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Sample records for punctate patterns ofmembrane-bound

  1. TUNABLE TENSOR VOTING FOR REGULARIZING PUNCTATE PATTERNS OFMEMBRANE-BOUND PROTEIN SIGNALS

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro; Bebis, George; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-04-29

    Membrane-bound protein, expressed in the basal-lateral region, is heterogeneous and an important endpoint for understanding biological processes. At the optical resolution, membrane-bound protein can be visualized as being diffused (e.g., E-cadherin), punctate (e.g., connexin), or simultaneously diffused and punctate as a result of sample preparation or conditioning. Furthermore, there is a significant amount of heterogeneity as a result of technical and biological variations. This paper aims at enhancing membrane-bound proteins that are expressed between epithelial cells so that quantitative analysis can be enabled on a cell-by-cell basis. We propose a method to detect and enhance membrane-bound protein signal from noisy images. More precisely, we build upon the tensor voting framework in order to produce an efficient method to detect and refine perceptually interesting linear structures in images. The novelty of the proposed method is in its iterative tuning of the tensor voting fields, which allows the concentration of the votes only over areas of interest. The method is shown to produce high quality enhancements of membrane-bound protein signals with combined punctate and diffused characteristics. Experimental results demonstrate the benefits of using tunable tensor voting for enhancing and differentiating cell-cell adhesion mediated by integral cell membrane protein.

  2. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gregory R; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K; Murphy, Robert F

    2015-12-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply "vesicular". We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors.

  3. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply “vesicular”. We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors. PMID:26624011

  4. Punctate Porokeratosis Palmaris et Plantaris

    PubMed Central

    Lanka, Padmavathy; Lanka, Lakshmana Rao; Manivachagam, Dhanalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Porokeratosis, a keratinization disorder, is probably a group of unrelated conditions with same distinctive histological appearance, featuring cornoid lamellae. A case of punctate porkeratosis in a 24 year old male patient is reported for its rarity. PMID:26120157

  5. Unilateral punctate porokeratosis - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Vera Barreto; Reis, José Pedro; Vieira, Ricardo; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2013-01-01

    This case report involves a 20-year-old man with unilateral punctate porokeratosis. The patient presented an 8-year history of numerous asymptomatic keratotic papules and pits with linear distribution on his left pal-mar surface and fifth finger of the left hand. Histopathological examination of the keratotic plug revealed findings of distinct epidermal depressions containing cornoid lamellae. This report review draws attention to differential diagnoses of punctate porokeratosis. PMID:23793192

  6. Unilateral punctate porokeratosis -- case report.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Vera Barreto; Reis, José Pedro; Vieira, Ricardo; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2013-01-01

    This case report involves a 20-year-old man with unilateral punctate porokeratosis. The patient presented an 8-year history of numerous asymptomatic keratotic papules and pits with linear distribution on his left pal-mar surface and fifth finger of the left hand. Histopathological examination of the keratotic plug revealed findings of distinct epidermal depressions containing cornoid lamellae. This report review draws attention to differential diagnoses of punctate porokeratosis.

  7. Characterization of Extensive Microstructural Variations Associated with Punctate White Matter Lesions in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Gao, J; Wang, M; Zheng, J; Li, Y; Hui, E S; Wan, M; Yang, J

    2017-06-01

    Punctate white matter lesions are common in preterm neonates. Neurodevelopmental outcomes of the neonates are related to the degree of extension. This study aimed to characterize the extent of microstructural variations for different punctate white matter lesion grades. Preterm neonates with punctate white matter lesions were divided into 3 grades (from mild to severe: grades I-III). DTI-derived fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity between patients with punctate white matter lesions and controls were compared with Tract-Based Spatial Statistics and tract-quantification methods. Thirty-three preterm neonates with punctate white matter lesions and 33 matched controls were enrolled. There were 15, 9, and 9 patients, respectively, in grades I, II, and III. Punctate white matter lesions were mainly located in white matter adjacent to the lateral ventricles, especially regions lateral to the trigone, posterior horns, and centrum semiovale and/or corona radiata. Extensive microstructural changes were observed in neonates with grade III punctate white matter lesions, while no significant changes in DTI metrics were found for grades I and II. A pattern of increased axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, and reduced/unchanged fractional anisotropy was found in regions adjacent to punctate white matter lesion sites seen on T1WI and T2WI. Unchanged axial diffusivity, increased radial diffusivity, and reduced/unchanged fractional anisotropy were observed in regions distant from punctate white matter lesion sites. White matter microstructural variations were different across punctate white matter lesion grades. Extensive change patterns varied according to the distance to the lesion sites in neonates with severe punctate white matter lesions. These findings may help in determining the outcomes of punctate white matter lesions and selecting treatment strategies. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  8. PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 Is a Novel Maize Gene Required for Leaf Pattern Formation That Functions Downstream of the Trans-Acting Small Interfering RNA Pathway1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Douglas, Ryan N.; Strable, Josh; Lee, Michelle; Buckner, Brent; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Schnable, Patrick S.; Timmermans, Marja C.P.; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The maize (Zea mays) gene RAGGED SEEDLING2-R (RGD2-R) encodes an ARGONAUTE7-like protein required for the biogenesis of trans-acting small interfering RNA, which regulates the accumulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3A transcripts in shoots. Although dorsiventral polarity is established in the narrow and cylindrical leaves of rgd2-R mutant plants, swapping of adaxial/abaxial epidermal identity occurs and suggests a model wherein RGD2 is required to coordinate dorsiventral and mediolateral patterning in maize leaves. Laser microdissection-microarray analyses of the rgd2-R mutant shoot apical meristem identified a novel gene, PUNCTATE VASCULAR EXPRESSION1 (PVE1), that is down-regulated in rgd2-R mutant apices. Transcripts of PVE1 provide an early molecular marker for vascular morphogenesis. Reverse genetic analyses suggest that PVE1 functions during vascular development and in mediolateral and dorsiventral patterning of maize leaves. Molecular genetic analyses of PVE1 and of rgd2-R;pve1-M2 double mutants suggest a model wherein PVE1 functions downstream of RGD2 in a pathway that intersects and interacts with the trans-acting small interfering RNA pathway. PMID:22669891

  9. Punctate follicular porokeratosis: clinical and pathologic features.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Ritika; Wile, Anna; King, Joy; Ward, Kimberley H M; Brodell, Robert T

    2015-11-01

    Porokeratosis is a disorder of keratinization characterized by an abnormal cornoid lamella surrounding an annular, scaly plaque with an atrophic center. A histologic variant of this condition has been proposed, termed follicular porokeratosis, in cases where follicular involvement was contiguous with an annular cornoid lamella. There has been only 1 report of punctate follicular porokeratosis, in which cornoid lamellae originated exclusively from hair follicles with no associated annular plaque. The authors present the second case of punctate follicular porokeratosis, further supporting the contention that this entity is a unique form of porokeratosis rather than a histologic variant. A 56-year-old African American female presented to the dermatology clinic with a 3-month history of keratotic lesions localized on the right posterior shoulder. Examination revealed an area of perifollicular keratotic papules, each surrounded by an erythematous rim. Histopathology revealed a cornoid lamella originating within a hair follicle, with the parakeratotic column protruding through the follicular orifice. The static nature of the condition along with exclusive involvement of hair follicles supports the notion of punctate follicular porokeratosis as a distinct clinical entity. The diagnosis of this condition relies heavily on proper histopathologic sampling revealing punctate follicular cornoid lamellae.

  10. Unilateral Punctate Keratitis Secondary to Wallenberg Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boto, Ana; Del Hierro, Almudena; Capote, Maria; Noval, Susana; Garcia, Amanda; Santiago, Susana

    2014-01-01

    We studied three patients who developed left unilateral punctate keratitis after suffering left-sided Wallenberg Syndrome. A complex evolution occurred in two of them. In all cases, neurophysiological studies showed damage in the trigeminal sensory component at the bulbar level. Corneal involvement secondary to Wallenberg syndrome is a rare cause of unilateral superficial punctate keratitis. The loss of corneal sensitivity caused by trigeminal neuropathy leads to epithelial erosions that are frequently unobserved by the patient, resulting in a high risk of corneal-ulcer development with the possibility of superinfection. Neurophysiological studies can help to locate the anatomical level of damage at the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, confirming the suspected etiology of stroke, and demonstrating that prior vascular involvement coincides with the location of trigeminal nerve damage. In some of these patients, oculofacial pain is a distinctive feature. PMID:24882965

  11. Unilateral punctate keratitis secondary to Wallenberg Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cidad, Pino; Boto, Ana; Del Hierro, Almudena; Capote, Maria; Noval, Susana; Garcia, Amanda; Santiago, Susana

    2014-06-01

    We studied three patients who developed left unilateral punctate keratitis after suffering left-sided Wallenberg Syndrome. A complex evolution occurred in two of them. In all cases, neurophysiological studies showed damage in the trigeminal sensory component at the bulbar level. Corneal involvement secondary to Wallenberg syndrome is a rare cause of unilateral superficial punctate keratitis. The loss of corneal sensitivity caused by trigeminal neuropathy leads to epithelial erosions that are frequently unobserved by the patient, resulting in a high risk of corneal-ulcer development with the possibility of superinfection. Neurophysiological studies can help to locate the anatomical level of damage at the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, confirming the suspected etiology of stroke, and demonstrating that prior vascular involvement coincides with the location of trigeminal nerve damage. In some of these patients, oculofacial pain is a distinctive feature.

  12. Combined treatment in punctate inner choroidopathy

    PubMed Central

    Terelak-Borys, Barbara; Zagajewska, Katarzyna; Jankowska-Lech, Irmina; Tesla, Piotr; Grabska-Liberek, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe a combination treatment for choroidal neovascular (CNV) membrane, secondary to punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC). Patient and methods A 44-year-old female patient was diagnosed with PIC complicated by the development of recurrent juxtafoveal neovascular membrane. The treatment included a sequence of monotherapy regimens: systemic steroid therapy, photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor (anti-VEGF). Owing to the CNV membrane resistance to various types of monotherapy, a combination treatment consisting of local injections of steroid underneath the Tenon’s capsule and intravitreal anti-VEGF injections was used. Results Systemic steroid therapy resulted in rapid local improvement with a very short remission period. No positive effects of photodynamic therapy were observed. Sequential anti-VEGF injections led to remission periods of several months. Permanent regression of CNV membrane was achieved following combined local application of steroid and intravitreal anti-VEGF injections. Conclusion A combination treatment including steroid and anti-VEGF medication characterized by anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic effects may be a very beneficial option for the treatment of recurrent CNV membrane as a complication of PIC. PMID:27729795

  13. Altered glutamatergic metabolism associated with punctate white matter lesions in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Wisnowski, Jessica L; Blüml, Stefan; Paquette, Lisa; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Nelson, Marvin D; Painter, Michael J; Damasio, Hanna; Gilles, Floyd; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Preterm infants (∼10% of all births) are at high-risk for long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities, most often resulting from white matter injury sustained during the neonatal period. Glutamate excitotoxicity is hypothesized to be a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of white matter injury; however, there has been no in vivo demonstration of glutamate excitotoxicity in preterm infants. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we tested the hypothesis that glutamate and glutamine, i.e., markers of glutamatergic metabolism, are altered in association with punctate white matter lesions and "diffuse excessive high signal intensity" (DEHSI), the predominant patterns of preterm white matter injury. We reviewed all clinically-indicated MRS studies conducted on preterm infants at a single institution during a six-year period and determined the absolute concentration of glutamate, glutamine, and four other key metabolites in the parietal white matter in 108 of those infants after two investigators independently evaluated the studies for punctate white matter lesions and DEHSI. Punctate white matter lesions were associated with a 29% increase in glutamine concentration (p = 0.002). In contrast, there were no differences in glutamatergic metabolism in association with DEHSI. Severe DEHSI, however, was associated with increased lactate concentration (p = 0.001), a marker of tissue acidosis. Findings from this study support glutamate excitotoxicity in the pathogenesis of punctate white matter lesions, but not necessarily in DEHSI, and suggest that MRS provides a useful biomarker for determining the pathogenesis of white matter injury in preterm infants during a period when neuroprotective agents may be especially effective.

  14. Punctate keratopathy of West Indians in patients undergoing photorefractive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Revelo, Mario L; Paredes, David; Jaramillo, Luis Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We present two cases of patients with corneal lesions compatible with punctate keratopathy of West Indians who underwent photorefractive keratectomy and laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis. Both had good postoperative results. The corneal lesions did not interfere with the refractive surgery. PMID:23355587

  15. [Clinical analyses of 21 cases of Thygeson's superficial punctate keratitis].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Wang, Zhiqun; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Xuguang

    2015-03-01

    To study the clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of Thygeson's superficial punctate keratitis (TSPK). Twenty-one cases diagnosed as TSPK between June 2010 and July 2013 were retrospectively analyzed, including clinical manifestation, characteristics of morphological changes imaged by laser confocal microscopy, treatment and therapeutic effects. All the 21 cases had the same presentation. Slit lamp examination showed several rough punctate intraepithelial opacities, which were usually slightly above the niveau of the surrounding epithelium. No cases had conjunctival congestions. Eight eyes of five patients with TSPK were imaged with a laser confocal biomicroscope. Clusters of highly reflective dots were revealed in the epithelium. The number of Langerhans cells was greatly increased in the basal cell layer of the focal corneal epithelium and the Bowman's layer in ten eyes affected by TSPK. The density of the subepithelial nerve plexus decreased. Some keratocytes had highly reflective cell bodies of irregular size, orientation, and shape in the anterior stroma in the affected eyes. After treatment with low concentration steroid eye drops and antiviral drugs, punctate opacities in all 21 cases were completely absorbed, leaving no scar, and the cure rate was 100%. But TSPK recurred in four cases. All recurrent cases were cured completely after treatment. Thygeson's superficial punctate keratitis is a kind of chronic recurrent superficial keratitis, without conjunctivitis. Confocal microscopic images have certain specificity, help diagnose and contribute to its pathogenesis research. Local use of low concentration steroid eye drops combined with antiviral drugs is effective for TSPK. Clinicians should pay attention to recurrence of TSPK.

  16. Quantification of punctate iron sources using magnetic resonance phase.

    PubMed

    McAuley, Grant; Schrag, Matthew; Sipos, Pál; Sun, Shu-Wei; Obenaus, Andre; Neelavalli, Jaladhar; Haacke, E Mark; Holshouser, Barbara; Madácsi, Ramóna; Kirsch, Wolff

    2010-01-01

    Iron-mediated tissue damage is present in cerebrovascular and neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Brain microbleeds are often present in these maladies and are assuming increasing clinical importance. Because brain microbleeds present a source of pathologic iron to the brain, the noninvasive quantification of this iron pool is potentially valuable. Past efforts to quantify brain iron have focused on content estimation within distributed brain regions. In addition, conventional approaches using "magnitude" images have met significant limitations. In this study, a technique is presented to quantify the iron content of punctate samples using phase images. Samples are modeled as magnetic dipoles and phase shifts due to local dipole field perturbations are mathematically related to sample iron content and radius using easily recognized geometric features in phase images. Phantoms containing samples of a chitosan-ferric oxyhydroxide composite (which serves as a mimic for hemosiderin) were scanned with a susceptibility-weighted imaging sequence at 11.7 T. Plots relating sample iron content and radius to phase image features were compared to theoretical predictions. The primary result is the validation of the technique by the excellent agreement between theory and the iron content plot. This research is a potential first step toward quantification of punctate brain iron sources such as brain microbleeds.

  17. Point process models for localization and interdependence of punctate cellular structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Majarian, Timothy D; Naik, Armaghan W; Johnson, Gregory R; Murphy, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Accurate representations of cellular organization for multiple eukaryotic cell types are required for creating predictive models of dynamic cellular function. To this end, we have previously developed the CellOrganizer platform, an open source system for generative modeling of cellular components from microscopy images. CellOrganizer models capture the inherent heterogeneity in the spatial distribution, size, and quantity of different components among a cell population. Furthermore, CellOrganizer can generate quantitatively realistic synthetic images that reflect the underlying cell population. A current focus of the project is to model the complex, interdependent nature of organelle localization. We built upon previous work on developing multiple non-parametric models of organelles or structures that show punctate patterns. The previous models described the relationships between the subcellular localization of puncta and the positions of cell and nuclear membranes and microtubules. We extend these models to consider the relationship to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and to consider the relationship between the positions of different puncta of the same type. Our results do not suggest that the punctate patterns we examined are dependent on ER position or inter- and intra-class proximity. With these results, we built classifiers to update previous assignments of proteins to one of 11 patterns in three distinct cell lines. Our generative models demonstrate the ability to construct statistically accurate representations of puncta localization from simple cellular markers in distinct cell types, capturing the complex phenomena of cellular structure interaction with little human input. This protocol represents a novel approach to vesicular protein annotation, a field that is often neglected in high-throughput microscopy. These results suggest that spatial point process models provide useful insight with respect to the spatial dependence between cellular structures.

  18. Punctate hyperfluorescent spots associated with central serous chorioretinopathy as seen on indocyanine green angiography.

    PubMed

    Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Ojima, Yumiko; Yamashiro, Kenji; Ooto, Sotaro; Tamura, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Satoko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine indocyanine green angiography of eyes with central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC). We retrospectively studied the medical records of 39 patients (41 eyes) with active CSC who were <50 years of age. All patients had undergone fluorescein angiography and indocyanine green angiography using a confocal laser scanning system. On indocyanine green angiography, most patients showed choroidal abnormalities, such as filling delay, venous dilation, subretinal leakage, or focal areas of hyperfluorescence, that were attributed to choroidal vascular hyperpermeability. In addition, punctate hyperfluorescent spots were seen in 38 of 41 eyes (93%) with active CSC and in 29 of 37 fellow eyes (78%); these spots were seen in the macular area and outside the vascular arcade or in peripapillary locations, and they often appeared as clusters of distinct spots. A cluster of punctate hyperfluorescent spots was seen on midphase indocyanine green angiography, and focal areas of hyperfluorescence often appeared to expand with time from these punctate hyperfluorescent spots. Focal areas of hyperpermeability in CSC may be derived from the leakage of tiny punctate spots in the inner choroid. Hyperpermeability of these lesions may be involved in the development of serous retinal detachment associated with CSC.

  19. Haploinsufficiency for AAGAB causes clinically heterogeneous forms of punctate palmoplantar keratoderma

    PubMed Central

    Pohler, Elizabeth; Mamai, Ons; Hirst, Jennifer; Zamiri, Mozheh; Horn, Helen; Nomura, Toshifumi; Irvine, Alan D.; Moran, Benvon E.; Wilson, Neil J.; Smith, Frances J. D.; Goh, Christabelle S. M; Sandilands, Aileen; Cole, Christian; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Evans, Alan T.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Masashi; Suehiro, Akihiro; Konohana, Izumi; Shboul, Mohammad; Teissier, Sebastien; Boussofara, Lobna; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Gribaa, Moez; Dopping-Hepenstal, Patricia J.; McGrath, John A; Brown, Sara J.; Goudie, David R.; Reversade, Bruno; Munro, Colin S.; McLean, W. H. Irwin

    2012-01-01

    Palmoplantar keratodermas (PPKs) are a group of disorders that are diagnostically and therapeutically problematic in dermatogenetics1-3. Punctate PPKs are characterized by circumscribed hyperkeratotic lesions on palms and soles with considerable heterogeneity. In 18 families with autosomal dominant punctate PPK (OMIM #148600), we report heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AAGAB, encoding alpha- and gamma-adaptin binding protein p34, at a previously linked locus on 15q22. p34, a cytosolic protein with a Rab-like GTPase domain, was shown to bind both clathrin adaptor protein complexes, indicative of a role in membrane traffic. Ultrastucturally, lesional epidermis showed abnormalities in intracellular vesicle biology. Immunohistochemistry showed hyperproliferation within the punctate lesions. Knockdown of p34 in keratinocytes led to increased cell division, which was linked to greatly increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein expression and tyrosine phosphorylation. We hypothesize that p34 deficiency may impair endocytic recycling of growth factor receptors such as EGFR, leading to increased signaling and proliferation. PMID:23064416

  20. The cytoplasmic sites of the snRNP protein complexes are punctate structures that are responsive to changes in metabolism and intracellular architecture.

    PubMed

    Zieve, G W

    1999-02-25

    Five anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies, Y12, 7.13, KSm4, KSm6, and 128, stain similar discrete punctate structures distributed throughout the cytoplasm of hamster fibroblasts in addition to the expected intense nuclear staining. Several criteria suggest the cytoplasmic staining reflects the cytoplasmic pools of snRNP core proteins. The relative intensity of the cytoplasmic staining is similar to the 30% relative abundance of the cytoplasmic snRNP core proteins compared to the nuclear snRNP core proteins based on cell-fractionation studies. Moreover, the cytoplasmic staining is removed by the same extraction conditions that solubilize the pools of cytoplasmic snRNP core proteins. The cytoplasmic sites of staining are typically spherical but heterogeneous in diameter (0.2-0.5 microm). The larger particles greatly exceed the diameter of individual snRNP core particles and are likely to represent centers of many snRNP proteins or snRNP protein complexes. The staining, though punctate, is evenly dispersed throughout the cytoplasm with no evidence of major compartmentalization. The cytoplasmic staining pattern collapses into larger foci of intensely staining structures when cellular energy levels are depleted or when cells are exposed to hypertonic medium. Unlike the normal sites of snRNP protein cytoplasmic staining, these larger collapsed foci resist detergent extraction. These results suggest that the cytoplasmic staining identified with the anti-Sm monoclonal antibodies represents the large pools of snRNP core proteins in the cytoplasm.

  1. Identification of a locus for type I punctate palmoplantar keratoderma on chromosome 15q22–q24

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Mir, A; Zlotogorski, A; Londono, D; Gordon, D; Grunn, A; Uribe, E; Horev, L; Ruiz, I; Davalos, N; Alayan, O; Liu, J; Gilliam, T; Salas-Alanis, J; Christiano, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: The identification of the molecular basis of disorders of keratinisation has significantly advanced our understanding of skin biology, revealing new information on key structures in the skin, such as the intermediate filaments, desmosomes, and gap junctions. Among these disorders, there is an extraordinarily heterogeneous group known as palmoplantar keratodermas (PPK), for which only a few molecular defects have been described. A particular form of PPK, known as punctate PPK, has been described in a few large autosomal dominant pedigrees, but its genetic basis has yet to be identified. Aim: Identification of the gene for punctate PPK. Methods: Clinical examination and linkage analysis in three families with punctate PPK. Results: A genomewide scan was performed on an extended autosomal dominant pedigree, and linkage to chromosome 15q22–q24 was identified. With the addition of two new families with the same phenotype, we confirmed the mapping of the locus for punctate PPK to a 9.98 cM interval, flanked by markers D15S534 and D15S818 (maximum two point lod score of 4.93 at θ = 0 for marker D15S988). Conclusions: We report the clinical and genetic findings in three pedigrees with the punctate form of PPK. We have mapped a genetic locus for this phenotype to chromosome 15q22–q24, which indicates the identification of a new gene involved in skin integrity. PMID:14684683

  2. [Intravitreal ranibizumab in the treatment of subretinal neovascularization in a case of punctate inner choroidopathy].

    PubMed

    Jiménez, B; Pinilla, I; Cristóbal, J A; Mínguez, E; Pérez, D; Cruz, N; Peiro, C

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 28-year old woman suffering loss of visual acuity in her left eye, who presented an image suggestive of a subretinal neovascular membrane in her left eye, and bilateral retinal lesions compatible with punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC). She was treated with intravitreal ranibizumab obtaining excellent results. The differential diagnosis must be made between PIC and the rest of "white dot syndromes" and the presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS). Antiangiogenic drugs may be a good alternative for the treatment of such diseases when they develop a subretinal neovascular membrane. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Punctate midline myelotomy: a minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of pain in inextirpable abdominal and pelvic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dun; Andrén-Sandberg, Ake

    2007-01-01

    The midline of the dorsal column contains a pathway that may be more important for transmitting visceral nociceptive signals than the spinothalamic tract. Punctate midline myelotomy, a neuroablative operation with the intent of interrupting the midline of the dorsal column, has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of otherwise intractable abdominal and pelvic cancer pain. The indications, technical procedure, outcomes, and complications of all published clinical studies of punctate midline myelotomy are reviewed. The lesion level of the spinal cord and the depth of the incision are discussed, with the focus on the feasibility of this technique.

  4. Choroidal neovascularisation on optical coherence tomography angiography in punctate inner choroidopathy and multifocal choroiditis.

    PubMed

    Levison, Ashleigh L; Baynes, Kimberly M; Lowder, Careen Y; Kaiser, Peter K; Srivastava, Sunil K

    2017-05-01

    To describe the findings seen on optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in patients with punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) and multifocal choroiditis and panuveitis (MCP) complicated by choroidal neovascular membranes. This was an Institutional Review Board-approved prospective, descriptive case series. 12 patients with PIC and MCP complicated by choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) were included. Each patient underwent slit-lamp examination by a uveitis specialist followed by conventional spectral domain OCT imaging of the macula. OCTA images of the macula were then obtained. 12 patients were enrolled in the study, out of which 9 patients were followed longitudinally. CNV was identified in 11 of the 12 patients. In all patients where fluorescein angiography (FA) was inconclusive for presence of CNV, OCTA identified CNV. Various lesions on OCT suggestive of activity correlated with changes in the vascular structure of OCTA to confirm suspicion of clinical activity. In patients with PIC and MCP complicated by CNV, OCTA successfully identified underlying CNV. Given the difficulty of differentiating inflammatory lesions from early CNV on OCT and FA, OCTA may provide a valuable method of monitoring patients with posterior uveitis highly correlated with development of CNV. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Two cases of hereditary benign telangiectasia in Turkey: sporadic occurrence with punctate telangiectasias surrounded by anemic halos.

    PubMed

    Takcı, Zennure; Tekin, Özlem; Tezer, Ayla

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary benign telangiectasia (HBT) is a very uncommon, genetically inherited, benign skin disorder, identified by widespread cutaneous telangiectasias. Herein, we present two sporadic cases of HBT that were admitted to the dermatology clinic for multiple punctate telangiectasias surrounded by anemic halos, favoring sun-exposed areas. These cases had no mucosal or visceral involvement and exhibited no family history of the disorder. The phenotypes of HBT are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. More clinical experience and genetic analyses are needed to understand the basis for the genetic heterogeneity and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations. We aimed to emphasize the hereditary and clinical heterogeneity of HBT by presenting two cases of HBT with punctate telangiectasias surrounded by anemic halos, with a sporadic occurrence.

  6. Chronic Graft-versus-host Disease Presenting with Multiple Punctate Intracranial Lesions on Contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Makoto; Nakamagoe, Kiyotaka; Obara, Naoshi; Ogawa, Shinichi; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sato, Taiki; Nohara, Seitaro; Chiba, Shigeru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system graft-versus-host disease can present quite a diagnostic challenge. We herein present a case of histologically-confirmed chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) involving the central nervous system that occurred at 19 months after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of confluent hyperintensity in the deep/subcortical white matter with multiple punctate and curvilinear gadolinium enhancements, suggesting the disruption of the blood-brain barrier. A brain biopsy revealed perivascular CD3-positive T cell infiltration around the small vessels. We propose that the detection of punctate-enhanced lesions by magnetic resonance imaging may be a useful finding that facilitates the early diagnosis of chronic GVHD involving the central nervous system. PMID:28154284

  7. Automated Grading System for Evaluation of Corneal Superficial Punctate Keratitis Associated with Dry Eye.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, John D; Lane, Keith; Ousler, George W; Angjeli, Endri; Smith, Lisa; Abelson, Mark

    2015-03-03

    Purpose. To develop an automated method of grading fluorescein staining that accurately reproduces the clinical grading system currently in use. Methods. From the slit lamp photograph of the fluorescein-stained cornea, the region of interest was selected and punctate dot number calculated using software developed with the Opencv computer vision library. Images (N=229) were then divided into six incremental severity categories based on computed scores. The final selection of fifty-four photographs represented the full range of scores: nine images from each of six categories. These were then evaluated by three investigators using a clinical 0-4 corneal staining scale. Pearson correlations were calculated to compare investigator scores, and mean investigator and automated scores. Lin's Concordance Correlations (CCC) and Bland Altman plots were used to assess agreement between methods and between investigators. Results. Pearson's correlation between investigators was 0.914; mean CCC between investigators was 0.882. Bland-Altman analysis indicated that scores assessed by Investigator 3 were significantly higher than those of Investigators 1 and 2 (paired t-test). The predicted grade was calculated to be: Gpred=1.48log(Ndots) - 0.206. The two-point Pearson's correlation coefficient between the methods was 0.927 (p<0.0001). CCC between predicted automated score Gpred and mean investigator score was 0.929, 95% C.I. (0.884, 0.957). Bland-Altman analysis did not indicate bias. The difference in standard deviation between clinical and automated methods was 0.398. Conclusion. An objective, automated analysis of corneal staining provides a quality assurance tool to be used to substantiate clinical grading of key corneal staining endpoints in multi-centered clinical trials of dry eye.

