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Sample records for pumped dye laser

  1. Diode-pumped dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdukova, O. A.; Gorbunkov, M. V.; Petukhov, V. A.; Semenov, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    This letter reports diode pumping for dye lasers. We offer a pulsed dye laser with an astigmatism-compensated three-mirror cavity and side pumping by blue laser diodes with 200 ns pulse duration. Eight dyes were tested. Four dyes provided a slope efficiency of more than 10% and the highest slope efficiency (18%) was obtained for laser dye Coumarin 540A in benzyl alcohol.

  2. Feasibility of solar-pumped dye lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Kim, Kyung C.; Kim, Kyong H.

    1987-01-01

    Dye laser gains were measured at various pump-beam irradiances on a dye cell in order to evaluate the feasibility of solar pumping. Rhodamine 6G dye was considered as a candidate for the solar-pumped laser because of its high utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. Measurements show that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye.

  3. Research of the quenched dye lasers pumped by excimer lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xue Shaolin; Lou Qihong

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the quenched dye lasers pumped by XeCl and KrF excimer lasers were investigated theoretically and experimentally. Dye laser pulses with duration of 0.8 ns for XeCl laser pumping and 2 ns for KrF laser pumping were obtained. The dye Rhodamine 6G dissolved in methyl was used as the active medium in the quenched dye laser. When the pump laser was KrF and the active medium was Coumarin 498 the quenched dye laser emitted pulse with duration of about 2 ns. The characteristics of the quenched dye laser was also investigated in detail.

  4. Design and Construction of Simple, Nitrogen-Laser-Pumped, Tunable Dye Lasers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilborn, Robert C.

    1978-01-01

    The basic physical principles of dye lasers are discussed and used to analyze the design and operation of tunable dye lasers pumped by pulsed nitrogen lasers. Details of the design and construction of these dye lasers are presented. Some simple demonstration experiments are described. (BB)

  5. Parameters of a dye laser with transverse pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Burakov, V.S.; Samson, A.M.; Zhukovskii, V.V.; Isaevich, A.V.

    1987-12-01

    The authors describe a new method for determining the excitation and output parameters of dye laser media under conditions of transverse optical pumping by laser radiation. The dye is modeled as a medium with two electron-vibrational levels. The method is based on the variation of the value of the distance on the mirror reflection coefficients of the resonator and on estimates of inactive or parasitic losses, the probability of exciting active dye molecules with the radiation incident on the front face of the cell, and the unsaturated gain coefficient of that output frequency. Experimental data are then derived for these conditions for a rhodamine 4C solution in ethanol. Pumping was done using a neodymium laser.

  6. Passive apparatus for stabilizing a flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    De Wilde, M.A.; Decker, L.J.

    1986-04-29

    A flash lamp pumped, dye laser apparatus is described which consists of a flash lamp and a liquid dye solution in a transparent compartment proximate to the flash lamp. The compartment is also connected to a tubular circulatory system for moving the liquid dye. The dye solution is activated by flashing of the lamp for lasing to emit light, the lamp and compartment enclosed in a cooling first water jacket, the jacket enclosing deionized water for cooling, an improved cooling system wherein the temperature of the deionized water and the liquid dye solution are maintained within 0.5/sup 0/C of one another, enabling the laser for pulsing at a stabilized 10 pulses per second rate.

  7. Flashlamp-pumped submicrosecond dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Trusov, A.K.; Trusov, K.K.

    1985-02-01

    A laser flashlamp pumping system having an input energy of 330 J and a pulse duration of approx.230 nsec was developed experimentally and tests were made using a solution of rhodamine 6G under lasing conditions. The maximum lasing energy was 1.1 J, the efficiency was 0.33%, the angle of divergence of the beam at half-energy in a planar resonator was 1.2--1.3 mrad, and the illumination of an ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G halved the output energy when the intensity was 170 kJ/liter.

  8. Performance analysis and characterization of the Lumonics Inc. HyperDYE-300 laser-pumped dye laser. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.S.; Davenport, W.E.; Ehrlich, J.J.

    1990-07-11

    The laser analyzed in this research, the Lumonics, Inc. HyperDYE-300 laser pumped dye laser, was procured via the FSTC D650 Program and was characterized in order to support the technology development of that program. The dye laser was pumped with a Neodymium:YAG q-switched laser and it utilized Rhodamine-6G in methanol. It was found to be tunable from about 545 nm to 590 nm and produced a maximum ouput energy of 56 percent of the pump beam energy. The analysis involved the measuring of optimum dye/solvent concentration, output energy versus tunability, optical efficiency versus tunability, temporal and spatial profiles, beam divergence, linewidth, and amplified spontaneous emission versus laser emission.

  9. High-efficiency high-energy flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Jethwa, J.; Anufrik, S.S.; Docchio, F.

    1982-08-01

    A flashlamp-pumped dye laser using barium sulfate or polytetrafluorethylene powders as diffuse reflection in a close-coupled pumping geometry is described. Long pulse pumping (approx.15 ..mu..sec) and use of a vaccum-walled dye cell gave an efficiency of 0.8%.

  10. Seventeen psec pulses from a nitrogen laser-pumped short-cavity rhodamine 6G dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Liesegang, G.W.

    1983-08-15

    We wish to report the generation of 17-psec pulses of 200-kW intensity from a nitrogen-pumped rhodamine 6G short-cavity dye laser. This dye laser has a cavity length of 120 ..mu..m and is axially pumped by the nitrogen laser. (AIP)

  11. Characteristics of a dye laser amplifier transversely pumped by copper vapor lasers with a two-dimensional calculation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, A.; Nakayama, T.; Kato, M.; Maruyama, Y.

    1997-08-01

    A two-dimensional rate equation model, taking into consideration the transverse absorption loss of pump laser power, is proposed to evaluate the characteristics of a dye laser amplifier with a large input laser beam diameter pumped by high average power copper vapor lasers. The calculations are in good agreement with the measurements taken with a Rhodamine 6G dye, and the model can be used for evaluation of the dye concentration at any wavelength. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  12. Scaling up a high average power dye laser amplifier and its new pumping designs

    SciTech Connect

    Takehisa, K.

    1997-01-01

    Scaling up of a high average power dye laser amplifier is discussed. Differences in the characteristics between a high average power dye laser amplifier with transverse pumping and longitudinal pumping are presented by a simple theory and simulations. The simulation results for dye laser amplifiers of 10-kW average output power show that longitudinal pumping is as efficient as transverse pumping with the potential of orders of magnitude lower dye flow rate. New pumping designs are also proposed for a dye laser amplifier aimed to achieve high gain with high efficiency to reduce the number of amplifier stages. Simulation results suggest that the new designs, in comparison with a conventional amplifier, can produce several orders of magnitude higher gain without decreasing the conversion efficiency. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  13. 29-fsec pulse generation from a linear-cavity synchronously pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, H.; Kurokawa, K.; Nakazawa, M.

    1988-09-01

    29-fsec optical pulses at a center wavelength of 615 nm have been generated from a linear-cavity synchronously pumped dye laser without using the colliding-pulse mode-locking technique. The laser consists of two dye jets (a gain jet and a saturable absorber jet) and a sequence of four Brewster-angled prisms. Kiton Red S is used as the laser dye instead of the conventional Rhodamine 6G.

  14. Investigation of a pulsed dye laser under various pumping conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nechaev, S.Y.

    1983-08-01

    An investigation was made of the influence of bilateral laser pumping in an almost longitudinal arrangement on the spectral and energy characteristics of a short-pulse laser utilizing rhodamine 6G. A considerable increase in efficiency over that for unilateral pumping was observed, together with a narrowing of the spectrum, in a dispersive resonator having a prism telescope and a grating.

  15. Development of a single-mode dye laser pumped by a copper vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasushi; Niki, Hideaki; Adachi, Satoru; Takeda, Tetsuya; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Yamanaka, Chiyoe

    1986-10-01

    An efficient high power single mode dye laser was developed for a study of uranium enrichment. The oscillation and amplification properties were studied experimentally and theoretically. The obtained band width was narrower than 100 MHz. When rhodamine 6 G chloride was used, the average output power and efficiency of the oscillator-amplifier system were 300 mW and 5%, respectively, at 575 nm for the total copper vapor laser pumping power of 4 W.

  16. High-power high-repetition-rate copper-vapor-pumped dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.; Dasgupta, K.; Kumar, S.; Manohar, K.G.; Nair, L.G.; Chatterjee, U.K. . Laser and Plasma Technology Div.)

    1994-06-01

    The design and development of an efficient high average power dye laser oscillator-amplifier system developed at the Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, is reported. The dye laser is pumped by a 6.5-kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser. The signal beam to the dye amplifier is obtained from an efficient narrow-band grazing incidence grating (GIG) dye laser oscillator incorporating a multiple prism beam expander. Amplifier extraction efficiency up to 40% was obtained in a single amplifier stage, using rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) in ethanol. The authors have also demonstrated simultaneous amplification of two laser beams at different wavelengths in the same dye amplifier cell.

  17. Reciprocal passive mode locking of a rhodamine 6G dye laser and the Ar/sup +/ pump laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yasa, Z.A.; Amer, N.M.

    1981-02-01

    A rhodamine 6G dye laser, internally pumped within the extended cavity of an Ar/sup +/-ion laser, is mode locked when its cavity length is matched to half that of the pump laser: the 5145-A argon laser line is passively mode locked by the combination of the saturable absorption and the lasing action of the dye, which is in turn synchronously pumped and mode locked. Tunable (5650-5950-A)approx.10 psec pulses are generated, and the average output power is approx.80 mW.

  18. Reciprocal passive mode locking of a rhodamine 6G dye laser and the Ar+ pump laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yasa, Zafer A.; Amer, Nabil M.

    1981-02-01

    We report that a rhodamine 6G dye laser, internally pumped within the extended cavity of an Ar+-ion laser, is mode locked when its cavity length is matched to half that of the pump laser: the 5145-Å argon laser line is passively mode locked by the combination of the saturable absorption and the lasing action of the dye, which is in turn synchronously pumped and mode locked. Tunable (5650–5950-Å) ~10 psec pulses are generated, and the average output power is ~80 mW.

  19. Performance of an array of plasma pinches as a new optical pumping source for dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rieger, H.; Kim, K.

    1983-11-01

    A new optical pumping source consisting of an array of plasma pinches in the hypocycloidal-pinch geometry is employed to pump a variety of dye lasers. A dye cuvette is inserted along the symmetry axis of the plasma device such that it may be surrounded by the plasma pinch. The light from the plasma pinch is very intense and rich in ultraviolet, which makes it an attractive optical pumping source for dye lasers, particularly in the blue-green spectral region. Control of the plasma fluorescence is achieved by the choice of gas, its fill pressure, and the capacitor bank voltage and its stored energy. The rise time of this ''plasma flashlamp'' depends mainly on the gas species and the fill pressure. Output energy of approx.2 mJ per cm/sup 3/ of lasing medium, or 2 kW/cm/sup 3/ for a 1-..mu..s laser pulse, is obtained from rhodamine 6G, coumarin 480, LD 490, and coumarin 504 dyes. That both the coumarin 480 and rhodamine 6G lasers have the comparable output power is a direct proof that the present optical pumping source is more efficient than the commercial xenon flashlamps in pumping lasers in the blue-green spectral region.

  20. Comparison of the treatment of vascular lesions with the copper-vapor laser and flashlamp-pumped dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flock, Stephen T.; Waner, Milton; McGrew, Ben; Colvin, G. B.; Montague, Donna

    1992-08-01

    Vascular lesions such as port-wine stains and telangiectases are sometimes treated with carbon-dioxide lasers, argon lasers or argon-pumped dye lasers; however these lasers are non- specific in their thermal effect on tissues and as a result often cause significant scarring. Recently, evidence has accumulated that the flashlamp-pumped dye (585 nm) and copper- vapor (578 nm) lasers, which produce pulsed light that is efficiently absorbed by hemoglobin, are more selective in coagulating abnormal vascular tissue and as a result give a superior clinical result. It is not yet clear what the most important physical and biological mechanisms are during the light-tissue interaction mediated by these two lasers. The post-treatment sequence of events is different for tissue irradiated by each laser; most significantly, the flashlamp-pumped dye laser causes significant transient purpura, whereas the copper vapor laser causes blanching and eschar formation. The clinical outcome, that is regression of the lesion, is equally successful with either laser although some evidence has accumulated showing that the flashlamp-pumped dye laser is best suited to the treatment of small vessel disease while the copper-vapor laser is better for the treatment of large vessel disease. In this paper, we will discuss our observations of the treatment of vascular lesions on humans with the copper-vapor and flashlamp-pumped dye lasers using empirically derived efficacious treatment parameters. Mathematical models of light and heat propagation and in vivo experiments involving mice ears and rat skin flaps will be used to elucidate what we feel are the important underlying mechanisms of this vascular lesion laser therapy.

  1. Continuous-wave dye laser pumped by a high-pressure argon arc

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, E.; Zander, C.; Drexhage, K.

    1988-11-01

    Continuous-wave operation of a Rhodamine 6G dye laser, incoherently pumped by a high-pressure argon arc, has been achieved. A special electrode design reduces melting of the electrode tips, and thus the arc provides the necessary brightness for periods of the order of hours.

  2. Narrow bandwidth tuning of rhodamine 6G dye pumped by a XeCl excimer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shangguan Cheng; Ling Ying-yi; Wang Yi-man; Dou Ai-rong; Huang Dan-hong

    1986-03-01

    In this paper the experimental study for narrow bandwidth tuning of ethylene glycol solution of rhodamine 6G pumped by a XeCl excimer laser is reported. The tunable range from 572.7 nm to 612.9 nm with linewidth of 0.004 nm has been obtained. The conversion efficiency is 16.0%. The experimental results of seven other dyes are also presented.

  3. Oxazine laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Field, George F.

    1992-01-01

    New oxazine compounds useful as dye laser media in solution, are superiior to prior art materials. The oxazine dyes useful when pumped by the 578.2 nm copper line to operate in the 700-800 nm range are described by formula I ##STR1##

  4. High efficiency picosecond pulse generation in the 675-930 nm region from a dye laser synchronously pumped by an argon-ion laser. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bado, P.; Dupuy, C.; Wilson, K.R.; Boggy, R.; Bowen, J.

    1983-04-01

    Picosecond pulses tunable from 675 to 930 micrometers have been obtained from a dye-laser synchronously pumped at 514.5 micrometers by a mode-locked Argon-ion laser. Peak energy conversion efficiencies between 10% and 29% are observed with pulse durations between 1.7 ps and 16 ps as measured by autocorrelation.

  5. Laser dye technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P R

    1999-09-01

    The author has worked with laser dyes for a number of years. A first interest was in the Navy blue-green program where a flashlamp pumped dye laser was used as an underwater communication and detection device. It made use of the optical window of sea-water--blue for deep ocean, green for coastal water. A major activity however has been with the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation Program (AVLIS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The aim here has been enriching isotopes for the nuclear fuel cycle. The tunability of the dye laser is utilized to selectively excite one isotope in uranium vapor, and this isotope is collected electrostatically as shown in Figure 1. The interests in the AVLIS program have been in the near ultra-violet, violet, red and deep-red.

  6. Laser beam control and diagnostic systems for the copper-pumped dye laser system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bliss, E.S.; Peterson, R.L.; Salmon, J.T.; Thomas, R.A.

    1992-11-01

    The laser system described in the previous paper is used for experiments in which success requires tight tolerances on beam position, direction, and wavefront. Indeed, the optimum performance of the laser itself depends on careful delivery of copper laser light to the dye amplifiers, precise propagation of dye laser beams through restricted amplifier apertures, and accurate monitoring of laser power at key locations. This paper describes the alignment systems, wavefront correction systems, and laser diagnostics systems which ensure that the control requirements of both the laser and associated experiments are met. Because laser isotope separation processes utilize more than one wavelength, these systems monitor and control multiple wavelengths simultaneously.

  7. Dye system for dye laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P.R.

    1991-05-21

    This patent describes a dye of the DCM family, (2-methyl-6-(2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl)-4H-pyran-4-ylidene)-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  8. Dye system for dye laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    A dye of the DCM family, [2-methyl-6-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-methyl-6-quinolinyl)ethenyl]-4H-pyran -4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile, dissolved in 2-phenoxyethanol, is non-mutagenic, stable and efficient, particularly in a pumped continuous wave laser system.

  9. Dye laser chain for laser isotope separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doizi, Denis; Jaraudias, Jean; Pochon, E.; Salvetat, G.

    1993-05-01

    Uranium enrichment by laser isotope separation uses a three step operation which requires four visible wavelengths to boost an individual U235 isotope from a low lying atomic energy level to an autoionizing state. The visible wavelengths are delivered by dye lasers pumped by copper vapor lasers (CVL). In this particular talk, a single dye chain consisting of a master oscillator and amplifier stages will be described and some of its performance given.

  10. Dye lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-08-01

    Studies on dye laser theory, design, components, optical systems, and frequency range are presented in approximately 96 citations. Abstracts on lasing dyes, pumping, tuning, excitation, molecular structure, and modulation are included. Studies on dye laser use in spectroscopy are covered.

  11. Experimental study of generalized self-filtering unstable resonators in an ablative-wall flash-lamp-pumped dye laser.

    PubMed

    Mahmodi, M; Farahbod, A H; Hariri, A

    1998-02-20

    The performance of a generalized self-filtering unstable resonator (GSFUR) that consists of two curved mirrors in a nonconfocal scheme with a low magnification of M = -1.62 in an ablative-wall flash-lamp dye laser is reported. The objective was to study the near- and far-field intensity distribution and the divergence of the laser beam. It was found that the output beam has a nearly Gaussian distribution with a pulse duration of ~400 ns FWHM, almost independent of the diameter of the field-limiting aperture, but increases slightly with the pumping rate. A diffraction-limited laser beam of 1.1 mrad was obtained from this laser cavity. The output energy was ~1 mJ when an intracavity glass plate was used as an output coupler. The required relations needed for the GSFUR design were also derived. PMID:18268685

  12. Multimode distributed feedback laser emission in a dye-doped optically pumped polymer thin-film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, F.; Gindre, D.; Nunzi, J.-M.; Denis, C.; Dumarcher, V.; Fiorini-Debuisschert, C.; Kretsch, K. P.; Rocha, L.

    2004-11-01

    We report on particular features of thin film distributed feedback (DFB) lasers. Devices are optically pumped using a Lloyd-mirror interferometer. For a given DFB grating period, the number of lasing modes is film thickness dependent. Spectral content of the devices is analysed using planar waveguide theory. An excellent agreement between the theoretical transverse electric mode structure and the laser emission spectrum is found.

  13. Argon-pumped tunable dye laser for port-wine stains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teillac-Hamel, Dominique; de Prost, Yves

    1994-12-01

    We have been using a continuous dye laser (coherent medical) for more than two years. The wavelength is 585 nm, the power 1.8 W and the fluence 16 - 18 J/cm2. We have treated 364 patients with port-wine stains and 15 children with ulcerated hemangiomas. The results were analyzed using a computer program developed by a team in Lille. The most frequent color was pale pink, followed by deep pink, red and purple. The mean number of laser sessions was 2.3.

  14. Grating cavity dual wavelength dye laser.

    PubMed

    Zapata-Nava, Oscar Javier; Rodríguez-Montero, Ponciano; Iturbe-Castillo, M David; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2011-02-14

    We report simultaneous dual wavelength dye laser emission using Littman-Metcalf and Littrow cavity configurations with minimum cavity elements. Dual wavelength operation is obtained by laser operation in two optical paths inside the cavity, one of which uses reflection in the circulating dye cell. Styryl 14 laser dye operating in the 910 nm to 960 nm was used in a 15%:85% PC/EG solvent green pumped with a Q-switched doubled Nd3+:YAG laser. PMID:21369171

  15. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Kim, K. H.; Stock, L. V.

    1986-01-01

    In order to evaluate the feasibility of the solar pumped dye laser, the parametric study of a dye laser amplifier pumped by a solar simulator and flashlamp was carried out, and the amplifier gains were measured at various pump beam irradiances on the dye cell. Rhodamine 6G was considered as a candidate for the solar pumped laser because of its good utilization of the solar spectrum and high quantum efficiency. The measurement shows that a solar concentration of 20,000 is required to reach the threshold of the dye. The work to construct a kinetic model algorithm which predicts the output parameter of laser was progressed. The kinetic model was improved such that there is good agreement between the theoretical model and experimental data for the systems defined previously as flashlamp pumped laser oscillator, and the long path length solar pumped laser.

  16. Small-beam, low-power argon-pumped tunable dye laser at 585 nm for the treatment of cherry angiomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littler, Curt M.

    1990-06-01

    An argon-pumped tunable dye laser tuned to 585 nm was used to treat clinically typical cherry angiomas in a preliminary study. A spot size of 0.1 mm and low power (0.1 - 0.15W) in the continuous mode was used for treatment. Results ranged from decrease in size of the cherry angioma to complete regression. In all cases, there was minimal to no scarring. Further study in the treatment of elevated cutaneous vascular lesions with the continuous wave dye laser seems warranted.

  17. Pneumatically tunable optofluidic dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wuzhou; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-02-01

    We presented a tunable optofluidic dye laser with integrated elastomeric air-gap etalon controlled by air pressure. The chip was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via replica molding. It comprises a liquid waveguide and microscale air-gap mirrors providing the feedback. The lasing wavelength is chosen by the interference between two parallel PDMS-air interfaces inside the internal tunable air-gap etalon, of which pneumatic tuning can be realized by inflating the air-gap etalon with compressed air. This dye laser exhibits a pumping threshold of 1.6 μJ/pulse, a lasing linewidth of 3 nm, and a tuning range of 14 nm.

  18. Laser ablation of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, M.; Stuke, M.

    1992-01-01

    High density 50 μs pulses of the UV dyes PPF, POPOP and BBO and of two dyes in the visible region, Xanthen N92 and Fluorol 7GA were generated by laser ablation. Dye powders were pressed with 7800 kp/cm 2 in round pellets which were ablated by exposure to KrF excimer laser radiation (248 nm) at a fluence of 100 mJ/cm 2. The ablation cloud was optically activated with a XeCl excimer laser. Its fluorescence spectrum was measured and was identified as a dye vapour fluorescence spectrum by comparison to conventional dye solution and dye vapour spectra. The dye cloud is not deflected in an electric field (10 6 V/m). By changing the delay time between the ablation laser and the focused activation laser, the velocity distribution of the ablated dye was measured. Its maximum is at 600 m/s for PPF. Knowing the thickness of the ablated dye layer per shot (300 Å) and the size of the ablation cloud (pictures of a video camera), one can estimate the maximum density of the dye in the gas pulse to be 10 -5 mol/ l in the range of concentration of lasing dyes. However, no lasing was observed up to now.

  19. Medium performance effect on the high output energy from a xenon lamp-pumped pyrromethene-567 solid-state dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Chen, De-Ying; Fan, Rong-Wei; He, Wei-Ming

    2012-04-01

    In order to obtain a high output energy from a xenon lamp-pumped solid-state dye laser, homogeneities of laser mediums and flatnesses of medium faces with different processing treatments are discussed in the paper. The mediums without aging treatment, which are prepared by using a prepolymer process and have diamond-machined end faces to produce the required optical finish, give a highest laser output of 281.9 mJ with 0.215% slope efficiency at 2.0 × 10-4 mol/L. The best medium lifetime is 21 shots to 50% of original output equating 74.6 kJ/liter.

  20. Argon-pumped tunable dye laser therapy for facial port-wine stain hemangiomas in adults--a new technique using small spot size and minimal power

    SciTech Connect

    Scheibner, A.; Wheeland, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    A low power, argon-pumped tunable dye laser was used to deliver yellow light of 577 nm. Individual blood vessels within port-wine stain hemangiomas were treated with a 0.1-mm beam of light using 8 X magnification. This technique permits excellent resolution of facial and nuchal port-wine stain hemangiomas in adults without the adverse complications of textural change, permanent pigmentation abnormality, or hypertrophic scarring.

  1. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Steve A.; Seppala, Lynn G.

    1986-01-01

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous tream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  2. Fiber optics interface for a dye laser oscillator and method

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, S.A.; Seppala, L.G.

    1984-06-13

    A dye laser oscillator in which one light beam is used to pump a continuous stream of dye within a cooperating dye chamber for producing a second, different beam is generally disclosed herein along with a specific arrangement including an optical fiber and a fiber optics interface for directing the pumping beam into the dye chamber. The specific fiber optics interface illustrated includes three cooperating lenses which together image one particular dimension of the pumping beam into the dye chamber from the output end of the optical fiber in order to insure that the dye chamber is properly illuminated by the pumping beam.

  3. Characteristics of a Broadband Dye Laser Using Pyrromethene and Rhodamine Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Wheeler, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    A broadband dye laser pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser with a full-width half-maximum (FWHM) from 592 to 610 nm was created for the use in a dual-pump broadband CARS system called WIDECARS. The desired broadband dye laser was generated with a mixture of Pyrromethene dyes as an oscillator gain medium and a spectral selective optic in the oscillator cavity. A mixture of Rhodamine dyes were used in the amplifier dye cell. To create this laser a study was performed to characterize the spectral behavior of broadband dye lasers created with Rhodamine dyes 590, 610, and 640, Pyrromethene dyes 597 and 650 as well as mixture of these dyes.

  4. Dye laser traveling wave amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, F.; Hohman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Injection locking was applied to a cavity-dumped coaxial flashlamp pumped dye laser in an effort to obtain nanosecond duration pulses which have both high energy and narrow-linewidth. In the absence of an injected laser pulse, the cavity-dumped dye laser was capable of generating high energy (approx. 60mJ) nanosecond duration output pulses. These pulses, however, had a fixed center wavelength and were extremely broadband (approx. 6nm FWHM). Experimental investigations were performed to determine if the spectral properties of these outputs could be improved through the use of injection-locking techniques. A parametric study to determine the specific conditions under which the laser could be injection-locked was also carried out. Significant linewidth reduction to 0.0015nm) of the outputs was obtained through injection-locking but only at wavelengths near the peak lasing wavelength of the dye. It was found, however; that by inserting weakly dispersive tuning elements in the laser cavity, these narrow-linewidth outputs could be obtained over a wide (24nm) tuning range. Since the tuning elements had low insertion losses, the tunability of the output was obtained without sacrificing output pulse energy.

  5. Solid state dye laser for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldag, Henry R.

    1994-06-01

    The development of solid state dye lasers could lead to a major breakthrough in the cost and compactness of a medical device. Advantages include: elimination of the flow system for the gain medium; ease with which to implement wavelength agility or the replacement of a degraded rod or sheet; and toxicity and flammability become a non-issue. Dye lasers have played a role in cardiology, dermatology, and urology. Of these cardiology is of interest to Palomar. The Palomar Model 3010 flashlamp-pumped dye laser medical device was used during phase 1 FDA clinical trials to break-up blood clots that cause heart attacks, a process known as coronary laser thrombolysis. It is the objective of this research and development effort to produce solid matrix lasers that will replace liquid dye lasers in these medical specialties.

  6. Dye lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-08-01

    This bibliography covers studies on dye laser theory, design, components, optical systems, and frequency range. Abstracts on lasing dyes, pumping, tuning, excitation, molecular structure, and modulation are included. Studies on dye laser use in spectroscopy are covered. This updated bibliography contains 217 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  7. Treatment of Port-Wine Stains with Flash Lamp Pumped Pulsed Dye Laser on Indian Skin: A Six Year Study

    PubMed Central

    Thajudheen, Chandroth Ponnambath; Jyothy, Kannangath; Priyadarshini, Arul

    2014-01-01

    Context: Port-wine stain (PWS) is one of the commonly encountered congenital cutaneous vascular lesions, with an equal sex distribution. Pulsed dye lasers (PDL) have revolutionized the treatment of both congential and acquired cutaneous vascular lesions. The pulsed dye lasers owing to its superior efficacy and safety profile have become the gold standard for the management of port-wine stains. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy and side effects of pulsed dye laser for the management of Port-wine stain on Indian skin. Materials and Methods: Seventy five patients of Fitzpatrick skin types IV&V with PWS underwent multiple treatments with PDL (V beam-Candela) over a period of six years at monthly intervals. Laser parameters were wavelength 595nm, spot sizes 7-10mm, fluence 6-12 j/cm2, pulse duration 0.45-10ms, along with cryogen cooling. Serial photographs were taken before and after every session. Clinical improvement scores of comparable photographs using a quartile grading (o=<20%, 1=21-40%, 2=41-60%, 3=61-80%, 4=>80%) were judged independently by two dermatologists after the series of treatment. Minimum number of treatments was 6 and maximum 17. They were followed up at six monthly intervals to observe re darkening of PWS. Results: No patient showed total clearance.Grade3 improvement was observed in 70 % of children and 50% of adults after 8-10 sessions. Children showed better and faster response than adults. Thirty percent of patients developed post inflammatory hyper pigmentation which resolved over a period of six to eight weeks. Two patients had superficial scarring due to stacking of pulses. None of the patients showed re darkening of PWS till now. Conclusion: Pulsed dye laser is an effective and safe treatment for port-wine stain in Indian skin. PMID:24761097

  8. Fanshaped superradiance of a dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Peng, G.

    1982-09-01

    The experimental apparatus used to achieve fan shaped superradiance of a dye laser by using second harmonics from a giant pulsed YAP:Nd(3+) laser oscillator-amplifier to pump Rhodamine 6G is described. The laser device employs a single 45 deg LiNbO3 electro-optical Q-switched yttrium aluminate laser as the oscillation stage, and after one stage of oscillation of yttrium aluminate laser amplification, it puts out a laser peak power of approximately 30 MW, with a repetition rate of once per second using LiLO3 (I type phase matching, theta m approximately 30 deg) outer cavity frequency doubling, it puts out 0.539 micrometer frequency doubled light, with a peak power of 1.8 MW and then uses the 0.539 micrometer frequency doubled light to pump Rhodamine 6G laser dye. The emission obtained assumes a fan shape which is planar.

  9. Continuous-wave organic dye lasers and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Shapira, Ofer; Chua, Song-Liang; Zhen, Bo; Lee, Jeongwon; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-16

    An organic dye laser produces a continuous-wave (cw) output without any moving parts (e.g., without using flowing dye streams or spinning discs of solid-state dye media to prevent photobleaching) and with a pump beam that is stationary with respect to the organic dye medium. The laser's resonant cavity, organic dye medium, and pump beam are configured to excite a lasing transition over a time scale longer than the associated decay lifetimes in the organic dye medium without photobleaching the organic dye medium. Because the organic dye medium does not photobleach when operating in this manner, it may be pumped continuously so as to emit a cw output beam. In some examples, operation in this manner lowers the lasing threshold (e.g., to only a few Watts per square centimeter), thereby facilitating electrical pumping for cw operation.

  10. Short pulse generation from a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G ring dye laser using the colliding pulse mode-locking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The colliding pulse mode-locking (CPM) technique has been applied to a flashlamp-pumped rhodamine 6G dye laser to reliably generate pulses of <1.5 ps. Pulse evolution in the ring cavity has been studied by examining the pulse characteristics at various parts of the pulse train using a Photochron II streak camera. The measured pulse durations in the ring cavity were found to be detector-limited and were shorter than those generated in a linear cavity. The shortest pulses were observed to evolve toward the end of the --600-ns long mode-locked train.

  11. Green pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, Jerry W.; Brown, David C.

    2005-04-01

    Initial experiments with pulsed and CW pumping an alexandrite laser rod at 532 nm are presented. This pumping architecture holds promise for the production of scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  12. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  13. Nanoimprinted polymer photonic crystal dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Mads B.; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Buss, Thomas; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, Niels A.; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-05-01

    Optically pumped polymer photonic crystal band-edge dye lasers are presented. The photonic crystal is a rectangular lattice providing laser feedback as well as an optical resonance for the pump light. The lasers are defined in a thin film of photodefinable Ormocore hybrid polymer, doped with the laser dye Pyrromethene 597. A compact frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser (352 nm, 5 ns pulses) is used to pump the lasers from above the chip. The laser devices are 450 nm thick slab waveguides with a rectangular lattice of 100 nm deep air holes imprinted into the surface. The 2-dimensional rectangular lattice is described by two orthogonal unit vectors of length a and b, defining the ΓP and ΓX directions. The frequency of the laser can be tuned via the lattice constant a (187 nm - 215 nm) while pump light is resonantly coupled into the laser from an angle (θ) depending on the lattice constant b (355 nm). The lasers are fabricated in parallel on a 10 cm diameter wafer by combined nanoimprint and photolithography (CNP). CNP relies on a UV transparent quartz nanoimprint stamp with an integrated metal shadow mask. In the CNP process the photonic crystal is formed by mechanical deformation (imprinting) while the larger features are defined by UV exposure through the combined mask/mold.

  14. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Feeman, James F.; Field, George F.

    1998-01-01

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula I are provided ##STR1## wherein R.sup.1 and R.sup.4 are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R.sup.1 -R.sup.2 or R.sup.2 -R.sup.4 form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R.sup.2 is hydrogen or joined with R.sup.1 or R.sup.4 as described above; R.sup.3 is --(CH.sub.2).sub.m --SO.sub.3.sup.-, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or ##STR2## where Y is 2 --SO.sub.3.sup.- ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO.sub.3.sup.-. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  15. Water soluble laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.; Feeman, J.F.; Field, G.F.

    1998-08-11

    Novel water soluble dyes of the formula 1 are provided by the formula described in the paper wherein R{sup 1} and R{sup 4} are alkyl of 1 to 4 carbon atoms or hydrogen; or R{sup 1}--R{sup 2} or R{sup 2}--R{sup 4} form part of aliphatic heterocyclic rings; R{sup 2} is hydrogen or joined with R{sup 1} or R{sup 4} as described above; R{sup 3} is --(CH{sub 2}){sub m}--SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}, where m is 1 to 6; X is N, CH or formula 2 given in paper where Y is 2 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} ; Z is 3, 4, 5 or 6 --SO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}. The novel dyes are particularly useful as the active media in water solution dye lasers.

  16. Azacoumarin dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue-green to near ultraviolet region.

  17. Azaquinolone dye lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.; Atkins, Ronald L.; Henry, Ronald A.; Fletcher, Aaron N.

    1978-01-01

    A dye laser comprising a laser dye solution of a compound having the general structure: ##STR1## wherein at least one of the 5, 6 and 8 ring positions is occupied by a nitrogen atom in lieu of the corresponding CR group and X is OH, alkoxy, or amino including amino substituted by at least one of the following: alkyl, aryl, acyl, aracyl, a group which taken together with the nitrogen atom of the amino group forms a heterocyclic ring, or part of one or two 5 or 6 membered aliphatic heterocyclic rings attached to ring A at positions 6 or 8 or both depending on where the N in ring A is located. R.sub.1, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, R.sub.6 and R.sub.8 are hydrogen or other groups as defined below. The compounds lase in the blue to near ultraviolet region.

  18. Laser kinetic processes in dye mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Jie; Fu Honglang

    1988-11-01

    Radiation from rhodamine 6G+cresyl violet and rhodamine B+cresyl violet dye mixtures in ethyl alcohol pumped by N/sub 2/ laser light were studied. The rate constants of resonant transfer in the mixtures were determined. The radiative transfer processes are discussed.

  19. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Miley, George H.; Wells, William E.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  20. Single mode optofluidic distributed feedback dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Zhaoyu; Emery, Teresa; Scherer, Axel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01

    Single frequency lasing from organic dye solutions on a monolithic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer chip is demonstrated. The laser cavity consists of a single mode liquid core/PDMS cladding channel waveguide and a phase shifted 15th order distributed feedback (DFB) structure. A 1mM solution of Rhodamine 6G in a methanol and ethylene glycol mixture was used as the gain medium. Using 6 nanosecond 532nm Nd:YAG laser pulses as the pump light, we achieved threshold pump fluence of ~0.8mJ/cm2 and single-mode operation at pump levels up to ten times the threshold. This microfabricated dye laser provides a compact and inexpensive coherent light source for microfluidics and integrated optics covering from near UV to near IR spectral region.

  1. Tunable optofluidic distributed feedback dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenyu; Zhang, Zhaoyu; Emery, Teresa; Scherer, Axel; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-08-01

    We demonstrated a continuously tunable optofluidic distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser on a monolithic poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer chip. The optical feedback was provided by a phase-shifted higher order Bragg grating embedded in the liquid core of a single mode buried channel waveguide. We achieved nearly 60nm continuously tunable output by mechanically varying the grating period with two dye molecules Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and Rhodamine 101 (Rh101). Single-mode operation was obtained with <0.1nm linewidth. Because of the higher order grating, a single laser, when operated with different dye solutions, can provide tunable output covering from near UV to near IR spectral region. The low pump threshold (< 1uJ) makes it possible to use a single high energy pulsed laser to pump hundreds of such lasers on a chip. An integrated array of five DFB dye lasers with different lasing wavelengths was also demonstrated. Such laser arrays make it possible to build highly parallel optical sensors on a chip. The laser chip is fully compatible with PDMS based soft microfluidics.

  2. Variables affecting clinical response to treatment of facial port-wine stains by flash lamp-pumped pulsed dye laser: the importance of looking beyond the skin.

    PubMed

    Bencini, Pier Luca; Cazzaniga, Simone; Galimberti, Michela Gianna; Zane, Cristina; Naldi, Luigi

    2014-07-01

    The response of port-wine stains (PWS) to conventional laser treatment in adults is difficult to predict. To assess the influence of local or systemic hemodynamic variables on the clearance of PWS by using flash lamp-pumped pulsed (FLPP) dye laser. All consecutive patients ages 18 years or older undergoing laser treatment for a facial PWS were eligible. Laser sessions were scheduled every 8 weeks. All patients were evaluated based on a standard scale with four evaluation categories, from no or minimal improvement to total or almost total clearance. Clearance was achieved by 50.1 % (95 % confidence interval 35.6-64.7) of patients after a maximum of 15 treatment sessions. In multivariate analysis, increased age, a newly described Type III capillaroscopic pattern, and presence of lesions in dermatome V2 were all associated with a reduced clinical response to treatment. In a model restricted to demographic pattern and patient characteristics, arterial hypertension was also associated with a lower clinical response. A strong association was found between arterial hypertension and the Type III capillaroscopic pattern. Age, arterial hypertension, capillaroscopic pattern, and body location should be considered when planning laser treatment of PWS.

  3. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, Daniel L.

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam.

  4. Explosively pumped laser light

    DOEpatents

    Piltch, Martin S.; Michelotti, Roy A.

    1991-01-01

    A single shot laser pumped by detonation of an explosive in a shell casing. The shock wave from detonation of the explosive causes a rare gas to luminesce. The high intensity light from the gas enters a lasing medium, which thereafter outputs a pulse of laser light to disable optical sensors and personnel.

  5. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.

  6. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability.

  7. Continuous-wave dye lasers in the DCM region.

    PubMed

    Hammond, P; Cooke, D

    1992-11-20

    Laser dye DCM in an ethylene glycol solution is a favored medium for converting the argon-ion 488- and 514-nm pump lines to tunable radiation in the 600-730-nm region. However, the dye precipitates from solution, is a powerful mutagen, and the glycol solvent is hygroscopic. Replacement dyes in 3-phenyl-1- propanol or 2-phenoxyethanol, particularly the latter, are proposed.

  8. Continuous-wave dye lasers in the DCM region

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, P.; Cooke, D. )

    1992-11-20

    Laser dye DCM in an ethylene glycol solution is a favored medium for converting the argon-ion 488- and 514-nm pump lines to tunable radiation in the 600--730-nm region. However, the dye precipitates from solution, is a powerful mutagen, and the glycol solvent is hygroscopic. Replacement dyes in 3-phenyl-1-propanol or 2-phenoxyethanol, particularly the latter, are proposed.

  9. Fusion reactor pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Jassby, D.L.

    1987-09-04

    A nuclear pumped laser capable of producing long pulses of very high power laser radiation is provided. A toroidal fusion reactor provides energetic neutrons which are slowed down by a moderator. The moderated neutrons are converted to energetic particles capable of pumping a lasing medium. The lasing medium is housed in an annular cell surrounding the reactor. The cell includes an annular reflecting mirror at the bottom and an annular output window at the top. A neutron reflector is disposed around the cell to reflect escaping neutrons back into the cell. The laser radiation from the annular window is focused onto a beam compactor which generates a single coherent output laser beam. 10 figs.

  10. Alexandrite laser pumped by semiconductor lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scheps, R.; Gately, B.M.; Myers, J.F. ); Krasinski, J.S. ); Heller, D.F. )

    1990-06-04

    We report the first operation of a direct diode-pumped tunable chromium-doped solid-state laser. A small alexandrite (Cr:BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) crystal was longitudinally pumped by two visible laser diodes. The threshold pump power was 12 mW using the {ital R}{sub 1} line at 680.4 nm for the pump transition, and the slope efficiency was 25%. The measured laser output bandwidth was 2.1 nm.

  11. High-repetition-rate high-power variable-bandwidth dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lavi, S.; Amit, M.; Bialolanker, G.; Miron, E.; Levin, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    An efficient high-repetition-rate dye laser is described which has a bandwidth that can be tailored to match typical atomic inhomogeneous linewidths. The dye laser is pumped by a 4-kHz 2--6 mJ/pulse copper vapor laser. The total efficiency of the dye laser (oscillator and amplifier) is 45% for rhodamine 6G and 30% for rhodamine B.

  12. Random lasers from dye-doped chiral photonic crystal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuhua; Zhou, Ying; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2007-02-01

    We have obtained a dye-doped chiral photonic crystal (PC) film with reflection band gap much wider than its original band gap without dye dopants by using multiple-step fabrication processes. Moreover, the dye-doped chiral PC films using our multiple-step fabrication processes exhibit many oscillations within the broadened reflection band gap. The abrupt change of the optical density of state (DOS) around the oscillations provides the possibility of generating laser emission when the dye-doped chiral PC film is pumped by a pulsed laser with wavelength in the absorption region of the laser dye. Based on this property, we demonstrated random lasers which exhibit different multiple-mode laser wavelength at different spatial positions. Different from the random lasers induced by the scattering mechanism, the random lasers from the dye-doped cholesteric polymer film exhibit Gaussian-like beam shape and specific propagation orientation which is normal to the cholesteric planar surface. It is foreseeable that a high efficiency and high power broadband laser can be generated using cholesteric polymer films.

  13. Precisely tunable, narrow-band pulsed dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, P.S.; Keto, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    A narrow-band, precisely tunable dye laser pumped by an injection-seeded YAG laser is described. The laser achieves an output of 100 mJ/pulse and 40{percent} efficiency when one uses Rhodamine 6G dyes. The output pulse is Gaussian both in time and spatial profile. The laser oscillator employs an intracavity {acute e}talon that is repetitively pressure scanned over one free spectral range while the grating successively steps to consecutive {acute e}talon modes. We pressure scanned the {acute e}talon under computer control using a bellows. Methods are described for calibrating the tuning elements for absolute precision. We demonstrated that the laser has an absolute precision of {plus_minus}0.4 pm over a 1.0-nm scan. This accuracy is achievable over the wavelength range of a dye. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  14. Solvent-free fluidic organic dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Young; Mager, Loic; Cham, Tran Thi; Dorkenoo, Kokou D; Fort, Alain; Wu, Jeong Weon; Barsella, Alberto; Ribierre, Jean-Charles

    2013-05-01

    We report on the demonstration of liquid organic dye lasers based on 9-(2-ethylhexyl)carbazole (EHCz), so-called liquid carbazole, doped with green- and red-emitting laser dyes. Both waveguide and Fabry-Perot type microcavity fluidic organic dye lasers were prepared by capillary action under solvent-free conditions. Cascade Förster-type energy transfer processes from liquid carbazole to laser dyes were employed to achieve color-variable amplified spontaneous emission and lasing. Overall, this study provides the first step towards the development of solvent-free fluidic organic semiconducting lasers and demonstrates a new kind of optoelectronic applications for liquid organic semiconductors.

  15. Highly efficient solid-state distributed feedback dye laser based on polymer-filled nanoporous glass composite excited by a diode-pumped solid-state Nd:LSB microlaser.

    PubMed

    Katarkevich, Vasili M; Rubinov, Anatoli N; Efendiev, Terlan Sh; Anufrik, Slavamir S; Koldunov, Modest F

    2015-09-10

    Realization of a compact, robust, highly stable, and efficient solid-state distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser based on pyrromethene 580-doped modified poly-(methyl methacrylate) embedded into nanoporous glass host is reported. A diode-pumped solid-state STA01SH-500 Nd:LSB microlaser (λ=532  nm; τ0.5∼0.5  ns; EP≤80  μJ; f≤500  Hz) is used as a pump source. When pumped well above threshold, a DFB laser emits a train of ultrashort pulses (τ≤1  ns; τ0.5<0.5  ns; Δλ0.5≤0.01  nm), while at excitation intensities not far from threshold, single transform-limited picosecond pulses (τ0.5≤40  ps; τ0.5Δν0.5∼0.3), tunable from 541 to 598 nm, are generated. The DFB lasing efficiency reaches ∼60% upon an energy stability of ∼1.4% and an overall service life of the active element of ∼9×107 laser shots. More than an order of magnitude increase in the temperature stability of a lasing wavelength as compared with ethanol solutions of laser dyes is practically demonstrated.

