children with Tracheostomies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrickson, Janice G.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Four children (ages 5-8) with tracheostomies were taught to self-administer a suctioning procedure via doll-centered simulations. Performance of all children improved as a function of training; skill maintenance was demonstrated during followup; and participants revealed high levels of satisfaction with outcomes. (Author/JDD)

  10. Dual-durometer soft suction foot robot for concrete inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huston, Dryver; Burns, Dylan; Gardner-Morse, John; Montane, Paul; Angola, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Climbing on concrete, masonry and brick with automated machines is difficult due to the uneven surfaces that prevent getting a good grip. This paper describes developments in using dual-durometer pneumatic suction feet for gripping onto concrete surfaces as part of a multi-legged robotic climbing system for inspecting concrete structures with vertical walls. The dual durometer technique presents a compliant suction tip to the concrete thereby producing a good seal against an irregular surface, and stiff component to deliver the structural rigidity needed for walking and climbing. Individually actuated pneumatic Venturi vacuum generators provide the suction from positive pneumatic pressure in a manner that is robust against leaks that cause the systemic vacuum collapse that can plague other vacuum configurations. The feet are attached to a six-legged robot that with a nominal floor walking capability and gait. Climbing a wall requires modification to leg actuation and gait, along with suction feet. System design, integration, concrete wall climbing performance and sensor deployment in the form of a lightweight ground penetrating radar system are presented.

  11. Overnight closed suction drainage after axillary lymphadenectomy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, C D; McFadden, D W

    1997-10-01

    Axillary lymphadenectomy in breast conservation surgery is associated with substantial morbidity in either seroma formation or infection. Seroma formation in the axilla requiring aspiration occurs in up to 42 per cent of patients treated without drainage. Prolonged outpatient suction drainage reduces but does not eliminate the incidence of seroma formation, while increasing cost, discomfort, and possibly infection rates. We studied the efficacy of overnight closed suction drainage in patients undergoing breast conservation surgery. Fifty consecutive patients undergoing a standard axillary dissection for breast cancer were studied. The axilla was drained with a 7-French closed suction drain. All drains were removed within 23 hours of surgery and prior to discharge from the outpatient surgical center. Patients were examined by the operating surgeon 7 to 10 days after surgery. One patient (2%) experienced a seroma postoperatively. No infections were observed in all 50 patients, and the remaining 49 patients did not experience visible or symptomatic seromas. The number of lymph nodes removed ranged between 5 and 33 with a mean of 15.5 +/- 0.6. Nine out of 50 (18%) patients had metastatic breast cancer to the axillary lymph nodes. Patients undergoing breast conservation surgery benefit from overnight closed suction drainage of the axilla. This short-term method reduces the incidence and the inherent morbidity of axillary seroma formation.

  12. The benefits of planar circular mouths on suction feeding performance

    PubMed Central

    Skorczewski, Tyler; Cheer, Angela; Wainwright, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    Suction feeding is the most common form of prey capture across aquatic feeding vertebrates and many adaptations that enhance efficiency and performance are expected. Many suction feeders have mechanisms that allow the mouth to form a planar and near-circular opening that is believed to have beneficial hydrodynamic effects. We explore the effects of the flattened and circular mouth opening through computational fluid dynamics simulations that allow comparisons with other mouth profiles. Compared to mouths with lateral notches, we find that the planar mouth opening results in higher flow rates into the mouth and a region of highest flow that is positioned at the centre of the mouth aperture. Planar mouths provide not only for better total fluid flow rates through the mouth but also through the centre of the mouth near where suction feeders position their prey. Circular mouths are shown to provide the quickest capture times for spherical and elliptical prey because they expose the prey item to a large region of high flow. Planar and circular mouths result in higher flow velocities with peak flow located at the centre of the mouth opening and they maximize the capacity of the suction feeders to exert hydrodynamic forces on the prey. PMID:22319101

  13. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Aquaspace H2OME Guardian Water Filter, available through Western Water International, Inc., reduces lead in water supplies. The filter is mounted on the faucet and the filter cartridge is placed in the "dead space" between sink and wall. This filter is one of several new filtration devices using the Aquaspace compound filter media, which combines company developed and NASA technology. Aquaspace filters are used in industrial, commercial, residential, and recreational environments as well as by developing nations where water is highly contaminated.

  14. INTERIOR VIEW OF MIANUS RIVER PUMP STATION LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF MIANUS RIVER PUMP STATION LOOKING SOUTHEAST. THE CYLINDRICAL TANKS ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PHOTOGRAPH ARE SAND-GRAVEL FILTERS. THE DIESEL POWERED PUMPS LOCATED IN THE CENTER LEFT FOREGOUND SUPPLIED FRESH WATER THROUGH A 16" LINE TO THE POWER PLANT BOILERS LOCATED ONE MILE SOUTH OF THE PUMP STATION - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Mianus River Pumping Station, River Road & Boston Post Road, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  15. An experimental and analytical investigation into the performance of centrifugal pumps operating with air-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterrett, John Douglas

    1994-01-01

    An investigation was made into the performance of centrifugal pumps when two-phase non-condensable mixtures of gas and liquid are flowing. This problem is encountered during loss-of-coolant accidents in nuclear reactor systems and in the pumping of oil where natural gas may be present in the mixture. Analytical and experimental techniques were used to address the issues of scaling between a model and a prototype pump and the validity of the single-phase pump affinity laws when two-phase flows are present. The results from this effort have also provided insight into the physical phenomena which cause the degradation in pump performance. An analytical model for the motion of a single bubble through a pump impeller is provided. The results from this fundamental problem show that the Coriolis and buoyancy forces are important in describing the kinematics of a gas phase. These results show that dynamic similitude is not preserved between a model and prototype impeller when the standard single-phase pump scaling relationships are used. The motion of a single bubble is also shown to be influenced by the magnitude of the pump suction pressure. The results from an extensive series of air-water two phase pump tests are provided. A 1/4 scale pump, modeled after the Savannah River Site K-reactor pumps, was tested over a wide range of pump speeds, flow rates, and suction pressures. These results indicate that the single-phase pump affinity laws are not applicable to two-phase pump flows and that the magnitude of the pump suction pressure is an important quantity in determining the pump performance. A second analytical model is developed for two-phase flow through a pump impeller. The results from this one-dimensional, two-fluid, non-homogeneous streamline model show good agreement with the experimental data. The model results support the experimental data in showing that the single-phase pump affinity relationships are not valid for two-phase pump flows and that dynamic

  16. Fast efficient Ca atomic resonance filter at 423 nm.

    PubMed

    Walther, F G

    1992-11-15

    An optically pumped active Ca atomic resonance filter is demonstrated, applicable to background-limited optical communications through scatter channels. In pump saturation, the filter should detect 50% of the incident 423-nm signal power with an internal photon gain of 6 and a response time of 10 micros, 2 orders of magnitude faster than a passive Ca filter. Response time of 100 micros has been demonstrated, limited by available pump power. The filter maintains the wide field of view and reduced solar background associated with atomic absorption at the Ca Fraunhofer line while permitting higher data rate communications.

  17. Structural integrity analysis of process water system Bingham pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.K.

    1992-10-01

    Bingham pumps comprise part of the pressure boundary of the Process Water System (PWS). Monitoring the pump casing through in-service inspection is important to demonstrate the structural integrity throughout service. An acceptance criteria methodology with technical bases is provided to disposition flaws detected during examination of the pump casing. The methodology ensures that the defined structural or safety margins against failure are maintained throughout pump service in full consideration of service-induced degradation. Acceptance criteria, defining the acceptable flaw (length and depth) configurations for the pump casing, are established through structural analyses of the casing and flaw stability analyses of postulated flaws. Three-dimensional shell element model of the complex-shaped casing is constructed and detailed finite element stress analyses are performed at normal and off-normal loading conditions. Safety factors are applied to the resultant stresses and flaws are postulated at the most highly stressed regions of the pump casing. Postulated throughwall flaws in simplified casing configurations are analyzed with linear elastic and limit load methods with conservative application of the stress results. The most limiting results from the flaw stability analyses define The acceptable flaw length of 3.5 inches for the casing. The pump suction cover was separately analyzed to study the bolt failure concerns. Analyses were performed considering all bolts intact, all bolts cracked (25% deep through minor diameter), and up to 8 bolts inactive. It is found that as many as 4 bolts could be completely broken without adversely impacting the pressure boundary of the pumps at the design and operating conditions. Therefore, the current practice of volumetric and surface examination of the suction cover bolts is sufficient for the continued safe operation of the pumps.

  18. Test specification for decant pump and winch assembly. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Staehr, T.W.

    1995-02-22

    This specification provides the requirements for testing of the vertical turbine decant pump including the floating suction with load sensing winch control, instrumentation and the associated PLC/PC control system. All assembly necessary for testing including piping, temporary wiring, etc., shall be performed by the Seller. All referenced figures are at the back of this document. The testing consists of performance testing, winch testing and calibration, instrumentation verification testing and run-in testing of the pump. Testing shall be done in the presence and under the direction of the Buyer in accordance with this procedure.

  19. Electronically Tunable Filter and Dye Laser.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CaMoO4 filter was constructed, evaluated, and used to tune a flashlamp pumped dye laser. A total electronic tuning range of 6800 to 4735 was achieved...theoretical study of an electronically tunable CaMoO4 filter for use in the near infrared portion of the spectrum. (Author)

  20. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  1. Biological Filters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klemetson, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. The review is concerned with biological filters, and it covers: (1) trickling filters; (2) rotating biological contractors; and (3) miscellaneous reactors. A list of 14 references is also presented. (HM)

  2. Tracheal Suctioning Improves Gas Exchange but not Hemodynamics in Asphyxiated Lambs with Meconium Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Mathew, Bobby; Nair, Jayasree; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Rawat, Munmun; Nielsen, Lori; Swartz, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Current neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommend tracheal suctioning of non-vigorous neonates born through meconium stained amniotic fluid. Methods We evaluated the effect of tracheal suctioning at birth in 29 lambs with asphyxia induced by cord occlusion and meconium aspiration during gasping. Results Tracheal suctioning at birth (n=15) decreased amount of meconium in distal airways (53±29 particles/mm2 lung area) compared to no-suction (499±109 particles/mm2, n=14, p<0.001). Three lambs in the suction group had cardiac arrest during suctioning requiring chest compressions and epinephrine. Onset of ventilation was delayed in the suction group (146±11 vs. 47±3 sec in no-suction group, p=0.005). There was no difference in pulmonary blood flow, carotid blood flow, pulmonary or systemic blood pressure between the two groups. Left atrial pressure was significantly higher in the suction group. Tracheal suctioning resulted in higher PaO2/FiO2 levels (122±21 vs. 78±10 mmHg) and ventilator efficiency index (0.3±0.05 vs.0.16±0.03). Two lambs in the no-suction group required inhaled NO. Lung 3-nitrotyrosine levels were higher in the suction group (0.65±0.03 ng/μg protein) compared to the no-suction group (0.47 ± 0.06). Conclusion Tracheal suctioning improves oxygenation and ventilation. Suctioning does not improve pulmonary/systemic hemodynamics or oxidative stress in an ovine model of acute meconium aspiration with asphyxia. PMID:25406897

  3. Filter validation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    Validation of a sterilizing filtration process is critical since it is impossible with currently available technology to measure the sterility of each filled container; therefore, sterility assurance of the filtered product must be achieved through validation of the filtration process. Validating a pharmaceutical sterile filtration process involves three things: determining the effect of the liquid on the filter, determining the effect of the filter on the liquid, and demonstrating that the filter removes all microorganisms from the liquid under actual processing conditions.

  4. Metallic Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Filtration technology originated in a mid 1960's NASA study. The results were distributed to the filter industry, an HR Textron responded, using the study as a departure for the development of 421 Filter Media. The HR system is composed of ultrafine steel fibers metallurgically bonded and compressed so that the pore structure is locked in place. The filters are used to filter polyesters, plastics, to remove hydrocarbon streams, etc. Several major companies use the product in chemical applications, pollution control, etc.

  5. FILTER TREATMENT

    DOEpatents

    Sutton, J.B.; Torrey, J.V.P.

    1958-08-26

    A process is described for reconditioning fused alumina filters which have become clogged by the accretion of bismuth phosphate in the filter pores, The method consists in contacting such filters with faming sulfuric acid, and maintaining such contact for a substantial period of time.

  6. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A compact, lightweight electrolytic water filter generates silver ions in concentrations of 50 to 100 parts per billion in the water flow system. Silver ions serve as effective bactericide/deodorizers. Ray Ward requested and received from NASA a technical information package on the Shuttle filter, and used it as basis for his own initial development, a home use filter.

  7. Effect of sidewall suction on flow in two-dimensional wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    A closed-form analysis of flow in a two-dimensional subsonic wind tunnel that uses sidewall suction around the model to reduce sidewall boundary-layer effects is presented. The model problem that is treated involves a flat plate airfoil in a tunnel with a suction window shaped to permit an analytic solution. This solution shows that the lift coefficient depends explicitly on the porosity parameter of the suction window and implicitly on the suction pressure differential. For a given sidewall displacement thickness, the lift coefficient increases as the suction-window porosity decreases.

  8. Effect of sidewall suction on flow in two-dimensional wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A closed-form analysis of flow in a two-dimensional subsonic wind tunnel which uses sidewall suction around the model to reduce sidewall boundary-layer effects is presented. The model problem which is treated involves a flat plate airfoil in a tunnel with a suction window shaped to permit an analytic solution. This solution shows that the lift coefficient depends explicitly on the porosity parameter of the suction window and implicitly on the suction pressure differential. For a given sidewall displacement thickness, the lift coefficient increases as the suction-window porosity decreases.

  9. Reciprocating down-hole sand pump

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhle, J.L.

    1987-04-28

    This patent describes the invention of a continuously-operated reciprocating down-hole sand pump comprising: a steel polished plunger pipe that strokes back and forth within a steel honed pump barrel, and is equipped with a self-lubricating fluorocarbon V-ring system that is pressure-actuated during compression strokes; the self-lubricating fluorocarbon V-ring system also is self-actuated by means of coil springs to provide wiping action to the polished plunger pipe during suction strokes; the self-lubricating fluorocarbons V-ring system also self-adjusts by means of coil springs located adjacent the fluorocarbon V-ring so as to automatically compensate for V-ring wear; and the self-lubricating fluorocarbon V-ring system also is designed in such a manner so as to eliminate voids and discourage the extrusion of V-rings in high temperature and high-pressure applications.

  10. An experimental investigation of pump as turbine for micro hydro application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    >N Raman, I Hussein,

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of a centrifugal pump working as turbine (PAT). An end suction centrifugal pump was tested in turbine mode at PAT experimental rig installed in the Mechanical Engineering Laboratory of Universiti Tenaga Nasional. The pump with specific speed of 15.36 (m, m3/s) was used in the experiment and the performance characteristic of the PAT was determined. The experiment showed that a centrifugal pump can satisfactorily be operated as turbine without any mechanical problems. As compared to pump operation, the pump was found to operate at higher heads and discharge values in turbine mode. The best efficiency point (BEP) in turbine mode was found to be lower than BEP in pump mode. The results obtained were also compared to the work of some previous researchers.

  11. An evaluation of a hubless inducer and a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindley, B. K.; Martinson, A. R.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the performance of several configurations of hubless inducers with a hydrodynamically similar conventional inducer and to demonstrate the performance of a full flow hydraulic turbine driven inducer boost pump using these inducers. A boost pump of this type consists of an inducer connected to a hydraulic turbine with a high speed rotor located in between. All the flow passes through the inducer, rotor, and hydraulic turbine, then into the main pump. The rotor, which is attached to the main pump shaft, provides the input power to drive the hydraulic turbine which, in turn, drives the inducer. The inducer, rotating at a lower speed, develops the necessary head to prevent rotor cavitation. The rotor speed is consistent with present main engine liquid hydrogen pump designs and the overall boost pump head rise is sufficient to provide adequate main pump suction head. This system would have the potential for operating at lower liquid hydrogen tank pressures.

  12. Development of marketable solar assisted heat pumps. Phase II. Summary report, technical results

    SciTech Connect

    Hundt, R.; Heard, S.

    1981-02-20

    A water source heat pump has been designed that is capable of operating over the range from 40 to 110/sup 0/F entering water temperature and has a heating coefficient of performance greater than six in the upper portion of this range. A computerized heat pump balance program was written to allow the performance of either a water-to-water or a water-to-air heat pump to be predicted in either the heating or cooling mode. A detailed program description, flow charts, and sample outputs are appended. The balance program was used to specify components for a high efficiency water-to-water and a high efficiency water-to-air heat pump. Performance predictions for both units in heating and in cooling are included. The water-to-water and water-to-air performance predictions were compared. The water-to-air approach was clearly superior. A detailed design and layout was done for the three solar-assisted water-to-air heat pump. A horizontal configuration was chosen for marketability reasons. The design was made consistent with high quantity production equipment available in our factories and should result in the lowest possible manufacturing cost. A key question to be answered in this project is whether a reciprocating compressor can operate without damage at the high suction pressures characteristic to the inline SAHP. Reciprocating compressors are normally applied in applications with maximum suction pressures equal to a 55/sup 0/F saturated suction temperature. An accelerated life test was performed on low speed at 85/sup 0/F saturated suction temperature and 100/sup 0/F saturated condensing temperature. After 465 hours at these severe conditions no performance degradation or physical damage was noted. Tests on high speed at 70/sup 0/F saturated suction temperature are in progress and should define the limits where the compressor may be safely operated.

  13. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  14. Electrokinetic pump

    DOEpatents

    Hencken, Kenneth R.; Sartor, George B.

    2004-08-03

    An electrokinetic pump in which the porous dielectric medium of conventional electrokinetic pumps is replaced by a patterned microstructure. The patterned microstructure is fabricated by lithographic patterning and etching of a substrate and is formed by features arranged so as to create an array of microchannels. The microchannels have dimensions on the order of the pore spacing in a conventional porous dielectric medium. Embedded unitary electrodes are vapor deposited on either end of the channel structure to provide the electric field necessary for electroosmotic flow.

  15. High efficiency pump for space helium transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasenbein, Robert; Izenson, Michael G.; Swift, Walter L.; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1991-01-01

    A centrifugal pump was developed for the efficient and reliable transfer of liquid helium in space. The pump can be used to refill cryostats on orbiting satellites which use liquid helium for refrigeration at extremely low temperatures. The pump meets the head and flow requirements of on-orbit helium transfer: a flow rate of 800 L/hr at a head of 128 J/kg. The overall pump efficiency at the design point is 0.45. The design head and flow requirements are met with zero net positive suction head, which is the condition in an orbiting helium supply Dewar. The mass transfer efficiency calculated for a space transfer operation is 0.99. Steel ball bearings are used with gas fiber-reinforced teflon retainers to provide solid lubrication. These bearings have demonstrated the longest life in liquid helium endurance tests under simulated pumping conditions. Technology developed in the project also has application for liquid helium circulation in terrestrial facilities and for transfer of cryogenic rocket propellants in space.

  16. Use minimum flow data to prolong centrifugal pump life

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.A.