  8. A new species of Diplocentrus (Scorpiones: Diplocentridae) with punctate pedipalp surfaces, a diagnostic character within the "mexicanus" group.

    PubMed

    Santibáñez-López, Carlos E; González-Santillán, Edmundo

    2017-05-01

    Diplocentrus duende n. sp. is described based on adult males collected from a locality in the Tehuacán-Cuicatlán Valley, Mexico. This species has punctate pedipalp surfaces, a condition present only in four other species of this specious genus. As suggested here, this condition has evolved independently in these species within the "mexicanus" group of Diplocentrus from the rest of the diplocentrids. Copyright © 2017 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Bilateral and symmetrical palmoplantar punctate keratoses in childhood: a possible clinical clue for an early diagnosis of PTEN hamartoma-tumour syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferran, M; Bussaglia, E; Matias-Guiu, X; Pujol, R M

    2009-07-01

    Palmoplantar punctate keratoses may be the main cutaneous sign of various diseases (porokeratosis punctata palmaris et plantaris, keratosis punctata of the palmar creases, familial punctate palmoplantar keratoderma) or represent a secondary feature [Cowden's syndrome (CS) and Darier's disease]. In CS, such keratoses usually appear during the second and third decades of life, together with other mucocutaneous features. We present the case of a 3-year-old girl with palmoplantar punctate keratoses in whom diagnosis of new-onset CS was suspected only after the development of other cutaneous lesions. Genetic analysis confirmed the diagnosis. This case highlights the necessity to consider CS in the differential diagnosis when palmoplantar punctate keratoses are found, even in paediatric patients. A prompt diagnosis is important in order to monitor the development of possible underlying associated neoplasms.

  10. Punctate inner choroidopathy complicated with exudative neurosensory detachment: A favourable response to treatment with systemic corticosteroids and intravitreal ranibizumab.

    PubMed

    Roca, M; Menezo, M; Ronchera, J M; Esteban, J M; Roca, B

    2017-07-01

    Punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) is a variant of multifocal choroiditis that principally affects young and healthy women. A case of this condition is described in a woman who presented with a scotoma as the main complaint. Four months after the diagnosis of PIC, she developed an exudative neurosensory detachment associated with an active focus of juxtafoveal choroiditis. Finally, with systemic corticosteroids and intravitreal ranibizumab, she made excellent progress. Intravitreal ranibizumab, associated with systemic corticosteroids, may be an effective treatment for exudative neurosensory detachment complicating PIC. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of therapeutic touch on brain activation of preterm infants in response to sensory punctate stimulus: a near-infrared spectroscopy-based study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Noritsugu; Ohgi, Shohei; Wada, Norihisa; Loo, Kek Khee; Higashimoto, Yuji; Fukuda, Kanji

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether therapeutic touch in preterm infants can ameliorate their sensory punctate stimulus response in terms of brain activation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. The study included 10 preterm infants at 34-40 weeks' corrected age. Oxyhaemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) concentration, heart rate (HR), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and body movements were recorded during low-intensity sensory punctate stimulation for 1 s with and without therapeutic touch by a neonatal development specialist nurse. Each stimulation was followed by a resting phase of 30 s. All measurements were performed with the infants asleep in the prone position. sensory punctate stimulus exposure significantly increased the oxy-Hb concentration but did not affect HR, SaO2 and body movements. The infants receiving therapeutic touch had significantly decreased oxy-Hb concentrations over time. Therapeutic touch in preterm infants can ameliorate their sensory punctate stimulus response in terms of brain activation, indicated by increased cerebral oxygenation. Therefore, therapeutic touch may have a protective effect on the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow during sensory punctate stimulus in neonates.

  12. Loss-of-Function Mutations in CAST Cause Peeling Skin, Leukonychia, Acral Punctate Keratoses, Cheilitis, and Knuckle Pads

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhimiao; Zhao, Jiahui; Nitoiu, Daniela; Scott, Claire A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Smith, Frances J.D.; Wilson, Neil J.; Cole, Christian; Schwartz, Mary E.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Wang, Huijun; Feng, Cheng; Duo, Lina; Zhou, Eray Yihui; Ren, Yali; Dai, Lanlan; Chen, Yulan; Zhang, Jianguo; Xu, Xun; O’Toole, Edel A.; Kelsell, David P.; Yang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Calpastatin is an endogenous specific inhibitor of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. Here we show that loss-of-function mutations in calpastatin (CAST) are the genetic causes of an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by generalized peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads, which we propose to be given the acronym PLACK syndrome. In affected individuals with PLACK syndrome from three families of different ethnicities, we identified homozygous mutations (c.607dup, c.424A>T, and c.1750delG) in CAST, all of which were predicted to encode truncated proteins (p.Ile203Asnfs∗8, p.Lys142∗, and p.Val584Trpfs∗37). Immunohistochemistry shows that staining of calpastatin is reduced in skin from affected individuals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed widening of intercellular spaces with chromatin condensation and margination in the upper stratum spinosum in lesional skin, suggesting impaired intercellular adhesion as well as keratinocyte apoptosis. A significant increase of apoptotic keratinocytes was also observed in TUNEL assays. In vitro studies utilizing siRNA-mediated CAST knockdown revealed a role for calpastatin in keratinocyte adhesion. In summary, we describe PLACK syndrome, as a clinical entity of defective epidermal adhesion, caused by loss-of-function mutations in CAST. PMID:25683118

  13. Loss-of-function mutations in CAST cause peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhimiao; Zhao, Jiahui; Nitoiu, Daniela; Scott, Claire A; Plagnol, Vincent; Smith, Frances J D; Wilson, Neil J; Cole, Christian; Schwartz, Mary E; McLean, W H Irwin; Wang, Huijun; Feng, Cheng; Duo, Lina; Zhou, Eray Yihui; Ren, Yali; Dai, Lanlan; Chen, Yulan; Zhang, Jianguo; Xu, Xun; O'Toole, Edel A; Kelsell, David P; Yang, Yong

    2015-03-05

    Calpastatin is an endogenous specific inhibitor of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease. Here we show that loss-of-function mutations in calpastatin (CAST) are the genetic causes of an autosomal-recessive condition characterized by generalized peeling skin, leukonychia, acral punctate keratoses, cheilitis, and knuckle pads, which we propose to be given the acronym PLACK syndrome. In affected individuals with PLACK syndrome from three families of different ethnicities, we identified homozygous mutations (c.607dup, c.424A>T, and c.1750delG) in CAST, all of which were predicted to encode truncated proteins (p.Ile203Asnfs∗8, p.Lys142∗, and p.Val584Trpfs∗37). Immunohistochemistry shows that staining of calpastatin is reduced in skin from affected individuals. Transmission electron microscopy revealed widening of intercellular spaces with chromatin condensation and margination in the upper stratum spinosum in lesional skin, suggesting impaired intercellular adhesion as well as keratinocyte apoptosis. A significant increase of apoptotic keratinocytes was also observed in TUNEL assays. In vitro studies utilizing siRNA-mediated CAST knockdown revealed a role for calpastatin in keratinocyte adhesion. In summary, we describe PLACK syndrome, as a clinical entity of defective epidermal adhesion, caused by loss-of-function mutations in CAST.

  14. Superficial Punctate Keratitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... moisture. When the cause is exposure to ultraviolet light, an antibiotic ointment and an eye drop that dilates the pupil may provide relief. When the cause is a drug reaction or an allergy to eye drops, the drug ...

  15. Evaluation of the progression rate of atrophy lesions in punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) based on autofluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Hua, Rui; Liu, Limin; Chen, Lei

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the autofluorescence (AF) characteristics of punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) and to evaluate the progression rate of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy lesions in PIC using confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Twenty-two eyes of 14 PIC cases and 21 eyes of 21 non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) cases which received retinal coagulation as a control group were enrolled in this study. Enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) and AF were recorded from all patients at 18 months follow-up. The RPE atrophy areas of PIC and laser scars in NPDR were analyzed using the Region Finder software of the Heidelberg Eye Explorer. This software allows direct export of AF images from the database and semi-automated detection of atrophic areas by shadow correction, vessel detection, and selection of seed points. At baseline, both hyperfluorescence and hypofluorescence were observed in the lesions of PIC eyes with a focal elevation of RPE and corresponding disruption of the ellipsoid region of the inner segment ellipsoid zone (EZ). In contrast, hypo-AF was detected when there was a lack of RPE. The mean progression rate of RPE atrophy in PIC and NPDR were 3.735 mm(2)/year (0.056-0.545) and 0.127 mm(2)/year (0.015-0.466), respectively. Compared with the atrophy area in the last visit, the progression rate in PIC was significantly greater than that in NPDR (Z=5.615, P<0.0001). The results of AF reflect the status of PIC and the progression rate of RPE atrophy in PIC, which can be used to predict the progress of PIC noninvasively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians in a Colombian Referral Center and a New Name Proposed: Rice´s Keratopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Jaramillo, Luis C; Paredes, David; Camacho, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : To perform a prevalence study of Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians in Colombian individuals and to propose a new name for the condition. Methods : Prospective, population-based epidemiological study. All patients evaluated between November 1 and December 31, 2012, in the Centro Oftalmológico Virgilio Galvis and Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL), Floridablanca, Colombia, with clinical findings of white corneal opacities corresponding to Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians were identified. Careful slit-lamp examination was performed for clinical diagnosis and findings were reported in the electronic medical record indicating number and location of the lesions. Prevalence was calculated for the total population, and for gender and age groups. Furthermore a literature review was performed and a new name for the condition proposed. Results : In the whole group of patients, prevalence was 1.0%. No one case was diagnosed in a patient younger than 21 year-old. No one lesion was located within 2.5 mm of the corneal apex. 96% of affected patients had unilateral involvement. 58.5% of eyes had a single corneal lesion; 7% of eyes had 6 or 7 corneal lesions. Conclusion : The condition heretofore known as Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians was present in 1% of our patients in Colombia (South America). Thus, this non-infectious, non-inflammatory, asymptomatic ailment of unknown etiology is not restricted to people of Antillean descent, or who have lived in these islands. We propose the new name “Rice's keratopathy". Age and male gender were independent risk factors for the presence of the keratopathy. PMID:25713637

  17. Prevalence of Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians in a Colombian Referral Center and a New Name Proposed: Rice´s Keratopathy.

    PubMed

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Jaramillo, Luis C; Paredes, David; Camacho, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    To perform a prevalence study of Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians in Colombian individuals and to propose a new name for the condition. Prospective, population-based epidemiological study. All patients evaluated between November 1 and December 31, 2012, in the Centro Oftalmológico Virgilio Galvis and Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL), Floridablanca, Colombia, with clinical findings of white corneal opacities corresponding to Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians were identified. Careful slit-lamp examination was performed for clinical diagnosis and findings were reported in the electronic medical record indicating number and location of the lesions. Prevalence was calculated for the total population, and for gender and age groups. Furthermore a literature review was performed and a new name for the condition proposed. In the whole group of patients, prevalence was 1.0%. No one case was diagnosed in a patient younger than 21 year-old. No one lesion was located within 2.5 mm of the corneal apex. 96% of affected patients had unilateral involvement. 58.5% of eyes had a single corneal lesion; 7% of eyes had 6 or 7 corneal lesions. The condition heretofore known as Punctate Keratopathy of West Indians was present in 1% of our patients in Colombia (South America). Thus, this non-infectious, non-inflammatory, asymptomatic ailment of unknown etiology is not restricted to people of Antillean descent, or who have lived in these islands. We propose the new name "Rice's keratopathy". Age and male gender were independent risk factors for the presence of the keratopathy.

  18. Low-dose etretinate shows promise in management of punctate palmoplantar keratoderma type 1: Case report and review of the published work.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Toshifumi; Moriuchi, Reine; Takeda, Masae; Suzuki, Shotaro; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Ito, Takamasa; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Satoko

    2015-09-01

    Punctate palmoplantar keratoderma type 1 (PPKP1) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of keratinization, clinically characterized by punctate keratotic papules affecting the palmoplantar skin. Loss-of-function mutations in AAGAB have recently been reported as a cause of PPKP1. Despite the discovery of the genetic cause of PPKP1, pathogenesis-based therapies are still unavailable. Moreover, little is known about the effectiveness of treatments for PPKP1. In this study, we analyzed a Japanese woman with PPKP1 and identified a novel frame-shift mutation c.195_198del4 (p.Lys66Phefs*43) in AAGAB. Moreover, low-dose etretinate was effective in improving the PPKP1 lesions in our patient. Our published work review identified only eight cases of PPKP1 with successful response to topical or systemic treatments. Notably, six of the cases were successfully treated with systemic retinoids. Thus, this study clearly provides further evidence that PPKP1 is caused by AAGAB mutations and that systemic retinoids are the most promising current treatment for PPKP1.

  19. Patterned charring along the contact points of a metallic locket due to lightning strike.

    PubMed

    Adil, Md Tanveer; Rahman, Rumana; Das, Soumen

    2016-06-01

    Superficial cutaneous burns following lightning strike may vary in patterns ranging from linear burns, punctate burns, feathering burns, and thermal burns. Contact with an extrinsic object in the pathway of lightning current can lead to disastrous consequences. The lucky who survive may show bizarre and interesting burn patterns to tell their story.

  20. Eight Novel Mutations Confirm the Role of AAGAB in Punctate Palmoplantar Keratoderma Type 1 (Buschke-Fischer-Brauer) and Show Broad Phenotypic Variability.

    PubMed

    Giehl, Kathrin A; Herzinger, Thomas; Wolff, Hans; Sárdy, Miklós; von Braunmühl, Tanja; Dekeuleneer, Valérie; Sznajer, Yves; Tennstedt, Dominique; Boes, Pascaline; Rapprich, Stefan; Wagner, Nicola; Betz, Regina C; Braun-Falco, Markus; Strom, Tim; Ruzicka, Thomas; Eckstein, Gertrud N

    2016-05-01

    Punctate palmoplantar keratoderma (PPKP1; Buschke-Fischer-Brauer) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited skin disease characterized by multiple hyperkeratotic papules involving the palms and soles. Mutations have been found at 2 loci, on chromosomes 15q22-15q24 and 8q24.13-8q24.21. We recently identified mutations in 3 families, in the AAGAB gene on 15q, which encodes the alpha- and gamma-adaptin-binding protein p34. The current study examined 14 additional families, comprising a total of 26 affected individuals and identified 8 novel mutations in 9 families. In one family a mutation that was present only in the affected individuals was found, and in 4 other families, previously reported mutations were found (1, 2). These results confirm the role of AAGAB in PPKP1. Our findings suggest that there is no correlation with age, but with mechanical factors. No additional obvious genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, even when comparing different types of mutations. Rather, identical genotypes presented a very broad interfamilial and intrafamilial variability of phenotypes.

  1. Effect of Switching to Travoprost Preserved With SofZia in Glaucoma Patients With Chronic Superficial Punctate Keratitis While Receiving BAK-preserved Latanoprost.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Makoto; Ikeda, Yoko; Mizoue, Shiro; Arakaki, Yoshikuni; Kita, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Satoshi

    2016-06-01

    To assess the effect of switching 1 eye to topical travoprost 0.004% preserved with SofZia (TRAVATAN Z solution) in patients who had chronic superficial punctate keratitis (SPK) in both eyes treated with benzalkonium chloride-preserved latanoprost 0.005% (XALATAN). This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter, open-label, comparative 3-month follow-up study. Patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension who received XALATAN monotherapy for at least 3 months and had SPK in both eyes were enrolled at 9 facilities. For each patient, 1 eye was randomly selected and switched to TRAVATAN Z solution (T-group); the contralateral control eye was treated with XALATAN (X-group). SPK in 5 corneal regions, conjunctival hyperemia, tear breakup time (TBUT), and intraocular pressure (IOP) were examined in a masked manner at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Changes in SPK, hyperemia, TBUT, and IOP were compared within treatment groups and between treatment groups. Fifty-six patients completed the study. The frequency of SPK significantly decreased from baseline in the T-group and the X-group at 1 and 3 months (T-group, P<0.001; X-group, P<0.05). In the T-group, SPK scores were significantly improved in 4 corneal regions, excluding the superior region, at 1 and 3 months (all P<0.05), whereas in the X-group, SPK scores were significantly improved only in the temporal region at 1 month and in the inferior region at 3 months (P<0.05 for both). The total SPK score at 1 and 3 months in the T-group was significantly lower compared with the score in the X-group (P=0.0023 and 0.0102, respectively). The SPK score for the superior and central corneal region at 3 months in the T-group was significantly lower compared with the score in the X-group (P=0.0212 and 0.022, respectively). There were no substantial intergroup or intragroup differences in changes from baseline for hyperemia scores, TBUT, or IOP reduction. Switching therapy from benzalkonium chloride

  2. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  3. Marangoni patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagu, N. Nirmal; Strombom, Evelyn; Palumbo, Daniel; Caicedo, Carlos; Shinbrot, Troy

    2010-11-01

    We study Marangoni patterns that emerge when common food dye is dropped into a dish of shallow water. These patterns consist of tendrils and spots that sharpen over time before eventually fading. We demonstrate that the patterns can be modeled using coupled reaction-diffusion equations, where the "reaction" terms appear due to a nonlinear dependence of surface tension on dye concentration. We show using a spatio-temporal metric that these patterns are distinct from previously described Turing patterns.

  4. Permanent Visual Change Associated with Punctate Foveal Lesions,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    offset of the acuity target, two additional response panels were illuminated, displaying a Landolt ring and and a gapless ring. Positive ... reinforcement (fruit juice) required that the animal depress the correct panel, matching the stimulus target presented. Correct delayed, forced-choice matching

  5. Punctate Vascular Papules on the Tongue and Scrotum

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Pooja; Meena, Dilip; Tanveer, Nadeem; Sharma, Vinod K; Sethuraman, Gomathy

    2012-01-01

    We report a 60-year-old man who presented with a 2-year history of painless red raised lesions involving the tongue and scrotum. Histopathology was suggestive of angiokeratoma. Oral angiokeratomas are most commonly found as a component of the generalized systemic disorder in Fabry's disease or fucosidosis. Our patient had isolated mucosal angiokeratomas which is very rare. PMID:22707780

  6. Foam patterns

    DOEpatents

    Chaudhry, Anil R; Dzugan, Robert; Harrington, Richard M; Neece, Faurice D; Singh, Nipendra P; Westendorf, Travis

    2013-11-26

    A method of creating a foam pattern comprises mixing a polyol component and an isocyanate component to form a liquid mixture. The method further comprises placing a temporary core having a shape corresponding to a desired internal feature in a cavity of a mold and inserting the mixture into the cavity of the mold so that the mixture surrounds a portion of the temporary core. The method optionally further comprises using supporting pins made of foam to support the core in the mold cavity, with such pins becoming integral part of the pattern material simplifying subsequent processing. The method further comprises waiting for a predetermined time sufficient for a reaction from the mixture to form a foam pattern structure corresponding to the cavity of the mold, wherein the foam pattern structure encloses a portion of the temporary core and removing the temporary core from the pattern independent of chemical leaching.

  7. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  8. Desert Patterns

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Desert Patterns - April 13th, 2003 Description: Seen through the "eyes" of a satellite sensor, ribbons of Saharan sand dunes seem to glow in sunset colors. These patterned stripes are part of Erg Chech, a desolate sand sea in southwestern Algeria, Africa, where the prevailing winds create an endlessly shifting collage of large, linear sand dunes. The term "erg" is derived from an Arabic word for a field of sand dunes. Credit: USGS/NASA/Landsat 7 To learn more about the Landsat satellite go to: landsat.gsfc.nasa.gov/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Join us on Facebook

  9. Nucleic acid distribution pattern in avian erythrocytes and mammalian lymphocytes: comparative studies by fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Isitor, G N; Asgarali, Z; Pouching, K

    2008-12-01

    Nucleated erythrocytes of healthy domestic chicken and ducks, and lymphocytes of healthy Sprague Dawley rats were evaluated for nucleic acid distribution pattern, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. The results demonstrate a unique organization of nuclear DNA of mature chicken and duck erythrocytes, as well as immature duck erythrocytes, as delineated spherical nuclear bodies that mostly corresponded with euchromatin zones of the cells in routine Wright-stain blood smears. The nuclear DNA of the rat lymphocytes, on the other hand, was observed as a more diffuse green fluorescing nuclear areas, with punctate variably-sized diffuse areas of RNA red fluorescence. RNA red color fluorescence was also evident in the narrow cytoplasm of the lymphocytes, especially in large lymphocytes, in comparison with the cytoplasm of the mature avian erythrocytes that completely lacked any nucleic acid fluorescence. Nuclear RNA fluorescence was lacking in the mature chicken erythrocytes, compared with those of the mature and immature duck erythrocytes as well as lymphocytes of both avian and rats blood. The significance of these findings lies in the establishment of normal benchmarks for the nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acid pattern in eukaryotic cells. These normal benchmarks become valuable in rapid diagnostic situations associated with pathologies, such as the presence of viral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that can alter the nucleic acid pattern of the host cells, and in conditions of cellular abnormal protein aggregations. Variability of cellular nucleic acid pattern can also aid in prognostic assessments of neoplastic conditions.

  10. Defrosting Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-487, 18 September 2003

    This June 2003 Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows patterns created by defrosting processes on the south polar seasonal ice cap. Seasonal cap refers to the part of the polar cap that comes and goes with the seasons, as opposed to the residual cap, which lasts throughout the summer. The area shown here, in summer, will have no frost. This picture was taken during southern spring. As the seasonal frost begins to sublime away, dark cracks form a polygon pattern, and wind blows material to form varied bright and dark streaks. What is unknown is whether the dark streaks consist of sand and silt from beneath the seasonal frost, or whether they, too, consist of frost that has been transformed into coarse-grained particles that can be mobilized by wind. Alternatively, the streaks represent erosion and removal of frost, rather than deposition of granular material. The bright streaks are most likely made of frost--whether they are water ice or carbon dioxide ice remains to be determined. The bulk of the frosted surface shown here is carbon dioxide ice. The image is located near 87.3oS, 192.4oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  11. Pattern collapse solution for asymmetric pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C. J.; Huang, C. H.; Yang, Elvis; Yang, T. H.; Chen, K. C.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most critical issues associate with decreasing photo-resist feature size is pattern collapse, and more serious pattern collapse can be easily observed especially in asymmetric pitch environment due to unbalanced capillary stress acting on photo-resist pattern during development rinse step. The pattern collapse would kill product yield in the worse condition. This work investigates the approaches of mitigating the asymmetric pattern collapse behavior, such as adjusting photoresist pattern aspect ratio, applying surfactant during development rinse to reduce the solution surface tension, and altering underlying anti-reflection coating and hard-mask combinations to tailor the photo-resist bottom profile as well as decreasing developer permeation into photo-resist interface. Pattern sizing to resist unbalanced capillary force is also explored in the asymmetric pattern region. Two novel layout methods to mitigate asymmetric dummy pattern collapse were demonstrated and both methods were confirmed to have higher immunity against pattern collapse in asymmetric pitch environment.

  12. An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Peter; Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; Bäck, Marcus; Kågedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon; Los, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity towards distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone.

  13. An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Karin; Appelqvist, Hanna; Cieślar-Pobuda, Artur; Bäck, Marcus; Kågedal, Bertil; Jonasson, Jon A.; Los, Marek J.; Nilsson, K. Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity toward distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone. PMID:26501054

  14. Derivative Sign Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  15. Derivative Sign Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the patterns of signs of infinitely differentiable real functions shows that only four patterns are possible if the function is required to exhibit the pattern at all points in its domain and that domain is the set of all real numbers. On the other hand all patterns are possible if the domain is a bounded open interval.

  16. Patterns of Enlisted Compensation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    we documented the patterns of enlisted compensation. Nor did we perform a behavioral analysis of these patterns-that is, we do not explain why the...patterns we observed exist. Rather, our documentation of the patterns is intended to be a baseline description that can serve to identify areas in which future behavioral analysis would be especially fruitful.

  17. Male pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Male pattern baldness is a sex-linked characteristic that is passed from mother to child. A man can more accurately predict his chances of developing male pattern baldness by observing his mother's father than by looking ...

  18. Pattern Formation in Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karma, Alain

    2011-04-01

    Pattern formation is ubiquitous in nature, from sand ripples formed by wind to the development of a complex biological organism with different organs and a central nervous system. In the realm of materials, patterns are formed invariably when matter is transformed between different solid, liquid or gaseous states far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Material failure is itself mediated by the propagation of cracks that form intricate patterns. Understanding how patterns form and evolve is key to design materials with desired properties and to optimize their performance and safety. This talk will discuss recent progress made to understand three distinct class of patterns including the highly branched snow-flake-like dendritic patterns formed during the solidification process, polycrystalline patterns shaped by grain boundaries, and crack patterns.

  19. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  20. Mathematical Pattern Hunters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitin, Phyllis; Whitin, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The habit of looking for patterns, the skills to find them, and the expectation that patterns have explanations is an essential mathematical habit of mind for young children (Goldenberg, Shteingold, & Feurzeig 2003, 23). Work with patterns leads to the ability to form generalizations, the bedrock of algebraic thinking, and teachers must nurture…

  1. Mathematical Pattern Hunters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitin, Phyllis; Whitin, David J.

    2011-01-01

    The habit of looking for patterns, the skills to find them, and the expectation that patterns have explanations is an essential mathematical habit of mind for young children (Goldenberg, Shteingold, & Feurzeig 2003, 23). Work with patterns leads to the ability to form generalizations, the bedrock of algebraic thinking, and teachers must nurture…

  2. Temporal Pattern of the Repeated Bout Effect of Eccentric Exercise on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Michelle A.; Kimura, Iris F.; Sitler, Michael R.; Kendrick, Zebulon V.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the temporal pattern of the repeated bout effect of eccentric exercise on perceived pain and muscular tenderness associated with delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Design and Setting: Subjects completed 2 identical eccentric exercise bouts separated by 6, 7, 8, or 9 weeks. The experiment was conducted in a biokinetics research laboratory. Subjects: Sixteen male and 15 female untrained subjects (age = 24.59 ± 4.42 years, height = 171.71 ± 7.81 cm, weight = 73.00 ± 11.20 kg). Measurements: Two physiologic characteristics of DOMS were measured immediately before and 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after each eccentric exercise bout. Perceived pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS), and muscular tenderness was measured using a punctate tenderness gauge (PTG). Results: Two 4 × 2 × 5 (group × bout × time) analyses of variance with repeated measures on the bout and time factors were performed on the VAS and PTG data. Significant (P < .05) main effects were found for group, bout, and time for the VAS and the PTG data. No significant interactions were detected. Post hoc analysis revealed significantly less perceived pain for the 9-week group than the 8-week group. The 7-week group had significantly less and the 8-week group had significantly more muscular tenderness than any other group. Perceived pain and muscular tenderness were significantly less after exercise bout 2 than after exercise bout 1. All subjects had significantly less perceived pain and muscular tenderness pre-exercise than 0 and 24 hours after the eccentric exercise bouts. Conclusions: An effective prophylaxis for perceived pain and muscular tenderness associated with DOMS is the performance of an eccentric exercise bout 6 to 9 weeks before a similar exercise bout. PMID:12937441

  3. Block Copolymer Thin Films: Patterns and Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Register, Richard A.

    2001-03-01

    The nanostructures ("microdomains") in thin block copolymer films make excellent contact masks for surface patterning on the nanoscale. Using these thin films as templates, we have developed techniques based on reactive ion etching to uniformly and completely pattern the underlying substrate with a dense periodic pattern of dots, holes, or lines, with widths of order 20 nm. In addition, we have fabricated arrays of metal dots by backfilling these holes, and GaAs quantum dots by regrowth onto patterned GaAs substrates. A key issue in this nanopatterning approach is controlling the pattern which forms within the mask. While the local structure of the pattern (e.g., spheres vs. cylinders) is easily controlled through block copolymer composition, the long-range order ("grain size") is more difficult to manipulate. For cylinder-forming diblocks, we find that the correlation length of the microdomains grows as a weak power of annealing time, approximately 1/4. The principal types of defects which destroy the long-range order of the microdomains are disclinations. Sequential AFM images taken on the same region of the film after varying annealing times can be strung together into "movies" (to be shown at the talk) which directly show that the principal mode of defect annihilation (and hence grain growth) is the annihilation of disclination quadrupoles (pairs of +1/2 and -1/2 disclinations). We propose a model for quadrupole annihilation which reproduces the 1/4 exponent. Preliminary results for sphere-forming systems suggest that the exponent there is even lower than 1/4, making it difficult to achieve a significant degree of coarsening by extending the annealing time. * in collaboration with D.H. Adamson, P.M. Chaikin, Z. Cheng, P.D. Dapkus (USC), C.K. Harrison, D.A. Huse, R.R. Li (USC), and M. Park.