  16. Highly efficient solid-state distributed feedback dye laser based on polymer-filled nanoporous glass composite excited by a diode-pumped solid-state Nd:LSB microlaser.

    PubMed

    Katarkevich, Vasili M; Rubinov, Anatoli N; Efendiev, Terlan Sh; Anufrik, Slavamir S; Koldunov, Modest F

    2015-09-10

    Realization of a compact, robust, highly stable, and efficient solid-state distributed feedback (DFB) dye laser based on pyrromethene 580-doped modified poly-(methyl methacrylate) embedded into nanoporous glass host is reported. A diode-pumped solid-state STA01SH-500 Nd:LSB microlaser (λ=532  nm; τ0.5∼0.5  ns; EP≤80  μJ; f≤500  Hz) is used as a pump source. When pumped well above threshold, a DFB laser emits a train of ultrashort pulses (τ≤1  ns; τ0.5<0.5  ns; Δλ0.5≤0.01  nm), while at excitation intensities not far from threshold, single transform-limited picosecond pulses (τ0.5≤40  ps; τ0.5Δν0.5∼0.3), tunable from 541 to 598 nm, are generated. The DFB lasing efficiency reaches ∼60% upon an energy stability of ∼1.4% and an overall service life of the active element of ∼9×107 laser shots. More than an order of magnitude increase in the temperature stability of a lasing wavelength as compared with ethanol solutions of laser dyes is practically demonstrated. PMID:26368971

  17. Triplet-extinction coefficients of some laser dyes. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlopoulos, T.G.; Golich, D.J.

    1989-03-01

    For flashlamp-pumped dye lasers, the negative effect of triplet-state losses on laser action efficiency is well known. Oscilloscope traces of laser pulses showed that laser action diminishes much sooner than the flashlamp excitation pulse. This effect was attributed to the buildup of triplet-state dye molecules during the excitation from the flashlamp pulse. Triplet-extinction coefficients epsilon(T) were measured over the laser-action spectral region of Rhodamine 6G; Rhodamine B; Rhodamine 110; Fluorol-7GA; Coumarin 540A; Coumarin 522; Coumarin 1; Coumarin 120; 4,4'-diphenyl stilbene; and 2,7-bis(4-methoxy-phenyl)-9,9-dipropylfluorene. The different lines from an argon-ion cw laser were employed for excitation. McClure's method was used to obtain the triplet extinction coefficients Epsilon(T). The method requires the measurement of triplet optical densities OD(T) as a function of different cw laser-excitation intensities (powers) I(ex). The importance of triplet-state losses on dye-laser efficiency is reviewed. The laser action properties of the laser dyes studied are briefly discussed as they relate to the measured epsilon=(T) values.

  18. Rhodamine 6G laser pumped by cathodoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Lisitsyn, V.M.; Lyakh, G.O.; Orlovskii, V.M.; Osipov, V.V.; Urbazaev, M.N.

    1984-08-01

    Cathodoluminescence from a CdS crystal, generated by the action of high-power short-duration electron beam pulses was used to pump a rhodamine 6G (R6G) laser. Measurements were made of the energy spectrum of the electrons in the beam exciting the CdS crystal, of the cathodoluminescence spectrum of CdS, of the absorption and emission spectra of the dye, and also of the time characteristics of the cathodoluminescence and of the dye laser radiation. When the electron beam incident on the crystal was characterized by a current of 500 A and duration 8 nsec at half-height, the radiation pulses emitted by R6G had an energy of approx.1 mJ and the efficiency of generation of these pulses was approx.0.3%. OFF

  19. Nuclear pumped gas laser research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, K.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear pumping of lasers by fission-fragments from nuclear chain reactions is discussed. Application of the newly developed lasers to spacecraft propulsion or onboard power, to lunar bases for industrial processing, and to earth for utilization of power without pollution and hazards is envisioned. Emphasis is placed on the process by which the fission-fragement kinetic energy is converted into laser light.

  20. High-efficiency pyrromethene doped solid-state dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hermes, R.E. ); Allik, T.H.; Chandra, S. ); Hutchinson, J.A. )

    1993-08-16

    Successful laser oscillation of various pyrromethene dyes doped in a modified acrylic plastic has been achieved. Pumped with a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm, a slope efficiency of 85% has been obtained from one of the dyes in plastic, with an output beam energy of 128 mJ. A useful lifetime of greater than 20 000 shots at 3.33 Hz with output energies above 30 mJ has been demonstrated, with only a 34% loss in the available output energy.

  1. Pumping of titanium sapphire laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelínková, H.; Vaněk, P.; Valach, P.; Hamal, K.; Kubelka, J.; Škoda, V.; Jelínek, M.

    1993-02-01

    Two methods of Ti:Sapphire pumping for the generation of tunable laser radiation in the visible region were studied. For coherent pumping, the radiation of the second harmonic of a Nd:YAP laser was used and a maximum output energy of E out=4.5 mJ was reached from the Ti:Sapphire laser. For noncoherent pumping, two different lengths of flashlamp pulses were used and a maximum of E out=300 mJ was obtained. Preliminary estimations of the wavelength range of tunability were made.

  2. Spectral broadening in a microdroplet dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knospe, Anders G.; Kwok, Alfred S.

    2004-05-01

    We have observed broadening of the lasing spectrum of 60-μm diameter micrdroplet dye lasers. The spectral width of microdroplet dye lasers consisting of Rhodamine 6G or Pyrromethene 597 is essentially constant when water is used as a solvent but broaden by >30% at high input-laser intensities when ethanol is used as solvent. Spectral broadening is preceded by stimulated Raman scattering of ethanol in the microdroplets as the input-laser intensity increases.

  3. The physics of dye laser amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, C. C.

    This paper describes a method for the complete analysis of the optical properties of a laser dye. The analysis uses direct measurements of the saturation intensities for absorption and emission. The complete analysis of an ultraviolet laser dye, 3,5,3,5-Tetra-t-butyl-p-sexiphenyl, demonstrates the power of the saturation analysis method. The dye TBS exhibits some unique optical properties which affect its emission wavelength range and photochemistry.

  4. Tunable DFB lasers based on DNA-surfactant-dye complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chida, Toshifumi; Kawabe, Yutaka

    2012-10-01

    We succeeded to observe fluorescence enhancement and tunable laser emission from spin coated films of DNAcetyltrimetylammonium (CTMA) complex doped with weakly fluorescent cyanine dyes, DiQC2(1) and DiQC2(3) which were optically excited by interfering two beams forming a induced dynamic grating. Wavelength tuning of the laser emission was achieved by varying the angle between the pumping beams determining the grating period on the film. Degradation processes of the dye-doped films of DNA complex and PMMA were investigated and compared by monitoring absorption spectra after continuous excitation with a pulsed laser. Roles of DNA for fluorescence enhancement and improved durability were confirmed for these cyanine dyes.

  5. Photonics of laser-excited symmetric cationic polymethine dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlichnyi, Valerii A; Maier, G V; Lapin, I N; Kopylova, T N; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A; Ishchenko, Aleksandr A

    2007-02-28

    Efficient lasing is obtained in the visible and near-IR spectral regions in solutions of symmetric polymethine dyes of the indolenine series (indocyanines) pumped by the second harmonic of a Nd{sup 3+}:YAG laser at 532 nm and an exciplex XeCl* laser at 308 nm into the first (long-wavelength) and higher-lying electronic absorption bands. The quantum lasing efficiency upon UV excitation achieves 37%. It is shown that these dyes can also limit the radiation power of these lasers. Polymethine dyes limit especially efficiently the second-harmonic power, their attenuation factor for the radiation power density of 100 MW cm{sup -2} achieving 14. The nanosecond flash-photolysis study of transient absorption spectra showed that the radiation power is limited by the mechanism of reverse saturated singlet-singlet absorption. It is established that the limiting ability of polymethines strongly depends on their structure. (active media)

  6. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-02

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  7. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhuang; Mhibik, Oussama; Nafa, Malik; Chénais, Sébastien; Forget, Sébastien

    2015-02-01

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  8. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems

    PubMed Central

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes. PMID:27350073

  9. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de La Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes.

  10. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes. PMID:27350073

  11. Circularly polarized laser emission induced in isotropic and achiral dye systems.

    PubMed

    Cerdán, Luis; García-Moreno, Sara; Costela, Angel; García-Moreno, Inmaculada; de la Moya, Santiago

    2016-06-28

    The production of efficient, tunable, and switchable circularly polarized laser emission would have far reaching implications in optical communications or biophotonics. In this work, it is demonstrated the direct generation of circularly polarized (CP) laser emission in achiral and isotropic dye laser systems without the use of extracavity polarizing elements, and without resorting to chiral dyes, chiral liquid crystal matrices, or interferometric methods. The origin of this ellipticity arises from the dynamic birefringence induced by the strong and polarized laser pumping and the subsequent orientation anisotropy of the excited molecular dipoles. A complete polarimetric characterization of the polarization state of conventional dye laser oscillators as a function of different experimental parameters is performed and it is shown that the generated light always possesses a certain level of circularity that changes in a distinctive way with pump energy and polarization. These results demonstrate that it is possible to generate and modulate CP laser light from efficient and photostable conventional laser dyes.

  12. Theoretical studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, Wynford L.

    1990-01-01

    One concept for collecting solar energy is to use large solar collectors and then use lasers as energy converters whose output beams act as transmission lines to deliver the energy to a destination. The efficiency of the process would be improved if the conversion could be done directly using solar pumped lasers, and the possibility of making such lasers is studied. There are many applications for such lasers, and these are examined. By including the applications first, the requirements for the lasers will be more evident. They are especially applicable to the Space program, and include cases where no other methods of delivering power seem possible. Using the lasers for conveying information and surveillance is also discussed. Many difficulties confront the designer of an efficient system for power conversion. These involve the nature of the solar spectrum, the method of absorbing the energy, the transfer of power into laser beams, and finally, the far field patterns of the beams. The requirements of the lasers are discussed. Specific laser configurations are discussed. The thrust is into gas laser systems, because for space applications, the laser could be large, and also the medium would be uniform and not subject to thermal stresses. Dye and solid lasers are treated briefly. For gas lasers, a chart of the various possibilities is shown, and the various families of gas lasers divided according to the mechanisms of absorbing solar radiation and of lasing. Several specific models are analyzed and evaluated. Overall conclusions for the program are summarized, and the performances of the lasers related to the requirements of various applications.

  13. High-repetition-rate, narrow-band dye lasers with water as a solvent for dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Alok K.; Sinha, Sucharita; Kundu, Soumitra; Kumar, Sasi; Nair, Sivagiriyal Karunakaran Sreenivasan; Pal, Tamal; Dasgupta, Kamalesh

    2002-03-01

    The performance of a copper vapor laser-pumped narrow-band dye laser in oscillator-amplifier configuration with water-based binary mixture solvents is described. Although oscillator efficiency in water-surfactant (sodium lauryl sulfate) solvent was comparable with that that employed pure ethanolic solvent, amplifier efficiency was found to be lower. Experiments that were carried out with vertically polarized pump beams and either horizontally or vertically polarized signal beams show that, in case of both the pump and signal having orthogonal polarization (horizontal) and same polarization (vertical), the extraction efficiency for both ethanolic and water-micelle media increased substantially from 15.7% to 18.5% and from 10% to 12.5%, respectively. However, the relative difference remained nearly the same, indicating that a slower orientational diffusion of excited dye molecules in a micellar medium is not responsible for a decrease in amplifier efficiency. Amplifier efficiency comparable with that containing ethanolic dye solutions could be obtained with a binary solvent that comprises a mixture of water and about 30% n-propanol. The performances of two efficient dyes, Rhodamine-6G and Kiton Red S, using water-based solvents were studied.

  14. Hair ignition by dye laser for port-wine stain: risk factors evaluated.

    PubMed

    Molin, L; Hallgren, S

    1999-04-01

    Flashlamp-pumped pulsed dye laser is the preferred treatment for port-wine stain. Vascular hemoglobin and epidermal melanin are competing sites for dye laser absorption and damage. The case presented illustrates the potential hazard of ignition induced by dye laser treatment on the face of a patient receiving inhalation anesthesia. A 6-year-old girl with almost black hair was treated for a port-wine stain covering most of the right half of her face. She was treated with dye laser under general anesthesia administered by mask. A laser pulse close to the upper part of the eyebrow induced a blaze and the eyebrow was instantly destroyed by the fire. Regrowth of the eyebrow was complete after a few months. Hair specimens of various colors were exposed experimentally to dye laser irradiation in room and oxygen-saturated atmospheres. Risk factors of ignition are high laser dosage, a high oxygen level, repeated pulses and dark colored hair.

  15. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  16. Ultraviolet single-frequency coupled optofluidic ring resonator dye laser.

    PubMed

    Tu, Xin; Wu, Xiang; Li, Ming; Liu, Liying; Xu, Lei

    2012-08-27

    Ultraviolet single-frequency lasing is realized in a coupled optofluidic ring resonator (COFRR) dye laser that consists of a thin-walled capillary microfluidic ring resonator and a cylindrical resonator. The whispering gallery modes (WGMs) in each resonator couple to each other and generate single-frequency laser emission. Single-frequency lasing occurs at 386.75 nm with a pump threshold of 5.9 μJ/mm. The side-mode-suppression ratio (SMSR) is about 20 dB. Moreover, the laser emits mainly in two directions, and each of them has a divergence of only 10.5°.

  17. Technology and engineering aspects of high power pulsed single longitudinal mode dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, V. S.; Mukherjee, Jaya; Gantayet, L. M.

    2015-09-01

    Tunable single mode pulsed dye lasers are capable of generating optical radiations in the visible range having very small bandwidths (transform limited), high average power (a few kW) at a high pulse repetition rate (a few tens of kHz), small beam divergence and relatively higher efficiencies. These dye lasers are generally utilized laser dyes dissolved in solvents such as water, heavy water, ethanol, methanol, etc. to provide a rapidly flowing gain medium. The dye laser is a versatile tool, which can lase either in the continuous wave (CW) or in the pulsed mode with pulse duration as small as a few tens of femtoseconds. In this review, we have examined the several cavity designs, various types of gain mediums and numerous types of dye cell geometries for obtaining the single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser. Different types of cavity configuration, such as very short cavity, short cavity with frequency selective element and relatively longer cavity with multiple frequency selective elements were reviewed. These single mode lasers have been pumped by all kinds of pumping sources such as flash lamps, Excimer, Nitrogen, Ruby, Nd:YAG, Copper Bromide and Copper Vapor Lasers. The single mode dye lasers are either pumped transversely or longitudinally to the resonator axis. The pulse repletion rate of these pump lasers were ranging from a few Hz to a few tens of kHz. Physics technology and engineering aspects of tuning mechanism, mode hop free scanning and dye cell designs are also presented in this review. Tuning of a single mode dye laser with a resolution of a few MHz per step is a technologically challenging task, which is discussed here.

  18. New laser materials for laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenssen, H. P.

    1990-01-01

    The potential advantages of laser diode pumped solid state lasers are many with high overall efficiency being the most important. In order to realize these advantages, the solid state laser material needs to be optimized for diode laser pumping and for the particular application. In the case of the Nd laser, materials with a longer upper level radiative lifetime are desirable. This is because the laser diode is fundamentally a cw source, and to obtain high energy storage, a long integration time is necessary. Fluoride crystals are investigated as host materials for the Nd laser and also for IR laser transitions in other rare earths, such as the 2 micron Ho laser and the 3 micron Er laser. The approach is to investigate both known crystals, such as BaY2F8, as well as new crystals such as NaYF8. Emphasis is on the growth and spectroscopy of BaY2F8. These two efforts are parallel efforts. The growth effort is aimed at establishing conditions for obtaining large, high quality boules for laser samples. This requires numerous experimental growth runs; however, from these runs, samples suitable for spectroscopy become available.

  19. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth R.; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Alvin; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary L.

    2015-05-19

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  20. Transverse pumped laser amplifier architecture

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Manes, Kenneth; Deri, Robert; Erlandson, Al; Caird, John; Spaeth, Mary

    2013-07-09

    An optical gain architecture includes a pump source and a pump aperture. The architecture also includes a gain region including a gain element operable to amplify light at a laser wavelength. The gain region is characterized by a first side intersecting an optical path, a second side opposing the first side, a third side adjacent the first and second sides, and a fourth side opposing the third side. The architecture further includes a dichroic section disposed between the pump aperture and the first side of the gain region. The dichroic section is characterized by low reflectance at a pump wavelength and high reflectance at the laser wavelength. The architecture additionally includes a first cladding section proximate to the third side of the gain region and a second cladding section proximate to the fourth side of the gain region.

  1. Electron beam pumped semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William F. (Inventor); Reid, Ray D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Electron-beam-pumped semiconductor ultra-violet optical sources (ESUVOSs) are disclosed that use ballistic electron pumped wide bandgap semiconductor materials. The sources may produce incoherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped light emitting triodes (ELETs). The sources may produce coherent radiation and take the form of electron-beam-pumped laser triodes (ELTs). The ELTs may take the form of electron-beam-pumped vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (EVCSEL) or edge emitting electron-beam-pumped lasers (EEELs). The semiconductor medium may take the form of an aluminum gallium nitride alloy that has a mole fraction of aluminum selected to give a desired emission wavelength, diamond, or diamond-like carbon (DLC). The sources may be produced from discrete components that are assembled after their individual formation or they may be produced using batch MEMS-type or semiconductor-type processing techniques to build them up in a whole or partial monolithic manner, or combination thereof.

  2. Dye lasing arrangement including an optical assembly for altering the cross-section of its pumping beam and method

    DOEpatents

    O'Neil, Richard W.; Sweatt, William C.

    1992-01-01

    An optical assembly is disclosed herein along with a method of operation for use in a dye lasing arrangement, for example a dye laser oscillator or a dye amplifier, in which a continuous stream of dye is caused to flow through a given zone in a cooperating dye chamber while the zone is being illuminated by light from a pumping beam which is directed into the given zone. This in turn causes the dye therein to lase and thereby produce a new dye beam in the case of a dye laser oscillator or amplify a dye beam in the case of a dye amplifier. The optical assembly so disclosed is designed to alter the pump beam such that the beam enters the dye chamber with a different cross-sectional configuration, preferably one having a more uniform intensity profile, than its initially produced cross-sectional configuration. To this end, the assembly includes a network of optical components which first act on the beam while the latter retains its initially produced cross-sectional configuration for separating it into a plurality of predetermined segments and then recombines the separated components in a predetermined way which causes the recombined beam to have the different cross-sectional configuration.

  3. Compact and highly efficient laser pump cavity

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.; Bass, Isaac L.; Zapata, Luis E.

    1999-01-01

    A new, compact, side-pumped laser pump cavity design which uses non-conventional optics for injection of laser-diode light into a laser pump chamber includes a plurality of elongated light concentration channels. In one embodiment, the light concentration channels are compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) which have very small exit apertures so that light will not escape from the pumping chamber and will be multiply reflected through the laser rod. This new design effectively traps the pump radiation inside the pump chamber that encloses the laser rod. It enables more uniform laser pumping and highly effective recycle of pump radiation, leading to significantly improved laser performance. This new design also effectively widens the acceptable radiation wavelength of the diodes, resulting in a more reliable laser performance with lower cost.

  4. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a c-w dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  5. Effects of pump modulation on a four-level laser amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Chakmakjian, S.H.; Koch, K.; Papademetriou, S.; Stroud, C.R. Jr. )

    1989-09-01

    A theory is developed to describe the way in which modulations in the pump intensity produce modulations in the gain of a four-level, homogeneously broadened laser amplifier. The theory is tested by carrying out an experiment using an alexandrite crystal pumped by a cw dye laser. A second dye laser is used to measure the gain in the inverted laser transition. The dependence of the magnitude and the bandwidth of the gain on the pumping rate is determined. Agreement between theory and experiment is good.

  6. Influence of ZnO nanoparticles on Coumarin-503 and Coumarin-540 dye mixture for energy transfer distributed feedback dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, G. V.; Basheer Ahamed, M.

    2016-07-01

    Using organic dyes Coumarin-503 (C503) and Coumarin-540 (C540) as donor and acceptor dyes, respectively, and Nd-YAG as pumping source (355 nm), an energy transfer-distributed feedback dye laser (ETDFDL) was constructed and its characteristics studied. Theoretical studies such as critical transfer radius (Ro), critical concentration (Co), and half quenching concentration (C1/2) were carried out using the absorption and fluorescence spectra of donor and acceptor dyes. On varying the input pump energy to the nanoparticle-incorporated ETDFDL and keeping the acceptor and donor dye concentrations constant, the lasing output obtained was found to be higher than that without the use of nanoparticles. This enhancement was due to the size, shape, and coupling between nanoparticles with the dye mixture. Tunability in the range of 435-553 nm was obtained for both donor (C503) and acceptor (C540) DFDL as a function of the angle of interfering beams of the pump laser.

  7. Calculation and comparison of thermal effect in laser diode pumped slab lasers with different pumping structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Yuefeng; Dong, Wei; Niu, Yanxiong

    2008-03-01

    Laser diode (LD) pumped slab laser, as an important high average power solid-state laser, is a promising laser source in military and industrial fields. The different laser diode pumping structures lead to different thermal effect in the slab gain medium. The thermal and stress analysis of slab laser with different pumping structure are performed by finite element analysis (FEA) with the software program ANSYS. The calculation results show that the face pumped and cooled laser results in a near one-dimension temperature distribution and eliminates thermal stress induced depolarization. But the structure is low pump efficiency due to the small thickness of slabs and the requirement to cool and pump through the same faces. End-pumped slab laser is high pump efficiency and excellent mode match, but its pumping arrangement is fairly complicated. The edge-pumped face-cooling slab laser's pump efficiency is better than face-pumping, and its pumping structure is simpler than end-pumped laser, but the tensile stress on surfaces may initiate failure of the gain medium so it is important to design so that the stress is well below the stress fracture limit. The comparison of the thermal effects with different pumping structure shows that, the edge-pumped slab laser has engineering advantages in high power slab laser's application. Furthermore, the end-pumped slab laser tends to get the best beam quality, so it is fit for the application which has a special requirement on laser beam quality.

  8. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, B E; Singh, U N; Higdon, N S; Cotnoir, L J; Wilkerson, T D; Browell, E V

    1987-05-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, we have generated narrowband (~0.03-cm(-1)) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using the narrow linewidth (~0.02-cm(-1)) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20% and 35% when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. We measured the linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures and inferred collisional broadening coefficients that agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  9. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Singh, U. N.; Cotnoir, L. J.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Higdon, N. S.; Browell, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, narrowband (about 0.03/cm) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths was generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), using the narrow linewidth (about 0.02/cm) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20 percent and 35 percent, when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. The linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures, and the inferred collisional broadening coefficients, agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  10. Dye lasers: Design, operation, and performance. March 1975-October 1989 (Citations from the Searchable Physics Information Notices data base). Report for Mar 75-Oct 89

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, operation, and performance of dye lasers. Dye materials, pulse techniques, laser pumping systems, experimental applications, design of dye laser systems, and performance evaluations are considered. Modeling of dye laser operation is also discussed. Descriptions of system components and experimental variables, and their effects on laser output are included. References to other laser systems such as carbon dioxide lasers, x-ray lasers, and UV lasers are included in related bibliographies. (Contains 264 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  11. Development of a single-longitudinal-mode, high-peak-power, tunable pulsed dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.F.; Valentini, J.J. )

    1994-09-01

    A compact, high-peak-power, user-friendly, single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) tunable dye laser has been developed. The device yields [gt]12 mJ pulses of 6 ns duration and [similar to]2.7[times]transform-limited linewidths of [lt]200 MHz. Seamless single-mode tunability of [gt]20 cm[sup [minus]1] is possible without resetting. The dye laser makes efficient use of the pump laser, with [similar to]10% conversion of the 532 nm pump energy to tunable dye power and occupies [lt]4 m[sup 2] (including pump laser and all diagnostics). The linewidth of the device can be switched from [lt]200 MHz SLM operation to [lt]0.5 cm[sup [minus]1] broadband modeless operation by moving one mirror. This allows rapid interchange between high-resolution scanning and a fast survey scan'' mode of operation to isolate the spectral region of interest at low resolution.

  12. Off-axis coherently pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A coherently optically pumped laser system is described. A pump laser beam propagates through a laser medium contained in a degenerate cavity resonator in a controlled multiple round trip fashion in such a way that the unused pump beam emerges from an injection aperture at a different angle from which it enters the resonator. The pump beam is angularly injected off of the central axis of the resonator body whereupon the pump beam alternately undergoes spreading and focusing while pumping the laser medium by a process of resonant absorption. The emergent pump beam can also be used as a second pump beam source by being reinjected back into the cavity or it can be used for pumping another laser.

  13. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, D.S.

    1987-07-31

    The apparatus of this invention may comprise a system for generating laser radiation from a high-energy neutron source. The neutron source is a tokamak fusion reactor generating a long pulse of high-energy neutrons and having a temperature and magnetic field effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//center dot/s. Conversion means are provided adjacent the fusion reactor at a location operable for converting the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. A lasing medium is spaced about and responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Fusion pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, Daniel S.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for generating energy in the form of laser radiation. A tokamak fusion reactor is provided for generating a long, or continuous, pulse of high-energy neutrons. The tokamak design provides a temperature and a magnetic field which is effective to generate a neutron flux of at least 10.sup.15 neutrons/cm.sup.2.s. A conversion medium receives neutrons from the tokamak and converts the high-energy neutrons to an energy source with an intensity and an energy effective to excite a preselected lasing medium. The energy source typically comprises fission fragments, alpha particles, and radiation from a fission event. A lasing medium is provided which is responsive to the energy source to generate a population inversion which is effective to support laser oscillations for generating output radiation.

  15. Diode-pumped laser altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Isyanova, Y.

    1993-01-01

    TEM(sub 00)-mode output energies up to 22.5 mJ with 23 percent slope efficiencies were generated at 1.064 microns in a diode-laser pumped Nd:YAG laser using a transverse-pumping geometry. 1.32-micron performance was equally impressive at 10.2 mJ output energy with 15 percent slope efficiency. The same pumping geometry was successfully carried forward to several complex Q-switched laser resonator designs with no noticeable degradation of beam quality. Output beam profiles were consistently shown to have greater than 90 percent correlation with the ideal TEM(sub 00)-order Gaussian profile. A comparison study on pulse-reflection-mode (PRM), pulse-transmission-mode (PTM), and passive Q-switching techniques was undertaken. The PRM Q-switched laser generated 8.3 mJ pulses with durations as short as 10 ns. The PTM Q-switch laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 5 ns. The passively Q-switched laser generated 5 mJ pulses with durations as short as 2.4 ns. Frequency doubling of both 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns with conversion efficiencies of 56 percent in lithium triborate and 10 percent in rubidium titanyl arsenate, respectively, was shown. Sum-frequency generation of the 1.064 microns and 1.32 microns radiations was demonstrated in KTP to generate 1.1 mJ of 0.589 micron output with 11.5 percent conversion efficiency.

  16. Tunable optofluidic dye laser with integrated air-gap etalon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wuzhou; Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Psaltis, Demetri

    2010-11-01

    In this work we demonstrate an integrated air-gap etalon that enables single wavelength operation and tuning ability for optofluidic dye laser. The integrated elastomeric air-gap etalon is controlled by air pressure. The chip was fabricated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) via replica molding. It comprises a liquid waveguide and micro-scale air-gap mirrors providing the feedback. The lasing wavelength is chosen by the interference between two parallel PDMS-air interfaces inside the internal tunable air-gap etalon, of which pneumatic tuning can be realized by inflating the air-gap etalon with compressed air. This dye laser exhibits a pumping threshold of 1.6 μJ/pulse, a lasing linewidth of 3 nm and a tuning range of 14 nm.

  17. Far-red polyurethane-host solid-state dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S V; Pozhar, V V; Dzyubenko, M I; Doroshenko, A O

    2009-09-30

    The output energy and emission spectrum of a solid-state dye laser using Oxazine 1 in polyurethane as the gain medium have been measured. Under microsecond pumping, efficient lasing has been obtained in the range 700-745 nm. The highest conversion efficiency and output energy achieved are 23% and 127 mJ, respectively. (lasers)

  18. Diode-pumped laser with improved pumping system

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Jim J.

    2004-03-09

    A laser wherein pump radiation from laser diodes is delivered to a pump chamber and into the lasing medium by quasi-three-dimensional compound parabolic concentrator light channels. The light channels have reflective side walls with a curved surface and reflective end walls with a curved surface. A flow tube between the lasing medium and the light channel has a roughened surface.

  19. Blackbody-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.

    1983-07-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping. Previously announced in STAR as N83-10420

  20. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell. 6 figs.

  1. Dye laser amplifier including a dye cell contained within a support vessel

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James

    1992-01-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of greater than 30 gallons/minute at a static pressure greater than 150 pounds/square inch and a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell.

  2. Linewidth characteristics of Raman-shifted dye laser output at 720 and 940 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.; Higdon, N. S.

    1986-01-01

    Existing DIAL systems for water vapor measurements in the troposphere operate at wavelengths near 720 nm. The use of stronger water vapor absorption lines in the range 930 to 960 nm will significantly improve DIAL measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere where water vapor concentrations are low. The generation of light at 940 nm using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG pumped dye laser is inefficient due to the small absorption if infrared dyes at the pump wavelength. However, 940 nm generation utilizing stimulated Raman scattering of dye lasers is attractive because of a potentially high conversion efficiency plus the possibility of retaining the narrow linewidth available from some dye lasers. The Raman conversion efficiency and line broadening are presented for first Stokes operation at 720 and 940 nm using hydrogen and deuterium as the Raman media.

  3. Lasant Materials for Blackbody-Pumped Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, R. J. (Editor); Chen, K. Y. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Blackbody-pumped solar lasers are proposed to convert sunlight into laser power to provide future space power and propulsion needs. There are two classes of blackbody-pumped lasers. The direct cavity-pumped system in which the lasant molecule is vibrationally excited by the absorption of blackbody radiation and laser, all within the blackbody cavity. The other system is the transfer blackbody-pumped laser in which an absorbing molecule is first excited within the blackbody cavity, then transferred into a laser cavity when an appropriate lasant molecule is mixed. Collisional transfer of vibrational excitation from the absorbing to the lasing molecule results in laser emission. A workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center to investigate new lasant materials for both of these blackbody systems. Emphasis was placed on the physics of molecular systems which would be appropriate for blackbody-pumped lasers.

  4. Lasers from fission. [nuclear pumping feasibility experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.; Helmick, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of the nuclear pumping of lasers was demonstrated in three experiments conducted independently at three different laboratories. In this context nuclear pumping of lasers is understood to be the excitation of a laser by the kinetic energy of the fission fragments only. A description is given of research concerned with the use of nuclear energy for the excitation of gas lasers. Experimental work was supplemented by theoretical research. Attention is given to a nuclear pumped He-Xe laser, a nuclear pumped CO laser, and a neon-nitrogen laser pumped by alpha particles. Studies involving uranium hexafluoride admixture to laser media are discussed along with research on uranium hexafluoride-fueled reactors.

  5. New efficient laser dyes for the red region of the spectrum. Part 1. Peri-indenones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, S. P.; Burdukova, O. A.; Komlev, I. V.; Petukhov, V. A.; Povedailo, V. A.; Semenov, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the generation characteristics of ethanol solutions of twenty newly synthesised dyes belonging to peri-indenones, including benzanthrones and phenalemines. The tuning curves of these dyes, generating light in the orange and red spectral regions, are measured, and the wavelength tuning ranges are determined. The dependence of the generation energy on the pump energy in a non-selective cavity is measured. It is shown that some of the synthesised dyes surpass the widely used laser dyes in the energy efficiency and the width of the wavelength tuning range.

  6. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser - Quantification for a narrowband absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brobst, William D.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors including transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power is presented for a CW dye laser with a narrow-band absorber (NO2). A Beer-Lambert type relationship is found over a small but useful range of these parameters. Quantitative measurement of intracavity absorption from the dye laser spectral profiles showed enhancements up to 12,000 (for pump powers near lasing threshold) when compared to extracavity measurements. The definition of an intracavity absorption coefficient allowed the determination of accurate transition strength ratios, demonstrating the reliability of the method.

  7. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Kim, K. H.; Stock, L. V.

    1987-01-01

    The improvement on the collection system of the Tarmarack Solar Simulator beam was attemped. The basic study of evaluating the solid state laser materials for the solar pumping and also the work to construct a kinetic model algorithm for the flashlamp pumped iodine lasers were carried out. It was observed that the collector cone worked better than the lens assembly in order to collect the solar simulator beam and to focus it down to a strong power density. The study on the various laser materials and their lasing characteristics shows that the neodymium and chromium co-doped gadolinium scandium gallium garnet (Nr:Cr:GSGG) may be a strong candidate for the high power solar pumped solid state laser crystal. On the other hand the improved kinetic modeling for the flashlamp pumped iodine laser provides a good agreement between the theoretical model and the experimental data on the laser power output, and predicts the output parameters of a solar pumped iodine laser.

  8. Laser inactivation of periodontal bacteria using photosensitizing dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Paul S.; Maddocks, L.; King, Terence A.; Drucker, D. B.

    1996-12-01

    We demonstrate the killing of the oral bacteria Prevotella nigrescens using a photosensitizer and light from a 10 Hz, frequency doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG pumped dye laser, with modified oscillator to increase output power. This system produced light at wavelengths close to 620 nm, the absorption maximum of the photosensitizing agent, malachite green isothiocyanate, a wavelength that is not significantly absorbed by tissue. A bacterial reduction of 97.5 percent was achieved at an energy density of 0.67 J/cm2 and exposure times of 300 seconds.

  9. Solar powered blackbody-pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Walter H.; Sirota, J. M.

    1991-02-01

    A concept for a solar-powered laser is presented which utilizes an intermediate blackbody cavity to provide a uniform optical pumping environment for the lasant, typically CO or CO2 or possibly a solid state laser medium. High power cw blackbody- pumped lasers with efficiencies on the order of 20 percent or more are feasible. The physical basis of this idea is reviewed. Small scale experiments using a high temperature oven as the optical pump have been carried out with gas laser mixtures. Detailed calculations showing a potential efficiency of 35 percent for blackbody pumped Nd:YAG system are discussed.

  10. High power diode pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.

    2008-05-01

    Diode pumped alkali lasers have developed rapidly since their first demonstration. These lasers offer a path to convert highly efficient, but relatively low brightness, laser diodes into a single high power, high brightness beam. General Atomics has been engaged in the development of DPALs with scalable architectures. We have examined different species and pump characteristics. We show that high absorption can be achieved even when the pump source bandwidth is several times the absorption bandwidth. In addition, we present experimental results for both potassium and rubidium systems pumped with a 0.2 nm bandwidth alexandrite laser. These data show slope efficiencies of 67% and 72% respectively.

  11. Optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system

    DOEpatents

    Buchwald, Melvin I.; Jones, Claude R.; Nelson, Leonard Y.

    1982-01-01

    An optically pumped isotopic ammonia laser system which is capable of producing a plurality of frequencies in the middle infrared spectral region. Two optical pumping mechanisms are disclosed, i.e., pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J) in response to enhancement of rotational cascade lasing including stimulated Raman effects, and, pumping on R(J) and lasing on P(J+2). The disclosed apparatus for optical pumping include a hole coupled cavity and a grating coupled cavity.

  12. Effect of solvent viscosity on the anisotropy of distribution of excited centers in an active medium of a dye laser at a pump power near the threshold value

    SciTech Connect

    Yartsev, A.I.; Sechkarev, A.V.

    1995-03-01

    Dependences of the anisotropy of the distribution of excited centers (A) in rhodamine 6G and 6-aminophenolenon solutions in organic solvents of different viscosity are studied. Relying on the character of the dependence of A on the viscosity, the conclusion is made that it is possible to employ a relation similar to the Levshin-Perrin formula for polarized luminescence in the threshold excitation mode. Experimental data are used to calculate angles between absorption and emission dipoles of electron auxochrome groups of molecules for the dyes under investigation and to estimate the effective volume of activator molecules for the ethanol solution of rhodamine 6G. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Solar-pumped solid state Nd lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Zapata, L.

    1985-01-01

    Solid state neodymium lasers are considered candidates for space-based polar-pumped laser for continuous power transmission. Laser performance for three different slab laser configurations has been computed to show the excellent power capability of such systems if heat problems can be solved. Ideas involving geometries and materials are offered as potential solutions to the heat problem.

  14. Laser based on dye-activated silica gel

    SciTech Connect

    Altshuler, G.B.; Bakhanov, V.A.; Dulneva, E.G.; Erofeev, A.V.; Mazurin, O.V.; Roskova, G.P.; Tsekhomskaya, T.S.

    1987-06-01

    Silica gel activated by a dye is used as a new laser medium. The lasin characteristics of rhodamine 6G in silica gel are reported. An important characteristic of the dye laser is its long service life, which is determined by the photostability of the dye in silic gel.(AIP)

  15. Cladding For Transversely-Pumped Laser Rod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.; Fan, Tso Yee

    1989-01-01

    Combination of suitable dimensioning and cladding of neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet of similar solid-state laser provides for more efficient utilization of transversely-incident pump light from diode lasers. New design overcomes some of limitations of longitudinal- and older transverse-pumping concepts and promotes operation at higher output powers in TEM00 mode.

  16. Design of multilamp nonimaging laser pump cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    A technique has been developed to design single laser rod, multiple flash lamp pump cavities that allow all of the energy generated by the lamp to pass through the laser rod before entering another lamp cavity. The effective lamp and rod perimeters are matched, guaranteeing maximal concentration and uniformity of pumping.

  17. Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James

    1992-01-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner.

  18. Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.

    1992-12-01

    A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner. 9 figs.

  19. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon

    1990-01-01

    The optimum conditions of a solar pumped iodine laser are found in this research for the case of a continuous wave operation and a pulsed operation. The optimum product of the pressure(p) inside the laser tube and the tube diameter(d) was pd=40 approx. 50 torr-cm on the contrary to the case of a high intensity flashlamp pumped iodine laser where the optimum value of the product is known to be pd=150 torr-cm. The pressure-diameter product is less than 1/3 of that of the high power iodine laser. During the research period, various laser materials were also studied for solar pumping. Among the laser materials, Nd:YAG is found to have the lowest laser threshold pumping intensity of about 200 solar constant. The Rhodamine 6G was also tested as the solar pumped laser material. The threshold pumping power was measured to be about 20,000 solar constant. The amplification experiment for a continuously pumped iodine laser amplifier was performed using Vortek solar simulator and the amplification factors were measured for single pass amplification and triple pass amplification of the 15 cm long amplifier tube. The amplification of 5 was obtained for the triple pass amplification.

  20. Solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Weksler, M.; Shwartz, J.

    1988-06-01

    Results are presented for direct solar pumping of a ND:YAG rod laser. Stable CW output of more than 60 W was obtained with a slope efficiency exceeding 2 percent. A compound parabolic concentrator, designed to increase the solar radiation coupled into the laser rod, was used in these experiments. The results are consistent with predictions based on a simple solar-pumped laser model, which is also presented. Using this model, it is shown that existing laser materials with broad-band absorption characteristics (e.g., alexandrite and Nd:Cr:GSGG) have a potential for better than 10 percent overall conversion efficiency when solar pumped.

  1. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2007-10-23

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  2. Diode pumped alkali vapor fiber laser

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Beach, Raymond J.; Dawson, Jay W.; Krupke, William F.

    2006-07-26

    A method and apparatus is provided for producing near-diffraction-limited laser light, or amplifying near-diffraction-limited light, in diode pumped alkali vapor photonic-band-gap fiber lasers or amplifiers. Laser light is both substantially generated and propagated in an alkali gas instead of a solid, allowing the nonlinear and damage limitations of conventional solid core fibers to be circumvented. Alkali vapor is introduced into the center hole of a photonic-band-gap fiber, which can then be pumped with light from a pump laser and operated as an oscillator with a seed beam, or can be configured as an amplifier.

  3. Diode-pumped alkali laser-bleached wave dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perram, Glen P.; Miller, Wooddy; Hurd, Ed

    2012-11-01

    A three level analytic model for optically pumped alkali metal vapor lasers is developed by considering the steady state rate equations for the longitudinally averaged number densities of the ground 2S 1/2 and first excited 2P3/2, and 2P1/2 states. The threshold pump intensity includes both the requirements to fully bleach the pump transition and exceed optical losses, typically about 200 Watts/cm2. Slope efficiency depends critically on the fraction of incident photons absorbed. For efficient operation, the collisional relaxation between the two upper levels should be fast to prevent bottle-necking. By assuming a statistical distribution between the upper two levels, the limiting analytic solution for the quasi-two level system is achieved. The highly saturated pump limit of the recently developed three-level model for Diode Pumped Alkali Lasers (DPAL) is also developed. The model is anchored to several recent laser demonstrations. A rubidium laser pumped on the 5 2S1/2 - 5 2P3/2 D2 transition by a pulsed dye laser at pump intensities exceeding 3.5 MW/cm2 (< 1000 times threshold) has been demonstrated. Output energies as high as 12 μJ/pulse are limited by the rate for collision relaxation of the pumped 2P3/2 state to the upper laser 2P1/2 state. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume during each pulse. For modest alkali atom and ethane spin-orbit relaxer concentrations, the gain medium can only process about 50 photons/atom during the 2 - 8 ns pump pulse. At 110° C and 550 Torr of ethane, the system is bottlenecked. The system efficiency based on absorbed photons approaches 36% even for these extreme pump conditions. Furthermore, at 320°C with 2500 torr of helium, a pulsed potassium laser with 1.15 MW/cm2 peak intensity and 9.3% slope efficiency has been demonstrated.

  4. Generation of microsecond laser pulses in polyurethane matrices doped with dyes

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, S V; Pozhar, V V; Dzyubenko, M I

    2006-08-31

    Active laser elements based on polyurethane matrices doped with rhodamine 6G and oxazine 17 dyes are fabricated and tested. Lasing in the yellow-green and red spectral regions is obtained upon excitation of these matrices by a dye laser at 532 nm. The spectral and spatial-angular parameters of emission are studied. It is shown that these parameters are similar for polymer and liquid dye lasers. It is confirmed that pump radiation causes strong thermal distortions of active polymer media and the degree of influence of these distortions on lasing is demonstrated in experiments. The tuning of a laser based on a rhodamine 6G-doped polymer matrix is demonstrated in the range between 579 and 601 nm. (lasers)

  5. Quantum beats in forward scattering - Subnanosecond studies with a mode-locked dye laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harde, H.; Burggraf, H.; Mlynek, J.; Lange, W.

    1981-06-01

    Time-resolved polarization spectroscopy of transient coherent superpositions of atomic substates is extended to the picosecond time scale by using a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser. As a first demonstration, hyperfine beats in the sodium D1 and D2 lines were resolved. The ground-state splitting could be determined with an accuracy of better than 0.001.

  6. Quantum beats in forward scattering: subnanosecond studies with a mode-locked dye laser.

    PubMed

    Harde, H; Burggraf, H; Mlynek, J; Lange, W

    1981-06-01

    Time-resolved polarization spectroscopy of transient coherent superpositions of atomic substates is extended to the picosecond time scale by using a synchronously pumped mode-locked dye laser. As a first demonstration, hyperfine beats in the sodium D(1) and D(2), lines were resolved. The ground-state splitting could be determined with an accuracy of better than 10(-3).

  7. Raman-shifted dye laser for water vapor DIAL measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Grossmann, B.E.; Singh, U.N.; Higdon, N.S.; Cotnoir, L.J.; Wilkerson, T.D.; Browell, E.V.

    1987-05-01

    For improved DIAL measurements of water vapor in the upper troposphere or lower stratosphere, we have generated narrowband (--0.03-cm/sup -1/) laser radiation at 720- and 940-nm wavelengths by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) using the narrow linewidth (--0.02-cm/sup -1/) output of a Nd:YAG-pumped dye laser. For a hydrogen pressure of 350 psi, the first Stokes conversion efficiencies to 940 nm were 20% and 35% when using a conventional and waveguide Raman cell, respectively. We measured the linewidth of the first Stokes line at high cell pressures and inferred collisional broadening coefficients that agree well with those previously measured in spontaneous Raman scattering.