    1996-03-01

    Environmental and safety concerns and, in the US, the consequences of failing of meet EPA regulations are intensifying efforts to improve the reliability of pumping equipment. A critical step toward achieving this goal is eliminating cavitation, and the resulting impeller and shaft vibrations, which, ultimately, cause seal and bearing failure. In centrifugal pumps, cavitation results when they run at very low flow rates, as can happen during unplanned upsets or interruptions. This particularly true since many centrifugal pumps are now controlled by automatic valves in their discharge lines. The problem can be prevented by providing a small bypass line to the pump`s suction source, to control temperature rise in the pump. Usually, the minimum flow is so low that the bypass loop can be kept open without detracting from the pump`s efficiency. It needn`t require a flow control valve or any special instrumentation, but will let the pump run at a comfortable flow, even with the control valve closed. This paper describes a method to determine minimum thermal flow to prevent cavitation.

  17. Refraction outcomes after suction loss during small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE)

    PubMed Central

    Gab-Alla, Amr A

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate refractive outcomes of two management approaches after suction loss during the small-incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) technique. Patients and methods This retrospective and comparative study was conducted at the El-Gowhara Private Eye Center. It included 26 consecutive eyes of patients who experienced suction loss during the SMILE technique. Patients were divided into two groups by the technical difficulties in redocking: in group A (12 eyes) suction loss occurred after the posterior lenticular cut and the creation of side-cuts, then suction was reapplied, and the procedure was completed; in group B (14 eyes) suction loss occurred after the posterior lenticular cut and the creation of side-cuts, then the procedure was postponed for 24 hours and completed with the same parameters. Manifest refraction outcomes were measured and compared 6 months postoperatively. Results This study included 26 eyes with suction loss during the SMILE technique: five patients with suction loss in both eyes, nine patients with suction loss in the right eye and seven patients with suction loss in the left eye. The incidence of suction loss in this study was 2.7%. At the postoperative 6-month follow-up time, there were statistically significant differences in refraction outcomes between the two groups, with a hyperopic shift in group A compared with group B. Conclusion A good refraction outcome can be achieved with appropriate management of suction loss during the SMILE technique, and it is recommended to postpone the treatment if this happens. PMID:28331285

  18. Suppression of perturbed free-induction decay and noise in experimental ultrafast pump-probe data.

    PubMed

    Nuernberger, Patrick; Lee, Kevin F; Bonvalet, Adeline; Polack, Thomas; Vos, Marten H; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Joffre, Manuel

    2009-10-15

    We apply a Fourier filtering technique for the global removal of coherent contributions, like perturbed free-induction decay, and noise, to experimental pump-probe spectra. A further filtering scheme gains access to spectra otherwise only recordable by scanning the probe's center frequency with adjustable spectral resolution. These methods cleanse pump-probe data and allow improved visualization and simpler analysis of the contained dynamics. We demonstrate these filters using visible pump/mid-infrared probe spectroscopy of ligand dissociation in carboxyhemoglobin.

  19. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  20. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, Joseph C.

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  1. On equations for the total suction and its matric and osmotic components

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, Vinh N.T. Morris, Peter H.; Dux, Peter F.

    2008-11-15

    A clear fundamental understanding of suctions is crucial for the study of the behaviour of plastic cement mortar and concrete, including plastic shrinkage cracking. In this paper, the expression relating the change in free energy of the pore water with an isothermal change in pressure is first derived. Based upon definitions of suctions, it is then shown that total, matric, and osmotic suctions can all be expressed in the same thermodynamic form. The widely accepted, but not yet satisfactorily validated, assumption that the total suction comprises matric and osmotic components is then confirmed theoretically. The well-known Kelvin equation for matric suction, and Morse and van't Hoff equations for osmotic suction are subsequently derived from the corresponding thermodynamic equations. The applicability of latter two equations in evaluating the osmotic suctions of cement mortar and concrete is highlighted.

  2. Suction-based grasping tool for removal of regular- and irregular-shaped intraocular foreign bodies.

    PubMed

    Erlanger, Michael S; Velez-Montoya, Raul; Mackenzie, Douglas; Olson, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    To describe a suction-based grasping tool for the surgical removal of irregular-shaped and nonferromagnetic intraocular foreign bodies. A surgical tool with suction capabilities, consisting of a stainless steel shaft with a plastic handle and a customizable and interchangeable suction tip, was designed in order to better engage and manipulate irregular-shaped in-traocular foreign bodies of various sizes and physical properties. The maximal suction force and surgical capabilities were assessed in the laboratory and on a cadaveric eye vitrectomy model. The suction force of the water-tight seal between the intraocular foreign body and the suction tip was estimated to be approximately 40 MN. During an open-sky vitrectomy in a porcine model, the device was successful in engaging and firmly securing foreign bodies of different sizes and shapes. The suction-based grasping tool enables removal of irregular-shaped and nonferromagnetic foreign bodies. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Clinical effects of closed suction drainage on wound healing in patients with head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Byers, R M; Ballantyne, A J; Goepfert, H; Guillamondegui, O M; Larson, D L; Medina, J

    1982-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine what optimal levels of suction pressure were necessary to provide good drainage volume and obliteration of any dead space and also to determine the prevalence of clotting and complications secondary to various levels of suction pressure. The patients were grouped by their degree of nutritional depletion, prior radiation exposure, the types of surgical procedures undergone, and the results of tests using four levels of suction pressure. Three of the suction pressure values were obtained with a wall suction and one was obtained using a portable closed system. All wall suction pressure levels were certainly comparable with the portable unit. However, the portable unit provided continuous suction pressure when the patients were ambulatory and was not associated with any statistically significant increase in wound complications or equipment failure.

  4. Influence of matric suction on shear strength behavior of a residual clayey soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayadelen, C.; Tekinsoy, M. A.; Taşkıran, T.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, the shear strength with respect to the matric suction of unsaturated soils was studied. For this purpose, unsaturated triaxial testing procedures were applied to the undisturbed residual soil specimens. An apparatus for performing triaxial tests was designed and constructed. In the tests, matric suction was controlled by using the axis translation technique, and pore water volume changes were measured by means of a volume change transducer with 10-8 m3 sensitivity. The test results indicated that the matric suction contributes to the shear strength of unsaturated soil specimens, and this contribution called suction strength varies non-linearly with respect to the matric suction. The logarithmic model needing to know the air-entry value and the internal friction angle of a soil specimen for prediction of the suction strength were presented and compared with the test results. It was found that suction strength values predicted from the proposed model were in satisfactory agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Effects of outlet blade angle of centrifugal pump on the pump performance under air-water two-phase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Minemura, Kiyoshi; Kinoshita, Katsuhiko; Ihara, Masaru; Furukawa, Hironori; Egashira, Kazuyuki

    1995-12-31

    To establish the optimum design parameters of offshore oil well centrifugal pumps, which should deliver crude oil containing a large amount of gas, various shapes of pump impeller with different outlet blade angles, locations of leading-edge and numbers of impeller blades as the design parameters were tested with various rotating speeds and suction pressures under air-water two-phase flow conditions. The greater the outlet blade angle, the less the degradation of the pump performance becomes, showing the optimum blade angle approximately equals to 90{degree}.

  6. Variational filtering.

    PubMed

    Friston, K J

    2008-07-01

    This note presents a simple Bayesian filtering scheme, using variational calculus, for inference on the hidden states of dynamic systems. Variational filtering is a stochastic scheme that propagates particles over a changing variational energy landscape, such that their sample density approximates the conditional density of hidden and states and inputs. The key innovation, on which variational filtering rests, is a formulation in generalised coordinates of motion. This renders the scheme much simpler and more versatile than existing approaches, such as those based on particle filtering. We demonstrate variational filtering using simulated and real data from hemodynamic systems studied in neuroimaging and provide comparative evaluations using particle filtering and the fixed-form homologue of variational filtering, namely dynamic expectation maximisation.

  7. Identification and classification of physiologically significant pumping states in an implantable rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Dean M; Lovell, Nigel H; Ayre, Peter J; Mason, David G; Cloherty, Shaun L

    2006-09-01

    In a clinical setting it is necessary to control the speed of rotary blood pumps used as left ventricular assist devices to prevent possible severe complications associated with over- or underpumping. The hypothesis is that by using only the noninvasive measure of instantaneous pump impeller speed to assess flow dynamics, it is possible to detect physiologically significant pumping states (without the need for additional implantable sensors). By varying pump speed in an animal model, five such states were identified: regurgitant pump flow, ventricular ejection (VE), nonopening of the aortic valve over the cardiac cycle (ANO), and partial collapse (intermittent and continuous) of the ventricle wall (PVC-I and PVC-C). These states are described in detail and a strategy for their noninvasive detection has been developed and validated using (n = 6) ex vivo porcine experiments. Employing a classification and regression tree, the strategy was able to detect pumping states with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity: state VE-99.2/100.0% (sensitivity/specificity); state ANO-100.0/100.0%; state PVC-I- 95.7/91.2%; state PVC-C-69.7/98.7%. With a simplified binary scheme differentiating suction (PVC-I, PVC-C) and nonsuction (VE, ANO) states, both such states were detected with 100% sensitivity.

  8. Development of small centrifugal pumps for an electric propellant pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Göran; Bigert, Mikael

    Small centrifugal pumps with low specific speeds have been designed, manufactured and performance tested at Volvo Flygmotor AB under a contract from the European Space Agency (ESA) over the period mid-1985 to mid-1988. The development of the pumps is a part of the work carried out to develop an Electric Propellant Pump System (EPPS) for the storable propellant monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetraoxide (NTO). Supporting technology development has been funded by the Swedish Delegation for Space Activities (DFR) and Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) together with Volvo Flygmotor. The main advantages of a typical EPPS communication satellite application are weight and volume reduction of the propellant system compared with a pressure-fed system. Active engine mixture ratio control and improved propellant utilization are also possible. Refuelling in space is another potential application where EPPS can be used. The development work was focused on communication satellite apogee propulsion and used the MBB 3 kN engine as reference. This paper presents the pump design and analyses and the results from the test campaigns of three different pump configurations, carried out with water as test liquid. The head rise, efficiency and suction performance together with other characteristics are also given. The planned next development step is to demonstrate pump performance in the propellants and primarily in NTO. The step is funded by (DFR)/(SSC) together with Volvo Flygmotor.

  9. Evaluation of Karl Storz CMAC Tip™ device versus traditional airway suction in a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Lipe, Demis N; Lindstrom, Randi; Tauferner, Dustin; Mitchell, Christopher; Moffett, Peter

    2014-07-01

    We compared the efficacy of Karl Storz CMAC Tip™ with inline suction to CMAC with traditional suction device in cadaveric models simulating difficult airways, using media mimicking pulmonary edema and vomit. This was a prospective, cohort study in which we invited emergency medicine faculty and residents to participate. Each participant intubated 2 cadavers (one with simulated pulmonary edema and one with simulated vomit), using CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Thirty emergency medicine providers performed 4 total intubations each in a crossover trial comparing the CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Two intubations were performed with simulated vomit and two with simulated pulmonary edema. The primary outcome was time to successful intubation; and the secondary outcome was proportion of successful intubation. The median time to successful intubation using the CMAC with inline suction versus traditional suction in the pulmonary edema group was 29s and 30s respectively (p=0.54). In the vomit simulation, the median time to successful intubation was 40s using the CMAC with inline suction and 41s using the CMAC with traditional suction (p=0.70). There were no significant differences in time to successful intubation between the 2 devices. Similarly, the proportions of successful intubation were also not statistically significant between the 2 devices. The proportions of successful intubations using the inline suction were 96.7% and 73.3%, for the pulmonary edema and vomit groups, respectively. Additionally using the handheld suction device, the proportions for the pulmonary edema and vomit group were 100% and 66.7%, respectively. CMAC with inline suction was no different than CMAC with traditional suction and was associated with no statistically significant differences in median time to intubation or proportion of successful intubations.

  10. Evaluation of Karl Storz CMAC Tip™ Device Versus Traditional Airway Suction in a Cadaver Model

    PubMed Central

    Lipe, Demis N.; Lindstrom, Randi; Tauferner, Dustin; Mitchell, Christopher; Moffett, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We compared the efficacy of Karl Storz CMAC Tip™ with inline suction to CMAC with traditional suction device in cadaveric models simulating difficult airways, using media mimicking pulmonary edema and vomit. Methods This was a prospective, cohort study in which we invited emergency medicine faculty and residents to participate. Each participant intubated 2 cadavers (one with simulated pulmonary edema and one with simulated vomit), using CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Thirty emergency medicine providers performed 4 total intubations each in a crossover trial comparing the CMAC with inline suction and CMAC with traditional suction. Two intubations were performed with simulated vomit and two with simulated pulmonary edema. The primary outcome was time to successful intubation; and the secondary outcome was proportion of successful intubation. Results The median time to successful intubation using the CMAC with inline suction versus traditional suction in the pulmonary edema group was 29s and 30s respectively (p=0.54). In the vomit simulation, the median time to successful intubation was 40s using the CMAC with inline suction and 41s using the CMAC with traditional suction (p=0.70). There were no significant differences in time to successful intubation between the 2 devices. Similarly, the proportions of successful intubation were also not statistically significant between the 2 devices. The proportions of successful intubations using the inline suction were 96.7% and 73.3%, for the pulmonary edema and vomit groups, respectively. Additionally using the handheld suction device, the proportions for the pulmonary edema and vomit group were 100% and 66.7%, respectively. Conclusion CMAC with inline suction was no different than CMAC with traditional suction and was associated with no statistically significant differences in median time to intubation or proportion of successful intubations. PMID:25035766

  11. 18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Electrically driven pumps in Armory Street Pump House. Pumps in background formerly drew water from the clear well. They went out of service when use of the beds was discontinued. Pumps in the foreground provide high pressure water to Hamden. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Armory Street Pumphouse, North side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. Effect of wall suction on the stability of compressible subsonic flows over smooth two-dimensional backward-facing steps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Al-Maaitah, Ayman A.; Nayfeh, Ali H.; Ragab, Saad A.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of suction on the stability of compressible flows over backward-facing steps is investigated. Mach numbers up to 0.8 are considered. The results show that continuous suction stabilizes the flow outside the separation bubble, but it destabilizes the flow inside it. Nevertheless, the overall N factor decreases as the suction level increases due to the considerable reduction of the separation bubble. For the same suction flow rate, properly distributed suction strips stabilize the flow more than continuous suction. The size of the separation bubble, and hence its effect on the instability can be considerably reduced by placing strips with high suction velocities in the separation region.

  13. Stability of flow over axisymmetric bodies with porous suction strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, A. H.; Reed, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Linear triple deck, closed form solutions for mean-flow quantities are developed for axisymmetric incompressible flow past a body with porous strips. The solutions account for upstream influence and are linear superpositions of the flow past the body without suction plus the perturbations due to the suction strips. Flow past the suctionless body is calculated using the Transition Analysis Program System, and a simple linear optimization scheme to determine number, spacing, and mass flow rate through the strips on an axisymmetric body is developed using the linear, triple-deck, closed-form solutions. The theory is demonstrated by predicting optimal strip distributions, and the effect of various adverse pressure-gradient situations on stability is studied.

  14. Modified Soil Water Retention Functions for All Matric Suctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayer, Michael J.; Simmons, C. Steven

    1995-05-01

    The Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten functions were modified to adequately represent retention at all matric suctions. The modification consisted of replacing the residual water content with an adsorption equation (Campbell and Shiozawa, 1992). The modified functions retain the form of the original functions in the wet range and the form of an adsorption equation in the dry range. The modified functions provided excellent fits to data from six soils with textures ranging from sand to silty clay. The modified van Genuchten function can use previously determined parameters to obtain a reasonable representation of the high matric suction range, thus allowing for the use of existing parameter sets. The modified functions, as well as the function proposed by Rossi and Nimmo (1994), were combined with the Mualem conductivity model to generate closed-form analytical expressions for the calculation of hydraulic conductivity.

  15. Suction blister skin grafting--a modern application.

    PubMed

    Parbhoo, A V; Simpson, M T

    2014-03-01

    The suction blistering technique produces an ultra-thin skin graft with no morbidity at the donor site. Negative pressure using wall suction in outpatients is used to generate a graft that can be used for reconstruction, and it avoids the need for invasive procedures in patients with coexisting conditions. The harvested tissue has a low metabolic demand and survival is excellent. We used it in a patient when previous reconstructions after excision of skin cancer had failed. Graft survival was more than 95% by surface area and there was no donor site morbidity. We have found it particularly useful for grafting over Integra® dermal regeneration template (Integra LifeSciences Corporation, NJ, USA) to produce healing at difficult sites. Patients tolerate the procedure well and the donor site heals quickly. It is useful where recipient vascularity is poor or where coexisting conditions prevent complex procedures. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. 80. (Credit JTL) Filters added in 1947 and 1975 in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. (Credit JTL) Filters added in 1947 and 1975 in foreground (south of 1942 filter building). Tops of fluorine tanks for new (1980) fluoridation system can barely be seen over left edge of filters. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  17. 66. (Credit JTL) Filter rooms looking south from end of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. (Credit JTL) Filter rooms looking south from end of 1924 wing extension. Concrete gravity filters are in foreground, converted New York filters in background. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  18. Intermittent patient suction system, self-contained control

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Jay L.

    1992-01-01

    An intermittent patient suction system, a self-contained control device therefor and methods of making the same are provided, the self-contained control device having a housing that contains two restrictor units therein for respectively controlling the "on" time and "off" time that the control device applies a vacuum and does not apply a vacuum through the output of the control device to the patient.

  19. Approximation theory for boundary layer suction through individual slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walz, A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic concepts of influencing boundary layers are summarized, especially the prevention of flow detachment and the reduction of frictional resistance. A mathematical analysis of suction through a slit is presented with two parameters, for thickness and for shape of the boundary layer, being introduced to specify the flow's velocity profile behind the slit. An approximation of the shape parameter produces a useful formula, which can be used to determine the most favorable position of the slit. An aerodynamic example is given.

  20. Making Large Suction Panels For Laminar-Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, Dal V.

    1991-01-01

    Perforated titanium panels used to identify and resolve issues related to manufacture. Recently, relatively large suction panels with aerodynamically satisfactory surface perforations and with surface contours and smoothness characteristics necessary for Laminar-Flow Control (LFC) designed, fabricated, and tested. Requirements of production lines for commercial transport airplanes carefully considered in development of panels. Sizes of panels representative of what is used on wing of commercial transport airplane. Tests of perforated panels in transonic wind tunnel demonstrated aerodynamic stability at flight mach numbers.

  1. Impact of Suction Loss During Small Incision Lenticule Extraction (SMILE).

    PubMed

    Liu, Manli; Wang, Jianchao; Zhong, Wen; Wang, Danyang; Zhou, Yugui; Liu, Quan

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the clinical results of suction loss in eyes during small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE). This prospective paired-eye case study enrolled 8,490 eyes of 4,296 patients, of which 35 eyes experienced suction loss during the SMILE procedure while being treated for myopia or myopic astigmatism. The eyes with suction loss were re-treated with SMILE, femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK (FS-LASIK), or pseudo SMILE, and the fellow eyes were treated with SMILE. Patients were examined before surgery and at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 and 3 months postoperatively. Corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), manifest refraction, higher order aberrations (HOAs), and morphologic modifications of corneal architecture were evaluated. At 3 months, patients were asked if they preferred the vision in either eye. High-contrast CDVA was worse in the eyes that suffered loss of suction than in the fellow eyes at 1 week postoperatively (two-tailed paired t tests, P = .04), but not at 1 and 3 months. There was no statistical significance between the two treatments in the safety and efficacy indices or the 3rd and 4th order aberrations at 3 months postoperatively (two-tailed paired t tests, all P > .05). No apparent abnormalities were observed in the corneas by frequency-domain optical coherence tomography. Re-treatment with femtosecond laser for incomplete SMILE was safe, predictable, and effective, and the patients did not perceive a difference in vision. [J Refract Surg. 2016;32(10):686-692.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, Walter

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction slot that is assumed to cut off part of the boundary layer without exerting any sink effect. The development, which is approximate, is based on the heat conduction equation. The heat conduction equation enters the analysis through a linearization of the Prandtl-Mises form of the boundary-layer equation.