  4. Ramadan Major Dietary Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. Results: We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). Conclusions: This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest. PMID:25593728

  5. Ramadan major dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Shadman, Zhaleh; Poorsoltan, Nooshin; Akhoundan, Mahdieh; Larijani, Bagher; Soleymanzadeh, Mozhdeh; Akhgar Zhand, Camelia; Seyed Rohani, Zahra Alsadat; Khoshniat Nikoo, Mohsen

    2014-09-01

    There has been no data on population based dietary patterns during the Ramadan fasting month. The purpose of this study was to detect Ramadan major dietary patterns among those who fast in Tehran. This cross-sectional study included 600 subjects, aged 18-65 with body mass index (BMI) of 18.5-40, who had decided to fast during Ramadan. Anthropometric measurements, usual physical activity level and educational status were collected two weeks before Ramadan. Information on Ramadan dietary intakes was obtained using a food frequency questionnaire and factor analysis was used to identify major dietary patterns. We identified four major dietary patterns: 1) Western-like pattern; high in fast foods, salty snacks, nuts, potato, fish, poultry, chocolates, juices; 2) high cholesterol and high sweet junk food pattern; high in pickles, sweets and condiments, butter and cream, canned fish, visceral meats and eggs; 3) Mediterranean-like pattern; high in vegetables, olive oil, dates, dairy, dried fruits, fruits, red meats, tea and coffee and 4) Ramadan-style pattern; large consumption of Halim, soups, porridges, legumes and whole grains, soft drinks, Zoolbia and Bamieh. Age was positively and inversely associated with Mediterranean-like (P = 0.003; r = 0.17) and Ramadan style (P = 0.1; r = -0.13) dietary pattern, respectively. Pre-Ramadan physical activity level was associated with a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern (P < 0.0001; r = 0.20). This study showed a Ramadan-specific dietary pattern has unique characteristics, which has not yet been identified as a model of dietary pattern. Also, among identified dietary patterns, Mediterranean-like was the healthiest.

  6. Identification and punctate nuclear localization of a novel noncoding RNA, Ks-1, from the honeybee brain.

    PubMed Central

    Sawata, Miyuki; Yoshino, Daisuke; Takeuchi, Hideaki; Kamikouchi, Azusa; Ohashi, Kazuaki; Kubo, Takeo

    2002-01-01

    We identified a novel gene, Ks-1, which is expressed preferentially in the small-type Kenyon cells of the honeybee brain. This gene is also expressed in some of the large soma neurons in the brain and in the suboesophageal ganglion. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction experiments indicated that Ks-1 transcripts are enriched in the honeybee brain. cDNA cloning revealed that the consensus Ks-1 cDNA is over 17 kbp and contains no significant open reading frames. Furthermore, fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Ks-1 transcripts are located in the nuclei of the neural cells, accumulating in some scattered spots. These findings demonstrate that Ks-1 encodes a novel class of noncoding nuclear RNA and is possibly involved in the regulation of neural functions. PMID:12088150

  7. [Punctate cytology of benign and malignant changes in the thyroid gland (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Krisch, K; Jakesz, R; Erd, W; Klement, M B; Feigl, W; Sinzinger, H; Laczkovics, A

    1976-10-22

    80 thyroid gland aspirates obtained post-operatively were compared with 69 clinically punctured cases. The results suggest that the vast majority of cytological misdiagnoses are caused by a faulty withdrawal technique. As a contribution to the differential diagnosis of "follicular neoplasia" an attempt was made to introduce the diameter of the nucelus obtained morphometrically as a parameter of malignancy. In aspirates of highly differentiated follicular carcinomas a significantly higher percentage of thyrocytes with larger nuclear diameters are found than in benign nodular changes in the thyroid gland.

  8. Pattern randomness aftereffect

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuki; Kawabe, Takahiro; Miyazaki, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Humans can easily discriminate a randomly spaced from a regularly spaced visual pattern. Here, we demonstrate that observers can adapt to pattern randomness. Following their adaption to prolonged exposure to two-dimensional patterns with varying levels of physical randomness, observers judged the randomness of the pattern. Perceived randomness decreased (increased) following adaptation to high (low) physical randomness (Experiment 1). Adaptation to 22.5°-rotated adaptor stimuli did not cause a randomness aftereffect (Experiment 2), suggesting that positional variation is unlikely to be responsible for the pattern randomness perception. Moreover, the aftereffect was not selective to contrast polarity (Experiment 3) and was not affected by spatial jitter (Experiment 4). Last, the aftereffect was not affected by adaptor configuration (Experiment 5). Our data were consistent with a model assuming filter-rectify-filter processing for orientation inputs. Thus, we infer that neural processing for orientation grouping/segregation underlies the perception of pattern randomness. PMID:24113916

  9. Making patterns on graphene.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong; Loh, Kian Ping

    2010-08-24

    Graphene-based nanostructures are considered as promising alternatives to silicon-based mesostructures in future electronic nanodevices. The lithographical patterning of graphene, which are essential steps in any form of microelectronic processing, present interesting challenges because of the atomic layer thickness of graphene. Mesoscopic devices based on graphene require high spatial resolution patterning that will induce as little damage as possible. This research news highlights and evaluates recent developments in the nanostructuring and patterning of graphene.

  10. Hierarchical Pattern Classifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, Gigi L.; Eberlein, Susan J.

    1992-01-01

    Hierarchical pattern classifier reduces number of comparisons between input and memory vectors without reducing detail of final classification by dividing classification process into coarse-to-fine hierarchy that comprises first "grouping" step and second classification step. Three-layer neural network reduces computation further by reducing number of vector dimensions in processing. Concept applicable to pattern-classification problems with need to reduce amount of computation necessary to classify, identify, or match patterns to desired degree of resolution.

  11. [The central pattern generators].

    PubMed

    Balaban, P M; Vorontsov, D D; Dyakonova, V E; Dyakonova, T L; Zakharov, I S; Korshunova, T A; Orlov, O Yu; Pavlova, G A; Panchin, Yi V; Sakharov, D A; Falikman, M V

    2013-01-01

    The central pattern generator (CPG) is defined as a set of neurons involved in joint production of patterned motor output. The roundtable discussion on the CPG was a part of the 5th All-Russian Conference on Animal Behavior (Moscow, Nov. 21, 2012). The discussion centred on three core themes: 1) the mechanisms of the organization and reconfiguration of pattern generating neuronal ensembles, 2) extrapolations that extend the CPG concept beyond the motor systems, and 3) evolutionary and developmental aspects of CPG.

  12. Optical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    2008-10-01

    Contributors; Preface; 1. Pattern recognition with optics Francis T. S. Yu and Don A. Gregory; 2. Hybrid neural networks for nonlinear pattern recognition Taiwei Lu; 3. Wavelets, optics, and pattern recognition Yao Li and Yunglong Sheng; 4. Applications of the fractional Fourier transform to optical pattern recognition David Mendlovic, Zeev Zalesky and Haldum M. Oxaktas; 5. Optical implementation of mathematical morphology Tien-Hsin Chao; 6. Nonlinear optical correlators with improved discrimination capability for object location and recognition Leonid P. Yaroslavsky; 7. Distortion-invariant quadratic filters Gregory Gheen; 8. Composite filter synthesis as applied to pattern recognition Shizhou Yin and Guowen Lu; 9. Iterative procedures in electro-optical pattern recognition Joseph Shamir; 10. Optoelectronic hybrid system for three-dimensional object pattern recognition Guoguang Mu, Mingzhe Lu and Ying Sun; 11. Applications of photrefractive devices in optical pattern recognition Ziangyang Yang; 12. Optical pattern recognition with microlasers Eung-Gi Paek; 13. Optical properties and applications of bacteriorhodopsin Q. Wang Song and Yu-He Zhang; 14. Liquid-crystal spatial light modulators Aris Tanone and Suganda Jutamulia; 15. Representations of fully complex functions on real-time spatial light modulators Robert W. Cohn and Laurence G. Hassbrook; Index.

  13. Characterizations of natural patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunaratne, Gemunu H.; Hoffman, David K.; Kouri, Donald J.

    1998-05-01

    Labyrinthine patterns are observed in systems as diverse as animal coats, slime mold colonies, fish scales, and cloud streets. However, even under well-controlled conditions, repetition of an experiment gives structures with vastly different details. A theoretical analysis of ``universal'' aspects of patterns requires a quantitative description that gives similar values for distinct configurations. We introduce a function to characterize the ``disorder'' of labyrinthine patterns that is the same for structures generated under identical control parameters. Furthermore, patterns with different visual characteristics are described by distinct functions.

  14. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Mielke, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress on the development of modeling software, testing software against caclulated data from program VPAP and measured patterns, and calculating roll plane patterns for general aviation aircraft is reported. Major objectives are the continued development of computer software for aircraft modeling and use of this software and program OSUVOL to calculate principal plane and volumetric radiation patterns. The determination of proper placement of antennas on aircraft to meet the requirements of the Microwave Landing System is discussed. An overview of the performed work, and an example of a roll plane model for the Piper PA-31T Cheyenne aircraft and the resulting calculated roll plane radiation pattern are included.

  15. Female-pattern baldness (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Female-pattern baldness is a pattern of hair loss (alopecia) caused by hormones, aging and genetics. Unlike male-pattern baldness, female-pattern baldness is an over-all thinning which maintains the normal ...

  16. Engaging with Islamic Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Islamic patterns were a regular feature in mathematics classrooms, and probably still feature in many wall displays. However, as part of the learning process, these ancient designs appear to have lost any significant contemporary appeal. Here, the power of software is engaged to bring the construction of Islamic type patterns up to date. Forget…

  17. Patterning roadmap: 2017 prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neisser, Mark

    2017-06-01

    Road mapping of semiconductor chips has been underway for over 20 years, first with the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) roadmap and now with the International Roadmap for Devices and Systems (IRDS) roadmap. The original roadmap was mostly driven bottom up and was developed to ensure that the large numbers of semiconductor producers and suppliers had good information to base their research and development on. The current roadmap is generated more top-down, where the customers of semiconductor chips anticipate what will be needed in the future and the roadmap projects what will be needed to fulfill that demand. The More Moore section of the roadmap projects that advanced logic will drive higher-resolution patterning, rather than memory chips. Potential solutions for patterning future logic nodes can be derived as extensions of `next-generation' patterning technologies currently under development. Advanced patterning has made great progress, and two `next-generation' patterning technologies, EUV and nanoimprint lithography, have potential to be in production as early as 2018. The potential adoption of two different next-generation patterning technologies suggests that patterning technology is becoming more specialized. This is good for the industry in that it lowers overall costs, but may lead to slower progress in extending any one patterning technology in the future.

  18. Biologic Patterns of Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granger, Carl V.; Linn, Richard T.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the use of Rasch analysis to elucidate biological patterns of disability present in the functional ability of persons undergoing medical rehabilitation. Uses two measures, one for inpatients and one for outpatients, to illustrate the approach and provides examples of some biological patterns of disability associated with specific types…

  19. Is It a Pattern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how in early mathematics learning, young children are often asked to recognize and describe visual patterns in their environment--perhaps on their clothing, a toy, or the carpet; around a picture frame; or in the playground equipment. Exploring patterns in the early years is seen as an important introduction to algebraic…

  20. Patterned Personality Portraits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surrena, Michelle Flandera

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project she developed for her students. The project emphasizes personality and pattern as the main objectives through a series of steps that include drawing exercises, observation skills, stream-of-color, intense patterning and texturizing, and colored pencil techniques. By drawing down the…

  1. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagherian, A. B.; Mielke, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    Use of calculation program START and modeling program P 3D to produce radiation patterns of antennas mounted on a space station is discussed. Basic components of two space stations in the early design stage are simulated and radiation patterns for antennas mounted on the modules are presented.

  2. Choreographing Patterns and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawes, Zachary; Moss, Joan; Finch, Heather; Katz, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors begin with a description of an algebraic dance--the translation of composite linear growing patterns into choreographed movement--which was the last component of a research-based instructional unit that focused on fostering an understanding of linear functional rules through geometric growing patterns and…

  3. Is It a Pattern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarvey, Lynn M.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how in early mathematics learning, young children are often asked to recognize and describe visual patterns in their environment--perhaps on their clothing, a toy, or the carpet; around a picture frame; or in the playground equipment. Exploring patterns in the early years is seen as an important introduction to algebraic…

  4. Interferometers without fringe patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Malacara-Doblado, Daniel

    1995-08-01

    There are some optical arrangements closely resembling interferometric configurations. These, however, do not produce fringe patterns. An important characteristic of this device is that they do not have two different outputs with complementary patterns, but only one. Two of these configurations are described.

  5. Engaging with Islamic Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugarman, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Islamic patterns were a regular feature in mathematics classrooms, and probably still feature in many wall displays. However, as part of the learning process, these ancient designs appear to have lost any significant contemporary appeal. Here, the power of software is engaged to bring the construction of Islamic type patterns up to date. Forget…

  6. Patterns of Heart Attacks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    36 5.1 Pattern of gradually increasing occurrence of COPD .............................................. 37 5.2 Pattern of...deaths [1]. According to the Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2010 Update from the American Heart Association, the estimated annual incidence of MI...7]. The study combined the insurance claims from the Medicare and the Manitoba Health Services Commission claims database with hospitalization

  7. Patterns in shrinking gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Eriko Sato; Tanaka, Toyoichi

    1992-08-01

    POLYMER gels can undergo a volume phase transition (either continuous or discontinuous) when an external condition, such as temperature or solvent composition, is altered1-3. During this transition, the volume may change by a factor of several thousand, and various patterns develop in the gel. The patterns arising from swelling and shrinking differ in both their appearance and their physical mechanisms. The mechanism for the formation and evolution of patterns on swelling gels has been established as being due to a single kind of mechanical instability4-7 in contrast, the shrinking patterns seem to be sensitive to both the initial and final states of the transition. Here we classify the various shrinking patterns in the form of a phase diagram, and explain the poly-morphism in terms of macroscopic phase separation.

  8. Patterning of cells through patterning of biology.

    PubMed

    Kala, A; Jain, P K; Friedman, S H

    2014-07-01

    For the first time, cells have been patterned on surfaces through the spatial manipulation of native gene expression. By manipulating the inherent biology of the cell, as opposed to the chemical nature of the surfaces they are attached to, we have created a potentially more flexible way of creating patterns of cells that does not depend on the substrate. This was accomplished by bringing an siRNA that targets the expression of pten under the control of light, by modifying it with photocleavable groups. This pten-targeting siRNA has been previously demonstrated to induce dissociation of cells from surfaces. We modified this siRNA with dimethoxy nitro phenyl ethyl photocleavable groups (DMNPE) to allow the activity of the siRNA, and hence pten knockdown, to be toggled with light. Using this approach we demonstrated light dependent cell dissociation only with a DMNPE modified siRNA that targets pten and not with control siRNAs. In addition we demonstrated the ability to make simple patterns of cells through the application of masks during irradiation.

  9. Nurse attendee purchasing patterns.

    PubMed

    Weiss, M D; Savik, K; Kjervik, D K

    1993-01-01

    Retention of nursing professionals is crucial in responding to the increasing demand for and complexity of nursing care. Augmenting the decision-making role of nurses is one important retention-related strategy. Purchasing patterns reflect one aspect of nurses' decision-making role. National meetings provide nurses with an opportunity to investigate educational and employment options, as well as to preview technological advances in patient care products and supplies. Yet, the purchasing patterns of nurses related to the marketing of patient care supplies, or educational material at national meetings have rarely been acknowledged or researched. This study investigated the purchasing patterns of nurse attendees as revealed at a national meeting and how attendance influenced purchasing input following the meeting. The study addressed differences in purchasing patterns between specific groups of nurse attendees, as well as the relationship between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. A descriptive methodology utilizing participant observation at four national nursing meetings and mail survey in four phases was used to determine if there were: (1) identifiable purchasing patterns for nurses attending specific nursing-organization sponsored national meetings, (2) differences in purchasing patterns between nurse attendees from these meetings, (3) differences in self-reported post-meeting purchase input, and (4) relationships between meeting attendance motivators and purchasing patterns. The findings demonstrate that nurse attendee purchasing patterns can be identified and do vary among nursing groups. Nurse attendees at specialty meetings were more likely to act as specifiers, have a more dominant role in purchasing and were more likely to influence product purchases than were nurse attendees from generalist meetings. Self-reports of post-meeting purchasing input demonstrated that nurse attendees utilized information gained at national meetings in

  10. Pattern Formation in Hydrozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berking, Stefan

    The fresh water polyp Hydra is famous for its ability to regenerate missing structures. Even aggregates of single cells transform eventually into normally shaped animals. This indicates a communication within the tissue and within the aggregates which determines the spatial pattern of gene expression. Such pattern-forming systems are thought to play a decisive role in the control of self-organization during embryogenesis. Marine and fresh water hydrozoa appear to allow an access to such a system. Although the molecular components are still mostly unknown, the regulatory properties of the pattern-forming system are increasingly well understood, and this may help eventually to identify the components involved.

  11. Parallel Algorithms and Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, Robert W.

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation on parallel algorithms and patterns. A parallel algorithm is a well-defined, step-by-step computational procedure that emphasizes concurrency to solve a problem. Examples of problems include: Sorting, searching, optimization, matrix operations. A parallel pattern is a computational step in a sequence of independent, potentially concurrent operations that occurs in diverse scenarios with some frequency. Examples are: Reductions, prefix scans, ghost cell updates. We only touch on parallel patterns in this presentation. It really deserves its own detailed discussion which Gabe Rockefeller would like to develop.

  12. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics.

  13. Patterns of Gender Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carol Lynn; Ruble, Diane N.

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive theory of gender development must describe and explain long-term developmental patterning and changes and how gender is experienced in the short term. This review considers multiple views on gender patterning, illustrated with contemporary research. First, because developmental research involves understanding normative patterns of change with age, several theoretically important topics illustrate gender development: how children come to recognize gender distinctions and understand stereotypes, and the emergence of prejudice and sexism. Second, developmental researchers study the stability of individual differences over time, which elucidates developmental processes. We review stability in two domains—sex segregation and activities/interests. Finally, a new approach advances understanding of developmental patterns, based on dynamic systems theory. Dynamic systems theory is a metatheoretical framework for studying stability and change, which developed from the study of complex and nonlinear systems in physics and mathematics. Some major features and examples show how dynamic approaches have been and could be applied in studying gender development. PMID:19575615

  14. Patterns of Organizational Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Ronald G.

    1969-01-01

    Patterns of relationships were identified between indices of organizational conflict and several measures of each of five organizational variables. The measures were adapted from 1500 questionnaires and 600 interviews in 28 public high schools. (Author)

  15. Multiscale conformal pattern transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lodewijks, Kristof; Miljkovic, Vladimir; Massiot, Inès; Mekonnen, Addis; Verre, Ruggero; Olsson, Eva; Dmitriev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a method for seamless transfer from a parent flat substrate of basically any lithographic top-down or bottom-up pattern onto essentially any kind of surface. The nano- or microscale patterns, spanning macroscopic surface areas, can be transferred with high conformity onto a large variety of surfaces when such patterns are produced on a thin carbon film, grown on top of a sacrificial layer. The latter allows lifting the patterns from the flat parent substrate onto a water-air interface to be picked up by the host surface of choice. We illustrate the power of this technique by functionalizing broad range of materials including glass, plastics, metals, rough semiconductors and polymers, highlighting the potential applications in in situ colorimetry of the chemistry of materials, anti-counterfeit technologies, biomolecular and biomedical studies, light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, conformal photovoltaics and flexible electronics. PMID:27329824

  16. Discovering Structure Through Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meconi, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    Patterns in an array of numerals are analyzed; suggestions are given for guided discovery activities leading to a discussion of the properties of identity, closure, commutativity, inverses, and associativity. (DT)

  17. Patterned Colloidal Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2017-09-11

    Colloidal photonic crystals (PCs) have been well developed because they are easy-to-prepare, cost-effective, and versatile to be modified and functionalized. Patterned colloidal PCs contributes a novel approach to constructing high-performance PC devices with unique structures and specific functions. In this review, an overview of the strategies for fabricating patterned colloidal PCs, including patterned substrate induced assembly, inkjet printing, and selective immobilization and modification is presented. The advantages of patterned PC devices are also discussed in detail, for example, the detection sensitivity and response speed of sensors can be improved; the flow direction and wicking rate of the microfluidic channel can be well controlled; cross-reactive molecules can be recognized through array patterned microchip; the display devices with tunable pattern, well-arranged RGB unit, and wide viewing-angle can be fabricated; and several anti-counterfeiting devices with different security strategies can be constructed. Finally, the perspective of future developments and challenges is presented and widely exhibited. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Dynamic Association with Donor Cell Filopodia and Lipid-Modification Are Essential Features of Wnt8a during Patterning of the Zebrafish Neuroectoderm

    PubMed Central

    Luz, Marta; Spannl-Müller, Stephanie; Özhan, Günes; Kagermeier-Schenk, Birgit; Rhinn, Muriel; Weidinger, Gilbert; Brand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt proteins are conserved signaling molecules that regulate pattern formation during animal development. Many Wnt proteins are post-translationally modified by addition of lipid adducts. Wnt8a provides a crucial signal for patterning the anteroposterior axis of the developing neural plate in vertebrates. However, it is not clear how this protein propagates from its source, the blastoderm margin, to the target cells in the prospective neural plate, and how lipid-modifications might influence Wnt8a propagation and activity. Results We have dynamically imaged biologically active, fluorescently tagged Wnt8a in living zebrafish embryos. We find that Wnt8a localizes to membrane-associated, punctate structures in live tissue. In Wnt8a expressing cells, these puncta are found on filopodial cellular processes, from where the protein can be released. In addition, Wnt8a is found colocalized with Frizzled receptor-containing clusters on signal receiving cells. Combining in vitro and in vivo assays, we compare the roles of conserved Wnt8a residues in cell and non-cell-autonomous signaling activity and secretion. Non-signaling Wnt8 variants show these residues can regulate Wnt8a distribution in producing cell membranes and filopodia as well as in the receiving tissue. Conclusions Together, our results show that Wnt8a forms dynamic clusters found on filopodial donor cell and on signal receiving cell membranes. Moreover, they demonstrate a differential requirement of conserved residues in Wnt8a protein for distribution in producing cells and receiving tissue and signaling activity during neuroectoderm patterning. PMID:24427298

  19. Expression pattern of REIC/Dkk-3 in various cell types and the implications of the soluble form in prostatic acinar development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Watanabe, Masami; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Li, Shun-Ai; Edamura, Kohei; Huang, Peng; Yamaguchi, Ken; Nasu, Yasutomo; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Hiroshi; Takei, Kohji; Ueki, Hideo; Huh, Nam-Ho; Li, Ming; Kaku, Haruki; Na, Yanqun; Kumon, Hiromi

    2010-12-01

    The tumor suppressor REIC/Dkk-3 is a secretory protein which was originally identified to be downregulated in human immortalized cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of REIC/Dkk-3 in various cell types to characterize its physiological functions. We first examined the expression level of REIC/Dkk-3 in a broad range of cancer cell types and confirmed that it was significantly downregulated in all of the cell types. We also examined the tissue distribution pattern in a variety of normal mouse organs. Ubiquitous REIC/Dkk-3 protein expression was observed in the organs. The expression was abundant in the liver, heart and brain tissue, but was absent in the spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the subcellular localization of REIC/Dkk-3 had a punctate pattern around the nucleus, indicating its association with secretory vesicles. In cancer cells stably transfected with REIC/Dkk-3, the protein was predominantly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) under observation with confocal microscopy. Because REIC/Dkk-3 was found to be abundantly expressed in the acinar epithelial cells of the mouse prostate, we analyzed the effects of recombinant REIC/Dkk-3 protein on the acinar morphogenesis of RWPE-1 cells, which are derived from human normal prostate epithelium. Statistically significant acinar growth was observed in the culture condition with 10 µg/ml REIC/Dkk-3 protein, implicating the soluble form in prostatic acinar development. Current results suggest that REIC/Dkk-3 may play a role in regulating the morphological process of normal tissue architecture through an autocrine and/or paracrine manner.

  20. Dynamic distribution and formation of a para-sarcomeric banding pattern of prosomes during myogenic differentiation of satellite cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Foucrier, J; Grand, M C; De Conto, F; Bassaglia, Y; Géraud, G; Scherrer, K; Martelly, I

    1999-04-01

    Myogenesis proceeds by fusion of proliferating myoblasts into myotubes under the control of various transcription factors. In adult skeletal muscle, myogenic stem cells are represented by the satellite cells which can be cultured and differentiate in vitro. This system was used to investigate the subcellular distribution of a particular type of prosomes at different steps of the myogenic process. Prosomes constitute the MCP core of the 26S proteasomes but were first observed as subcomplexes of the untranslated mRNPs; recently, their RNase activity was discovered. A monoclonal antibody raised against the p27K subunit showed that the p27K subunit-specific prosomes move transiently into the nucleus prior to the onset of myoblast fusion into myotubes; this represents possibly one of the first signs of myoblast switching into the differentiation pathway. Prior to fusion, the prosomes containing the p27K subunit return to the cytoplasm, where they align with the gradually formed lengthwise-running desmin-type intermediate filaments and the microfilaments, co-localizing finally with the actin bundles. The prosomes progressively form discontinuous punctate structures which eventually develop a pseudo-sarcomeric banding pattern. In myotubes just formed in vitro, the formation of this pattern seems to preceed that produced by the muscle-specific sarcomeric (alpha)-actin. Interestingly, this pattern of prosomes of myotubes in terminal in vitro differentiation was very similar to that of prosomes observed in vivo in foetal and adult muscle. These observations are discussed in relation to molecular myogenesis and prosome/proteasome function.

  1. Dynamic association with donor cell filopodia and lipid-modification are essential features of Wnt8a during patterning of the zebrafish neuroectoderm.

    PubMed

    Luz, Marta; Spannl-Müller, Stephanie; Özhan, Günes; Kagermeier-Schenk, Birgit; Rhinn, Muriel; Weidinger, Gilbert; Brand, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Wnt proteins are conserved signaling molecules that regulate pattern formation during animal development. Many Wnt proteins are post-translationally modified by addition of lipid adducts. Wnt8a provides a crucial signal for patterning the anteroposterior axis of the developing neural plate in vertebrates. However, it is not clear how this protein propagates from its source, the blastoderm margin, to the target cells in the prospective neural plate, and how lipid-modifications might influence Wnt8a propagation and activity. We have dynamically imaged biologically active, fluorescently tagged Wnt8a in living zebrafish embryos. We find that Wnt8a localizes to membrane-associated, punctate structures in live tissue. In Wnt8a expressing cells, these puncta are found on filopodial cellular processes, from where the protein can be released. In addition, Wnt8a is found colocalized with Frizzled receptor-containing clusters on signal receiving cells. Combining in vitro and in vivo assays, we compare the roles of conserved Wnt8a residues in cell and non-cell-autonomous signaling activity and secretion. Non-signaling Wnt8 variants show these residues can regulate Wnt8a distribution in producing cell membranes and filopodia as well as in the receiving tissue. Together, our results show that Wnt8a forms dynamic clusters found on filopodial donor cell and on signal receiving cell membranes. Moreover, they demonstrate a differential requirement of conserved residues in Wnt8a protein for distribution in producing cells and receiving tissue and signaling activity during neuroectoderm patterning.