  8. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Tso Yee; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, interest in diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers has increased due to their advantages over flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers. A historical overview is presented of semiconductor diode-pumped solid-state lasers beginning with work in the early 1960s and continuing through recent work on wavelength extension of these devices by laser operation on new transitions. Modeling of these devices by rate equations to obtain expressions for threshold, slope efficiency, and figures of merit is also given.

  9. Theoretcial studies of solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.; Fong, Z. S.

    1984-01-01

    A method of pumping a COhZ laser by a hot cavity was demonstrated. The cavity, heated by solar radiation, should increase the efficiency of solar pumped lasers used for energy conversion. Kinetic modeling is used to examine the behavior of such a COhZ laser. The kinetic equations are solved numerically vs. time and, in addition, steady state solutions are obtained analytically. The effect of gas heating filling the lower laser level is included. The output power and laser efficiency are obtained as functions of black body temperature and gas ratios (COhZ-He-Ar) and pressures. The values are compared with experimental results.

  10. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.

    1987-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from March 1, 1987 to September 30, 1987 under NASA grant NAG1-441 entitled 'Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier'. During this period Nd:YAG and Nd:Cr:GSGG crystals have been tested for the solar-simulator pumped cw laser, and loss mechanisms of the laser output power in a flashlamp-pumped iodine laser also have been identified theoretically. It was observed that the threshold pump-beam intensities for both Nd:YAG and Nd:Cr:GSGG crystals were about 1000 solar constants, and the cw laser operation of the Nd:Cr:GSGG crystal was more difficult than that of the Nd:YAG crystal under the solar-simulator pumping. The possibility of the Nd:Cr:GSGG laser operation with a fast continuously chopped pumping was also observed. In addition, good agreement between the theoretical calculations and the experimental data on the loss mechanisms of a flashlamp-pumped iodine laser at various fill pressures and various lasants was achieved.

  11. Recent advances in optically pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilla, Juan; Shu, Qi-Ze; Zhou, Hailong; Weiss, Eli; Reed, Murray; Spinelli, Luis

    2007-02-01

    Optically pumped semiconductor lasers offer significant advantages with respect to all traditional diode-pumped solid state lasers (including fiber lasers) in regards to wavelength flexibility, broad pump tolerance, efficient spectral and spatial brightness conversion and high power scaling. In this talk we will describe our recent progress in the lab and applying this technology to commercial systems. Results include diversified wavelengths from 460 to 570nm, power scaling to >60W of CW 532nm, and the launch of a low cost 5W CW visible source for forensic applications.

  12. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Ware, Kenneth D.; Jones, Claude R.

    1986-01-01

    Exploding conducting film laser optical pumping apparatus. The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-.mu.m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  13. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Stock, Larry V.

    1989-01-01

    This semiannual progress report covers the period from September 1, 1988 to February 28, 1989 under NASA grant NAG-1-441 entitled, Direct Solar-Pumped Iodine Laser Amplifier. During this period, the research effort was concentrated on the solar pumped master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) system using n-C3F7I. In the experimental work, the amplification measurement was conducted to identify the optimum conditions for amplification of the center's Vortek solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. A modeling effort was also pursued to explain the experimental results in the theoretical work. The amplification measurement of the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier is the first amplification experiment on the continuously pumped amplifier. The small signal amplification of 5 was achieved for the triple pass geometry of the 15 cm long solar simulator pumped amplifier at the n-C3F7I pressure of 20 torr, at the flow velocity of 6 m/sec and at the pumping intensity of 1500 solar constants. The XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator, which was developed in the previous research, was employed as the master oscillator for the amplification measurement. In the theoretical work, the rate equations of the amplifier was established and the small signal amplification was calculated for the solar simulator pumped iodine laser amplifier. The amplification calculated from the kinetic equations with the previously measured rate coefficients reveals very large disagreement with experimental measurement. Moreover, the optimum condition predicted by the kinetic equation is quite discrepant with that measured by experiment. This fact indicates the necessity of study in the measurement of rate coefficients of the continuously pumped iodine laser system.

  14. Compression mechanism of subpicosecond pulses by malachite green dye in passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI CW dye lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, A.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, H.; Takemura, H.; Tanaka, S.

    1983-04-01

    The pulse width compression effect of a malachite green (MG) dye upon subpicosecond pulses has been experimentally investigated in a CW passively mode-locked rhodamine 6G/DODCI dye laser. The pulse width reduces as MG concentration increases, and reaches 0.34 ps at 1.5 X 10/sup -6/ M. By adding the MG dye, good mode locking is achieved in a rather wide pumping-power range. A computer simulation of pulse growth has also been carried out by using simple rate equations, in which the fast-recovery component of loss due to the MG dye is taken into account. The simulated results can explain some experimental results qualitatively such as pulse width compression and pumping-power restriction. The pulse width compression results essentially from the fast recovery of cavity loss caused by the MG dye.

  15. Diode laser pumped solid state laser with 2 micrometer wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansson, G.; Callenas, A.

    1994-06-01

    Research at the FOA in the field diode laser pumped solid state lasers with 2 micrometer wavelength is presented. The research was made within the project Antisensor laser. Basic models for CW and pulsed lasers are presented together with results and experience from the design of a diode laser pumped CW laser based on Thulium (Tm), Holmium (Ho) doped Yttrium Lithium Fluoride (TLiF4), abbreviated Tm, Ho:YLF. Measurements on upconversion of energy from the upper laser level in the laser crystal has been made. The upconversion causes loss of energy which leads to higher laser threshold and lower upper state effective lifetime. The result shows less upconversion in Tm, Ho doped YLF than with the same active ions doped into Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Tm, Ho: YAG). A simple pump configuration was assembled which produced a pump focus of about 200 micrometers radius. With 1 W pump power, an output power of 50 mW was achieved with the laser crystal at room temperature (25 C). With the crystal cooled to 5 C temperature, 77 mW output power was achieved. The measured laser threshold was in good agreement with the calculated value. The efficiency was only 10% compared to the predicted value of 50%. Measurements of laser beam cross section, wavelength and longitudinal laser modes have also been made and is presented in the report.

  16. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Cox, J. D.; Weinstein, N. H.

    1983-01-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10Mw CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the inherent advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high power densities. Liquids also have inherent advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13:Nd(3+):ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency as well as its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development and testing of the laser liquid and the development of a large solar concentrator to pump the laser was emphasized. The procedure to manufacture the laser liquid must include diagnostic tests of the solvent purity (from protic contamination) at various stages in the production process.

  17. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Cox, J. D.; Weinstein, N. H.

    1983-03-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10Mw CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the inherent advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high power densities. Liquids also have inherent advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13:Nd(3+):ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency as well as its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development and testing of the laser liquid and the development of a large solar concentrator to pump the laser was emphasized. The procedure to manufacture the laser liquid must include diagnostic tests of the solvent purity (from protic contamination) at various stages in the production process.

  18. Laser-induced quantum pumping in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    San-Jose, Pablo; Prada, Elsa; Kohler, Sigmund; Schomerus, Henning

    2012-10-08

    We investigate non-adiabatic electron pumping in graphene generated by laser irradiation with linear polarization parallel or perpendicular to the transport direction. Transport is dominated by the spatially asymmetric excitation of electrons from evanescent into propagating modes. For a laser with parallel polarization, the pumping response exhibits a subharmonic resonant enhancement which directly probes the Fermi energy; no such enhancement occurs for perpendicular polarization. The resonance mechanism relies on the chirality of charge carriers in graphene.

  19. Exploding conducting film laser pumping apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Ware, K.D.; Jones, C.R.

    1984-04-27

    The 342-nm molecular iodine and the 1.315-..mu..m atomic iodine lasers have been optically pumped by intense light from exploding-metal-film discharges. Brightness temperatures for the exploding-film discharges were approximately 25,000 K. Although lower output energies were achieved for such discharges when compared to exploding-wire techniques, the larger surface area and smaller inductance inherent in the exploding-film should lead to improved efficiency for optically-pumped gas lasers.

  20. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  1. Research on solar pumped liquid lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, J. D.; Kurzweg, U. H.; Weinstein, N. H.; Schneider, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    A solar pumped liquid laser that can be scaled up to high power (10 mW CW) for space applications was developed. Liquid lasers have the advantage over gases in that they provide much higher lasant densities and thus high-power densities. Liquids also have advantages over solids in that they have much higher damage thresholds and are much cheaper to produce for large scale applications. Among the liquid laser media that are potential candidates for solar pumping, the POC13: Nd sup 3+:ZrC14 liquid was chosen for its high intrinsic efficiency and its relatively good stability against decomposition due to protic contamination. The development of a manufacturing procedure and performance testing of the laser, liquid and the development of an inexpensive large solar concentrator to pump the laser are examined.

  2. Excitation efficiency of a side-pumped fiberized fluorescent dye microcapillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko; Nedev, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    In the present work we study the dependence of fluorescence spectra for different pump source characteristics on the length of a micro-capillary filled with a fluorescent dye solution. A standard fiber-optic glass ferrule with two parallel 125 μm inner diameter holes serving as capillary structures has been studied. One of the holes of the ferrule was filled with a solution of Rhodamine 6G in glycerin, while in the second hole an angle-polished single-mode pump optical fiber was placed. Experiments with pump fibers polished at 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, 40° and 45° with a reflective aluminium coating have been conducted. The analysis of the experimental data shows differences in the behavior of the fluorescent spectra at different polished angles. Theoretical calculations for pump ray trajectories as well as overall power transmission for pump fibers polished at different angles have been made. The results show that the proposed construction could be used in optofluidic chemical and biosensors, microfluidic lasers or as a compact fluorescent source compatible with fiber-optic components.

  3. Frequency stabilization of diode-laser-pumped solid state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the NASA Sunlite program is to fly two diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers on the space shuttle and while doing so to perform a measurement of their frequency stability and temporal coherence. These measurements will be made by combining the outputs of the two lasers on an optical radiation detector and spectrally analyzing the beat note. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers have several characteristics that will make them useful in space borne experiments. First, this laser has high electrical efficiency. Second, it is of a technology that enables scaling to higher powers in the future. Third, the laser can be made extremely reliable, which is crucial for many space based applications. Fourth, they are frequency and amplitude stable and have high temporal coherence. Diode-laser-pumped solid-state lasers are inherently efficient. Recent results have shown 59 percent slope efficiency for a diode-laser-pumped solid-state laser. As for reliability, the laser proposed should be capable of continuous operation. This is possible because the diode lasers can be remote from the solid state gain medium by coupling through optical fibers. Diode lasers are constructed with optical detectors for monitoring their output power built into their mounting case. A computer can actively monitor the output of each diode laser. If it sees any variation in the output power that might indicate a problem, the computer can turn off that diode laser and turn on a backup diode laser. As for stability requirements, it is now generally believed that any laser can be stabilized if the laser has a frequency actuator capable of tuning the laser frequency as far as it is likely to drift in a measurement time.

  4. Semiconductor disk laser-pumped subpicosecond holmium fibre laser

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Marakulin, A V; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, Andrei S; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-01-31

    The first passively mode-locked holmium fibre laser has been demonstrated, with a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) as a mode locker. Semiconductor disk lasers have been used for the first time to pump holmium fibre lasers. We obtained 830-fs pulses at a repetition rate of 34 MHz with an average output power of 6.6 mW.

  5. Stable, red laser pumped, multi-kilohertz Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, Hamish; Withford, Michael J.; Piper, James A.

    2006-04-01

    Operation of a miniature Alexandrite laser pulse-pumped at 671 nm by a Q-switched, frequency-doubled, diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 laser is reported. Average power output ∼150 mW at 765 nm with optical-to-optical slope efficiencies of 28% has been demonstrated for gain-switched operation of the Alexandrite laser at 80 kHz. Q-switched pump-pulse stacking has been used to reduce output pulse width by a factor of 6 and increase peak power by a factor of 38 over gain-switched operation.

  6. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In Heon; Kim, Khong Hon; Stock, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    A XeCl laser pumped iodine laser oscillator was developed which will be incorporated into the Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) system. The developed XeCl laser produces output energy of about 60 mJ per pulse. The pulse duration was about 10 nsec. The kinetic model for the solar-pumped laser was refined and the algorithm for the calculation of a set of rate equations was improved to increase the accuracy and the efficiency of the calculation. The improved algorithm was applied to explain the existing experimental data taken from a flashlamp pumped iodine laser for three kinds of lasants, i-C3F7I, n-C4F9I, and t-C4F9I. Various solid laser materials were evaluated for solar-pumping. The materials studied were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, and Cr:Nd:GSGG crystals. The slope efficiency of 0.17 percent was measured for the Nd:YLF near the threshold pump intensity which was 211 solar constants (29W/sq cm). The threshold pump intensity of the Nd:YAG was measured to be 236 solar constants (32W/sq cm) and the near-threshold slope efficiency was 0.12 percent. True CW laser operation of Cr:Nd:GSGG was possible only at pump intensities less than or equal to 1,500 solar constants (203 W/sq cm). This fact was attributed to the high thermal focusing effect of the Cr:Nd:GSGG rod.

  7. Diode laser-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the consequences for solid-state lasers of novel diode laser-pumping technology. Diode laser-pumped neodymium lasers have operated at an electrical-to-optical efficiency of 10 percent in a single spatial mode, with linewidths of less than 10 kHz, and with a spectral power brightness sufficiently great to allow frequency extension by harmonic generation in nonlinear crystals; this has yielded green and blue sources of coherent radiation. Q-switched operation with kW peak powers and mode-locked operation with 10-picosec pulse widths have also been demonstrated. All-solid-state lasers at prices comparable to those of current flash-lamp-pumped laser systems are foreseen, as are power levels exceeding 1 kW, for coherent radar, global satellite sensing, and micromachining.

  8. Investigation of the pump wavelength influence on pulsed laser pumped Alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogilvy, H.; Withford, M. J.; Mildren, R. P.; Piper, J. A.

    2005-09-01

    Recent theoretical modelling and experimental results have shown that excess lattice phonon energy created dur ing the non-radiative energy transfer from the 4T2 pump manifold to the 2E storage level in Alexandrite when pumped with wavelengths shorter than ˜645 nm causes chaotic lasing output. Shorter pump wavelengths have also been associated with increased non-radiative energy decay and reduced laser efficiency. We report studies of fluorescence emission spectra of Alexandrite illuminated at a range of wavelengths from green to red, which demonstrate reduced fluorescence yield for shorter pump wavelengths at elevated crystal temperatures. Investigations of pulsed laser pumping of Alexandrite over the same spectral range demonstrated reduced pump threshold energy for longer pump wavelengths. High repetition rate pulsed pumping of Alexandrite at 532, 578 and 671 nm showed stable and efficient laser performance was only achieved for red pumping at 671 nm. These results support the theoretical model and demonstrate the potential for scalable, red laser pumped, all-solid-state Alexandrite lasers.

  9. Influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap on the performance of optically pumped cesium vapor laser.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Tom; Lebiush, Eyal; Auslender, Ilya; Barmashenko, Boris D; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2016-06-27

    Experimental and theoretical study of the influence of the pump-to-laser beam overlap, a crucial parameter for optimization of optically pumped alkali atom lasers, is reported for Ti:Sapphire pumped Cs laser. Maximum laser power > 370 mW with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 43% and slope efficiency ~55% was obtained. The dependence of the lasing power on the pump power was found for different pump beam radii at constant laser beam radius. Non monotonic dependence of the laser power (optimized over the temperature of the Cs cell) on the pump beam radius was observed with a maximum achieved at the ratio ~0.7 between the pump and laser beam radii. The optimal temperature decreased with increasing pump beam radius. A simple optical model of the laser, where Gaussian spatial shapes of the pump and laser intensities in any cross section of the beams were assumed, was compared to the experiments. Good agreement was obtained between the measured and calculated dependence of the laser power on the pump power at different pump beam radii and also of the laser power, threshold pump power and optimal temperature on the pump beam radius. The model does not use empirical parameters such as mode overlap efficiency and can be applied to different Ti:Sapphire and diode pumped alkali lasers with arbitrary spatial distributions of the pump and laser beam widths. PMID:27410591

  10. LED pumped polymer laser sensor for explosives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Morawska, Paulina O; Kanibolotsky, Alexander L; Skabara, Peter J; Turnbull, Graham A; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2013-01-01

    A very compact explosive vapor sensor is demonstrated based on a distributed feedback polymer laser pumped by a commercial InGaN light-emitting diode. The laser shows a two-stage turn on of the laser emission, for pulsed drive currents above 15.7 A. The ‘double-threshold’ phenomenon is attributed to the slow rise of the ∼30 ns duration LED pump pulses. The laser emits a 533 nm pulsed output beam of ∼10 ns duration perpendicular to the polymer film. When exposed to nitroaromatic model explosive vapors at ∼8 ppb concentration, the laser shows a 46% change in the surface-emitted output under optimized LED excitation. PMID:25821526

  11. Direct solar-pumped iodine laser amplifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Kwang S.; Hwang, In H.; Stock, Larry V.

    1988-01-01

    A XeCl laser which was developed earlier for an iodine laser oscillator was modified in order to increase the output pulse energy of XeCl laser so that the iodine laser output energy could be increased. The electrical circuit of the XeCl laser was changed from a simple capacitor discharge circuit of the XeCl laser to a Marx system. Because of this improvement the output energy from the XeCl laser was increased from 60 mj to 80 mj. Subsequently, iodine laser output energy was increased from 100 mj to 3 mj. On the other hand, the energy storage capability and amplification characteristics of the Vortek solar simulator-pumped amplifier was calculated expecting the calculated amplification factor is about 2 and the energy extraction efficiency is 26 percent due to the very low input energy density to the amplifier. As a result of an improved kinetic modeling for the iodine solar simulator pumped power amplifier, it is found that the I-2 along the axis of the tube affects seriously the gain profile. For the gas i-C3F7I at the higher pressures, the gain will decrease due to the I-2 as the pumping intensity increases, and at these higher pressures an increase in flow velocity will increase the gain.

  12. Solar Pumped Lasers and Their Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    Since 1980, NASA has been pursuing high power solar lasers as part of the space power beaming program. Materials in liquid, solid, and gas phases have been evaluated against the requirements for solar pumping. Two basic characteristics of solar insolation, namely its diffuse irradiance and 5800 K blackbody-like spectrum, impose rather stringent requirements for laser excitation. However, meeting these requirements is not insurmountable as solar thermal energy technology has progressed today, and taking advantage of solar pumping lasers is becoming increasingly attractive. The high density photons of concentrated solar energy have been used for mainly electric power generation and thermal processing of materials by the DOE Solar Thermal Technologies Program. However, the photons can interact with materials through many other direct kinetic paths, and applications of the concentrated photons could be extended to processes requiring photolysis, photosynthesis, and photoexcitation. The use of solar pumped lasers on Earth seems constrained by economics and sociopolitics. Therefore, prospective applications may be limited to those that require use of quantum effects and coherency of the laser in order to generate extremely high value products and services when conventional and inexpensive means are ineffective or impossible. The new applications already proposed for concentrated solar photons, such as destruction of hazardous waste, production of renewable fuel, production of fertilizer, and air/water pollution controls, may benefit from the use of inexpensive solar pumped laser matched with the photochemical kinetics of these processes.

  13. Solar pumped lasers and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ja H.

    Since 1980, NASA has been pursuing high power solar lasers as part of the space power beaming program. Materials in liquid, solid, and gas phases have been evaluated against the requirements for solar pumping. Two basic characteristics of solar insolation, namely its diffuse irradiance and 5800 K blackbody-like spectrum, impose rather stringent requirements for laser excitation. However, meeting these requirements is not insurmountable as solar thermal energy technology has progressed today, and taking advantage of solar pumping lasers is becoming increasingly attractive. The high density photons of concentrated solar energy have been used for mainly electric power generation and thermal processing of materials by the DOE Solar Thermal Technologies Program. However, the photons can interact with materials through many other direct kinetic paths, and applications of the concentrated photons could be extended to processes requiring photolysis, photosynthesis, and photoexcitation. The use of solar pumped lasers on Earth seems constrained by economics and sociopolitics. Therefore, prospective applications may be limited to those that require use of quantum effects and coherency of the laser in order to generate extremely high value products and services when conventional and inexpensive means are ineffective or impossible. The new applications already proposed for concentrated solar photons, such as destruction of hazardous waste, production of renewable fuel, production of fertilizer, and air/water pollution controls, may benefit from the use of inexpensive solar pumped laser matched with the photochemical kinetics of these processes.

  14. Optically pumped Na/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kanorskii, S.I.; Kaslin, V.M.; Yakushev, O.F.

    1980-10-01

    A pulsed copper vapor laser emitting the 578.2 nm line was used as the pump source in achieving stimulated emission as a result of the electronic A/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/ to X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ transitions in the Na/sub 2/ molecule in the spectral range 0.765 to 0.804 ..mu... The average power of all the emission lines was 10 mW when the pulsed pump power was 150 W and the efficiency of conversion of the optical pump energy was about 3%. The pulse repetition frequency was 3.3 kHz. Violet diffuse radiation of the Na/sub 2/ molecules, generated by pumping with the copper vapor laser, was observed. The superradiance regime was found for some of the lines.

  15. Solar pumped continuous wave carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yesil, O.; Christiansen, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to demonstrate the feasibility of a solar pumped laser concept, gain has been measured in a CO2-He laser medium optically pumped by blackbody radiation. Various gas mixtures of CO2 and He have been pumped by blackbody radiation emitted from an electrically heated oven. Using a CO2 laser as a probe, an optical gain coefficient of 1.8 x 10 to the -3rd/cm has been measured at 10.6 microns for a 9:1 CO2-He mixture at an oven temperature of about 1500 K, a gas temperature of about 400 K and a pressure of about 1 torr. This corresponds to a small signal gain coefficient when allowance is made for saturation effects due to the probe beam, in reasonable agreement with a theoretical value.

  16. High-average-power dye laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Bass, I L; Bonanno, R E; Hackel, R P; Hammond, P R

    1992-11-20

    The copper-laser-pumped dye laser system developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is now capable of sustained, efficient, and reliable operation at total powers exceeding 2500 W and single amplifier chain powers exceeding 1300 W. Wavelength center frequency stability is maintainable to < 50 MHz. Laser dyes developed at LLNL permit tunability from 550 to 650 nm. Wave-front quality is < lambda/4 peak to valley. The system is operated remotely with the aid of a comprehensive set of diagnostics. Besides supporting its primary atomic-vapor-laser-isotope-separation mission, the system is being used in alternate applications such as materials processing and the generation of artificial guide stars. PMID:20802559

  17. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-08-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  18. Scaling studies of solar pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Chang, J.

    1985-01-01

    A progress report of scaling studies of solar pumped lasers is presented. Conversion of blackbody radiation into laser light has been demonstrated in this study. Parametric studies of the variation of laser mixture composition and laser gas temperature were carried out for CO2 and N2O gases. Theoretical analysis and modeling of the system have been performed. Reasonable agreement between predictions in the parameter variation and the experimental results have been obtained. Almost 200 mW of laser output at 10.6 micron was achieved by placing a small sapphire laser tube inside an oven at 1500 K the tube was filled with CO2 laser gas mixture and cooled by longitudinal nitrogen gas flow.

  19. Advancements in flowing diode pumped alkali lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Stalnaker, Donald M.; Guild, Eric M.; Oliker, Benjamin Q.; Moran, Paul J.; Townsend, Steven W.; Hostutler, David A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple variants of the Diode Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL) have recently been demonstrated at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Highlights of this ongoing research effort include: a) a 571W rubidium (Rb) based Master Oscillator Power Amplifier (MOPA) with a gain (2α) of 0.48 cm-1, b) a rubidium-cesium (Cs) Multi-Alkali Multi-Line (MAML) laser that simultaneously lases at both 795 nm and 895 nm, and c) a 1.5 kW resonantly pumped potassium (K) DPAL with a slope efficiency of 50%. The common factor among these experiments is the use of a flowing alkali test bed.

  20. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser: quantification for a narrowband absorber.

    PubMed

    Brobst, W D; Allen, J E

    1987-09-01

    Although it is recognized as a very sensitive detection technique, the general application of intracavity absorption to areas such as chemical kinetics and photochemistry has been somewhat limited. Concerns are frequently expressed about the nonlinear nature, experimental difficulty, and reliability of the technique. To allay some of these objections, the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors such as transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power has been investigated experimentally for a cw dye laser with a narrowband absorber (NO(2)). For this case a Beer-Lambert type relationship has been confirmed over a useful range of these parameters. The extent of intracavity absorption was quantitatively measured directly from the dye laser spectral profiles and, when compared to extracavity measurements, indicated enhancements as high as 12,000 for pump powers near lasing threshold. By defining an intracavity absorption coefficient, it was possible to demonstrate the reliability of the method by obtaining accurate transition strength ratios.

  1. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser: quantification for a narowband absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Brobst, W.D.; Allen J.E. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Although it is recognized as a very sensitive detection technique, the general application of intracavity absorption to areas such as chemical kinetics and photochemistry has been somewhat limited. Concerns are frequently expressed about the nonlinear nature, experimental difficulty, and reliability of the technique. To allay some of these objections, the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors such as transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power has been investigated experimentally for a cw dye laser with a narrowband absorber (NO/sub 2/). For this case a Beer-Lambert type relationship has been confirmed over a useful range of these parameters. The extent of intracavity absorption was quantitatively measured directly from the dye laser spectral profiles and, when compared to extracavity measurements, indicated enhancements as high as 12,000 for pump powers near lasing threshold. By defining an intracavity absorption coefficient, it was possible to demonstrate the reliability of the method by obtaining accurate transition strength ratios.

  2. Solar pumped laser technology options for space power transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of long-range options for in-space laser power transmission is presented. The focus is on the new technology and research status of solar-pumped lasers and their solar concentration needs. The laser options include gas photodissociation lasers, optically-pumped solid-state lasers, and blackbody-pumped transfer lasers. The paper concludes with a summary of current research thrusts.

  3. Optically pumped microplasma rare gas laser.

    PubMed

    Rawlins, W T; Galbally-Kinney, K L; Davis, S J; Hoskinson, A R; Hopwood, J A; Heaven, M C

    2015-02-23

    The optically pumped rare-gas metastable laser is a chemically inert analogue to three-state optically pumped alkali laser systems. The concept requires efficient generation of electronically excited metastable atoms in a continuous-wave (CW) electric discharge in flowing gas mixtures near atmospheric pressure. We have observed CW optical gain and laser oscillation at 912.3 nm using a linear micro-discharge array to generate metastable Ar(4s, 1s(5)) atoms at atmospheric pressure. We observed the optical excitation of the 1s(5) → 2p(9) transition at 811.5 nm and the corresponding fluorescence, optical gain and laser oscillation on the 2p(10) ↔ 1s(5) transition at 912.3 nm, following 2p(9)→2p(10) collisional energy transfer. A steady-state kinetics model indicates efficient collisional coupling within the Ar(4s) manifold. PMID:25836515

  4. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  5. Photoactive dye enhanced tissue ablation for endoscopic laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Minwoo; Nguyen, Trung Hau; Nguyen, Van Phuc; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2015-02-01

    Laser light has been widely used as a surgical tool to treat benign prostate hyperplasia with high laser power. The purpose of this study was to validate the feasibility of photoactive dye injection to enhance light absorption and eventually to facilitate tissue ablation with low laser power. The experiment was implemented on chicken breast due to minimal optical absorption Amaranth (AR), black dye (BD), hemoglobin powder (HP), and endoscopic marker (EM), were selected and tested in vitro with a customized 532-nm laser system with radiant exposure ranging from 0.9 to 3.9 J/cm2. Light absorbance and ablation threshold were measured with UV-VIS spectrometer and Probit analysis, respectively, and compared to feature the function of the injected dyes. Ablation performance with dye-injection was evaluated in light of radiant exposure, dye concentration, and number of injection. Higher light absorption by injected dyes led to lower ablation threshold as well as more efficient tissue removal in the order of AR, BD, HP, and EM. Regardless of the injected dyes, ablation efficiency principally increased with input parameter. Among the dyes, AR created the highest ablation rate of 44.2+/-0.2 μm/pulse due to higher absorbance and lower ablation threshold. Preliminary tests on canine prostate with a hydraulic injection system demonstrated that 80 W with dye injection yielded comparable ablation efficiency to 120 W with no injection, indicating 33 % reduced laser power with almost equivalent performance. In-depth comprehension on photoactive dye-enhanced tissue ablation can help accomplish efficient and safe laser treatment for BPH with low power application.

  6. Extended emission wavelength of random dye lasers by exploiting radiative and non-radiative energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan Ismail, Wan Zakiah; Goldys, Ewa M.; Dawes, Judith M.

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate long-wavelength operation (>700 nm) of random dye lasers (using a methylene blue dye) with the addition of rhodamine 6G and titania, enabled by radiative and non-radiative energy transfer. The pump energy is efficiently absorbed and transferred to the acceptors, to support lasing in random dye lasers in the near infrared. The optimum random laser performance with the highest emission intensity and the lowest lasing threshold was achieved for a concentration of methylene blue as the acceptor equal to 6× the concentration of rhodamine 6G (donor). Excessive levels of methylene blue increased the lasing threshold and broadened the methylene blue emission linewidth due to dye quenching from re-absorption. This is due to competition between the donor emission and energy transfer and between absorption loss and fluorescence quenching. The radiative and non-radiative energy transfer is analyzed as a function of the acceptor concentration and pump energy density, with consideration of the spectral overlap. The dependence of the radiative and non-radiative transfer efficiency on the acceptor concentration is obtained, and the energy transfer parameters, including the radiative and non-radiative energy transfer rate constants ( K R and K NR), are investigated using Stern-Volmer analysis. The analysis indicates that radiative energy transfer is the dominant energy transfer mechanism in this system.

  7. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  8. Solar-pumped CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treanor, Charles E.

    This paper describes a method of converting thermal radiation directly into laser radiation at a wavelength of about 5 micrometers. The working fluid for the laser operation is a mixture of carbon monoxide and argon. The source of thermal radiation is assumed to be a solar oven or electrical oven operating in the range of 2000 to 2500 K. The use of carbon monoxide as the lasing material presents the advantage that the absorbing lines can be pressure broadened to permit efficient absorption of the thermal radiation without unacceptable increases in vibrational relaxation. Estimates of the efficiency, size, and power loading of such a laser are discussed.

  9. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Kohei; Ishii, Shoken; Itabe, Toshikazu; Asai, Kazuhiro; Sato, Atsushi

    2016-06-01

    A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  10. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  11. Flashlamp-excited dye laser therapy for treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, David J.

    1990-06-01

    Flashlamp excited dye laser therapy represents an exciting new advance in the treatment of a variety of cutaneous vascular lesions. Portwine stains, angiomas and telangiectases can be treated in all age groups with this laser system. This paper will review the physics of flashlamp dye laser photothermolysis. The differences between argon laser photocoagulation and flashlamp excited dye laser therapy will be reviewed.

  12. Prototype laser-diode-pumped solid state laser transmitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Cheng, Emily A. P.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Monolithic, diode-pumped Nd:YAG ring lasers can provide diffraction-limited, single-frequency, narrow-linewidth, tunable output which is adequate for use as a local oscillator in a coherent communication system. A laser was built which had a linewidth of about 2 kHz, a power of 5 milliwatts, and which was tunable over a range of 30 MHz in a few microseconds. This laser was phase-locked to a second, similar laser. This demonstrates that the powerful technique of heterodyne detection is possible with a diode-pumped laser used as the local oscillator. Laser diode pumping of monolithic Nd:YAG rings can lead to output powers of hundreds of milliwatts from a single laser. A laser was built with a single-mode output of 310 mW. Several lasers can be chained together to sum their power, while maintaining diffraction-limited, single frequency operation. This technique was demonstrated with two lasers, with a total output of 340 mW, and is expected to be practical for up to about ten lasers. Thus with lasers of 310 mW, output of up to 3 W is possible. The chaining technique, if properly engineered, results in redundancy. The technique of resonant external modulation and doubling is designed to efficiently convert the continuous wave, infrared output of our lasers into low duty-cycle pulsed green output. This technique was verified through both computer modeling and experimentation. Further work would be necessary to develop a deliverable system using this technique.

  13. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; Mcdonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-01-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  14. High power diode lasers for solid-state laser pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Kurt J.; McDonnell, Patrick N.

    1994-02-01

    The development and commercial application of high power diode laser arrays for use as solid-state laser pumps is described. Such solid-state laser pumps are significantly more efficient and reliable than conventional flash-lamps. This paper describes the design and fabrication of diode lasers emitting in the 780 - 900 nm spectral region, and discusses their performance and reliability. Typical measured performance parameters include electrical-to-optical power conversion efficiencies of 50 percent, narrow-band spectral emission of 2 to 3 nm FWHM, pulsed output power levels of 50 watts/bar with reliability values of over 2 billion shots to date (tests to be terminated after 10 billion shots), and reliable operation to pulse lengths of 1 ms. Pulse lengths up to 5 ms have been demonstrated at derated power levels, and CW performance at various power levels has been evaluated in a 'bar-in-groove' laser package. These high-power 1-cm stacked-bar arrays are now being manufactured for OEM use. Individual diode laser bars, ready for package-mounting by OEM customers, are being sold as commodity items. Commercial and medical applications of these laser arrays include solid-state laser pumping for metal-working, cutting, industrial measurement and control, ranging, wind-shear/atmospheric turbulence detection, X-ray generation, materials surface cleaning, microsurgery, ophthalmology, dermatology, and dental procedures.

  15. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, I.H. . Dept. of Physics); Lee, J.H. . Langley Research Center)

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the efficiencies and threshold pump intensities of various solid-state laser materials that have been estimated to compare their performance characteristics as direct solar-pumped CW lasers. Among the laser materials evaluated in this research, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6%; however, it does not seem to be practical for solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AMO) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12% when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  16. Optical Features of Spherical Gold Nanoparticle-Doped Solid-State Dye Laser Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, D. Q.; Lien, N. T. H.; Duong, V. T. T.; Duong, V.; An, N. T. M.

    2016-05-01

    The development of a new laser medium based on gold nanoparticle/dye-doped polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been investigated. In particular, gold nanoparticles with small (16 nm diameter) spherical shape strongly influenced the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of [2-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]ethenyl]-6-methyl-4 H-pyran-4-ylidene]-propanedinitrile (DCM) laser dye. Fluorescence quenching and enhancement of DCM emission were observed for various concentrations of gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Fluorescence intensity enhancement was recorded for the sample containing 1.5 × 1010 par/mL GNPs and doped with 3 × 10-5 mol/L DCM. Thermal photodegradation was significantly decreased by using low pump energy for laser emission.

  17. Microwave accelerator E-beam pumped laser

    DOEpatents

    Brau, Charles A.; Stein, William E.; Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A device and method for pumping gaseous lasers by means of a microwave accelerator. The microwave accelerator produces a relativistic electron beam which is applied along the longitudinal axis of the laser through an electron beam window. The incident points of the electron beam on the electron beam window are varied by deflection coils to enhance the cooling characteristics of the foil. A thyratron is used to reliably modulate the microwave accelerator to produce electron beam pulses which excite the laser medium to produce laser pulse repetition frequencies not previously obtainable. An aerodynamic window is also disclosed which eliminates foil heating problems, as well as a magnetic bottle for reducing laser cavity length and pressures while maintaining efficient energy deposition.

  18. Effects of bandwidth-limiting tuning elements in synchronously pumped mode-locked lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Zandi, B.; Casperson, L.W.; MacFarlane, D.L. )

    1990-03-01

    A description of bandwidth-limiting tuning filters is introduced into a semiclassical model for synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. The finite phase memory of the molecular wave functions is included as are the isotropic molecular distribution and the finite vibrational relaxation times. The new set of equations has been solved numerically using the best available values for the various parameters. The results have been compared with experimental data obtained using a rhodamine 6G dye laser, which is synchronously pumped using an acousto-optically mode-locked argon laser. Tuning element effects have been studied using two- and three-plate birefringent filters and a tuning wedge, and the experimental results agree with the numerical solutions.

  19. Passive mode locking of an energy transfer continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    French, P.M.W.; Taylor, J.R.

    1986-08-01

    The first passive mode locking of a continuous-wave energy transfer dye laser is reported. Using an argon ion laser-pumped mixture of rhodamine 6G and sulphur rhodamine 101 as the active medium, pulses of less than 500 fs duration have been generated over the spectral range 652-694 nm using two different saturable absorbers in a simple linear cavity without dispersion optimization. Pulses as short as 120 fs have been measured using standard second-harmonic generation autocorrelation techniques.

  20. Terahertz graphene lasers: Injection versus optical pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, Victor; Otsuji, Taiichi; Ryzhii, Maxim; Mitin, Vladimir

    2013-12-04

    We analyze the formation of nonequilibrium states in optically pumped graphene layers and in forward-biased graphene structures with lateral p-i-n junctions and consider the conditions of population inversion and lasing. The model used accounts for intraband and interband relaxation processes as well as deviation of the optical phonon system from equilibrium. As shown, optical pumping suffers from a significant heating of both the electron-hole plasma and the optical phonon system, which can suppress the formation of population inversion. In the graphene structures with p-i-n junction, the injected electrons and holes have relatively low energies, so that the effect of cooling can be rather pronounced, providing a significant advantage of the injection pumping in realization of graphene terahertz lasers.

  1. Semiconductor Laser Diode Pumps for Inertial Fusion Energy Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Deri, R J

    2011-01-03

    Solid-state lasers have been demonstrated as attractive drivers for inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and at the Omega Facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) in Rochester, NY. For power plant applications, these lasers must be pumped by semiconductor diode lasers to achieve the required laser system efficiency, repetition rate, and lifetime. Inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will require approximately 40-to-80 GW of peak pump power, and must operate efficiently and with high system availability for decades. These considerations lead to requirements on the efficiency, price, and production capacity of the semiconductor pump sources. This document provides a brief summary of these requirements, and how they can be met by a natural evolution of the current semiconductor laser industry. The detailed technical requirements described in this document flow down from a laser ampl9ifier design described elsewhere. In brief, laser amplifiers comprising multiple Nd:glass gain slabs are face-pumped by two planar diode arrays, each delivering 30 to 40 MW of peak power at 872 nm during a {approx} 200 {micro}s quasi-CW (QCW) pulse with a repetition rate in the range of 10 to 20 Hz. The baseline design of the diode array employs a 2D mosaic of submodules to facilitate manufacturing. As a baseline, they envision that each submodule is an array of vertically stacked, 1 cm wide, edge-emitting diode bars, an industry standard form factor. These stacks are mounted on a common backplane providing cooling and current drive. Stacks are conductively cooled to the backplane, to minimize both diode package cost and the number of fluid interconnects for improved reliability. While the baseline assessment in this document is based on edge-emitting devices, the amplifier design does not preclude future use of surface emitting diodes, which may offer appreciable future cost reductions and

  2. Multi-lamp laser pumping cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kuppenheimer, J.D. Jr.

    1987-07-21

    An optically pumped laser comprises: A. a cylindrical laser rod having a longitudinal central rod axis; B. cylindrical lamps for optically pumping the laser rod. The lamps have longitudinal central lamp axes parallel to the rod axis. The lamps being so located with respect to each other and to the laser rod as to define in cross section a base line associated with each lamp and extending between the rod axis and the lamp axis of the associated lamp. The base lines being equal in length and equiangularly spaced; and C. a reflector wall consisting essentially of first and second wall sections associated with each lamp, the cross sections of the first and second wall sections associated with a given lamp essentially following first and second curves extending from a lamp cusp associated with the given lamp to second and first rod cusps, respectively, associated with the given lamp. The first and second curves consist of the loci of points to which the sums of the distances, exterior to the laser rod and the given lamp, from first and second rod starting points, respectively, associated with the given lamp and from first and second lamp starting points, respectively, on the given lamp equal a fixed quantity.

  3. Singlet Oxygen and Dye-Triplet-State Quenching in Solid-State Dye Lasers Consisting of Pyrromethene 567 Doped Poly(Methyl Methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad; Rahn, Mark D.; King, Terence A.

    1999-10-01

    Solid-state dye lasers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) doped with Pyrromethene 567 dye (P567) have been investigated. The preparation techniques employed provided high photostability and laser damage threshold for P567 in pure PMMA with 270,000 pulses emitted before the conversion efficiency fell to half its initial value for a pump fluence of 0.16 J cm 2 . When PMMA was modified with 1,4-diazobicyclo 2,2,2 octane singlet oxygen quencher, the longevity increased to 550,000 pulses, corresponding to a normalized photostability of 270 GJ mol 1 . Modification of PMMA with a triplet quencher (perylene) yielded no improvement, but in ethanol solutions both additives enhanced photostability. It is possible that in PMMA, stabilization by means of triplet quenching that depends on dye diffusion is prevented but that stabilization by means of singlet oxygen quenching that depends on the faster oxygen diffusion rate will succeed.

  4. Efficiency and threshold pump intensity of CW solar-pumped solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In H.; Lee, Ja H.

    1991-01-01

    The authors consider the relation between the threshold pumping intensity, the material properties, the resonator parameters, and the ultimate slope efficiencies of various solid-state laser materials for solar pumping. They clarify the relation between the threshold pump intensity and the material parameters and the relation between the ultimate slope efficiency and the laser resonator parameters such that a design criterion for the solar-pumped solid-state laser can be established. Among the laser materials evaluated, alexandrite has the highest slope efficiency of about 12.6 percent; however, it does not seem to be practical for a solar-pumped laser application because of its high threshold pump intensity. Cr:Nd:GSGG is the most promising for solar-pumped lasing. Its threshold pump intensity is about 100 air-mass-zero (AM0) solar constants and its slope efficiency is about 12 percent when thermal deformation is completely prevented.

  5. Laser photolysis of fluorone dyes in a chitosan matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Slyusareva, E A; Sizykh, A G; Gerasimova, M A; Slabko, V V; Myslivets, S A

    2012-08-31

    Kinetics of laser-induced photobleaching of fluorone dyes (fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, erythrosin B, Rose Bengal) is studied in a chitosan matrix. For all dyes the bleaching kinetics at the intensities of laser radiation 0.7 - 11.9 W cm{sup -2} demonstrates quasi-monomolecular behaviour. The results are analysed using a kinetic model, based on the four-level (S{sub 0}, S{sub 1}, T{sub 1}, T{sub n}) scheme of the dye with chemically active triplet states taken into account. It is shown that the rate constants of the chemical reaction involving higher triplet states in the dyes studied amount to (3.9 - 18.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and exceed the analogous values for the reaction involving the first lower triplet states by nine orders of magnitude. The rate of reaction involving the first triplet states appeared to be higher by one - two orders of magnitude than that in the case of higher triplet states involved because of low population of the latter. The possible mechanism of dye bleaching with participation of chitosan that consists in reduction of the dye to the leuco form by transfer of hydrogen from the chitosan matrix is discussed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

  6. The pump parameters optimization in LDA pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yaofeng; Zhang, Ruofan; Yang, Hongru

    2015-02-01

    Based on the propagation of Gaussian light, Zemax program is used to simulate the pump light propagating process and absorbing distribution for LDA side-pump laser rod,and the corresponding heat load distribution analysis of the rod is done by using Lascad program.On the basis of simulation results,the pump parameters of LDA side-pump Nd:YAG are optimized which provide valuable guidances for side-pump LDA designing and pump module engineering.

  7. Grating THz laser with optical pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoury, Jed; Haji-saeed, Bahareh; Woods, Charles; Kierstead, John

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we present a design for a widely tunable solid-state optically and electrically pumped THz laser based on the Smith-Purcell free-electron laser. In the free-electron laser, an energetic electron beam pumps a metallic grating to generate surface plasmons. Our solid-state optically pumped design consists of a thin layer of dielectic, such as SiNx, sandwiched between a corrugated structure and a thin metal or semiconductor layer. The lower layer is for current streaming, and replaces the electron beam in the original design. The upper layer consists of one micro-grating for coupling the electromagnetic field in, another for coupling out, and a nano-grating for coupling with the current in the lower layer for electromagnetic field generation. The surface plasmon waves generated from the upper layer by an external electromagnetic field, and the lower layer by the applied current, are coupled. Emission enhancement occurs when the plasmonic waves in both layers are resonantly coupled.

  8. Applications for reactor-pumped lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, R. J.; McArthur, D. A.

    Nuclear reactor-pumped lasers (RPL's) have been developed in the US by the Department of Energy for over two decades, with the primary research occurring at Sandia National Laboratories and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The US program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1,271, 1,733, 1,792, 2,032, 2,630, 2,650, and 3,370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, and 3-D ceramic lithography. In addition, a ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth's shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night.

  9. A blackbody radiation-pumped CO2 laser experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, W. H.; Insuik, R. J.; Deyoung, R. J.