  3. Mexican blind cavefish use mouth suction to detect obstacles.

    PubMed

    Holzman, Roi; Perkol-Finkel, Shimrit; Zilman, Gregory

    2014-06-01

    Fish commonly use their lateral line system to detect moving bodies such as prey and predators. A remarkable case is the Mexican blind cavefish Astyanax fasciatus, which evolved the ability to detect non-moving obstacles. The swimming body of A. fasciatus generates fluid disturbances, the alteration of which by an obstacle can be sensed by the fish's lateral line system. It is generally accepted that these alterations can provide information on the distance to the obstacle. We observed that A. fasciatus swimming in an unfamiliar environment open and close their mouths at high frequency (0.7-4.5 Hz) in order to generate suction flows. We hypothesized that repeated mouth suction generates a hydrodynamic velocity field, which is altered by an obstacle, inducing pressure gradients in the neuromasts of the lateral line and corresponding strong lateral line stimuli. We observed that the frequency and rate of mouth-opening events varied with the fish's distance to obstacles, a hallmark of pulse-based navigation mechanisms such as echolocation. We formulated a mathematical model of this hitherto unrecognized mechanism of obstacle detection and parameterized it experimentally. This model suggests that suction flows induce lateral line stimuli that are weakly dependent on the fish's speed, and may be an order of magnitude stronger than the correspondent stimuli induced by the fish's gliding body. We illustrate that A. fasciatus can navigate non-visually using a combination of two deeply ancestral and highly conserved mechanisms of ray-finned fishes: the mechanism of sensing water motion by the lateral line system and the mechanism of generating water motion by mouth suction. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Suction catheter for enhanced control and accuracy of transseptal access.

    PubMed

    Sulkin, Matthew S; Berwick, Zachary C; Hermiller, James B; Navia, Jose A; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2016-12-20

    Percutaneous structural heart therapies, such as mitral value repair, require site-specific transseptal access (TSA). This can be challenging for interventional cardiologists. We describe a TSA catheter (TSAC) that utilises suction for enhanced control and puncture accuracy. Here, we aim to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the device. Ex vivo interatrial septum preparations were dissected from swine (n=8) and diseased human hearts (n=6) to quantify TSAC suction and needle puncture force. TSAC suction was 6.5-fold greater than the opposing needle puncture force, and thus provides sufficient stabilisation for punctures. The safety and efficacy of TSAC was evaluated in a chronic mitral regurgitation swine model (n=10) and compared to a conventional TSA device. MR was induced by disrupting one to three mitral chordae tendineae, and the progression of heart disease was followed for three weeks. During device testing, procedure time and fluoroscopy exposure were not statistically different between devices. TSAC reduced septal displacement from 8.7±0.30 mm to 3.60±0.19 mm (p<0.05) and improved puncture accuracy 1.75-fold. TSAC provides controlled TSA and improves puncture accuracy, while maintaining procedure time and workflow. These findings provide a strong rationale for a first-in-man study to demonstrate the clinical utility of the device.

  5. Manipulation of Leading-Edge Vortex Evolution by Applied Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, James; Akkala, James

    2016-11-01

    The generation and shedding of vortices from unsteady maneuvering bodies can be characterized within a framework of vorticity transport, accounting for the effects of multiple sources and sinks of vorticity on the overall circulation of the vortex system. On a maneuvering wing, the diffusive flux of secondary vorticity from the surface is a critical contributor to the strength and dynamics of the leading-edge vortex, suggesting that flow control strategies targeting the manipulation of the secondary vorticity flux and the secondary vortex may provide an effective means of manipulating vortex development. Suction has been applied in the vicinity of the secondary vortex during the downstroke of a periodically-plunging flat-plate airfoil, and the flow evolution and aerodynamic loads are compared to the baseline case in which suction is not applied. Observation of the resulting surface pressure distribution and flow evolution suggest that the secondary flux of vorticity and the evolution of the flow field can be altered subject to appropriate position of the suction ports relative to the developing vortex structures, and at a specific temporal window in the development of the vortex. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Grant Number FA9550-16-1-0107 and NSF EPSCoR Grant Number EPS1101284.

  6. Unsteady diffuser vane pressure and impeller wake measurements in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, N.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a vaned diffuser of a centrifugal pump, and wake measurements of the flow exiting a centrifugal impeller into a vaneless diffuser are presented. Frequency spectra and ensemble averages are given for the unsteady measurements. Two different impellers were used, the pump impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) and a two-dimensional impeller. The magnitude of the unsteady total pressure measured in the stationary frame at the impeller exit was found to be of the same order of magnitude as the total pressure rise across the pump. The magnitude of the unsteady diffuser vane pressures was observed to be significantly different on suction and pressure side of the vane, attaining its largest value on the suction side the leading edge while decreasing along the vane.

  7. Unsteady diffuser vane pressure and impeller wake measurements in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, N.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1987-01-01

    Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a vaned diffuser of a centrifugal pump, and wake measurements of the flow exiting a centrifugal impeller into a vaneless diffuser are presented. Frequency spectra and ensemble averages are given for the unsteady measurements. Two different impellers were used, the pump impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) and a two-dimensional impeller. The magnitude of the unsteady total pressure measured in the stationary frame at the impeller exit was found to be of the same order of magnitude as the total pressure rise across the pump. The magnitude of the unsteady diffuser vane pressures was observed to be significantly different on suction and pressure side of the vane, attaining its largest value on the suction side the leading edge while decreasing along the vane.

  8. Pre-compression volume on flow ripple reduction of a piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bing; Song, Yuechao; Yang, Huayong

    2013-11-01

    Axial piston pump with pre-compression volume(PCV) has lower flow ripple in large scale of operating condition than the traditional one. However, there is lack of precise simulation model of the axial piston pump with PCV, so the parameters of PCV are difficult to be determined. A finite element simulation model for piston pump with PCV is built by considering the piston movement, the fluid characteristic(including fluid compressibility and viscosity) and the leakage flow rate. Then a test of the pump flow ripple called the secondary source method is implemented to validate the simulation model. Thirdly, by comparing results among the simulation results, test results and results from other publications at the same operating condition, the simulation model is validated and used in optimizing the axial piston pump with PCV. According to the pump flow ripples obtained by the simulation model with different PCV parameters, the flow ripple is the smallest when the PCV angle is 13°, the PCV volume is 1.3×10-4 m3 at such operating condition that the pump suction pressure is 2 MPa, the pump delivery pressure 15 MPa, the pump speed 1 000 r/min, the swash plate angle 13°. At the same time, the flow ripple can be reduced when the pump suction pressure is 2 MPa, the pump delivery pressure is 5 MPa,15 MPa, 22 MPa, pump speed is 400 r/min, 1 000 r/min, 1 500 r/min, the swash plate angle is 11°, 13°, 15° and 17°, respectively. The finite element simulation model proposed provides a method for optimizing the PCV structure and guiding for designing a quieter axial piston pump.

  9. Effect of endotracheal suction on lung dynamics in mechanically-ventilated paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Brenda; Futter, Merle; Argent, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Endotracheal suctioning is performed regularly in ventilated infants and children to remove obstructive secretions. The effect of suctioning on respiratory mechanics is not known. This study aimed to determine the immediate effect of endotracheal suctioning on dynamic lung compliance, tidal volume, and airway resistance in mechanically-ventilated paediatric patients by means of a prospective observational clinical study. Lung mechanics were recorded for five minutes before and five minutes after a standardised suctioning procedure in 78 patients intubated with endotracheal tubes < or = 4.0 mm internal diameter. Twenty-four patients with endotracheal tube leaks > or = 20% were excluded from analysis. There was a significant overall decrease in dynamic compliance (p < 0.001) and mechanical expired tidal volume (p = 0.03) following suctioning with no change in the percentage endotracheal tube leak (p = 0.41). The change in dynamic compliance was directly related to both endotracheal tube and catheter sizes. There was no significant change in expiratory or inspiratory airway resistance following suctioning (p > 0.05). Although the majority of patients (68.5%) experienced a drop in dynamic compliance following suctioning, dynamic compliance increased in 31.5% of patients after the procedure. This study demonstrates that endotracheal suctioning frequently causes an immediate drop in dynamic compliance and expired tidal volume in ventilated children with variable lung pathology, intubated with small endotracheal tubes, probably indicating loss of lung volume caused by the suctioning procedure. There is no evidence that suctioning reduces airway resistance.

  10. Optimization of renal transfection using a renal suction-mediated transfection method in mice.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Yota; Kawakami, Shigeru; Fuchigami, Yuki; Oyama, Natsuko; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Konishi, Satoshi; Shimizu, Kazunori; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a suction-mediated transfection method in mice. The purpose of this study was to optimize the suction-mediated transfection conditions using a pressure-controlled computer system for efficient and safe kidney-targeted gene delivery in mice. Naked pCMV-Luc was injected into the tail vein in mice, and then the right kidney was suctioned by a device of the suction pressure-controlled system. The effects of renal transfection conditions, such as the suction pressure degree, suction pressure waveform and device area were evaluated by measuring luciferase expression. In addition, renal injury was examined. The renal suction-mediated transfection method at -30 kPa showed high transgene expression. The renal suction waveform did not affect the transfection activity. Under the optimized conditions, the high transgene expression was mostly observed at the renal suctioned site. The transfection conditions used did not induce histological defects or increases in two renal injury biomarkers (Kidney injury molecule-1 mRNA and Clusterin mRNA). We have clarified the transfection conditions for efficient and safe transfection in the kidney using the suction-mediated transfection method in mice.

  11. [Extendable Cords to Prevent Tumbling of a Suction Device during Craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Osawa, Shigeyuki; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Kumabe, Toshihiro

    2016-02-01

    Suction is necessary during craniotomy, and intraoperative tumbling of the suction device interrupts operative procedures. To avoid this, we developed a technique that would fasten the device to an extendable cord as is used to secure cell phones. We used this technique in more than 300 craniotomies at the specific point of time when the suction device tends to tumble, i. e., during the opening and closure of a wound, which requires frequent instrument exchanges. Extendable cords fastened to the tip of the suction hose using a gift tie were attached to the drapes to secure the suction device next to the operative field. During the operation, the extendable cord followed the suction device manipulations. Consequently, although there was some tension in the cord during its extension, the maneuverability of the suction device was maintained. As the hanging suction device was closer to the operative field than devices stored in conventional pockets, its manipulation was easier and quicker. Upon release, the suction device automatically returned to its original position without distracting the surgeon. Tumbling of the device was prevented, and there were no procedure-related complications. Our simple modification using extendable cords prevented tumbling, avoided unnecessary replacements, and eased the manipulation of a suction device.

  12. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, G.B.; Dilmore, W.J.

    1992-09-01

    A vertical vessel is described having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas. 18 figs.

  13. Filtering apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Haldipur, Gaurang B.; Dilmore, William J.

    1992-01-01

    A vertical vessel having a lower inlet and an upper outlet enclosure separated by a main horizontal tube sheet. The inlet enclosure receives the flue gas from a boiler of a power system and the outlet enclosure supplies cleaned gas to the turbines. The inlet enclosure contains a plurality of particulate-removing clusters, each having a plurality of filter units. Each filter unit includes a filter clean-gas chamber defined by a plate and a perforated auxiliary tube sheet with filter tubes suspended from each tube sheet and a tube connected to each chamber for passing cleaned gas to the outlet enclosure. The clusters are suspended from the main tube sheet with their filter units extending vertically and the filter tubes passing through the tube sheet and opening in the outlet enclosure. The flue gas is circulated about the outside surfaces of the filter tubes and the particulate is absorbed in the pores of the filter tubes. Pulses to clean the filter tubes are passed through their inner holes through tubes free of bends which are aligned with the tubes that pass the clean gas.

  14. The effect of balance holes to centrifugal pump performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, O.; Ozgoren, M.; Aksoy, M. H.; Kocaaslan, O.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze of a centrifugal pump with and without balance holes by using ANSYS-Fluent software. The pump used in the study is a commercial centrifugal pump consisting of two stages that is a model of Sempa Pump Company. Firstly, models of impeller, diffuser, suction and discharge sections of the centrifugal pump were separately drawn using Ansys and Solidworks software. Later, grid structures were generated on the flow volume of the pump. Turbulent flow volume was numerically solved by realizable k-є turbulence model. The flow analyses were focused on the centrifugal pump performance and the flow characteristics under different operational conditions with/without balance holes. Distributions of flow characteristics such as velocity and pressure distributions in the flow volume were also determined, numerically. The results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) with/without balance holes for the pump head and hydraulic efficiency on the design flow rate of 80 m3/h were found to be 81.5/91.3 m and 51.9/65.3%, respectively.

  15. An experimental investigation of two-phase liquid oxygen pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The results of an experimental program to explore the feasibility of pumping two-phase oxygen (liquid and gas) at the pump inlet are reported. Twenty-one cavitation tests were run on a standard J-2 oxygen pump at the MSFC Components Test Laboratory. All tests were run with liquid oxygen 5 to 10 K above the normal boiling point temperature. During ten tests run at approximately at the pump inlet were noted before complete pump performance 50 percent of the nominal operating speed, two phase conditions were achieved. Vapor volumes of 40 to 50 percent at the pump inlet were noted before complete pump performance loss. The experimental results compared to predictions. Nine cavitation tests run at the nominal pump speed over a 5 K temperature range showed progressively lower net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements as temperature was increased. Two-phase operation was not achieved. The temperature varying NPSH data were used to calculate thermodynamic effects on NPSH, and the results were compared to existing data.

  16. Heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, A.J.

    1982-11-30

    A single working fluid heat pump system having a turbocompressor with a first fluid input for the turbine and a second fluid input for the compressor, and a single output volute or mixing chamber for combining the working fluid output flows of the turbine and the compressor. The system provides for higher efficiency than single fluid systems whose turbine and compressor are provided with separate output volutes.

  17. Solar Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pique, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Proposed pump moves liquid by action of bubbles formed by heat of sun. Tube of liquid having boiling point of 100 to 200 degrees F placed at focal axis of cylindrical reflector. Concentrated sunlight boils liquid at focus, and bubbles of vapor rise in tube, carrying liquid along with them. Pressure difference in hot tube sufficient to produce flow in large loop. Used with conventional flat solar heating panel in completely solar-powered heat-storage system.

  18. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOEpatents

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  19. Why Cannot Suction Drains Prevent Postoperative Spinal Epidural Hematoma?

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Dong Ki; Kim, Jin Woo; Yi, Seong Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative spinal epidural hematoma (POSEH) is different from spontaneous or post-spinal procedure hematoma because of the application of suction drains. However, it appeared that suction drains were not effective for prevention of POSEH in previous studies. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that POSEH can be caused by hypercoagulability. Methods This was an experimental study. One hundred fifty milliliters of blood was donated from each of the 12 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery and infused into 3 saline bags of 50 mL each. One of the 3 bags in each set contained 5,000 units of thrombin. All of them were connected to 120 ± 30 mmHg vacuum suctions: drainage was started 8 minutes after connection to the vacuum system for 12 normal blood bags (BV8) and 12 thrombin-containing blood bags (TBV8) and 15 minutes after connection for the remaining 12 normal blood bags (BV15). The amount of initial and remaining hematoma at 20 minutes, 120 minutes, and 24 hours after vacuum application were measured by their weight (g). The primary endpoint was the difference between BV8 and TBV8. The secondary end point was the difference between BV8 and BV15. Results The remaining hematoma in TBV8 was significantly greater than that in BV8 at all measurement points: 46.3 ± 12.4 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.000) at 20 minutes; 33.0 ± 8.2 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 (p = 0.000) at 120 minutes; and 26.1 ± 4.0 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.000) at 24 hours after vacuum application. The remaining hematoma of BV15 was significantly greater than that of BV8 at all measurement points: 30.0 ± 12.0 vs. 17.0 ± 1.3 (p = 0.002) at 20 minutes; 24.2 ± 7.6 vs. 16.3 ± 1.2 at 120 minutes (p = 0.002); and 22.2 ± 6.6 vs. 15.8 ± 1.6 (p = 0.004) at 24 hours after vacuum application. Conclusions With a suction drain in place, the amount of remaining hematoma could be affected by coagulability. Thrombin-containing local hemostatics and the length of time elapsed before the

  20. Numerical simulation of flow in centrifugal pump with complex impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bao-ling; Lin, Yong-gang; Jin, Ying-zi

    2011-03-01

    Based on the Navier-Stokes equations and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model, three dimensional turbulent flow fields in centrifugal pump with long-mid-short blade complex impeller are calculated and analyzed numerically. The relative velocity and pressure distributions in the flowpart are obtained. It is found that the flow in the passage of the complex impeller is unsymmetrical due to the joint action between volute and impeller. The back-flow region is at inlet of long-blade suction side, near middle part of long-blade pressure side and outlet of short-blade suction side. The flow near volute throat is affected greatly by volute. The relative velocity is large and it is easy to bring back flow at outlet of the complex impeller near volute throat. The static and total pressure rise uniformly from inlet to outlet in the impeller. At impeller outlet, the pressure periodically decreases from pressure side to suction side, and then the static pressure sharply rise near the throat. The experimental results show that the back flow in the impeller has an important influence on the performance of pump.

  1. Performance of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.; Steward, W. G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II are determined over the temperature range of 1.6 to 4.2 K. The single-stage pump is powered by a close-coupled cryogenic induction motor. In the absence of cavitation, pump performance (head and capacity) was found to be identical for He I and He II. Developed heads up to 16 m and capacities of up to 900 liters/hr are obtained at 7000 rpm. A three-blade screw inducer was shown to require much less suction head than a six-blade propeller inducer.

  2. Performance of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.; Steward, W. G.

    1988-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II are determined over the temperature range of 1.6 to 4.2 K. The single-stage pump is powered by a close-coupled cryogenic induction motor. In the absence of cavitation, pump performance (head and capacity) was found to be identical for He I and He II. Developed heads up to 16 m and capacities of up to 900 liters/hr are obtained at 7000 rpm. A three-blade screw inducer was shown to require much less suction head than a six-blade propeller inducer.

  3. Performance of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludtke, P. R.; Daney, D. E.; Steward, W. G.

    The performance characteristics of a small centrifugal pump in He I and He II are determined over the temperature range of 1.6 to 4.2 K. The single-stage pump is powered by a close-coupled cryogenic induction motor. In the absence of cavitation, pump performance (head and capacity) was found to be identical for He I and He II. Developed heads up to 16 m and capacities of up to 900 liters/hr are obtained at 7000 rpm. A three-blade screw inducer was shown to require much less suction head than a six-blade propeller inducer.