  2. Patterned laser trabeculoplasty.

    PubMed

    Turati, Mauricio; Gil-Carrasco, Felix; Morales, Adolfo; Quiroz-Mercado, Hugo; Andersen, Dan; Marcellino, George; Schuele, Georg; Palanker, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    A novel computer-guided laser treatment for open-angle glaucoma, called patterned laser trabeculoplasty, and its preliminary clinical evaluation is described. Forty-seven eyes of 25 patients with open-angle glaucoma received 532-nm laser treatment with 100-μm spots. Power was titrated for trabecular meshwork blanching at 10 ms and sub-visible treatment was applied with 5-ms pulses. The arc patterns of 66 spots rotated automatically after each laser application so that the new pattern was applied at an untreated position. Approximately 1,100 laser spots were placed per eye in 16 steps, covering 360° of trabecular meshwork. The intraocular pressure decreased from the pretreatment level of 21.9 ± 4.1 to 16.0 ± 2.3 mm Hg at 1 month (n = 41) and remained stable around 15.5 ± 2.7 mm Hg during 6 months of follow-up (n = 30). Patterned laser trabeculoplasty provides rapid, precise, and minimally traumatic (sub-visible) computer-guided treatment with exact abutment of the patterns, exhibiting a 24% reduction in intraocular pressure during 6 months of follow-up (P < .01). Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Excitability dependent pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakara, Kaumudi; Gholami, Azam; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2014-03-01

    On starvation, the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum emit the chemo-attractant cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) at specific frequencies. The neighboring amoebae sense cAMP through membrane receptors and produce their own cAMP. Soon the cells synchronize and move via chemotaxis along the gradient of cAMP. The response of the amoebae to the emission of cAMP is seen as spiral waves or target patterns under a dark field microscope. The causal reasons for the selection of one or the other patterns are still unclear. Here we present a possible explanation based on excitability. The excitability of the amoebae depends on the starvation time because the gene expression changes with starvation. Cells starved for longer times are more excitable. In this work, we mix cells of different excitabilities to study the dependence of the emergent patterns on the excitability. Preliminary results show a transition from spirals to target patterns for specific excitabilities. A phase map of the patterns for different combinations of excitability and number densities is obtained. We compare our findings with numerical simulations of existing theoretical models.

  4. MSU Antenna Pattern Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, Tsan; Kleespies, Thomas J.; Green, J. Philip

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) antenna pattern data for nine MSU Flight Models (FMs) have been successfully rescued from 22-year old 7-track and 9-track magnetic tapes and cartridges. These antenna pattern data were unpacked into user-friendly ASCII format, and are potentially useful for making antenna pattern corrections to MSU antenna temperatures in retrieving the true brightness temperatures. We also properly interpreted the contents of the data and show how to convert the measured antenna signal amplitude in volts into relative antenna power in dB with proper normalization. It is found that the data are of high quality with a 60-dB drop in the co-polarized antenna patterns from the central peak value to its side-lobe regions at scan angles beyond 30 deg. The unpacked antenna pattern data produced in this study provide a useful database for data users to correct the antenna side-lobe contribution to MSU measurements. All of the data are available to the scientific community on a single CD-ROM.

  5. Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Pattern Conversion Ability: Generating Figural Patterns Based on Number Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiliç, Çigdem

    2017-01-01

    In that current study, pattern conversion ability of 25 pre-service mathematics teachers (producing figural patterns following number patterns) was investigated. During the study participants were asked to generate figural patterns based on those number patterns. The results of the study indicate that many participants could generate different…

  6. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Ioannides, Dimitrios; Lazaridou, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss, or female pattern androgenetic alopecia, is a nonscarring alopecia with a multi-factorial etiology that mostly affects postmenopausal women and is characterized by a reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp. The clinical picture is characterized by a diffuse rarefaction of scalp hair over the mid-frontal scalp and a more-or-less intact frontal hairline without any signs of inflammation or scarring. Although the disease poses only a cosmetic concern, it is chronic and may have a significant negative psychological impact on the affected person. The aim of treating female pattern hair loss is to reduce hair loss and, to a certain extent, succeed in promoting hair regrowth. Various treatment methods are available, but it remains unclear which are the most effective. Early initiation of treatment and the combination of various modalities seem to be more efficacious than monotherapy. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Design Patterns - Past, Present & Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamma, Erich

    Design Patterns are now a 15 year old thought experiment. And today, for many, Design Patterns have become part of the standard development lexicon. This talk looks back to the origin of Design Patterns and how they evolved since their initial description. I will then show patterns in action in the context of the Eclipse and Jazz platforms. Finally, I will discuss how the Design Patterns from the book can be refactored towards a Design Pattern 2.0 version.

  8. Phyllotactic Patterns on Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, Patrick D.; Newell, Alan C.

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate how phyllotaxis (the arrangement of leaves on plants) and the deformation configurations seen on plant surfaces may be understood as the energy-minimizing buckling pattern of a compressed shell (the plant's tunica) on an elastic foundation. The key new idea is that the strain energy is minimized by configurations consisting of special triads of almost periodic deformations. We reproduce a wide spectrum of plant patterns, all with the divergence angles observed in nature, and show how the occurrences of Fibonacci-like sequences and the golden angle are natural consequences.

  9. Patterning flows and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroock, Abraham Duncan

    This thesis presents the use of patterned surfaces for controlling fluid dynamics on a sub-millimeter scale, and for fabricating a new class of polymeric materials. In chapters 1--4, chemical and mechanical structures were used to control the form of flows of fluids in microchannels. This work was done in the context of the development of microfluidic technology for performing chemical tasks in portable, integrated devices. Chapter 1 reviews this work for an audience of chemists who are potential users of these techniques in the development of micro-analytical and micro-synthetic devices. Appendix 1 contains a more general review of microfluidics. Chapter 2 presents experimental results on the use of patterned surface charge density to create new electroosmotic (EO) flows in microchannels; the chapter includes a successful model of the observed flows. In Chapter 3, patterns of topography on the wall of a microchannel were used to generate recirculation in pressure-driven flows. The design and characterization of an efficient mixer based on these flows is presented. A theoretical treatment of these flows is given in Appendix 2. The experimental methods used for the work with both EO and pressure-driven flows are presented in Chapter 4. In Chapter 5, a pattern of asymmetrical grooves in a heated plate was used to perturb Marangoni-Benard (M-B) convection, a dynamic system that spontaneously forms patterned flows. The interaction of the imposed pattern and the inherent pattern of the M-B convection led to a net flow in the plane of convecting layer of fluid. The direction of this flow depended on the orientation of the asymmetrical grooves, the temperature difference across the layer, and the thickness of the layer. A phenomenological model is presented to explain this ratchet effect in which local recirculation was coupled into a global flow. In Chapter 6, surfaces patterned by microcontact printing were used as a workbench on which to build molecularly thin polymer

  10. Secure Design Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Kernighan , Brian W. & Pike, Rob. The Practice of Programming. Addison-Wesley, 1999 (ISBN 020161586X). [Massa 2008] Massa, Jacques. “Migrate an...from Kernighan and Pike’s The Practice of Programming [Ker- nighan 1999] • well-known basic design patterns from [Gamma 1995] 1.2.3 Intended Audience...Developer Shed, March 6, 2007. http://www.devshed.com/c/a/PHP/Validating-User-Input-with-the-Strategy-Pattern/ 61 | CMU/SEI-2009-TR-010 [ Kernighan 1999

  11. Isotropically polarized speckle patterns.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Mikolaj K; Aizpurua, Javier; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Vidal, Xavier; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Sáenz, Juan José

    2015-03-20

    The polarization of the light scattered by an optically dense and random solution of dielectric nanoparticles shows peculiar properties when the scatterers exhibit strong electric and magnetic polarizabilities. While the distribution of the scattering intensity in these systems shows the typical irregular speckle patterns, the helicity of the incident light can be fully conserved when the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of the scatterers are equal. We show that the multiple scattering of helical beams by a random dispersion of "dual" dipolar nanospheres leads to a speckle pattern exhibiting a perfect isotropic constant polarization, a situation that could be useful in coherent control of light as well as in lasing in random media.

  12. Nutritional Patterns of Centenarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mary Ann; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared dietary patterns of 165 older adults. Compared to younger cohorts, centenarians (n=24) consumed breakfast more regularly, avoided weight loss diets and large fluctuation in body weight, consumed slightly more vegetables, and relied on doctors and family for nutrition information. Centenarians were less likely to consume low-fat diets and…

  13. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Female Pattern Hair Loss Share | The most common type of hair loss seen in women is androgenetic alopecia, also ... men, it does not have to be complete hair loss. This is seen as hair thinning predominantly ...

  14. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  15. A Passion for Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venola, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    Popular culture is a relatively new area of study in the artroom, and combining it with the demands of a rigorous curriculum requires some thought. Combining threads from several sources was the key to an exciting exploration of pattern inspired by a newspaper headline. In 2006, a landmark case was settled in Austria, which repatriated five famous…

  16. Patterning of somatosympathetic reflexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Yates, B. J.

    1999-01-01

    In a previous study, we reported that vestibular nerve stimulation in the cat elicits a specific pattern of sympathetic nerve activation, such that responses are particularly large in the renal nerve. This patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes was the same in anesthetized and decerebrate preparations. In the present study, we report that inputs from skin and muscle also elicit a specific patterning of sympathetic outflow, which is distinct from that produced by vestibular stimulation. Renal, superior mesenteric, and lumbar colonic nerves respond most strongly to forelimb and hindlimb nerve stimulation (approximately 60% of maximal nerve activation), whereas external carotid and hypogastric nerves were least sensitive to these inputs (approximately 20% of maximal nerve activation). In contrast to vestibulosympathetic reflexes, the expression of responses to skin and muscle afferent activation differs in decerebrate and anesthetized animals. In baroreceptor-intact animals, somatosympathetic responses were strongly attenuated (to <20% of control in every nerve) by increasing blood pressure levels to >150 mmHg. These findings demonstrate that different types of somatic inputs elicit specific patterns of sympathetic nerve activation, presumably generated through distinct neural circuits.

  17. Storyboards for Meaningful Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubon, Lucille P.; Shafer, Kathryn G.

    2010-01-01

    The initial focus of this kindergarten-level action research project was on identifying which students could create a pattern. The focus then shifted to helping all students successfully achieve this goal. The intervention uses a storyboard where students select colored cubes to represent objects and then snap the cubes together as indicated on…

  18. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  19. Computational Thinking Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  20. Walmsley CVC Patterns Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Sean A.

    Designed to provide a criterion referenced measurement of CVC (consonant vowel consonant) word patterns, this test consists of six subtests of 152 items prepared as slides for projection. Items are to be presented to the subjects on two separate occasions. (This document is one of those reviewed in The Research Instruments Project (TRIP) monograph…

  1. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  2. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Birch, M P; Lalla, S C; Messenger, A G

    2002-07-01

    Female pattern hair loss is a common condition characterized by a diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. The prevalence increases with advancing age. It has been widely thought to be the female counterpart of male balding and is often referred to as female androgenetic alopecia. However, the role of androgens is not fully established. Scalp hair loss is undoubtedly a feature of hyperandrogenism in women but many women with female pattern hair loss have no other clinical or biochemical evidence of androgen excess. Female pattern hair loss is probably a multifactorial genetically determined trait and it is possible that both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent mechanisms contribute to the phenotype. In managing patients with female pattern hair loss the physician should be aware that the adverse effects on quality of life can be quite severe and do not necessarily correlate with the objective degree of hair loss. The treatment options are currently limited but modest improvements in hair density are achievable in some women.

  3. Experiments with Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a hands-on experiment that covers many areas of high school mathematics. Included are the notions of patterns, proof, triangular numbers and various aspects of problem solving. The problem involves the arrangements of a school of fish using split peas or buttons to represent the fish. (Contains 4 figures.)

  4. Understanding taxi travel patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hua; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhu, Ji; Jia, Xiaoping; Chiu, Anthony S. F.; Xu, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Taxis play important roles in modern urban transportation systems, especially in mega cities. While providing necessary amenities, taxis also significantly contribute to traffic congestion, urban energy consumption, and air pollution. Understanding the travel patterns of taxis is thus important for addressing many urban sustainability challenges. Previous research has primarily focused on examining the statistical properties of passenger trips, which include only taxi trips occupied with passengers. However, unoccupied trips are also important for urban sustainability issues because they represent potential opportunities to improve the efficiency of the transportation system. Therefore, we need to understand the travel patterns of taxis as an integrated system, instead of focusing only on the occupied trips. In this study we examine GPS trajectory data of 11,880 taxis in Beijing, China for a period of three weeks. Our results show that taxi travel patterns share similar traits with travel patterns of individuals but also exhibit differences. Trip displacement distribution of taxi travels is statistically greater than the exponential distribution and smaller than the truncated power-law distribution. The distribution of short trips (less than 30 miles) can be best fitted with power-law while long trips follow exponential decay. We use radius of gyration to characterize individual taxi's travel distance and find that it does not follow a truncated power-law as observed in previous studies. Spatial and temporal regularities exist in taxi travels. However, with increasing spatial coverage, taxi trips can exhibit dual high probability density centers.

  5. Pattern recognition in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Dick; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2013-09-01

    Pattern recognition is concerned with the development of systems that learn to solve a given problem using a set of example instances, each represented by a number of features. These problems include clustering, the grouping of similar instances; classification, the task of assigning a discrete label to a given instance; and dimensionality reduction, combining or selecting features to arrive at a more useful representation. The use of statistical pattern recognition algorithms in bioinformatics is pervasive. Classification and clustering are often applied to high-throughput measurement data arising from microarray, mass spectrometry and next-generation sequencing experiments for selecting markers, predicting phenotype and grouping objects or genes. Less explicitly, classification is at the core of a wide range of tools such as predictors of genes, protein function, functional or genetic interactions, etc., and used extensively in systems biology. A course on pattern recognition (or machine learning) should therefore be at the core of any bioinformatics education program. In this review, we discuss the main elements of a pattern recognition course, based on material developed for courses taught at the BSc, MSc and PhD levels to an audience of bioinformaticians, computer scientists and life scientists. We pay attention to common problems and pitfalls encountered in applications and in interpretation of the results obtained.

  6. Reconfigurable antenna pattern verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drexler, Jerome P. (Inventor); Becker, Robert C. (Inventor); Meyers, David W. (Inventor); Muldoon, Kelly P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of verifying programmable antenna configurations is disclosed. The method comprises selecting a desired antenna configuration from a plurality of antenna configuration patterns, with the selected antenna configuration forming at least one reconfigurable antenna from reconfigurable antenna array elements. The method validates the formation of the selected antenna configuration to determine antenna performance of the at least one reconfigurable antenna.

  7. Painting Patterns with Pixels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoerg, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art unit for middle school students where they created their own original pattern through the use of "ClarisWorks Paint." Discusses the procedure for the project and the evaluation used at the end of the unit. Emphasizes the importance of learning about computers. (CMK)

  8. Patterns of Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Helen

    1978-01-01

    In her introduction to this theme issue on women and leadership, the author reviews evidence on the background characteristics and advancement patterns of women leaders. Childhood sports participation, parental support, role models, mentors, education, and the development of security and self-confidence are considered as requisites to leadership…

  9. A Passion for Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venola, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    Popular culture is a relatively new area of study in the artroom, and combining it with the demands of a rigorous curriculum requires some thought. Combining threads from several sources was the key to an exciting exploration of pattern inspired by a newspaper headline. In 2006, a landmark case was settled in Austria, which repatriated five famous…

  10. Northern Plains Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-513, 14 October 2003

    Patterns are common on the northern plains of Mars. Like their terrestrial counterparts in places like Siberia, Alaska, and northern Canada, patterned ground on Mars might be an indicator of the presence of ground ice. Whether it is true that the patterns on Mars are related to ground ice and whether the ice is still present beneath the martian surface are unknown. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) picture shows an example of patterned ground on the martian northern plains near 72.4oN, 252.6oW. The dark dots and lines are low mounds and chains of mounds. The circular feature near the center of the image is the location of a buried meteor impact crater; its presence today is marked only by the dark boulders on its rim and ejecta blanket that have managed to remain uncovered at the martian surface. The area shown is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  11. Nutritional Patterns of Centenarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mary Ann; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Compared dietary patterns of 165 older adults. Compared to younger cohorts, centenarians (n=24) consumed breakfast more regularly, avoided weight loss diets and large fluctuation in body weight, consumed slightly more vegetables, and relied on doctors and family for nutrition information. Centenarians were less likely to consume low-fat diets and…

  12. Algebraic Reasoning through Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.; Becker, Joanne Rossi

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the results of a three-year study that explores students' performance on patterning tasks involving prealgebra and algebra. The findings, insights, and issues drawn from the study are intended to help teach prealgebra and algebra. In the remainder of the article, the authors take a more global view of the three-year study on…

  13. Spider Web Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A delicate pattern, like that of a spider web, appears on top of the Mars residual polar cap, after the seasonal carbon-dioxide ice slab has disappeared. Next spring, these will likely mark the sites of vents when the carbon-dioxide ice cap returns. This Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  14. Turing Patterns Inside Cells

    PubMed Central

    Strier, Damián E.; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2007-01-01

    Concentration gradients inside cells are involved in key processes such as cell division and morphogenesis. Here we show that a model of the enzymatic step catalized by phosphofructokinase (PFK), a step which is responsible for the appearance of homogeneous oscillations in the glycolytic pathway, displays Turing patterns with an intrinsic length-scale that is smaller than a typical cell size. All the parameter values are fully consistent with classic experiments on glycolytic oscillations and equal diffusion coefficients are assumed for ATP and ADP. We identify the enzyme concentration and the glycolytic flux as the possible regulators of the pattern. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first closed example of Turing pattern formation in a model of a vital step of the cell metabolism, with a built-in mechanism for changing the diffusion length of the reactants, and with parameter values that are compatible with experiments. Turing patterns inside cells could provide a check-point that combines mechanical and biochemical information to trigger events during the cell division process. PMID:17940616

  15. Secure Design Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    www.devshed.com/c/a/PHP/Validating-User-Input-with-the-Strategy-Pattern/ [ Kernighan 1999] Kernighan , Brian W. & Pike, Rob. The Practice of...Postfix mail system designs • relevant recommendations from Kernighan and Pike’s The Practice of Programming [Ker- nighan 1999] • well-known basic design

  16. Experiences, Patterns, and Explanations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunckel, Kristin L.

    2010-01-01

    In an activity sequence that took place over several days, the class learned about sound and how people hear sounds. Following each activity, students engaged in whole-group sharing sessions and individual journal-writing sessions that were designed to help them see the patterns that emerged from their explorations. The activities were carefully…

  17. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Owens, T. M.; Mielke, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Calculated principal-and off-principal plane patterns are presented for the following aircraft: de Havilland DHC-7, Rockwell Sabreliner 75A, Piper PA-31T Cheyenne, Lockheed Jet Star II, Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain, Beechcraft Duke B60, Rockwell Commander 700, Cessna Citation 3, Piper PA-31P Pressurized Navajo, Lear Jet, and Twin Otter DHC-6.

  18. Spider Web Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    A delicate pattern, like that of a spider web, appears on top of the Mars residual polar cap, after the seasonal carbon-dioxide ice slab has disappeared. Next spring, these will likely mark the sites of vents when the carbon-dioxide ice cap returns. This Mars Global Surveyor, Mars Orbiter Camera image is about 3-kilometers wide (2-miles).

  19. Fixture for forming evaporative pattern (EPC) process patterns

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Paul C.; Jordan, Ronald R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of casting metal using evaporative pattern casting process patterns in combination with a fixture for creating and maintaining a desired configuration in flexible patterns. A pattern is constructed and gently bent to the curvature of a suitable fixture. String or thin wire, which burns off during casting, is used to tie the pattern to the fixture. The fixture with pattern is dipped in a commercially available refractory wash to prevent metal adherence and sticking to the fixture. When the refractory wash is dry, the fixture and pattern are placed in a flask, and sand is added and compacted by vibration. The pattern remains in position, restrained by the fixture. Metal that is poured directly into the pattern replaces the pattern exactly but does not contact or weld to the fixture due to the protective refractory layer. When solid, the casting is easily separated from the fixture. The fixture can be cleaned for reuse in conventional casting cleaning equipment.

  20. Travel Patterns in China

    PubMed Central

    Garske, Tini; Yu, Hongjie; Peng, Zhibin; Ye, Min; Zhou, Hang; Cheng, Xiaowen; Wu, Jiabing; Ferguson, Neil

    2011-01-01

    The spread of infectious disease epidemics is mediated by human travel. Yet human mobility patterns vary substantially between countries and regions. Quantifying the frequency of travel and length of journeys in well-defined population is therefore critical for predicting the likely speed and pattern of spread of emerging infectious diseases, such as a new influenza pandemic. Here we present the results of a large population survey undertaken in 2007 in two areas of China: Shenzhen city in Guangdong province, and Huangshan city in Anhui province. In each area, 10,000 randomly selected individuals were interviewed, and data on regular and occasional journeys collected. Travel behaviour was examined as a function of age, sex, economic status and home location. Women and children were generally found to travel shorter distances than men. Travel patterns in the economically developed Shenzhen region are shown to resemble those in developed and economically advanced middle income countries with a significant fraction of the population commuting over distances in excess of 50 km. Conversely, in the less developed rural region of Anhui, travel was much more local, with very few journeys over 30 km. Travel patterns in both populations were well-fitted by a gravity model with a lognormal kernel function. The results provide the first quantitative information on human travel patterns in modern China, and suggest that a pandemic emerging in a less developed area of rural China might spread geographically sufficiently slowly for containment to be feasible, while spatial spread in the more economically developed areas might be expected to be much more rapid, making containment more difficult. PMID:21311745

  1. Auditory Perception of Spatiotemporal Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolkmitt, Frank J.; Brindley, Robin

    1977-01-01

    To test the tendency of subjects to perceptually organize discrete temporal patterns with regard to runs of identical stimulus events, spatiotemporal patterns of white noise were presented for reproduction. It is suggested that changes in runs of auditory patterns are perceptually analogous to changes in contours of visual patterns. (Editor/RK)

  2. Patterns of sleep behaviour.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the electroencephalogram as the critical measurement procedure for sleep research, and survey of major findings that have emerged in the last decade on the presence of sleep within the twenty-four-hour cycle. Specifically, intrasleep processes, frequency of stage changes, sequence of stage events, sleep stage amounts, temporal patterns of sleep, and stability of intrasleep pattern in both man and lower animals are reviewed, along with some circadian aspects of sleep, temporal factors, and number of sleep episodes. It is felt that it is particularly critical to take the presence of sleep into account whenever performance is considered. When it is recognized that responsive performance is extremely limited during sleep, it is easy to visualize the extent to which performance is controlled by sleep itself.

  3. Patterns of sleep behaviour.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the electroencephalogram as the critical measurement procedure for sleep research, and survey of major findings that have emerged in the last decade on the presence of sleep within the twenty-four-hour cycle. Specifically, intrasleep processes, frequency of stage changes, sequence of stage events, sleep stage amounts, temporal patterns of sleep, and stability of intrasleep pattern in both man and lower animals are reviewed, along with some circadian aspects of sleep, temporal factors, and number of sleep episodes. It is felt that it is particularly critical to take the presence of sleep into account whenever performance is considered. When it is recognized that responsive performance is extremely limited during sleep, it is easy to visualize the extent to which performance is controlled by sleep itself.

  4. Optical Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Jutamulia, Suganda

    1998-06-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of optical pattern recognition, covering theoretical aspects as well as details of practical implementations and signal processing techniques. The first chapter is devoted to pattern recognition performed with optical correlators. Later chapters discuss new approaches based on neural networks, wavelet transforms, and the fractional Fourier transform. The book also covers nonlinear filter methods and optical-electronic hybrid systems. The final part deals with the devices and materials employed in modern systems, such as photorefractive crystals, microlasers, and liquid crystal spatial light modulators. The volume gives many examples of working systems that integrate optics, electronics, and computers, and it covers a range of new developments from mathematical theories to novel optical materials. It will be of great interest to graduate students and researchers in optical engineering and machine vision.

  5. Antenna pattern study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Warren

    1988-01-01

    Prediction of antenna radiation patterns has long been an important function in the design of command, communication, and tracking systems for rocket vehicles and spacecraft. An acceptable degree of assurance that a radio link will provide the required quality of data or certainty of correct command execution must be acquired by some means if the system is to be certified as reliable. Two methods have been used to perform this function: (1) Theoretical analysis, based on the known properties of basic antenna element types and their behavior in the presence of conductive structures of simple shape, and (2) Measurement of the patterns on scale models of the spacecraft or rocket vehicle on which the antenna is located. Both of these methods are ordinarily employed in the antenna design process.

  6. Complex spatiotemporal convection patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesch, W.

    1996-09-01

    This paper reviews recent efforts to describe complex patterns in isotropic fluids (Rayleigh-Bénard convection) as well as in anisotropic liquid crystals (electro-hydrodynamic convection) when driven away from equilibrium. A numerical scheme for solving the full hydrodynamic equations is presented that allows surprisingly well for a detailed comparison with experiments. The approach can also be useful for a systematic construction of models (order parameter equations).

  7. Clinical patterns of phytodermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sasseville, Denis

    2009-07-01

    Exposure to plants is very common, through leisure or professional activity. In addition, plant products and botanic extracts are increasingly present in the environment. Cutaneous adverse reactions to plants and their derivatives occur fairly frequently, and establishing the correct diagnosis is not always easy. The astute clinician relies on a detailed history and a careful skin examination to substantiate his opinion. This article reviews the characteristic clinical patterns of phyto- and phytophotodermatitis and some less common presentations.

  8. Advanced Pattern Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    classification via statistical pattern recognition; image preprocessing, enhancement, and filtering; image warping , resampling, and point positioning; and...obj_region training files *•* Edit Programs »*» mode_filter ( mdf ) - mode filtering of a classified image (noise cleaning) edge_thin - thin... mdf 5 5 comments: experimental Method to segregate Water, Urban, Vegetation urban edges method_type: edge measurements: avg 3/ep_smooth 2

  9. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  10. LANL application communication patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Pakiin, Scott

    2011-01-10

    This brief presentation describes the communication patterns used by a set of unclassified applications developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory: XNobel/XRAGE/RAGE/SAGE, Krak, Sweep3D, and Partisn. It mentions which processes communicate with which other processes, whether the application is typically run in a strong-scaling mode or a weak-scaling mode, what message sizes are commonly used, and how the application's performance changes at scale.

  11. Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    redundant model of the data to be used in classification . There are two classes of learning, or adaptation schemes. The first, unsupervised learning...37, No. 3, pp. 242-247, 1983. [2] E. F. Codd, Cellular Automata , Academic Press, 1968. [31 H. Everett, G. Gilbreath, S. Alderson, D. J. Marchette...Na al Oca aytm aete !JTI FL E COPY AD-A 199 030 Technical Document 1335 August 1988 Adaptive Gaussian Pattern Classif ication C. E. Priebe D. J

  12. Shells and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutley, Jane

    2009-01-01

    "Shells and Patterns" was a project the author felt would easily put smiles on the faces of her fifth-graders, and teach them about unity and the use of watercolor pencils as well. It was thrilling to see the excitement in her students as they made their line drawings of shells come to life. For the most part, they quickly got the hang of…

  13. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambone, Elisabeth A.

    2018-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected vehicle response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach was used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the thruster performance characteristics, a database of information relating the thruster ring commands and the desired vehicle response was used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands was analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods was used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands was established, it was used in place of traditional control methods and gains set. This pattern recognition approach was compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  14. Pattern Driven Stress Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, Andrew; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of patterns from isotropic initial states is a major driver of modern soft-matter research. This avenue of study is directed by the desire to understand the complex physics of the varied structures found in Nature, and by technological interest in functional materials that may be derived through biomimicry. In this work we show how a simple striped phase can respond with significant complexity to an appropriately chosen perturbation. In particular, we show how a buckled elastic plate transitions into a state of stress localization using a simple, self-assembled variation in surface topography. The collection of topographic boundaries act in concert to change the state from isotropic sinusoidal wrinkles, to sharp folds or creases separated by relatively flat regions. By varying the size of the imposed topographic pattern or the wavelength of the wrinkles, we construct a state diagram of the system. The localized state has implications for both biological systems, and for the control of non-linear pattern formation.

  15. Gardosian Patterns in Tribology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    The following paper is a memorial retrospective on selected research of Dr. Michael N. Gardos. Dr. Gardos spent his professional career engaged in tribological research which often extended the scientific boundaries of the field. Several of the concepts he put forth into the tribology community were initially met with grave skepticism but over time his views have been largely embraced but not widely acknowledged. His approach to new research topics was often characterized by these qualities: 1) pioneering points of view, 2) the use of the model experiment, and 3) the presence of multiple research agendas for each single experiment. I have chosen to name his research approach as "Gardosian Patterns" in honor of his contributions to Tribology. Three specific examples of these patterns will be reviewed. One is the concept of atomic level tailoring of materials to control macroscopic properties. A second is the use of a model ball polishing experiment to identify high fracture toughness ceramics for use in rolling element bearings. A third Gardosian Pattern example is his pioneering work with the tribology of diamond and diamond films in which he proposed controlling friction via surface bond tailoring. In these examples, Gardos utilized conventional research tools in unconventional ways and, at times, even developed new tools which have become part of the mainstream. His remarkable career has left a positive and lasting mark on Tribology.