    1982-09-01

    Thermal radiation from a high temperature oven was used as an optical pump to achieve lasing from CO2 mixtures. Laser output as a function of blackbody temperature and gas conditions is described. This achievement represents the first blackbody cavity pumped laser and has potential for solar pumping.

  10. Advanced solar energy conversion. [solar pumped gas lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    An atomic iodine laser, a candidate for the direct solar pumped lasers, was successfully excited with a 4 kW beam from a xenon arc solar simulator, thus proving the feasibility of the concept. The experimental set up and the laser output as functions of operating conditions are presented. The preliminary results of the iodine laser amplifier pumped with the HCP array to which a Q switch for giant pulse production was coupled are included. Two invention disclosures - a laser driven magnetohydrodynamic generator for conversion of laser energy to electricity and solar pumped gas lasers - are also included.

  11. Triplet extinction coefficients of some laser dyes I

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlopoulos, T.G.; Golich, D.J.

    1988-07-15

    We measured the triplet extinction coefficients epsilon/sub T/ over the laser action spectral region of Rhodamine 6G; Rhodamine B; Rhodamine 110; Fluorol-7GA; Coumarin 540A; Coumarin 522; Coumarin 1; Coumarin 120; 4,4'-diphenyl stilbene; and 2,7-bis-(4-methoxy-phenyl)-9,9-dipropylfluorene. We employed the different lines from an argon ion cw laser for excitation. McClure's method was used to obtain the triplet extinction coefficients epsilon/sub T/. The method requires the measurement of triplet optical densities OD/sub T/ as a function of different cw laser excitation intensities (powers) I/sub ex/ . The importance of triplet-state losses on dye laser efficiency is reviewed. The laser action properties of the laser dyes we studied are briefly discussed as they relate to the measured epsilon/sub T/ values.

  12. Efficiency of Nd laser materials with laser diode pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Cross, Patricia L.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    For pulsed laser-diode-pumped lasers, where efficiency is the most important issue, the choice of the Nd laser material makes a significant difference. The absorption efficiency, storage efficiency, and extraction efficiency for Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:GSGG, Nd:BEL, Nd:YVO4, and Nd:glass are calculated. The materials are then compared under the assumption of equal quantum efficiency and damage threshold. Nd:YLF is found to be the best candidate for the application discussed here.

  13. Conversion of the luminescence of laser dyes in opal matrices to stimulated emission

    SciTech Connect

    Alimov, O K; Basiev, T T; Orlovskii, Yu V; Osiko, V V; Samoilovich, M I

    2008-07-31

    The luminescence and laser characteristics of a synthetic opal matrix filled with organic dyes are studied upon excitation by nanosecond laser pulses. The appearance of stimulated emission in a partially ordered scattering medium is investigated. It is shown that if the luminescence spectrum of a dye (oxazine-17) is located far outside the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, stimulated emission along a preferential direction in the (111) plane is observed when pumping exceeds a threshold even without an external optical cavity. The stimulated emission spectrum is considerably narrower than the luminescence spectrum and consists of several narrow lines located within the dye luminescence band. If the luminescence spectrum of a dye (rhodamine 6G) overlaps with the photonic bandgap of the opal matrix, a different picture is observed. The loss of radiation in the matrix leads to the red shift of the luminescence spectrum, while the stimulated emission as in the case of oxazine-17 lies is observed within the luminescence band. (active media, lasers, and amplifiers)

  14. Polarized three-photon-pumped laser in a single MOF microcrystal

    PubMed Central

    He, Huajun; Ma, En; Cui, Yuanjing; Yu, Jiancan; Yang, Yu; Song, Tao; Wu, Chuan-De; Chen, Xueyuan; Chen, Banglin; Qian, Guodong

    2016-01-01

    Higher order multiphoton-pumped polarized lasers have fundamental technological importance. Although they can be used to in vivo imaging, their application has yet to be realized. Here we show the first polarized three-photon-pumped (3PP) microcavity laser in a single host–guest composite metal–organic framework (MOF) crystal, via a controllable in situ self-assembly strategy. The highly oriented assembly of dye molecules within the MOF provides an opportunity to achieve 3PP lasing with a low lasing threshold and a very high-quality factor on excitation. Furthermore, the 3PP lasing generated from composite MOF is perfectly polarized. These findings may eventually open up a new route to the exploitation of multiphoton-pumped solid-state laser in single MOF microcrystal (or nanocrystal) for future optoelectronic and biomedical applications. PMID:26983592

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a multipass, plane mirror, femtosecond dye laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, M.; Penzkofer, A.; Gössl, G.

    1995-08-01

    Femtosecond pulses of a passive mode-locked Rhodamine-6G dye laser are amplified in a double-stage, three-pass, plane mirror, Sulforhodamine-101 amplifier system. Saturable filters (Schott glass RG645 and Malachite Green) are used to suppress amplified spontaneous emission. Input pulses of 110-fs duration are broadened to 240 fs in the amplifier system and recompressed to 75 fs in a prism-pair compressor. Using a 20-Hz Q-switched Nd:YAG pump laser of 50-mJ second-harmonic output energy, we obtained amplified and recompressed pulses of 180- mu J energy at 625 nm starting with 40-pJ input pulses. The small-signal amplification dynamics is studied numerically. Relevant gain dye and saturable filter parameters are derived. The influence of amplified spontaneous emission is analyzed.

  16. Grazing Incidence Pumping for Efficient X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Patel, P K; Price, D F; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2004-09-30

    We report progress in developing efficient pumping of laser-driven x-ray lasers that opens new possibilities for both high average power x-ray lasers as well as producing progressively shorter wavelength lasers. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) is described. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing the short pulse {approx}ps laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. The scheme requires careful tailoring of the pump and plasma conditions to the specific x-ray laser under investigation but the main advantage is a 3 - 30 times reduction in the laser pump energy for mid-Z materials. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  17. Preparation of 6-hydroxyindolines and their use for preparation of novel laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Field, G.F.; Hammond, P.R.

    1993-10-26

    A novel method is described for the synthesis of 6-hydroxyindolines and new fluorescent dyes produced therefrom, which dyes are ring-constrained indoline-based rhodamine class dyes. These dyes have absorption and emission spectra which make them particularly useful in certain dye laser applications.

  18. Preparation of 6-hydroxyindolines and their use for preparation of novel laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Field, George F.; Hammond, Peter R.

    1993-01-01

    A novel method for the synthesis of 6-hydroxyindolines and new fluorescent dyes produced therefrom, which dyes are ring-constrained indoline-based rhodamine class dyes. These dyes have absorption and emission spectra which make them particularly useful in certain dye laser applications.

  19. Flow tube used to cool solar-pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    A flow tube has been designed and constructed to provide two major functions in the application of a laser beam for transmission of both sound and video. It maintains the YAG laser at the proper operating temperature of 300 degrees K under solar pumping conditions, and it serves as a pump cavity for the laser crystal.

  20. Amplified spontaneous emission in solar-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Yong S.; Hwang, In H.; Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1992-01-01

    The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) from a long pulse, solar-simulating radiation pumped iodine laser amplifier is studied. The ASE threshold pump intensity is almost proportional to the inverse of the laser gain length when the gas pressure is constant in the laser tube.

  1. a Blackbody-Pumped Carbon Dioxide Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insuik, Robin Joy

    A proof of concept experiment has been carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using blackbody radiation to pump a gas laser. Building on earlier experiments in which optical gain was measured in a CO(,2) laser mixture exposed to blackbody radiation at a temperature of 1500(DEGREES)K, continuous wave oscillation of CO(,2) has been achieved, for the first time, using radiation from a blackbody cavity as the pump source. This was made possible by actively cooling the laser mixture as it was exposed to the radiation field of an electrically heated oven. Output power measurements are presented from a series of experiments using mixtures of CO(,2), He, and Ar. Maximum output power was obtained with a 20%CO(,2) - 15%He- 65%Ar mixture at pressures around 6-10 Torr. The output power was found to vary greatly with the gas temperature and the blackbody temperature. By varying these parameters output powers up to 8 mW have been achieved. The effects of the buffer gas are also shown to be important. Based on the experimental results, it is believed that the buffer gas is needed to inhibit diffusion of the excited species out of the laser mode volume. This diffusion leads to deactivation at the walls. Adding more CO(,2) results in a decrease in output power, indicating that the gas has a finite optical depth and the mode volume is not pumped if too much CO(,2) is present. A model which incorporates these effects is presented. The predicted small signal gains and powers based on this model adequately match the trends observed experimentally.

  2. Multimode-diode-pumped gas (alkali-vapor) laser

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J; Kanz, V K

    2005-08-22

    We report the first demonstration of a multimode-diode-pumped gas laser--Rb vapor operating on the 795 nm resonance transition. Peak output of {approx}1 Watt was obtained using a volume-Bragg-grating stabilized pump diode array. The laser's output radiance exceeded the pump radiance by a factor greater than 2000. Power scaling (by pumping with larger diode arrays) is therefore possible.

  3. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy. PMID:25121863

  4. Optically pumped distributed feedback dye lasing with slide-coated TiO₂ inverse-opal slab as Bragg reflector.

    PubMed

    Han, Sung Gu; Lim, Jongchul; Shin, Jinsub; Lee, Sung-Min; Park, Taiho; Yoon, Jongseung; Woo, Kyoungja; Lee, Hyunjung; Lee, Wonmok

    2014-08-15

    We demonstrate an optical amplification of organic dye within a TiO2 inverse-opal (IO) distributed feedback (DFB) reflector prepared by a slide-coating method. Highly reflective TiO2 IO film was fabricated by slide coating the binary aqueous dispersions of polystyrene microspheres and charge-stabilized TiO2 nanoparticles on a glass slide and subsequently removing the polymer-opal template. TiO2 IO film was infiltrated, in turn, with the solutions of DCM, a fluorescent dye in various solvents with different indices of refraction. Optical pumping by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser resulted in amplified spontaneous emission in each dye solution. In accordance with the semi-empirical simulation by the FDTD method, DCM in ethanol showed the best emission/stopband matching for the TiO2 IO film used in this study. Therefore, photo excitation of a DCM/ethanol cavity showed a single-mode DFB lasing at 640 nm wavelength at moderate pump energy.

  5. High-energy transversely pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Komashko, A.

    2011-03-01

    We report on the results from our transversely pumped alkali laser. This system uses an Alexandrite laser to pump a stainless steel laser head. The system uses methane and helium as buffer gasses. Using rubidium, the system produced up to 40 mJ of output energy when pumped with 63 mJ. Slope efficiency was 75%. Using potassium as the lasing species the system produced 32 mJ and a 53% slope efficiency.

  6. Solar-pumped gas laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    The direct conversion of solar radiation into an inverted population for extraction in an optical cavity holds promise as a relatively simple system design. Broad-band photoabsorption in the visible or near-UV range is required to excite large volumes of gas and to ensure good solar absorption efficiency. The state excited must be a metastable state which is not quenched by the parent gas. The emission bandwidth must be less than approximately 10 A. The system should show chemical reversibility and an insensitivity to increasing temperature. Other properties such as good quantum efficiency and kinetic efficiency are also implied. A search of electronic-vibrational transitions in diatomic molecules satisfying these conditions is now in progress. A photodissociation-pumped atomic iodine laser is now being tested under solar pumping conditions. Photodissociation studies for thallium spin-flip metastable formation will begin in the near future.

  7. Fissioning uranium plasmas and nuclear-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Current research into uranium plasmas, gaseous-core (cavity) reactors, and nuclear-pumped lasers is discussed. Basic properties of fissioning uranium plasmas are summarized together with potential space and terrestrial applications of gaseous-core reactors and nuclear-pumped lasers. Conditions for criticality of a uranium plasma are outlined, and it is shown that the nonequilibrium state and the optical thinness of a fissioning plasma can be exploited for the direct conversion of fission fragment energy into coherent light (i.e., for nuclear-pumped lasers). Successful demonstrations of nuclear-pumped lasers are described together with gaseous-fuel reactor experiments using uranium hexafluoride.

  8. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  9. DOE reactor-pumped laser program

    SciTech Connect

    Felty, J.R.; Lipinski, R.J.; McArthur, D.A.; Pickard, P.S.

    1993-12-31

    FALCON is a high-power, steady-state, nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL) concept that is being developed by the Department of Energy. The FALCON program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1271, 1733, 1792, 2032, 2630, 2650, and 3370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. A ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth`s shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night. The compact size and self-contained power also makes an RPL very suitable for ship basing so that power-beaming activities could be situated around the globe. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, wide-area deposition of diamond-like coatings, and 3-D ceramic lithography.

  10. DOE reactor-pumped laser program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felty, James R.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; McArthur, David A.; Pickard, Paul S.

    1994-05-01

    FALCON is a high-power, steady-state, nuclear reactor-pumped laser (RPL) concept that is being developed by the Department of Energy. The FALCON program has experimentally demonstrated reactor-pumped lasing in various mixtures of xenon, argon, neon, and helium at wavelengths of 585, 703, 725, 1271, 1733, 1792, 2032, 2630, 2650, and 3370 nm with intrinsic efficiency as high as 2.5%. The major strengths of a reactor-pumped laser are continuous high-power operation, modular construction, self-contained power, compact size, and a variety of wavelengths (from visible to infrared). These characteristics suggest numerous applications not easily accessible to other laser types. A ground-based RPL could beam its power to space for such activities as illuminating geosynchronous communication satellites in the earth's shadow to extend their lives, beaming power to orbital transfer vehicles, removing space debris, and providing power (from earth) to a lunar base during the long lunar night. The compact size and self-contained power also makes an RPL very suitable for ship basing so that power-beaming activities could be situated around the globe. The continuous high power of an RPL opens many potential manufacturing applications such as deep-penetration welding and cutting of thick structures, wide-area hardening of metal surfaces by heat treatment or cladding application, wide-area vapor deposition of ceramics onto metal surfaces, production of sub-micron sized particles for manufacturing of ceramics, wide-area deposition of diamond- like coatings, and 3-D ceramic lithography.

  11. Development of short pulse laser pumped x-ray lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Osterheld, A L; Hunter, J R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2000-02-22

    X-ray lasers have been extensively studied around the world since the first laboratory demonstration on the Novette laser at LLNL in 1984. The characteristic properties of short wavelength, high monochromaticity, collimation and coherence make x-ray lasers useful for various applications. These include demonstrations of biological imaging within the water window, interferometry of laser plasmas and radiography of laser-heated surfaces. One of the critical issues has been the high power pump required to produce the inversion. The power scaling as a function of x-ray laser wavelength follows a {approx} {lambda}{sup -4} to {approx} {lambda}{sup -6} law. The shortest x-ray laser wavelength of {approx}35 {angstrom} demonstrated for Ni-like Au was at the limit of Nova laser capabilities. By requiring large, high power lasers such as Nova, the shot rate and total number of shots available have limited the rapid development of x-ray lasers and applications. In fact over the last fifteen years the main thrust has been to develop more efficient, higher repetition rate x-ray lasers that can be readily scaled to shorter wavelengths. The recent state of progress in the field can be found in references. The objective of the project was to develop a soft x-ray laser (XRL) pumped by a short pulse laser of a few joules. In effect to demonstrate a robust, worlung tabletop x-ray laser at LLNL for the first time. The transient collisional scheme as proposed by Shlyaptsev et al. was the candidate x-ray laser for study. The successful endeavor of any scientific investigation is often based upon prudent early decisions and the choice of this scheme was both sound and fruitful. It had been demonstrated very recently for Ne-like Ti at 326 {angstrom} using a small tabletop laser but had not yet reached its full potential. We chose this scheme for several reasons: (a) it was a collisional-type x-ray laser which has been historically the most robust; (b) it had the promise of high efficiency

  12. Femtosecond laser direct writing of single mode polymer micro ring laser with high stability and low pumping threshold.

    PubMed

    Parsanasab, Gholam-Mohammad; Moshkani, Mojtaba; Gharavi, Alireza

    2015-04-01

    We have demonstrated an optically pumped polymer microring laser fabricated by two photon polymerization (TPP) of SU-8. The gain medium is an organic dye (Rhodamine B) doped in SU-8, and the laser cavity is a double coupled microring structure. Single mode lasing was obtained from the two coupled rings each with 30 µm and 29 µm radii using Vernier effect. Low laser threshold of 0.4 µJ/mm(2) is achieved using 1 µm wide polymer waveguides and the quality factor is greater than 10(4) at 612.4 nm wavelength. The lasing remained stable with pump energies from threshold to energies as high as 125 times the threshold.

  13. Recycle Rate in a Pulsed, Optically Pumped Rubidium Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Wooddy S.; Sulham, Clifford V.; Holtgrave, Jeremy C.; Perram, Glen P.

    2010-10-08

    A pulsed, optically pumped rubidium laser operating in analogy to the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) system at pump intensities as high as 750 kW/cm{sup 2} has been demonstrated with output energies of up to 13 {mu}J/pulse. Output energy is dramatically limited by spin-orbit relaxation rates under these high intensity pump conditions. More than 250 photons are available for every rubidium atom in the pumped volume, requiring a high number of cycles per atom during the 2-8 ns duration of the pump pulse. At 550 Torr of ethane, the spin-orbit relaxation rate is too slow to effectively utilize all the incident pump photons. Indeed, a linear dependence of output energy on pump pulse duration for fixed pump energy is demonstrated.

  14. Convenient Microscale Synthesis of a Coumarin Laser Dye Analog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2006-01-01

    Coumarin (2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) and its derivatives constitute a fascinating class of organic substances that are utilized industrially in areas such as cosmetics, food preservatives, insecticides and fluorescent laser dyes. The product can be synthesized, purified, and characterized within two hours with benefits of microscale reactivity being…

  15. Study of photoproducts of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol upon powerful laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Batishche, S.A.; Malevich, N.A.; Mostovnikov, V.A.

    1995-04-01

    Absorption spectra of rhodamine 6G in ethanol solution are measured using, the technique of laser probing upon pumping by a doubled Nd {sup 3+}:YAG laser with pulse length{tau}{sub 01}{approx_equal}16ns. It is shown that, at the pumping energy density {ge}1.5 J/cm{sup 2}, short-lived ({tau} < 25 ns) and long-lived photoproducts formed in the dye solution, which absorbed in a wide spectral range, including the lasing region. The estimates show that the probability of rhodamine 6G transformation to the photoproduct upon three-step excitation at 532 nm achieves {approximately}2.5 X 10{sup -3}. It is noted that, in order to obtain reliable spectroscopic information using this technique, one should take into account the intense scattering of probing radiation by thermal noise gratings, which are formed due to self-diffraction of the pumping radiation into noise components.

  16. Tuning laser output characteristics of a pyrotechnically pumped free-running Nd:YAG laser in terms of pumping kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Xiaoli; Yang, Fan; Luo, Jiangshan; Tang, Yongjian

    2015-02-01

    Using light radiation directly produced by combustion of some pyrotechnics as pumping sources of solid state lasers is a potentially effective way to obtain compact and high energy lasers. Kinetics of this kind of pumping is studied in terms of pulse energy and pulse time characteristics as well as laser output energy. Pumping kinetics is turned through changing fabrication methods of the pumping modules. It was found that the useful light energy and pulse time for the pyrotechnic pumping light showed opposite changing trend. Compressing pulse duration from 45 ms to about 10 ms would simultaneously cause 20%~ 50% decreases in useful light radiation energy. However, the laser output energy produced by these pumping sources only had a variation 9%, ranging from 427 mJ to 468 mJ. Reasons were related to the decrease in fluorescence loss in pumping energy below the threshold for the pyrotechnic modules having shorter pulse duration but higher radiation power.

  17. Large fluctuations at the lasing threshold of solid- and liquid-state dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Supratim; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-08-01

    Intensity fluctuations in lasers are commonly studied above threshold in some special configurations (especially when emission is fed back into the cavity or when two lasers are coupled) and related with their chaotic behaviour. Similar fluctuating instabilities are usually observed in random lasers, which are open systems with plenty of quasi-modes whose non orthogonality enables them to exchange energy and provides the sort of loss mechanism whose interplay with pumping leads to replica symmetry breaking. The latter however, had never been observed in plain cavity lasers where disorder is absent or not intentionally added. Here we show a fluctuating lasing behaviour at the lasing threshold both in solid and liquid dye lasers. Above and below a narrow range around the threshold the spectral line-shape is well correlated with the pump energy. At the threshold such correlation disappears, and the system enters a regime where emitted laser fluctuates between narrow, intense and broad, weak peaks. The immense number of modes and the reduced resonator quality favour the coupling of modes and prepares the system so that replica symmetry breaking occurs without added disorder.

  18. Large fluctuations at the lasing threshold of solid- and liquid-state dye lasers

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Supratim; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-01-01

    Intensity fluctuations in lasers are commonly studied above threshold in some special configurations (especially when emission is fed back into the cavity or when two lasers are coupled) and related with their chaotic behaviour. Similar fluctuating instabilities are usually observed in random lasers, which are open systems with plenty of quasi-modes whose non orthogonality enables them to exchange energy and provides the sort of loss mechanism whose interplay with pumping leads to replica symmetry breaking. The latter however, had never been observed in plain cavity lasers where disorder is absent or not intentionally added. Here we show a fluctuating lasing behaviour at the lasing threshold both in solid and liquid dye lasers. Above and below a narrow range around the threshold the spectral line-shape is well correlated with the pump energy. At the threshold such correlation disappears, and the system enters a regime where emitted laser fluctuates between narrow, intense and broad, weak peaks. The immense number of modes and the reduced resonator quality favour the coupling of modes and prepares the system so that replica symmetry breaking occurs without added disorder. PMID:27558968

  19. Large fluctuations at the lasing threshold of solid- and liquid-state dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Basak, Supratim; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-01-01

    Intensity fluctuations in lasers are commonly studied above threshold in some special configurations (especially when emission is fed back into the cavity or when two lasers are coupled) and related with their chaotic behaviour. Similar fluctuating instabilities are usually observed in random lasers, which are open systems with plenty of quasi-modes whose non orthogonality enables them to exchange energy and provides the sort of loss mechanism whose interplay with pumping leads to replica symmetry breaking. The latter however, had never been observed in plain cavity lasers where disorder is absent or not intentionally added. Here we show a fluctuating lasing behaviour at the lasing threshold both in solid and liquid dye lasers. Above and below a narrow range around the threshold the spectral line-shape is well correlated with the pump energy. At the threshold such correlation disappears, and the system enters a regime where emitted laser fluctuates between narrow, intense and broad, weak peaks. The immense number of modes and the reduced resonator quality favour the coupling of modes and prepares the system so that replica symmetry breaking occurs without added disorder. PMID:27558968

  20. Large fluctuations at the lasing threshold of solid- and liquid-state dye lasers.

    PubMed

    Basak, Supratim; Blanco, Alvaro; López, Cefe

    2016-08-25

    Intensity fluctuations in lasers are commonly studied above threshold in some special configurations (especially when emission is fed back into the cavity or when two lasers are coupled) and related with their chaotic behaviour. Similar fluctuating instabilities are usually observed in random lasers, which are open systems with plenty of quasi-modes whose non orthogonality enables them to exchange energy and provides the sort of loss mechanism whose interplay with pumping leads to replica symmetry breaking. The latter however, had never been observed in plain cavity lasers where disorder is absent or not intentionally added. Here we show a fluctuating lasing behaviour at the lasing threshold both in solid and liquid dye lasers. Above and below a narrow range around the threshold the spectral line-shape is well correlated with the pump energy. At the threshold such correlation disappears, and the system enters a regime where emitted laser fluctuates between narrow, intense and broad, weak peaks. The immense number of modes and the reduced resonator quality favour the coupling of modes and prepares the system so that replica symmetry breaking occurs without added disorder.

  1. Key techniques for space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang; Xiong, Sheng-jun; Liu, Xiao-long; Han, Wei-hua

    2014-12-01

    In space, the absence of atmospheric turbulence, absorption, dispersion and aerosol factors on laser transmission. Therefore, space-based laser has important values in satellite communication, satellite attitude controlling, space debris clearing, and long distance energy transmission, etc. On the other hand, solar energy is a kind of clean and renewable resources, the average intensity of solar irradiation on the earth is 1353W/m2, and it is even higher in space. Therefore, the space-based solar pumped lasers has attracted much research in recent years, most research focuses on solar pumped solid state lasers and solar pumped fiber lasers. The two lasing principle is based on stimulated emission of the rare earth ions such as Nd, Yb, Cr. The rare earth ions absorb light only in narrow bands. This leads to inefficient absorption of the broad-band solar spectrum, and increases the system heating load, which make the system solar to laser power conversion efficiency very low. As a solar pumped semiconductor lasers could absorb all photons with energy greater than the bandgap. Thus, solar pumped semiconductor lasers could have considerably higher efficiencies than other solar pumped lasers. Besides, solar pumped semiconductor lasers has smaller volume chip, simpler structure and better heat dissipation, it can be mounted on a small satellite platform, can compose satellite array, which can greatly improve the output power of the system, and have flexible character. This paper summarizes the research progress of space-based solar pumped semiconductor lasers, analyses of the key technologies based on several application areas, including the processing of semiconductor chip, the design of small and efficient solar condenser, and the cooling system of lasers, etc. We conclude that the solar pumped vertical cavity surface-emitting semiconductor lasers will have a wide application prospects in the space.

  2. Linewidth-tunable laser diode array for rubidium laser pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhiyong; Tan Rongqing; Xu Cheng; Li Lin

    2013-02-28

    To optimise the pump source for a high-power diodepumped rubidium vapour laser, we have designed a laser diode array (LDA) with a narrowed and tunable linewidth and an external cavity formed by two volume Bragg gratings (VBGs). Through controlling the temperature differences between the two VBGs, the LDA linewidth, which was 1.8 nm before mounting the two VBGs, was tunable from 100 pm to 0.2 nm, while the output power changed by no more than 4 %. By changing simultaneously the temperature in both VBGs, the centre wavelength in air of the linewidth-tunable LDA was tunable from 779.40 nm to 780.05 nm. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  3. CO.sub.2 optically pumped distributed feedback diode laser

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    A diode laser optically pumped by a CO.sub.2 coherent source. Interference fringes generated by feeding the optical pumping beam against a second beam, periodically alter the reflectivity of the diode medium allowing frequency variation of the output signal by varying the impingent angle of the CO.sub.2 laser beams.

  4. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsen, J.

    1991-02-13

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions.

  5. CW YVO4:Er Laser with Resonant Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Matrosov, V. N.; Tolstik, N. A.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The lasing characteristics of a YVO4:Er laser with resonant pumping in the 1.5-1.6 μm range are studied. Lasing is obtained at λ = 1603 nm with a differential efficiency of up to 61%. YVO4:Er crystals are found to offer promise for use in efficient resonantly (in-band) pumped lasers.

  6. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, J.

    1992-05-26

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser is formed of a vanadium and titanium foil combination that is driven by two beams of intense line focused optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions. 4 figs.

  7. Vanadium-pumped titanium x-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped x-ray laser (10) is formed of a vanadium (12) and titanium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state neon-like titanium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from fluorine-like vanadium ions (32).

  8. Portable IR dye laser optofluidic microresonator as a temperature and chemical sensor.

    PubMed

    Lahoz, F; Martín, I R; Gil-Rostra, J; Oliva-Ramirez, M; Yubero, F; Gonzalez-Elipe, A R

    2016-06-27

    A compact and portable optofluidic microresonator has been fabricated and characterized. It is based on a Fabry-Perot microcavity consisting essentially of two tailored dichroic Bragg mirrors prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering deposition. The microresonator has been filled with an ethanol solution of Nile-Blue dye. Infrared laser emission has been measured with a pump threshold as low as 0.12 MW/cm2 and an external energy conversion efficiency of 41%. The application of the device as a temperature and a chemical sensor is demonstrated. Small temperature variations as well as small amount of water concentrations in the liquid laser medium are detected as a shift of the resonant laser modes. PMID:27410592

  9. Treatment of basal-cellular skin cancer and heavy concomitant diseases by a photodynamic therapeutic method with a dye laser LITT-PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, V. A.; Soldatov, A. N.; Vusik, M. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental results of initial testing dye-laser "LITT-PDT" pumped by a copper vapor laser are presented. "LITT PDT" is a modern laser medical complex on CVL-pumped dye laser, generating radiation in a red spectrum area with a tuning wavelength of 630 - 700 nm and preserving high intensity of radiation on each wavelength, necessary for treatment by a photodynamic therapeutic method (PDM). Radiation in a red spectrum area (630 - 700 nm) enables treatment for oncological diseases by PDM using any photosensitizer. The given laser medical complex, generating radiation simultaneously on yellow and green discrete spectrum lines, makes methods of low intensive laser therapy for treatment of precancer and dermatological diseases possible.

  10. Cascaded Energy Transfer for Efficient Broad-Band Pumping of High Quality, Micro Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rotschild, Carmel; Tomes, M.; Mendoza, H.; Andrew, T. L.; Swager, Timothy M.; Carmon, T.; Baldo, Marc

    2011-05-24

    Micro-ring lasers that exhibit a quality factor (Q) larger than 5.2 × 10{sup 6} with a direct-illumination, non-resonant pump are demonstrated. The micro-rings are coated with three organic dyes forming a cascaded energy-transfer, which reduces material-losses by a factor larger than 10{sup 4}, transforming incoherent light to coherent light with high quantum-efficiency. The operating principle is general and can enable fully integrated on-chip, high-Q micro-lasers.

  11. A comparison of the Cassegrain and other beam expanders in high-power pulsed dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trebino, R.; Siegman, A. E.; Roller, J. P.

    1982-08-01

    Beiting and Smith (1979) introduced a pulsed dye laser cavity employing an on-axis reflective Cassegrain telescope in place of the refractive telescope beam expander used in the dye laser oscillator reported by Haensch (1972). The new design has the potential to overcome several drawbacks of the Haensch design. The characteristics of the Cassegrain dye laser are discussed, and a report is presented of some problems encountered in an attempt to achieve efficient high-power operation. Attention is given to amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and alignment effects, and to a comparison of the Cassegrain dye laser with other commonly used pulsed dye laser designs. It is found that the Cassegrain dye laser has some advantages over the Haensch design. These advantages are mainly related to the larger possible magnification and, hence, better linewidth. But the Cassegrain dye laser retains also several drawbacks inherent in the Haensch model, including alignment difficulty, high cost, and ASE.

  12. Generation of picosecond pulses in a dye laser excited by radiation from an argon laser with passively locked modes

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradova, A.A.; Krindach, D.P.; Nazarov, B.I.; Tsapenko, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Passive locking of argon laser modes was used in generation of tunable picosecond pulses in a synchronously excited dye laser. An experimental study was made of the characteristics of the dye laser radiation as a function of the argon laser characteristics.

  13. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, R.E. Jr.; Johnson, S.A.

    1994-10-11

    An interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams in the form of illumination bar to the lasing zone of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier. The preferred interface module includes an optical fiber array having a plurality of optical fibers arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source, and their proximal ends delivered into a relay structure. The proximal ends of the optical fibers are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array delivered from the optical fiber array is acted upon by an optical element array to produce an illumination bar which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window. The illumination bar is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout. 5 figs.

  14. Interface module for transverse energy input to dye laser modules

    DOEpatents

    English, Jr., Ronald E.; Johnson, Steve A.

    1994-01-01

    An interface module (10) for transverse energy input to dye laser modules is provided particularly for the purpose of delivering enhancing transverse energy beams (36) in the form of illumination bar (54) to the lasing zone (18) of a dye laser device, in particular to a dye laser amplifier (12). The preferred interface module (10) includes an optical fiber array (30) having a plurality of optical fibers (38) arrayed in a co-planar fashion with their distal ends (44) receiving coherent laser energy from an enhancing laser source (46), and their proximal ends (4) delivered into a relay structure (3). The proximal ends (42) of the optical fibers (38) are arrayed so as to be coplanar and to be aimed generally at a common point. The transverse energy beam array (36) delivered from the optical fiber array (30) is acted upon by an optical element array (34) to produce an illumination bar (54) which has a cross section in the form of a elongated rectangle at the position of the lasing window (18). The illumination bar (54) is selected to have substantially uniform intensity throughout.

  15. Dye-enhanced diode laser photocoagulation of choroidal neovascularizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingbeil, Ulrich; Puliafito, Carmen A.; McCarthy, Dan; Reichel, Elias; Olk, Joseph; Lesiecki, Michael L.

    1994-06-01

    Dye-enhanced diode laser photocoagulation, using the dye indocyanine green (ICG), has shown some potential in the treatment of choroidal neovascularizations (CNV). A diode laser system was developed and optimized to emit at the absorption maximum of ICG. In a clinical study at two retinal centers, more than 70 patients, the majority of which had age-related macular degeneration, were treated. Eighteen cases with ill-defined subfoveal CNV were followed an average of 11 months after laser treatment. The results show success in resolving the CNV with an average long-term preservation of visual function equal to or superior to data provided by the Macular Photocoagulation Study for confluent burns of low intensity applied to the CNV. Details of the technique and discussion of the controversies inherent in such a treatment strategy will be presented.

  16. Multimode pumped continuous-wave solid-state Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Grabtchikov, A S; Lisinetskii, V A; Orlovich, V A; Schmitt, M; Maksimenka, R; Kiefer, W

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate the continuous-wave operation of a solid-state Raman laser containing a barium nitrate crystal as the Raman medium. The Raman laser, which has a singly resonant cavity, is pumped by multimode radiation. The Raman oscillation threshold is reached at approximately 2 W of pump power. As much as 500 kW/cm2 of Stokes power density at 60-kW/cm2 pump power density is obtained in the cavity. PMID:15584282

  17. Multimode pumped continuous-wave solid-state Raman laser.

    PubMed

    Grabtchikov, A S; Lisinetskii, V A; Orlovich, V A; Schmitt, M; Maksimenka, R; Kiefer, W

    2004-11-01

    We demonstrate the continuous-wave operation of a solid-state Raman laser containing a barium nitrate crystal as the Raman medium. The Raman laser, which has a singly resonant cavity, is pumped by multimode radiation. The Raman oscillation threshold is reached at approximately 2 W of pump power. As much as 500 kW/cm2 of Stokes power density at 60-kW/cm2 pump power density is obtained in the cavity.

  18. Single-frequency tunable laser for pumping cesium frequency standards

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, O V; Ivanov, Andrei V; Leonovich, A I; Kurnosov, V D; Kurnosov, K V; Chernov, Roman V; Shishkov, V V; Pleshanov, S A

    2006-08-31

    A single-frequency tunable laser for pumping the cesium frequency standard is studied. It is shown experimentally that the laser emits at a single frequency despite the fact that a few longitudinal modes of the external cavity fall within the reflection band of a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) written in the optical fibre. The laser wavelength can be tuned by varying the pump current of the laser, its temperature, and the FBG temperature. The laser linewidth does not exceed 2 MHz for 10 mW of output power. (lasers)

  19. Long-Lifetime Laser Materials For Effective Diode Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.

    1991-01-01

    Long quantum lifetimes reduce number of diodes required to pump. Pumping by laser diodes demonstrated with such common Nd laser materials as neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and Nd:YLiF4, but such materials as Nd:LaF3, Nd:NaF.9YF3, and possibly Nd:YF3 more useful because of long lifetimes of their upper laser energy levels. Cost effectiveness primary advantage of solid-state laser materials having longer upper-laser-level lifetimes. Because cost of diodes outweighs cost of laser material by perhaps two orders of magnitude, cost reduced significantly.

  20. Dye-triplet-state and singlet-oxygen quenching effects in solid state dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Terence A.; Ahmad, Mohammad; Gorman, Anthony; Hamblett, I.; Rahn, Mark D.

    2000-04-01

    The main photodegradation mechanisms of pyrromethene 567 are discussed, and the quantum efficiency of self-sensitized photo-oxidation, the predominant mechanism, was found to be 0.5% in aerated benzene-d6. Other degradation mechanisms do exist, but the high photostability of the dye in solid host media possibly implies that they are all diffusion controlled. Solid-state dye lasers based on pyrromethene 567 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) with an added singlet oxygen quencher 1,4-diazobicyclo [2,2,2] octane showed a lifetime of 550,000 pulses. A triplet quencher, perylene, provided no improvement. Singlet oxygen quenching is effective in the solid-state whereas triplet quenching is not, presumably due to the slower diffusion rate of dye molecules compared with oxygen.

  1. Combined CW ring single-frequency Ti:sapphire/dye laser for atom cooling and high-precision spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobtsev, Sergey; Baraulya, Vladimir; Lunin, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    Presented in the work are the results of the development of a new combined CW ring single-frequency laser with universal design that allows efficient use as the active medium of both a Ti:Sapphire crystal and a dye jet. For the first time such combination has been implemented in a horizontal resonator configuration that offers an improvement of stability in the position of optical elements and more convenient operation. The short-term line width without the frequency stabilisation is less than 5 MHz (Ti:Sapphire) and < 10 MHz (Dye); with the frequency stabilisation to a specially designed thermo-stabilised reference interferometer with high finesse, the line width is less than 10 kHz (Ti:Sapphire) and 90 kHz (Dye), output frequency drift being less than 25 MHz/hour. The total working spectral range of the combined laser stretches from 550 to 1000 nm (550-770 nm for the Dye and 695-1000 nm for Ti:Sapphire) when pumped with 532/515-nm radiation. The maximum output power with a 10-W pump exceeds 2 W for the Ti:Sapphire configuration and is > 1 .5 W for the Dye one.

  2. High power CW iodine laser pumped by solar simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ja H.; Lee, Min H.; Weaver, Willard R.

    1987-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser was pumped by a long Ar arc as the solar simulator to produce a 10-W CW output. Continuous lasing for 1 h was achieved with a flow of the laser material n-C3F7I. The 10-W CW output is the highest produced to date and establishes the feasibility of developing a solar-pumped laser for space power transmission.

  3. Diode pumped alkali vapor lasers for high power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweiback, J.; Krupke, B.; Komashko, A.

    2008-02-01

    General Atomics has been engaged in the development of diode pumped alkali vapor lasers. We have been examining the design space looking for designs that are both efficient and easily scalable to high powers. Computationally, we have looked at the effect of pump bandwidth on laser performance. We have also looked at different lasing species. We have used an alexandrite laser to study the relative merits of different designs. We report on the results of our experimental and computational studies.

  4. XeCl laser pumped iodine laser using t-C4F9I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In Heon; Han, Kwang S.; Lee, Ja H.

    1989-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser using t-C4F9I as the active material was pumped by a XeCl laser. An iodine laser output energy of 3 mJ with pulse duration of 25 ns was obtained when the pumping pulse energy was 80 mJ, the iodine pressure was 70 torr, and the reflectance of the output mirror was 85 percent. The high pumping efficiency and low threshold pump power achieved in this experiment are attributable to the high absorption cross section at the pump laser wavelength (308 nm) of the iodide used.

  5. XeCl laser pumped iodine laser using t-C4F9I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, In Heon; Han, Kwang S.

    1989-01-01

    An iodine photodissociation laser using t-C4F9I as the active material was pumped by an XeCl laser. An iodine laser output energy of 3 mJ with pulse duration of 25 ns was obtained when the pumping pulse energy was 80 mJ, the iodide pressure was 70 torr, and the reflectance of the output mirror was 85 percent. The high pumping efficiency and low threshold pump power achieved in this experiment are attributable to the high absorption cross section at the pump laser wavelength (308 nm) of the iodide used.

  6. Bichromatic coherent random lasing from dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals controlled by pump light polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mingchao; Shi, Li-Jie; Deng, Luogen; Yang, Huai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the bichromatic coherent random lasing actions from the dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals. Two groups of lasing peaks, of which the full widith at half maximum is about 0.3 nm, are clearly observed. The shorter- and longer-wavelength modes are associated with the excitation of the single laser dye (DCM) monomers and dimers respectively. The experimental results show that the competition between the two groups of the lasing peaks can be controlled by varying the polarization of the pump light. When the polarization of the pump light is rotated from 0° to 90°, the intensity of the shorter-wavelength lasing peak group reduces while the intensity of the longer-wavelength lasing peak group increases. In addition, a red shift of the longer-wavelength modes is also observed and the physical mechanisms behind the red-shift phenomenon are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474021 and 51333001), the Key Program for International S&T Cooperation Projects of China (Grant No. 2013DFB50340), the Issues of Priority Development Areas of the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120001130005), and the Key (Key Grant) Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 313002).

  7. Bichromatic coherent random lasing from dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals controlled by pump light polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Meng; Yang, Mingchao; Shi, Li-Jie; Deng, Luogen; Yang, Huai

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate the bichromatic coherent random lasing actions from the dye-doped polymer stabilized blue phase liquid crystals. Two groups of lasing peaks, of which the full widith at half maximum is about 0.3 nm, are clearly observed. The shorter- and longer-wavelength modes are associated with the excitation of the single laser dye (DCM) monomers and dimers respectively. The experimental results show that the competition between the two groups of the lasing peaks can be controlled by varying the polarization of the pump light. When the polarization of the pump light is rotated from 0° to 90°, the intensity of the shorter-wavelength lasing peak group reduces while the intensity of the longer-wavelength lasing peak group increases. In addition, a red shift of the longer-wavelength modes is also observed and the physical mechanisms behind the red-shift phenomenon are discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474021 and 51333001), the Key Program for International S&T Cooperation Projects of China (Grant No. 2013DFB50340), the Issues of Priority Development Areas of the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120001130005), and the Key (Key Grant) Project of Chinese Ministry of Education (Grant No. 313002).

  8. Nuclear-Pumped Lasers. [efficient conversion of energy liberated in nuclear reactions to coherent radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The state of the art in nuclear pumped lasers is reviewed. Nuclear pumped laser modeling, nuclear volume and foil excitation of laser plasmas, proton beam simulations, nuclear flashlamp excitation, and reactor laser systems studies are covered.

  9. Grazing Incidence Pumping for High Efficiency X-ray Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2005-10-03

    Over the last decade, most laser-driven collisional excitation x-ray lasers have relied on the absorption of the pump energy incident at normal incidence to a pre-formed plasma. The main advantage is that the inversion can be created at various plasma regions in space and time where the amplification and ray propagation processes are best served. The main disadvantage is that different plasma regions regardless of the contribution to the inversion have to be pumped simultaneously in order to make the laser work. This leads to a loss of efficiency. The new scheme of grazing incidence pumping (GRIP) addresses this issue. In essence, a chosen electron density region of a pre-formed plasma column, produced by a longer pulse at normal incidence onto a slab target, is selectively pumped by focusing a short pulse of 100 fs-10 ps duration laser at a determined grazing incidence angle to the target surface. The exact angle is dependent on the pump wavelength and relates to refraction of the drive beam in the plasma. The controlled use of refraction of the pumping laser in the plasma results in several benefits: The pump laser path length is longer and there is an increase in the laser absorption in the gain region for creating a collisional Ni-like ion x-ray laser. There is also an inherent traveling wave, close to c, that increases the overall pumping efficiency. This can lead to a 3-30 times reduction in the pump energy for mid-Z, sub-20 nm lasers. We report several examples of this new x-ray laser on two different laser systems. The first demonstrates a 10 Hz x-ray laser operating at 18.9 nm pumped with a total of 150 mJ of 800 nm wavelength from a Ti:Sapphire laser. The second case is shown where the COMET laser is used both at 527 nm and 1054 nm wavelength to pump higher Z materials with the goal of extending the wavelength regime of tabletop x-ray lasers below 10 nm.

  10. DPSS Laser Beam Quality Optimization Through Pump Current Tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Omohundro, Rob; Callen, Alice; Sukuta, Sydney; /San Jose City Coll.

    2012-03-30

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate how a DPSS laser beam's quality parameters can be simultaneously optimized through pump current tuning. Two DPSS lasers of the same make and model were used where the laser diode pump current was first varied to ascertain the lowest RMS noise region. The lowest noise was found to be 0.13% in this region and the best M{sup 2} value of 1.0 and highest laser output power were simultaneously attained at the same current point. The laser manufacturer reported a M{sup 2} value of 1.3 and RMS noise value of .14% for these lasers. This study therefore demonstrates that pump current tuning a DPSS laser can simultaneously optimize RMS Noise, Power and M{sup 2} values. Future studies will strive to broaden the scope of the beam quality parameters impacted by current tuning.

  11. Wave optics simulation of diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2016-03-01

    A numerical simulation code for a diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL) was developed. The code employs the Fresnel- Kirchhoff diffraction integral for both laser mode and pump light propagations. A three-dimensional rate equation set was developed to determine the local gain. The spectral divergence of the pump beam was represented by a series of monochromatic beams with different wavelengths. The calculated results showed an excellent agreements with relevant experimental results. It was found that the main channel of the pump power drain is the spontaneous emission from the upper level of the lasing transition.