  4. Using the motor to monitor pump conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Casada, D.

    1996-12-01

    When the load of a mechanical device being driven by a motor changes, whether in response to changes in the overall process or changes in the performance of the driven device, the motor inherently responds. For induction motors, the current amplitude and phase angle change as the shaft load changes. By examining the details of these changes in amplitude and phase, load fluctuations of the driven device can be observed. The usefulness of the motor as a transducer to improve the understanding of devices with high torque fluctuations, such as positive displacement compressors and motor-operated valves, has been recognized and demonstrated for a number of years. On such devices as these, the spectrum of the motor current amplitude, phase, or power normally has certain characteristic peaks associated with various load components, such as the piston stroke or gear tooth meshing frequencies. Comparison and trending of the amplitudes of these peaks has been shown to provide some indication of their mechanical condition. For most centrifugal pumps, the load fluctuations are normally low in torque amplitude, and as a result, the motor experiences a correspondingly lower level of load fluctuation. However, both laboratory and field test data have demonstrated that the motor does provide insight into some important pump performance conditions, such as hydraulic stability and pump-to-motor alignment. Comparisons of other dynamic signals, such as vibration and pressure pulsation, to motor data for centrifugal pumps are provided. The effects of inadequate suction head, misalignment, mechanical and hydraulic unbalance on these signals are presented.

  5. Ultraviolet filters.

    PubMed

    Shaath, Nadim A

    2010-04-01

    The chemistry, photostability and mechanism of action of ultraviolet filters are reviewed. The worldwide regulatory status of the 55 approved ultraviolet filters and their optical properties are documented. The photostabilty of butyl methoxydibenzoyl methane (avobenzone) is considered and methods to stabilize it in cosmetic formulations are presented.

  6. Axial and centrifugal continuous-flow rotary pumps: a translation from pump mechanics to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Nader; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Kobayashi, Mariko; Smedira, Nicholas G; Hoercher, Katherine J; Massiello, Alex; Lee, Sangjin; Horvath, David J; Starling, Randall C

    2013-01-01

    The recent success of continuous-flow circulatory support devices has led to the growing acceptance of these devices as a viable therapeutic option for end-stage heart failure patients who are not responsive to current pharmacologic and electrophysiologic therapies. This article defines and clarifies the major classification of these pumps as axial or centrifugal continuous-flow devices by discussing the difference in their inherent mechanics and describing how these features translate clinically to pump selection and patient management issues. Axial vs centrifugal pump and bearing design, theory of operation, hydrodynamic performance, and current vs flow relationships are discussed. A review of axial vs centrifugal physiology, pre-load and after-load sensitivity, flow pulsatility, and issues related to automatic physiologic control and suction prevention algorithms is offered. Reliability and biocompatibility of the two types of pumps are reviewed from the perspectives of mechanical wear, implant life, hemolysis, and pump deposition. Finally, a glimpse into the future of continuous-flow technologies is presented. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Replacement Saltwell Pumping System Document Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    BELLOMY, J.R.

    2000-12-07

    This document bibliography is prepared to identify engineering documentation developed during the design of the Replacement Saltwell Pumping System. The bibliography includes all engineering supporting documents and correspondence prepared prior to the deployment of the system in the field. All documents referenced are available electronically through the Records Management Information System (RMIS). Major components of the Replacement Saltwell Pumping System include the Sundyne Canned Motor Pump, the Water Filter Skid, the Injection Water Skid and the Backflow Preventer Assembly. Drawing H-14-104498 provides an index of drawings (fabrication details, P&IDs, etc.) prepared to support development of the Replacement Saltwell Pumping System. Specific information pertaining to new equipment can be found in Certified Vendor Information (CVI) File 50124. This CVI file has been established specifically for new equipment associated with the Replacement Saltwell Pumping System.

  8. Navier-Stokes simulations of the effects of suction holes on a flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitz, Hubert L.; Fasel, Hermann F.

    1994-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations are employed to explore the effects of suction holes on transition in a laminar flat plate boundary layer. The Navier-Stokes equations are cast in vorticity-velocity form. Periodicity is imposed in spanwise direction; all other spatial derivatives are discretized with fourth order compact differences. An explicit fourth order Runge-Kutta scheme is employed for the time-integration of the vorticity transport equations. Suction is applied through a row of holes aligned in spanwise direction. For low suction strengths, each hole generates a pair of stable streamwise vortices. When the suction strength exceeds a critical value, the vortices become unstable. For high suction strengths, vortex shedding occurs right at the suction holes. Our numerical findings agree well with experimental observations.

  9. Femtosecond Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flap Creation in Narrow Palpebral Fissure Eyes without Suction.

    PubMed

    Chang, John S M; Law, Antony K P; Ng, Jack C M; Cheng, May S Y

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate a surgical technique used in eyes with narrow palpebral fissure undergoing femtosecond laser flap creation without suction during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). All data of 2 patient groups were collected through chart review. Group 1 consisted of 6 eyes with narrow palpebral fissure in which the suction ring was manually fixated and femtosecond laser was applied accordingly. Thirty comparison cases were randomly drawn from among eyes that underwent a standard LASIK procedure matched for age and preoperative refraction (group 2). Only 1 eye of each patient was selected to compare the refractive and visual outcomes between groups. In all group 1 eyes, the flaps were created successfully with manual fixation of the suction ring without suction. No eyes lost 2 or more lines of vision. No significant difference was found in the safety and refractive outcomes between groups. Manual fixation of the suction ring in eyes with narrow palpebral fissure without suction was feasible for flap creation during LASIK.

  10. Capsule- and disk-filter procedure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skrobialowski, Stanley C.

    2016-01-01

    Capsule and disk filters are disposable, self-contained units composed of a pleated or woven filter medium encased in a polypropylene or other plastic housing that can be connected inline to a sample-delivery system (such as a submersible or peristaltic pump) that generates sufficient pressure (positive or negative) to force water through the filter. Filter media are available in several pore sizes, but 0.45 µm is the pore size used routinely for most studies at this time. Capsule or disk filters (table 5.2.1.A.1) are required routinely for most studies when filtering samples for trace-element analyses and are recommended when filtering samples for major-ion or other inorganic-constituent analyses.

  11. Fastest predators in the plant kingdom: functional morphology and biomechanics of suction traps found in the largest genus of carnivorous plants.

    PubMed

    Poppinga, Simon; Weisskopf, Carmen; Westermeier, Anna Sophia; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2015-11-24

    Understanding the physics of plant movements, which describe the interplay between plant architecture, movement speed and actuation principles, is essential for the comprehension of important processes like plant morphogenesis. Recent investigations especially on rapid plant movements at the interface of biology, physics and engineering sciences highlight how such fast motions can be achieved without the presence of muscles, nerves and technical hinge analogies. The suction traps (bladders) of carnivorous bladderworts (Utricularia spp., Lentibulariaceae, Lamiales) are considered as some of the most elaborate moving structures in the plant kingdom. A complex interplay of morphological and physiological adaptations allows the traps to pump water out of their body and to store elastic energy in the deformed bladder walls. Mechanical stimulation by prey entails opening of the otherwise watertight trapdoor, followed by trap wall relaxation, sucking in of water and prey, and consecutive trapdoor closure. Suction can also occur spontaneously in non-stimulated traps. We review the current state of knowledge about the suction trap mechanism with a focus on architectonically homogeneous traps of aquatic bladderwort species from section Utricularia (the so-called 'Utricularia vulgaris trap type'). The functional morphology and biomechanics of the traps are described in detail. We discuss open questions and propose promising aspects for future studies on these sophisticated ultra-fast trapping devices.

  12. Fastest predators in the plant kingdom: functional morphology and biomechanics of suction traps found in the largest genus of carnivorous plants

    PubMed Central

    Poppinga, Simon; Weisskopf, Carmen; Westermeier, Anna Sophia; Masselter, Tom; Speck, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the physics of plant movements, which describe the interplay between plant architecture, movement speed and actuation principles, is essential for the comprehension of important processes like plant morphogenesis. Recent investigations especially on rapid plant movements at the interface of biology, physics and engineering sciences highlight how such fast motions can be achieved without the presence of muscles, nerves and technical hinge analogies. The suction traps (bladders) of carnivorous bladderworts (Utricularia spp., Lentibulariaceae, Lamiales) are considered as some of the most elaborate moving structures in the plant kingdom. A complex interplay of morphological and physiological adaptations allows the traps to pump water out of their body and to store elastic energy in the deformed bladder walls. Mechanical stimulation by prey entails opening of the otherwise watertight trapdoor, followed by trap wall relaxation, sucking in of water and prey, and consecutive trapdoor closure. Suction can also occur spontaneously in non-stimulated traps. We review the current state of knowledge about the suction trap mechanism with a focus on architectonically homogeneous traps of aquatic bladderwort species from section Utricularia (the so-called ‘Utricularia vulgaris trap type’). The functional morphology and biomechanics of the traps are described in detail. We discuss open questions and propose promising aspects for future studies on these sophisticated ultra-fast trapping devices. PMID:26602984

  13. DISK PUMP FEASIBILITY INVESTIGATION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The disk pump was investigated at the Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory (AFRPL) to determine the feasibility of using a novel viscous pumping... pump primarily for application as an inducer. The disk pump differs drastically from conventional pumps because of the following major factors: (1) The...The pump inlet relative velocity is equal only to the through flow velocity between the disks. Therefore, there is good indication that the disk pump will

  14. Some recent applications of the suction analogy to asymmetric flow situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    A recent extension of the suction analogy for the estimation of vortex loads on asymmetric configurations was reviewed. This includes the asymmetric augmented vortex lift and the forward sweep effect on side edge suction. Application of this extension to a series of skewed wings has resulted in an improved estimating capability for a wide range of asymmetric flow situations. Hence, the suction analogy concept now has more general applicability for subsonic lifting surface analysis.

  15. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    PubMed

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P < .001) from the preset level. Fluid aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P < .001) and was much more during 15 and 20 seconds suction time as compared to 5 seconds (P < .001). Massive aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  16. The practice of intensive care nurses using the closed suctioning system: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Somayeh; Yazdannik, AhmadReza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal suctioning (ETS) is an essential procedure performed for mechanically ventilated patients. ETS can be either performed by open or closed suctioning system (CSS). There may be some concern on how closed-system ETS is practiced by intensive care nurses. This study was designed to investigate closed-system ETS practices of critical care nurses and to compare their practice with standard recommendations. Materials and Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted during August and December 2012 to establish how critical care nurses (N = 40) perform different steps in a typical ETS practice and to compare it with the current best practice recommendations through a 23-item structured checklist. The results were categorized into three sections: Pre-suctioning, suctioning, and post-suctioning practices. Results: Pre-suctioning, suctioning, and post-suctioning practices mean scores were 7.5, 11.75, and 8.5, respectively, out of 16, 16, and 12, respectively. The total suctioning practice score was 27.75 out of 44. Most discrepancies were observed in the patients’ assessment and preparation, infection control practices, and use of an appropriate catheter. Spearman correlation coefficient indicated a significant statistical positive correlation between suctioning education period and suctioning practice score (P < 0.0001) and between working experience and suctioning practice score (P = 0.02). Conclusions: The findings revealed that critical care nurses do not fully adhere to the best practice recommendation in CSS. We recommend that standard guidelines on ETS practice be included in the current education of critical care nurses. PMID:26457102

  17. DENVER DISC FILTER IN CO91107, SHOWING FIVE DOUBLESIDED DISCS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DENVER DISC FILTER IN CO-91-107, SHOWING FIVE DOUBLE-SIDED DISCS AND DRIVE MOTOR. NOTE FOUR VERTICAL SLURRY FEED PIPES FROM OVERHEAD MANIFOLD AND SUCTION PIPE IN FOREGROUND. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  18. Well pump

    SciTech Connect

    Page, J.S.

    1983-03-08

    Well fluid pumping apparatus comprises: (A) body structure defining an upright plunger bore, (B) a plunger reciprocable in that bore, (C) the body structure also defining a chamber sidewardly offset from an axis defined by the plunger bore and communicating with the bore, and (D) valving carried by the body structure to pass intake fluid via the chamber into the plunger bore in response to stroking of the plunger in one direction in the bore, and to pass discharge fluid from the plunger bore into and from the chamber in response to stroking of the plunger in the opposite direction in the bore.

  19. Well pump

    DOEpatents

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  20. Motionless heat pump - A new application of thermal transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugimoto, K.; Hirota, Y.; Kizaki, Y.

    2016-11-01

    A motionless heat pump system using a combination of thermal transpiration flow of a rarefied gas and a phase change of water has been proposed. This system consists primarily of a thermal transpiration pump, referred to as a Knudsen pump, and two chambers filled with water and water vapor, respectively. The Knudsen pump moves water vapor from one chamber to the other. The pressure drop in the outflow chamber promotes the evaporation of water and heat absorption, whereas the pressure increase in the inflow chamber promotes vapor condensation and heat generation. The maximum pressure difference and mass flow rate obtained by a Knudsen pump composed of a glass fiber filter were 57.6 Pa and 0.0484 mg/s/cm2, respectively, at a temperature difference across the filter of 120 K between the two chambers. The vapor delivery capacity of this pump was also measured experimentally.

  1. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  2. Closed suction drainage versus closed simple drainage in the management of modified radical mastectomy wounds.

    PubMed

    Ezeome, E R; Adebamowo, C A

    2008-09-01

    To compare the outcomes of modified radical mastectomy wounds managed by closed wound drainage with suction and without suction. A prospective randomised trial was conducted at the University College Hospital in Ibadan, and the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital in Enugu. Fifty women who required modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer were randomised to have closed wound drainage with suction (26 patients) and closed wound drainage without suction (24 patients). There was no significant difference in the intraoperative and postoperative variables. Suction drainage drained less volume of fluid and stayed for a shorter time in the wound, but the differences were not significant. There was no difference in the length of hospital stay, time to stitch removal, and number of dressing changes. More haematomas and wound infections occurred in the simple drain group while more seromas occurred in the suction drain group, but these were not significant. The suction drain was more difficult to manage and the cost was 15 times higher than the simple drainage system. Closed simple drains are not inferior to suction drains in mastectomy wounds and, considering the cost saving and simplicity of postoperative care, they are preferable to suction drains.

  3. Lung recruitment and endotracheal suction in ventilated preterm infants measured with electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Hough, Judith L; Shearman, Andrew D; Liley, Helen; Grant, Caroline A; Schibler, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Although suctioning is a standard airway maintenance procedure, there are significant associated risks, such as loss of lung volume due to high negative suction pressures. This study aims to assess the extent and duration of change in end-expiratory level (EEL) resulting from endotracheal tube (ETT) suction and to examine the relationship between EEL and regional lung ventilation in ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. A prospective observational clinical study of the effect of ETT suction on 20 non-muscle-relaxed preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) on conventional mechanical ventilation was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit. Ventilation distribution was measured with regional impedance amplitudes and EEL using electrical impedance tomography. ETT suction resulted in a significant increase in EEL post-suction (P < 0.01). Regionally, anterior EEL decreased and posterior EEL increased post-suction, suggesting heterogeneity. Tidal volume was significantly lower in volume-guarantee ventilation compared with pressure-controlled ventilation (P = 0.04). ETT suction in non-muscle-relaxed and ventilated preterm infants with RDS results in significant lung volume increase that is maintained for at least 90 min. Regional differences in distribution of ventilation with ETT suction suggest that the behaviour of the lung is heterogeneous in nature. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  4. [The effect evaluation of suction drainage to prevent fistula after superficial parotidectomy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin; Jia, Mu-yun; Cai, Zhen; Yuan, Rong-tao; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Kui; Bu, Ling-xue

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of suction drainage to prevent fistula after parotidectomy, and seek the best opportunity to remove the drainage according to the draining output and duration. One hundred and ninety-four patients with parotid diseases after superficial parotidectomy were assigned into pressure dressing group and suction drainage group. Pressure dressing was used after suction drainage tube was removed in the pressure group, while suction drainage tube was fixed through the process in the suction group. Postoperative salivary fistula occurrence between the 2 groups was analyzed with Pearson chi-square test, and the contribution of the output and duration resulting in salivary fistula was analyzed by Fisher's exact test with SPSS 19.0 software package. The occurrence of salivary fistula in the pressure dressing group and suction group was 11.6% and 15.5%, respectively in the suction group. No significance difference was found between the 2 groups (P>0.05). In the suction drainage group, significant correlation of the draining duration and salivary fistula was not found (P>0.05). However, the draining output less than 20 mL resulted in lower salivary fistula rate compared with the draining output of 20-30 mL. According to our findings, suction drainage can be used as a substitute for pressure dressing after parotidectomy in preventing salivary fistula, and the best timing of drainage extubation is when the draining output is less than 20 mL within 24 hours.

  5. The NASA Langley laminar-flow-control experiment on a swept, supercritical airfoil: Suction coefficient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.; Harris, Charles D.; Harvey, William D.

    1991-01-01

    A swept supercritical wing incorporating laminar flow control at transonic flow conditions was designed and tested. The definition of an experimental suction coefficient and a derivation of the compressible and incompressible formulas for the computation of the coefficient from measurable quantities is presented. The suction flow coefficient in the highest velocity nozzles is shown to be overpredicted by as much as 12 percent through the use of an incompressible formula. However, the overprediction on the computed value of suction drag when some of the suction nozzles were operating in the compressible flow regime is evaluated and found to be at most 6 percent at design conditions.

  6. Boundary layer suction through rectangular orifices: effects of aspect ratio and orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Buren, T.; Smits, A. J.; Amitay, M.

    2017-07-01

    The flow field generated by suction through a rectangular orifice within a laminar boundary layer is investigated using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. For orifice aspect ratios of 6, 12, and 18, the impact of suction on the surrounding flow field appears to be self-similar, scaling with aspect ratio and suction velocity. Changing the orifice pitch angle had almost no impact on the surrounding boundary layer, but, as expected, changing the skew angle significantly altered the extent of the suction impact on the flow field.

  7. Uncertainties in pesticide monitoring using suction cups: Evidences from numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weihermüller, L.; Kasteel, R.; Vanderborght, J.; Šimůnek, J.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-04-01

    Risk assessment of pesticide leaching towards the groundwater becomes more and more prescribed by the authorities. Various methods are available to monitor transport and leaching of pesticides in the vadose zone. For experiments at the field scale, soil coring or in-situ sampling using capillary wicks, porous plates, and suction cups are used. The advantage of the in-situ sampling systems resides in the high temporal resolution of solute extraction at different depths or horizons. Especially suction cups seem to play an important role in pesticide monitoring due to their easy installation and low costs. In literature, most studies analyzing suction cup behavior focused on conservative substances, steady state infiltration, and homogeneous soils. In our numerical study, we analyzed breakthrough curves from suction cups in heterogeneous soils under atmospheric conditions. To account for reactive transport, two pesticides were also simulated, whereby each one represents a different physico-chemical behavior. Finally, we simulated two different operation modes of the suction cups: i) permanent suction according to a measured reference tensiometer plus additional offset, and ii) weekly operation with constant suction of -600 cm. The results show that the breakthrough as well as the mass recovery and the mean concentration depends on the physico-chemical properties of the substance and location of the suction cup within the heterogeneous flow field. Second, the total mass as well as the mean concentration depends on the operation mode of the suction cup system.