  16. Pattern Recognition Control Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gambone, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Spacecraft control algorithms must know the expected spacecraft response to any command to the available control effectors, such as reaction thrusters or torque devices. Spacecraft control system design approaches have traditionally relied on the estimated vehicle mass properties to determine the desired force and moment, as well as knowledge of the effector performance to efficiently control the spacecraft. A pattern recognition approach can be used to investigate the relationship between the control effector commands and the spacecraft responses. Instead of supplying the approximated vehicle properties and the effector performance characteristics, a database of information relating the effector commands and the desired vehicle response can be used for closed-loop control. A Monte Carlo simulation data set of the spacecraft dynamic response to effector commands can be analyzed to establish the influence a command has on the behavior of the spacecraft. A tool developed at NASA Johnson Space Center (Ref. 1) to analyze flight dynamics Monte Carlo data sets through pattern recognition methods can be used to perform this analysis. Once a comprehensive data set relating spacecraft responses with commands is established, it can be used in place of traditional control laws and gains set. This pattern recognition approach can be compared with traditional control algorithms to determine the potential benefits and uses.

  17. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-10-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) also known as female androgenetic alopecia is a common condition afflicting millions of women that can be cosmetically disrupting. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for obtaining optimal outcome. This review addresses the clinical presentation of female pattern hair loss, its differential diagnosis and treatment modalities. A) Diffuse thinning of the crown region with preservation of the frontal hairline (Ludwig's type) B) The "Christmas tree pattern" where the thinning is wider in the frontal scalp giving the alopecic area a triangular shaped figure resembling a christmas tree. C) Thinning associated with bitemporal recession (Hamilton type). Generally, FPHL is not associated with elevated androgens. Less commonly females with FPHL may have other skin or general signs of hyperandrogenism such as hirsutism, acne, irregular menses, infertility, galactorrhea and insulin resistance. The most common endocrinological abnormality associated with FPHL is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). The most important diseases to consider in the differential diagnosis of FPHL include Chronic Telogen Effluvium (CTE), Permanent Alopecia after Chemotherapy (PAC), Alopecia Areata Incognito (AAI) and Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia (FFA). This review describes criteria for distinguishing these conditions from FPHL. The only approved treatment for FPHL, which is 2% topical Minoxidil, should be applied at the dosage of 1ml twice day for a minimum period of 12 months. This review will discuss off-label alternative modalities of treatment including 5-alfa reductase inhibitors, antiandrogens, estrogens, prostaglandin analogs, lasers, light treatments and hair transplantation.

  18. Robustness of Embryonic Patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkai, Naama

    2002-03-01

    Developmental patterning proceeds reliably despite natural fluctuations in the expression levels of genes and changes in gene dosage. Patterning mechanisms that rely on morphogen gradients generally involve a network of feedback loops, which buffer against such perturbations. Although most components of the patterning networks have been identified and characterized, quantitative and mechanistic understanding of how their functions are integrated to achieve robustness is still missing. Here, we report a quantitative study of a morphogen gradient, determining cell fates in the fruit-fly embryo. We find that differential protein cleavage, coupled with selective diffusion, defines a robust system which can adjust to large variations in levels of the different protein components. The mechanism underlying robustness relies on the convergence of the signaling profile to a finite distribution, which in most regions is independent of physical boundary conditions such as production rates. An excess of signaling molecules is stored in a restricted spatial domain. This limiting profile property is exhibited by a class of reaction-diffusion equations, and may represent a general mechanism for achieving robustness in morphogen gradient systems. Experimental verification of model's predictions will be described.

  19. Blood stain pattern analysis.

    PubMed

    Peschel, O; Kunz, S N; Rothschild, M A; Mützel, E

    2011-09-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) refers to the collection, categorization and interpretation of the shape and distribution of bloodstains connected with a crime. These kinds of stains occur in a considerable proportion of homicide cases. They offer extensive information and are an important part of a functional, medically and scientifically based reconstruction of a crime. The following groups of patterns can essentially be distinguished: dripped and splashed blood, projected blood, impact patterns, cast-off stains, expirated and transferred bloodstains. A highly qualified analysis can help to estimate facts concerning the location, quality and intensity of an external force. A sequence of events may be recognized, and detailed questions connected with the reconstruction of the crime might be answered. In some cases, BPA helps to distinguish between accident, homicide and suicide or to identify bloodstains originating from a perpetrator. BPA is based on systematic training, a visit to the crime scene or alternatively good photographic documentation, and an understanding and knowledge of autopsy findings or statements made by the perpetrator and/or victim. A BPA working group has been established within the German Society of Legal Medicine aiming to put the knowledge and practical applications of this subdiscipline of forensic science on a wider basis.

  20. Detecting Patterns of Anomalies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    ct)P (bt|ct) , where A,B and C are mutually exclusive subsets of attributes with at most k elements . This ratio is similar to the previous formula , but...AND SUBTITLE Detecting Patterns of Anomalies 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...to be dependent if, µ(A,B) ≥ βµ (2.1) where, βµ is a threshold parameter, set to a low value of 0.1 ( empirically ) in our experi- ments. Thus, for a

  1. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOEpatents

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  2. Polar Polygon Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-338, 22 April 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image was taken during southern spring, as the seasonal carbon dioxide frost cap was subliming away. Frost remaining in shallow cracks and depressions reveals a fantastic polygonal pattern. Similar polygons occur in the Earth's arctic and antarctic regions-on Earth such polygons are related to the freeze and thaw of ground ice. The picture covers an area about 3 km (about 1.9 mi) wide near 71.9oS, 11.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  3. Patterning droplets with durotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Style, Robert W.; Che, Yonglu; Park, Su Ji; Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho; Hyland, Callen; German, Guy K.; Power, Michael P.; Wilen, Larry A.; Wettlaufer, John S.; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cell types have shown a remarkable ability to detect and move along gradients in stiffness of an underlying substrate—a process known as durotaxis. The mechanisms underlying durotaxis are still unresolved, but generally believed to involve active sensing and locomotion. Here, we show that simple liquid droplets also undergo durotaxis. By modulating substrate stiffness, we obtain fine control of droplet position on soft, flat substrates. Unlike other control mechanisms, droplet durotaxis works without imposing chemical, thermal, electrical, or topographical gradients. We show that droplet durotaxis can be used to create large-scale droplet patterns and is potentially useful for many applications, such as microfluidics, thermal control, and microfabrication. PMID:23798415

  4. Electrohydrodynamically patterned colloidal crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayward, Ryan C. (Inventor); Poon, Hak F. (Inventor); Xiao, Yi (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for assembling patterned crystalline arrays of colloidal particles using ultraviolet illumination of an optically-sensitive semiconducting anode while using the anode to apply an electronic field to the colloidal particles. The ultraviolet illumination increases current density, and consequently, the flow of the colloidal particles. As a result, colloidal particles can be caused to migrate from non-illuminated areas of the anode to illuminated areas of the anode. Selective illumination of the anode can also be used to permanently affix colloidal crystals to illuminated areas of the anode while not affixing them to non-illuminated areas of the anode.

  5. Elements of butterfly wing patterns.

    PubMed

    Nijhout, H F

    2001-10-15

    The color patterns on the wings of butterflies are unique among animal color patterns in that the elements that make up the overall pattern are individuated. Unlike the spots and stripes of vertebrate color patterns, the elements of butterfly wing patterns have identities that can be traced from species to species, and typically across genera and families. Because of this identity it is possible to recognize homologies among pattern elements and to study their evolution and diversification. Individuated pattern elements evolved from non-individuated precursors by compartmentalization of the wing into areas that became developmentally autonomous with respect to color pattern formation. Developmental compartmentalization led to the evolution of serially repeated elements and the emergence of serial homology. In these compartments, serial homologues were able to acquire site-specific developmental regulation and this, in turn, allowed them to diverge morphologically. Compartmentalization of the wing also reduced the developmental correlation among pattern elements. The release from this developmental constraint, we believe, enabled the great evolutionary radiation of butterfly wing patterns. During pattern evolution, the same set of individual pattern elements is arranged in novel ways to produce species-specific patterns, including such adaptations as mimicry and camouflage.

  6. Hidden patterns of reciprocity.

    PubMed

    Syi

    2014-03-21

    Reciprocity can help the evolution of cooperation. To model both types of reciprocity, we need the concept of strategy. In the case of direct reciprocity there are four second-order action rules (Simple Tit-for-tat, Contrite Tit-for-tat, Pavlov, and Grim Trigger), which are able to promote cooperation. In the case of indirect reciprocity the key component of cooperation is the assessment rule. There are, again, four elementary second-order assessment rules (Image Scoring, Simple Standing, Stern Judging, and Shunning). The eight concepts can be formalized in an ontologically thin way we need only an action predicate and a value function, two agent concepts, and the constant of goodness. The formalism helps us to discover that the action and assessment rules can be paired, and that they show the same patterns. The logic of these patterns can be interpreted with the concept of punishment that has an inherent paradoxical nature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Archetypes as action patterns.

    PubMed

    Hogenson, George B

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons by researchers at the University of Parma promises to radically alter our understanding of fundamental cognitive and affective states. This paper explores the relationship of mirror neurons to Jung's theory of archetypes and proposes that archetypes may be viewed as elementary action patterns. The paper begins with a review of a proposed interpretation of the fainting spells of S. Freud in his relationship with Jung as an example of an action pattern that also defines an archetypal image. The challenge that mirror neurons present to traditional views in analytical psychology and psychoanalysis, however, is that they operate without recourse to a cognitive processing element. This is a position that is gaining increasing acceptance in other fields as well. The paper therefore reviews the most recent claims made by the Boston Process of Change Study Group as well as conclusions drawn from dynamic systems views of development and theoretical robotics to underline the conclusion that unconscious agency is not a requirement for coherent action. It concludes with the suggestion that this entire body of research may lead to the conclusion that the dynamic unconscious is an unnecessary hypothesis in psychoanalysis and analytical psychology.

  8. Patterns of Negotiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sood, Suresh; Pattinson, Hugh

    Traditionally, face-to-face negotiations in the real world have not been looked at as a complex systems interaction of actors resulting in a dynamic and potentially emergent system. If indeed negotiations are an outcome of a dynamic interaction of simpler behavior just as with a complex system, we should be able to see the patterns contributing to the complexities of a negotiation under study. This paper and the supporting research sets out to show B2B (business-to-business) negotiations as complex systems of interacting actors exhibiting dynamic and emergent behavior. This paper discusses the exploratory research based on negotiation simulations in which a large number of business students participate as buyers and sellers. The student interactions are captured on video and a purpose built research method attempts to look for patterns of interactions between actors using visualization techniques traditionally reserved to observe the algorithmic complexity of complex systems. Students are videoed negotiating with partners. Each video is tagged according to a recognized classification and coding scheme for negotiations. The classification relates to the phases through which any particular negotiation might pass, such as laughter, aggression, compromise, and so forth — through some 30 possible categories. Were negotiations more or less successful if they progressed through the categories in different ways? Furthermore, does the data depict emergent pathway segments considered to be more or less successful? This focus on emergence within the data provides further strong support for face-to-face (F2F) negotiations to be construed as complex systems.

  9. Evolutionary pattern search algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, W.E.

    1995-09-19

    This paper defines a class of evolutionary algorithms called evolutionary pattern search algorithms (EPSAs) and analyzes their convergence properties. This class of algorithms is closely related to evolutionary programming, evolutionary strategie and real-coded genetic algorithms. EPSAs are self-adapting systems that modify the step size of the mutation operator in response to the success of previous optimization steps. The rule used to adapt the step size can be used to provide a stationary point convergence theory for EPSAs on any continuous function. This convergence theory is based on an extension of the convergence theory for generalized pattern search methods. An experimental analysis of the performance of EPSAs demonstrates that these algorithms can perform a level of global search that is comparable to that of canonical EAs. We also describe a stopping rule for EPSAs, which reliably terminated near stationary points in our experiments. This is the first stopping rule for any class of EAs that can terminate at a given distance from stationary points.

  10. Female Pattern Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Herskovitz, Ingrid; Tosti, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Context: Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) also known as female androgenetic alopecia is a common condition afflicting millions of women that can be cosmetically disrupting. Prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential for obtaining optimal outcome. This review addresses the clinical presentation of female pattern hair loss, its differential diagnosis and treatment modalities. Evidence Acquisition: A) Diffuse thinning of the crown region with preservation of the frontal hairline (Ludwig’s type) B) The “Christmas tree pattern” where the thinning is wider in the frontal scalp giving the alopecic area a triangular shaped figure resembling a christmas tree. C) Thinning associated with bitemporal recession (Hamilton type). Generally, FPHL is not associated with elevated androgens. Less commonly females with FPHL may have other skin or general signs of hyperandrogenism such as hirsutism, acne, irregular menses, infertility, galactorrhea and insulin resistance. The most common endocrinological abnormality associated with FPHL is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Results: The most important diseases to consider in the differential diagnosis of FPHL include Chronic Telogen Effluvium (CTE), Permanent Alopecia after Chemotherapy (PAC), Alopecia Areata Incognito (AAI) and Frontal Fibrosing Alopecia (FFA). This review describes criteria for distinguishing these conditions from FPHL. Conclusions: The only approved treatment for FPHL, which is 2% topical Minoxidil, should be applied at the dosage of 1ml twice day for a minimum period of 12 months. This review will discuss off-label alternative modalities of treatment including 5-alfa reductase inhibitors, antiandrogens, estrogens, prostaglandin analogs, lasers, light treatments and hair transplantation. PMID:24719635

  11. Patterns of public participation.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Jean; Tumilty, Emma; Max, Catherine; Lu, Lanting; Tantivess, Sripen; Hauegen, Renata Curi; Whitty, Jennifer A; Weale, Albert; Pearson, Steven D; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Wang, Hufeng; Staniszewska, Sophie; Weerasuriya, Krisantha; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cubillos, Leonardo

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of this paper is to exhibit cross-national patterns in respect of public participation, linking those differences to institutional features of the countries concerned. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is an example of case-orientated qualitative assessment of participation practices. It derives its data from the presentation of country case studies by experts on each system. The country cases are located within the historical development of democracy in each country. Findings - Patterns of participation are widely variable. Participation that is effective through routinized institutional processes appears to be inversely related to contestatory participation that uses political mobilization to challenge the legitimacy of the priority setting process. No system has resolved the conceptual ambiguities that are implicit in the idea of public participation. Originality/value - The paper draws on a unique collection of country case studies in participatory practice in prioritization, supplementing existing published sources. In showing that contestatory participation plays an important role in a sub-set of these countries it makes an important contribution to the field because it broadens the debate about public participation in priority setting beyond the use of minipublics and the observation of public representatives on decision-making bodies.

  12. Different patterns of confabulation.

    PubMed

    Dalla Barba, G

    1993-12-01

    In this study we investigated the amnesic-confabulatory condition of two patients, M.B. and S.D., exhibiting different patterns of confabulation. Neuropsychological examination showed in M.B. a normal intellectual efficiency and a selective deficit of episodic memory, whereas S.D. was impaired in tests of intellectual efficiency, episodic memory, semantic knowledge and frontal functions. The relation of confabulation to retrieval conditions and the degree of impairment of the semantic memory system was investigated with a set of questions involving the retrieval of various kinds of information. In M.B. confabulation was restricted to episodic memory tasks, whereas in S.D. it also affected the retrieval of semantic information. S.D.'s confabulatory reports were 'semantically anomalous', whereas the semantic structure of M.B.'s confabulations was appropriate. Further investigation using the encoding specificity paradigm showed an interaction of encoding/retrieval conditions in M.B. but not in S.D. This pattern of results is discussed in terms of a different level of disruption of processes that normally monitor the retrieval of information. It is further argued that the confabulation content must be considered in terms of its semantic structure and relies on the level of integrity of semantic knowledge.

  13. Cancer Map Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kulldorff, Martin; Song, Changhong; Gregorio, David; Samociuk, Holly; DeChello, Laurie

    2006-01-01

    Background Maps depicting the geographic variation in cancer incidence, mortality or treatment can be useful tools for developing cancer control and prevention programs, as well as for generating etiologic hypotheses. An important question with every cancer map is whether the geographic pattern seen is due to random fluctuations, as by pure chance there are always some areas with more cases than expected, or whether the map reflects true underlying geographic variation in screening, treatment practices, or etiologic risk factors. Methods Nine different tests for spatial randomness are evaluated in very practical settings by applying them to cancer maps for different types of data at different scales of spatial resolution: breast, prostate, and thyroid cancer incidence; breast cancer treatment and prostate cancer stage in Connecticut; and nasopharynx and prostate cancer mortality in the U.S. Results Tango’s MEET, Oden’s Ipop, and the spatial scan statistic performed well across all the data sets. Besag-Newell’s R, Cuzick-Edwards k-NN, and Turnbull’s CEPP often perform well, but the results are highly dependent on the parameter chosen. Moran’s I performs poorly for most data sets, whereas Swartz Entropy Test and Whittemore’s Test perform well for some data sets but not for other. Conclusions When publishing cancer maps we recommend evaluating the spatial patterns observed using Tango’s MEET, a global clustering test, and the spatial scan statistic, a cluster detection test. PMID:16458789

  14. Spatiotemporal Patterns Produced by Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yuji; Nakahara, Akio; Matsushita, Mitsugu; Matsuyama, Tohey

    1995-06-01

    Spatiotemporal patterns formed by a bacterial colony of Proteus mirabilis on an agar plate were observed. About half or one hour after the colony spread over the entire surface of the agar medium in a petridish, various patterns including target and spiral patterns appeared. They are very similar to those seen in other dissipative systems, such as chemical oscillations and electrohydrodynamic convective systems. Microscopic observations revealed that the collective motion of bacterial cells is responsible for the formation of these spatiotemporal patterns.

  15. Patterns to Develop Algebraic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    What is the role of patterns in developing algebraic reasoning? This important question deserves thoughtful attention. In response, this article examines some differing views of algebraic reasoning, discusses a controversy regarding patterns, and describes how three types of patterns--in contextual problems, in growing geometric figures, and in…

  16. Patterns and Costs of Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Alan Jay

    1984-01-01

    Presents results of the Library Crime Research Project, a three-year study of crime and disruption patterns in public libraries in all 50 states. Patterns of crime, costs of crime (direct, indirect), losses due to crime, patterns of security use, and effects of victimization are covered. Three references are listed. (EJS)

  17. Patterns to Develop Algebraic Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stump, Sheryl L.

    2011-01-01

    What is the role of patterns in developing algebraic reasoning? This important question deserves thoughtful attention. In response, this article examines some differing views of algebraic reasoning, discusses a controversy regarding patterns, and describes how three types of patterns--in contextual problems, in growing geometric figures, and in…

  18. Patterns of Thinking in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The reading teacher needs to be well versed in the teaching of reading, which includes different patterns of thinking in each student. A skilled reader develops patterns of thinking pertaining to content read. Identified patterns of thinking need to be analyzed and incorporated as objectives for student attainment in reading. This paper discusses…

  19. The Dissemination of Pedagogical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogical patterns have been around since 1995, but several authors claim their impact is limited. However, these claims are based on authors' own observations and not on methodical evaluations of the use and dissemination of pedagogical patterns. This claim is in contrast to the vision of the creators of pedagogical patterns--they think…

  20. The Dissemination of Pedagogical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogical patterns have been around since 1995, but several authors claim their impact is limited. However, these claims are based on authors' own observations and not on methodical evaluations of the use and dissemination of pedagogical patterns. This claim is in contrast to the vision of the creators of pedagogical patterns--they think…

  1. Patterns in Active Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Julia M.

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to cellular monolayers, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements and exhibit turbulent-like, chaotic patterns. We describe how active systems can be stabilised by tuning a physical feature of the system, friction. We demonstrate how the crossover between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened, can be achieved by using friction as a control parameter and demonstrate vortex ordering at the wet-dry crossover. We show that the self organisation of vortices into lattices is accompanied by the spatial ordering of topological defects leading to active crystal-like structures. The emergence of vortex lattices which leads to the positional ordering of topological defects may be a useful step towards the design and control of active materials.

  2. Recognizing complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Pawan

    2002-11-01

    How the brain recognizes complex patterns in the environment is a central, but little understood question in neuroscience. The problem is of great significance for a host of applications such as biometric-based access control, autonomous robots and content-based information management. Although some headway in these directions has been made, the current artificial systems do not match the robustness and versatility of their biological counterparts. Here I examine recognition tasks drawn from two different sensory modalities--face recognition and speaker/speech recognition. The goal is to characterize the present state of artificial recognition technologies for these tasks, the influence of neuroscience on the design of these systems and the key challenges they face.

  3. [Normal myelination patterns].

    PubMed

    González Alenda, F J; Pérez-Romero, M; Sánchez, I; Frutos, R; Fraile, E; Romero, J; Carrasco, E G

    1991-12-01

    The MR images obtained of brain during the process of myelination taking place from birth to 2 years of age are analyzed. Basically, the study focuses on the changes in signal intensity experienced by the elements of the brain in the different sequences, consisting in an increase (T1 weighted sequence) or decrease (T2 sequences) in the signal. The chronological evolution of these changes is compared with the classic myelination pattern, described prior to the development of MR, based on necropsies. Also assessed were the progressive changes in the signals of the gray and white matter, reflecting their hydric contents, throughout the period of maturation of the brain structures. It is concluded that MR imaging is presently the diagnostic method of choice in the monitoring of myelination. MR spectroscopy studies offer important perspectives for assessment and follow up of this process from the metabolic point of view.

  4. Cell polarity: mechanochemical patterning.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Nathan W; Grill, Stephan W

    2013-02-01

    Nearly every cell type exhibits some form of polarity, yet the molecular mechanisms vary widely. Here we examine what we term 'chemical systems' where cell polarization arises through biochemical interactions in signaling pathways, 'mechanical systems' where cells polarize due to forces, stresses and transport, and 'mechanochemical systems' where polarization results from interplay between mechanics and chemical signaling. To reveal potentially unifying principles, we discuss mathematical conceptualizations of several prototypical examples. We suggest that the concept of local activation and global inhibition - originally developed to explain spatial patterning in reaction-diffusion systems - provides a framework for understanding many cases of cell polarity. Importantly, we find that the core ingredients in this framework - symmetry breaking, self-amplifying feedback, and long-range inhibition - involve processes that can be chemical, mechanical, or even mechanochemical in nature.

  5. Pattern, Growth and Control

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    The view of biology as goal-directed engineering has deep historical roots in developmental biology, a field currently benefitting from an influx of ideas and methods from systems biology. Systems biology draws on non-biological paradigms to explain developmental mechanisms of control, the specific type of regulation that achieves or maintains a desired end. This review highlights some of the current efforts designed to elucidate basic design principles underlying the engineering objectives of robustness, precision, and scaling that are required during developmental control of growth and pattern formation. Examples from vertebrate and invertebrate development are used to illustrate general principles including the value of integral feedback in achieving set-point control; the usefulness of self-organizing behavior; the importance of recognizing and appropriately handling noise; and the No Free Lunch theory. Through the examination of such principles, systems biology offers a functional framework to make sense of the mechanistic complexity of organismal development. PMID:21414486

  6. Female pattern hair loss.

    PubMed

    Singal, Archana; Sonthalia, Sidharth; Verma, Prashant

    2013-01-01

    Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) is a common cause of hair loss in women characterized by diffuse reduction in hair density over the crown and frontal scalp with retention of the frontal hairline. Its prevalence increases with advancing age and is associated with significant psychological morbidity. The pathophysiology of FPHL is still not completely understood and seems to be multifactorial. Although androgens have been implicated, the involvement of androgen-independent mechanisms is evident from frequent lack of clinical or biochemical markers of hyperandrogenism in affected women. The role of genetic polymorphisms involving the androgen and estrogen receptors is being increasingly recognized in its causation and predicting treatment response to anti-androgens. There are different clinical patterns and classifications of FPHL, knowledge of which facilitates patient management and research. Chronic telogen effluvium remains as the most important differential diagnosis. Thorough history, clinical examination, and evaluation are essential to confirm diagnosis. Patients with clinical signs of androgen excess require assessment of biochemical parameters and imaging studies. It is prudent to screen the patients for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk factors. The treatment comprises medical and/or surgical modalities. Medical treatment should be initiated early as it effectively arrests hair loss progression rather than stimulating regrowth. Minoxidil continues to be the first line therapy whereas anti-androgens form the second line of treatment. The progressive nature of FPHL mandates long-term treatment for sustained effect. Medical therapy may be supplemented with cosmetic concealment in those desirous of greater hair density. Surgery may be worthwhile in some carefully selected patients.

  7. Smart pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Alam, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test correlation methods for pattern recognition applications. A broad overview of the main correlation architectures is first given. Many correlation data are compared with those obtained from standard pattern recognition methods. We used our simulations to predict improved decisional performance from correlation methods. More specifically, we are focused on the POF filter and composite filter family. We present an optimized composite correlation filter, called asymmetric segmented phase-only filter (ASPOF) for mobile target recognition applications. The main objective is to find a compromise between the number of references to be merged in the correlation filter and the time needed for making a decision. We suggest an all-numerical implementation of a VanderLugt (VLC) type composite filter. The aim of this all-numerical implementation is to take advantage of the benefits of the correlation methods and make the correlator easily reconfigurable for various scenarios. The use of numerical implementation of the optical Fourier transform improves the decisional performance of the correlator. Further, it renders the correlator less sensitive to the saturation phenomenon caused by the increased number of references used for fabricating the composite filter. Different tests are presented making use of the peak-to-correlation energy criterion and ROC curves. These tests confirm the validity ofour technique. Elderly fall detection and underwater mine detection are two applications which are considered for illustrating the benefits of our approach. The present work is motivated by the need for detailed discussions of the choice of the correlation architecture for these specific applications, pre-processing in the input plane and post processing in the output plane techniques for such analysis.

  8. 3-D laser patterning process utilizing horizontal and vertical patterning

    DOEpatents

    Malba, Vincent; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process which vastly improves the 3-D patterning capability of laser pantography (computer controlled laser direct-write patterning). The process uses commercially available electrodeposited photoresist (EDPR) to pattern 3-D surfaces. The EDPR covers the surface of a metal layer conformally, coating the vertical as well as horizontal surfaces. A laser pantograph then patterns the EDPR, which is subsequently developed in a standard, commercially available developer, leaving patterned trench areas in the EDPR. The metal layer thereunder is now exposed in the trench areas and masked in others, and thereafter can be etched to form the desired pattern (subtractive process), or can be plated with metal (additive process), followed by a resist stripping, and removal of the remaining field metal (additive process). This improved laser pantograph process is simpler, faster, move manufacturable, and requires no micro-machining.

  9. Nanoscale pattern fidelity and transfer of hierarchically patterned thermoplastics films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Kulkarni, Manish; Marshall, Allan; Douglas, Jack; Karim, Alamgir; the university of akron Team

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate a versatile and inexpensive method for controlling the surface relief structure of both flexible elastomeric and glassy polymer films over large areas through a two-step imprinting process. First, nanoscale patterns were formed by nanoimprinting polymer films with a pattern on a DVD disk, obtained originally by nanoimprinting from a lithographically etched master pattern on a silicon wafer; micron-scale patterns were then superimposed on the nanoimprinted films by exposing them to ultraviolet radiation in oxygen (UVO) through a TEM grid mask having variable micron-scale patterning. This simple two-stage imprinting method allows for facile fabrication of hierarchically structured elastomer and thermoplastic polymer films. Besides, the thermodynamic properties of dewetting phenomenon of polystyrene film under the confinement of hierarchically patterned PDMS is studied.

  10. Pattern optimizing verification of self-align quadruple patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamato, Masatoshi; Yamada, Kazuki; Oyama, Kenichi; Hara, Arisa; Natori, Sakurako; Yamauchi, Shouhei; Koike, Kyohei; Yaegashi, Hidetami

    2017-03-01

    Lithographic scaling continues to advance by extending the life of 193nm immersion technology, and spacer-type multi-patterning is undeniably the driving force behind this trend. Multi-patterning techniques such as self-aligned double patterning (SADP) and self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) have come to be used in memory devices, and they have also been adopted in logic devices to create constituent patterns in the formation of 1D layout designs. Multi-patterning has consequently become an indispensible technology in the fabrication of all advanced devices. In general, items that must be managed when using multi-patterning include critical dimension uniformity (CDU), line edge roughness (LER), and line width roughness (LWR). Recently, moreover, there has been increasing focus on judging and managing pattern resolution performance from a more detailed perspective and on making a right/wrong judgment from the perspective of edge placement error (EPE). To begin with, pattern resolution performance in spacer-type multi-patterning is affected by the process accuracy of the core (mandrel) pattern. Improving the controllability of CD and LER of the mandrel is most important, and to reduce LER, an appropriate smoothing technique should be carefully selected. In addition, the atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique is generally used to meet the need for high accuracy in forming the spacer film. Advances in scaling are accompanied by stricter requirements in the controllability of fine processing. In this paper, we first describe our efforts in improving controllability by selecting the most appropriate materials for the mandrel pattern and spacer film. Then, based on the materials selected, we present experimental results on a technique for improving etching selectivity.