  12. Taming random lasers through active spatial control of the pump.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, N; Andreasen, J; Gigan, S; Sebbah, P

    2012-07-20

    Active control of the spatial pump profile is proposed to exercise control over random laser emission. We demonstrate numerically the selection of any desired lasing mode from the emission spectrum. An iterative optimization method is employed, first in the regime of strong scattering where modes are spatially localized and can be easily selected using local pumping. Remarkably, this method works efficiently even in the weakly scattering regime, where strong spatial overlap of the modes precludes spatial selectivity. A complex optimized pump profile is found, which selects the desired lasing mode at the expense of others, thus demonstrating the potential of pump shaping for robust and controllable single mode operation of a random laser.

  13. Taming Random Lasers through Active Spatial Control of the Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelard, N.; Andreasen, J.; Gigan, S.; Sebbah, P.

    2012-07-01

    Active control of the spatial pump profile is proposed to exercise control over random laser emission. We demonstrate numerically the selection of any desired lasing mode from the emission spectrum. An iterative optimization method is employed, first in the regime of strong scattering where modes are spatially localized and can be easily selected using local pumping. Remarkably, this method works efficiently even in the weakly scattering regime, where strong spatial overlap of the modes precludes spatial selectivity. A complex optimized pump profile is found, which selects the desired lasing mode at the expense of others, thus demonstrating the potential of pump shaping for robust and controllable single mode operation of a random laser.

  14. Laser action of optically pumped atomic titanium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, H.; Hirata, K.

    1989-09-01

    Laser action has been observed on the titanium 551.4 nm, 3D0(1)-F2, transition. A nitrogen laser is used to produce the titanium vapor by irradiating a metal plate, and the titanium atoms are optically pumped by another nitrogen laser.

  15. High-definition color image in dye thermal transfer printing by laser heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Takashi

    1999-12-01

    In laser thermal transfer printing using dye sublimation type medium, a high definition and continuous tone image can be obtained easily because the laser beam is focused to small spot and heat energy can be controlled by the pulse width modulation of laser light. The donor ink sheet is composed of the laser absorbing layer and sublimation dye layer. The tone reproduction was depend on the mixture ratio of dye to binder and thickness of ink layer. The four color ink sheets such as cyan, magenta, yellow and black were prepared for color printing image which have a high resolution and good continuous tone reproduction using sublimation dye transfer printing by laser heating.

  16. Electronic improvement of interferometric measurement of dye laser wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, J. J. L.; Steeman, P. A. M.; Kemper, A. H.; Steenhuysen, L. W. G.

    1985-08-01

    The wavelength of a dye laser beam has been determined with a Michelson interferometer with one moving mirror. The addition and design of a phase locked loop (PLL) to multiply the fringe frequency is discussed. Experimentally it appeared that the addition of a PLL has two main advantages: an improvement in the resolution of the system by a factor of ten, and an improvement in reproducibility due to the flywheel effect of the PLL.

  17. Self-scanning of a dye laser due to feedback from a BaTiO/sub 3/ phase-conjugate reflector

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    Feedback from a self-pumped BaTiO/sub 3/ phase-conjugate reflector into an untuned cw dye laser produces substantial line narrowing (4--6 GHz) and generates a recurrent wavelength sweep from the rhodamine 6G peak at 618 nm to as far as 644 nm.

  18. Ultraviolet lasers. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, S. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reports cited from the international literature describe various aspects of ultraviolet lasers including laser output, far ultraviolet radiation, electron pumping, optical pumping, and laser materials. Gas lasers, pulsed lasers, dye lasers, CO2 lasers, xenon fluoride lasers, and transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) lasers are considered. This updated bibliography contains 283 citations, 66 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  19. Assignment of the /Li-7/2 optically pumped laser transitions pumped by Ar/+/ and Kr/+/ laser lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verma, K. K.; Stwalley, W. C.; Zemke, W. T.

    1981-01-01

    Welling and Wellegehausen (1977) have reported a list of Na2 and Li2 lines (belonging to B-X and A-X systems) which lase when vapors of these dimers are pumped with an Ar(+) or Kr(+) laser. A description is presented of a fluorescence study of the A-X system of the (Li-7)2 molecule excited by a Kr(+) laser (6471 A). The optically pumped laser lines are identified as P and R doublets in two different fluorescence series. The conditions which favor lasing action of these lines are pointed out. All but one of the known optically pumped laser lines of (Li-7)2 along with their assignments are presented in a table. For each pumping line, several additional wavelengths are listed which satisfy the condition for laser oscillations and which might well lase well under slightly improved conditions.

  20. Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam

    DOEpatents

    O'Neil, R.W.; Davin, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough. 4 figs.

  1. Dye laser amplifier including an improved window configuration for its dye beam

    DOEpatents

    O'Neil, Richard W.; Davin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    A dye laser amplifier in which a continuously replenished supply of dye is excited with a first light beam in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam passing therethrough is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a cell though which a continuous stream of the dye is caused to pass, and means for directing the first beam into the cell while the second beam is directed into and through the same cell. There is also disclosed herein a specific improvement to this amplifier which resides in the use of a pair of particularly configured windows through which the second beam passes along fixed paths as the second beam enters and exits the dye cell. Each of these windows has a relatively thick main section which is substantially larger in dimensions transverse to its beam path than the cross section of the second beam itself, whereby to add structural integrity to the overall window. At the same time, the latter includes a second section which is disposed entirely within the confines of the main section and through which the second beam is intended to pass in its entirety. This second section is made substantially thinner than the main section in order to reduce optical distortion as the second beam passes therethrough.

  2. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode.

  3. Instabilities in a three-level coherently pumped laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. C.; Lawandy, N. M.

    1987-01-01

    A theory for a coherently pumped, homogeneously broadened laser is developed which predicts instability at excitations 1.6 times threshold. The system exhibits a period-doubling sequence, chaos, and a period-three window.

  4. Beam intensity reshaping by pump modification in a laser amplifier.

    PubMed

    Litvin, Igor A; Collet, Oliver J P; King, Gary; Strauss, Hencharl

    2015-11-16

    We propose a new technique for laser beam shaping into a desirable beam profile by using a laser amplifier with a pump beam that has a modified intensity profile. We developed the analytical formula, which describes the transformation of the seed beam into the desired beam profile in a four level amplifiers small signal regime. We propose a numerically method to obtain the required pump intensity profile in the case where high pump power saturated the laser crystal or for three level materials. The theory was experimentally verified by one dimensionally shaping a Gaussian shaped seed into a Flat-Top beam in a Ho:YLF amplifier pumped by a Tm:YLF laser with a HG(01) intensity profile. PMID:26698497

  5. Further remarks on electron beam pumping of laser materials.

    PubMed

    Klein, C A

    1966-12-01

    This article demonstrates that recently completed studies on the energy dissipation of kilovolt electron beams in solids provide readily applicable methods for assessing the situation in electron beam pumped lasers. PMID:20057662

  6. AlGaAs diode pumped tunable chromium lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1992-01-01

    An all-solid-state laser system is disclosed wherein the laser is pumped in the longwave wing of the pump absorption band. By utilizing a laser material that will accept unusually high dopant concentrations without deleterious effects on the crystal lattice one is able to compensate for the decreased cross section in the wing of the absorption band, and the number of pump sources which can be used with such a material increases correspondingly. In a particular embodiment a chromium doped colquiriite-structure crystal such as Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 is the laser material. The invention avoids the problems associated with using AlGaInP diodes by doping the Cr:LiSrAlF.sub.6 heavily to enable efficient pumping in the longwave wing of the absorption band with more practical AlGaAs diodes.

  7. High efficiency >26 W diode end-pumped Alexandrite laser.

    PubMed

    Teppitaksak, Achaya; Minassian, Ara; Thomas, Gabrielle M; Damzen, Michael J

    2014-06-30

    We show for the first time that multi-ten Watt operation of an Alexandrite laser can be achieved with direct red diode-pumping and with high efficiency. An investigation of diode end-pumped Alexandrite rod lasers demonstrates continuous-wave output power in excess of 26W, more than an order of magnitude higher than previous diode end-pumping systems, and slope efficiency 49%, the highest reported for a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser. Wavelength tuning from 730 to 792nm is demonstrated using self-seeding feedback from an external grating. Q-switched laser operation based on polarization-switching to a lower gain axis of Alexandrite has produced ~mJ-pulse energy at 1kHz pulse rate in fundamental TEM(00) mode. PMID:24977887

  8. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  9. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  10. Absolute tracer dye concentration using airborne laser-induced water Raman backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    The use of simultaneous airborne-laser-induced dye fluorescence and water Raman backscatter to measure the absolute concentration of an ocean-dispersed tracer dye is discussed. Theoretical considerations of the calculation of dye concentration by the numerical comparison of airborne laser-induced fluorescence spectra with laboratory spectra for known dye concentrations using the 3400/cm OH-stretch water Raman scatter as a calibration signal are presented which show that minimum errors are obtained and no data concerning water mass transmission properties are required when the laser wavelength is chosen to yield a Raman signal near the dye emission band. Results of field experiments conducted with an airborne conical scan lidar over a site in New York Bight into which rhodamine dye had been injected in a study of oil spill dispersion are then indicated which resulted in a contour map of dye concentrations, with a minimum detectable dye concentration of approximately 2 ppb by weight.

  11. High-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Churin, D; Olson, J; Norwood, R A; Peyghambarian, N; Kieu, K

    2015-06-01

    We report a high-power synchronously pumped femtosecond Raman fiber laser operating in the normal dispersion regime. The Raman laser is pumped by a picosecond Yb(3+)-doped fiber laser. It produces highly chirped pulses with energy up to 18 nJ, average power of 0.76 W and 88% efficiency. The pulse duration is measured to be 147 fs after external compression. We observed two different regimes of operation of the laser: coherent and noise-like regime. Both regimes were experimentally characterized. Numerical simulations are in a good agreement with experimental results. PMID:26030549

  12. Development of injection-seeded optical parametric laser systems with pulsed dye amplifiers for high-spectral-resolution combustion diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuiyan, Aizaz Hossain

    The development and application of optical parametric (OP) systems with pulsed dye amplifiers producing single frequency mode (SFM), narrow linewidth, and tunable laser radiation for high-spectral-resolution laser diagnostics is described. An optical parametric generator (OPG) was developed, consisting of a pair of counter-rotating β barium borate (β-BBO) crystals pumped by third-harmonic output of an injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser. The OPG crystals themselves are injection-seeded using a continuous wave (cw) distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser or external cavity diode laser (ECDL) at idler wavelength. The OPG is converted for some applications into an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) by incorporating a feedback cavity. The signal output from the OP system is amplified using pulsed dye amplifiers. The PDAs are pumped either by second-harmonic or third-harmonic output of the Nd:YAG laser depending on the OP output wavelength and the dye solution used in PDAs. The linewidth of the laser beam produced using OP/PDA systems is 200 MHz and the spatial beam profile is nearly Gaussian. Initial application of OP/PDA system included two-photon laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic oxygen in counter-flow flames, dual pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) for N2 and CO2, and nitric oxide (NO) planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) in compressible flowfield. A two-photon pump polarization spectroscopy probe (TPP-PSP) laser system has also been developed using two SFM OPG/PDA systems for the detection of atomic hydrogen (H-atom) in flames. In TPP-PSP, a 243-nm pump beam excites the 1S-2S two photon transition and the excited atoms in 2S level are probed by polarization spectroscopy between n=2 and n=3 manifolds using a circularly polarized 656-nm pump and a linearly polarized 656-nm probe laser beam. Using the TPP-PSP scheme, atomic hydrogen was detected at concentrations as low as 11 ppm. The use of injection-seeded OPG/PDAs as SFM sources for the

  13. The LASL program in nuclear pumped liquid lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansfield, C. R.; Bird, P. F.; Davis, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The development of nuclear-pumped, liquid-based lanthanide ion lasers is discussed. Early investigations of lanthanide ion lasers have lead to solid-state and gaseous neodymium lasers, and a demonstration of lasing in the liquid state. Solvents containing organic chelating agents have been employed in liquid Eu(+3) and Tb(+3) lasers to extend fluorescence lifetimes, however aprotic solvents have been found to enable the development of large-scale liquid lasers. The advantages to be gained from high-power nuclear-pumped lasers based on lanthanide solutions include the high density of fissile materials possible, and a nuclear pumping cell which can operate in either a nuclear or optical pumping mode is being fabricated at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to investigate the nuclear pumping of liquid lanthanide ion lasers. Areas that need exploration before specific laser design features can be considered include energy channeling within the liquid upon excitation, radiation damage due to solvent dissociation, and reactor technology for the development of a self-critical liquid reactor.

  14. Nuclear pumped lasers: Advantages of O2 (1 delta)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    Nuclear pumped laser technology was evaluated as a possible future weapons contender. It was determined that in order to become a primary weapon the following engineering problems must be solved: shielding, heat dissipation, high efficiency fixed focus pumping, good beam quality, and thermal blooming.

  15. Quantum mechanical features of optically pumped CW FIR lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seligson, D.; Leite, J. R. R.; Sanchez, A.; Feld, M. S.; Ducloy, M.

    1977-01-01

    Quantum mechanical predictions for the gain of an optically pumped CW FIR laser are presented for cases in which one or both of the pump and FIR transitions are pressure or Doppler broadened. The results are compared to those based on the rate equation model. Some of the quantum mechanical predictions are verified in CH3OH.

  16. Efficient potassium diode pumped alkali laser operating in pulsed mode.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Boris V; Rotondaro, Matthew D; Shaffer, Michael K; Knize, Randall J

    2014-07-14

    This paper presents the results of our experiments on the development of an efficient hydrocarbon free diode pumped alkali laser based on potassium vapor buffered by He gas at 600 Torr. A slope efficiency of more than 50% was demonstrated with a total optical conversion efficiency of 30%. This result was achieved by using a narrowband diode laser stack as the pump source. The stack was operated in pulsed mode to avoid limiting thermal effects and ionization.

  17. Nuclear pumping of a neutral carbon laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prelas, M. A.; Anderson, J. H.; Boody, F. P.; Nagalingam, S. J. S.; Miley, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear pumped lasing on the neutral carbon line at 1.45 microns has been achieved in mixtures of He-CO, He-N2-CO, He-CO2, and Ne-CO and Ne-CO2. A minimum thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10 to the 14th n/sq cm-sec was sufficient for oscillation in the helium mixtures. The peak of the laser output was delayed up to 5.5 ms relative to the neutron pulse in He-CO2, He-N2-CO, Ne-CO and Ne-CO2 mixtures while no delay was observed in He-CO mixtures. Lasing was obtained with helium pressures from 20 to 800 T, Ne pressures from 100 to 200 T, CO from 0.25 to 20 mT, N2 from 0.5 to 5 mT, and CO2 from 0.1 to 25 mT in the respective mixtures.

  18. Nuclear pumping of a neutral carbon laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prelas, M. A.; Anderson, J. H.; Boody, F. P.; Nagalingam, S. J. S.; Miley, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear pumped lasing on the neutral carbon line at 1.45 micron was achieved in mixtures of He-CO, He-N2-CO, He-CO2, and Ne-CO and Ne-CO2. A minimum thermal neutron flux of 2 x 10 to the 14th power sq cm-sec was sufficient for oscillation in the helium mixtures. The peak of the laser output was delayed up to 5.5 ms relative to the neutron pulse in He-CO2, He-N2-CO, Ne-CO, and Ne-CO2 mixtures while no delay was observed in He-CO mixtures. Lasing was obtained with helium pressures from 20 to 800 T, Ne pressures from 100 to 200 T, CO from 0.25 to 20 mT, N2 from 0.5 mT, and CO2 from 0.1 to 25 mT in the respective mixtures.

  19. Laser velocimetry with fluorescent dye-doped polystyrene microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lowe, K Todd; Maisto, Pietro; Byun, Gwibo; Simpson, Roger L; Verkamp, Max; Danehy, Paul M; Tiemsin, Pacita I; Wohl, Christopher J

    2013-04-15

    Simultaneous Mie scattering and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals are obtained from individual polystyrene latex microspheres dispersed in an air flow. Microspheres less than 1 μm mean diameter were doped with two organic fluorescent dyes, Rhodamine B (RhB) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF), intended either to provide improved particle-based flow velocimetry in the vicinity of surfaces or to provide scalar flow information (e.g., marking one of two fluid streams). Both dyes exhibit measureable fluorescence signals that are on the order of 10(-3) to 10(-4) times weaker than the simultaneously measured Mie signals. It is determined that at the conditions measured, 95.5% of RhB LIF signals and 32.2% of DCF signals provide valid laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements compared with the Mie scattering validation rate with 6.5 W of 532 nm excitation, while RhB excited with 1.0 W incident laser power still exhibits 95.4% valid velocimetry signals from the LIF channel. The results suggest that the method is applicable to wind tunnel measurements near walls where laser flare can be a limiting factor and monodisperse particles are essential.

  20. Laser velocimetry with fluorescent dye-doped polystyrene microspheres.

    PubMed

    Lowe, K Todd; Maisto, Pietro; Byun, Gwibo; Simpson, Roger L; Verkamp, Max; Danehy, Paul M; Tiemsin, Pacita I; Wohl, Christopher J

    2013-04-15

    Simultaneous Mie scattering and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) signals are obtained from individual polystyrene latex microspheres dispersed in an air flow. Microspheres less than 1 μm mean diameter were doped with two organic fluorescent dyes, Rhodamine B (RhB) and dichlorofluorescein (DCF), intended either to provide improved particle-based flow velocimetry in the vicinity of surfaces or to provide scalar flow information (e.g., marking one of two fluid streams). Both dyes exhibit measureable fluorescence signals that are on the order of 10(-3) to 10(-4) times weaker than the simultaneously measured Mie signals. It is determined that at the conditions measured, 95.5% of RhB LIF signals and 32.2% of DCF signals provide valid laser-Doppler velocimetry measurements compared with the Mie scattering validation rate with 6.5 W of 532 nm excitation, while RhB excited with 1.0 W incident laser power still exhibits 95.4% valid velocimetry signals from the LIF channel. The results suggest that the method is applicable to wind tunnel measurements near walls where laser flare can be a limiting factor and monodisperse particles are essential. PMID:23595429

  1. Stable 811.53 nm diode laser pump source for optically pumped metastable Ar laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Zuo, Duluo; Zhao, Jun; Li, Bin; Yu, Anlan; Wang, Xinbing

    2016-10-01

    A stable external cavity diode laser coupled with volume Bragg grating for metastable argon atoms pumping is presented. The measured maximum output power of the continuous wave is 6.5 W when the spectral width (FWHM) is less than 21 pm around 811.53 nm and the power efficiency is 68%. The tuning range of the emission wavelength is bigger than 270 pm. The calculated deviation in relative absorption efficiency caused by the fluctuations of wavelength and power is less than 4%.

  2. Feasibility of supersonic diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.

    2013-04-08

    The feasibility of supersonic operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is studied for Cs and K atoms applying model calculations, based on a semi-analytical model previously used for studying static and subsonic flow DPALs. The operation of supersonic lasers is compared with that measured and modeled in subsonic lasers. The maximum power of supersonic Cs and K lasers is found to be higher than that of subsonic lasers with the same resonator and alkali density at the laser inlet by 25% and 70%, respectively. These results indicate that for scaling-up the power of DPALs, supersonic expansion should be considered.

  3. Application of reactor-pumped lasers to power beaming

    SciTech Connect

    Repetti, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    Power beaming is the concept of centralized power generation and distribution to remote users via energy beams such as microwaves or laser beams. The power beaming community is presently performing technical evaluations of available lasers as part of the design process for developing terrestrial and space-based power beaming systems. This report describes the suitability of employing a nuclear reactor-pumped laser in a power beaming system. Although there are several technical issues to be resolved, the power beaming community currently believes that the AlGaAs solid-state laser is the primary candidate for power beaming because that laser meets the many design criteria for such a system and integrates well with the GaAs photodiode receiver array. After reviewing the history and physics of reactor-pumped lasers, the advantages of these lasers for power beaming are discussed, along with several technical issues which are currently facing reactor-pumped laser research. The overriding conclusion is that reactor-pumped laser technology is not presently developed to the point of being technially or economically competitive with more mature solid-state technologies for application to power beaming. 58 refs.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide sensor using laser grade dye Rhodamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattanaik, Amitansu; Sahare, P. D.; Nanda, Maitreyee

    2007-11-01

    Many chemical sensors based on fluorescence spectroscopy have been reported in applications, ranging from biomedical and environmental monitoring to industrial process control. In these diverse applications, the analyte can be probed directly, by measuring its intrinsic absorption, or by incorporating some transduction mechanism such as reagent chemistry to enhance sensitivity and selectivity. Hydrogen Peroxide is a colorless liquid. It is a common oxidizing and bleaching agent. It plays an important role in High Power Laser such as Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (COIL). As it is on the Hazardous substance list and on the special health hazard substance list, detection of Hydrogen Peroxide is of great importance. In the present study the detection of hydrogen Peroxide is by fluorescence quenching of laser grade dye Rhodamine B. Estimation of rate constant of the bimolecular quenching reaction is made.

  5. Theoretical and experimental studies of optically pumped molecular gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratanavis, Amarin

    Optically pumped molecular gas lasers based on vibrational-rotational transitions in the infrared spectral region were studied experimentally and theoretically. A model was developed to predict the performance of such lasers and explore their potentials for energy and power scaling. This rate equation model was applied to explore the performance of a second-overtone (pulsed) and a first-overtone (CW) pumped HBr laser. Experimental improvements concerning temperature spectral tuning and frequency stabilization of a Nd:YAG laser that pumped HBr were accomplished. Lasing at 4 microns was demonstrated from such a system. We identified acetylene and hydrogen cyanide as potential laser gases that can be pumped with lasers emitting in the attractive telecommunication C band region at about 1.5 microns. Estimations and fluorescence measurements suggest the possibility of lasing in the 3 micron region. Lasing was demonstrated for the first time with a 5 ns pump pulse from an optical parametric oscillator using traditional cavities. The first gas filled hollow fiber laser based on population inversion was demonstrated with C2H2 and emission in the 3 micron region was observed. An analytical model indicates the possibility of CW lasing with small Stokes shift in both C2H 2 and HCN.

  6. The shape effect of Au particles on random laser action in disordered media of Rh6G dye doped with PMMA polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiajia; Feng, Guoying; Zhou, Shouhuan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Shutong; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Random laser actions in a disordered media based on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) polymer doped with Rh6G dye and Au nanoparticles have been demonstrated. It was observed that the shape of Au nanoparticles can tune the spectral central position of the random laser action. It was also seen that the shape of Au nanoparticles strongly affects the pump threshold. Comparing nanosphere- and nanorod-based systems, the nanorod-based one exhibited a lower threshold.

  7. Spectral and temporal features of the pumping of rhodamine 6G by radiation from a copper vapor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Soldatov, A.N.; Sukhanov, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the influence of the relative delay time tau and of the intensity ratio R/sub 21/ of the spectral components emitted by a copper vapor laser on the energy and spectral characteristics of lasing in rhodamine 6G. For certain values of tau and P/sub 21/, lasing in the dye was disrupted. A clamping effect was discovered between the rhodamine 6G laser emission spectrum and the yellow line of the copper vapor laser. The results obtained were used to determine the parameters of an interference filter for suppressing the yellow line from the copper vapor laser, and this made it possible to raise the efficiency of conversion of the pump radiation into lasing in the dye.

  8. Diode-pumped Alexandrite ring laser for lidar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, A.; Jungbluth, B.; Strotkamp, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Poprawe, R.; Höffner, J.

    2016-03-01

    We present design and performance data of a diode-pumped Q-switched Alexandrite ring laser in the millijoule regime, which is longitudinally pumped by laser diode bar modules in the red spectral range. As a first step, a linear resonator was designed and characterized in qcw operation as well as in Q-switched operation. Based on these investigations, two separate linear cavities were set up, each with one Alexandrite crystal longitudinally pumped by one diode module. The two cavities are fused together and form a ring cavity which yields up to 6 mJ pulse burst energy in the qcw regime at 770 nm.

  9. Four-Pass Coupler for Laser-Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    A four-pass optical coupler affords increased (in comparison with related prior two-pass optical couplers) utilization of light generated by a laser diode in side pumping of a solid-state laser slab. The original application for which this coupler was conceived involves a neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) crystal slab, which, when pumped by a row of laser diodes at a wavelength of 809 nm, lases at a wavelength of 1,064 nm. Heretofore, typically, a thin laser slab has been pumped in two passes, the second pass occurring by virtue of reflection of pump light from a highly reflective thin film on the side opposite the side through which the pump light enters. In two-pass pumping, a Nd:YAG slab having a thickness of 2 mm (which is typical) absorbs about 84 percent of the 809-nm pump light power, leaving about 16 percent of the pump light power to travel back toward the laser diodes. This unused power can cause localized heating of the laser diodes, thereby reducing their lifetimes. Moreover, if the slab is thinner than 2 mm, then even more unused power travels back toward the laser diodes. The four-pass optical coupler captures most of this unused pump light and sends it back to the laser slab for two more passes. As a result, the slab absorbs more pump light, as though it were twice as thick. The gain and laser cavity beam quality of a smaller laser slab in conjunction with this optical coupler can thus be made comparable to those of a larger two-pass-pumped laser slab.

  10. Preparation of certain m-aminophenols and the use thereof for preparation of laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, Peter R.

    1986-01-01

    Methods are provided for making certain m-aminophenols using a sulfonation/alkali fusion procedure. The aminophenols are key intermediates in the synthesis of dyes, particularly efficient, stable dyes for laser application. Preparations of some rhodamine and phenoxazone dyes from the m-aminophenols are described.

  11. Preparation of certain m-aminophenols and the use thereof for preparation of laser dyes

    DOEpatents

    Hammond, P.R.

    1983-12-29

    Methods are provided for making certain m-aminophenols using a sulfonation/alkali fusion procedure. The aminophenols are key intermediates in the synthesis of dyes, particularly efficient, stable dyes for laser application. Preparations of some rhodamine and phenoxazone dyes from the m-aminophenols are described.

  12. Photophysical and photochemical properties of coumarin laser dyes in amphiphilic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G., II; Jackson, W. R.; Kanoktanaporn, S.; Bergmark, W. R.

    1983-10-01

    Photophysical properties of coumarin laser dyes solubilized in aqueous detergent or cyclodextrin solutions have been investigated. Dyes appear to be incorporated in hydrated (hydrogen bonded) sites within detergent micelles. Photodegradation is inhibited for detergent solubilized dye. Electron transfer photochemistry is examined by flash photolysis.

  13. Passively Q-switched side pumped monolithic ring laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Steven X. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed herein are systems and methods for generating a side-pumped passively Q-switched non-planar ring oscillator. The method introduces a laser into a cavity of a crystal, the cavity having a round-trip path formed by a reflection at a dielectrically coated front surface, a first internal reflection at a first side surface of the crystal at a non-orthogonal angle with the front, a second internal reflection at a top surface of the crystal, and a third internal reflection at a second side surface of the crystal at a non-orthogonal angle with the front. The method side pumps the laser at the top or bottom surface with a side pump diode array beam and generates an output laser emanating at a location on the front surface. The design can include additional internal reflections to increase interaction with the side pump. Waste heat may be removed by mounting the crystal to a heatsink.

  14. Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy: Optical Dye Distribution in Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swindle, Ryan

    2005-03-01

    Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy is an experimental modality used to treat superficial tumors implanted on sterile Balb/C mice. The goal of the project is to induce a positive immune response toward a complete eradication of the primary tumor. Optimal necrosis results from depositing the maximum amount of thermal energy into the tumor without damaging the surrounding healthy tissue. In our laboratory, the optical dye, indocyanine green (ICG), is injected into the center of the tumor prior to surface and interstitial laser irradiation. A diode laser operating at a wavelength near 804 nm exerts thermal energy into the tumor via ICG absorption at 790 nm. Maximum immune response should occur with a uniform distribution of ICG throughout the tumor. By mapping the ICG distribution, the spatial homogeneity of the dye can be determined, which, in turn, mimics the tumor temperature profile. After excision, the tumors were cut into samples of approximately 250 microns thick and dissolved in a chemical detergent. Each sample was run through an absorption spectrometer to determine the distribution of ICG throughout the tumor. Results for both radial and depth profiles of ICG tumor distribution will be presented.

  15. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  16. Improving Reliability of High Power Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Baggott, Renee S.; Lockard, George E.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Most Lidar applications rely on moderate to high power solid state lasers to generate the required transmitted pulses. However, the reliability of solid state lasers, which can operate autonomously over long periods, is constrained by their laser diode pump arrays. Thermal cycling of the active regions is considered the primary reason for rapid degradation of the quasi-CW high power laser diode arrays, and the excessive temperature rise is the leading suspect in premature failure. The thermal issues of laser diode arrays are even more drastic for 2-micron solid state lasers which require considerably longer pump pulses compared to the more commonly used pump arrays for 1-micron lasers. This paper describes several advanced packaging techniques being employed for more efficient heat removal from the active regions of the laser diode bars. Experimental results for several high power laser diode array devices will be reported and their performance when operated at long pulsewidths of about 1msec will be described.

  17. Stimulated Raman scattering of laser dye mixtures dissolved in multiple scattering media

    SciTech Connect

    Yashchuk, V P; Komyshan, A O; Tikhonov, E A; Olkhovyk, L A

    2014-10-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of a mixture of rhodamine 6G and pyrromethene 605 laser dyes in vesicular films is studied. It is shown that a peculiar interaction of dyes occurs under conditions of multiple scattering of light from vesicles. This interaction manifests itself as SRS excitation of one of the dyes by random lasing of the other dye, provided that the random lasing spectrum overlaps the Stokes lines of the first dye. In addition, there is energy transfer between molecules of these dyes if their luminescence and absorption spectra overlap. The results obtained confirm that the mechanism of SRS from laser dyes in multiple scattering media is similar to that in coherent-active Raman spectroscopy. These results extend the possibility of determining the vibrational spectrum of dye molecules from their secondary radiation in these media. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Cs laser with unstable cavity transversely pumped by multiple diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, B V; Shaffer, M K; Knize, R J

    2009-08-17

    We have demonstrated a Cs vapor laser with an unstable resonator transversely pumped by 15 narrowband laser diode arrays. A slope efficiency of 43%, a total optical efficiency of 31% and a maximum output power 49 W were obtained with a pump power of 157 Watts. PMID:19687954

  19. Diode edge-pumped passively Q-switched microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Weipeng; Tsunekane, Masaki; Taira, Takunori

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing demand for high-intensity subnanosecond lasers for emerging industrial applications. While femtosecond and picosecond laser sources are considered promising, they suffer from the significant drawbacks of increased complexity and cost. In this regard, we demonstrate a unique edge-pumped passively Q-switched Nd∶YAG/Cr4+∶YAG microchip laser. The microchip is made of a Nd∶YAG/Sm∶YAG composite ceramic, and a Sm∶YAG cladding is utilized as both the pump beam waveguide and amplified spontaneous emission absorber. With the use of a flat-concave laser cavity, we obtain single-pulse energy of 1.66 mJ for an absorbed pump energy of 24 mJ. Further, the resulting pulse width is 683 ps, and the repetition rate is 10 Hz.

  20. Diode-laser-pump module with integrated signal ports for pumping amplifying fibers and method

    DOEpatents

    Savage-Leuchs; Matthias P.

    2009-05-26

    Apparatus and method for collimating pump light of a first wavelength from laser diode(s) into a collimated beam within an enclosure having first and second optical ports, directing pump light from the collimated beam to the first port; and directing signal light inside the enclosure between the first and second port. The signal and pump wavelengths are different. The enclosure provides a pump block having a first port that emits pump light to a gain fiber outside the enclosure and that also passes signal light either into or out of the enclosure, and another port that passes signal light either out of or into the enclosure. Some embodiments use a dichroic mirror to direct pump light to the first port and direct signal light between the first and second ports. Some embodiments include a wavelength-conversion device to change the wavelength of at least some of the signal light.

  1. High power tandem-pumped thulium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Yang, Jianlong; Huang, Chongyuan; Luo, Yongfeng; Wang, Shiwei; Tang, Yulong; Xu, Jianqiu

    2015-02-01

    We propose a cascaded tandem pumping technique and show its high power and high efficient operation in the 2-μm wavelength region, opening up a new way to scale the output power of the 2-μm fiber laser to new levels (e.g. 10 kW). Using a 1942 nm Tm(3+) fiber laser as the pump source with the co- (counter-) propagating configuration, the 2020 nm Tm(3+) fiber laser generates 34.68 W (35.15W) of output power with 84.4% (86.3%) optical-to-optical efficiency and 91.7% (92.4%) slope efficiency, with respect to launched pump power. It provides the highest slope efficiency reported for 2-μm Tm(3+)-doped fiber lasers, and the highest output power for all-fiber tandem-pumped 2-μm fiber oscillators. This system fulfills the complete structure of the proposed cascaded tandem pumping technique in the 2-μm wavelength region (~1900 nm → ~1940 nm → ~2020 nm). Numerical analysis is also carried out to show the power scaling capability and efficiency of the cascaded tandem pumping technique. PMID:25836159

  2. High average power diode pumped solid state lasers for CALIOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Halpin, J.; Moran, B.

    1994-07-01

    Diode pumping of solid state media offers the opportunity for very low maintenance, high efficiency, and compact laser systems. For remote sensing, such lasers may be used to pump tunable non-linear sources, or if tunable themselves, act directly or through harmonic crystals as the probe. The needs of long range remote sensing missions require laser performance in the several watts to kilowatts range. At these power performance levels, more advanced thermal management technologies are required for the diode pumps. The solid state laser design must now address a variety of issues arising from the thermal loads, including fracture limits, induced lensing and aberrations, induced birefringence, and laser cavity optical component performance degradation with average power loading. In order to highlight the design trade-offs involved in addressing the above issues, a variety of existing average power laser systems are briefly described. Included are two systems based on Spectra Diode Laboratory`s water impingement cooled diode packages: a two times diffraction limited, 200 watt average power, 200 Hz multi-rod laser/amplifier by Fibertek, and TRW`s 100 watt, 100 Hz, phase conjugated amplifier. The authors also present two laser systems built at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) based on their more aggressive diode bar cooling package, which uses microchannel cooler technology capable of 100% duty factor operation. They then present the design of LLNL`s first generation OPO pump laser for remote sensing. This system is specified to run at 100 Hz, 20 nsec pulses each with 300 mJ, less than two times diffraction limited, and with a stable single longitudinal mode. The performance of the first testbed version will be presented. The authors conclude with directions their group is pursuing to advance average power lasers. This includes average power electro-optics, low heat load lasing media, and heat capacity lasers.

  3. Theoretical and Experimental studies on CH3OH THz Laser Pumped by Pulse Carbon Dioxide Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Fei; Jing, Wang; Zhaoshuo, Tian; Yanchao, Zhang; Shiyou, Fu; Qi, Wang

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, according to the molecular structure and vibration mode of micro-asymmetric gyroscope CH3OH molecule, dynamic process of optically pumped Terahertz laser is analyzed theoretically. The rate equation models based on three level systems are given according to the theory of typical laser rate equation. The output THz pulsed laser waveform is obtained by solving the rate equation model. An all-metal Terahertz laser pumped by RF waveguide carbon dioxide laser is designed with CH3OH as its working gas. The pulsed Terahertz laser output is obtained. The waveform and repetition frequency of the optically pumped laser are measured in the experiments. The Terahertz laser designed does not need water cooling system. It also has the advantages of simple structure and small size.

  4. Laser performance of Coumarin 540A dye molecules in polymeric host media with different viscosities: From liquid solution to solid polymer matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Costela, A.; Garcia-Moreno, I.; Barroso, J.; Sastre, R.

    1998-01-01

    Photophysical parameters and lasing properties of Coumarin 540A dye molecules are studied in solutions of increasing viscosity, from liquid solutions in 1,4-dioxane to solid solutions in poly(methyl methacrylate). The fluorescence quantum yield and lasing efficiencies decrease as the viscosity of the solution increases, reflecting the strong influence of the rigidity of the medium on the radiative processes. The photodegradation mechanisms acting on the fluorophores are analyzed by following the dependence of laser induced fluorescence and laser output on the number of pump laser pulses. The fluorescence redistribution after pattern photobleaching technique is used, and Fick{close_quote}s second law is applied to study the diffusion of dye molecules in the highly viscous polymer solutions. The diffusion coefficients of the dye molecules as a function of the increased viscosity of the medium are determined. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Additive and subtractive coherence peaks in pump and probe experiments with high repetition rate fs laser pulses in a flowing malachite green solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watermann, V.; Waltinger, T.; Eichler, H. J.

    1995-02-01

    Pump and probe absorption bleaching experiments with femtosecond laser pulses in a flowing dye solution lead to a coherence peak or coherence dip at zero time delay. The size and sign of this peak are strongly affected by the flow velocity of the solution. Experimental results are in good agreement with a two-wave mixing theory, which takes pump and probe coupling by an absorption and a temperature grating into account.

  6. Photophysical parameters and fluorescence quenching of 7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC) laser dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mossalamy, E. H.; Obaid, A. Y.; El-Daly, S. A.

    2011-10-01

    The optical properties including electronic absorption spectrum, emission spectrum, fluorescence quantum yield, and dipole moment of electronic transition of 7-diethylaminocoumarin (DEAC) laser dye have been measured in different solvents. Both electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra are red shifted as the polarity of the medium increases, indicating that the dipole moment of molecule increases on excitation. The fluorescence quantum yield of DEAC decreases as the polarity of solvent increases, a result of the role of solvent polarity in stabilization of the twisting of the intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) in excited state, which is a non-emissive state, as well as hydrogen bonding with the hetero-atom of dye. The emission spectrum of DEAC has also been measured in cationic (CTAC) and anionic (SDS) micelles, the intensity increases as the concentration of surfactant increases, and an abrupt change in emission intensity is observed at critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant. 2×10 -3 mol dm -3 of DEAC gives laser emission in the blue region on pumping with nitrogen laser ( λex=337.1 nm). The laser parameters such as tuning range, gain coefficient ( α), emission cross section ( σe), and half-life energy have been calculated in different solvents, namely acetone, dioxane , ethanol, and dimethyforamide (DMF). The photoreactivity of DEAC has been studied in CCl 4 at a wavelength of 366 nm. The values of photochemical yield ( ϕc) and rate constant ( k) are determined. The interaction of organic acceptors such as picric acid (PA), tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), and 7,7,8,8-tetracynoquinonedimethane (TCNQ) with DEAC is also studied using fluorescence measurements in acetonitrile (CH 3CN); from fluorescence quenching study we assume the possible electron transfer from excited donor DEAC to organic acceptor forming non-emissive exciplex.

  7. Synthesis, structure, and physical properties of hybrid nanocomposites for solid-state dye lasers.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, I; Costela, A; Cuesta, A; García, O; del Agua, D; Sastre, R

    2005-11-24

    We report on the synthesis, structural characterization, physical properties, and lasing action of two organic dyes, Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and Pyrromethene 597 (PM597), incorporated into new hybrid organic-inorganic materials, where the organic component was either poly(2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate) (PHEMA) or copolymers of HEMA with methyl methacrylate (MMA), and the inorganic counterpart consisted of silica derived from hydrolysis-condensation of methyltriethoxysilane (TRIEOS) in weight proportion of up to 30%. Lasing efficiencies of up 23% and high photostabilities, with no sign of degradation in the initial laser output after 100 000 pump pulses at 10 Hz, were demonstrated when pumping the samples transversely at 534 nm with 5.5 mJ/pulse. A direct relationship could be established between the structure of the hybrid materials, analyzed by solid-state NMR, and their laser behavior. An inorganic network dominated by di-/tri- substituted silicates in a proportion approximately 35:65, corresponding to samples of HEMA with 15 and 20 wt % proportion of TRIEOS, optimizes the lasing photostability. The thermal properties of these materials, together with the high homogeneity revealed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, even in compounds with high silica content, indicate their microstructure to be a continuous phase, corresponding to the polymer matrix, which "traps" the silica components at molecular level via covalent bonding, with few or no silica islands.

  8. Efficiency of continuous-wave solar pumped semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stanley; Küppers, Franko; Pau, Stanley

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of an efficient solar pumped semiconductor laser system that uses high efficiency multi-junction photovoltaic cells and laser diodes in order to achieve the sunlight to laser light conversion efficiency of over 10% without any active cooling and concentration optics. Semiconductor lasers with wavelength from 445 nm to 1550 nm are powered directly by an array of photovoltaic (PV) cells under one sun illumination (100 mW/cm2). The maximum energy efficiency reaches 10.34% at 976 nm with an output power of 4.31 W. This system is inherently more efficient than direct solar pumped lasers that have been studied in the past and could play a key role in future renewable energy production and power beaming applications.

  9. High Power 938nm Cladding Pumped Fiber Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J; Beach, R; Brobshoff, A; Liao, Z; Payne, S; Pennington, D; Taylor, L; Hackenberg, W; Bonaccini, D

    2002-12-26

    We have developed a Nd:doped cladding pumped fiber amplifier, which operates at 938nm with greater than 2W of output power. The core co-dopants were specifically chosen to enhance emission at 938nm. The fiber was liquid nitrogen cooled in order to achieve four-level laser operation on a laser transition that is normally three level at room temperature, thus permitting efficient cladding pumping of the amplifier. Wavelength selective attenuation was induced by bending the fiber around a mandrel, which permitted near complete suppression of amplified spontaneous emission at 1088nm. We are presently seeking to scale the output of this laser to 10W. We will discuss the fiber and laser design issues involved in scaling the laser to the 10W power level and present our most recent results.

  10. Potential of solar-simulator-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyoung, Russell J.

    1990-01-01

    An attempt was made to pump an alexandrite laser rod using a Tamarak solar simulator and also a tungsten-halogen lamp. A very low optical laser cavity was used to achieve the threshold minimum pumping-power requirement. Lasing was not achieved. The laser threshold optical-power requirement was calculated to be approximately 626 W/sq cm for a gain length of 7.6 cm, whereas the Tamarak simulator produces 1150 W/sq cm over a gain length of 3.3 cm, which is less than the 1442 W/sq cm required to reach laser threshold. The rod was optically pulsed with 200 msec pulses, which allowed the alexandrite rod to operate at near room temperature. The optical intensity-gain-length product to achieve laser threshold should be approximately 35,244 solar constants-cm. In the present setup, this product was 28,111 solar constants-cm.

  11. High power, high efficiency diode pumped Raman fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, Yaakov; Fromzel, Viktor; Zhang, Jun; Dahan, Asaf; Ter-Gabrielyan, Nikolay; Pattnaik, Radha K.; Dubinskii, Mark

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a high power high efficiency Raman fiber laser pumped directly by a laser diode module at 976 nm. 80 Watts of CW power were obtained at a wavelength of 1020 nm with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 53%. When working quasi-CW, at a duty cycle of 30%, 85 W of peak power was produced with an efficiency of 60%. A commercial graded-index (GRIN) core fiber acts as the Raman fiber in a power oscillator configuration, which includes spectral selection to prevent generation of the 2nd Stokes. In addition, significant brightness enhancement of the pump beam is attained due to the Raman gain distribution profile in the GRIN fiber. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest power Raman fiber laser directly pumped by laser diodes, which also exhibits a record efficiency for such a laser. In addition, it is the highest power Raman fiber laser (regardless of pumping source) demonstrated based on a GRIN fiber.

  12. Direct solar pumping of semiconductor lasers: A feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Neal G.

    1991-01-01

    The primary goals of the feasibility study are the following: (1) to provide a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of pumping semiconductor lasers in space directly focused sunlight; and (2) to identify semiconductor laser structures expected to operate at the lowest possible focusing intensities. It should be emphasized that the structures under consideration would provide direct optical-to-optical conversion of sunlight into laser light in a single crystal, in contrast to a configuration consisting of a solar cell or battery electrically pumping a current injection laser. With external modulation, such lasers may prove to be efficient sources for intersatellite communications. We proposed to develop a theoretical model of semiconductor quantum-well lasers photopumped by a broadband source, test it against existing experimental data where possible, and apply it to estimating solar pumping requirements and identifying optimum structures for operation for operation at low pump intensities. This report outlines our progress toward these goals. Discussion of several technical details are left to the attached summary abstract.

  13. 980nm diode laser pump modules operating at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Jenna; Semenic, Tadej; Leisher, Paul; Bhunia, Avijit; Mashanovitch, Milan; Renner, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Existing thermal management technologies for diode laser pumps place a significant load on the size, weight and power consumption of High Power Solid State and Fiber Laser systems, thus making current laser systems very large, heavy, and inefficient in many important practical applications. This problem is being addressed by the team formed by Freedom Photonics and Teledyne Scientific through the development of novel high power laser chip array architectures that can operate with high efficiency when cooled with coolants at temperatures higher than 50 degrees Celsius and also the development of an advanced thermal management system for efficient heat extraction from the laser chip array. This paper will present experimental results for the optical, electrical and thermal characteristics of 980 nm diode laser pump modules operating effectively with liquid coolant at temperatures above 50 degrees Celsius, showing a very small change in performance as the operating temperature increases from 20 to 50 degrees Celsius. These pump modules can achieve output power of many Watts per array lasing element with an operating Wall-Plug-Efficiency (WPE) of >55% at elevated coolant temperatures. The paper will also discuss the technical approach that has enabled this high level of pump module performance and opportunities for further improvement.