  8. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  9. Numerical studies in a centrifugal pump with the improved blade considering cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P. F.; Zhang, Y. X.; Xu, C.; Zhou, X.; Zhang, J. Y.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a centrifugal pump with the improved blade for cavitation is studied numerically. A 3D impeller with logarithmic spiral blade profile was designed by the in-house hydraulic design code using a centrifugal pump geometric parameters, and the blade profile curve of suction side on the designed impeller is replaced by a combination of tangent line and circle arc line. The cavitation flows in the centrifugal pump with designed impeller, modified impeller and centrifugal pump spectrum impeller are respectively calculated by two-phase CFD simulation at three flow rates. The tests of the centrifugal pump have been conducted to verify numerical simulation. The effects of designed impeller and modified impeller on hydraulic efficiency, critical cavitation number, cavitation length, head drop performance and vapor cavity distribution in impeller are investigated. The results show that the modification of blade profile curve of suction side can improve the cavitation performance of an impeller and hydraulic efficiency of centrifugal pump. Compared with designed impeller, the critical cavitation number of centrifugal pump with modified impeller decrease by 26.5% under the same flow rate coefficient, and the cavitation intensity in the modified impeller is weakened effectively. The hydraulic efficiency of modified impeller also increases by 4.9%.

  10. Comparing two levels of closed system suction pressure in ICU patients: Evaluating the relative safety of higher values of suction pressure

    PubMed Central

    Yazdannik, Ahmad R.; Haghighat, Somayeh; Saghaei, Mahmoud; Eghbali, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Endotracheal suctioning (ETS) is one of the most common supportive measures in intensive care units (ICU). ETS may be associated with complications including hypoxia and tachycardia. Closed system suctioning (CSS) decreases the rate of cardiorespiratory complication mainly due to continuation of ventilatory support and oxygenation during procedure. CSS has questionable efficacy, therefore higher values of negative pressure has been recommended to enhance the efficacy of CSS. This study was designed to evaluate the effects on gas exchange of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure compared with 100 mmHg in CSS. Materials and Methods: Fifty mechanically ventilated (MV) ICU patients were selected for the study. Two consecutive ten seconds CSS using suction pressures of 100 and 200 mmHg, in random order applied in each subject with the two hours wash out period. Effects of two levels of suction pressure on gas exchange were measured by recording the SPo2 values at 4 times. Results: Repeated measure analysis of variance didn't show any significant difference between two levels of pressure (P = 0.315), but within each groups (100 and 200 mmHg) SPO2 changes was significant (P = 0.000). There was a mild but significant and transient increase in heart rate following both suction pressures, but no significant difference between two groups. Conclusion: The results show that CSS with suction pressure 200 mmHg has no detrimental effect on cardiorespiratory function of MV ICU patients. Since the safety of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure was approved, using 200 mmHg suction pressures is recommended for ETS of MV patients. PMID:23983740

  11. Comparing two levels of closed system suction pressure in ICU patients: Evaluating the relative safety of higher values of suction pressure.

    PubMed

    Yazdannik, Ahmad R; Haghighat, Somayeh; Saghaei, Mahmoud; Eghbali, Maryam

    2013-03-01

    Endotracheal suctioning (ETS) is one of the most common supportive measures in intensive care units (ICU). ETS may be associated with complications including hypoxia and tachycardia. Closed system suctioning (CSS) decreases the rate of cardiorespiratory complication mainly due to continuation of ventilatory support and oxygenation during procedure. CSS has questionable efficacy, therefore higher values of negative pressure has been recommended to enhance the efficacy of CSS. This study was designed to evaluate the effects on gas exchange of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure compared with 100 mmHg in CSS. Fifty mechanically ventilated (MV) ICU patients were selected for the study. Two consecutive ten seconds CSS using suction pressures of 100 and 200 mmHg, in random order applied in each subject with the two hours wash out period. Effects of two levels of suction pressure on gas exchange were measured by recording the SPo2 values at 4 times. Repeated measure analysis of variance didn't show any significant difference between two levels of pressure (P = 0.315), but within each groups (100 and 200 mmHg) SPO2 changes was significant (P = 0.000). There was a mild but significant and transient increase in heart rate following both suction pressures, but no significant difference between two groups. The results show that CSS with suction pressure 200 mmHg has no detrimental effect on cardiorespiratory function of MV ICU patients. Since the safety of 200 mmHg suctioning pressure was approved, using 200 mmHg suction pressures is recommended for ETS of MV patients.

  12. Theoretical model for a background noise limited laser-excited optical filter for doubled Nd lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shay, Thomas M.; Garcia, Daniel F.

    1990-06-01

    A simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter is reported. Calculations for Rb filter transitions that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd lasers are presented. The results of these calculations show the filter's quantum efficiency versus the laser pump power. The required laser pump powers required range from 2.4 to 60 mW/sq cm of filter aperture.

  13. Comparative ecophysiology of active zoobenthic filter feeding, essence of current knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Larsen, P. S.

    2000-12-01

    The present contribution gives an overview of current knowledge of a comprehensive and steadily growing research field. The first section deals with water pumping and particle retention mechanisms in ciliary and muscular filter feeders. The second section examines the biological filter pumps in order to assess adaptation to the environment. Filter-feeding benthic invertebrates have evolved filter pumps to solve common basic problems. This has led to a large degree of similarity between otherwise distant standing species, which makes comparative studies interesting and important. The present review of zoobenthic filter feeding aims at accentuating such recognition.

  14. Theoretical model for a background noise limited laser-excited optical filter for doubled Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M.; Garcia, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    A simple theoretical model for the calculation of the dependence of filter quantum efficiency versus laser pump power in an atomic Rb vapor laser-excited optical filter is reported. Calculations for Rb filter transitions that can be used to detect the practical and important frequency-doubled Nd lasers are presented. The results of these calculations show the filter's quantum efficiency versus the laser pump power. The required laser pump powers required range from 2.4 to 60 mW/sq cm of filter aperture.

  15. Suction cautery adenoidectomy (SCA): is the additional cost justified?

    PubMed

    Hajr, Eman; Hagr, Abdulrahman; Al-Arfaj, Ahmed; Ashraf, Masooda

    2011-03-01

    Adenoidectomy is one of the oldest and most frequent ENT procedures. This study aimed to compare adenoidectomy using suction-cautery adenoidectomy (SCA) to curettage with respect to operative time, postoperative complications, and cost-effectiveness. The data for this retrospective case control study were retrieved from the Medical Records Department at one of the few medical centers that perform this technique in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The data for each case included the following: patient demographic features, type of procedure, time of operation, occurrence of any postoperative complications, length of hospital stay and cost of the procedure. To minimize the sources of variance in our data, all adenoidectomies were performed by the same consultant otolaryngologist, using either SCA or curettage. Of the 86 patients who underwent adenoidectomy in this study, SCA was performed in half of them (43) and curettage in the other half. The two groups were well matched with no significant group differences in either age or gender (p=0.2 and p=0.19, respectively). There was a significant reduction in operative time (p<0.001) in the SCA group. There were no cases of postoperative hemorrhage after SCA, but there was one case of hemorrhage in the curette group that required a 2nd surgery to control the bleeding. Regarding cost, there were additional profits of more than 700,000 SR (US$180,000) each month with SCA as compared to curettage. The suction cautery technique was superior at reducing operative time, increasing cost-effectiveness and decreasing the risk of postoperative complications. Therefore, we suggest suction cautery as the most appropriate method for adenoidectomy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pump apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Kime, J.A.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a gas-oil well production system for pumping formation fluid wherein a down hole pump is provided having a barrel including a barrel fluid inlet, a barrel fluid outlet, a barrel chamber, and a plunger mounted in the barrel chamber having a plunger chamber. The plunger is reciprocally driven between an upper terminal position at the end of the plunger upstroke and a lower terminal position at the end of the plunger downstroke. The method for removing developed gaseous fluids in the formation fluid from the barrel chamber comprises: drawing formation fluid into the barrel chamber during the plunger upstroke; providing gas port means in the barrel; expelling the developed gaseous fluids from the barrel chamber through the gas port means during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from the upper terminal position of the gas port means; and substantially blocking the gas port means and moving formation fluid into the plunger chamber during the occurrence of that portion of the plunger downstroke from below the gas port means to the lower terminal position.

  17. Fat Harvest Using a Closed-Suction Drain

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Roxana; Mallucci, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    We propose a safe, simple, and novel method to harvest fat using a standard liposuction cannula and a Redivac or alternative closed-suction drain. The authors have used this technique for both 'dry' and 'wet' liposuction. This technique is both easy to perform and cost-effective whilst providing both a silent and relatively atraumatic fat harvest. The lower negative pressure compared with traditional harvesting systems likely preserves fat integrity for lipofilling. This method maximises resources already held within a hospital environment. PMID:27218029

  18. Spatial simulation of instability control by periodic suction blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danabasoglu, G.; Biringen, S.; Streett, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of active control by periodic suction blowing in spatially evolving plane Poiseuille flow is investigated by the direct simulation of the three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results reveal that significant reductions in perturbation amplitudes can be obtained by a proper choice of the control wave amplitude and phase. The upstream influence of the control wave is shown to be confined to a region in the vicinity of the control slot with no apparent effect on the flow development.

  19. Motion compensation using a suctioning stabilizer for intravital microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Lee, Sungon; Gorbatov, Rostic; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Motion artifacts continue to present a major challenge to single cell imaging in cardiothoracic organs such as the beating heart, blood vessels, or lung. In this study, we present a new water-immersion suctioning stabilizer that enables minimally invasive intravital fluorescence microscopy using water-based stick objectives. The stabilizer works by reducing major motion excursions and can be used in conjunction with both prospective or retrospective gating approaches. We show that the new approach offers cellular resolution in the beating murine heart without perturbing normal physiology. In addition, because this technique allows multiple areas to be easily probed, it offers the opportunity for wide area coverage at high resolution. PMID:24086796

  20. Spatial simulation of instability control by periodic suction blowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danabasoglu, G.; Biringen, S.; Streett, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability of active control by periodic suction blowing in spatially evolving plane Poiseuille flow is investigated by the direct simulation of the three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results reveal that significant reductions in perturbation amplitudes can be obtained by a proper choice of the control wave amplitude and phase. The upstream influence of the control wave is shown to be confined to a region in the vicinity of the control slot with no apparent effect on the flow development.

  1. Parameter identification for a suction-dependent plasticity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, L.; Schrefler, B. A.

    2001-03-01

    In this paper, the deterministic parameter identification procedure proposed in a companion paper is applied to suction-dependent elasto-plasticity problems. A mathematical model for such type of problems is firstly presented, then it is applied to the parameter identification using laboratory data. The identification procedure is applied in a second example to exploitation of a gas reservoir. The effects of the extraction of underground fluids appear during and after quite long periods of time and strongly condition the decision to profit or not of the natural resources. Identification procedures can be very useful tools for reliable long-term predictions.

  2. Centrifugal experimental study of suction bucket foundations under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaobing; Wu, Yongren; Jiao, Bintian; Wang, Shuyun

    2007-12-01

    Centrifugal experiments were carried out to investigate the responses of suction bucket foundations under horizontal and vertical dynamic loading. It is shown that when the loading amplitude is over a critical value, the sand at the upper part around the bucket is softened or even liquefied. The excess pore pressure decreases from the upper part to the lower part of the sand layer in the vertical direction and decreases radially from the bucket’s side wall in the horizontal direction. Large settlements of the bucket and the sand layer around the bucket are induced by dynamic loading. The dynamic responses of the bucket with smaller height (the same diameter) are heavier.

  3. Lubrication and tribology in seawater hydraulic piston pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Li, Zhuang-Yun; Zhu, Yu-Quan

    2003-06-01

    Water hydraulic systems have provoked major interest because of the human friendly and environmental safety aspects. Piston pump is one of the most frequently used hydraulic units in recent engineering technique. In water hydraulic piston pump, poor lubrication is more likely to happen than in oil hydraulic one because of difference in properties between water and oil. So there are some key problems such as corrosive wear and erosion, which are investigated briefly. Many new materials have been developed, which give longer life expectancies with water without corrosion and erosion. A new type of seawater hydraulic piston pumps with better suction characteristics had been developed at HUST. Much of this research has concentrated on new materials, structure and experiments, which are also specially introduced.

  4. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  5. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

    1996-10-29

    A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of waters or other fluid sources, includes a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis. 5 figs.

  6. Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability

    DOEpatents

    Hopkins, Charles D.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Toole, Jr., William R.

    1996-01-01

    A hydraulically operated pump for in-ground filtering and monitoring of ws or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of o-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

  7. 62. (Credit CBF) Operating floor of filter room, c1912. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. (Credit CBF) Operating floor of filter room, c1912. The remodeled New York horizontal pressure filters (now gravity filters) are in the foreground; the remodelled Hyatt tub filters are in the background. - McNeil Street Pumping Station, McNeil Street & Cross Bayou, Shreveport, Caddo Parish, LA

  8. Rod pumping and proppant flowback at the Lost Hills Field

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, I.G.

    1995-12-31

    Proppant flowback from hydraulically fractured wells can lead to sand wear on the pump barrel and plunger and increased pulling costs on rod pumped wells. Two approaches for lengthening run times of the pumps were tried. One approach was to install pumps that will allow production of a sand laden fluid. Pressure actuated plunger (PAP) pumps were field tested and showed an average increase of 81.6% in run time. These split ring wiper pumps clean the barrel of sand prior to the passing of the plunger. The other approach was to keep the sand and from entering the pumps. When down hole filters were utilized, run life of the pumps with the filters increases 135%. Well pulling cost savings of $11.91 per well-day and $9.24 per well-day are documented for the PAP pumps and filters, respectively. Application guidelines based on the sand loading rate and gross liquid production of the wells are presented, as well as some operational experiences.

  9. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures contribute to negative pressures in a mechanical lung model

    PubMed Central

    Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Opdahl, Helge; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Borchsenius, Fredrik; Skjønsberg, Ole Henning

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Removal of pulmonary secretions in mechanically ventilated patients usually requires suction with closed catheter systems or flexible bronchoscopes. Manual ventilation is occasionally performed during such procedures if clinicians suspect inadequate ventilation. Suctioning can also be performed with the ventilator entirely disconnected from the endotracheal tube (ETT). The aim of this study was to investigate if these two procedures generate negative airway pressures, which may contribute to atelectasis. Methods The effects of device insertion and suctioning in ETTs were examined in a mechanical lung model with a pressure transducer inserted distal to ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm internal diameter (ID). A 16 Fr bronchoscope and 12, 14 and 16 Fr suction catheters were used at two different vacuum levels during manual ventilation and with the ETTs disconnected. Results During manual ventilation with ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm ID, and bronchoscopic suctioning at moderate suction level, peak pressure (PPEAK) dropped from 23, 22 and 24.5 cm H2O to 16, 16 and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Maximum suction reduced PPEAK to 20, 17 and 11 cm H2O, respectively, and the end-expiratory pressure fell from 5, 5.5 and 4.5 cm H2O to –2, –6 and –17 cm H2O. Suctioning through disconnected ETTs (open suction procedure) gave negative model airway pressures throughout the duration of the procedures. Conclusions Manual ventilation and open suction procedures induce negative end-expiratory pressure during endotracheal suctioning, which may have clinical implications in patients who need high PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure). PMID:28725445

  10. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures contribute to negative pressures in a mechanical lung model.

    PubMed

    Nakstad, Espen Rostrup; Opdahl, Helge; Heyerdahl, Fridtjof; Borchsenius, Fredrik; Skjønsberg, Ole Henning

    2017-01-01

    Removal of pulmonary secretions in mechanically ventilated patients usually requires suction with closed catheter systems or flexible bronchoscopes. Manual ventilation is occasionally performed during such procedures if clinicians suspect inadequate ventilation. Suctioning can also be performed with the ventilator entirely disconnected from the endotracheal tube (ETT). The aim of this study was to investigate if these two procedures generate negative airway pressures, which may contribute to atelectasis. The effects of device insertion and suctioning in ETTs were examined in a mechanical lung model with a pressure transducer inserted distal to ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm internal diameter (ID). A 16 Fr bronchoscope and 12, 14 and 16 Fr suction catheters were used at two different vacuum levels during manual ventilation and with the ETTs disconnected. During manual ventilation with ETTs of 9 mm, 8 mm and 7 mm ID, and bronchoscopic suctioning at moderate suction level, peak pressure (PPEAK) dropped from 23, 22 and 24.5 cm H2O to 16, 16 and 15 cm H2O, respectively. Maximum suction reduced PPEAK to 20, 17 and 11 cm H2O, respectively, and the end-expiratory pressure fell from 5, 5.5 and 4.5 cm H2O to -2, -6 and -17 cm H2O. Suctioning through disconnected ETTs (open suction procedure) gave negative model airway pressures throughout the duration of the procedures. Manual ventilation and open suction procedures induce negative end-expiratory pressure during endotracheal suctioning, which may have clinical implications in patients who need high PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure).

  11. Initial design of a novel suction enteroscope for endoscopic locomotion in the small bowel (with video).

    PubMed

    Wagh, Mihir S; Montane, Roberto

    2012-02-01

    The upper GI tract and the colon are readily accessible endoscopically, but the small intestine is relatively difficult to evaluate. To demonstrate the feasibility of using suction as a means of locomotion and to assess the initial design of a suction enteroscope. Feasibility study. Animal laboratory. Various prototype suction devices designed in our laboratory were tested in swine small intestine in a force test station. For in vivo experiments in live anesthetized animals, two suction devices (1 fixed tip and 1 movable tip) were attached to the outside of the endoscope. By creating suction in the fixed tip, the endoscope was anchored while the movable tip was advanced. Suction was then applied to the extended tip to attach it to the distal bowel. Suction on the fixed tip was then released and the movable tip with suction pulled back, resulting in advancement of the endoscope. These steps were sequentially repeated. Intestinal segments were sent for pathologic assessment after testing. Force generated ranged from 0.278 to 4.74 N with 64.3 to 88 kPa vacuum pressure. A linear relationship was seen between the pull force and vacuum pressures and tip surface area. During in vivo experiments, the endoscope was advanced in 25-cm segmental increments with sequential suction-and-release maneuvers. No significant bowel trauma was seen on pathology and necropsy. The enteroscopy system requires further refinement. A novel suction enteroscope was designed and tested. Suction tip characteristics played a critical role impacting the functionality of this enteroscopy system. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Suction based mechanical characterization of superficial facial soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Weickenmeier, J; Jabareen, M; Mazza, E

    2015-12-16

    The present study is aimed at a combined experimental and numerical investigation of the mechanical response of superficial facial tissues. Suction based experiments provide the location, time, and history dependent behavior of skin and SMAS (superficial musculoaponeurotic system) by means of Cutometer and Aspiration measurements. The suction method is particularly suitable for in vivo, multi-axial testing of soft biological tissue including a high repeatability in subsequent tests. The campaign comprises three measurement sites in the face, i.e. jaw, parotid, and forehead, using two different loading profiles (instantaneous loading and a linearly increasing and decreasing loading curve), multiple loading magnitudes, and cyclic loading cases to quantify history dependent behavior. In an inverse finite element analysis based on anatomically detailed models an optimized set of material parameters for the implementation of an elastic-viscoplastic material model was determined, yielding an initial shear modulus of 2.32kPa for skin and 0.05kPa for SMAS, respectively. Apex displacements at maximum instantaneous and linear loading showed significant location specificity with variations of up to 18% with respect to the facial average response while observing variations in repeated measurements in the same location of less than 12%. In summary, the proposed parameter sets for skin and SMAS are shown to provide remarkable agreement between the experimentally observed and numerically predicted tissue response under all loading conditions considered in the present study, including cyclic tests.