  11. The common patterns of nature.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A

    2009-08-01

    We typically observe large-scale outcomes that arise from the interactions of many hidden, small-scale processes. Examples include age of disease onset, rates of amino acid substitutions and composition of ecological communities. The macroscopic patterns in each problem often vary around a characteristic shape that can be generated by neutral processes. A neutral generative model assumes that each microscopic process follows unbiased or random stochastic fluctuations: random connections of network nodes; amino acid substitutions with no effect on fitness; species that arise or disappear from communities randomly. These neutral generative models often match common patterns of nature. In this paper, I present the theoretical background by which we can understand why these neutral generative models are so successful. I show where the classic patterns come from, such as the Poisson pattern, the normal or Gaussian pattern and many others. Each classic pattern was often discovered by a simple neutral generative model. The neutral patterns share a special characteristic: they describe the patterns of nature that follow from simple constraints on information. For example, any aggregation of processes that preserves information only about the mean and variance attracts to the Gaussian pattern; any aggregation that preserves information only about the mean attracts to the exponential pattern; any aggregation that preserves information only about the geometric mean attracts to the power law pattern. I present a simple and consistent informational framework of the common patterns of nature based on the method of maximum entropy. This framework shows that each neutral generative model is a special case that helps to discover a particular set of informational constraints; those informational constraints define a much wider domain of non-neutral generative processes that attract to the same neutral pattern.

  12. Exploring patterns and pattern languages of medical education.

    PubMed

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Bates, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    The practices and concepts of medical education are often treated as global constants even though they can take many forms depending on the contexts in which they are realised. This represents challenges in presenting and appraising medical education research, as well as in translating practices and concepts between different contexts. This paper explores the problem and seeks to respond to its challenges. This paper explores the application of architectural theorist Christopher Alexander's work on patterns and pattern languages to medical education. The authors review the underlying concepts of patterns and pattern language, they consider the development of pattern languages in medical education, they suggest possible applications of pattern languages for medical education and they discuss the implications of such use. Examples are drawn from across the field of medical education. The authors argue that the deliberate and systematic use of patterns and pattern languages in describing medical educational activities, systems and contexts can help us to make sense of the world, and the pattern languages of medical education have the potential to advance understanding and scholarship in medical education, to drive innovation and to enable critical engagement with many of the underlying issues in this field. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. FLARING PATTERNS IN BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Paggi, A.; Cavaliere, A.; Tavani, M.; Vittorini, V.; D'Ammando, F.

    2011-08-01

    Blazars radiate from relativistic jets launched by a supermassive black hole along our line of sight; the subclass of flat spectrum radio quasars exhibits broad emission lines, a telltale sign of a gas-rich environment and high accretion rate, contrary to the other subclass of the BL Lacertae objects. We show that this dichotomy of the sources in physical properties is enhanced in their flaring activity. The BL Lac flares yielded spectral evidence of being driven by further acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the jet. Here, we discuss spectral fits of multi-{lambda} data concerning strong flares of the two flat spectrum radio quasars 3C 454.3 and 3C 279 recently detected in {gamma}-rays by the AGILE and Fermi satellites. We find that optimal spectral fits are provided by external Compton radiation enhanced by increasing production of thermal seed photons by growing accretion. We find such flares to trace patterns on the jet-power-electron-energy plane that diverge from those followed by flaring BL Lac objects and discuss why these occur.

  14. Pattern recognition in spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebran, M.; Paletou, F.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new automated procedure that simultaneously derives the effective temperature Teff, surface gravity log g, metallicity [Fe/H], and equatorial projected rotational velocity ve sin i for stars. The procedure is inspired by the well-known PCA-based inversion of spectropolarimetric full-Stokes solar data, which was used both for Zeeman and Hanle effects. The efficiency and accuracy of this procedure have been proven for FGK, A, and late type dwarf stars of K and M spectral types. Learning databases are generated from the Elodie stellar spectra library using observed spectra for which fundamental parameters were already evaluated or with synthetic data. The synthetic spectra are calculated using ATLAS9 model atmospheres. This technique helped us to detect many peculiar stars such as Am, Ap, HgMn, SiEuCr and binaries. This fast and efficient technique could be used every time a pattern recognition is needed. One important application is the understanding of the physical properties of planetary surfaces by comparing aboard instrument data to synthetic ones.

  15. Age patterns of marriage.

    PubMed

    Coale, A J

    1971-07-01

    Abstract In different populations there is a common curve describing first-marriage frequency (first marriages per woman) as a function of age for each cohort. To fit the variety of patterns of human nuptiality it suffices to choose the age that serves as origin for a standard curve of first-marriage frequency, and to choose appropriate horizontal and vertical scales for the curve. The prevalence of a standard form for first-marriage frequency implies that the proportion ever-married in any cohort also rises along a standard curve, subject to choice of origin (the earliest age of first marriage), vertical scale (the proportion ever-marrying by the end of life), and horizontal scale (the pace at which the proportion ever-married increases with age). A mathematical expression (a double exponential) is found to fit the risk offirst marriage (among those who ever marry), and some of the implications of uniform features of nuptiality in different populations are discussed.

  16. Multinomial pattern matching revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, Matthew S.; Rigling, Brian D.

    2015-05-01

    Multinomial pattern matching (MPM) is an automatic target recognition algorithm developed for specifically radar data at Sandia National Laboratories. The algorithm is in a family of algorithms that first quantizes pixel value into Nq bins based on pixel amplitude before training and classification. This quantization step reduces the sensitivity of algorithm performance to absolute intensity variation in the data, typical of radar data where signatures exhibit high variation for even small changes in aspect angle. Our previous work has focused on performance analysis of peaky template matching, a special case of MPM where binary quantization is used (Nq = 2). Unfortunately references on these algorithms are generally difficult to locate and here we revisit the MPM algorithm and illustrate the underlying statistical model and decision rules for two algorithm interpretations: the 1-of-K vector form and the scalar. MPM can also be used as a detector and specific attention is given to algorithm tuning where "peak pixels" are chosen based on their underlying empirical probabilities according to a reward minimization strategy aimed at reducing false alarms in the detection scenario and false positives in a classification capacity. The algorithms are demonstrated using Monte Carlo simulations on the AFRL civilian vehicle dataset for variety of choices of Nq.

  17. Programmable high crystallinity carbon patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Hong; Gu, Yang; Fu, Wei; Zheng, Lu; Liu, Guowei; He, Yongmin; Long, Yi; Zhao, Wu; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotube and graphene are promising candidates for next-generation flexible electronics. However, the practical application of carbon electronics requires controlled fabrication of those materials with micro-patterned structures on flexible substrate at wafer-scale and low cost. Inspiring from the conventional photolithography process and pyrolysis of photoresist, herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of high-quality micro-patterned high crystallinity carbon. The method employed pre-patterned pyrolyzed photoresist as carbon precursors, in order to minimize the mobility of carbon during the high temperature growth, which results into high quality carbon patterns with a lateral resolution up to ~2 µm. The flexible carbon electronics are demonstrated by transferring the as-patterned high crystallinity carbon patterns to the flexible substrate, and showing asymmetric tensile-compressive response with high output resolution. These results will pave the way to the next-generation carbon-based flexible electronics and mechanical sensors.

  18. Brugada ECG patterns in athletes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Eugene H

    2015-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is responsible for up to 4% of all sudden cardiac deaths worldwide and up to 20% of sudden cardiac deaths in patients with structurally normal hearts. Heterogeneity of repolarization and depolarization, particularly over the right ventricle and the outflow tract, is responsible for the arrhythmogenic substrate. The coved Type I ECG pattern is considered diagnostic of the syndrome but its prevalence is very low. Distinguishing between a saddle back Type 2 Brugada pattern and one of many "Brugada-like" patterns presents challenges especially in athletes. A number of criteria have been proposed to assess Brugada ECG patterns. Proper precordial ECG lead placement is paramount. This paper reviews Brugada syndrome, Brugada ECG patterns, and recently proposed criteria. Recommendations for evaluating a Brugada ECG pattern are provided.

  19. Pattern formation with proportionate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Deepak

    It is a common observation that as baby animals grow, different body parts grow approximately at same rate. This property, called proportionate growth is remarkable in that it is not encountered easily outside biology. The models of growth that have been studied in Physics so far, e.g diffusion -limited aggregation, surface deposition, growth of crystals from melt etc. involve only growth at the surface, with the inner structure remaining frozen. Interestingly, patterns formed in growing sandpiles provide a very wide variety of patterns that show proportionate growth. One finds patterns with different features, with sharply defined boundaries. In particular, even with very simple rules, one can produce patterns that show striking resemblance to those seen in nature. We can characterize the asymptotic pattern exactly in some special cases. I will discuss in particular the patterns grown on noisy backgrounds. Supported by J. C. Bose fellowship from DST (India).

  20. Communication patterns and allocation strategies.

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Vitus Joseph; Mache, Jens Wolfgang; Bunde, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by observations about job runtimes on the CPlant system, we use a trace-driven microsimulator to begin characterizing the performance of different classes of allocation algorithms on jobs with different communication patterns in space-shared parallel systems with mesh topology. We show that relative performance varies considerably with communication pattern. The Paging strategy using the Hilbert space-filling curve and the Best Fit heuristic performed best across several communication patterns.

  1. Patterns Unique, Yet Familiar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-21

    This close-up image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter gives the impression of looking like bacterial cells and their internal structures which travel and split in the process of life. These features are fractal in nature: the same image is preserved through different scales, with the pattern repeating eternally. The reality is, we are looking at one of Mars' polar regions; the South Polar residual cap to be precise, and, as with many things in Martian planetary science, there is a precise reasoning behind the name. With the coming and going of the seasons, this is an area on Mars where ice remains even after the peak of summer arrives. The texture is very alien, bearing more of a resemblance to the universe of the very small, rather than the universe far, far away. But if this is a polar cap, then why does it not look like the polar caps on Earth? Indeed, there is no equivalent terrain observed here on Earth. The so-called "Swiss cheese terrain, referencing the numerous holes of the region, is a product of seasonal exchange between the surface and the Martian atmosphere. With a predominantly carbon dioxide content at 98 percent, the colder temperatures condense the gas out of the atmosphere to produce dry ice. The prevalence of water is more concentrated in the north, leaving the South polar region more carbon dioxide rich, and it's this difference in composition that generates the unusual texture of the Swiss cheese terrain. The Red Planet is one of the chief candidates in the search for life elsewhere in the Solar System; however, a quick glance at this image virtually gives the impression we have already found it. NB: The cutout image has been rotated so that north is approximately up. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21880

  2. Vaccination pattern affects immunological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etchegoin, P. G.

    2005-08-01

    The response of the immune system to different vaccination patterns is studied with a simple model. It is argued that the history and characteristics of the pattern defines very different secondary immune responses in the case of infection. The memory function of the immune response can be set to work in very different modes depending on the pattern followed during immunizations. It is argued that the history and pattern of immunizations can be a decisive (and experimentally accessible) factor to tailor the effectiveness of a specific vaccine.

  3. Learning with imperfectly labeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of learning in pattern recognition using imperfectly labeled patterns is considered. The performance of the Bayes and nearest neighbor classifiers with imperfect labels is discussed using a probabilistic model for the mislabeling of the training patterns. Schemes for training the classifier using both parametric and non parametric techniques are presented. Methods for the correction of imperfect labels were developed. To gain an understanding of the learning process, expressions are derived for success probability as a function of training time for a one dimensional increment error correction classifier with imperfect labels. Feature selection with imperfectly labeled patterns is described.

  4. Organization Patterns and Decision Making Patterns in Teacher Corps Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goddu, Roland

    This guide to organization and decision making patterns in a Teacher Corps project is in the form of a workbook. It contains several forms and worksheets to be completed. There is a discussion of decision making patterns and a review of decision making skills. It is stated that to make good decisions, one needs skills to (1) identify the persons…

  5. Dietary Patterns: Challenges and Opportunities in Dietary Patterns Research

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, increasing numbers of researchers have used dietary patterns to characterize the population’s diet and to examine associations between diet and disease outcomes. Many methods, primarily data-driven and index-based approaches, are available for characterizing dietary patterns in a p...

  6. Field theory of pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agu, Masahiro

    1988-06-01

    Based on the psychological experimental fact that images in mental space are transformed into other images for pattern identification, a field theory of pattern identification of geometrical patterns is developed with the use of gauge field theory in Euclidean space. Here, the ``image'' or state function ψ[χ] of the brain reacting to a geometrical pattern χ is made to correspond to the electron's wave function in Minkowski space. The pattern identification of the pattern χ with the modified pattern χ+Δχ is assumed to be such that their images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] in the brain are transformable with each other through suitable transformation groups such as parallel transformation, dilatation, or rotation. The transformation group is called the ``image potential'' which corresponds to the vector potential of the gauge field. An ``image field'' derived from the image potential is found to be induced in the brain when the two images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] are not transformable through suitable transformation groups or gauge transformations. It is also shown that, when the image field exists, the final state of the image ψ[χ] is expected to be different, depending on the paths of modifications of the pattern χ leading to a final pattern. The above fact is interpreted as a version of the Aharonov and Bohm effect of the electron's wave function [A. Aharonov and D. Bohm, Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)]. An excitation equation of the image field is also derived by postulating that patterns are identified maximally for the purpose of minimizing the number of memorized standard patterns.

  7. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-01-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than

  8. Patterns, Quantities, and Linear Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Amy B.

    2009-01-01

    Pattern generalization and a focus on quantities are important aspects of algebraic reasoning. This article describes two different approaches to teaching and learning linear functions for middle school students. One group focused on patterns in number tables, and the other group worked primarily with real-world quantities. This article highlights…

  9. Injury Patterns in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Presents statistics on injury patterns in youth sports, recommending that physicians who care for young athletes understand the kinds of injuries likely to be sustained. Awareness of injury patterns helps medical professionals identify variables associated with injury, anticipate or prevent injuries, plan medical coverage, and compare individual…

  10. Pattern Identification Exercise. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Norm

    Career exploration typically involves the investigation of personal factors: interests, aptitudes, values, and personal style. This digest outlines one counseling method, pattern identification exercise (PIE). PIE starts with past experiences and identifies personal patterns which are relevant to career decisions. A premise of PIE is that…

  11. Financing Higher Education. Current Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Gareth

    The nature of the changes in the patterns of financing and control of higher education systems which have been observed in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries over the last decade are discussed. In particular, the report analyzes the links between expenditure patterns, costs and efficiency in higher education…

  12. Oral Patterns and Written Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Alan

    It is proposed that many students are unable to distinguish between unguarded writing patterns and literate or expository ones, and it is becoming increasingly necessary in writing instruction to clarify and impose the distinction between these patterns. This problem is confounded by current trends toward exclusively spoken language in the…

  13. Pigments, patterns, and fish behavior.

    PubMed

    Price, Anna C; Weadick, Cameron J; Shim, Janet; Rodd, F Helen

    2008-12-01

    Color patterns in fish are often multicomponent signals, composed of pigment-based and structural color patches that can be used to communicate within species, in both inter- and intrasexual interactions, and between species. In this review, we discuss some of the roles played by pigment-based elements of color pattern. We begin by discussing general forms of coloration, classifying them by appearance (e.g., cryptic vs. conspicuous) and apparent function (e.g., conspicuous coloration and mating displays, stripes and cooperation, and bars and aggression). We then briefly discuss the roles pigments play in the perception of these color patterns via their presence in the eye. In the last section, we look at the relative importance of carotenoid versus melanic coloration in situations where honest signals to potential rivals and potential mates might be required. In this survey, we have highlighted some recent research, especially studies that consider both the physiological and behavioral processes underlying the evolution and expression of pigment-based color patterns in fish. The nature of pigmented color patterns depends not just on the dynamics of pattern development and physiological regulation, but also on the behavioral roles played by these patterns, both now and in the past. As such, advances in particular fields of study on pigment patterns (physiology, developmental biology, behavioral ecology, evolutionary biology, etc.) will increasingly depend on insights from other fields.

  14. Double-patterning-friendly OPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohai; Luk-Pat, Gerry; Cork, Chris; Barnes, Levi; Lucas, Kevin

    2009-03-01

    Double patterning technology (DPT) is one of the main options for printing critical layers at 32nm half-pitch and beyond. To enable DPT, a layout decomposition tool is first used to split the original design into two separate decomposed-design layouts. Each decomposed-design layout may then receive optical proximity correction (OPC) and RETs to produce a mask layout. The requirements for OPC to enable individual layer DPT patterning are generally the same as current single exposure OPC requirements, meaning that the success criteria will be similar to previous node specifications. However, there are several new challenges for OPC with DPT. These include large litho-etch biases, two sets of process variables associated with each patterning layer and the relative pattern placement between them. The order of patterning may be important as there may be process interactions between the two patterns especially at overlap regions. Corners which were rounded in single patterning layers may now become sharp, potentially increasing reliability concerns due to electromigration. In this study, we address many of these issues by proposing several new techniques that can be used in OPC with DPT. They are specifically designed for the Litho-Etch-Litho-Etch process, but some of the ideas may be extended to develop OPC methods for other DPT processes. We applied the new OPC method to several circuit and test patterns and demonstrated how OPC results were improved compared to regular OPC methods.

  15. Biomolecular Patterning via Photocatalytic Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Bearinger, J P; Hiddessen, A L; Wu, K J; Christian, A T; Dugan, L C; Stone, G; Camarero, J; Hinz, A K; Hubbell, J A

    2005-02-18

    We have developed a novel method for patterning surface chemistry: Photocatalytic Lithography. This technique relies on inexpensive stamp materials and light; it does not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates, and the wavelength of light should not limit feature resolution. We have demonstrated the utility of this technique through the patterning of proteins, single cells and bacteria.

  16. Retirement Patterns and Income Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasang, Anette Eva

    2012-01-01

    How do social policies shape life courses, and which consequences do different life course patterns hold for individuals? This article engages the example of retirement in Germany and Britain to analyze life course patterns and their consequences for income inequality. Sequence analysis is used to measure retirement trajectories. The liberal…

  17. Retirement Patterns and Income Inequality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasang, Anette Eva

    2012-01-01

    How do social policies shape life courses, and which consequences do different life course patterns hold for individuals? This article engages the example of retirement in Germany and Britain to analyze life course patterns and their consequences for income inequality. Sequence analysis is used to measure retirement trajectories. The liberal…

  18. Research applications of ecosystem patterns

    Treesearch

    Robert G. Bailey

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the origins of natural ecosystem patterns from global to local scales. It describes how understanding these patterns can help scientists and managers in two ways. First, the local systems are shown within the context of larger systems. This perspective can be applied in assessing the connections between action at one scale and effect at another,...

  19. Teenage Drivers: Patterns of Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Allan F.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on patterns of risk among teenage drivers through a review and synthesis of the literature. Varying patterns of risk form the basis for graduated licensing systems designed to promote low-risk and discourage high-risk driving. (Contains 6 tables, 13 figures, and 29 references.) (AUTHOR/WFA)

  20. The overall patterns of burns

    PubMed Central

    Almoghrabi, A.; Abu Shaban, N.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Burn patterns differ across the whole world and not only in relation to lack of education, overcrowding, and poverty. Cultures, habits, traditions, psychiatric illness, and epilepsy are strongly correlated to burn patterns. However, burns may also occur because of specific religious beliefs and activities, social events and festivals, traditional medical practices, occupational activities, and war. PMID:22639565

  1. Injury Patterns in Youth Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Presents statistics on injury patterns in youth sports, recommending that physicians who care for young athletes understand the kinds of injuries likely to be sustained. Awareness of injury patterns helps medical professionals identify variables associated with injury, anticipate or prevent injuries, plan medical coverage, and compare individual…

  2. Syntax-induced pattern deafness.

    PubMed

    Endress, Ansgar D; Hauser, Marc D

    2009-12-08

    Perceptual systems often force systematically biased interpretations upon sensory input. These interpretations are obligatory, inaccessible to conscious control, and prevent observers from perceiving alternative percepts. Here we report a similarly impenetrable phenomenon in the domain of language, where the syntactic system prevents listeners from detecting a simple perceptual pattern. Healthy human adults listened to three-word sequences conforming to patterns readily learned even by honeybees, rats, and sleeping human neonates. Specifically, sequences either started or ended with two words from the same syntactic category (e.g., noun-noun-verb or verb-verb-noun). Although participants readily processed the categories and learned repetition patterns over nonsyntactic categories (e.g., animal-animal-clothes), they failed to learn the repetition pattern over syntactic categories, even when explicitly instructed to look for it. Further experiments revealed that participants successfully learned the repetition patterns only when they were consistent with syntactically possible structures, irrespective of whether these structures were attested in English or in other languages unknown to the participants. When the repetition patterns did not match such syntactically possible structures, participants failed to learn them. Our results suggest that when human adults hear a string of nouns and verbs, their syntactic system obligatorily attempts an interpretation (e.g., in terms of subjects, objects, and predicates). As a result, subjects fail to perceive the simpler pattern of repetitions--a form of syntax-induced pattern deafness that is reminiscent of how other perceptual systems force specific interpretations upon sensory input.

  3. Growing Patterns: Seeing beyond Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, mathematical patterns have been acknowledged as important early components of children's development of algebraic reasoning (NCTM 2000). In particular, growing patterns have attracted significant attention as a context that helps students develop an understanding of functional relationships (Lee and Freiman 2006; Moss et…

  4. PATTERN PREDICTION OF ACADEMIC SUCCESS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LUNNEBORG, CLIFFORD E.; LUNNEBORG, PATRICIA W.

    A TECHNIQUE OF PATTERN ANALYSIS WHICH EMPHASIZES THE DEVELOPMENT OF MORE EFFECTIVE WAYS OF SCORING A GIVEN SET OF VARIABLES WAS FORMULATED. TO THE ORIGINAL VARIABLES WERE SUCCESSIVELY ADDED TWO, THREE, AND FOUR VARIABLE PATTERNS AND THE INCREASE IN PREDICTIVE EFFICIENCY ASSESSED. RANDOMLY SELECTED HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS WHO HAD PARTICIPATED IN THE…

  5. Growing Patterns: Seeing beyond Counting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, mathematical patterns have been acknowledged as important early components of children's development of algebraic reasoning (NCTM 2000). In particular, growing patterns have attracted significant attention as a context that helps students develop an understanding of functional relationships (Lee and Freiman 2006; Moss et…

  6. Patterning and templating for nanoelectronics.

    PubMed

    Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Ozkan, Mihri; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Huang, Yu; Chang, Jane P; Monbouquette, Harold G; Chen, Yong; Nealey, Paul; Botros, Youssry

    2010-02-09

    The semiconductor industry will soon be launching 32 nm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology node using 193 nm lithography patterning technology to fabricate microprocessors with more than 2 billion transistors. To ensure the survival of Moore's law, alternative patterning techniques that offer advantages beyond conventional top-down patterning are aggressively being explored. It is evident that most alternative patterning techniques may not offer compelling advantages to succeed conventional top-down lithography for silicon integrated circuits, but alternative approaches may well indeed offer functional advantages in realising next-generation information processing nanoarchitectures such as those based on cellular, bioinsipired, magnetic dot logic, and crossbar schemes. This paper highlights and evaluates some patterning methods from the Center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics in Los Angeles and discusses key benchmarking criteria with respect to CMOS scaling.

  7. Method of patterning an aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Scott T [Edgewood, NM

    2012-07-24

    A method for producing a pattern in an aerogel disposed as a coating on a substrate comprises exposing the aerogel coating to the vapors of a hydrophobic silane compound, masking the aerogel coating with a shadow photomask and irradiating the aerogel coating with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. The exposure to UV through the shadow mask creates a pattern of hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions in the aerogel coating. Etching away the hydrophilic regions of the aerogel coating, preferably with a 1 molar solution of sodium hydroxide, leaves the unwetted and unetched hydrophobic regions of the aerogel layer on the substrate, replicating the pattern of the photomask. The hydrophobic aerogel pattern can be further exposed to UV irradiation if desired, to create a hydrophilic aerogel pattern.

  8. Dynamic Skin Patterns in Cephalopods

    PubMed Central

    How, Martin J.; Norman, Mark D.; Finn, Julian; Chung, Wen-Sung; Marshall, N. Justin

    2017-01-01

    Cephalopods are unrivaled in the natural world in their ability to alter their visual appearance. These mollusks have evolved a complex system of dermal units under neural, hormonal, and muscular control to produce an astonishing variety of body patterns. With parallels to the pixels on a television screen, cephalopod chromatophores can be coordinated to produce dramatic, dynamic, and rhythmic displays, defined collectively here as “dynamic patterns.” This study examines the nature, context, and potential functions of dynamic patterns across diverse cephalopod taxa. Examples are presented for 21 species, including 11 previously unreported in the scientific literature. These range from simple flashing or flickering patterns, to highly complex passing wave patterns involving multiple skin fields. PMID:28674500

  9. Patterning by area selective oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Chang-Yong; Kamcev, Jovan; Black, Charles T.; Grubbs, Robert

    2015-12-29

    Technologies are described for methods for producing a pattern of a material on a substrate. The methods may comprise receiving a patterned block copolymer on a substrate. The patterned block copolymer may include a first polymer block domain and a second polymer block domain. The method may comprise exposing the patterned block copolymer to a light effective to oxidize the first polymer block domain in the patterned block copolymer. The method may comprise applying a precursor to the block copolymer. The precursor may infuse into the oxidized first polymer block domain and generate the material. The method may comprise applying a removal agent to the block copolymer. The removal agent may be effective to remove the first polymer block domain and the second polymer block domain from the substrate, and may not be effective to remove the material in the oxidized first polymer block domain.

  10. Resolution of choroidal neovascularization secondary to punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) with intravitreal anti-VEGF agents: a case series.

    PubMed

    Mangat, Simran S; Ramasamy, B; Prasad, Som; Walters, Gavin; Mohammed, Moin; Mckibbin, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Case series of four patients with CNVM secondary to PIC treated solely with anti VEGF in three cases and in combination with PDT in the other. This series reveals long term follow up (3 months to 28 months) which is currently not described in the literature.

  11. Punctate Radiation Dermatitis of the Foot and Ankle Caused by Distal Embolization of 90Y Microspheres During Liver Directed Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nia, Benjamin B; Nia, Emily S; Avery, Ryan J; Kuo, Phillip H; Hennemeyer, Charles T

    2017-09-01

    A 41-year-old man with gastric adenocarcinoma presented with hepatic metastases. The metastases were refractory to systemic chemotherapy, so radioembolization with Y microspheres was performed. Because of stasis or saturation of the tumor with embolic particles, 79% of the microspheres were injected. At follow-up, the patient complained of "red bumps" that had developed on his right foot/ankle the day after the radioembolization. Because a portion of the dose was still in the catheter when withdrawn from the right femoral artery, the interventional radiologist used a Geiger counter to confirm radioactivity in the cutaneous lesions and thus the distal embolization of the microspheres.

  12. Analysis Of Overlay Distortion Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, John D.; Kirk, Joseph P.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive geometrical approach is presented for the least-squares analysis of overlay distortion patterns into useful, physically meaningful systematic distortion subpatterns and an essentially non-systematic residue. A scheme of generally useful distortion sub-patterns is presented in graphic and algorithmic form; some of these sub-patterns are additions to those already in widespread use. A graphic and geometric approach is emphasized rather than an algebraic or statistical approach, and an example illustrates the value in utilizing the pattern-detecting ability of the eye-brain system. The conditions are described under which different distortion sub-patterns may interact, possibly leading to misleading or erroneous conclusions about the types and amounts of different distortions present. Examples of typical interaction situations are given, and recommendations are made for analytic procedures to avoid misinterpretation. It is noted that the lower-order distortion patterns preserve straight-line linearity, but that higher-order distortion may result in straight lines becoming curved. The principle of least-squares analysis is outlined and a simple polynomial data-fitting example is used to illustrate the method. Algorithms are presented for least-squares distortion analysis of overlay patterns, and an APL2 program is given to show how this may easily be implemented on a digital computer. The appendix extends the treatment to cases where small-angle approximation is not permissible.

  13. Hand aperture patterns in prehension.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Raoul M; Zaal, Frank T J M; Jeannerod, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Although variations in the standard prehensile pattern can be found in the literature, these alternative patterns have never been studied systematically. This was the goal of the current paper. Ten participants picked up objects with a pincer grip. Objects (3, 5, or 7cm in diameter) were placed at 30, 60, 90, or 120cm from the hands' starting location. Usually the hand was opened gradually to a maximum immediately followed by hand closing, called the standard hand opening pattern. In the alternative opening patterns the hand opening was bumpy, or the hand aperture stayed at a plateau before closing started. Two participants in particular delayed the start of grasping with respect to start of reaching, with the delay time increasing with object distance. For larger object distances and smaller object sizes, the bumpy and plateau hand opening patterns were used more often. We tentatively concluded that the alternative hand opening patterns extended the hand opening phase, to arrive at the appropriate hand aperture at the appropriate time to close the hand for grasping the object. Variations in hand opening patterns deserve attention because this might lead to new insights into the coordination of reaching and grasping.