  14. Ti:sapphire laser with long-pulse lamp pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koselja, Michael P.; Kubelka, Jiri; Kvapil, Jiri

    1992-06-01

    Lamp pumping of Ti:Sapphire has some advantages over laser pumping and represents some interest due to possible applications. The paper will present laser behavior of Ti:Sapphire under very long lamp pulse pumping. Pulse lamp duration (FWHM) was more than 100 times greater than the lifetime of Ti3+. Output energy with no tuning element was achieved greater than 1.5 J with 0.12% electrical-to-optical efficiency. Dimensions of the rod used was 7 mm in diameter and 148 mm in length. The doping level of Ti3+ was 0.09% Ti2O3 in the rod. Tuning characteristics with different tuning elements are also presented. Further development to obtain CW lamp pumping operation will be discussed.

  15. Optical parametric amplifier pumped by two mutually incoherent laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamošauskas, G.; Dubietis, A.; Valiulis, G.; Piskarskas, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report on the experimental proof-of-principle demonstration of the ultrashort pulse single-pass beta-barium borate, BBO optical parametric amplifier pumped by two mutually incoherent laser sources. We show that the amplified signal at 1054 nm gains energy from both pump pulses with wavelengths of 680 and 527 nm, respectively, with overall energy conversion of 36%, and exhibits low wavefront distortions and improved energy stability in the gain saturation regime.

  16. High power continuous-wave Alexandrite laser with green pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Shirin; Major, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    We report on a continuous-wave (CW) Alexandrite (Cr:BeAl2O4) laser, pumped by a high power green source at 532 nm with a diffraction limited beam. An output power of 2.6 W at 755 nm, a slope efficiency of 26%, and wavelength tunability of 85 nm have been achieved using 11 W of green pump. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest CW output power of a high brightness laser pumped Alexandrite laser reported to date. The results obtained in this experiment can lead to the development of a high power tunable CW and ultrafast sources of the near-infrared or ultraviolet radiation through frequency conversion.

  17. Optically pumped pulsed Li/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslin, V.; Yakushev, O.

    1982-02-01

    Pulsed lasing was obtained for the first time from Li/sub 2/ molecules by optical pumping with radiation from a pulsed copper vapor laser (578.2 nm, pulse repetition frequency 5 kHz). The laser transitions, with wavelengths in the range 867--907 nm, belong to the electronic A/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub u/--X/sup 1/..sigma../sup +//sub g/ system. With a pump power of 190 mW, an average output power of 8 mW was achieved with an efficiency for the conversion of the optical pumping energy of 7%. A number of Li/sub 2/ laser emission lines were observed in the superradiant regime.

  18. Adaptive pumping for spectral control of random lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachelard, Nicolas; Gigan, Sylvain; Noblin, Xavier; Sebbah, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    A laser is not necessarily a sophisticated device: pumping an amplifying medium randomly filled with scatterers makes a perfectly viable `random laser'. The absence of mirrors greatly simplifies laser design, but control over the emission wavelength and directionality is lost, seriously hindering prospects for this otherwise simple laser. Recently, we proposed an approach to tame random lasers, inspired by coherent light control in complex media. Here, we implement this method in an optofluidic random laser where modes are spatially extended and overlap, making individual mode selection impossible, a priori. We show experimentally that control over laser emission can be regained even in this extreme case. By actively shaping the optical pump within the random laser, single-mode operation at any selected wavelength is achieved with spectral selectivity down to 0.06 nm and more than 10 dB side-lobe rejection. This method paves the way towards versatile tunable and controlled random lasers as well as the taming of other laser sources.

  19. Broadly tunable, longitudinally diode-pumped Alexandrite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strotkamp, M.; Witte, U.; Munk, A.; Hartung, A.; Gausmann, S.; Hengesbach, S.; Traub, M.; Hoffmann, H.-D.; Hoeffner, J.; Jungbluth, B.

    2014-02-01

    We present design and first performance data of a broadly tunable Alexandrite laser longitudinally pumped by a newly developed high brightness single emitter diode laser module with output in the red spectral range. Replacing the flashlamps, which are usually used for pumping Alexandrite, will increase the efficiency and maintenance interval of the laser. The pump module is designed as an optical stack of seven single-emitter laser diodes. We selected an optomechanical concept for the tight overlay of the radiation using a minimal number of optical components for collimation, e.g. a FAC and a SAC lens, and focusing. The module provides optical output power of more than 14 W (peak pulse output in the focus) with a beam quality of M2 = 41 in the fast axis and M2 = 39 in the slow axis. The Alexandrite crystal is pumped from one end at a repetition rate of 35 Hz and 200μs long pump pulses. The temperature of the laser crystal can be tuned to between 30 °C and 190 °C using a thermostat. The diode-pumped Alexandrite laser reaches a maximum optical-optical efficiency of 20 % and a slope efficiency of more than 30 % in fundamental-mode operation (M2 < 1.10). When a Findlay-Clay analysis with four different output couplers is conducted, the round-trip loss of the cavity is determined to be around 1 %. The wavelength is tunable to between 755 and 788 nm via crystal temperature or between 745 and 805 nm via an additional Brewster prism.

  20. Optimization of rod diameter in solid state lasers side pumped with multiple laser diode arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, Newton, Jr.; Chamblee, Christyl M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Lockard, George E.; Cross, Patricia L.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study to determine the optimum laser rod diameter for maximum output energy in a solid state neodymium laser transversely pumped with multiple laser diode arrays are reported here. Experiments were performed with 1.0 mm, 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm rod radii of both neodymium doped Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and La2Be2O5 (Nd:BeL) pumped with laser diode arrays having a maximum combined energy of 10.5 mJ. Equations were derived which predict the optimum rod radius and corresponding output mirror reflectivity for a given laser material and total pump energy. Predictions of the equations agreed well with the experiments for each of the laser materials which possessed significantly different laser properties from one another.

  1. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkbride, James M. R.; Causier, Sarah K.; Dalton, Andrew R.; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; Weidmann, Damien

    2014-02-07

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  2. Pump and probe spectroscopy with continuous wave quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Kirkbride, James M R; Causier, Sarah K; Dalton, Andrew R; Weidmann, Damien; Ritchie, Grant A D

    2014-02-01

    This paper details infra-red pump and probe studies on nitric oxide conducted with two continuous wave quantum cascade lasers both operating around 5 μm. The pump laser prepares a velocity selected population in a chosen rotational quantum state of the v = 1 level which is subsequently probed using a second laser tuned to a rotational transition within the v = 2 ← v = 1 hot band. The rapid frequency scan of the probe (with respect to the molecular collision rate) in combination with the velocity selective pumping allows observation of marked rapid passage signatures in the transient absorption profiles from the polarized vibrationally excited sample. These coherent transient signals are influenced by the underlying hyperfine structure of the pump and probe transitions, the sample pressure, and the coherent properties of the lasers. Pulsed pump and probe studies show that the transient absorption signals decay within 1 μs at 50 mTorr total pressure, reflecting both the polarization and population dephasing times of the vibrationally excited sample. The experimental observations are supported by simulation based upon solving the optical Bloch equations for a two level system.

  3. Possibility of nuclear pumped laser experiment using low enriched uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Toru; Takezawa, Hiroki

    2012-06-01

    Possibility to perform experiments for nuclear pumped laser oscillation by using low enriched uranium is investigated. Kinetic analyses are performed for two types of reactor design, one is using highly enriched uranium and the other is using low enriched uranium. The reactor design is based on the experiment reactor in IPPE. The results show the oscillation of nuclear pumped laser in the case of low enriched uranium reactor is also possible. The use of low enriched uranium in the experiment will make experiment easier.

  4. Graphene surface emitting terahertz laser: Diffusion pumping concept

    SciTech Connect

    Davoyan, Arthur R.; Morozov, Mikhail Yu.; Popov, Vyacheslav V.; Satou, Akira; Otsuji, Taiichi

    2013-12-16

    We suggest a concept of a tunable graphene-based terahertz (THz) surface emitting laser with diffusion pumping. We employ significant difference in the electronic energy gap of graphene and a typical wide-gap semiconductor, and demonstrate that carriers generated in the semiconductor can be efficiently captured by graphene resulting in population inversion and corresponding THz lasing from graphene. We develop design principles for such a laser and estimate its performance. We predict up to 50 W/cm{sup 2} terahertz power output for 100 kW/cm{sup 2} pump power at frequency around 10 THz at room temperature.

  5. Nonlinear fibre-optic devices pumped by semiconductor disk lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Chamorovskiy, A Yu; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2012-11-30

    Semiconductor disk lasers offer a unique combination of characteristics that are particularly attractive for pumping Raman lasers and amplifiers. The advantages of disk lasers include a low relative noise intensity (-150 dB Hz{sup -1}), scalable (on the order of several watts) output power, and nearly diffraction-limited beam quality resulting in a high ({approx}70 % - 90 %) coupling efficiency into a single-mode fibre. Using this technology, low-noise fibre Raman amplifiers operating at 1.3 {mu}m in co-propagation configuration are developed. A hybrid Raman-bismuth doped fibre amplifier is proposed to further increase the pump conversion efficiency. The possibility of fabricating mode-locked picosecond fibre lasers operating under both normal and anomalous dispersion is shown experimentally. We demonstrate the operation of 1.38-{mu}m and 1.6-{mu}m passively mode-locked Raman fibre lasers pumped by 1.29-{mu}m and 1.48-{mu}m semiconductor disk lasers and producing 1.97- and 2.7-ps pulses, respectively. Using a picosecond semiconductor disk laser amplified with an ytterbium-erbium fibre amplifier, the supercontinuum generation spanning from 1.35 {mu}m to 2 {mu}m is achieved with an average power of 3.5 W. (invited paper)

  6. Diode-Pumped Mode-Locked LiSAF Laser

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    Under this contract we have developed Cr{sup 3+}:LiSrAlF{sub 6} (Cr:LiSAF, LiSAF) mode-locked lasers suitable for generation of polarized electrons for CEBAF. As 670 nm is an excellent wavelength for optical pumping of Cr:LiSAF, we have used a LIGHTWAVE developed 670 nm diode pump module that combines the output of ten diode lasers and yields approximately 2 Watts of optical power. By the use of a diffraction limited pump beam however, it is possible to maintain a small mode size through the length of the crystal and hence extract more power from Cr:LiSAF laser. For this purpose we have developed a 1 Watt, red 660nm laser (LIGHTWAVE model 240R) which serves as an ideal pump for Cr:LiSAF and is a potential replacement of costly and less robust krypton laser. This new system is to compliment LIGHTWAVE Series 240, and is currently being considered for commercialization. Partially developed under this contract is LIGHTWAVEs product model 240 which has already been in our production lines for a few months and is commercially available. This laser produces 2 Watts of output at 532 nm using some of the same technology developed for production of the 660nm red system. It is a potential replacement for argon ion lasers and has better current and cooling requirements and is an excellent pump source for Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Also, as a direct result of this contract we now have the capability of commercially developing a mode-locked 100MHz Cr:LiSAF system. Such a laser could be added to our 100 MHz LIGHTWAVE Series 131. The Series 131 lasers provide pico second pulses and were originally developed under another DOE SBIR. Both models of LIGHTWAVE Series 240 lasers, the fiber coupled pump module and the 100MHz LiSAF laser of Series 131 have been partially developed under this contract, and are commercially competitive products.

  7. A linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized dye laser for application in laser cooling of molecules.

    PubMed

    Dai, D P; Xia, Y; Yin, Y N; Yang, X X; Fang, Y F; Li, X J; Yin, J P

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate a robust and versatile solution for locking the continuous-wave dye laser for applications in laser cooling of molecules which need linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized lasers. The dye laser is first stabilized with respect to a reference cavity by Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique which results in a single frequency with the linewidth 200 kHz and short-term stabilization, by stabilizing the length of the reference cavity to a stabilized helium-neon laser we simultaneously transfer the ± 2 MHz absolute frequency stability of the helium-neon laser to the dye laser with long-term stabilization. This allows the dye laser to be frequency chirped with the maximum 60 GHz scan range while its frequency remains locked. It also offers the advantages of locking at arbitrary dye laser frequencies, having a larger locking capture range and frequency scanning range to be implemented via software. This laser has been developed for the purpose of laser cooling a molecular magnesium fluoride beam.

  8. A linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized dye laser for application in laser cooling of molecules.

    PubMed

    Dai, D P; Xia, Y; Yin, Y N; Yang, X X; Fang, Y F; Li, X J; Yin, J P

    2014-11-17

    We demonstrate a robust and versatile solution for locking the continuous-wave dye laser for applications in laser cooling of molecules which need linewidth-narrowed and frequency-stabilized lasers. The dye laser is first stabilized with respect to a reference cavity by Pound-Drever-Hall (PDH) technique which results in a single frequency with the linewidth 200 kHz and short-term stabilization, by stabilizing the length of the reference cavity to a stabilized helium-neon laser we simultaneously transfer the ± 2 MHz absolute frequency stability of the helium-neon laser to the dye laser with long-term stabilization. This allows the dye laser to be frequency chirped with the maximum 60 GHz scan range while its frequency remains locked. It also offers the advantages of locking at arbitrary dye laser frequencies, having a larger locking capture range and frequency scanning range to be implemented via software. This laser has been developed for the purpose of laser cooling a molecular magnesium fluoride beam. PMID:25402105

  9. PicoGreen dye as an active medium for plastic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, C.; Vallabhan, C. P. G.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Nampoori, V. P. N.

    2015-08-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid lipid complex thin films are used as a host material for laser dyes. We tested PicoGreen dye, which is commonly used for the quantification of single and double stranded DNA, for its applicability as lasing medium. PicoGreen dye exhibits enhanced fluorescence on intercalation with DNA. This enormous fluorescence emission is amplified in a planar microcavity to achieve yellow lasing. Here the role of DNA is not only a host medium, but also as a fluorescence dequencher. With the obtained results we have ample reasons to propose PicoGreen dye as a lasing medium, which can lead to the development of DNA based bio-lasers.

  10. LED pumped Nd:YAG laser development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, G. I.; Kiang, Y. C.; Lynch, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a development program for light emitting diode (LED) pumped Nd:YAG lasers are described. An index matching method to increase the coupling efficiency of the laser is described. A solid glass half-cylinder of 5.0 by 5.6 centimeters was used for index matching and also as a pumping cavity reflector. The laser rods were 1.5 by 56 millimeters with dielectric coatings on both end surfaces. The interfaces between the diode array, glass cylinder, and laser rod were filled with viscous fluid of refractive index n = 1.55. Experiments performed with both the glass cylinder and a gold coated stainless steel reflector of the same dimensions under the same operating conditions indicate that the index matching cylinder gave 159 to 200 percent improvement of coupling efficiency over the metal reflector at various operating temperatures.

  11. Solar-simulator-pumped atomic iodine laser kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, H. W.; Raju, S.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1983-01-01

    The literature contains broad ranges of disagreement in kinetic data for the atomic iodine laser. A kinetic model of a solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser is used to select those kinetic data consistent with recent laser experiments at the Langley Research Center. Analysis of the solar-simulator-pumped laser experiments resulted in the following estimates of rate coefficients: for alkyl radical (n-C3F7) and atomic iodine (I) recombination, 4.3 x 10 to the 11th power (1.9) + or - cu cm/s; for n-C3F7I stabilized atomic iodine recombination (I + I) 3.7 x 10 to the -32nd power (2.3) + or -1 cm to the 6th power/s; and for molecular iodine (I2) quenching, 3.1 x 10 to the -11th power (1.6) + or - 1 cu cm/s. These rates are consistent with the recent measurements.

  12. Injection locking of an optically pumped FIR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. O.; Bava, E.; Demarchi, A.; Godone, A.

    1980-05-01

    The practical possibility of optically pumped far-infrared laser stabilization by injection of a highly stable synthesized signal into the laser is experimentally investigated. The injection locking takes place in a 350 kHz locking range and the two lasers used in the experiment work on the 432 micron line of HCOOH pumped by the 9R (20) line of a CO2 laser. Locking range versus injected power attenuation is plotted, and it is noted that the locking range can be increased by improving the coupling of the injected signal. Experimental results show that this method can be efficiently used in the frequency range up to one THz, for metrological purposes.

  13. Cladding for transverse-pumped solid-state laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Fan, Tso Y. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a transverse pumped, solid state laser, a nonabsorptive cladding surrounds a gain medium. A single tranverse mode, namely the Transverse Electromagnetic (TEM) sub 00 mode, is provided. The TEM sub 00 model has a cross sectional diameter greater than a transverse dimension of the gain medium but less than a transverse dimension of the cladding. The required size of the gain medium is minimized while a threshold for laser output is lowered.

  14. Solar Pumped High Power Solid State Laser for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fork, Richard L.; Laycock, Rustin L.; Green, Jason J. A.; Walker, Wesley W.; Cole, Spencer T.; Frederick, Kevin B.; Phillips, Dane J.

    2004-01-01

    Highly coherent laser light provides a nearly optimal means of transmitting power in space. The simplest most direct means of converting sunlight to coherent laser light is a solar pumped laser oscillator. A key need for broadly useful space solar power is a robust solid state laser oscillator capable of operating efficiently in near Earth space at output powers in the multi hundred kilowatt range. The principal challenges in realizing such solar pumped laser oscillators are: (1) the need to remove heat from the solid state laser material without introducing unacceptable thermal shock, thermal lensing, or thermal stress induced birefringence to a degree that improves on current removal rates by several orders of magnitude and (2) to introduce sunlight at an effective concentration (kW/sq cm of laser cross sectional area) that is several orders of magnitude higher than currently available while tolerating a pointing error of the spacecraft of several degrees. We discuss strategies for addressing these challenges. The need to remove the high densities of heat, e.g., 30 kW/cu cm, while keeping the thermal shock, thermal lensing and thermal stress induced birefringence loss sufficiently low is addressed in terms of a novel use of diamond integrated with the laser material, such as Ti:sapphire in a manner such that the waste heat is removed from the laser medium in an axial direction and in the diamond in a radial direction. We discuss means for concentrating sunlight to an effective areal density of the order of 30 kW/sq cm. The method integrates conventional imaging optics, non-imaging optics and nonlinear optics. In effect we use a method that combines some of the methods of optical pumping solid state materials and optical fiber, but also address laser media having areas sufficiently large, e.g., 1 cm diameter to handle the multi-hundred kilowatt level powers needed for space solar power.

  15. Deformation of partially pumped active mirrors for high average-power diode-pumped solid-state lasers.

    PubMed

    Albach, Daniel; LeTouzé, Geoffroy; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe

    2011-04-25

    We discuss the deformation of a partially pumped active mirror amplifier as a free standing disk, as implemented in several laser systems. We rely on the Lucia laser project to experimentally evaluate the analytical and numerical deformation models. PMID:21643092

  16. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  17. Rapid prototyping of a micro pump with laser micromaching

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Chu, D.; Liu, S.L.; Tuck, M.R.; Mahmud, Z.; Amatucci, V.

    1995-08-01

    A micro electrohydrodynamic (EHD) injection pump has been developed using laser micromaching technology. Two designs have been fabricated, tested, and evaluated. The first design has two silicon pieces with KOH-etched wells which are stacked on the top of each other. The wells am etched on one side of the wafer and gold is deposited on the other side to serve as the pump electrodes. A ND:YAG laser is used to drill an array holes in the well region of both silicon die. This creates a grid distribution with a rectangular pattern. Next the well regions of the die are aligned, and the parts are bonded together using a Staystik thermoplastic. The pump unit is then mounted into a ceramic package over the hole drilled to permit fluid flow. Aluminum ribbon wire bonds are used to connect the pump electrodes to the package leads. Isolation of metallization and wires is achieved by filling the package well and coating the wires with polyimide.When a voltage is applied at the electrodes, ions are injected into the working fluid, such as an organic solvent, thus inducing flow. The second design has the die oriented ``back-to-back`` and bonded together with stayform. A ``back-to-back`` design will decrease the grid distance so that a smaller voltage is required for pumping. Preliminary results have demonstrated that this micro pump can achieved a pressure head of about 287 Pa with an applied voltage of 120 volts.

  18. Anomalous dispersion and the pumping of far infrared (FIR) lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that the anomalous dispersion at the pump transition in molecular far-infrared lasers (FIR) can lead to sizable focusing and defocusing effects. Criteria for beam spreading and trapping are considered with CH2F as an example.

  19. Control of molecular handedness using pump-dump laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoki, Kunihito; González, Leticia; Fujimura, Yuichi

    2002-02-01

    A theoretical method for controlling handedness of preoriented enantiomers starting from an equal mixture of right(R)-handed and left(L)-handed molecules using linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulses is presented. The essence of the method lies in the fact that the molecular handedness of oriented enantiomers is reflected in the direction of the electronic transition moment vector. A pump-dump control scheme via an electronic excited state is considered for controlling molecular handedness in a femtosecond time scale. The direction of the polarization vector of the pump pulse and that of the dump pulse are determined in such a way that there is the largest interaction between the laser and the L-(R-) handed molecules, while the interaction with R-(L-) handed ones vanishes. In the case in which both the pump and dump pulses are independent of each other with no overlap between them, an analytical expression for the yield of molecular handedness is derived by solving the equation of motion of the density matrix. This expression shows that both the pump and dump lasers with π-pulse area produce the maximum transfer yield of molecular handedness. The effectiveness of the laser control method is demonstrated by numerical simulation of dynamic chirality of pre-oriented H2POSH in a racemic mixture via the first electronic singlet excited state.

  20. Composition and method of preparation of solid state dye laser rods

    DOEpatents

    Hermes, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention includes solid polymeric-host laser rods prepared using bulk polymerization of acrylic acid ester comonomers which, when admixed with dye(s) capable of supporting laser oscillation and polymerized with a free radical initiator under mild thermal conditions, produce a solid product having the preferred properties for efficient lasing. Unsaturated polymerizable laser dyes can also be employed as one of the comonomers. Additionally, a method is disclosed which alleviates induced optical stress without having to anneal the polymers at elevated temperatures (>85.degree. C.).

  1. Traveling-wave laser-produced-plasma energy source for photoionization laser pumping and lasers incorporating said

    DOEpatents

    Sher, Mark H.; Macklin, John J.; Harris, Stephen E.

    1989-09-26

    A traveling-wave, laser-produced-plasma, energy source used to obtain single-pass gain saturation of a photoionization pumped laser. A cylindrical lens is used to focus a pump laser beam to a long line on a target. Grooves are cut in the target to present a surface near normal to the incident beam and to reduce the area, and hence increase the intensity and efficiency, of plasma formation.

  2. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  3. Continuously tunable solution-processed organic semiconductor DFB lasers pumped by laser diode.

    PubMed

    Klinkhammer, Sönke; Liu, Xin; Huska, Klaus; Shen, Yuxin; Vanderheiden, Sylvia; Valouch, Sebastian; Vannahme, Christoph; Bräse, Stefan; Mappes, Timo; Lemmer, Uli

    2012-03-12

    The fabrication and characterization of continuously tunable, solution-processed distributed feedback (DFB) lasers in the visible regime is reported. Continuous thin film thickness gradients were achieved by means of horizontal dipping of several conjugated polymer and blended small molecule solutions on cm-scale surface gratings of different periods. We report optically pumped continuously tunable laser emission of 13 nm in the blue, 16 nm in the green and 19 nm in the red spectral region on a single chip respectively. Tuning behavior can be described with the Bragg-equation and the measured thickness profile. The laser threshold is low enough that inexpensive laser diodes can be used as pump sources.

  4. Laser diode pumped high efficiency Yb:YAG crystalline fiber waveguide lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth

    2015-02-01

    Single-clad and double-clad Yb:YAG crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) have been prepared with Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technology. By using a fiber coupled laser diode as pump source, a single-mode laser with near diffraction limited beam quality M2=1.02 has been demonstrated in a double-clad CFW. The laser output power and efficiency are 13.2 W and 34%, respectively. In a single-clad CFW, core pumping was used. The laser output has top-hat beam profile. An output power of 28 W and a slope efficiency of 78% have been achieved respectively.

  5. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  6. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  7. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  8. Characteristics of the electron beam pumped iodine monofluoride laser

    SciTech Connect

    Champagne, L.F.; Ehrlich, J.E.

    1983-02-01

    Electron beam pumping of Ar/CF/sub 3/I/NF/sub 3/ mixtures yields optical pulse lengths about 0.5 ..mu..s from iodine monofluoride. Laser efficiency in this system is about0.04 percent. Laser performance is limited by the formation of molecular iodine. The formation of molecular iodine in the excited state (I/sub 2/) reduces the number of iodine atoms available to form IF. In the ground state, molecular iodine (I/sub 2/) absorbs the IF laser emission at 485 and 491 nm.

  9. Characteristics of the electron beam pumped iodine monofluoride laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champagne, L. F.; Ehrlich, J. E.

    1983-02-01

    Electron beam pumping of Ar/CF3I/NF3 mixtures yields optical pulse lengths approximately 0.5 microsec from iodine monofluoride. Laser efficiency in this system is approximately 0.04 percent. Laser performance is limited by the formation of molecular iodine. The formation of molecular iodine in the excited state reduces the number of iodine atoms available to form excited-state IF. In the ground state, molecular iodine absorbs the excited-state IF laser emission at 485 and 491 nm.

  10. Ho:KLuW microchip laser intracavity pumped by a diode-pumped Tm:KLuW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serres, J. M.; Loiko, P. A.; Mateos, X.; Yumashev, K. V.; Kuleshov, N. V.; Petrov, V.; Griebner, U.; Aguiló, M.; Díaz, F.

    2015-07-01

    A compact intracavity-pumped microchip Ho laser is realized using stacked Tm:KLuW/Ho:KLuW crystals pumped by a laser diode at 805 nm; both crystals are cut for light propagation along the N g optical indicatrix axis and emit with polarization along the N m axis. Maximum CW output power of 285 mW is achieved at a wavelength of 2080 nm for 5.6 W absorbed pump power in the Tm:KLuW crystal with a maximum slope efficiency of 8.3 %. Maximum total (Tm3+ and Ho3+ emission) output of 887 mW with a slope efficiency of 23 % is achieved. Laser operation is obtained in the 1867-1900 nm spectral range corresponding to the Tm emission, while Ho emits at 2078-2100 nm, depending on the output coupling. The microchip Ho laser generates a near-circular output beam with M 2 < 1.1. The compact laser setup with plane-plane cavity provides automatic mode-matching condition for the Tm and Ho laser modes.

  11. Optically pumped distributed feedback thin film waveguide lasers with multiwavelength and polarized emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Chen, F.; Li, R.; Dong, H.; Fan, J.; Zhang, L.; Shi, L.; Wong, K. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Zirconia titania organically modified silicate (ZrO2-TiO2-ORMOSIL) thin film waveguides of thickness from 0.4 to 7.0 μm were synthesized using low temperature sol-gel method. Narrow linewidth distributed feedback (DFB) lasing was demonstrated in rhodamine 6G-doped ZrO2-TiO2-ORMOSIL waveguides. Simultaneous tuning of multiple-output wavelengths was achieved in the dye-doped waveguides by varying the period of the gain modulation generated by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm. As many as eight separate output wavelengths were observed for a planar ZrO2-TiO2-ORMOSIL waveguide of thickness 7.0-μm. The output polarizations of the DFB waveguide lasers can be tuned by varying the polarization of the crossing pump beams. TE and TM optical waves belonging to the same propagation mode were generated by crossing two polarized pump beams, resulting in an effective double of the number of output wavelengths. Continuous tuning of the polarized laser outputs was also achieved by varying the crossing angle.

  12. Efficient 750-nm LED-pumped Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Yan; Su, Cheng-Kuo; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chiu, Yu-Chung; Huang, Yen-Chieh

    2016-05-30

    We report an Nd:YAG laser pumped by light emission diodes (LEDs) at 750 nm. With 1% output coupling from a linear cavity containing a 2-cm long Nd:YAG crystal, the laser generated 37.5 μJ pulse energy at 1064 nm with M2 = 1.1 when pumped by 2.73-mJ LED energy in a 1-ms pulse at a 10 Hz rate. The measured optical and slope efficiencies for this linear-cavity laser are 1.36, and 9%, respectively. With 1 and 5% output couplings from a Z-cavity containing the same laser crystal, the lasers generated 346 and 288 μJ pulse energy with an optical efficiency of 3.4 and 2.8% and slope efficiency of 6.6 and 14%, respectively, for the same 1-ms pump pulse repeating at a 10 Hz rate. At the highest output from the Z-cavity, the measured M2 for the beam is 3.6. PMID:27410125

  13. A nuclear pumped laser for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, G. H.

    1989-08-01

    The Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) has been proposed to study Inertial Confinement Fusion targets with reactor-grade gains. An advanced solid-state laser is the prime candidate as the driver for the LMF. However, here, a conceptual design is presented here for an alternate approach using a Nuclear Pumped Laser (NPL). A pulsed fission reactor is used to excite an oxygen-iodine laser in this design, based on preliminary data on nuclear pumping of O2(1-Delta). Although a working NPL of this specific type has not yet been assembled, it is believed that this concept holds great potential, both as a test facility driver and as a future power reactor.

  14. Experimental study of the diode pumped alkali laser (DPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Masamori; Nagaoka, Ryuji; Nagaoka, Hiroki; Nagai, Toru; Wani, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    A small-scale cesium diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) apparatus has been developed for fundamental researches. A commercial laser diode with volume Bragg grating outcoupler is used to pump the gain cell longitudinally. Both windows of the gain cell are set at Brewster's angle for minimum loss and maximum durability. Output coupling coefficient is continuously variable from 13% to 85% by the slanted quartz plate outcoupler inserted in the optical resonator. Small signal gain is measured with a laser diode probe at various gain cell temperatures. A 6.5 W continuouswave output with 56% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency (based on the absorbed power) has been achieved. A numerical simulation code is developed and its calculation results are in good agreement with the experiments.

  15. Coherent communication link using diode-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Wallace, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Work toward developing a diffraction limited, single frequency, modulated transmitter suitable for coherent optical communication or direct detection communication is discussed. Diode pumped, monolithic Nd:YAG nonplanar ring oscillators were used as the carrier beam. An external modulation technique which can handle high optical powers, has moderate modulation voltage, and which can reach modulation rates of 1 GHz was invented. Semiconductor laser pumped solid-state lasers which have high output power (0.5 Watt) and which oscillate at a single frequency, in a diffraction limited beam, at the wavelength of 1.06 microns were built. A technique for phase modulating the laser output by 180 degrees with a 40-volt peak to peak driving voltage is demonstrated. This technique can be adapted for amplitude modulation of 100 percent with the same voltage. This technique makes use of a resonant bulk modulator, so it does not have the power handling limitations of guided wave modulators.

  16. Electrically pumped edge-emitting photonic bandgap semiconductor laser

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Shawn-Yu; Zubrzycki, Walter J.

    2004-01-06

    A highly efficient, electrically pumped edge-emitting semiconductor laser based on a one- or two-dimensional photonic bandgap (PBG) structure is described. The laser optical cavity is formed using a pair of PBG mirrors operating in the photonic band gap regime. Transverse confinement is achieved by surrounding an active semiconductor layer of high refractive index with lower-index cladding layers. The cladding layers can be electrically insulating in the passive PBG mirror and waveguide regions with a small conducting aperture for efficient channeling of the injection pump current into the active region. The active layer can comprise a quantum well structure. The quantum well structure can be relaxed in the passive regions to provide efficient extraction of laser light from the active region.

  17. Invasive leg vein treatment with 1064/1319 Nd:YAG laser: combination with dye laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smucler, Roman; Horak, Ladislav; Mazanek, Jiri

    1999-06-01

    More than 2 500 leg veins patients were treated with dye laser / ScleroPlus, Candela, USA / successfully in our clinic and we use this therapy as the basic cosmetics treatment. But especially diameter of leg vein is limiting factor. Very often we have to treat some cases that are not ideal for classical surgical or for dye laser method. We decided to make invasive perivenous laser coagulation. We adapted original Czech 1064/1319 nm Nd:YAG laser / US patent pending /, which is new combine tool, for invasive application. Principe: After we have penetrated the cutis with laser fiber we coagulate leg veins during slowly perivenous motion. Perfect preoperative examination is a condition of success. After 15 months we have very interesting results. Some patients / 15%/ were perfect treated only with this possibility but excellent results are acquired from combination with dye laser.

  18. A High Efficiency Grazing Incidence Pumped X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Keenan, R; Price, D F; Patel, P K; Smith, R F; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2006-08-31

    The main objective of the project is to demonstrate a proof-of-principle, new type of high efficiency, short wavelength x-ray laser source that will operate at unprecedented high repetition rates (10Hz) that could be scaled to 1kHz or higher. The development of a high average power, tabletop x-ray laser would serve to complement the wavelength range of 3rd and future 4th generation light sources, e.g. the LCLS, being developed by DOE-Basic Energy Sciences. The latter are large, expensive, central, synchrotron-based facilities while the tabletop x-ray laser is compact, high-power laser-driven, and relatively inexpensive. The demonstration of such a unique, ultra-fast source would allow us to attract funding from DOE-BES, NSF and other agencies to pursue probing of diverse materials undergoing ultrafast changes. Secondly, this capability would have a profound impact on the semiconductor industry since a coherent x-ray laser source would be ideal for ''at wavelength'' {approx}13 nm metrology and microscopy of optics and masks used in EUV lithography. The project has major technical challenges. We will perform grazing-incidence pumped laser-plasma experiments in flat or groove targets which are required to improve the pumping efficiency by ten times. Plasma density characterization using our existing unique picosecond x-ray laser interferometry of laser-irradiated targets is necessary. Simulations of optical laser propagation as well as x-ray laser production and propagation through freely expanding and confined plasma geometries are essential. The research would be conducted using the Physics Directorate Callisto and COMET high power lasers. At the end of the project, we expect to have a high-efficiency x-ray laser scheme operating below 20 nm at 10Hz with a pulse duration of {approx}2 ps. This will represent the state-of-the-art in x-ray lasers and would be a major step forward from our present picosecond laser-driven x-ray lasers. There is an added bonus of creating

  19. Infantile hemangioma: pulsed dye laser versus surgical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remlova, E.; Dostalova, T.; Michalusova, I.; Vranova, J.; Jelinkova, H.; Hubacek, M.

    2014-05-01

    Hemangioma is a mesenchymal benign tumor formed by blood vessels. Anomalies affect up to 10% of children and they are more common in females than in males. The aim of our study was to compare the treatment efficacy, namely the curative effect and adverse events, such as loss of pigment and appearance of scarring, between classical surgery techniques and laser techniques. For that reason a group of 223 patients with hemangioma was retrospectively reviewed. For treatment, a pulsed dye laser (PDL) (Rhodamine G, wavelength 595 nm, pulsewidth between 0.45 and 40 ms, spot diameter 7 mm, energy density 9-11 J cm-2) was used and the results were compared with a control group treated with classical surgical therapy under general anesthesia. The curative effects, mainly number of sessions, appearance of scars, loss of pigment, and relapses were evaluated as a marker of successful treatment. From the results it was evident that the therapeutic effects of both systems are similar. The PDL was successful in all cases. The surgery patients had four relapses. Classical surgery is directly connected with the presence of scars, but the system is safe for larger hemangiomas. It was confirmed that the PDL had the optimal curative effect without scars for small lesions (approximately 10 mm). Surgical treatment under general anesthesia is better for large hemangiomas; the disadvantage is the presence of scars.

  20. Measuring the Dispersion Curve of a PMMA-Fibre Optic Cable Using a Dye Laser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorba, Serkan; Farah, Constantine; Pant, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    An advanced undergraduate laboratory experiment is outlined which uses a dye laser to map out the chromatic dispersion curve of a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) optical fibre. Seven different wavelengths across the visible spectrum are employed using five different dyes. The light pulse is split into two pulses, one to a nearby photodetector and…

  1. New diode wavelengths for pumping solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.; Beach, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    High-power laser-diode arrays have been demonstrated to be viable pump sources for solid-state lasers. The diode bars (fill factor of 0.7) were bonded to silicon microchannel heatsinks for high-average-power operation. Over 12 W of CW output power was achieved from a one cm AlGaInP tensile-strained single-quantum-well laser diode bar. At 690 nm, a compressively-strained single-quantum-well laser-diode array produced 360 W/cm{sup 2} per emitting aperture under CW operation, and 2.85 kW of pulsed power from a 3.8 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array. InGaAs strained single-quantum-well laser diodes emitting at 900 nm produced 2.8 kW pulsed power from a 4.4 cm{sup 2} emitting-aperture array.

  2. New ytterbium-phosphate glass for diode-pumped lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Galagan, B I; Glushchenko, I N; Denker, B I; Sverchkov, S E; Kisel', V E; Kuril'chik, S V; Kuleshov, N V

    2009-10-31

    A new ytterbium laser glass based on an alumoborophosphate composition is developed. It is shown that the chemical and thermal stabilities of this glass are record-high for phosphate glasses and that its spectral and luminescent characteristics compare well with popular laser glasses. A mould of laser-quality glass doped with ytterbium with a concentration of 5x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} is synthesised. Active laser elements 5x5x2 mm in size are prepared from this glass for longitudinal diode pumping. These elements were used to fabricate a laser, whose output power in the cw regime reached 783 mW and maximum slope efficiency was 28.9%. Pulses with a duration of {approx}150 fs and a peak power of about 5 kW are obtained in the passive mode-locking regime. (active media)

  3. Computing Temperatures In Optically Pumped Laser Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, Usamah O.

    1991-01-01

    Computer program presents new model solving temperature-distribution problem for laser rods of finite length and calculates both radial and axial components of temperature distributions in these rods. Contains several self-checking schemes to prevent over-writing of memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77.

  4. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin; Liu, Fang; Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng

    2014-08-15

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550–600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 × 10{sup −15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  5. Environmental testing of a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a set of diode-laser-arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.; Lesh, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Results of the environmental test of a compact, rigid and lightweight diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser module are discussed. All optical elements are bonded onto the module using space applicable epoxy, and two 200 mW diode laser arrays for pump sources are used to achieve 126 mW of CW output with about 7 percent electrical-to-optical conversion efficiency. This laser assembly and a set of 20 semiconductor diode laser arrays were environmentally tested by being subjected to vibrational and thermal conditions similar to those experienced during launch of the Space Shuttle, and both performed well. Nevertheless, some damage to the laser front facet in diode lasers was observed. Significant degradation was observed only on lasers which performed poorly in the life test. Improvements in the reliability of the Nd:YAG laser are suggested.

  6. Fibre-coupled red diode-pumped Alexandrite TEM00 laser with single and double-pass end-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabzadah, E. A.; Damzen, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the investigation of an Alexandrite laser end-pumped by a fibre-coupled red diode laser module. Power, efficiency, spatial, spectral, and wavelength tuning performance are studied as a function of pump and laser cavity parameters. It is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of greater than 1 W power and also highest laser slope efficiency (44.2%) in a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser with diffraction-limited TEM00 mode operation. Spatial quality was excellent with beam propagation parameter M 2 ~ 1.05. Wavelength tuning from 737–796 nm was demonstrated using an intracavity birefringent tuning filter. Using a novel double pass end-pumping scheme to get efficient absorption of both polarisation states of the scrambled fibre-delivered diode pump, a total output coupled power of 1.66 W is produced in TEM00 mode with 40% slope efficiency.

  7. Fibre-coupled red diode-pumped Alexandrite TEM00 laser with single and double-pass end-pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabzadah, E. A.; Damzen, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    We report the investigation of an Alexandrite laser end-pumped by a fibre-coupled red diode laser module. Power, efficiency, spatial, spectral, and wavelength tuning performance are studied as a function of pump and laser cavity parameters. It is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of greater than 1 W power and also highest laser slope efficiency (44.2%) in a diode-pumped Alexandrite laser with diffraction-limited TEM00 mode operation. Spatial quality was excellent with beam propagation parameter M 2 ~ 1.05. Wavelength tuning from 737-796 nm was demonstrated using an intracavity birefringent tuning filter. Using a novel double pass end-pumping scheme to get efficient absorption of both polarisation states of the scrambled fibre-delivered diode pump, a total output coupled power of 1.66 W is produced in TEM00 mode with 40% slope efficiency.

  8. Theoretical analysis of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped alkali vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Binglin; Xu, Xingqi; Xia, Chunsheng; Pan, Bailiang

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of two new pump-couplings: semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped configurations in alkali vapor lasers is reported, which mainly includes the numerical approaches for evaluation of the pump intensity and temperature distribution in the cell of these two configurations. Comparison between the simulated results of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped Cs vapor lasers and the experimental results of the single-side pumped Cs vapor lasers with a cylindrical white diffuse reflector and a stable or unstable resonator is made. Dependencies of laser power on pump power and flowed velocity for semi-ring, trapezoid, single and double side-pumped configurations are calculated, demonstrating the advantages of the semi-ring and trapezoid LD side-pumped configurations. Thus the model is very helpful for designing high-power side-pumped alkali vapor lasers.

  9. A Pr 3+-doped ZBLAN fibre upconversion laser pumped by an Yb 3+-doped silica fibre laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pask, H. M.; Tropper, A. C.; Hanna, D. C.

    1997-02-01

    An Yb 3+-doped silica fibre laser pumped at 840 nm has been used to provide the two pump wavelengths, 840 nm and 1020 nm, required for pumping a Pr 3+-doped ZBLAN fibre upconversion laser. The performance of the upconversion laser at 491, 520 and 635 nm is presented, with measurements of fibre loss at 635 nm and 520 nm which indicate that fibre losses are an important factor limiting the performance of the upconversion laser.

  10. Pump and signal combiner for bi-directional pumping of all-fiber lasers and amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Theeg, Thomas; Sayinc, Hakan; Neumann, Jörg; Overmeyer, Ludger; Kracht, Dietmar

    2012-12-17

    We developed an all-fiber component with a signal feedthrough capable of combining up to 6 fiber-coupled multi-mode pump sources to a maximum pump power of 400 W at efficiencies in the range of 89 to 95%, providing the possibility of transmitting a high power signal in forward and in reverse direction. Hence, the fiber combiner can be implemented in almost any fiber laser or amplifier architecture. The complete optical design of the combiner was developed based on ray tracing simulations and confirmed by experimental results.

  11. 946 nm Diode Pumped Laser Produces 100mJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axenson, Theresa J.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An innovative approach to obtaining high energy at 946 nm has yielded 101 mJ of laser energy with an optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 24.5%. A single gain module resonator was evaluated, yielding a maximum output energy of 50 mJ. In order to obtain higher energy a second gain module was incorporated into the resonator. This innovative approach produced un-surprised output energy of 101 mJ. This is of utmost importance since it demonstrates that the laser output energy scales directly with the number of gain modules. Therefore, higher energies can be realized by simply increasing the number of gain modules within the laser oscillator. The laser resonator incorporates two gain modules into a folded "M-shaped" resonator, allowing a quadruple pass gain within each rod. Each of these modules consists of a diode (stack of 30 microlensed 100 Watt diode array bars, each with its own fiber lens) end-pumping a Nd:YAG laser rod. The diode output is collected by a lens duct, which focuses the energy into a 2 mm diameter flat to flat octagonal pump area of the laser crystal. Special coatings have been developed to mitigate energy storage problems, including parasitic lasing and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), and encourage the resonator to operate at the lower gain transition at 946 nm.

  12. Theoretical studies of solar-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harries, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic vapor lasers of Na2 and Li2 are examined as solar energy converters. The absorbed photons cause transitions to vibrational-rotational levels in an upper electronic state. With broad band absorption the resultant levels can have quantum numbers considerably higher than the upper lasing level. The excited molecule then relaxes to the upper lasing level which is one of the lower vibrational levels in the upper electronic state. The relaxation occurs from collisions, provided the molecule is not quenched into the ground level electronic state. Lasing occurs with a transition to a vibrational level in the lower electronic state. Rough estimates of solar power efficiencies are 1 percent for Na2 and probably a similar figure for Li2. The nondissociative lasers from a family distinct from materials which dissociate to yield an excited atom.