  13. Morphine Pharmacodynamics in Mechanically Ventilated Preterm Neonates Undergoing Endotracheal Suctioning.

    PubMed

    Välitalo, P A; Krekels, E H; van Dijk, M; Simons, Shp; Tibboel, D; Knibbe, C A

    2017-04-01

    To date, morphine pharmacokinetics (PKs) are well quantified in neonates, but results about its efficacy are ambiguous. This work presents an analysis of a previously published study on pain measurements in mechanically ventilated preterm neonates who received either morphine or placebo to improve comfort during invasive ventilation. The research question was whether morphine reduces the pain associated with endotracheal or nasal suctioning before, during, and after suctioning. Because these neonates cannot verbalize their pain levels, pain was assessed on the basis of several validated pain measurement instruments (i.e., COMFORT-B, preterm infant pain profile [PIPP], Neonatal Infant Pain Scale (NIPS), and visual analogue scale (VAS)). The item response theory (IRT) was used to analyze the data in order for us to handle the data from multiple-item pain scores. The analysis showed an intra-individual relationship between morphine concentrations and pain reduction, as measured by COMFORT-B and VAS. However, the small magnitude of the morphine effect was not considered clinically relevant for this intervention in preterm neonates. © 2017 The Authors CPT: Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  14. Temperature Measurement in WTE Boilers Using Suction Pyrometers

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty. PMID:24248279

  15. Adaptive Suction and Blowing for Twin-Tail Buffet Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandil, Osama A.; Yang, Zhi

    1999-01-01

    Adaptive active flow control for twin-tail buffet alleviation is investigated. The concept behind this technique is to place control ports on the tail outer and inner surfaces with flow suction or blowing applied through these ports in order to minimize the pressure difference across the tail. The suction or blowing volume flow rate from each port is proportional to the pressure difference across the tail at this location. A parametric study of the effects of the number and location of these ports on the buffet response is carried out. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. This complex multidisciplinary problem is solved sequentially using three sets of equations for the fluid flow, aeroelastic response and grid deformation, using a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The computational model is pitched at 30 deg angle of attack. The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. The model is investigated for the inboard position of the twin tails, which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% of the wing span. Comparison of the time history and power spectral density responses of the tails for various distributions of the control ports are presented and discussed.

  16. [Swimming pool suction injury: etiology, profylaxis and management].

    PubMed

    Škach, J; Kašák, P; Šrám, J

    2015-01-01

    Swimming pool suction injuries are unique and rare with a substantive risk of fatal consequences. Little children under the age of 8 are the most frequent victims with serious injuries. Drownings of different seriousness are also a usual part of accidents. The case of a 19 year old man trapped in the gluteal area by a unsecured suction drainage hole illustrates the uniqueness of this problem in an interesting way. Prophylactic arrangements are well known but the problem is with their strict application. Fatal causes excluding drowning include hypovolemic shock from the sudden redistribution of intersticial fluid and blood and also the evisceration of the bowel and other abdominal organs. Localised often bizarre and large swellings and sufusions can be treated nonoperatively in the vast majority of cases. For the prevention of these injuries it is important to inform the public and increase their awareness to these injuries. It is also crucial for the correct management of these injuries a deeper awareness of this issue and a sharing of experiences and solutions with other experts.Key words: vacuum - accident - entrapment - compartment syndrome.

  17. Successful closed suction drain management of a canine elbow hygroma.

    PubMed

    Pavletic, M M; Brum, D E

    2015-07-01

    A 1-year-old castrated male St. Bernard dog presented to Angell Animal Medical Center with bilateral elbow hygromas which had been present for several weeks. The largest hygroma involving the left elbow was managed with a closed suction (active) drain system to continuously collapse the hygroma pocket over a 3-week period. Soft bedding was used to protect the elbows from further impact trauma to the olecranon areas. Following drain removal, there was no evidence of hygroma recurrence based on periodic examinations over an 18-month period. The smaller non-operated right elbow hygroma had slightly enlarged during this period. Closed suction drain management of the hygroma proved to be a simple and economical method of collapsing the left elbow hygroma. This closed drainage system eliminated the need for the postoperative bandage care required with the use of the Penrose (passive) drain method of managing elbow hygromas. The external drain tube should be adequately secured in order to minimise the risk of its inadvertent displacement.

  18. Temperature measurement in WTE boilers using suction pyrometers.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Fabio; Najafi, Behzad

    2013-11-15

    The temperature of the flue-gas in the post combustion zone of a waste to energy (WTE) plant has to be maintained within a fairly narrow range of values, the minimum of which is prescribed by the European Waste Directive 2000/76/CE, whereas the maximum value must be such as to ensure the preservation of the materials and the energy efficiency of the plant. A high degree of accuracy in measuring and controlling the aforementioned temperature is therefore required. In almost the totality of WTE plants this measurement process is carried out by using practical industrial thermometers, such as bare thermocouples and infrared radiation (IR) pyrometers, even if affected by different physical contributions which can make the gas temperature measurements incorrect. The objective of this paper is to analyze errors and uncertainties that can arise when using a bare thermocouple or an IR pyrometer in a WTE plant and to provide a method for the in situ calibration of these industrial sensors through the use of suction pyrometers. The paper describes principle of operation, design, and uncertainty contributions of suction pyrometers, it also provides the best estimation of the flue-gas temperature in the post combustion zone of a WTE plant and the estimation of its expanded uncertainty.

  19. Kinematics of suction feeding in the seahorse Hippocampus reidi.

    PubMed

    Roos, Gert; Van Wassenbergh, Sam; Herrel, Anthony; Aerts, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Fish typically use a rostro-caudal wave of head expansion to generate suction, which is assumed to cause a uni-directional, anterior-to-posterior flow of water in the expanding head. However, compared with typical fish, syngnathid fishes have a remarkably different morphology (elongated snout, small hyoid, immobile pectoral girdle) and feeding strategy (pivot feeding: bringing the small mouth rapidly close to the prey by neurocranial dorsorotation). As a result, it is unclear how suction is generated in Syngnathidae. In this study, lateral and ventral expansions of the head were quantified in Hippocampus reidi and linked to the kinematics of the mouth, hyoid and neurocranium. In addition, the flow velocities inside the bucco-pharyngeal cavity and in front of the mouth were calculated. Our data suggest that the volume changes caused by lateral expansion are dominant over ventral expansion. Maximum gape, neurocranium rotation and hyoid depression are all reached before actual volume increase and before visible prey movement. This implies that, unlike previously studied teleosts, hyoid rotation does not contribute to ventral expansion by lowering the floor of the mouth during prey capture in H. reidi. The lateral volume changes show a rostro-caudal expansion, but the maximal flow velocity is not near the mouth aperture (as has been demonstrated for example in catfish) but at the narrow region of the buccal cavity, dorsal to the hyoid.

  20. Classification of physiologically significant pumping states in an implantable rotary blood pump: effects of cardiac rhythm disturbances.

    PubMed

    Karantonis, Dean M; Lovell, Nigel H; Ayre, Peter J; Mason, David G; Cloherty, Shaun L

    2007-06-01

    Methods of speed control for implantable rotary blood pumps (iRBPs) are vital for providing implant recipients with sufficient blood flow to cater for their physiological requirements. The detection of pumping states that reflect the physiological state of the native heart forms a major component of such a control method. Employing data from a number of acute animal experiments, five such pumping states have been previously identified: regurgitant pump flow, ventricular ejection (VE), nonopening of the aortic valve (ANO), and partial collapse (intermittent [PVC-I] and continuous [PVC-C]) of the ventricle wall. An automated approach that noninvasively detects such pumping states, employing a classification and regression tree (CART), has also been developed. An extension to this technique, involving an investigation into the effects of cardiac rhythm disturbances on the state detection process, is discussed. When incorporating animal data containing arrhythmic events into the CART model, the strategy showed a marked improvement in detecting pumping states as compared to the model devoid of arrhythmic data: state VE--57.4/91.7% (sensitivity/specificity) improved to 97.1/100.0%; state PVC-I--66.7/83.1% improved to 100.0/88.3%, and state PVC-C--11.1/66.2% changed to 0.0/100%. With a simplified binary scheme differentiating suction (PVC-I, PVC-C) and nonsuction (VE, ANO) states, suction was initially detected with 100/98.5% sensitivity/specificity, whereas with the subsequent improved model, both these states were detected with 100% sensitivity. The accuracy achieved demonstrates the robustness of the technique presented, and substantiates its inclusion into any iRBP control methodology.

  1. Three-dimensional flow observation on the air entrainment into a vertical-wet-pit pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, K.; Maeda, T.; Nagura, T.; Inoue, T.

    2016-11-01

    The authors consider the air entrainment into a suction pipe which is vertically inserted down into a suction sump across a mean free-water surface. This configuration is often referred to as the “vertical wet-pit pump,” and has many practical advantages in construction, maintenance and operation. Most of the flows appearing in various industrial and environmental problems like the present suction- sump flow become often complicated owing to both of their unsteadiness with poor periodicity and their fully-three-dimensionality. In order to understand the complicated flow inside a suction sump in the vertical-wet-pit-pump configuration, the authors experimentally observe the flow using the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry (3D-PTV) technique, which includes more unknown factors in accuracy and reliability than other established measuring techniques. So, the authors examine the simultaneous measurement by the 3D-PTV with another velocimetry the ultrasonic velocity profiler. As a result, under the suitable condition with high accuracy, the authors have revealed the complicated flow.

  2. LMFBR with booster pump in pumping loop

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, H.J.

    1975-10-14

    A loop coolant circulation system is described for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) utilizing a low head, high specific speed booster pump in the hot leg of the coolant loop with the main pump located in the cold leg of the loop, thereby providing the advantages of operating the main pump in the hot leg with the reliability of cold leg pump operation.

  3. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, G.B.; Brynsvold, G.V.; Jahns, T.M.

    1989-08-22

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium are disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet. 4 figs.

  4. Winding for linear pump

    DOEpatents

    Kliman, Gerald B.; Brynsvold, Glen V.; Jahns, Thomas M.

    1989-01-01

    A winding and method of winding for a submersible linear pump for pumping liquid sodium is disclosed. The pump includes a stator having a central cylindrical duct preferably vertically aligned. The central vertical duct is surrounded by a system of coils in slots. These slots are interleaved with magnetic flux conducting elements, these magnetic flux conducting elements forming a continuous magnetic field conduction path along the stator. The central duct has placed therein a cylindrical magnetic conducting core, this core having a cylindrical diameter less than the diameter of the cylindrical duct. The core once placed to the duct defines a cylindrical interstitial pumping volume of the pump. This cylindrical interstitial pumping volume preferably defines an inlet at the bottom of the pump, and an outlet at the top of the pump. Pump operation occurs by static windings in the outer stator sequentially conveying toroidal fields from the pump inlet at the bottom of the pump to the pump outlet at the top of the pump. The winding apparatus and method of winding disclosed uses multiple slots per pole per phase with parallel winding legs on each phase equal to or less than the number of slots per pole per phase. The slot sequence per pole per phase is chosen to equalize the variations in flux density of the pump sodium as it passes into the pump at the pump inlet with little or no flux and acquires magnetic flux in passage through the pump to the pump outlet.

  5. Liquid metal pump

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.

    1982-01-01

    The liquid metal pump comprises floating seal rings and attachment of the pump diffuser to the pump bowl for isolating structural deflections from the pump shaft bearings. The seal rings also eliminate precision machining on large assemblies by eliminating the need for a close tolerance fit between the mounting surfaces of the pump and the seals. The liquid metal pump also comprises a shaft support structure that is isolated from the pump housing for better preservation of alignment of shaft bearings. The shaft support structure also allows for complete removal of pump internals for inspection and repair.

  6. 21 CFR 878.4680 - Nonpowered, single patient, portable suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... apparatus. 878.4680 Section 878.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....4680 Nonpowered, single patient, portable suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A nonpowered, single patient, portable suction apparatus is a device that consists of a manually operated plastic, disposable...

  7. 21 CFR 878.4680 - Nonpowered, single patient, portable suction apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... apparatus. 878.4680 Section 878.4680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....4680 Nonpowered, single patient, portable suction apparatus. (a) Identification. A nonpowered, single patient, portable suction apparatus is a device that consists of a manually operated plastic, disposable...

  8. 75 FR 70112 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Non-Powered Suction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Devices; Classification of Non-Powered Suction Apparatus Device Intended for Negative Pressure Wound... Administration (FDA) is classifying the non- powered suction apparatus device intended for negative pressure... Apparatus Device Intended for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy.'' The agency is classifying the device into...

  9. 46 CFR 134.180 - Piping for fire-main suction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping for fire-main suction. 134.180 Section 134.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ADDED PROVISIONS FOR LIFTBOATS § 134.180 Piping for fire-main suction. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of...

  10. 46 CFR 134.180 - Piping for fire-main suction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping for fire-main suction. 134.180 Section 134.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ADDED PROVISIONS FOR LIFTBOATS § 134.180 Piping for fire-main suction. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of...

  11. 46 CFR 134.180 - Piping for fire-main suction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping for fire-main suction. 134.180 Section 134.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ADDED PROVISIONS FOR LIFTBOATS § 134.180 Piping for fire-main suction. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of...

  12. 46 CFR 134.180 - Piping for fire-main suction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping for fire-main suction. 134.180 Section 134.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ADDED PROVISIONS FOR LIFTBOATS § 134.180 Piping for fire-main suction. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of...

  13. 46 CFR 134.180 - Piping for fire-main suction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping for fire-main suction. 134.180 Section 134.180 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OFFSHORE SUPPLY VESSELS ADDED PROVISIONS FOR LIFTBOATS § 134.180 Piping for fire-main suction. (a) Except as provided by paragraph (b) of...

  14. Development of advanced stability theory suction prediction techniques for laminar flow control. [on swept wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srokowski, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of obtaining accurate estimates of suction requirements on swept laminar flow control wings was discussed. A fast accurate computer code developed to predict suction requirements by integrating disturbance amplification rates was described. Assumptions and approximations used in the present computer code are examined in light of flow conditions on the swept wing which may limit their validity.

  15. 77 FR 25717 - Proposed Issuance of a General NPDES Permit for Small Suction Dredging

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed Issuance of a General NPDES Permit for Small Suction Dredging AGENCY: Environmental... mining operations in Idaho for small suction dredges (intake nozzle size of 5 inches in diameter or...

  16. Real-time imaging of suction blistering in human skin using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Joana C.O.; Palero, Jonathan A.; Jurna, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Separation of skin epidermis from the dermis by suction blistering has been used with high success rate for autologous skin epidermal grafting in burns, chronic wounds and vitiligo transplantation treatment. Although commercial products that achieve epidermal grafting by suction blistering are presently available, there is still limited knowledge and understanding on the dynamic process of epidermal-dermal separation during suction blistering. In this report we integrated a suction system to an Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) which allowed for the first time, real-time imaging of the suction blistering process in human skin. We describe in this report the evolution of a suction blister where the growth is modeled with a Boltzmann sigmoid function. We further investigated the relationship between onset and steady-state blister times, blister growth rate, applied suction pressure and applied local skin temperature. Our results show that while the blister time is inversely proportional to the applied suction pressure, the relationship between the blister time and the applied temperature is described by an exponential decay. PMID:26713194

  17. Bacterial contamination of suction catheter tips during aortic valve replacement surgery: a prospective observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Johanna; Sutherland, Sofia; Söderström, Åsa; Roman-Emanuel, Christine; Jeppsson, Anders; Olofsson, Elisabeth Hansson; Svensson, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mediastinitis is a severe complication after open heart surgery. The infection causes prolonged hospitalization and an increased mortality risk. Observations from orthopaedic surgery showed that the suction catheter used during surgery is commonly contaminated with bacteria. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of suction catheter contamination in cardiac surgery and to study if suction time influences the contamination risk. Fifty suction catheter tips were collected during 25 aortic valve replacement operations. The suction tip was exchanged once during the operation (after aortotomy closure). The tips were subjected to bacterial contamination analysis. In 20 of the 25 investigated cases (80%), bacterial contamination was detected on one or both tips. The tip used during the beginning of the operation showed bacterial contamination in 13/25 cases (52%) and the second tip in 12/25 (48%). In 5/25 cases (20%) both tips were contaminated. There was no association between bacterial contamination and suction time. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus was the most commonly detected microorganism. The suction device should be considered as a potential source of bacterial contamination in cardiac surgery. The results suggest that the suction catheter should be replaced before key moments like valve implantation and sternal closure.

  18. Micropolar boundary layer flow at a stagnation point on a moving wall with suction and injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanien, I. A.; Hady, F. M.

    1988-10-01

    The flow of a micropolar fluid at a two-dimensional stagnation point on a moving wall with suction and injection is studied. Numerical computations were carried out on a VME-2955 computer. The effects of the suction/injection parameter and dimensionless material parameters are discussed.

  19. Effects of suction dredging on streams: a review and an evaluation strategy

    Treesearch

    Bret C. Harvey; Thomas E. Lisle

    1998-01-01

    Abstract - Suction dredging for gold in river channels is a small-scale mining practice whereby streambed material is sucked up a pipe, passed over a sluice box to sort out the gold, and discarded as tailings over another area of bed. Natural resource managers should be concerned about suction dredging because it is common in streams in western North America that...

  20. Impact of supra-cuff suction on ventilator-associated pneumonia prevention

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carolina Ramos; Santana, Vivian Taciana Simioni

    2012-01-01

    Critically ill patients are intubated or tracheostomized because, in most cases, these individuals require invasive mechanical ventilation. The cannulae that are used include the cuff, which can act as a reservoir for oropharyngeal secretions, predisposing to ventilator-associated pneumonia. Studies have revealed that the suction of subglottic secretions through the dorsal suction lumen above the endotracheal tube cuff delays the onset and reduces the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. The aim of this review is to assess published studies regarding the significance of using suction with a supra-cuff device for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients treated with orotracheal intubation or tracheostomy. Therefore, by searching national and international databases, a literature review was undertaken of studies published between the years 1986 and 2011. Few results were found relating the suction of subglottic secretions to decreased duration of mechanical ventilation and length of stay in the intensive care unit. The suction of subglottic secretions is ineffective in decreasing mortality but is effective in reducing the incidence of early-onset ventilator-associated pneumonia and hospital costs. Techniques involving continuous suction of subglottic secretions may be particularly efficient in removing secretions; however, intermittent suction appears to be the least harmful method. In conclusion, cannulae with a supra-cuff suction device enable the aspiration of subglottic secretions, providing benefits to critically ill patients by reducing the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia and, consequently, hospital costs - with no large-scale adverse effects. PMID:23917940

  1. Ion pump provides increased vacuum pumping speed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Multiple-cell ion pumps with increased vacuum pumping speed are used for producing ultrahigh vacuums in vacuum tubes and mass spectrometers. The pump has eight cathode-anode magnetron cells arranged in a cylinder which increase the surface area of the cathode.