  14. Temporal pattern processing in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Comins, Jordan A; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2014-10-01

    Understanding how the brain perceives, organizes and uses patterned information is directly related to the neurobiology of language. Given the present limitations, such knowledge at the scale of neurons, neural circuits and neural populations can only come from non-human models, focusing on shared capacities that are relevant to language processing. Here we review recent advances in the behavioral and neural basis of temporal pattern processing of natural auditory communication signals in songbirds, focusing on European starlings. We suggest a general inhibitory circuit for contextual modulation that can act to control sensory representations based on patterning rules.

  15. Pattern formation at liquid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidel, Barbara; Knobler, Charles M.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative experimental investigations of pattern formation at a liquid interface are described. The reaction studied is the photoreduction of Fe 3+ in aqueous solution and the subsequent formation of Turnbull's Blue. Both the wavelength of the pattern and the time at which the break in homogeneity occurs have been studied as functions of the concentrations of the reactants and the viscosity of the solvent. Many of the features of the process are consistent with a mechanism in which autocatalysis is enhanced by double diffusion. Preliminary studies of pattern formation in the KI/starch/chloralhydrate system are also presented.

  16. Multifunctional pattern-generating circuits.

    PubMed

    Briggman, K L; Kristan, W B

    2008-01-01

    The ability of distinct anatomical circuits to generate multiple behavioral patterns is widespread among vertebrate and invertebrate species. These multifunctional neuronal circuits are the result of multistable neural dynamics and modular organization. The evidence suggests multifunctional circuits can be classified by distinct architectures, yet the activity patterns of individual neurons involved in more than one behavior can vary dramatically. Several mechanisms, including sensory input, the parallel activity of projection neurons, neuromodulation, and biomechanics, are responsible for the switching between patterns. Recent advances in both analytical and experimental tools have aided the study of these complex circuits.

  17. Dead simple OWL design patterns.

    PubMed

    Osumi-Sutherland, David; Courtot, Melanie; Balhoff, James P; Mungall, Christopher

    2017-06-05

    Bio-ontologies typically require multiple axes of classification to support the needs of their users. Development of such ontologies can only be made scalable and sustainable by the use of inference to automate classification via consistent patterns of axiomatization. Many bio-ontologies originating in OBO or OWL follow this approach. These patterns need to be documented in a form that requires minimal expertise to understand and edit and that can be validated and applied using any of the various programmatic approaches to working with OWL ontologies. Here we describe a system, Dead Simple OWL Design Patterns (DOS-DPs), which fulfills these requirements, illustrating the system with examples from the Gene Ontology. The rapid adoption of DOS-DPs by multiple ontology development projects illustrates both the ease-of use and the pressing need for the simple design pattern system we have developed.

  18. Dead simple OWL design patterns

    DOE PAGES

    Osumi-Sutherland, David; Courtot, Melanie; Balhoff, James P.; ...

    2017-06-05

    Bio-ontologies typically require multiple axes of classification to support the needs of their users. Development of such ontologies can only be made scalable and sustainable by the use of inference to automate classification via consistent patterns of axiomatization. Many bio-ontologies originating in OBO or OWL follow this approach. These patterns need to be documented in a form that requires minimal expertise to understand and edit and that can be validated and applied using any of the various programmatic approaches to working with OWL ontologies. We describe a system, Dead Simple OWL Design Patterns (DOS-DPs), which fulfills these requirements, illustrating themore » system with examples from the Gene Ontology. In conclusion, the rapid adoption of DOS-DPs by multiple ontology development projects illustrates both the ease-of use and the pressing need for the simple design pattern system we have developed.« less

  19. Detection of Patterns Within Randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Ruedi; Christen, Markus

    The identification of jittered regular signals (="patterns#) embedded in a noisy background is an important and difficult task, particularly in the neurosciences. Traditional methods generally fail to capture such signals. Staircase-like structures in the log-log correlation plot, however, are reliable indicators of such signal components.We provide a number of applications of this method and derive an analytic relationship between the length of the pattern n and the maximal number of steps s(n,m) that are observable at a chosen embedding dimension m. For integer linearly independent patterns and small jitter and noise, the length of the embedded pattern can be calculated from the number of steps. The method is demonstrated to have a huge potential for experimental applications.

  20. Evolving Neural Network Pattern Classifiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-01

    This work investigates the application of evolutionary programming for automatically configuring neural network architectures for pattern...evaluating a multitude of neural network model hypotheses. The evolutionary programming search is augmented with the Solis & Wets random optimization

  1. A Pattern Theory of Self

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Shaun

    2013-01-01

    I argue for a pattern theory of self as a useful way to organize an interdisciplinary approach to discussions of what constitutes a self. According to the pattern theory, a self is constituted by a number of characteristic features or aspects that may include minimal embodied, minimal experiential, affective, intersubjective, psychological/cognitive, narrative, extended, and situated aspects. A pattern theory of self helps to clarify various interpretations of self as compatible or commensurable instead of thinking them in opposition, and it helps to show how various aspects of self may be related across certain dimensions. I also suggest that a pattern theory of self can help to adjudicate (or at least map the differences) between the idea that the self correlates to self-referential processing in the cortical midline structures of the brain and other narrower or wider conceptions of self. PMID:23914173

  2. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  3. Casting Using A Polystyrene Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Peter; Guenther, Bengamin; Vranas, Thomas; Veneris, Peter; Joyner, Michael

    1993-01-01

    New technique for making metal aircraft models saves significant amount of time and effort in comparison with conventional lost-wax method. Produces inexpensive, effective wind-tunnel models. Metal wind-tunnel model cast by use of polystyrene pattern.

  4. Replication of nanoscale DNA patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, Corinna; Wang, Tong; Sha, Ruojie; Leunissen, Mirjam; Dreyfus, Remi; Seeman, Nadrian; Chaikin, Paul

    2011-03-01

    We present an artificial supramolecular system mimicking self- replication and information transmission strategies in nature, but without the aid of enzymes or equivalent biological mechanisms. Using DNA nanotechnology techniques, we can make DNA tiles with selective interactions based on complementary single-strand connections. A linear tile pattern distinguished by their connector sequences is transmitted to a subsequent generation of copies by connector hybridisation. Longitudinal pattern formation and transverse copy attachment are well separated by different melting temperatures. We have achieved a faithful transmission of the pattern information to the second replication generation. We use AFM imaging to test for pattern fidelity and gel electrophoresis for quantitative yield analysis. supported by a DAAD postdoc grant.

  5. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  6. Monolithic pattern-sensitive detector

    DOEpatents

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2000-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet light (EUV) is detected using a precisely defined reference pattern formed over a shallow junction photodiode. The reference pattern is formed in an EUV absorber preferably comprising nickel or other material having EUV- and other spectral region attenuating characteristics. An EUV-transmissive energy filter is disposed between a passivation oxide layer of the photodiode and the EUV transmissive energy filter. The device is monolithically formed to provide robustness and compactness.

  7. Capacitance enhancement via electrode patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tuan A.; Striolo, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The necessity of increasing the energy density in electric double layer capacitors to meet current demand is fueling fundamental and applied research alike. We report here molecular dynamics simulation results for aqueous electrolytes near model electrodes. Particular focus is on the effect of electrode patterning on the structure of interfacial electrolytes, and on the potential drop between the solid electrodes and the bulk electrolytes. The latter is estimated by numerically integrating the Poisson equation using the charge densities due to water and ions accumulated near the interface as input. We considered uniform and patterned electrodes, both positively and negatively charged. The uniformly charged electrodes are modeled as graphite. The patterned ones are obtained by removing carbon atoms from the top-most graphene layer, yielding nanoscopic squares and stripes patterns. For simplicity, the patterned electrodes are effectively simulated as insulators (the charge remains localized on the top-most layer of carbon atoms). Our simulations show that the patterns alter the structure of water and the accumulation of ions at the liquid-solid interfaces. Using aqueous NaCl solutions, we found that while the capacitance calculated for three positively charged electrodes did not change much, that calculated for the negatively charged electrodes significantly increased upon patterning. We find that both water structure and orientation, as well as ion accumulation affect the capacitance. As electrode patterning affects differently water structure and ion accumulation, it might be possible to observe ion-specific effects. These results could be useful for advancing our understanding of electric double layer capacitors, capacitive desalination processes, as well as of fundamental interfacial electrolytes properties.

  8. Capacitance enhancement via electrode patterning

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tuan A.; Striolo, Alberto

    2013-11-28

    The necessity of increasing the energy density in electric double layer capacitors to meet current demand is fueling fundamental and applied research alike. We report here molecular dynamics simulation results for aqueous electrolytes near model electrodes. Particular focus is on the effect of electrode patterning on the structure of interfacial electrolytes, and on the potential drop between the solid electrodes and the bulk electrolytes. The latter is estimated by numerically integrating the Poisson equation using the charge densities due to water and ions accumulated near the interface as input. We considered uniform and patterned electrodes, both positively and negatively charged. The uniformly charged electrodes are modeled as graphite. The patterned ones are obtained by removing carbon atoms from the top-most graphene layer, yielding nanoscopic squares and stripes patterns. For simplicity, the patterned electrodes are effectively simulated as insulators (the charge remains localized on the top-most layer of carbon atoms). Our simulations show that the patterns alter the structure of water and the accumulation of ions at the liquid-solid interfaces. Using aqueous NaCl solutions, we found that while the capacitance calculated for three positively charged electrodes did not change much, that calculated for the negatively charged electrodes significantly increased upon patterning. We find that both water structure and orientation, as well as ion accumulation affect the capacitance. As electrode patterning affects differently water structure and ion accumulation, it might be possible to observe ion-specific effects. These results could be useful for advancing our understanding of electric double layer capacitors, capacitive desalination processes, as well as of fundamental interfacial electrolytes properties.

  9. Erosion Patterns on Dissolving Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Caroline; Polizzi, Stefano; Berhanu, Michael; Derr, Julien; Courrech Du Pont, Sylvain

    2015-11-01

    The shaping of landscapes results from water or wind erosional processes. Here we focus on dissolution processes. We perform laboratory experiments on hard caramel bodies, which dissolve on a short timescale, compared to geological material such as limestone. We highlight the spontaneous appearance of a dissolution pattern with no external flow. When a tilted hard caramel block dissolves, the syrup (denser than water) sinks in the bath and induces a flow, which results in a pattern on the bottom of the block. First parallel stripes appear, which evolve to transversal scallops in about one hour. The whole pattern moves upstream at a slow velocity. The stripes appearance is due to a buoyancy-driven instability. By varying the density and the viscosity of the bath, we show that the initial wavelengths of the pattern are in agreement with those given by the solutal Rayleigh-Benard number. Later pattern evolution to scallops results from complex interactions between the flow and the topography. Finally we emphasize that similar mechanism of patterns formation can occur in the dissolution of minerals like salt, but also in the shaping of the bottom face of melting icebergs in the cold seas.

  10. TOPTRAC: Topical Trajectory Pattern Mining

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Younghoon; Han, Jiawei; Yuan, Cangzhou

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing use of GPS-enabled mobile phones, geo-tagging, which refers to adding GPS information to media such as micro-blogging messages or photos, has seen a surge in popularity recently. This enables us to not only browse information based on locations, but also discover patterns in the location-based behaviors of users. Many techniques have been developed to find the patterns of people's movements using GPS data, but latent topics in text messages posted with local contexts have not been utilized effectively. In this paper, we present a latent topic-based clustering algorithm to discover patterns in the trajectories of geo-tagged text messages. We propose a novel probabilistic model to capture the semantic regions where people post messages with a coherent topic as well as the patterns of movement between the semantic regions. Based on the model, we develop an efficient inference algorithm to calculate model parameters. By exploiting the estimated model, we next devise a clustering algorithm to find the significant movement patterns that appear frequently in data. Our experiments on real-life data sets show that the proposed algorithm finds diverse and interesting trajectory patterns and identifies the semantic regions in a finer granularity than the traditional geographical clustering methods. PMID:26709365

  11. Buckling of Patterned Top Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Dokyeong; Suh, Hyo Seon; Char, Kookheon

    Buckling of thin films on elastomeric substrates such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the well-known phenomenon in buckling instability originating from the moduli mismatch between a substrate and a thin film placed on the top. Recently, many studies on the microstructure created by the buckling with flat top films have been reported and physics behind them has almost been well received. However, only a few work has been done for the buckling structure with micro- or nano-patterned top films and buckling mechanics for patterned top film-PDMS bilayers has not yet been established in detail. Here, we present the buckling of various patterned top films placed on top of elastomeric PDMS substrates. Geometrical patterns were prepared by unconventional lithography techniques such as thermal imprinting of polystyrene (PS) films. Buckling instability was induced by applying mechanical stress to the patterned top surface-PDMS bilayers. Resulting buckled structures showed different mechanical structures as shape and structural parameters of the top thin films were varied. The structural changes were analyzed by introducing a beam theory or a plate theory for the simple modeling of the top surfaces, giving insights on the buckling mechanics of top films with complicated patterns placed on PDMS substrates.

  12. Multimorbidity patterns: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Prados-Torres, Alexandra; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Hancco-Saavedra, Jorge; Poblador-Plou, Beatriz; van den Akker, Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this review was to identify studies on patterns of associative multimorbidity, defined as the nonrandom association between diseases, focusing on the main methodological features of the studies and the similarities among the detected patterns. Studies were identified through MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic database searches from their inception to June 2012 and bibliographies. The final 14 articles exhibited methodological heterogeneity in terms of the sample size, age and recruitment of study participants, the data source, the number of baseline diseases considered, and the statistical procedure used. A total of 97 patterns composed of two or more diseases were identified. Among these, 63 patterns were composed of three or more diseases. Despite the methodological variability among studies, this review demonstrated relevant similarities for three groups of patterns. The first one comprised a combination of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, the second one was related with mental health problems, and the third one with musculoskeletal disorders. The existence of associations beyond chance among the different diseases that comprise these patterns should be considered with the aim of directing future lines of research that measure their intensity, clarify their nature, and highlight the possible causal underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pattern formation in Salt Playa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasser, Jana; Goehring, Lucas; Nield, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Salt Playa, or crusts, often exhibit polygonal salt-ridge patterns with a diameter of roughly 1 m. Several mechanisms, like cracking or wrinkling of the surface crust have been discussed, but none of these can explain the scale of the observed patterns. We investigate a theory where we link the crust pattern to buoyancy-driven flows in the porous ground beneath them. In this model, salinity gradients arise due to evaporation at the ground surface. These gradients lead to the formation of convection cells, much like the convection caused by temperature gradients. The spatial scaling of these convection rolls significantly depends on the evaporation rate, while the onset of convection is controlled by the permeability of the soil. Here we will show a link between surface salt patterns and subsurface dynamics. We investigate the onset of convection, the scaling of convection cells, and the formation of salt crusts in a sandy soil confined to a Hele-Shaw cell in analogue experiments and link subsurface concentration gradients to surface crust patterns by means of a field study. The aim of the experiments and the field study is to explore how porous media convection can affect salt crust patterns in arid environments.

  14. Gastric siderosis: patterns and significance.

    PubMed

    Marginean, Esmeralda C; Bennick, Michael; Cyczk, Jan; Robert, Marie E; Jain, Dhanpat

    2006-04-01

    Recently, we encountered 2 cases of diffuse iron deposition in gastric antral and fundic glandular epithelium, which in 1 patient eventually led to the diagnosis of hemochromatosis. Gastric mucosal siderosis (GS) has previously been described in hemochromatosis patients, alcoholics, and in association with iron medications. However, the prevalence of various patterns of iron deposition in the gastric mucosa and their clinical significance have not been studied in detail. The 2 index cases mentioned above and 500 additional consecutive gastric biopsies examined over a period of 8 months at our institution were stained for iron by the Prussian blue method. In addition, all patients with genetic hemochromatosis diagnosed by liver biopsy in our department between 1998 and 2003 who also had gastric biopsies were identified from the surgical pathology files and included in the study (n = 3). The location of iron deposition [stromal cells (endothelium, fibroblasts, macrophages), glandular epithelium, or extracellular] was recorded and subjectively graded as 1+ to 3+ according to the severity of deposition within the mucosa. Relevant histologic changes (inflammation, presence of H. pylori, ulceration) and clinical features were reviewed. Three patterns of GS were identified: A) "nonspecific GS" with predominant iron deposition in the stromal cells including macrophages, and focally in epithelium; B) "iron-pill gastritis" with often mild gastritis and reactive gastropathy type changes, and mostly extracellular deposition with focal stromal cells and epithelial deposition; and C) predominant deposition in antral and fundic glandular epithelium. Of the 500 cases studied, a total of 18 (3.6%) cases were found to have GS. Of these 18 cases, 11 (2.2%) showed pattern A, 4 (0.8%) showed pattern B, and 3 (0.6%) showed pattern C. The GS in patterns A and B was always focal or patchy (1+ to 2+), whereas in pattern C it was generally diffuse and strong (2+ to 3+). A history of oral

  15. Demonstrations of beats as moving interference patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-02-01

    A ripple tank demonstration is described that displays the dynamic interference patterns responsible for producing beats. Photographs are provided of a computer simulation of various beat interference patterns. Young's two-slit interference pattern is presented as a special case (the zero-beat case) of the more general beat interference pattern. Equations for the constructive interference paths of beat interference patterns are derived.

  16. Vertebrate Embryonic Cleavage Pattern Determination.

    PubMed

    Hasley, Andrew; Chavez, Shawn; Danilchik, Michael; Wühr, Martin; Pelegri, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The pattern of the earliest cell divisions in a vertebrate embryo lays the groundwork for later developmental events such as gastrulation, organogenesis, and overall body plan establishment. Understanding these early cleavage patterns and the mechanisms that create them is thus crucial for the study of vertebrate development. This chapter describes the early cleavage stages for species representing ray-finned fish, amphibians, birds, reptiles, mammals, and proto-vertebrate ascidians and summarizes current understanding of the mechanisms that govern these patterns. The nearly universal influence of cell shape on orientation and positioning of spindles and cleavage furrows and the mechanisms that mediate this influence are discussed. We discuss in particular models of aster and spindle centering and orientation in large embryonic blastomeres that rely on asymmetric internal pulling forces generated by the cleavage furrow for the previous cell cycle. Also explored are mechanisms that integrate cell division given the limited supply of cellular building blocks in the egg and several-fold changes of cell size during early development, as well as cytoskeletal specializations specific to early blastomeres including processes leading to blastomere cohesion. Finally, we discuss evolutionary conclusions beginning to emerge from the contemporary analysis of the phylogenetic distributions of cleavage patterns. In sum, this chapter seeks to summarize our current understanding of vertebrate early embryonic cleavage patterns and their control and evolution.

  17. EUV patterning successes and frontiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, Nelson; Corliss, Dan; Petrillo, Karen; Saulnier, Nicole; Xu, Yongan; Meli, Luciana; Tang, Hao; De Silva, Anuja; Hamieh, Bassem; Burkhardt, Martin; Mignot, Yann; Johnson, Richard; Robinson, Chris; Breton, Mary; Seshadri, Indira; Dunn, Derren; Sieg, Stuart; Miller, Eric; Beique, Genevieve; Labonte, Andre; Sun, Lei; Han, Geng; Verduijn, Erik; Han, Eunshoo; Kim, Bong Cheol; Kim, Jongsu; Hontake, Koichi; Huli, Lior; Lemley, Corey; Hetzer, Dave; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Matsunaga, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    The feature scaling and patterning control required for the 7nm node has introduced EUV as a candidate lithography technology for enablement. To be established as a front-up lithography solution for those requirements, all the associated aspects with yielding a technology are also in the process of being demonstrated, such as defectivity process window through patterning transfer and electrical yield. This paper will review the current status of those metrics for 7nm at IBM, but also focus on the challenges therein as the industry begins to look beyond 7nm. To address these challenges, some of the fundamental process aspects of holistic EUV patterning are explored and characterized. This includes detailing the contrast entitlement enabled by EUV, and subsequently characterizing state-of-the-art resist printing limits to realize that entitlement. Because of the small features being considered, the limits of film thinness need to be characterized, both for the resist and underlying SiARC or inorganic hardmask, and the subsequent defectivity, both of the native films and after pattern transfer. Also, as we prepare for the next node, multipatterning techniques will be validated in light of the above, in a way that employs the enabling aspects of EUV as well. This will thus demonstrate EUV not just as a technology that can print small features, but one where all aspects of the patterning are understood and enabling of a manufacturing-worthy technology.

  18. Techniques for Specifying Bug Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D J; Vuduc, R W; Misherghi, G

    2007-04-30

    We present our on-going work to develop techniques for specifying source code signatures of bug patterns. Specifically, we discuss two approaches. The first approach directly analyzes a program in the intermediate representation (IR) of the ROSE compiler infrastructure using ROSE's API. The second analyzes the program using the bddbddb system of Lam, Whaley, et al.. In this approach, we store the IR produced by ROSE as a relational database, express patterns as declarative inference rules on relations in the language Datalog, and bddbddb implements the Datalog programs using binary decision diagram (BDD) techniques. Both approaches readily apply to large-scale applications, since ROSE provides full type analysis, control flow, and other available analysis information. In this paper, we primarily consider bug patterns expressed with respect to the structure of the source code or the control flow, or both. More complex techniques to specify patterns that are functions of data flow properties may be addressed by either of the above approaches, but are not directly treated here. Our Datalog-based work includes explicit support for expressing patterns on the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) in parallel distributed memory programs. We show examples of this on-going work as well.

  19. Monolayer patterning using ketone dipoles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyoung; Xue, Yi; Pašková, Tereza; Zimmt, Matthew B

    2013-08-14

    The self-assembly of multi-component monolayers with designed patterns requires molecular recognition among components. Dipolar interactions have been found to influence morphologies of self-assembled monolayers and can affect molecular recognition functions. Ketone groups have large dipole moments (2.6 D) and are easily incorporated into molecules. The potential of ketone groups for dipolar patterning has been evaluated through synthesis of two 1,5-disubstituted anthracenes bearing mono-ketone side chains, STM characterization of monolayers self-assembled from their single and two component solutions and molecular mechanics simulations to determine their self-assembly energetics. The results reveal that (i) anthracenes bearing self-repulsive mono-ketone side chains assemble in an atypical monolayer morphology that establishes dipolar attraction, instead of repulsion, between ketones in adjacent side chains; (ii) pairs of anthracene molecules whose self-repulsive ketone side chains are dipolar complementary spontaneously assemble compositionally patterned monolayers, in which the two components segregate into neighboring, single component columns, driven by side chain dipolar interactions; (iii) compositionally patterned monolayers also assemble from dipolar complementary anthracene pairs that employ different dipolar groups (ketones or CF2 groups) in their side chains; (iv) the ketone group, with its larger dipole moment and size, provides comparable driving force for patterned monolayer formation to that of the smaller dipole, and smaller size, CF2 group.

  20. Submicron patterned metal hole etching

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.; Contolini, Robert J.; Liberman, Vladimir; Morse, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    A wet chemical process for etching submicron patterned holes in thin metal layers using electrochemical etching with the aid of a wetting agent. In this process, the processed wafer to be etched is immersed in a wetting agent, such as methanol, for a few seconds prior to inserting the processed wafer into an electrochemical etching setup, with the wafer maintained horizontal during transfer to maintain a film of methanol covering the patterned areas. The electrochemical etching setup includes a tube which seals the edges of the wafer preventing loss of the methanol. An electrolyte composed of 4:1 water: sulfuric is poured into the tube and the electrolyte replaces the wetting agent in the patterned holes. A working electrode is attached to a metal layer of the wafer, with reference and counter electrodes inserted in the electrolyte with all electrodes connected to a potentiostat. A single pulse on the counter electrode, such as a 100 ms pulse at +10.2 volts, is used to excite the electrochemical circuit and perform the etch. The process produces uniform etching of the patterned holes in the metal layers, such as chromium and molybdenum of the wafer without adversely effecting the patterned mask.

  1. How do drumlin patterns evolve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, Jeremy; Clark, Chris; Spagnolo, Matteo; Hughes, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The flow of a geomorphic agent over a sediment bed creates patterns in the substrate composed of bedforms. Ice is no exception to this, organising soft sedimentary substrates into subglacial bedforms. As we are yet to fully observe their initiation and evolution beneath a contemporary ice mass, little is known about how patterns in subglacial bedforms develop. Here we study 36,222 drumlins, divided into 72 flowsets, left behind by the former British-Irish Ice sheet. These flowsets provide us with 'snapshots' of drumlin pattern development. The probability distribution functions of the size and shape metrics of drumlins within these flowsets were analysed to determine whether behaviour that is common of other patterned phenomena has occurred. Specifically, we ask whether drumlins i) are printed at a specific scale; ii) grow or shrink after they initiate; iii) stabilise at a specific size and shape; and iv) migrate. Our results indicate that drumlins initiate at a minimum size and spacing. After initiation, the log-normal distribution of drumlin size and shape metrics suggests that drumlins grow, or possibly shrink, as they develop. We find no evidence for stabilisation in drumlin length, supporting the idea of a subglacial bedform continuum. Drumlin migration is difficult to determine from the palaeo-record. However, there are some indications that a mixture of static and mobile drumlins occurs, which could potentially lead to collisions, cannibalisation and coarsening. Further images of modern drumlin fields evolving beneath ice are required to capture stages of drumlin pattern evolution.

  2. Ultrafast laser patterning of graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.; Emelianov, Alexey V.; Lin, Chih-Lang; Otero, Nerea; Romero, Pablo M.

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the recent results in ultrafast (femtoseconds and picoseconds) pulsed laser patterning of graphene films (single layer graphene, graphene oxide (GO)). We investigated such effects of nonlinear optical interaction like selective laser ablation of graphene, laser reduction of graphene oxide and local functionalization (oxidation) of graphene based on multiphoton absorption for microelectrode patterning. The graphene oxide and reduction was demonstrated under femtosecond laser pulses as well as fine ablation for monolayer GO films under ps laser pulses. We demonstrated the patterned laser reduction over the GO film leads to minimum in resistance for laser fluence because of interplay of chemical and thermal effects in carbon lattice and photons. The micro-scale patterns in graphene on SiO2 substrates were fabricated using ultrashort 515 nm laser pulses. For both picosecond and femtosecond laser pulses two competitive processes, based on photo-thermal (ablation) and photochemical (oxidation/etching) effects, were observed. The laser-induced etching of graphene starts just below the threshold energy of graphene ablation. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. Patterned graphene was investigated by AFM, microRaman, SEM and sheet resistance measurements and other techniques. The mechanisms of ultrafast laser interaction with graphene are discussed. The comprehensive models of graphene oxidation/reduction are suggested.

  3. Helicity patterns on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pevtsov, A.

    Solar magnetic fields exhibit hemispheric preference for negative (pos- itive) helicity in northern (southern) hemisphere. The hemispheric he- licity rule, however, is not very strong, - the patterns of opposite sign helicity were observed on different spatial scales in each hemisphere. For instance, many individual sunspots exhibit patches of opposite he- licity inside the single polarity field. There are also helicity patterns on scales larger than the size of typical active region. Such patterns were observed in distribution of active regions with abnormal (for a give hemisphere) helicity, in large-scale photospheric magnetic fields and coronal flux systems. We will review the observations of large-scale pat- terns of helicity in solar atmosphere and their possible relationship with (sub-)photospheric processes. The emphasis will be on large-scale pho- tospheric magnetic field and solar corona.

  4. Dynamic Patterns in Active Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jülicher, Frank

    2012-02-01

    Biological matter is inherently dynamic and exhibits active properties. A key example is the force generation by molecular motors in the cell cytoskeleton. Such active processes give rise to the generation of active mechanical stresses and spontaneous flows in gel-like cytoskeletal networks. Active material behaviors play a key role for the dynamics of cellular processes such as cell locomotion and cell division. We will discuss intracellular flow patterns that are created by active processes in the cell cortex. By combining theory with quantitative experiments we show that observed flow patterns result from profiles of active stress generation in the system. We will also consider the situation where active stress is regulated by a diffusing molecular species. In this case, spatial concentration patterns are generated by the interplay of stress regulation and self-generated flow fields.