  13. Demonstration of a diode-pumped metastable Ar laser.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiande; Glebov, Leonid; Venus, George; Heaven, Michael C

    2013-12-15

    Pulsed lasing from optically pumped rare gas metastable atoms (Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) has been demonstrated previously. The laser relies on a three-level scheme, which involves the (n+1)p[5/2](3) and (n+1)p[1/2](1) states from the np(5)(n+1)p electronic configuration and the metastable (n+1)s[3/2](2) level of the np(5)(n+1)s configuration (Racah notation). Population inversions were achieved using relaxation from ((n+1)p[5/2](3) to (n+1)p[1/2](1) induced by collisions with helium or argon at pressures near 1 atm. Pulsed lasing was easily achieved using the high instantaneous pump intensities provided by a pulsed optical parametric oscillator excitation laser. In the present study we examine the potential for the development of a continuous wave (CW) optically pumped Ar laser. We report lasing of the 4p[1/2](1)→4s[3/2](2) (912.547 nm) transition following CW diode laser excitation of the 4p[5/2](3)←4s[3/2](2) line (811.754 nm). A pulsed discharge was used to generate Ar 4s[3/2](2), and the time-resolved lasing kinetics provide insights concerning the radiative and collisional relaxation processes. PMID:24343016

  14. Highly Efficient Operation of Tm:fiber Laser Pumped Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Petros, M.; Yu, Jirong; Petzar, Paul; Trieu, Bo; Chen, Sam; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2006-01-01

    A 19 W, TEM(sub 00) mode, Ho:YLF laser pumped by continuous wave Tm:fiber laser has been demonstrated at the room temperature. The slope efficiency and optical-to-optical efficiency are 65% and 55%, respectively.

  15. High power, high efficiency, 2D laser diode arrays for pumping solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, A.; McShea, J.C.; Bogdan, A.R.; Petheram, J.C.; Rosen, A.

    1987-11-01

    This document reports the current performance of 2D laser diode arrays operating at 770 nm and 808 nm for pumping promethium and neodymium solid state lasers, respectively. Typical power densities are in excess of 2kw/cm/sup 2/ with overall efficiencies greater than 30%.

  16. Nd:LNA laser optical pumping of He-4 - Application to space magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, R. E.; Schearer, L. D.; Tin, P.; Marquedant, R.

    1988-12-01

    Results obtained from laser pumping in a helium magnetometer sensor, using a tunable Nd:LNA laser pumped with a high-power diode laser, are reported. It is shown that it was possible to observe both the Hanle signals and the n = 0, p = 1 parametric resonance by monitoring the pumping radiation passing through the cell. As the diode laser-pumped Nd:LNA laser was tuned through the D0, D1, and D2 transitions, three distinct resonance signals were produced. A comparison of the slope of lamp-pumped signals and laser-pumped D1 signals showed that, under otherwise identical conditions, the slope of the D1 laser signal was 45 times greater than the lamp-pumped signal.

  17. The aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solution as an active laser medium

    SciTech Connect

    Akimov, A I; Saletskii, A M

    2000-11-30

    The spectral, luminescent, and lasing properties of aqueous solutions of a cationic dye rhodamine 6G with additions of anion polyelectrolytes - polyacrylic and polymethacrylic acids - are studied. It is found that the energy and spectral properties of lasing of these solutions depend on the ratio of concentrations of polyelectrolyte and molecules. It is also found that the lasing parameters of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions can be controlled by changing the structure of the molecular system. The variation in the structure of aqueous-polyelectrolyte dye solutions of rhodamine 6G resulted in an almost five-fold increase in the lasing efficiency compared to that in aqueous dye solutions. (lasers, active media)

  18. University of Florida nuclear pumped laser program. [excitation of laser gaseous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanism of excitation of laser gases by fast ions (triton, proton, or fission fragments) and especially any role UF6 might play in radiative deexcitation of these gases were investigated. Population densities of excited important for laser action were obtained. Nuclear pumped CW-laser systems, especially He-Ne and CO2, were studied using steady state reactors. It was demonstrated that He-Ne lases in a CW-mode with nuclear pumping at both the red and the infrared transition. The infrared transition was observed to be superradiant.

  19. Luminescent light source for laser pumping and laser system containing same

    DOEpatents

    Hamil, Roy A.; Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a pumping lamp for use with lasers comprising a porous substrate loaded with a component capable of emitting light upon interaction of the component with exciting radiation and a source of exciting radiation. Preferably, the pumping lamp comprises a source of exciting radiation, such as an electron beam, and an aerogel or xerogel substrate loaded with a component capable of interacting with the exciting radiation, e.g., a phosphor, to produce light, e.g., visible light, of a suitable band width and of a sufficient intensity to generate a laser beam from a laser material.

  20. Efficient laser-diode end-pumped Nd:GGG lasers at 1054 and 1067 nm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Camy, P; Doualan, J L; Moncorgé, R

    2014-10-10

    Efficient and compact laser-diode end-pumped Nd:GGG simultaneous multiwavelength continuous-wave lasers at ∼1059, ∼1060 and ∼1062  nm were first demonstrated in a free-running 30 mm plano-concave laser cavity. The maximum output power was up to 3.92 W with a slope efficiency of about 53.6% with respect to the absorbed pump power. By inserting a 0.1 mm optical glass plate acting as a Fabry-Pérot etalon, a single-wavelength laser at ∼1067  nm with a maximum output power of 1.95 W and a slope efficiency of 28.5% can be obtained. Multiwavelength lasers, including those at ∼1054 or ∼1067  nm, were also achievable by suitably tilting the glass etalon. These simultaneous multiwavelength lasers provide a potential source for terahertz wave generation.

  1. Nd:GdVO4 ring laser pumped by laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, E. J.; Li, T.; Wang, Z. D.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-02-01

    The design and operation of a laser diode-pumped Nd:GdVO4 ring laser is described. A composite crystal (Nd:GdVO4/YVO4) with undoped ends is single-end pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode (LD) at 808 nm. A four-mirror ring cavity is designed to keep the laser operating unidirectionally, which eliminates spatial hole burning in the standing-wave cavity. This laser can operate either as continuous wave (CW) or Q-switched. The single-frequency power obtained was 9.1 W at 1063 nm. Q-switched operation produced 0.23 mJ/pulse at 20 kHz in the fundamental laser.

  2. Efficient laser-diode end-pumped Nd:GGG lasers at 1054 and 1067 nm.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping; Camy, P; Doualan, J L; Moncorgé, R

    2014-10-10

    Efficient and compact laser-diode end-pumped Nd:GGG simultaneous multiwavelength continuous-wave lasers at ∼1059, ∼1060 and ∼1062  nm were first demonstrated in a free-running 30 mm plano-concave laser cavity. The maximum output power was up to 3.92 W with a slope efficiency of about 53.6% with respect to the absorbed pump power. By inserting a 0.1 mm optical glass plate acting as a Fabry-Pérot etalon, a single-wavelength laser at ∼1067  nm with a maximum output power of 1.95 W and a slope efficiency of 28.5% can be obtained. Multiwavelength lasers, including those at ∼1054 or ∼1067  nm, were also achievable by suitably tilting the glass etalon. These simultaneous multiwavelength lasers provide a potential source for terahertz wave generation. PMID:25322387

  3. A random laser made of nematic liquid crystal doped with a laser dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznitko, L.; Kaliciak, K.; Adamow, A.; Mysliwiec, J.

    2016-06-01

    We report on random laser emission obtained in 5CB and E7 nematic liquid crystal (LC) mixtures doped with 1% weight to weight ratio of DCM laser dye. The LC cell was used as asymmetric planar waveguide were emission was collected from the edge of the sample. Variable stripe length method was utilized to estimate the gain and the losses coefficients. Both systems have shown the threshold energy fluence in order of several mJ/cm2. In both cases above Fredericks potential, significant increase of emission intensity was observed due to the increase of light scattering on liquid crystalline domains. Moreover the use of fifth order of diffraction grating covered with thin alumina film resulted in strong multimode and directional laser emission.

  4. High-Reliability Pump Module for Non-Planar Ring Oscillator Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Duncan T.; Qiu, Yueming; Wilson, Daniel W.; Dubovitsky, Serge; Forouhar, Siamak

    2007-01-01

    We propose and have demonstrated a prototype high-reliability pump module for pumping a Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO) laser suitable for space missions. The pump module consists of multiple fiber-coupled single-mode laser diodes and a fiber array micro-lens array based fiber combiner. The reported Single-Mode laser diode combiner laser pump module (LPM) provides a higher normalized brightness at the combined beam than multimode laser diode based LPMs. A higher brightness from the pump source is essential for efficient NPRO laser pumping and leads to higher reliability because higher efficiency requires a lower operating power for the laser diodes, which in turn increases the reliability and lifetime of the laser diodes. Single-mode laser diodes with Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) stabilized wavelength permit the pump module to be operated without a thermal electric cooler (TEC) and this further improves the overall reliability of the pump module. The single-mode laser diode LPM is scalable in terms of the number of pump diodes and is capable of combining hundreds of fiber-coupled laser diodes. In the proof-of-concept demonstration, an e-beam written diffractive micro lens array, a custom fiber array, commercial 808nm single mode laser diodes, and a custom NPRO laser head are used. The reliability of the proposed LPM is discussed.

  5. Efficient holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser longitudinally pumped by a semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1987-01-01

    Optical pumping of a holmium:yttrium lithium floride (Ho:YLF) crystal with a 790-nm continuous-wave diode-laser array has generated 56 mW of 2.1-micron laser radiation with an optical-to-optical conversion slope efficiency of 33 percent while the crystal temperature is held at 77 K. The lasing threshold occurs at 7 mW of input power, and laser operation continues up to a crystal temperature of 124 K.

  6. Indication of Local Laser Pump Depletion via Transmitted Self-Guided Laser Light

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Lu, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.

    2009-01-22

    In recent experiments it has been shown that an ultra-intense, ultra-short laser pulse can be self-guided over tens of Rayleigh lengths in an underdense plasma where {tau}(FWHM of the laser pulse) is on the order of the plasma wavelength ({lambda}{sub p}). Using an imaging spectrograph, the frequency of the transmitted laser pulse was spatially and spectrally resolved at the exit of 3, 5, and 8 mm long plasmas. The mechanism of laser pump depletion was studied by observing the amount that the transmitted laser pulse's spectrum was red shifted in wavelength through the interaction with the self-guiding plasma wave.

  7. Narrow line diode laser stacks for DPAL pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenning, Tobias; Irwin, David; Stapleton, Dean; Pandey, Rajiv; Guiney, Tina; Patterson, Steve

    2014-02-01

    Diode pumped alkali metal vapor lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality, making them an attractive candidate for future defense applications. A variety of gain media are used and each requires a different pump wavelength: near 852nm for cesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm. Typical high power diode lasers achieve spectral widths around 3nm (FWHM) in the near infrared spectrum. With state of the art locking techniques, either internal to the cavity or externally mounted gratings, the spectral width can typically be reduced to 0.5nm to 1nm for kW-class, high power stacks. More narrow spectral width has been achieved at lower power levels. The diode's inherent wavelength drift over operating temperature and output power is largely, but not completely, eliminated. However, standard locking techniques cannot achieve the required accuracy on the location of the spectral output or the spectral width for efficient DPAL pumping. Actively cooled diode laser stacks with continuous wave output power of up to 100W per 10mm bar at 780nm optimized for rubidium pumping will be presented. Custom designed external volume holographic gratings (VHGs) in conjunction with optimized chip material are used to narrow and stabilize the optical spectrum. Temperature tuning on a per-bar-level is used to overlap up to fifteen individual bar spectra into one narrow peak. At the same time, this tuning capability can be used to adjust the pump wavelength to match the absorption band of the active medium. A spectral width of <0.1nm for the entire stack is achieved at <1kW optical output power. Tuning of the peak wavelength is demonstrated for up to 0.15nm. The technology can easily be adapted to other diode laser wavelengths to pump different materials.

  8. Dual-pump CARS temperature and major species concentration measurements in counter-flow methane flames using narrowband pump and broadband Stokes lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Thariyan, Mathew P.; Ananthanarayanan, Vijaykumar; Bhuiyan, Aizaz H.; Naik, Sameer V.; Gore, Jay P.; Lucht, Robert P.

    2010-07-15

    Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used to measure temperature and species profiles in representative non-premixed and partially-premixed CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} flames. A new laser system has been developed to generate a tunable single-frequency beam for the second pump beam in the dual-pump N{sub 2}-CO{sub 2} CARS process. The second harmonic output ({proportional_to}532 nm) from an injection-seeded Nd:YAG laser is used as one of the narrowband pump beams. The second single-longitudinal-mode pump beam centered near 561 nm is generated using an injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator, consisting of two non-linear {beta}-BBO crystals, pumped using the third harmonic output ({proportional_to}355 nm) of the same Nd:YAG laser. A broadband dye laser (BBDL), pumped using the second harmonic output of an unseeded Nd:YAG laser, is employed to produce the Stokes beam centered near 607 nm with full-width-at-half-maximum of {proportional_to}250 cm{sup -1}. The three beams are focused between two opposing nozzles of a counter-flow burner facility to measure temperature and major species concentrations in a variety of CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} non-premixed and partially-premixed flames stabilized at a global strain rate of 20 s{sup -1} at atmospheric-pressure. For the non-premixed flames, excellent agreement is observed between the measured profiles of temperature and CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} concentration ratios with those calculated using an opposed-flow flame code with detailed chemistry and molecular transport submodels. For partially-premixed flames, with the rich side premixing level beyond the stable premixed flame limit, the calculations overestimate the distance between the premixed and the non-premixed flamefronts. Consequently, the calculated temperatures near the rich, premixed flame are higher than those measured. Accurate prediction of the distance between the premixed and the non-premixed flames provides an interesting challenge for

  9. A portable lidar using a diode-pumped YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Okumura, H.; Sugita, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Yamaguchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    A Mie lidar system is technically established and is used for monitoring air pollution, stratospheric and boundary layer aerosol distribution, plume dispersion, visibility, and the study of atmospheric structure and cloud physics. However, a lidar system is not widely used because of its cumbersome handling and unwieldy portability. Although the author developed a laser diode lidar system based on RM-CW technique, it has a limit of measurement distance. Here we report the development of an all solid Mie lidar system using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a Si-APD detector. This was constructed as a prototype of a handy lidar system.

  10. Longitudinal discharge pumped low-pressure XeCl laser

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, A I

    2013-10-31

    We have studied output parameters of a XeCl and a N{sub 2} laser pumped by a longitudinal discharge with automatic spark UV preionisation. The output parameters of a low-pressure (30 Torr) XeCl laser operating with Ar, Ne and He as buffer gases or with no buffer gas have been optimised for the first time. The laser generated 5-ns FWHM pulses with an average power of 0.5 mW and output energy of 0.15 mJ. Under longitudinal discharge pumping, an output energy per unit volume of 1.8 J L{sup -1} atm{sup -1} was reached using helium as a buffer gas. With argon-containing and buffer-free mixtures, it was 1.5 J L{sup -1} atm{sup -1}. The N{sub 2} laser generated 2.5-ns FWHM pulses with an average power of 0.35 mW and output energy of 0.05 mJ. (lasers)

  11. Advances in solid state laser technology for space and medical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Recent developments in laser technology and their potential for medical applications are discussed. Gas discharge lasers, dye lasers, excimer lasers, Nd:YAG lasers, HF and DF lasers, and other commonly used lasers are briefly addressed. Emerging laser technology is examined, including diode-pumped lasers and other solid state lasers.

  12. Thin-Film Evaporative Cooling for Side-Pumped Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Brian K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method are provided for cooling a crystal rod of a side-pumped laser. A transparent housing receives the crystal rod therethrough so that an annular gap is defined between the housing and the radial surface of the crystal rod. A fluid coolant is injected into the annular gap such the annular gap is partially filled with the fluid coolant while the radial surface of the crystal rod is wetted as a thin film all along the axial length thereof.

  13. Highly efficient neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet laser end pumped by a semiconductor laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    In recent experiments, 80-mW CW power in a single mode has been achieved from a neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser with only 1 W of electrical power input to a single semiconductor laser array pump. This corresponds to an overall efficiency of 8 percent, the highest reported CW efficiency for a Nd:YAG laser. A tightly focused semiconductor laser end pump configuration is used to achieve high pumping intensities (on the order of 1 kW/sq cm), which in turn causes the photon to photon conversion efficiency to approach the quantum efficiency (76 percent for Nd:YAG at 1.06 microns pumped at 0.810 micron). This is achieved despite the dual-lobed nature of the pump. Through the use of simple beam-combining schemes (e.g., polarization coupling and multireflection point pumping), output powers over 1 W and overall electrical to optical efficiencies as high as 10 percent are expected.

  14. Lasing properties of chromium-aluminum-doped forsterite pumped with an alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Behrens, E.G.; Jani, M.G.; Powell, R.C. ); Verdun, H.R. ); Pinto, A. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the lasing properties of chromium-aluminum-doped forsterite that were investigated using a tunable alexandrite laser as the pump source. Results of measurements of the lasing threshold, slope efficiency, spectral, and temporal profiles of the laser pulse, and the time delay between the alexandrite pump pulse and the laser emission are presented for pump wavelengths of 770, 746, and 730 nm and different pump beam energies. Laser rate equations are developed to model the lasing center as a four-level system and applied to the case of 746 nm pumping.

  15. Efficient, resonantly pumped, room-temperature Er3+:GdVO4 laser.

    PubMed

    Ter-Gabrielyan, N; Fromzel, V; Ryba-Romanowski, W; Lukasiewicz, T; Dubinskii, M

    2012-04-01

    We report an efficient room-temperature operation of a resonantly pumped Er3+:GdVO4 laser at 1598.5 nm. The maximum continuous wave (CW) output power of 3.5 W with slope efficiency of 56% was achieved with resonant pumping by an Er-fiber laser at 1538.6 nm. With pumping by a commercial laser diode bar stack, a quasi-CW (QCW) output of 7.7 W and maximum slope efficiency of ~53% versus absorbed pump power were obtained. This is believed to be the first resonantly (in-band) pumped, room-temperature Er3+:GdVO4 laser.

  16. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andy J

    2013-10-01

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  17. Method and system for homogenizing diode laser pump arrays

    DOEpatents

    Bayramian, Andrew James

    2016-05-03

    An optical amplifier system includes a diode pump array including a plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars disposed in an array configuration and characterized by a periodic distance between adjacent semiconductor diode laser bars. The periodic distance is measured in a first direction perpendicular to each of the plurality of semiconductor diode laser bars. The diode pump array provides a pump output propagating along an optical path and characterized by a first intensity profile measured as a function of the first direction and having a variation greater than 10%. The optical amplifier system also includes a diffractive optic disposed along the optical path. The diffractive optic includes a photo-thermo-refractive glass member. The optical amplifier system further includes an amplifier slab having an input face and position along the optical path and separated from the diffractive optic by a predetermined distance. A second intensity profile measured at the input face of the amplifier slab as a function of the first direction has a variation less than 10%.

  18. Direct laser interference patterning of polystyrene films doped with azo dyes, using 355 nm laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broglia, M. F.; Suarez, S.; Soldera, F.; Mücklich, F.; Barbero, C. A.; Bellingeri, R.; Alustiza, F.; Acevedo, D.

    2014-05-01

    The generation of line-like periodic patterns by direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) of polystyrene films (PS) at a wavelength of 355 nm has been investigated. No structuration is achieved in plain PS due to the weak absorption of the polymer at 355 nm. On the other hand, patterning is achieved on films doped (PSd) with an azo dye (2-anisidine → 2-anisidine) which is incorporated in the polymer solution used for film preparation. Periodic micro-structures are generated. DLIP on PSd results in the swelling of the surface at low fluences, while at high laser intensities it causes the ablation of the regions at the interference maxima positions. The results contrast with the usual process of DLIP on PS (at shorter wavelengths, like 266 nm) where only ablation is detected. The results suggest that decomposition of the azo dye is the driving force of the patterning which therefore differ from the patterning obtained when plain PS is irradiated with laser light able to be absorbed by the aromatic ring in PS (e.g. 266 nm). The biocompatibility of these materials and adhesion of cells was tested, the data from in vitro assays shows that fibroblast cells are attached and proliferate extensively on the PSd films.

  19. Deposition of organic dyes for dye-sensitized solar cell by using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Chih-Ping; Yu, Pin-Feng; Wang, Jyhpyng; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Mu; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2016-08-01

    The deposition of various distinct organic dyes, including ruthenium complex N3, melanin nanoparticle (MNP), and porphyrin-based donor-π-acceptor dye YD2-o-C8, by using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) for application to dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is investigated systematically. It is found that the two covalently-bonded organic molecules, i.e., MNP and YD2-o-C8, can be transferred from the frozen target to the substrate with maintained molecular integrity. In contrast, N3 disintegrates in the process, presumably due to the lower bonding strength of metal complex compared to covalent bond. With the method, DSSC using YD2-o-C8 is fabricated, and an energy conversion efficiency of 1.47% is attained. The issue of the low penetration depth of dyes deposited by MAPLE and the possible resolution to it are studied. This work demonstrates that MAPLE could be an alternative way for deposition of organic dyes for DSSC.

  20. Observation of enhanced thermal lensing due to near-Gaussian pump energy deposition in a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, David; Rines, David M.; Dinerman, Bradley J.; Martinsen, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The authors report operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a novel pumping geometry that ensures efficient conversion of pump energy into the TEM00 mode. Significant enhancement of thermally induced lensing due to the near-Gaussian energy deposition profile of the pump radiation was observed. An induced lens of approximately 3.2-m focal length was measured at average incident pump powers of only 3.2 W (corresponding to a 0.6 W heat load).

  1. Laser rods with undoped, flanged end-caps for end-pumped laser applications

    DOEpatents

    Meissner, Helmuth E.; Beach, Raymond J.; Bibeau, Camille; Sutton, Steven B.; Mitchell, Scott; Bass, Isaac; Honea, Eric

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for achieving improved performance in a solid state laser is provided. A flanged, at least partially undoped end-cap is attached to at least one end of a laserable medium. Preferably flanged, undoped end-caps are attached to both ends of the laserable medium. Due to the low scatter requirements for the interface between the end-caps and the laser rod, a non-adhesive method of bonding is utilized such as optical contacting combined with a subsequent heat treatment of the optically contacted composite. The non-bonded end surfaces of the flanged end-caps are coated with laser cavity coatings appropriate for the lasing wavelength of the laser rod. A cooling jacket, sealably coupled to the flanged end-caps, surrounds the entire length of the laserable medium. Radiation from a pump source is focussed by a lens duct and passed through at least one flanged end-cap into the laser rod.

  2. Efficient TEM(00)-mode operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welford, D.; Rines, D. M.; Dinerman, B. J.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of a laser-diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser with a novel pumping geometry that ensures efficient conversion of pump energy into the TEM(00) mode is reported. Of the 1064-nm output, 11.8 microJ of energy was obtained in a 200-microsec pulse with 64 microJ of pump energy at 808 nm. The overall conversion and slope efficiencies were 18 and 23 percent, respectively.

  3. Study on LD-pumped Nd:YAG laser cutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing; Fan, Zhongwei; Zhao, Cunhua; Bi, Yong; Zhang, Jing; Niu, Gang; Shi, Zhaohui; Pei, Bo; Zhang, Guoxin; Xue, Yan; Qi, Yan

    2005-12-01

    The theory of laser cutter and the technology neck is analyzed. We can conclude that it is almost impossible to deal with the waste thick silicon wafers which are yielded in producing silicon wafers by conventional eroding or diamond cutting, while it is also unperfected with ecumenical laser cutter without good beam quality or precise laser and optics system. It is represented that high average power and high repetition rate laser with good beam quality and precise laser and optics system are pivotal to obtain excellent cutting effect such as thick groove depth, rapid cutting speed, fine kerf section without considering the effect of technique. Considering laser medium thermal lens effect and thermal focal length changing with pumping power, using plano-convex high reflectivity mirror as the back cavity mirror to compensate the heat lens influence, aλ/4 waveplate to compensate heat-induced birefraction, utilize the Nd:YAG self-aperture effect, more than 50 W average power 1.064 um IR output is obtained with beam quality factor (M2) equals 3.19. Through the LD-Pumped Nd:YAG laser cutter we developed with short focus length negative spherical aberration focusing lens, double axis linear step motor positioning system, suitable beam expander multiplying factor, appropriate diameter of exit beam aperture, proper repetition rate, when the cutting velocity equals 400mm/min, 0.75mm thick silicon wafer can be penetrated; when the cutting velocity equals 100mm/min, double-layer 0.75mm thick silicon wafer can be penetrated. The cross section is fine and the groove is narrow, the cutting quality meets the expecting demand.

  4. Development of lasers optimized for pumping Ti:Al2O3 lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rines, Glen A.; Schwarz, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory demonstrations that were completed included: (1) an all-solid-state, broadly tunable, single-frequency, Ti:Al2O3 master oscillator, and (2) a technique for obtaining 'long' (nominally 100- to 200-ns FWHM) laser pulses from a Q-switched, Nd oscillator at energy levels commensurate with straightforward amplification to the joule level. A diode-laser-pumped, Nd:YLF laser with intracavity SHG was designed, constructed, and evaluated. With this laser greater than 0.9 W of CW, output power at 523.5 nm with 10 W of diode-laser pump power delivered to the Nd:YLF crystal was obtained. With this laser as a pump source, for the first time, to our knowledge, an all solid-state, single frequency, Ti:Al203 laser with sufficient output power to injection seed a high-energy oscillator over a 20-nm bandwidth was demonstrated. The pulsed laser work succeeded in demonstrating pulse-stretching in a Q-switched Nd:YAG oscillator. Pulse energies greater than 50-mJ were obtained in pulses with 100- to 200-ns pulsewidths (FWHM).

  5. Effects of argon, dye, and Nd:YAG lasers on epidermis, dermis, and venous vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Landthaler, M.; Haina, D.; Brunner, R.; Waidelich, W.; Braun-Falco, O.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the present study, which was performed at the dorsal aspects of the ears of guinea pigs, was to compare effects of different lasers on epidermis, dermis, and small venous vessels. Irradiations were performed with argon, dye, and Nd:YAG lasers. In the first series tissue repair processes were studied after argon laser application. Laser defects were excised after 1, 4, 8, and 14 days and were prepared for routine histological examination. The breadth of epidermal defect and extent of dermal coagulation and occlusion of vessels by thrombus formation were examined histologically. In a second series parameters of irradiation (ie, exposure time, laser power) of the three different lasers were changed systematically. Laser-induced morphological tissue changes could be best observed 24 hours after irradiation. Each of the lasers led to occlusion of vessels by thrombus formation and also coagulated epidermis and dermis. The extent of dermal and epidermal coagulation was less pronounced after dye laser application. Using short exposure times it was possible to reduce the extent of epidermal damage caused by argon and Nd:YAG lasers. Only 50-msec dye laser pulses led to intravascular thrombus formation without epidermal and dermal damage.

  6. Reactor-pumped laser facility at DOE's Nevada Test Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.

    1994-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is one excellent possibility for a laser power beaming site. It is in the low latitudes of the U.S., is in an exceptionally cloud-free area of the southwest, is already an area of restricted access (which enhances safety considerations), and possesses a highly skilled technical team with extensive engineering and research capabilities from underground testing of our nation's nuclear deterrence. The average availability of cloud-free clear line of site to a given point in space is about 84%. With a beaming angle of +/- 60 degree(s) from the zenith, about 52 geostationary-orbit (GEO) satellites could be accessed continuously from NTS. In addition, the site would provide an average view factor of about 10% for orbital transfer from low earth orbit to GEO. One of the major candidates for a long-duration, high- power laser is a reactor-pumped laser being developed by DOE. The extensive nuclear expertise at NTS makes this site a prime candidate for utilizing the capabilities of a rector pumped laser for power beaming. The site then could be used for many dual-use roles such as industrial material processing research, defense testing, and removing space debris.

  7. Ultrafast laser pump/x-ray probe experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Judd, E.; Schuck, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    In an ongoing project aimed at probing solids using x-rays obtained at the ALS synchrotron with a sub-picosecond time resolution following interactions with a 100 fs laser pulse, the authors have successfully performed pump-probe experiments limited by the temporal duration of ALS-pulse. They observe a drop in the diffraction efficiency following laser heating. They can attribute this to a disordering of the crystal. Studies with higher temporal resolution are required to determine the mechanism. The authors have also incorporated a low-jitter streakcamera as a diagnostic for observing time-dependant x-ray diffraction. The streakcamera triggered by a photoconductive switch was operated at kHz repetition rates. Using UV-pulses, the authors obtain a temporal response of 2 ps when averaging 5000 laser pulses. They demonstrate the ability to detect monochromatized x-ray radiation from a bend-magnet with the streak camera by measuring the pulse duration of a x-ray pulse to 70 ps. In conclusion, the authors show a rapid disordering of an InSb crystal. The resolution was determined by the duration of the ALS pulse. They also demonstrate that they can detect x-ray radiation from a synchrotron source with a temporal resolution of 2ps, by using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera. Their set-up will allow them to pursue laser pump/x-ray probe experiments to monitor structural changes in materials with ultrafast time resolution.

  8. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  9. Generation of high-power nanosecond pulses from laser diode-pumped Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kinpui

    1988-01-01

    Simulation results are used to compare the pulse energy levels and pulse energy widths that can be achieved with LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers for both the pulse-transmission mode (PTM) and pulse-reflection mode (PRM) Q-switching methods for pulse energy levels up to hundreds of microjoules and pulse widths as short as 1 ns. It is shown that high-power pulses with pulse widths as short as 1 ns can be generated with PTM Q-switched in LD-pumped Nd:YAG lasers. With the PRM Q-switching method, pulse widths as short as 2 ns and pulse energy at the level of a few hundred microjoules can also be achieved but require pumping with 8-10-mJ AlGaAs laser diode arrays.

  10. Enhanced efficiency of AlGaInP disk laser by in-well pumping.

    PubMed

    Mateo, C M N; Brauch, U; Schwarzbäck, T; Kahle, H; Jetter, M; Abdou Ahmed, M; Michler, P; Graf, T

    2015-02-01

    The performance of a 665-nm GaInP disk laser operated continuous-wave at 15°C both in-well-pumped at 640 nm and barrier pumped at 532 nm is reported. The efficiency with respect to the absorbed power was enhanced by 3.5 times when using a 640-nm pump instead of a 532-nm pump. In-well pumping which is based on the absorption of the pump photons within the quantum-well heterostructures of the gain region instead of short-wavelength absorption in the barrier and spacer regions reduces the quantum defect between pump and laser photon and hence the heat generation. A slope efficiency of 60% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained by in-well pumping at 15°C. Continuous-wave laser operation was further demonstrated at heat sink temperatures of up to 55°C. Both the measurement of photoluminescence and COMSOL simulation show that the overall heat load in the in-well pumped laser is smaller than in the barrier-pumped laser. These results demonstrate the potential of optical in-well pumping for the operation of red AlGaInP disk lasers if combined with means for efficient pump-light absorption.

  11. Enhanced efficiency of AlGaInP disk laser by in-well pumping.

    PubMed

    Mateo, C M N; Brauch, U; Schwarzbäck, T; Kahle, H; Jetter, M; Abdou Ahmed, M; Michler, P; Graf, T

    2015-02-01

    The performance of a 665-nm GaInP disk laser operated continuous-wave at 15°C both in-well-pumped at 640 nm and barrier pumped at 532 nm is reported. The efficiency with respect to the absorbed power was enhanced by 3.5 times when using a 640-nm pump instead of a 532-nm pump. In-well pumping which is based on the absorption of the pump photons within the quantum-well heterostructures of the gain region instead of short-wavelength absorption in the barrier and spacer regions reduces the quantum defect between pump and laser photon and hence the heat generation. A slope efficiency of 60% with respect to the absorbed pump power was obtained by in-well pumping at 15°C. Continuous-wave laser operation was further demonstrated at heat sink temperatures of up to 55°C. Both the measurement of photoluminescence and COMSOL simulation show that the overall heat load in the in-well pumped laser is smaller than in the barrier-pumped laser. These results demonstrate the potential of optical in-well pumping for the operation of red AlGaInP disk lasers if combined with means for efficient pump-light absorption. PMID:25836115

  12. High Energy Directly Pumped Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Ji-Rong; Singh, Upendra N.; Barnes, Norman P.

    2000-01-01

    The most commonly used crystal architecture to produce 2 micrometer laser is co-doping Ho and Tm into a single host crystal. In this method, the stored energy transfer from the Tm (3)F4 to the Ho (5)I7 manifold is not fast enough to warrant high efficiency for short pulse applications. By separating the Ho and the Tm ions and doping the Tm in YALO3 and the Ho in YLF, we were able to directly pump the Ho (5)I7 manifold with 1.94 micrometers. The Ho:YLF laser has produced 33 mJ at 2.062 micrometers with a quantum efficiency of 0.88. The performance of each laser will be presented.

  13. Optical power supply unit utilizing high power laser diode module developed for fiber laser pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Akira; Kiyoyama, Wataru; Yamauchi, Ryozo

    2014-05-01

    High power laser diode developed for fiber laser pumping is evaluated as a light source for an optical power supply unit. The output power of the newly developed laser diode module exceeds 15 W with 105 μm core fiber. It is estimated that more than 1600 mW power supply can be achieved with the single emitter laser diode module and a polycrystalline silicon cell over 1 km away from the light source. This unit can be used for sensor nodes in the fiber sensor network.

  14. Laser diode end-pumped ND:YAG laser. Memorandum report

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, I.F.

    1992-01-01

    100 Hz operation of a Nd:YAG laser longitudinally pumped by a 1 W peak power quasi-cw laser diode was investigated theoretically and experimentally. An optical-to-optical slope efficiency of 33%, indicating a wall-plug efficiency of 7%, was exhibited, but the threshold optical power of 330 mW was high due to poor antireflection coatings on the laser rod giving a round-trip intracavity loss of 3.1 %. The 1.064 micrometer output was observed to be diffraction-limited. The theoretical modelling of the laser's input/ output characteristics agreed well with the experimentally obtained results.

  15. High-power pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Larry R.; Hays, A. D.; Kaz, Alex; Kasinski, Jeff; Burnham, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    The operation of both pulsed and CW diode-pumped mode-locked Nd:YAG lasers are presented. The pulsed laser produced 1.0 mJ with pulsewidths of 90 psec at 20 Hz. The CW pumped laser produced 6 W output at 1.064 microns and 3 W output at 532 nm.

  16. High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm{sup 3+} and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture

    DOEpatents

    Beach, R.J.

    1997-11-18

    Wing pumping a Tm{sup 3+} doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 {micro}m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm{sup 3+} absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm{sup 3+} because high Tm{sup 3+} concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation. 7 figs.

  17. High efficiency 2 micrometer laser utilizing wing-pumped Tm.sup.3+ and a laser diode array end-pumping architecture

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.

    1997-01-01

    Wing pumping a Tm.sup.3+ doped, end pumped solid state laser generates 2 .mu.m laser radiation at high average powers with high efficiency. Using laser diode arrays to end-pump the laser rod or slab in the wing of the Tm.sup.3+ absorption band near 785 nm results in 2-for-1 quantum efficiency in Tm.sup.3+ because high Tm.sup.3+ concentrations can be used. Wing pumping allows the thermal power generated in the rod or slab to be distributed over a large enough volume to make thermal management practical in the laser gain medium even at high average power operation. The approach is applicable to CW, Q-switched, and rep-pulsed free-laser operation.

  18. A blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyoung, R. J.; Higdon, N. S.

    1984-08-01

    A compact blackbody-pumped CO2-N2 transfer laser was constructed and the significant operating parameters were investigated. Lasing was achieved at 10.6 microns by passing preheated N2 through a 1.5-mm-diameter nozzle to a laser cavity where the N2 was mixed with CO2 and He. An intrinsic efficiency of 0.7 percent was achieved for an oven temperature of 1473 K and N2 oven pressure of 440 torr. The optimum laser cavity consisted of a back mirror with maximum reflectivity and an output mirror with 97.5-percent reflectivity. The optimum gas mixture was 1CO2/.5He/6N2. The variation of laser output was measured as a function of oven temperature, nozzle diameter, N2 oven pressure, He and CO2 partial pressures, nozzle-to-oven separation, laser cell temperature, and output laser mirror reflectivity. With these parameters optimized, outputs approaching 1.4 watts were achieved.

  19. Laser diode pumped, erbium-doped, solid state laser with high slope efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterowitz, Leon; Allen, R.; Kintz, G.

    1989-10-01

    A laser and method for producing a laser emission at a wavelength of substantially 2.8 microns is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the laser comprises laser diode means for emitting a pump beam at a preselected wavelength; and a crystal having a preselected host material doped with a predetermined percent concentration of erbium activator ions sufficient to produce a laser emission at substantially 2.8 microns at a slope efficiency of at least 5 percent, but preferrably 10 percent, when the crystal is pumped by the pump beam. It is well known that the human body is comprised of approximately 70 percent water, with various human tissues containing about 60 to 90 percent of water, and bone and cartilage containing about 30 to 40 percent of water. Since the 2.8 micron wavelength has a substantially maximum absorption in water, this 2.8 micron wavelength is the ideal wavelength to use for a large variety of medical laser applications on the human body. A 2.8 micron wavelength laser could be used for precise surgery in such exemplary applications as brain surgery, neurosurgery, eye surgery, plastic surgery, burn treatment, and the removal of malignancies.

  20. Laser-diode-pumped, erbium-doped, solid-state laser with high slope efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Esterowitz, L.; Allen, R.; Kintz, G.

    1989-10-31

    A laser and method for producing a laser emission at a wavelength of substantially 2.8 microns is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the laser comprises laser diode means for emitting a pump beam at a preselected wavelength; and a crystal having a preselected host material doped with a predetermined percent concentration of erbium activator ions sufficient to produce a laser emission at substantially 2.8 microns at a slope efficiency of at least 5 percent, but preferrably 10 percent, when the crystal is pumped by the pump beam. It is well known that the human body is comprised of approximately 70% water, with various human tissues containing about 60% to 90% of water, and bone and cartilage containing about 30% to 40% of water. Since the 2.8 micron wavelength has a substantially maximum absorption in water, this 2.8 micron wavelength is the ideal wavelength to use for a large variety of medical laser applications on the human body. A 2.8 micron wavelength laser could be used for precise surgery in such exemplary applications as brain surgery, neurosurgery, eye surgery, plastic surgery, burn treatment and the removal of malignancies.

  1. Temporal Characterization of a Picosecond Laser-Pumped X-ray Laser (for Applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Nilsen, J; Shepherd, R; Shlyaptsev, V; Booth, R; Smith, R; Hunter, J

    2003-11-25

    Compact soft x-ray laser sources are now used routinely for various applications primarily because of their high repetition rate, high photon fluence and short pulse duration characteristics. For some of these applications, for example interferometry of high density laser-produced plasmas, longer optical drive pulses, 6-13 ps (FWHM), have been implemented to maximize the x-ray output and coherence. It is therefore important to know the x-ray laser pulse length, shape and repeatability for these specific experiments as a baseline measurement but also to better understand the temporal behavior as a function of the pumping conditions in general. We report a detailed temporal characterization of the picosecond-driven 14.7 nm Ni-like Pd ion x-ray laser on the Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser at LLNL using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera measurement of a horizontal slice of the near-field x-ray laser pattern. This is measured as a function of the chirped pulse amplification pumping laser conditions, including varying the pump pulse from 0.5-27 ps (FWHM), varying the plasma column length as well as investigating traveling wave (TW) and non-TW irradiation conditions.

  2. AFRL Advanced Electric Lasers Branch - Construction and Upgrade of a 50-watt Facility-Class Sodium Guidestar Pump Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T.; Miller, H.; Stohs, J.; Lu, C.; Baker, J.; Lucero, A.

    The development of a reliable and effective laser source for pumping mesospheric sodium to generate an artificial guidestar has been well documented. From the early achievements with 589nm high-power dye lasers at the Keck and Lick observatories to the ground-breaking 50W CW FASOR (Frequency Addition Source of Optical Radiation) Guidestar at the Air Forces Starfire Optical Range (SOR), there has been intense interest in this technology from both the academic and military communities. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the Air Force Research Laboratorys Advanced Electric Lasers Branch began a project to build, test, verify and deliver an upgraded version of the SOR FASOR for use at the AF Maui Optical Station (AMOS) in the summer of 2010. This FASOR will be similar in design to the existing SOR device and produce 50W of diffraction limited, linearly polarized narrow linewidth 589nm light by combining the output of two injection-locked Nd:YAG ring lasers (operating at 1064nm and 1319nm) using resonant sum-frequency generation in a lithium triborate crystal (LBO). The upgraded features will include modularized sub-components, embedded control electronics, and a simplified cooling system. The first portion of this upgrade project is to reconstruct the current SOR FASOR components and include improved methods of regulating the gain modules of the two injection lasers. In parallel with this effort, the technical plans for the modularization and re-packaging of the FASOR will be finalized and coordinated with the staff at Maui. This presentation will summarize the result of these efforts to date and provide updates on the AMOS FASOR status. Additionally, plans for "next-generation" FASOR upgrades for both SOR and AMOS will also be discussed.

  3. Comparative study of Nd:KGW lasers pumped at 808 nm and 877 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ke; Ge, Wen-Qi; Zhao, Tian-Zhuo; He, Jian-Guo; Feng, Chen-Yong; Fan, Zhong-Wei

    2015-10-01

    The laser performance and thermal analysis of Nd:KGW laser continuously pumped by 808 nm and 877 nm are comparatively investigated. Output power of 670 mW and 1587 mW, with nearly TEM00 mode, are achieved respectively at 808 nm pump and 877 nm pump. Meanwhile, a high-power passively Q-switched Nd:KGW/Cr4+:YAG laser pumped at 877 nm is demonstrated. An average output power of 1495 mW is obtained at pump power of 5.22 W while the laser is operating at repetition of 53.17 kHz. We demonstrate that 877 nm diode laser is a more potential pump source for Nd:KGW lasers.

  4. Effect of dye laser pulse duration on selective cutaneous vascular injury

    SciTech Connect

    Garden, J.M.; Tan, O.T.; Kerschmann, R.; Boll, J.; Furumoto, H.; Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1986-11-01

    The pulsed dye laser at 577 nm, a wavelength well absorbed by oxyhemoglobin, causes highly selective thermal injury to cutaneous blood vessels. Confinement of thermal damage to microvessels is, in theory, related to the laser exposure time (pulsewidth) on selective vascular injury. This study investigates the effect of 577 nm dye laser pulsewidth on selective vascular injury. Nine Caucasian, normal volunteers received 577 nm dye laser exposures at pulsewidths of 1.5-350 microseconds to their skin. Clinical purpura threshold exposure doses were determined in each volunteer, and biopsies of threshold and suprathreshold doses were examined in each volunteer. The laser exposure dose required to produce purpura increased as pulsewidth increased in all 9 subjects (p less than 0.001). This finding corresponds to laser pulsewidths equal to or exceeding the thermal relaxation times for dermal blood vessels. Histologically, vessel damage was selectively, but qualitatively, different for short vs long pulsewidths. Pulsewidths shorter than 20 microseconds caused vessel wall fragmentation and hemorrhage, whereas longer pulsewidths caused no significant hemorrhage. The purpura noted clinically appears to be due to a coagulum of intralumenal denatured erythrocytes. At 24 h, there was marked vessel wall necrosis at all pulsewidths. The short pulsewidths may cause erythrocyte vaporization, rapid thermal expansion, and mechanical vessel rupture with hemorrhage. Long pulsewidths appear to cause thermal denaturation with less mechanical vessel damage. The selective, nonhemorrhagic, vascular necrosis caused by the long-pulsewidth dye laser may lead to a more desirable clinical outcome in the therapy of blood vessel disease processes.

  5. Photophysical and photochemical properties of coumarin laser dyes in amphiphilic media. Technical report, 1 Jan-31 Oct 83

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, G. II; Jackson, W.R.; Kanoktanaporn, S.; Bergmark, W.R.

    1983-10-31

    Photophysical properties of coumarin laser dyes solubilized in aqueous detergent or cyclodextrin solutions have been investigated. Dyes appear to be incorporated in hydrated (hydrogen bonded) sites within detergent micelles. Photodegradation is inhibited for detergent solubilized dye. Electron transfer photochemistry is examined by flash photolysis.

  6. Copper vapour laser with an efficient semiconductor pump generator having comparable pump pulse and output pulse durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurkin, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    We report the results of experimental studies of a copper vapour laser with a semiconductor pump generator capable of forming virtually optimal pump pulses with a current rise steepness of about 40 A ns-1 in a KULON LT-1.5CU active element. To maintain the operating temperature of the active element's channel, an additional heating pulsed oscillator is used. High efficiency of the pump generator is demonstrated.