  2. Experimental Design and Analysis of Pump as Turbine for Microhydro System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M. A.; Muzammil, W. K.; Rahman, M.; Ibrahim, M. W. K.; Misran, S.

    2017-07-01

    Pump as Turbine (PAT) is typically used as electromechanical components in microhydro systems, especially by rural communities in developing countries to reduce initial capital cost. The technology is readily available and easily accessible compared to commercially available turbines. The aim of this paper is to present the experimental design and analysis of PAT for microhydro systems over a range of rotational speeds. An end suction centrifugal pump was tested by inversing the flow across the pump. The rotational speed of the impeller was controlled by manipulating the braking force applied to the output shaft. The corresponding flow rate, pressure, and torque were recorded and presented. The experiment results show that the centrifugal pump can operate in turbine modes without any modification on mechanical components with the highest efficiency of 65.04%; however, at off-design operation, the efficiency decreases significantly due to unmatched flow velocity with the wall boundaries inside the pump.

  3. Numerical Study of Two-Phase Flow in Micro-/Nanobubble Generating Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syaeful Alam, Hilman; Bahrudin; Sugiarto, Anto Tri

    2017-05-01

    Gas-liquid mixing pump is one of the multiphase flow problem in industrial applications as a micro-/nanobubble generator. However, very few report that studied the two-phase flow for application of microbubble generation because of the analysis complexity. In this paper, a steady state numerical simulation of gas-liquid two-phase flow in the gas-liquid mixing pump was employed to predict a performance and characteristic of fluid flow. Based on simulation results, it is demonstrated that the pump can work in self suction, and generates a vortex flow pattern at every stage of the impeller as regenerative. Performance pump of the numerical simulation is slightly higher than the design specifications Because of mechanical and volume losses was neglected. However, the evaluation method and simulation results from this work can be used as a reference for the design and improvement of the gas-liquid mixing pump.

  4. Radial, mixed and axial-flow pumps: Size estimation and specification, amendment A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-11-01

    This Data Item is available as part of the ESDU Sub-series on Fluid Mechanics Internal Flow. Performance estimates for a wide range of rotodynamic pumps are provided in order to anticipate the salient features of a suitable standard pump. This information which would otherwise only be available from a bulky collection of manufacturers' catalogs is complemented by a methodical procedure to pinpoint the most suitable pump configuration. Charts giving rapid estimates of size and efficiency (with formulae to allow easy programming for calculators or computers) are given together with approximate correlations of suction and discharge flange sizes, and data showing the effects that liquids of high viscosity have on pump performance. The information is supported by a comprehensive example which is backed up by numerous cross references to ESDU 80030 which provides a general introduction to pump performance considerations.

  5. Performance characteristics of two annular dump diffusers using suction-stabilized vortex flow control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, A. J.; Smith, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    Test results are described for two abrupt area change annular diffusers with provisions for maintaining suction stabilized toroidal vortices at the area discontinuity. Both diffusers had an overall area ratio of 4.0 with the prediffuser area ratio being 1.18 for diffuser A and 1.4 for diffuser B. Performance was evaluated at near atmospheric pressure and temperature for a range of inlet Mach numbers from 0.18 to 0.41 and suction rates from 0 to 18%. Static pressure recovery improved significantly as the suction rate was increased to approximately 11%. Results obtained with diffuser A were superior to that obtained with diffuser B. Flat radial profiles of exit velocity were not obtained since the flow showed preferential hub or tip attachment at moderate suction rates. At high suction rates the diffuser exit flow became circumferentially nonuniform and unstable.

  6. Controlled Suction with Venous Catheter Irrigation in Neurosurgery: A Cost Effective Technique.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Manas; Kumari, Manoranjitha; Vooturi, Sudhindra

    2017-01-01

    Keeping the operating field clean and visible is an important technique in neurosurgery. Continuous irrigation-suction (IS) of the surgical field is currently often done using devices available that are expensive and demand technical proficiency. We report a simple method of continuous IS using a widely available central venous catheter and a controlled suction cannula. We used a controlled suction cannula attached to a central suction system. A single lumen central venous catheter is passed through the keyhole of a controlled suction cannula, which is connected to a continuous irrigation system. The operative field was clean throughout the procedure, obviating the need for an assisting surgeon to irrigate into the deep operating field and, hence, reducing the duration of surgery. The proposed IS system could be surgeon friendly, easily manageable, yet cost-effective and efficient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Audit of Endotracheal Tube Suction in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kylie; Bulsara, Max K; Ramelet, Anne-Sylvie; Monterosso, Leanne

    2017-02-01

    We report outcomes of a clinical audit examining criteria used in clinical practice to rationalize endotracheal tube (ETT) suction, and the extent these matched criteria in the Endotracheal Suction Assessment Tool(ESAT)©. A retrospective audit of patient notes ( N = 292) and analyses of criteria documented by pediatric intensive care nurses to rationalize ETT suction were undertaken. The median number of documented respiratory and ventilation status criteria per ETT suction event that matched the ESAT© criteria was 2 [Interquartile Range (IQR) 1-6]. All criteria listed within the ESAT© were documented within the reviewed notes. A direct link was established between criteria used for current clinical practice of ETT suction and the ESAT©. The ESAT©, therefore, reflects documented clinical decision making and could be used as both a clinical and educational guide for inexperienced pediatric critical care nurses. Modification to the ESAT © requires "preparation for extubation" to be added.

  8. Experiments on the stability of the flat-plate boundary layer with suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, G. A.; Saric, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in the VPI and SU Stability Wind Tunnel on a flat-plate wind-tunnel model equipped with porous suction panels. Detailed hot-wire measurements were conducted in the laminar boundary layer to investigate the stabilizing effects of suction on growing Tollmien-Schlichting waves, which were introduced into the boundary layer using a vibrating ribbon. Special care was taken to minimize external disturbances and to avoid extraneous experimental bias. The measurements, which included mean-flow and disturbance-amplitude profiles across the boundary layer, showed that suction applied through discrete porous strips can be as effective as suction applied continuously over a much longer streamwise length. The measurements also showed that suction is more effective when placed forward, nearer to the region of neutral stability, than when placed in the region of maximum growth rate. These results also provided meaningful comparison with recent theory.

  9. Instability of compressible boundary layers along curved walls with suction or cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Hady, N. M.; Verma, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of suction of the boundary layer and wall cooling on the growth and development of three-dimensional longitudinal vortices over concave walls. The study is carried out for compressible flows for a range of Mach numbers from 0 to 5. Despite indications that small suction or small cooling rates locally reduce the critical Goertler number (destabilize the boundary layer), the overall effect of suction or cooling is to stabilize the boundary layer by reducing the amplitude ratio of the vortices. In case of suction, this becomes more difficult with increasing Mach number unless high suction rates are used. On the other hand, stabilizing the boundary layer with respect to Goertler vortices can hardly be achieved by cooling even when high cooling rates are used.

  10. An Experimental Study of Cavitation Detection in a Centrifugal Pump Using Envelope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chek Zin; Leong, M. Salman

    Cavitation represents one of the most common faults in pumps and could potentially lead to a series of failure in mechanical seal, impeller, bearing, shaft, motor, etc. In this work, an experimental rig was setup to investigate cavitation detection using vibration envelope analysis method, and measured parameters included sound, pressure and flow rate for feasibility of cavitation detection. The experiment testing included 3 operating points of the centrifugal pump (B.E.P, 90% of B.E.P and 80% of B.E.P). Suction pressure of the centrifugal pump was decreased gradually until the inception point of cavitation. Vibration measurements were undertaken at various locations including casing, bearing, suction and discharge flange of the centrifugal pump. Comparisons of envelope spectrums under cavitating and non-cavitating conditions were presented. Envelope analysis was proven useful in detecting cavitation over the 3 testing conditions. During the normal operating condition, vibration peak synchronous to rotational speed was more pronounced. It was however during cavitation condition, the half order sub-harmonic vibration component was clearly evident in the envelope spectrums undertaken at all measurement locations except at the pump bearing. The possible explanation of the strong sub-harmonic (½ of BPF) during cavitation existence in the centrifugal pump was due to insufficient time for the bubbles to collapse completely before the end of the single cycle.

  11. Feeding kinematics, suction and hydraulic jetting capabilities in bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus).

    PubMed

    Marshall, Christopher D; Kovacs, Kit M; Lydersen, Christian

    2008-03-01

    Feeding kinematics, suction and hydraulic jetting capabilities of bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) were characterized during controlled feeding trials. Feeding trials were conducted both on land and in water, and allowed a choice between suction and biting, but food was also presented that could be ingested by suction alone. Four feeding phases, preparatory, jaw opening, hyoid depression and jaw closing were observed; the mean feeding cycle duration was 0.54+/-0.22 s, regardless of feeding mode (P>0.05). Subjects feeding on land used biting and suction 89.3% and 10.7% of the time, respectively. Subjects feeding in water used suction and hydraulic jetting 96.3% and 3.7% of the time, respectively. No biting behavior was observed underwater. Suction feeding was characterized by a small gape (2.7+/-0.85 cm), small gape angle (24.4+/-8.13 degrees ), pursing of the rostral lips to form a circular aperture, and pursing of the lateral lips to occlude lateral gape. Biting was characterized by large gape (7.3+/-2.2 cm), large gape angle (41.7+/-15.2 degrees ), and lip curling to expose the teeth. An excavation behavior in which suction and hydraulic jetting were alternated was used to extract food from recessed wells. The maximum subambient and suprambient pressures recorded were 91.2 and 53.4 kPa, respectively. The inclusion of suction data for phocids broadens the principle that suction feeding kinematics is conserved among aquatic vertebrates. Furthermore, bearded seals support predictions that mouth size, fluid flow speed, and elusiveness of prey consumed are among a suite of traits that determine the specific nature of suction feeding among species.

  12. History and development of suction-irrigation-reaming.

    PubMed

    Green, James

    2010-11-01

    Excessive intramedullary pressure coincident to surgical procedures requiring entrance and surgical manipulation within the intramedullary canal is a problem that was recognized by Gerhard Küntscher, the godfather of intramedullary nailing. He expressed concern about this phenomenon in his early writings during the 1940's. Although he suggested certain technical methods to moderate the event while doing the surgical procedure he had no solution for absolutely preventing its occurrence. This became more of an issue after he introduced motorized reaming in the mid 1950's to improve the strength of intramedullary fixation. The first to demonstrate that pressure could be avoided during intramedullary surgeries were Lorenzi, Olerud and Dankwardt-Lillieström in the late 1960's. Using a method that employed suction evacuation of intramedullary content prior to reaming, and by introducing irrigation while reaming, they were able to achieve negative pressures during their intramedullary work. They proved that if an IM technique did not inject fat throughout the bone and into the organism there were significant benefits both locally and systemically. With impeccable methodology, they showed fat destroyed the vascularity of the bone and inhibited its revascularization. Systemically, its presence was associated with death and morbidity. K.M. Stürmer, using sheep in studies done in the 1980's, further validated the effectiveness of negative pressure reaming to prevent adverse effects associated with reaming. The attempt to create a device to provide these benefits clinically, however, has been challenging. The group in Muenster did work with a rinsing-suction-reamer (RSR) that showed fat introduction with reaming need not be significantly greater than when using an external fixator. In the US, the effort has focused on developing a reamer that integrated suction and irrigation into its design. This instrument has been given the acronym of RIA (reamer

  13. Multiphase pumping: indoor performance test and oilfield application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangling; Zhu, Hongwu; Zhang, Shousen; Li, Jifeng

    2010-03-01

    Multiphase pumping is essentially a means of adding energy to the unprocessed effluent which enables the liquid and gas mixture to be transported over a long distances without prior separation. A reduction, consolidation, or elimination of the production infrastructure, such as separation equipments and offshore platforms can be developed more economically. Also it successfully lowed the backpressure of wells, revived dead wells and improved the production and efficiency of oilfield. This paper reviews the issues related to indoor performance test and an oilfield application of the helico-axial multiphase pump designed by China University of Petroleum (Beijing). Pump specification and its hydraulic design are given. Results of performance testing under different condition, such as operational speed and gas volume fraction (GVF) etc are presented. Experimental studies on combination of theoretical analysis showed the multiphase pump satisfies the similitude rule, which can be used in the development of new MPP design and performance prediction. Test results showed that rising the rotation speed and suction pressure could better its performance, pressure boost improved, high efficiency zone expanding and the flow rate related to the optimum working condition increased. The pump worked unstable as GVF increased to a certain extent and slip occurred between two phases in the pump, creating surging and gas lock at a high GVF. A case of application in Nanyang oilfield is also studied.

  14. Multiphase pumping: indoor performance test and oilfield application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangling; Zhu, Hongwu; Zhang, Shousen; Li, Jifeng

    2009-12-01

    Multiphase pumping is essentially a means of adding energy to the unprocessed effluent which enables the liquid and gas mixture to be transported over a long distances without prior separation. A reduction, consolidation, or elimination of the production infrastructure, such as separation equipments and offshore platforms can be developed more economically. Also it successfully lowed the backpressure of wells, revived dead wells and improved the production and efficiency of oilfield. This paper reviews the issues related to indoor performance test and an oilfield application of the helico-axial multiphase pump designed by China University of Petroleum (Beijing). Pump specification and its hydraulic design are given. Results of performance testing under different condition, such as operational speed and gas volume fraction (GVF) etc are presented. Experimental studies on combination of theoretical analysis showed the multiphase pump satisfies the similitude rule, which can be used in the development of new MPP design and performance prediction. Test results showed that rising the rotation speed and suction pressure could better its performance, pressure boost improved, high efficiency zone expanding and the flow rate related to the optimum working condition increased. The pump worked unstable as GVF increased to a certain extent and slip occurred between two phases in the pump, creating surging and gas lock at a high GVF. A case of application in Nanyang oilfield is also studied.

  15. The numerical simulation based on CFD of hydraulic turbine pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, X. H.; Kong, F. Y.; Liu, Y. Y.; Zhao, R. J.; Hu, Q. L.

    2016-05-01

    As the functions of hydraulic turbine pump including self-adjusting and compensation with each other, it is far-reaching to analyze its internal flow by the numerical simulation based on CFD, mainly including the pressure field and the velocity field in hydraulic turbine and pump.The three-dimensional models of hydraulic turbine pump are made by Pro/Engineer software;the internal flow fields in hydraulic turbine and pump are simulated numerically by CFX ANSYS software. According to the results of the numerical simulation in design condition, the pressure field and the velocity field in hydraulic turbine and pump are analyzed respectively .The findings show that the static pressure decreases systematically and the pressure gradient is obvious in flow area of hydraulic turbine; the static pressure increases gradually in pump. The flow trace is regular in suction chamber and flume without spiral trace. However, there are irregular traces in the turbine runner channels which contrary to that in flow area of impeller. Most of traces in the flow area of draft tube are spiral.

  16. Development of a compact, sealless, tripod supported, magnetically driven centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Yuhki, A; Nogawa, M; Takatani, S

    2000-06-01

    In this study, a tripod supported sealless centrifugal blood pump was designed and fabricated for implantable application using a specially designed DC brushless motor. The tripod structure consists of 3 ceramic balls mounted at the bottom surface of the impeller moving in a polyethylene groove incorporated at the bottom pump casing. The follower magnet inside the impeller is coupled to the driver magnet of the motor outside the bottom pump casing, thus allowing the impeller to slide-rotate in the polyethylene groove as the motor turns. The pump driver has a weight of 230 g and a diameter of 60 mm. The acrylic pump housing has a weight of 220 g with the priming volume of 25 ml. At the pump rpm of 1,000 to 2,200, the generated head pressure ranged from 30 to 150 mm Hg with the maximum system efficiency being 12%. When the prototype pump was used in the pulsatile mock loop to assist the ventricle from its apex to the aorta, a strong correlation was obtained between the motor current and bypass flow waveforms. The waveform deformation index (WDI), defined as the ratio of the fundamental to the higher order harmonics of the motor current power spectral density, was computed to possibly detect the suction occurring inside the ventricle due to the prototype centrifugal pump. When the WDI was kept under the value of 0.20 by adjusting the motor rpm, it was successful in suppressing the suction due to the centrifugal pump in the ventricle. The prototype sealless, centrifugal pump together with the control method based on the motor current waveform analysis may offer an intermediate support of the failing left or right ventricle bridging to heart transplantation.

  17. Water Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Seeking to find a more effective method of filtering potable water that was highly contaminated, Mike Pedersen, founder of Western Water International, learned that NASA had conducted extensive research in methods of purifying water on board manned spacecraft. The key is Aquaspace Compound, a proprietary WWI formula that scientifically blends various types of glandular activated charcoal with other active and inert ingredients. Aquaspace systems remove some substances; chlorine, by atomic adsorption, other types of organic chemicals by mechanical filtration and still others by catalytic reaction. Aquaspace filters are finding wide acceptance in industrial, commercial, residential and recreational applications in the U.S. and abroad.

  18. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, D.P.; Singletary, B.H.; Evans, J.H.

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  19. Filter apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kuban, Daniel P.; Singletary, B. Huston; Evans, John H.

    1984-01-01

    A plurality of holding tubes are respectively mounted in apertures in a partition plate fixed in a housing receiving gas contaminated with particulate material. A filter cartridge is removably held in each holding tube, and the cartridges and holding tubes are arranged so that gas passes through apertures therein and across the partition plate while particulate material is collected in the cartridges. Replacement filter cartridges are respectively held in holding canisters mounted on a support plate which can be secured to the aforesaid housing, and screws mounted on said canisters are arranged to push replacement cartridges into the cartridge holding tubes and thereby eject used cartridges therefrom.

  20. Sigma Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balgovind, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The GLA Fourth-Order model is needed to smooth the topography. This is to remove the Gibbs phenomenon. The Gibbs phenomenon occurs whenever we truncate a Fourier Series. The Sigma factors were introduced to reduce the Gibbs phenomenon. It is found that the smooth Fourier series is nothing but the original Fourier series with its coefficients multiplied by corresponding sigma factors. This operator can be applied many times to obtain high order sigma filtered field and is easily applicable using FFT. It is found that this filter is beneficial in deriving the topography.

  1. Hydraulic pump

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, P.R.; Jantzen, D.E.

    1984-05-15

    This invention relates to an improved pump jack characterized by a hollow piston rod which telescopes down over the sucker rod to which it is clamped for reciprocating motion. The cylinder, in turn, is fastened in fixed position directly to the upper exposed end of the well casing. As fluid is introduced into the lower end of the cylinder it raises the piston into engagement with a pushrod housed in the upper cylinder head that lifts switch-actuating means associated therewith into a position operative to actuate a switch located adjacent thereto thereby causing the latter to change state and actuate a multi-function solenoid valve so as to cut off fluid flow to the cylinder. As gravity lowers the sucker rod and piston exhausting the hydraulic fluid therebeneath, an adjustable stop engages the pushrod from above so as to return it together with the switch-actuating means associated therewith to their original positions thereby resetting the switch to complete the operating cycle.

  2. Whole blood pumping with a microthrottle pump

    PubMed Central

    Davies, M. J.; Johnston, I. D.; Tan, C. K. L.; Tracey, M. C.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously reported that microthrottle pumps (MTPs) display the capacity to pump solid phase suspensions such as polystyrene beads which prove challenging to most microfluidic pumps. In this paper we report employing a linear microthrottle pump (LMTP) to pump whole, undiluted, anticoagulated, human venous blood at 200 μl min−1 with minimal erythrocyte lysis and no observed pump blockage. LMTPs are particularly well suited to particle suspension transport by virtue of their relatively unimpeded internal flow-path. Micropumping of whole blood represents a rigorous real-world test of cell suspension transport given blood’s high cell content by volume and erythrocytes’ relative fragility. A modification of the standard Drabkin method and its validation to spectrophotometrically quantify low levels of erythrocyte lysis by hemoglobin release is also reported. Erythrocyte lysis rates resulting from transport via LMTP are determined to be below one cell in 500 at a pumping rate of 102 μl min−1. PMID:21264059

  3. 21 CFR 878.4683 - Non-Powered suction apparatus device intended for negative pressure wound therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Non-Powered suction apparatus device intended for... Surgical Devices § 878.4683 Non-Powered suction apparatus device intended for negative pressure wound therapy. (a) Identification. A non-powered suction apparatus device intended for negative pressure wound...

  4. Induction of ventricular collapse by an axial flow blood pump.

    PubMed

    Amin, D V; Antaki, J F; Litwak, P; Thomas, D; Wu, Z J; Watach, M

    1998-01-01

    An important consideration for clinical application of rotary blood pump based ventricular assist is the avoidance of ventricular collapse due to excessive operating speed. Because healthy animals do not typically demonstrate this phenomenon, it is difficult to evaluate control algorithms for avoiding suction in vivo. An acute hemodynamic study was thus conducted to determine the conditions under which suction could be induced. A 70 kg calf was implanted with an axial flow assist device (Nimbus/UoP IVAS; Nimbus Inc., Rancho Cordova, CA) cannulated from the left ventricular apex to ascending aorta. On initiation of pump operation, several vasoactive interventions were performed to alter preload, afterload, and contractility of the left ventricle. Initially, dobutamine increased contractility and heart rate ([HR] = 139; baseline = 70), but ventricular collapse was not achievable, even at the maximal pump speed of 15,000 rpm. Norepinephrine decreased HR (HR = 60), increased contractility, and increased systemic vascular resistance ([SVR] = 24; baseline = 15), resulting in ventricular collapse at a pump speed of 14,000 rpm. Isoproterenol (beta agonist) increased HR (HR = 103) and decreased SVR (SVR = 12), but ventricular collapse was not achieved. Inferior vena cava occlusion reduced preload, and ventricular collapse was achieved at speeds as low as 11,000 rpm. Esmolol (beta1 antagonist) decreased HR (HR = 55) and contractility, and ventricular collapse was achieved at 11,500 rpm. Episodes of ventricular collapse were characterized initially by the pump output exceeding the venous return and the aortic valve remaining closed throughout the cardiac cycle. If continued, the mitral valve would remain open throughout the cardiac cycle. Using these unique states of the mitral and aortic valves, the onset of ventricular collapse could reliably be identified. It is hoped that the ability to detect the onset of ventricular collapse, rather than the event itself, will assist in

  5. Evaluation of closed-suction drainage for treating auricular hematomas.

    PubMed

    Swaim, S F; Bradley, D M

    1996-01-01

    The principal and dynamics of closed-suction wound drainage lend themselves to use on auricular hematomas. This type of drainage was evaluated in the treatment of 10 auricular hematomas on nine animals. Seven animal owners rated the results of the procedure as "good," and two rated them as "fair." The two rating the procedure as having "fair" results owned dogs with allergic dermatitis, and the auricular hematomas recurred. In both dogs, auricular hematomas again recurred after other means of treatment were used. If the pocket for the vacuum tube is not secure and the animal is quite active, or if it molests the bandage, or both, it is possible for the tube to break or the needle to come off of the tubing.

  6. Neonatal pinealectomy in rats - a simple micro-suction technique.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, Bohdan; Henry, Brandon Michael; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Gajda, Mariusz; Brzozowska, Iwona; Walocha, Jerzy A; Skowron-Cendrzak, Anna

    2017-01-01

    To determine the role of the pineal gland and its secretory product melatonin on various aspects of the functioning of the organism, the gland can be easily surgically removed in rats within 18 hours after birth. We performed pinealectomy in rats in a state of deep hypothermia under an operating microscope, using a micro-suction device of our own construction. The rats were induced into a state of suspended animation by placing them in the freezing compartment at minus 20 Celsius degrees. The cessation of respiration and heart beat lasted for about 15 minutes. During that time the pinealectomy was performed. In some cases there was minor hemorrhage that was easily controlled. There were no major side effects or mortality following surgery. All rats recovered within 15 minutes after the end of the procedure. The pinealectomy procedure described in this study is simple, rapid, effective and safe, and can be easily performed with instruments commonly available in most laboratories.

  7. Boundary layer development on turbine airfoil suction surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, O. P.; Wells, R. A.; Schlinker, R. H.; Bailey, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The results of a study supported by NASA under the Energy Efficient Engine Program, conducted to investigate the development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions that simulate the suction sides of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils, are presented. One velocity distribution represented a forward loaded airfoil ('squared-off' design), while the other represented an aft loaded airfoil ('aft loaded' design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a low-speed, high-aspect-ratio wind tunnel specifically designed for boundary layer investigations. It is intended that the detailed data presented in this paper be used to develop improved turbulence model suitable for application to turbine airfoil design.

  8. Multiple pump housing

    DOEpatents

    Donoho, II, Michael R.; Elliott, Christopher M.

    2010-03-23

    A fluid delivery system includes a first pump having a first drive assembly, a second pump having a second drive assembly, and a pump housing. At least a portion of each of the first and second pumps are located in the housing.

  9. Types of Breast Pumps

    MedlinePlus

    ... Powered and Electric Pumps A powered breast pump uses batteries or a cord plugged into an electrical outlet ... pumps rely on a power source, women who use powered breast pumps should be prepared for emergency situations when electricity or extra batteries may not be available. If breastfeeding is not ...

  10. Effects of open and closed suction systems on the haemodynamic parameters in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Özden, Dilek; Görgülü, Refia S

    2015-05-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of open and closed suction systems on haemodynamic parameters of the patients who underwent open heart surgery. Nurses should work meticulously and carefully as many complications may develop if the method used to perform suctioning is not appropriate. The quasi-experimental study design was used. The study sample comprised 120 patients who underwent open heart surgery in the cardiovascular surgery intensive care unit of a state hospital in Turkey. Haemodynamic parameters were determined just before, right after, at the 5th and 15th minute after suctioning. The data were evaluated with the One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for Repeated Measures, independent t-test and Bonferroni's test for further analysis (post hoc). The difference between heart rate (HR) and mean blood pressure, mean PaO2 and PaCO2 , SaO2 and pH values measured before, right after and at the 5th and 15th minute after suctioning was found to be significant in patients who underwent the open suctioning procedure. It was determined that the difference between mean PaO2 values was not significant and that SaO2 versus SpO2 values increased in patients who underwent the closed suctioning procedure. When the open and closed suction systems were compared, statistically significant difference was determined in terms of MAP, SpO2 . It was determined that HR, arterial blood pressure and arterial blood gases of the patients who underwent open heart surgery were negatively affected by the open suction system but did not increase significantly as soon as suctioning was over during the closed suctioning procedure. The data obtained indicate that closed system suctioning, compared with open system suctioning, can be used safely on this patient group. The closed suction system is recommended since it contributes to the enhancement of patient safety and the quality of nursing care. © 2014 The Authors. Nursing in Critical Care published by John Wiley & Sons

  11. Notch filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, G. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A notch filter for the selective attenuation of a narrow band of frequencies out of a larger band was developed. A helical resonator is connected to an input circuit and an output circuit through discrete and equal capacitors, and a resistor is connected between the input and the output circuits.

  12. Uniform flow over a permeable plane with downward suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ping-Cheng; Lin, Yen-Ti

    2015-04-01

    In previous research, studies on channel flow were mostly focused on the flow profiles with consideration of the horizontal (or streamwise) velocity component only. Due to the neglect of the vertical velocity component, the governing equations were simplified and then the analytical solutions could be probably derived. However, the vertical velocity as well as the horizontal velocity is actually existent in the real world, especially at the water-porous matrix interface. This study derives an analytical solution to a two-dimensional flow field composed of a uniform flow over a plane homogeneous porous medium with downward suction. The Navier-Stokes equations are employed to describe the water flow, whereas the poroelastic theory is addressed for the pore water flow. Setting the stream function for the velocity components associated with corresponding boundary conditions, we successfully find the solutions to the dimensionless boundary-value problem by taking the six-order power series method (PSM) and differential transform method (DTM), respectively. After the stream function is solved, the vertical velocity component as well as the horizontal velocity component can be obtained. The present results agree very well with the previous study which was carried out by a numerical method. This validates the presented analytical solutions separately by PSM and DTM. The vertical velocity increases gradually from the top lid to the bottom of the porous medium. The maximum horizontal velocity component is about 1.64 times of the downward suction velocity and occurs at a little below the centerline of the total depth. It is noted that the vertical velocity component should not be neglected in a two-dimensional flow, and the horizontal velocity might be affected by the vertical one. The present study also shows that the flow field of a two-dimensional flow is possible to be solved by analytical approaches. The employed technique and methods will be applied to the future study

  13. Impact of breast pumping on lactogenesis stage II after cesarean delivery: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Chapman, D J; Young, S; Ferris, A M; Pérez-Escamilla, R

    2001-06-01

    Women at risk for delayed onset of lactation are often advised to pump their breasts before lactogenesis stage II to hasten the timing of this process. The effectiveness of this clinical practice has not been previously evaluated. This study investigates the effects of breast pumping before the onset of lactation on early milk transfer and subsequent breastfeeding duration among women giving birth by cesarean delivery. Sixty women were randomly assigned to either the pumping group (n = 30), which used a double electric breast pump for six 10- to 15-minute sessions from 24 to 72 hours postpartum, or to the control group (n = 30), which held the pump to their breasts without suction for the same amount of time. Milk transfer was assessed by test weighing infants before and after 3 breastfeeding sessions daily. Test weight data were fitted to a second-order polynomial curve, to predict milk transfer over time. Breast pumping between 24 and 72 hours after cesarean delivery did not improve milk transfer. Participants in the pumping group tended to have lower milk transfer than did controls. Primiparae in the pumping group breastfed for ~5 months less than their counterparts in the control group; however, this difference was not statistically significant. Breast pumping did not improve milk transfer during the first 72 hours postpartum and may negatively affect breastfeeding duration among primiparous women. lactation, lactogenesis, breast milk, breast pumping, milk expression, breastfeeding, cesarean delivery.

  14. Multiphase-pump field trials demonstrate practical applications for the technology

    SciTech Connect

    Dal Porto, D.F.; Larson, L.A.

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents the results of two multiphase-pump field trials. One field trial was conducted offshore on a platform in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). It is a low-pressure boost (100 psi) application involving gas-lifted wells. The other field trial was conducted onshore in an oil field in Alberta, Canada. This multiphase pump was designed for a high-pressure boost (850 psi) capability with primarily rod-pumped wells feeding the suction of the pump. The offshore pump was sized to handle the flow from one well. By lowering the back pressure on the well, increased production was realized. The increased flow from one of the wells far surpassed the predicted quantity. Early problems with the double mechanical seal system were overcome and a new, simplified single mechanical seal system has been designed and installed. The onshore multiple pump clearly demonstrated that a twin-screw pump can operate reliably in a field environment, even under severe slug flow conditions. The trial indicated that a considerable portion of the liquid in the recycle stream (required because of the high gas fraction of the multiphase fluid from the field) flashes into gas, which occupies more volume in the pump than if it remained liquid. This decreased the capability of the pump to handle net flow from the field. These conditions motivated a re-evaluation of the pump-sizing techniques. Performance data and lessons learned information are presented for both field trials.

  15. PIV Measurements in Pumps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Pump Impeller Fig. 37 shows the top view of pump test rig for radial impeller pumps . The goal of this experiment is cavitation observation and their...PIV Measurements in Pumps 5 - 28 RTO-EN-AVT-143 Figure 37: Test Rig for Combined PIV Measurements and Cavitation Observation. Figure 38...RTO-EN-AVT-143 5 - 1 PIV Measurements in Pumps Dr. Detlev L. Wulff TU Braunschweig Institut für Strömungsmaschinen Langer Kamp 6 D-38106

  16. Elimination of suction effect in interfacing microchip electrophoresis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using porous monolithic plugs.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Heyong; Liu, Jinhua; Yin, Xuefeng; Shen, Hong; Xu, Zigang

    2012-07-07

    A suction-free interfacing method was developed for microchip electrophoresis hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MCE-ICP-MS). The hyphenated system was composed of a microchip, a demountable capillary microflow nebulizer (d-CMN) combined with a heated single pass spray chamber, a negative pressure sampling device, a high voltage power supply, a syringe pump and an ICP-MS. To eliminate the nebulizer suction generated by the pneumatic nebulizer and to ensure that the makeup solution flowed into the nebulizer, two porous polymer plugs were fabricated in the microchip. As a result, reasonably true electropherograms were obtained when compared to the CE separation performed in the traditional MCE-ICP-MS mode without porous polymer plugs. Electrophoretic separation of I(-) and IO(3)(-) was achieved within 25 s in a microchip with an effective separation length of only 15 mm at an electric field of 857 V cm(-1) using 10 mmol L(-1) borate (pH 9.2) as the running buffer. A resolution of 1.3 was obtained and the absolute detection limits for I(-) and IO(3)(-) were 0.12 and 0.13 fg, respectively. The precisions (RSD, n = 10) of the migration time and peak height for I(-) and IO(3)(-) were in the range of 1.1-1.6% and 2.5-2.8%, respectively. Two table salt samples were analyzed by an external calibration method. The iodate contents were in accordance with their labeled values. The recoveries of I(-) and IO(3)(-) in the table salt samples were in the range of 92-105%.

  17. Feasibility of nanofluid-based optical filters.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Robert A; Otanicar, Todd P; Herukerrupu, Yasitha; Bremond, Fabienne; Rosengarten, Gary; Hawkes, Evatt R; Jiang, Xuchuan; Coulombe, Sylvain

    2013-03-01

    In this article we report recent modeling and design work indicating that mixtures of nanoparticles in liquids can be used as an alternative to conventional optical filters. The major motivation for creating liquid optical filters is that they can be pumped in and out of a system to meet transient needs in an application. To demonstrate the versatility of this new class of filters, we present the design of nanofluids for use as long-pass, short-pass, and bandpass optical filters using a simple Monte Carlo optimization procedure. With relatively simple mixtures, we achieve filters with <15% mean-squared deviation in transmittance from conventional filters. We also discuss the current commercial feasibility of nanofluid-based optical filters by including an estimation of today's off-the-shelf cost of the materials. While the limited availability of quality commercial nanoparticles makes it hard to compete with conventional filters, new synthesis methods and economies of scale could enable nanofluid-based optical filters in the near future. As such, this study lays the groundwork for creating a new class of selective optical filters for a wide range of applications, namely communications, electronics, optical sensors, lighting, photography, medicine, and many more.

  18. Effects of Crust Ingestion on Mixer Pump Performance in Tank 241-SY-101: Workshop Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brennen, C.E.; Stewart, C.W.; Meyer, P.A.

    1999-10-20

    In August 1999, a workshop was held at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to discuss the effects of crust ingestion on mixer pump performance in Hanford Waste Tank 241-SY-101. The main purpose of the workshop was to evaluate the potential for crust ingestion to degrade mixing and/or damage the mixer pump. The need for a previously determined 12-inch separation between the top of the mixer pump inlet and the crust base was evaluated. Participants included a representative from the pump manufacturer, an internationally known expert in centrifugal pump theory, Hanford scientists and engineers, and operational specialists representing relevant fields of expertise. The workshop focused on developing an understanding of the pump design, addressing the physics of entrainment of solids and gases into the pump, and assessing the effects of solids and gases on pump performance. The major conclusions are summarized as follows: (1) Entrainment of a moderate amount of solids or gas from the crust should not damage the pump or reduce its lifetime, though mixing effectiveness will be somewhat reduced. (2) Air binding should not damage the pump. Vibrations due to ingestion of gas, solids, and objects potentially could cause radial loads that might reduce the lifetime of bearings and seals. However, significant damage would require extreme conditions not associated with the small bubbles, fine solids, and chunks of relatively weak material typical of the crust. (3) The inlet duct extension opening, 235 inches from the tank bottom, should be considered the pump inlet, not the small gap at 262 inches. (4) A suction vortex exists at the inlet of all pumps. The characteristics of the inlet suction vortex in the mixer pump are very hard to predict, but its effects likely extend upward several feet. Because of this, the current 12-inch limit should be replaced with criteria based on actual monitored pump performance. The most obvious criterion (in addition to current operational

  19. Response of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and spectra to concentrated wall suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    The response of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and spectra to concentrated suction applied through a porous wall strip has been quantified. Both suction and no suction data of the spectra collapsed reasonably well for Kolmogorov normalised wavenumber k {1/*} > 0.2. Similar results were also observed for second-order structure functions (not shown) for Kolmogorov normalised radius r* < 10. Although, the quality of collapsed is poorer for transverse component, the result highlights that Kolmogorov similarity hypothesis is reasonably well satisfied. However, the suction results shows a significant departure from the no suction case of the Kolmogorov normalised spectra and second-order structure functions for k {1/*} < 0.2 and r* > 20, respectively. The departure at the larger scales with collapse at the small scales suggests that suction induce a change in the small-scale motion. This is also reflected in the alteration of mean turbulent energy dissipation rate and Taylor microscale Reynolds number. This change is a result of the weakening of the large-scale structures. The effect is increased as the suction rate is increased.

  20. Bench-top testing of suction forces generated through endoscopic ultrasound-guided aspiration needles.

    PubMed

    Katanuma, Akio; Itoi, Takao; Baron, Todd H; Yasuda, Ichiro; Kin, Toshifumi; Yane, Kei; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Hajime; Sano, Itsuki; Minami, Ryuki; Manabu, Sen-yo; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Osanai, Manabu; Takahashi, Kuniyuki

    2015-05-01

    Adequate needle size and tissue acquisition techniques for endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) need further elucidation. Moreover, the actual negative pressure and suction forces of FNA needles remain unknown. We evaluated the suction forces of 19-gauge, 22-gauge, and 25-gauge conventional FNA needles and side hole aspiration needles using conventional negative pressure and the slow pull technique. Using a manometer, we determined the mean (SD) negative pressure and suction force for needle gauge, aspiration volume, and aspiration technique. We also evaluated the time to reach the maximum negative pressure. Suction force was comparatively higher in the 19-gauge needle when 50 ml of negative pressure was applied. Suction force using the slow pull method was very weak at 5% of pressure found with conventional methods. With the use of a 20-ml syringe, the time to reach the maximum negative pressure was 4 s in the 19-gauge needle, 11 s in the 22-gauge needle, and 80 s in the 25-gauge needle. Bench-top testing showed that suction force increases with a larger gauge needle and larger aspiration volume. The slow pull method produces a very weak suction force. The time to reach the maximum negative pressure was longest in the 25-gauge needle. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.