  7. 7-W single-mode thulium-doped fibre laser pumped at 1230 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Kravtsov, K S; Bufetov, Igor' A; Medvedkov, O I; Dianov, Evgenii M; Yashkov, M V; Gur'yanov, A N

    2005-07-31

    An efficient thulium-doped fibre laser emitting at {approx}2 {mu}m upon pumping into the long-wavelength {sup 3}H{sub 6} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 5} absorption band of Tm{sup 3+} ions is developed. The maximum output power of the single-mode thulium laser pumped at 1230 nm was 7 W at 1956 nm for a pump conversion efficiency of 35%. (lasers)

  8. 2-µm Tm:Lu₂O₃ ceramic disk laser intracavity-pumped by a semiconductor disk laser.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Esa J; Vasileva, Elena; Antipov, Oleg; Penttinen, Jussi-Pekka; Tavast, Miki; Leinonen, Tomi; Okhotnikov, Oleg G

    2013-10-01

    A proof-of-principle study of a 1.97-µm Tm:Lu2O3 ceramic disk laser, intracavity pumped by a 1.2-µm semiconductor disk laser, is presented. The demonstrated concept allows for improved pump absorption and takes advantage of the broad wavelength coverage provided by semiconductor disk laser technology. For thin disk lasers the small thickness of the gain element typically leads to inefficient pump light absorption. This problem is usually solved by using a complex multi-pass pump arrangement. In this study we address this challenge with a new laser concept of an intracavity pumped ceramic thin disk laser. The output power at 1.97 µm was limited to 250 mW due to heat spreader-less mounting scheme of the ceramic gain disk.

  9. Histologic comparison of the pulsed dye laser and copper vapor laser effects on pig skin

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, O.T.; Stafford, T.J.; Murray, S.; Kurban, A.K. )

    1990-01-01

    Albino pig skin was exposed to the copper vapor (CVL) and flash-lamp pulsed dye (PDL) lasers at 578 nm with a 3 mm diameter spotsize over a range of fluences until purpura and whitening were first established. The total irradiation time was the parameter that was varied in order for the CVL to reach the desired fluence. The lowest fluence producing each clinical endpoint was designated the threshold fluence: 34 J/cm{sup 2} was required to produce purpura using the CVL compared to 7.5 J/cm{sup 2} with the PDL laser. Histologically, skin exposed to purpura fluences from the CVL revealed the presence of constricted, disrupted papillary dermal blood vessels with trapped RBC's within them which were unlike those exposed to PDL where the irradiated vessels were dilated and packed with masses of intravascular agglutinated RBC's. The whitening threshold fluences for the CVL and PDL lasers were 67 J/cm{sup 2} and 29 J/cm{sup 2}, respectively. Streaming of epidermal cells and dermal collagen denaturation were observed in CVL irradiated skin, compared to occasional dyskeratotic epidermal cells and focal dermal collagen denaturation following PDL exposure. The mechanisms responsible for the clinical and histologic changes produced by the two laser systems are discussed.

  10. Spectral and generating properties of active laser media based on dye-doped elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezrodnyi, Vladimir; Derevyanko, N.; Ishchenko, Alexander A.; Slobodin, Valeriy V.; Karabanova, Ludmila V.

    2002-12-01

    The advantages of a polyurethane matrix over other polymers, which are widely used as active media for dye lasers, are analzyed. This matrix exhibits the photostability, service life, radiation resistance, conversion efficiency, and homogeneity of the dye distribution that surpass these properties for active media based on polyurethane acrylate, which has close physical and operation properties. These advantages result not only from the milder polymerization conditions but also from a lower probability of the formation of ion pairs and dye aggregates. A substantial suppression of these processes in polyurethane is explained by its greater polarity and solvation ability compared to polyurathane acrylate.

  11. Photoinduced processes in solid polymer solutions of dyes in an interference field of laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sizykh, A G; Tarakanova, E A

    1998-12-31

    An investigation was made of the relationships governing the photochemical mechanism of formation of light-induced gratings in solid polymer solutions of a dye with a high quantum yield of the triplet states. The combined analysis of the results of real and numerical experiments was made for a solution of eosin K in gelatin. The protonation rate constant of the dye was measured and the dependence of the diffraction efficiency on the duration of irradiation was explained taking diffusion of the dye into account. A method was proposed for determination of the duffusion coefficient in a spatially modified interference field of the laser radiation. The diffusion coefficients were found. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. 100  J-level nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Saumyabrata; Mason, Paul D; Ertel, Klaus; Jonathan Phillips, P; De Vido, Mariastefania; Chekhlov, Oleg; Divoky, Martin; Pilar, Jan; Smith, Jodie; Butcher, Thomas; Lintern, Andrew; Tomlinson, Steph; Shaikh, Waseem; Hooker, Chris; Lucianetti, Antonio; Hernandez-Gomez, Cristina; Mocek, Tomas; Edwards, Chris; Collier, John L

    2016-05-01

    We report on the successful demonstration of a 100 J-level, diode pumped solid state laser based on cryogenic gas cooled, multi-slab ceramic Yb:YAG amplifier technology. When operated at 175 K, the system delivered a pulse energy of 107 J at a 1 Hz repetition rate and 10 ns pulse duration, pumped by 506 J of diode energy at 940 nm, corresponding to an optical-to-optical efficiency of 21%. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest energy obtained from a nanosecond pulsed diode pumped solid state laser. This demonstration confirms the energy scalability of the diode pumped optical laser for experiments laser architecture.

  13. Low-threshold terahertz molecular laser optically pumped by a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagies, A.; Ducournau, G.; Lampin, J.-F.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a low-threshold, compact, room temperature, and continuous-wave terahertz molecular laser optically pumped by a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser. These characteristics are obtained, thanks to large dipole transitions of the active medium: NH3 (ammonia) in gas state. The low-power (<60 mW) laser pumping excites the molecules, thanks to intense mid-infrared transitions around 10.3 μm. The molecules de-excite by stimulated emission on pure inversion "umbrella-mode" quantum transitions allowed by the tunnel effect. The tunability of the quantum cascade laser gives access to several pure inversion transitions with different rotation states: we demonstrate the continuous-wave generation of ten laser lines around 1 THz. At 1.07 THz, we measure a power of 34 μW with a very low-threshold of 2 mW and a high differential efficiency of 0.82 mW/W. The spectrum was measured showing that the linewidth is lower than 1 MHz. To our knowledge, this is the first THz molecular laser pumped by a solid-state source and this result opens the way for compact, simple, and efficient THz source at room temperature for imaging applications.

  14. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  15. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er: YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Charles E.; Furu, Laurence H.

    1997-01-01

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 .mu.m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 .mu.m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 .mu.m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 .mu.m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems.

  16. Reliable pump sources for high-energy class lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölz, Martin; Pietrzak, Agnieszka; Kindsvater, Alex; Wolf, Jürgen; Meusel, Jens; Hülsewede, Ralf; Sebastian, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    High-energy class laser systems operating at high average power are destined to serve fundamental research and commercial applications. System cost is becoming decisive, and JENOPTIK supports future developments with the new range of 500 W quasi-continuous wave (QCW) laser diode bars. In response to different strategies in implementing high-energy class laser systems, pump wavelengths of 880 nm and 940 nm are available. The higher power output per chip increases array irradiance and reduces the size of the optical system, lowering system cost. Reliability testing of the 880 nm laser diode bar has shown 1 Gshots at 500 W and 300 μs pulse duration, with insignificant degradation. Parallel operation in eight-bar diode stacks permits 4 kW pulse power operation. A new high-density QCW package is under development at JENOPTIK. Cost and reliability being the design criteria, the diode stacks are made by simultaneous soldering of submounts and insulating ceramic. The new QCW stack assembly technology permits an array irradiance of 12.5 kW/cm². We present the current state of the development, including laboratory data from prototypes using the new 500 W laser diode in dense packaging.

  17. 100W high-brightness multi-emitter laser pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duesterberg, Richard; Xu, Lei; Skidmore, Jay A.; Guo, James; Cheng, Jane; Du, Jihua; Johnson, Brad; Vecht, David L.; Guerin, Nicolas; Huang, Benlih; Yin, Dongliang; Cheng, Peter; Raju, Reddy; Lee, Kong Weng; Cai, Jason; Rossin, Victor; Zucker, Erik P.

    2011-03-01

    We report results of a spatially-multiplexed broad area laser diode platform designed for efficient pumping of fiber lasers or direct-diode systems. Optical output power in excess of 100W from a 105μm core, 0.15NA fiber is demonstrated with high coupling efficiency. The compact form factor and low thermal resistance enable tight packing densities needed for kW-class fiber laser systems. Broad area laser diodes have been optimized to reduce near- and far-field performance and prevent blooming without sacrificing other electro-optic parameters. With proper lens optimization this produces ~5% increase in coupling / wall plug efficiency for our design. In addition to performance characteristics, an update on long term reliability testing of 9XX nm broad area laser diode is provided that continues to show no wear out under high acceleration. Under nominal operating conditions of 12W ex-facet power at 25C, the diode mean time to failure (MTTF) is forecast to be ~ 480 kh.

  18. Measurement of liquid sheet using laser tagging method by photochromic dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Nurrina Binti; Amagai, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Liquid atomization system has been extensively applied as the most significant process in many industrial fields. In the internal combustion engine, the combustion phenomenon is strongly influenced by the spray characteristics of the fuel given by the atomization process. In order to completely understand the whole atomization process, a detail investigation of relations between the liquid jet characteristics and the breakup phenomenon is required. In this study, a non-intrusive method called as laser tagging method by photochromic dye has been developed with aim to study the breakup process of liquid sheet in detail, covering from the behavior in film until disintegrated into ligament and droplets. The laser tagging method by photochromic dye is based on a shift in the absorption spectrum of photochromic dye molecules tagged by ultraviolet laser. The shift results a color change at the tagged region of liquid containing the dye. In this study, the motions of the dye traces were analyzed as the liquid surface velocity. As a result, liquid sheet was found to keep its velocity constantly in film before suddenly increase around broken point. However, it then decreased after broken into droplets. By forming a set of four points of dye traces on the liquid sheet, the change of relative position of the set enabled the measurement of deformation and rotational motion of the liquid sheet. As a result, the normal strain of the liquid sheet parallel to the flow direction depended on the flow behavior of ligament formation.

  19. Modular pump head design of diffused, metal, and hybrid pump geometry for diode-side-pumped high power Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Sundar, R; Ranganathan, K; Hedaoo, P; Bindra, K S

    2016-09-20

    In this paper, we present a comparative study on pump heads for a high power diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser. The pump head is a modular type, which is in the form of discs, with each disc holding three pump diodes kept at 120° with respect to each other. Unabsorbed pump light from the active medium is reflected by reflectors mounted adjacent to the pump diodes. The performance of a high power pump head made of modular discs mounted with specular or diffused type reflectors was studied. Hybrid pump geometry was also investigated, where the pump head is made up of discs loaded with metal and diffused reflectors, alternately. The discs are loaded around the active medium in such a way that successive discs are rotated by sixty degrees with respect to each other. Fluorescence profiles, thermal lensing, laser output power, and M2 values were studied for pump heads made up of metal, diffused, and hybrid type reflectors. All of the pump heads were studied for three different resonator lengths to maximize the output power with the best beam quality. The experimental results show that the diffused reflector-based geometry in a sixty degree rotated configuration produced the maximum output power and best beam quality in terms of the M2 value. PMID:27661579

  20. Diode-pumped Ho:Tm:YLF laser pumping and AgGaSe2 parametric oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Jani, Mahendra G.; Harrell, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    Tuning of both the pump laser, a Ho:Tm:YLF laser operating on the 5 I 7 - 5 I 8 transition, and an AgGaSe2 parametric oscillator has been demonstrated. Tuning of the Ho:Tm:YLF laser is complicated but not frustrated by the existence of both CO2 and H2O lines in the vicinity of the laser transition. Tuning of the parametric oscillator was achieved by tuning of the pump laser. Injection seeding of the parametric oscillator on the nonresonant signal was also demonstrated. In addition, the measured efficiencies of the parametric oscillator were compared by two different methods, measuring the parametric-oscillator output energy and measuring the energy depleted from the pump. By comparison of these measurements, the intrinsic efficiency of the parametric oscillator cab be determined

  1. Efficient 2122  nm Ho:YAG laser intra-cavity pumped by a narrowband-diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haizhou; Huang, Jianhong; Liu, Huagang; Li, Jinhui; Dai, Shutao; Weng, Wen; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-09-01

    We first demonstrate an efficient Ho:YAG laser intra-cavity pumped by a narrowband-diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser. The pump wavelength of the laser diode was selected according to the excitation peak which is also one of the absorption peaks of a 3.5 at. % Tm:YAG crystal and was locked by volume Bragg gratings. In the Tm laser experiment, a maximum output power of 11.12 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 51.6%, was obtained. In the Ho laser experiment, a maximum output power of 8.03 W at 2122 nm with a slope efficiency of 38% was obtained for 24.96 W of diode pump power incident on the Tm:YAG rod. PMID:27607945

  2. Efficient 2122  nm Ho:YAG laser intra-cavity pumped by a narrowband-diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haizhou; Huang, Jianhong; Liu, Huagang; Li, Jinhui; Dai, Shutao; Weng, Wen; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-09-01

    We first demonstrate an efficient Ho:YAG laser intra-cavity pumped by a narrowband-diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser. The pump wavelength of the laser diode was selected according to the excitation peak which is also one of the absorption peaks of a 3.5 at. % Tm:YAG crystal and was locked by volume Bragg gratings. In the Tm laser experiment, a maximum output power of 11.12 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 51.6%, was obtained. In the Ho laser experiment, a maximum output power of 8.03 W at 2122 nm with a slope efficiency of 38% was obtained for 24.96 W of diode pump power incident on the Tm:YAG rod.

  3. Pulsed dye laser application in ablation of vascular ectasias of the larynx: a preliminary animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Peak; Wang, Zhi; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; McMillan, Kathleen; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1995-05-01

    Vascular ectasias (dilatation) and vascular lesions of the larynx are difficult to treat with exciting modalities. Varix (enlarged vessel) of the vocal folds, vocal fold hemorrhage, vascular polyp, hemangioma, intubation or contact granuloma are common problems which disturb voice. Current applications of CO2 laser and cautery often damage the delicate vocal fold cover. The 585 nm dermatologic pulsed dye laser may be an ideal substitute. Two adult canines were examined under anesthesia via microlaryngoscopy technique. Pulsed dye laser (SPTL-1a, Candela Laser Corp., Wayland, MA) energy was delivered via the micromanipulator with the 3.1-mm spot size in single pulses of 6, 8, and 10 Joules/cm2 and applied to the vessels of the vocal folds, epiglottis, and arytenoid cartilage. Endoscopic examination was carried out immediately after the treatment and at 4 weeks postoperatively. The animals were sacrificed at 3 weeks, larynges excised, and whole organ laryngeal section were prepared for histology. Pulsed dye laser thrombosed vessels of the vocal fold using 6 or 8 Joules/cm2. Vascular break and leakage occurred at 10 Joules/cm2. Follow up examination showed excellent vessel obliteration or thrombosis without scarring or injury to the overlying tissues. Histologic examination shows vascular thrombosis without inflammation and fibrosis in the vocal fold cover. Pulsed dye laser may have promise in treatment of vascular lesions of the larynx and upper airway.

  4. Design and development of a high-power LED-pumped Ce:Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Villars, Brenden; Steven Hill, E; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-07-01

    By studying quasi-continuous wave (QCW) operation of a Ce:Nd:YAG solid-state laser directly pumped by LED arrays, we demonstrate the feasibility of direct-LED pumping as an alternative to direct-diode or flashlamp pumping. LEDs emitting either at 460 or 810 nm were used to pump an uncooled Ce:Nd:YAG laser rod (at 30-Hz repetition rate for tens of seconds). Pumping at 460 nm was made possible by the Ce(3+) co-dopant that enables transfer of excitations near to Nd(3+) ions in the YAG lattice. Comparison of these two pumping schemes has allowed for a thorough analysis of the performance and efficiency of this laser system. QCW output energies as high as 18 mJ/pulse are reported, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest output pulse energy achieved by an LED-pumped solid-state laser to date. PMID:26125364

  5. Delivering pump light to a laser gain element while maintaining access to the laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Honea, Eric C.; Payne, Stephen A.

    2001-01-01

    A lens duct is used for pump delivery and the laser beam is accessed through an additional component called the intermediate beam extractor which can be implemented as part of the gain element, part of the lens duct or a separate component entirely.

  6. Laser emission from diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic waveguide lasers realized by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique.

    PubMed

    Salamu, Gabriela; Jipa, Florin; Zamfirescu, Marian; Pavel, Nicolaie

    2014-03-10

    We report on realization of buried waveguides in Nd:YAG ceramic media by direct femtosecond-laser writing technique and investigate the waveguides laser emission characteristics under the pump with fiber-coupled diode lasers. Laser pulses at 1.06 μm with energy of 2.8 mJ for the pump with pulses of 13.1-mJ energy and continuous-wave output power of 0.49 W with overall optical efficiency of 0.13 were obtained from a 100-μm diameter circular cladding waveguide realized in a 0.7-at.% Nd:YAG ceramic. A circular waveguide of 50-μm diameter yielded laser pulses at 1.3 μm with 1.2-mJ energy.

  7. Investigation of absorption saturation in diode end-pumped microchip lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Z.; Chardon, A.; Sanchez, F.; Stephan, G.

    1996-12-31

    Two sorts of microchip laser materials, such as Nd:YVO{sub 4} and Er/Yb:Cr phosphate Kigre glass, are used to perform the experimental study of pump absorption saturation. A spatial-dependent rate equation model has been developed for the simulation, and hence the corresponding absorption saturation intensities are determined, the pump saturation intensity is 840 W/cm{sup 2} in the {pi}-polarization, and 2,200 W/cm{sup 2} in the {sigma}-polarization for the 3% a-cut Nd:YVO{sub 4} crystal for the 810nm pump wavelength, and 130 kW/cm{sup 2} for Er/Yb:Cr phosphate Kigre glass for the 975nm pump wavelength. Based on this nonlinear absorption effect, a high performance LD end-pumped Nd:YVO{sub 4} microchip laser was obtained with a low pump threshold of 3 mW and a high slope efficiency of 50%, while for Er/Yb:Cr phosphate Kigre glass laser, a low pump threshold of 5mW and 20% slope efficiency was obtained when pumped by a Ti:Sapphire laser. All the laser operated in a single transverse mode, and the 1.535{micro}m laser operated at a single longitudinal mode. This study gives a useful guideline to design and to optimize the pump beam radius of LD end-pumped microchip lasers.

  8. Side diode pumped ultra-compact Er:glass laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitkin, Vladimir V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.; Kharitonov, Artem A.; Buchenkov, Vyacheslav A.; Rodionov, Andrey Y.

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate side pumped ultra-compact Q-switched Er:glass laser for rangefinding with 1.4 mJ energy at 1.54 um. Laser diode with 75 W power and 5 ms pulse duration was used. Active medium was enveloped with diffuse reflector. Output pulse energy in free-running mode was 27 mJ with a slope efficiency of 12%. Transparent glass-ceramics containing Co2+:MgAl2O4 nanocrystals were used as a passive gate to ensure Q-switching in an operation temperature range and transverse mode selection. The Q-switch mode had steady operation at 1 Hz repetition rate with thermal effects playing no visible role.

  9. Pulsed hollow-cathode ion lasers: pumping and lasing parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Zinchenko, S P; Ivanov, I G

    2012-06-30

    Optimal discharge conditions have been experimentally found for ion lasers excited in the hollow-cathode discharge plasma by microsecond current pulses by pumping working atoms in secondkind collisions with ions and metastable buffer-gas atoms. Measurements of the output power of krypton ion and zinc-, cadmium-, mercury-, thallium-, copper-, and gallium-vapour lasers in tubes with cathodes of different diameters showed that the pulse power reaches several tens of watts, and the average power obtained with cathodes 2 cm in diameter and a length of 40 cm or more approaches 1 W. Lasing in most media is observed simultaneously at several lines (the multi-wavelength regime). Lasing on a three-component (He - Kr - Hg) mixture is realised in the multi-wavelength regime at blue, red, and IR lines.

  10. CF/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ as a dye laser tuning gas: refractive-index measurements

    SciTech Connect

    McGee, T.J.; Burris, J. Jr.

    1981-10-15

    Freon 12 is used for pressure tuning a dye laser. The frequency doubled dye laser radiation is used to excite the spectrum of NO-..gamma.. bands as a function of pressure and to deduce the index of refraction of the freon. (AIP)

  11. Improving Lifetime of Quasi-CW Laser Diode Arrays for Pumping 2-Micron Solid State Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Meadows, Byron L.; Baker, Nathaniel R.; Barnes, Bruce W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Operating high power laser diode arrays in long pulse regime of about 1 msec, which is required for pumping 2-micron thulium and holmium-based lasers, greatly limits their useful lifetime. This paper describes performance of laser diode arrays operating in long pulse mode and presents experimental data on the active region temperature and pulse-to-pulse thermal cycling that are the primary cause of their premature failure and rapid degradation. This paper will then offer a viable approach for determining the optimum design and operational parameters leading to the maximum attainable lifetime.

  12. Electronically tuned Cr:ZnSe laser pumped with Q-switched Tm:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Yumoto, Masaki; Saito, Norihito; Takagi, Utako; Wada, Satoshi

    2015-09-21

    We demonstrated a Q-switched, Tm:YAG-laser-pumped electronically tuned Cr:ZnSe laser, which was equipped with an acousto-optic tunable filter as a wavelength-tuning element. A tuning range from 2.17 to 2.71 μm and a maximum output energy of 7.9 mJ at 2.41 μm were realized. The energy conversion efficiency reached 34.1% at 2.41 μm. In addition, the Cr:ZnSe laser produced a high-quality beam in the TEM(00) mode. PMID:26406701

  13. Resonantly photo-pumped nickel-like erbium X-ray laser

    DOEpatents

    Nilsen, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    A resonantly photo-pumped X-ray laser (10) that enhances the gain of seve laser lines that also lase because of collisional excitations and recombination processes, is described. The laser comprises an aluminum (12) and erbium (14) foil combination (16) that is driven by two beams (18, 20) of intense line focused (22, 24) optical laser radiation. Ground state nickel-like erbium ions (34) are resonantly photo-pumped by line emission from hydrogen-like aluminum ions (32).

  14. Partially end-pumped Nd:YAG slab laser with a hybrid resonator.

    PubMed

    Du, K; Wu, N; Xu, J; Giesekus, J; Loosen, P; Poprawe, R

    1998-03-01

    A Nd:YAG slab is partially end pumped by a diode laser stack with three diode laser bars. The pumped volume has a rectangular cross section. A hybrid resonator, which is stable in the plane of small dimension and is off-axis unstable in the plane of large dimension of the gain cross section, was used to yield highly efficient laser operation at diffraction-limited beam quality. The laser design and experimental results are reported. PMID:18084515

  15. Partially end-pumped Nd:YAG slab laser with a hybrid resonator.

    PubMed

    Du, K; Wu, N; Xu, J; Giesekus, J; Loosen, P; Poprawe, R

    1998-03-01

    A Nd:YAG slab is partially end pumped by a diode laser stack with three diode laser bars. The pumped volume has a rectangular cross section. A hybrid resonator, which is stable in the plane of small dimension and is off-axis unstable in the plane of large dimension of the gain cross section, was used to yield highly efficient laser operation at diffraction-limited beam quality. The laser design and experimental results are reported.

  16. Observation of atmospheric ozone by dial with Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, M.; Shibata, T.

    1986-01-01

    Since the XeCl excimer laser (308 nm) was first used in Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for stratospheric ozone detection, the XeCl ozone lidar became a useful tool for the monitoring of the stratospheric ozone concentration. Shorter wavelength lasers are needed for the observation of ozone in the troposphere where the ozone concentration is about one order of magnitude smaller than in the stratosphere. In 1983, tropospheric ozone was observed with the combination of the second Stokes line (290.4 nm) of stimulated Raman scattering from methane pumped by a KrF laser and the XeCl laser line. The measurement of the ozone distribution from ground to 30 km was reported, using three Stokes lines of Raman lasers pumped by a KrF laser. At wavelengths shorter than 295 nm, the background solar radiation is effectively suppressed by atmospheric ozone. Such a solar-blind effect can be expected when two wavelengths 277 and 290.4 nm are used for DIAL ozone detection. A preliminary measurement of the day time ozone distribution in the troposphere is presented using these wavelengths generated by a KrF laser with a Raman shifter. Analysis using the lidar equation predicts the maximum detectable range is 7 km.

  17. Tm,Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by a semiconductor diode laser array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, Hamid (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An Ho:YLF crystal including Tm as sensitizers for the activator Ho, is optically pumped with a semiconductor diode laser array to generate 2.1 micron radiation with a pump power to output power of efficiency as high as 68 percent. The prior-art dual sensitizer system of Er and Tm requires cooling, such as by LN2, but by using Tm alone and decreasing the concentrations of Tm and Ho, and decreasing the length of the laser rod to about 1 cm, it has been demonstrated that laser operation can be obtained from a temperature of 77 K with an efficiency as high as 68 percent up to ambient room temperature with an efficiency at that temperature as high as 9 percent.

  18. Modeling of a solar-pumped iodine laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Lee, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    The direct conversion in space of solar radiation into laser radiation for power transmission to earth, satellites, or deep space probes shows promise as a reasonably simple technology and may have cost advantage in deployment and greater reliability compared to other methods of space power generation and transmission. The main candidates for solar pumping are the gas dynamic, photochemical, and direct photoexcited lasers. Here consideration is given to the photochemical reaction of alkyliodides which predominantly excite the I(2P1/2) state which then lases at 1.315 microns. The iodine ground state is eventually lost to reconstituting the gas or in the formation of molecular iodine. The rates at which the gas is required to be recycled through the laser system are modest. The side exposure at 100-fold solar concentration of a 100-m long tube with a 1 sq m cross section is estimated to provide 20 kW of continuous laser output. Scaling laws and optimum operating conditions of this system are discussed.

  19. The energy transfer mechanism of a photoexcited and electroluminescent organic hybrid thin film of blue, green, and red laser dyes.

    PubMed

    Li, Weiling; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yanqiong; Chen, Guo; Cai, Miao; Wei, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Though optically pumped lasing has been realized for years, electrically pumped lasing has not yet been achieved in organic semiconductor devices. In order to make a better understanding of the laser mechanisms of the organic materials, we prepared organic thin films consisting of three efficient laser dyes of a blue emitter, 4″,4″'-N,N-diphenylamine-4,4'-diphenyl-1,1'-binaphthyl (BN), a green emitter, 1,4-bis[2-[4-[N,N-di(p-tolyl)amino] phenyl]vinyl]benzene (DSB), and a red emitter, 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-t-butyl-6(1,1,7,7-tetramethyljulolidy-l-9-enyl)-4H-pyran (DCJTB) with different doping concentrations for the first time to investigate the cascade energy transfer process. The energy transfer schemes in the co-doped thin films in photoluminescence and electroluminescence have been investigated. The results indicated that the DSB molecules acted as a bridge to deliver energy more effectively from the host (BN) to the guest (DCJTB). Meanwhile, the maximum current efficiency (C E) and power efficiency (P E) of the organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) with the emitting layer of lower doping concentration were 13.5 cd/A and 14.1 lm/W, respectively.

  20. Polarization/Spatial Combining of Laser-Diode Pump Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelsinger, Paul; Liu, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    A breadboard version of an optical beam combiner is depicted which make it possible to use the outputs of any or all of four multimode laser diodes to pump a non-planar ring oscillator (NPRO) laser. The output of each laser diode has a single-mode profile in the meridional plane containing an axis denoted the 'fast' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis and a narrower multimode profile in the orthogonal meridional plane, which contains an axis denoted the 'slow' axis. One of the purposes served by the beam-combining optics is to reduce the fast-axis numerical aperture (NA) of the laser-diode output to match the NA of the optical fiber. Along the slow axis, the unmodified laser-diode NA is already well matched to the fiber optic NA, so no further slow-axis beam shaping is needed. In this beam combiner, the laser-diode outputs are collimated by aspherical lenses, then half-wave plates and polarizing beam splitters are used to combine the four collimated beams into two beams. Spatial combination of the two beams and coupling into the optical fiber is effected by use of anamorphic prisms, mirrors, and a focusing lens. The anamorphic prisms are critical elements in the NA-matching scheme, in that they reduce the fast-axis beam width to 1/6 of its original values. Inasmuch as no slow-axis beam shaping is needed, the collimating and focusing lenses are matched for 1:1 iumaging. Because these lenses are well corrected for infinite conjugates the combiner offers diffraction-limited performance along both the fast and slow axes.

  1. Measurement of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed in which a suitably tuned CO2 laser, frequency doubled by a Tl3AsSe37 crystal, was brought into resonance with a P-line or two R-lines in the fundamental vibration spectrum of CO. Cooling or heating produced by absorption in CO was measured in a gas-thermometer arrangement. P-line cooling and R-line heating could be demonstrated, measured, and compared. The experiments were continued with CO mixed with N2 added in partial pressures from 9 to 200 Torr. It was found that an efficient collisional resonance energy transfer from CO to N2 existed which increased the cooling effects by one to two orders of magnitude over those in pure CO. Temperature reductions in the order of tens of degrees Kelvin were obtained by a single pulse in the core of the irradiated volume. These measurements followed predicted values rather closely, and it is expected that increase of pulse energies and durations will enhance the heat pump effects. The experiments confirm the feasibility of quasi-isentropic engines which convert laser power into work without the need for heat rejection. Of more immediate potential interest is the possibility of remotely powered heat pumps for cryogenic use, such applications are discussed to the extent possible at the present stage.

  2. Robust remote-pumping sodium laser for advanced LIDAR and guide star applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstberger, Bernhard; Enderlein, Martin; Friedenauer, Axel; Schwerdt, Robin; Wei, Daoping; Karpov, Vladimir; Leisching, Patrick; Clements, Wallace R. L.; Kaenders, Wilhelm G.

    2015-10-01

    The performance of large ground-based optical telescopes is limited due to wavefront distortions induced by atmospheric turbulence. Adaptive optics systems using natural guide stars with sufficient brightness provide a practical way for correcting the wavefront errors by means of deformable mirrors. Unfortunately, the sky coverage of bright stars is poor and therefore the concept of laser guide stars was invented, creating an artificial star by exciting resonance fluorescence from the mesospheric sodium layer about 90 km above the earth's surface. Until now, mainly dye lasers or sumfrequency mixing of solid state lasers were used to generate laser guide stars. However, these kinds of lasers require a stationary laser clean room for operation and are extremely demanding in maintenance. Under a development contract with the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and W. M. Keck Observatory (WMKO), TOPTICA Photonics AG and its partner MPB Communications have finalized the development of a next-generation sodium guide star laser system which is available now as a commercial off-the-shelf product. The laser is based on a narrow-band diode laser, Raman fiber amplifier (RFA) technology and resonant second-harmonic generation (SHG), thus highly reliable and simple to operate and maintain. It emits > 22 W of narrow-linewidth (≈ 5 MHz) continuous-wave radiation at sodium resonance and includes a re-pumping scheme for boosting sodium return flux. Due to the SHG resonator acting as spatial mode filter and polarizer, the output is diffraction-limited with RMS wavefront error < λ/25. Apart from this unique optical design, a major effort has been dedicated to integrating all optical components into a ruggedized system, providing a maximum of convenience and reliability for telescope operators. The new remote-pumping architecture allows for a large spatial separation between the main part of the laser and the compact laser head. Together with a cooling-water flow of less than 5 l

  3. Two-Pass, Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Slab Laser Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry

    1992-01-01

    Neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) ring-laser head designed for compactness, simplicity, and increased efficiency for side pumping by diode lasers. Laser head includes two linear arrays of diode lasers, two fused-silica collimating rods, and Nd:YAG slab. Slab mounted on finned copper block, providing good thermal dissipation.

  4. High power 2 {mu}m diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.J.; Sutton, S.B.; Honea, E.C.; Skidmore, J.A.; Emanuel, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Using a scaleable diode end-pumping technology developed at LLNL, we have demonstrated a compact Tm:YAG laser capable of generating more than 50 W of cw 2 {mu}m laser output power. The design and operational characteristics of this laser, which was built originally for use in assessing laser surgical techniques, are discussed.

  5. Functional possibilities for forming different inverse population distributions in diode-side-pumped laser heads

    SciTech Connect

    Grechin, S G; Nikolaev, P P; Sharandin, E A

    2014-10-31

    The functional possibilities of diode-side-pumped laser heads of solid-state lasers for forming inverse population distributions of different types are analysed. The invariants determining the relationship between the laser head parameters upon scaling are found. The results of comparative experimental studies are presented. (lasers)

  6. High-power CW diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers and efficient nonlinear optical frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shine, Robert J.; Byer, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    During the interim period of this bridging contract, we have continued to work on the development of high-power cw diode-laser-array-pumped solid-state lasers. Towards that end, we have built lower power lasers in order to test individual components needed for the high-power laser, specifically we have built a 1 watt ring laser and a 5 watt slab laser. The 1 watt laser was used to study the injection locking process while assembling all the necessary electronics. We have demonstrated that it is possible to injection lock a diode-pumped laser using a single piezo-mounted mirror due to the lower intrinsic laser noise compared to an arc-lamp-pumped system. This allows us to optimize the injection locking servo loop and build a more stable locking system. The 5 watt laser was used as a test bed to find a practical way to mount the slab laser while minimizing the losses that occur at the total internal reflection (TIR) points in the slab. After trying many different means of protecting the TIR surfaces, we found that a new product from DuPont, Teflon AF 1600, has all the properties needed to provide a low loss protective coating. Using this material, the laser had a cavity loss of below 2%, which allowed for efficient operation of the laser in a side-pumped design. This laser produced 5 watts of output power with a slope efficiency near 20%.

  7. A nano-patterned photonic crystal laser with a dye-doped liquid crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Doo-Hyun; Morris, Stephen M.; Lorenz, Alexander; Castles, Flynn; Butt, Haider; Gardiner, Damian J.; Qasim, Malik M.; Wallikewitz, Bodo; Hands, Philip J. W.; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.; Coles, Harry J.; Friend, Richard H.

    2013-07-01

    Covering a nano-patterned titanium dioxide photonic crystal (PC) within a well-oriented film of dye-doped liquid crystal (LC), a distributed feedback laser is constructed whereby the emission characteristics can be manipulated in-situ using an electric field. This hybrid organic-inorganic structure permits simultaneous selectivity of both the beam pattern and laser wavelength by electrical addressing of the LC director. In addition, laser emission is obtained both in the plane and normal to the PC. Along with experimental data, a theoretical model is presented that is based upon an approximate calculation of the band structure of this birefringent, tuneable laser device.

  8. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  9. 407 W End-pumped Multi-segmented Nd:YAG Laser.

    PubMed

    Kracht, Dietmar; Wilhelm, Ralf; Frede, Maik; Dupré, Klaus; Ackermann, Lothar

    2005-12-12

    A composite crystalline Nd:YAG rod consisting of 5 segments with different dopant concentrations for high power diode end-pumping is presented. A maximum laser output power of 407 W with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 54 % was achieved by longitudinal pumping with a high power laser diode stack.

  10. High-performace cladding-pumped erbium-doped fibre laser and amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, L V; Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Medvedkov, O I; Lipatov, D S; Vechkanov, N N; Guryanov, Aleksei N

    2012-05-31

    We report cladding-pumped erbium-doped fibre laser and amplifier configurations. Through fibre design optimisation, we have achieved a record-high laser slope efficiency, 40 % with respect to absorbed pump power ({lambda} = 976 nm), and an output power of 7.5 W. The erbium-doped fibre amplifier efficiency reaches 32 %.

  11. The LUCIA project: a high average power ytterbium diode pumped solid state laser chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdet, Gilbert L.; Chanteloup, Jean-Christophe; Fulop, A.; Julien, Y.; Migus, Arnold

    2004-04-01

    With the goal to set up a high average power Diode Pumped Solid State Laser (100 Joules/10 Hz/10 ns), the Laboratory for Use of Intense Laser (LULI) is now studying various solutions concerning the amplifier medium, the cooling, the pumping and the extraction architectures. In this paper, we present the last states of these developments and the solutions already chosen.

  12. Diode end pumped laser and harmonic generator using same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, Robert L. (Inventor); Dixon, George J. (Inventor); Kane, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A second harmonic, optical generator is disclosed in which a laser diode produces an output pumping beam which is focused by means of a graded, refractive index rod lens into a rod of lasant material, such as Nd:YAG, disposed within an optical resonator to pump the lasant material and to excite the optical resonator at a fundamental wavelength. A non-linear electro-optic material such as MgO:LiNbO.sub.3 is coupled to the excited, fundamental mode of the optical resonator to produce a non-linear interaction with the fundamental wavelength producing a harmonic. In one embodiment, the gain medium and the non-linear material are disposed within an optical resonator defined by a pair of reflectors, one of which is formed on a face of the gain medium and the second of which is formed on a face of the non-linear medium. In another embodiment, the non-linear, electro-optic material is doped with the lasant ion such that the gain medium and the non-linear doubling material are co-extensive in volume. In another embodiment, a non-linear, doubling material is disposed in an optical resonator external of the laser gai medium for improved stability of the second harmonic generation process. In another embodiment, the laser gain medium andthe non-linear material are bonded together by means of an optically transparent cement to form a mechanically stable, monolithic structure. In another embodiment, the non-linear material has reflective faces formed thereon to define a ring resonator to decouple reflections from the non-linear medium back to the gain medium for improved stability.

  13. Diode-Laser Pumped Far-Infrared Local Oscillator Based on Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolokolov, K.; Li, J.; Ning, C. Z.; Larrabee, D. C.; Tang, J.; Khodaparast, G.; Kono, J.; Sasa, S.; Inoue, M.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The contents include: 1) Tetrahertz Field: A Technology Gap; 2) Existing THZ Sources and Shortcomings; 3) Applications of A THZ Laser; 4) Previous Optical Pumped LW Generations; 5) Optically Pumped Sb based Intersubband Generation Whys; 6) InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs; 7) Raman Enhanced Optical Gain; 8) Pump Intensity Dependence of THZ Gain; 9) Pump-Probe Interaction Induced Raman Shift; 10) THZ Laser Gain in InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs; 11) Diode-Laser Pumped Difference Frequency Generation (InGaAs/InP/AlAsSb QWs); 12) 6.1 Angstrom Semiconductor Quantum Wells; 13) InAs/GaSb/AlSb Nanostructures; 14) InAs/AlSb Double QWs: DFG Scheme; 15) Sb-Based Triple QWs: Laser Scheme; and 16) Exciton State Pumped THZ Generation. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  14. Master dye laser oscillator including a specific grating assembly for use therein

    DOEpatents

    Davin, J.M.

    1992-09-01

    A dye laser oscillator for producing a tuned dye beam is disclosed herein and includes, among other components, a beam output coupling assembly, a dye cell assembly, a beam expander assembly, an etalon assembly, and a grating assembly. Each of three assemblies is vertically supported from a horizontal base so as to be readily removable from the base without interference from or interfering with the other assemblies. The particular grating assembly disclosed is specifically designed for proper optical alignment with the intended path of the dye beam to be produced and for accurate pivotal movement relative to the beam path in order to function as a coarse tuning mechanism in the production of the ultimately tuned beam. 5 figs.

  15. Master dye laser oscillator including a specific grating assembly for use therein

    DOEpatents

    Davin, James M.

    1992-01-01

    A dye laser oscillator for producing a tuned dye beam is disclosed herein and includes, among other components, a beam output coupling assembly, a dye cell assembly, a beam expander assembly, an etalon assembly, and a grating assembly. Each of three assemblies is vertically supported from a horizontal base so as to be readily removable from the base without interference from or interfering with the other assemblies. The particular grating assembly disclosed is specifically designed for proper optical alignment with the intended path of the dye beam to be produced and for accurate pivotal movement relative to the beam path in order to function as a coarse tuning mechanism in the production of the ultimately tuned beam.

  16. Hair dryer use to optimize pulsed dye laser treatment in rosacea patients.

    PubMed

    Kashlan, Lana; Graber, Emmy M; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-06-01

    Rosacea is a common chronic inflammatory condition characterized by erythema, telangiectasias, papules, and pustules. While there are many effective treatment options for the papulopustular type, laser therapy remains the most effective modality to treat erythematotelangiectatic rosacea. Erythema and flushing associated with rosacea remains an uncomfortable and socially embarrassing problem for patients. Unfortunately, patients often do not have significant erythema or flushing when they present for laser treatment. With this in mind, we propose a novel technique aimed at enhancing the response of rosacea patients being treated for erythema with pulsed dye laser. Specifically, we present a split-face example of our clinical observation that pre-treatment with forced heated air prior to pulsed-dye laser leads to a greater response in rosacea patients with erythema and flushing.

  17. Preliminary results with dye-enhanced selective laser sclerosis of venous varicosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libutti, Steven K.; Oz, Mehmet C.; Chuck, Roy S. H.; Auteri, Joseph S.; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Nowygrod, Roman; Treat, Michael R.

    1990-06-01

    Laser sclerosis (photosclerosis) of veins after injection of wavelength-specific dyes to enhance and localize energy absorption could provide a useful adjunct to current treatment options. To enhance the absorption of 808nm diode laser energy, ear veins of 18 rabbits were infused with 2-3cc of indocyanine green (maximum absorption 805nm) and exposed for 2 to 20 seconds. Animals were sacrificed between 0 and 28 days after operation. Discrete time intervals of laser exposure exist during which various sized vessels can be photosclerosed without significant thermal injury to the overlying tissue. The use of low power, diode lasers, in conjunction with wavelength-specific dyes, may provide a simple, effective, and cosmetically appealling alternative to current treatment options for superficial varicosities of the extremities.

  18. Temporal Behavior of the Pump Pulses, Residual Pump Pulses, and THz Pulses for D2O Gas Pumped by a TEA CO2 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Lijie; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhai, Yusheng; Su, Yuling; Zhou, Fanghua; Qu, Yanchen; Zhao, Weijiang

    2016-08-01

    Temporal behavior of the pump pulses, residual pump pulses, and THz pulses for optically pumped D2O gas molecules was investigated by using a tunable TEA CO2 laser as the pumping source. The pulse profiles of pump laser pulses, residual pump pulses, and the THz output pulses were measured, simultaneously, at several different gas pressures. For THz pulse, the pulse delay between the THz pulse and the pump pulse was observed and the delay time was observed to increase from 40 to 70 ns with an increase in gas pressure from 500 to 1700 Pa. Both THz pulse broadening and compression were observed, and the pulse broadening effect transformed to the compression effect with increasing the gas pressure. For the residual pump pulse, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the main pulse decreased with increasing gas pressure, and the main pulse disappeared at high gas pressures. The secondary pulses were observed at high gas pressure, and the time intervals of about 518 and 435 ns were observed between the THz output pulse and the secondary residual pump pulse at the pressure of 1400 Pa and 1700 Pa, from which the vibrational relaxation time constants of about 5.45 and 5.55 μs Torr were obtained.

  19. High-average-power diode-pumped Yb: YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Avizonis, P V; Beach, R; Bibeau, C M; Emanuel, M A; Harris, D G; Honea, E C; Monroe, R S; Payne, S A; Skidmore, J A; Sutton, S B

    1999-10-01

    A scaleable diode end-pumping technology for high-average-power slab and rod lasers has been under development for the past several years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This technology has particular application to high average power Yb:YAG lasers that utilize a rod configured gain element. Previously, this rod configured approach has achieved average output powers in a single 5 cm long by 2 mm diameter Yb:YAG rod of 430 W cw and 280 W q-switched. High beam quality (M{sup 2} = 2.4) q-switched operation has also been demonstrated at over 180 W of average output power. More recently, using a dual rod configuration consisting of two, 5 cm long by 2 mm diameter laser rods with birefringence compensation, we have achieved 1080 W of cw output with an M{sup 2} value of 13.5 at an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 27.5%. With the same dual rod laser operated in a q-switched mode, we have also demonstrated 532 W of average power with an M{sup 2} < 2.5 at 17% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. These q-switched results were obtained at a 10 kHz repetition rate and resulted in 77 nsec pulse durations. These improved levels of operational performance have been achieved as a result of technology advancements made in several areas that will be covered in this manuscript. These enhancements to our architecture include: (1) Hollow lens ducts that enable the use of advanced cavity architectures permitting birefringence compensation and the ability to run in large aperture-filling near-diffraction-limited modes. (2) Compound laser rods with flanged-nonabsorbing-endcaps fabricated by diffusion bonding. (3) Techniques for suppressing amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and parasitics in the polished barrel rods.

  20. 1.88 Micrometers InGaAsP Pumped, Room Temperature Ho: LuAG Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George; Leisher, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A room temperature, directly diode pumped Ho:LuAG laser oscillated for the first time. Direct pumping of the Ho upper laser manifold maximizes efficiency, minimizes heating, and eliminates Ho:Tm energy sharing. Design and performance are presented.