  5. Stepwise Progression of Embryonic Patterning.

    PubMed

    Sandler, Jeremy E; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-07-01

    It is long established that the graded distribution of Dorsal transcription factor influences spatial domains of gene expression along the dorsoventral (DV) axis of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. However, the more recent realization that Dorsal levels also change with time raises the question of whether these dynamics are instructive. An overview of DV axis patterning is provided, focusing on new insights identified through quantitative analysis of temporal changes in Dorsal target gene expression from one nuclear cycle to the next ('steps'). Possible roles for the stepwise progression of this patterning program are discussed including (i) tight temporal regulation of signaling pathway activation, (ii) control of gene expression cohorts, and (iii) ensuring the irreversibility of the patterning and cell fate specification process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Stepwise progression of embryonic patterning

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, Jeremy; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2016-01-01

    It is long established that the graded distribution of Dorsal transcription factor influences spatial domains of gene expression along the dorsoventral axis of Drosophila melanogaster embryos. However, the more recent realization that Dorsal levels also change in time raises the question of whether these dynamics are instructive. Here, an overview of dorsoventral axis patterning is provided focusing on new insights identified through quantitative analysis of temporal changes in Dorsal target gene expression from one nuclear cycle to the next (‘steps’). Possible roles for the step-wise progression of this patterning program are discussed including (i) tight, temporal regulation of signaling pathway activation, (ii) control of gene expression cohorts, and (iii) to ensure irreversibility of the patterning and cell fate specification process. PMID:27230753

  7. Pattern control in unstable structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Oliver; Hogg, Tad; Huberman, Bernardo A.

    1998-07-01

    A major aim of smart structures is to reduce the amount of materials used to build them while achieving the same amount of dynamic control. This reduction can however lead to a loss of stiffness and a consequent instability of the structure in the presence of stresses. We have turned this problem around by examining how the use of dynamical instabilities can lead to improved control of given patterns in smart structures. In particular, we studied the possibility of dynamically switching between two configurations of a mechanical system, one in which the desired patterns are stable and one in which they are unstable. By comparing the performance of a distributed control in terms of time to switch and power consumption we established that unstable patterns often switch faster among themselves than stable ones without consuming more power.

  8. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system.

  9. Pattern Blocks: Building Algebraic Thinking with Progressive Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willcutt, Bob

    The books in this series provide an essential ingredient in the transition from concrete mathematical experience to the symbolic reasoning used in algebra. They aim to guide the student in building and extending manipulative patterns, collecting numerical data, and analyzing the results. The main objective of the activities in this book is for the…

  10. Pattern Formation on Networks: from Localised Activity to Turing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McCullen, Nick; Wagenknecht, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Networks of interactions between competing species are used to model many complex systems, such as in genetics, evolutionary biology or sociology and knowledge of the patterns of activity they can exhibit is important for understanding their behaviour. The emergence of patterns on complex networks with reaction-diffusion dynamics is studied here, where node dynamics interact via diffusion via the network edges. Through the application of a generalisation of dynamical systems analysis this work reveals a fundamental connection between small-scale modes of activity on networks and localised pattern formation seen throughout science, such as solitons, breathers and localised buckling. The connection between solutions with a single and small numbers of activated nodes and the fully developed system-scale patterns are investigated computationally using numerical continuation methods. These techniques are also used to help reveal a much larger portion of of the full number of solutions that exist in the system at different parameter values. The importance of network structure is also highlighted, with a key role being played by nodes with a certain so-called optimal degree, on which the interaction between the reaction kinetics and the network structure organise the behaviour of the system. PMID:27273339

  11. Spatiotemporal Wave Patterns: Information Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail Rabinovich; Lev Tsimring

    2006-01-20

    Pattern formation has traditionally been studied in non-equilibrium physics from the viewpoint of describing the basic structures and their interactions. While this is still an important area of research, the emphasis in the last few years has shifted towards analysis of specific properties of patterns in various complex media. For example, diverse and unexpected phenomena occur in neuro-like media that are characterized by highly non-trivial local dynamics. We carried out an active research program on analysis of spatio-temporal patterns in various physical systems (convection, oscillating fluid layer, soap film), as well as in neuro-like media, with an emphasis on informational aspects of the dynamics. Nonlinear nonequilibrium media and their discrete analogs have a unique ability to represent, memorize, and process the information contained in spatio-temporal patterns. Recent neurophysiological experiments demonstrated a certain universality of spatio-temporal representation of information by neural ensembles. Information processing is also revealed in the spatio-temporal dynamics of cellular patterns in nonequilibrium media. It is extremely important for many applications to study the informational aspects of these dynamics, including the origins and mechanisms of information generation, propagation and storage. Some of our results are: the discovery of self-organization of periodically oscillatory patterns in chaotic heterogeneous media; the analysis of the propagation of the information along a chaotic media as function of the entropy of the signal; the analysis of wave propagation in discrete non-equilibrium media with autocatalytic properties, which simulates the calcium dynamics in cellular membranes. Based on biological experiments we suggest the mechanism by which the spatial sensory information is transferred into the spatio-temporal code in the neural media. We also found a new mechanism of self-pinning in cellular structures and the related phenomenon

  12. Fractal dimension of bioconvection patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2 x 10 to the 6th organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching, and a fractal dimension (d about 1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  13. Fractal Dimension of Bioconvection Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-10-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2× 106 organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching and a fractal dimension (d˜1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  14. Patterns of Hypnotic Response, Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kihlstrom, John F.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been speculated that there are discrete patterns of responsiveness to hypnotic suggestions, perhaps paralleling the factor structure of hypnotizability. An earlier study by Brenneman & Kihlstrom (1986), employing cluster analysis, found evidence for 12 such profiles. A new study by Terhune (2015), employing latent profile analysis, found evidence for three such patterns among highly hypnotizable subjects, and a fourth comprising subjects of medium hypnotizability. Some differences between the two studies are described. Convincing identification of discrete “types” of high hypnotizability, such as dissociative and nondissociative, may require a larger dataset than is currently available, but also data pertaining directly to divisions in conscious awareness and experienced involuntariness. PMID:26551995

  15. Glass strengthening and patterning methods

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, David C; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Duty, Chad E

    2015-01-27

    High intensity plasma-arc heat sources, such as a plasma-arc lamp, are used to irradiate glass, glass ceramics and/or ceramic materials to strengthen the glass. The same high intensity plasma-arc heat source may also be used to form a permanent pattern on the glass surface--the pattern being raised above the glass surface and integral with the glass (formed of the same material) by use of, for example, a screen-printed ink composition having been irradiated by the heat source.

  16. Memristor-based pattern matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimo, Martin; Such, Ondrej; Skvarek, Ondrej; Fratrik, Milan

    2014-10-01

    Pattern matching is a machine learning area that requires high-performance hardware. It has been hypothesized that massively parallel designs, which avoid von Neumann architecture, could provide a significant performance boost. Such designs can advantageously use memristive switches. This paper discusses a two-stage design that implements the induced ordered weighted average (IOWA) method for pattern matching. We outline the circuit structure and discuss how a functioning circuit can be achieved using metal oxide devices. We describe our simulations of memristive circuits and illustrate their performance on a vowel classification task.

  17. Techniques for plotting shadow patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bainbridge, D.A.

    1982-02-01

    Basic approaches for plotting shadow patterns (summer or winter) are discussed, illustrated, and compared. The solar simulator technique uses floodlights or a moveable table to mimic the sun's path over a model of the building being studied. The drawback is that, for large developments, very small models would have to be built. Graphic solutions (2 types) are described in which: (1) sun angles are used to calculate shadow patterns using trigonometry and (2) drawings are made and shadows are calculated. Examples are given for a house on level ground and on sloping ground. Calculations of shade density are also illustrated. 8 references. (MJJ)

  18. Pattern formation in the geosciences.

    PubMed

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue.

  19. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  20. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  1. Noise and Dynamical Pattern Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1996-01-01

    In pattern-forming systems, such as Rayleigh-Benard convection or directional solidification, a large number of linearly stable, patterned steady states exist when the basic, simple steady state is unstable. Which of these steady states will be realized in a given experiment appears to depend on unobservable details of the system's initial conditions. We show, however, that weak, Gaussian white noise drives such a system toward a preferred wave number which depends only on the system parameters and is independent of initial conditions. We give a prescription for calculating this wave number, analytically near the onset of instability and numerically otherwise.

  2. Interactive design of generic chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Karen T; Wetzer, Lars; Rarey, Matthias

    2013-07-01

    Every medicinal chemist has to create chemical patterns occasionally for querying databases, applying filters or describing functional groups. However, the representations of chemical patterns have been so far limited to languages with highly complex syntax, handicapping the application of patterns. Graphic pattern editors similar to chemical editors can facilitate the work with patterns. In this article, we review the interfaces of frequently used web search engines for chemical patterns. We take a look at pattern editing concepts of standalone chemical editors and finally present a completely new, unpublished graphical approach to pattern design, the SMARTSeditor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Champagne Patterns and Lake Nyos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide bubbles in a glass of champagne rise to the surface in fine threads, which are made of bubble groupings that change over time. Researchers from French and Brazilian universities have produced a new model that accounts for the patterns in strings of bubbles in champagne and other effervescent fluids. The research appears in Physical…

  4. Patterns of Wildlife Value Orientations

    Treesearch

    Harry C. Zinn; Michael J. Manfredo; Susan C. Barro

    2002-01-01

    Public value orientations toward wildlife may be growing less utilitarian and more protectionist. To better understand one aspect of this trend, we investigated patterns of wildlife value orientations within families. Using a mail survey, we sampled Pennsylvania and Colorado hunting license holders 50 or older; obtaining a 54% response rate (n = 599). Males (94% of...

  5. Patterns of Propaganda and Persuasion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rank, Hugh

    Because children are exposed to highly professional sales pitches on television and because the old material produced by the Institute of Propaganda Analysis is outdated and in error, a new tool for the analysis of propaganda and persuasion is called for. Such a tool is the intensify/downplay pattern analysis chart, which includes the basic…

  6. A Lesson in Number Pattern

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Rodney

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a guided investigation into the spacial relationships between the centres of the squares in a Fibonacci tiling. It is essentially a lesson in number pattern, but includes work with surds, coordinate geometry, and some elementary use of complex numbers. The investigation could be presented to students in a number of ways…

  7. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves the interaction between the sun, wind, and earth. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the s...

  8. THE SOUND PATTERN OF ENGLISH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHOMSKY, NOAM; HALLE, MORRIS

    "THE SOUND PATTERN OF ENGLISH" PRESENTS A THEORY OF SOUND STRUCTURE AND A DETAILED ANALYSIS OF THE SOUND STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GENERATIVE GRAMMAR. IN THE PREFACE TO THIS BOOK THE AUTHORS STATE THAT THEIR "WORK IN THIS AREA HAS REACHED A POINT WHERE THE GENERAL OUTLINES AND MAJOR THEORETICAL PRINCIPLES ARE FAIRLY CLEAR" AND…

  9. Structural Pattern Drills: A Classification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulston, Christina Bratt

    The author attempts a reclassification of structural pattern drills, taking into account the theories of Skinner as well as Chomsky on language learning. Her intent is to propose a "systematic progression in the classroom from mechanical learning to the internalizing of competence." Drills could be used more effeciently in foreign language…

  10. Space Biology: Patterns of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Frank B.

    1971-01-01

    Present knowledge about Mars is compared with past beliefs about the planet. Biological experiments that indicate life may exist on Mars are interpreted. Life patterns or biological features that might be postulated for extraterrestrial life are presented at the molecular, cellular, organism, and ecosystem levels. (DS)

  11. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  12. Strange Patterns in Echus Chasma

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-10

    This image shows bright and dark patterns with curving boundaries, a good example of Mars art. What caused this appearance? This region of Echus Chasma has been flooded by lava flows that produced rough and smooth surfaces. The rough areas then trap bright dust, creating the contrasts in brightness. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20209

  13. Ownership Patterns on Hardwood Lands

    Treesearch

    Sam C. Doak

    1991-01-01

    The pattern of land use and ownership—including sizes of ownerships, types of landowners, and their various management objectives—affects the level of benefits available from the California's hardwood resource. Geographic information system (GIS) databases of ownership and population characteristics were developed for two California counties using local assessors...

  14. School Dropouts: Patterns and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natriello, Gary, Ed.

    This book collects articles that examine the patterns of dropping out evident among American youth, and the policies developed and implemented to reduce the incidence of dropping out. The following chapters (and their authors) are included: (1) Introduction (G. Natriello); (2) Can We Help Dropouts? Thinking about the Undoable (D. Mann); (3) Large…

  15. How to pattern a leaf

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, an...

  16. Verb Tone Patterns in Lamnsok

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grebe, Karl; Grebe, Winnifred

    1975-01-01

    The article discusses the tonal system of Lamnsok, a language spoken in the North-West province of the United Republic of Cameroun with specific reference to verbs. The tone pattern for a given clause is dependent on various factors handled at length. Charts and extensive examples accompany the text. (CLK)

  17. Exponential Growth through Pattern Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Betty

    2005-01-01

    Participants at the Summer Institute Pattern Exploration: Integration Math and Science in the Middle Grades used and developed a method treat arithmetic, algebra and geometry as one entity. The use of iterative geometric constructions is seen to reinforce the concepts of exponents, ratios and algebraic expressions for the nth stage of the…

  18. Patterned control of human locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yuri P; Zago, Myrka

    2012-01-01

    There is much experimental evidence for the existence of biomechanical constraints which simplify the problem of control of multi-segment movements. In addition, it has been hypothesized that movements are controlled using a small set of basic temporal components or activation patterns, shared by several different muscles and reflecting global kinematic and kinetic goals. Here we review recent studies on human locomotion showing that muscle activity is accounted for by a combination of few basic patterns, each one timed at a different phase of the gait cycle. Similar patterns are involved in walking and running at different speeds, walking forwards or backwards, and walking under different loading conditions. The corresponding weights of distribution to different muscles may change as a function of the condition, allowing highly flexible control. Biomechanical correlates of each activation pattern have been described, leading to the hypothesis that the co-ordination of limb and body segments arises from the coupling of neural oscillators between each other and with limb mechanical oscillators. Muscle activations need only intervene during limited time epochs to force intrinsic oscillations of the system when energy is lost. PMID:22411012

  19. Understanding individual human mobility patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Marta C.; Hidalgo, Cesar A.; Barabási, Albert-Lászlo

    2008-03-01

    Understanding human mobility patterns is of major importance for a number of areas, ranging from urban planning to traffic forecasting, transportation geography, and preventing the spread of biological and mobile viruses. Yet, in the absence of tools to monitor the time resolved location of a large number of individuals, our understanding of the basic laws governing human trajectories remains limited. Here we study the individual mobility pattern of mobile phone users whose position is tracked in a time resolved manner. We find that the displacement distribution of the whole population can be approximated with a truncated L'evy statistics, in agreement with earlier measurements. We show, however, that the main contribution to the observed distribution comes from the differences in the travel pattern of individuals. Furthermore, we find that the individual trajectories are bounded in space and are highly anisotropic, an effect that increases with the trajectory's radius of gyration. After we correct for differences in the radius of gyration and anisotropy all individuals are described by the same universal mobility pattern. These results open new avenues for modeling human motion, with important impact on agent based modeling, epidemic prevention, emergency response and urban planing.

  20. Yellow-poplar seedfall pattern

    Treesearch

    LaMont G. Engle

    1960-01-01

    Knowing the pattern of seedfall can be helpful when trying to regenerate yellow-poplar. This is especially true if the stand contains only scattered yellow-poplar seed trees. Information obtained from seed collections in Indiana shows that most of the seed falls north and northeast of seed trees.

  1. Exploring Patterns, Relations, and Functions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geer, Charles P.

    1992-01-01

    Describes three activities using dominoes, playing cards, and the calendar to give students mathematical experiences reinforcing basic skills and problem-solving strategies that involve patterns, relationships, and functions. Students discover mathematical relationships underlying the magic tricks used in the activities. (MDH)

  2. Patterns of smoking in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Balabanova, D; Bobak, M; McKee, M

    1998-01-01

    Although the rate of smoking-related deaths in Bulgaria is still relatively low, in international terms, it has been rising rapidly. This is likely to become worse in the future as Bulgaria faces growing pressure from transnational tobacco companies. There is, however, little information on patterns of smoking, which is necessary for development of effective policies to tackle tobacco consumption. To describe the pattern of smoking in Bulgaria and its relationship with sociodemographic factors. Multivariate analysis of data on patterns of tobacco consumption from a multi-stage nationwide survey of 1550 adults. Bulgaria, in 1997. Prevalence of current cigarette smoking. 38.4% of men and 16.7% of women smoke. Smoking rates are strongly associated with age, with 58% of men and 30% of women aged 30-39 smoking whereas only 5% of men aged 70 years and older and almost no women of this age smoke. Smoking is more common in cities, among those who are widowed or divorced, or who do not own their home. There is no clear association with household income or, for men, with education, although there is a suggestion that smoking may be more common among more highly educated women. The observed pattern of smoking indicates the need for a robust policy to tackle smoking in Bulgaria, especially among the young in large cities, informed by a better understanding of why smoking rates vary among different groups.

  3. Champagne Patterns and Lake Nyos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Carbon dioxide bubbles in a glass of champagne rise to the surface in fine threads, which are made of bubble groupings that change over time. Researchers from French and Brazilian universities have produced a new model that accounts for the patterns in strings of bubbles in champagne and other effervescent fluids. The research appears in Physical…

  4. Peoples, Processes and Patterns: Islam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Joan; And Others

    Designed for use by elementary and secondary teachers but useful to anyone interested in Islamic art, this booklet considers the ways in which design issues have been solved in Islamic cultures, both in the past and the present. The text covers two major areas: aspects of pattern in Islamic weaving and aspects of Islamic tilework. Under weaving…

  5. Primary and Secondary Patterned Portraits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrbach, Marla

    2002-01-01

    Describes art curriculum goals for first grade students in the Knob Noster (Missouri) school district where students are expected to learn about mixing primary colors to create secondary colors, to learn about creating patterns in artwork, and to understand art subject matter. Presents an art activity that accomplished these goals. (CMK)

  6. Space Biology: Patterns of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Frank B.

    1971-01-01

    Present knowledge about Mars is compared with past beliefs about the planet. Biological experiments that indicate life may exist on Mars are interpreted. Life patterns or biological features that might be postulated for extraterrestrial life are presented at the molecular, cellular, organism, and ecosystem levels. (DS)

  7. Visual Thinking Patterns. [Teaching Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Helen

    Theories and techniques for fostering creativity are described because all students, regardless of intelligence or talent, have artistic ability that should be developed. Four basic visual viewpoints have been identified: the expressive colorist, the hands-on formist, the neat observant designer, and the pattern-oriented draftsperson. These visual…

  8. Laser patterning of diamond films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, J.; Chen, X.

    1992-04-01

    Selective deposition and fine-scale patterning of hot filament deposited diamond films by the use of pulsed laser irradiation on silicon and copper substrates are reported. The substrates were abraded with diamond and alumina powders before hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. A drastic enhancement in diamond nucleation (using hot-filament chemical vapor deposition) was observed on specimens treated with diamond powder, whereas enhancement on specimens pretreated with alumina powder was relatively insignificant. It is found that the seeding of diamond crystals was substantially reduced by pulsed laser annealing/melting which removes the plastic damage as well as the seed crystals introduced by diamond powder pretreatment. The selective deposition or fine-scale patterning of diamond films was achieved either by a shadow masking or by scanning a focused laser beam to generate desired patterns. The nucleation can also be enhanced by laser deposition of thin films, such as diamond-like carbon and tungsten carbide (WC), and selective deposition and patterning achieved by controlled removal or deposition of the above films.

  9. Solution Patterns Predicting Pythagorean Triples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezenweani, Ugwunna Louis

    2013-01-01

    Pythagoras Theorem is an old mathematical treatise that has traversed the school curricula from secondary to tertiary levels. The patterns it produced are quite interesting that many researchers have tried to generate a kind of predictive approach to identifying triples. Two attempts, namely Diophantine equation and Brahmagupta trapezium presented…

  10. Peoples, Processes and Patterns: Islam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Joan; And Others

    Designed for use by elementary and secondary teachers but useful to anyone interested in Islamic art, this booklet considers the ways in which design issues have been solved in Islamic cultures, both in the past and the present. The text covers two major areas: aspects of pattern in Islamic weaving and aspects of Islamic tilework. Under weaving…

  11. Patterning via optical saturable transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantu, Precious

    For the past 40 years, optical lithography has been the patterning workhorse for the semiconductor industry. However, as integrated circuits have become more and more complex, and as device geometries shrink, more innovative methods are required to meet these needs. In the far-field, the smallest feature that can be generated with light is limited to approximately half the wavelength. This, so called far-field diffraction limit or the Abbe limit (after Prof. Ernst Abbe who first recognized this), effectively prevents the use of long-wavelength photons >300nm from patterning nanostructures <100nm. Even with a 193nm laser source and extremely complicated processing, patterns below ˜20nm are incredibly challenging to create. Sources with even shorter wavelengths can potentially be used. However, these tend be much more expensive and of much lower brightness, which in turn limits their patterning speed. Multi-photon reactions have been proposed to overcome the diffraction limit. However, these require very large intensities for modest gain in resolution. Moreover, the large intensities make it difficult to parallelize, thus limiting the patterning speed. In this dissertation, a novel nanopatterning technique using wavelength-selective small molecules that undergo single-photon reactions, enabling rapid top-down nanopatterning over large areas at low-light intensities, thereby allowing for the circumvention of the far-field diffraction barrier is developed and experimentally verified. This approach, which I refer to as Patterning via Optical Saturable Transitions (POST) has the potential for massive parallelism, enabling the creation of nanostructures and devices at a speed far surpassing what is currently possible with conventional optical lithographic techniques. The fundamental understanding of this technique goes beyond optical lithography in the semiconductor industry and is applicable to any area that requires the rapid patterning of large-area two or three

  12. Quantitative computation of RHEED patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lordi, Scott Andrew

    This thesis is concerned with the general problem of performing quantitative RHEED computations for both flat and rough surfaces using the multislice method. Modifications to the RHEED multislice method which make it into a practical technique for performing RHEED computations are described. Computation of convergent-beam RHEED patterns using the RHEED multislice method is demonstrated by application to the case of MgO (001). Computed patterns are compared (based on the overall pattern geometry) to energy-filtered Tanaka and convergent-beam patterns recorded in a transmission electron microscope. The validity of the RHEED multislice method for convergent-beam computations is demonstrated by the level of agreement achieved. The application of the RHEED multislice method combined with the edge patching algorithm to the computation of RHEED streaks from rough surfaces is demonstrated by applying it to the case of rough Fe (001) surfaces. The computations are done using the column approximation and by neglecting the scattering from steps parallel to the incident beam. The computations are set up using STM images of the surfaces from which the experimental RHEED patterns were recorded. The shapes of the diffuse parts of the computed and experimental streaks agree well. There is a discrepancy between experiment and theory in the magnitudes of the flat surface spot position peaks relative to the diffuse parts of the streaks. The shapes of the diffuse parts of the computed streaks are shown to be insensitive to the computational and potential parameters. The magnitudes of the flat surface spot position peaks are at least weakly dependent on the potential parameters and the long range height variations of the surface. This agreement conclusively demonstrates that the RHEED multislice method can be used to perform quantitative computations of RHEED streaks from real rough surfaces. An approximation method (the patchwork approximation) for doing RHEED computations, exact in

  13. Metacommunity patterns in larval odonates.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Shannon J; Davis, Christopher J; Relyea, Rick A; Yurewicz, Kerry L; Skelly, David K; Werner, Earl E

    2008-11-01

    The growth of metacommunity ecology as a subdiscipline has increased interest in how processes at different spatial scales structure communities. However, there is still a significant knowledge gap with respect to relating the action of niche- and dispersal-assembly mechanisms to observed species distributions across gradients. Surveys of the larval dragonfly community (Odonata: Anisoptera) in 57 lakes and ponds in southeast Michigan were used to evaluate hypotheses about the processes regulating community structure in this system. We considered the roles of both niche- and dispersal-assembly processes in determining patterns of species richness and composition across a habitat gradient involving changes in the extent of habitat permanence, canopy cover, area, and top predator type. We compared observed richness patterns and species distributions in this system to patterns predicted by four general community models: species sorting related to adaptive trade-offs, a developmental constraints hypothesis, dispersal assembly, and a neutral community assemblage. Our results supported neither the developmental constraints nor the neutral-assemblage models. Observed patterns of richness and species distributions were consistent with patterns expected when adaptive tradeoffs and dispersal-assembly mechanisms affect community structure. Adaptive trade-offs appeared to be important in limiting the distributions of species which segregate across the habitat gradient. However, dispersal was important in shaping the distributions of species that utilize habitats with a broad range of hydroperiods and alternative top predator types. Our results also suggest that the relative importance of these mechanisms may change across this habitat gradient and that a metacommunity perspective which incorporates both niche- and dispersal-assembly processes is necessary to understand how communities are organized.

  14. Erosion patterns on dissolving blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrech du Pont, Sylvain; Cohen, Caroline; Derr, Julien; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Patterns in nature are shaped under water flows and wind action, and the understanding of their morphodynamics goes through the identification of the physical mechanisms at play. When a dissoluble body is exposed to a water flow, typical patterns with scallop-like shapes may appear [1,2]. These shapes are observed on the walls of underground rivers or icebergs. We experimentally study the erosion of dissolving bodies made of salt, caramel or ice into water solutions without external flow. The dissolving mixture, which is created at the solid/liquid interface, undergoes a buoyancy-driven instability comparable to a Rayleigh-Bénard instability so that the dissolving front destabilizes into filaments. This mechanism yields to spatial variations of solute concentration and to differential dissolution of the dissolving block. We first observe longitudinal stripes with a well defined wavelength, which evolve towards chevrons and scallops that interact and move again the dissolving current. Thanks to a careful analysis of the competing physical mechanisms, we propose scaling laws, which account for the characteristic lengths and times of the early regime in experiments. The long-term evolution of patterns is understood qualitatively. A close related mechanism has been proposed to explain structures observed on the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes [3] and we suggest that our experiments are analogous and explain the scallop-like patterns on iceberg walls. [1] P. Meakin and B. Jamtveit, Geological pattern formation by growth and dissolution in aqueous systems, Proc. R. Soc. A 466, 659-694 (2010). [2] P.N. Blumberg and R.L. Curl, Experimental and theoretical studies of dissolution roughness, J. Fluid Mech. 65, 735-751 (1974). [3] L. Solari and G. Parker, Morphodynamic modelling of the basal boundary of ice cover on brakish lakes, J.G.R. 118, 1432-1442 (2013).

  15. A Repeat Look at Repeating Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markworth, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    A "repeating pattern" is a cyclical repetition of an identifiable core. Children in the primary grades usually begin pattern work with fairly simple patterns, such as AB, ABC, or ABB patterns. The unique letters represent unique elements, whereas the sequence of letters represents the core that is repeated. Based on color, shape,…

  16. Tools for visualization of knowledge patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miarka, Rostislav; Žáček, Martin; Gongolová, Zuzana

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge patterns are closely related to ontologies and knowledge bases. They represent general patterns of knowledge, which can be used in various ontologies. We propose to represent knowledge patterns in RDF language. This paper presents the possibilities of visualization of knowledge patterns in available editors of RDF graphs.

  17. Developing Algebraic Thinking through Pattern Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lesley; Freiman, Viktor

    2006-01-01

    Pattern work is now undertaken as early as kindergarten, and both researchers and teachers have discovered that children engage in pattern work with great enthusiasm and innate ability. Having some flexibility in pattern perception and selecting mathematically useful patterns require some training, although there is nothing particularly algebraic…

  18. Geometric Growing Patterns: What's the Rule?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourigan, Mairéad; Leavy, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    While within a geometric repeating pattern, there is an identifiable core which is made up of objects that repeat in a predictable manner, a geometric growing pattern (also called visual or pictorial growing patterns in other curricula) "is a pattern that is made from a sequence of figures [or objects] that change from one term to the next in…

  19. 30 CFR 104.3 - Pattern criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pattern criteria. 104.3 Section 104.3 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PATTERN OF VIOLATIONS PATTERN OF VIOLATIONS § 104.3 Pattern criteria. (a) The criteria of this section shall be used to identify those mines...

  20. Point pattern analysis of FIA data

    Treesearch

    Chris Woodall

    2002-01-01

    Point pattern analysis is a branch of spatial statistics that quantifies the spatial distribution of points in two-dimensional space. Point pattern analysis was conducted on stand stem-maps from FIA fixed-radius plots to explore point pattern analysis techniques and to determine the ability of pattern descriptions to describe stand attributes. Results indicate that the...

  1. 30 CFR 104.2 - Pattern criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pattern criteria. 104.2 Section 104.2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PATTERN OF VIOLATIONS PATTERN OF VIOLATIONS § 104.2 Pattern criteria. (a) At least once each year, MSHA will review the compliance and...

  2. Geometric Growing Patterns: What's the Rule?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hourigan, Mairéad; Leavy, Aisling

    2015-01-01

    While within a geometric repeating pattern, there is an identifiable core which is made up of objects that repeat in a predictable manner, a geometric growing pattern (also called visual or pictorial growing patterns in other curricula) "is a pattern that is made from a sequence of figures [or objects] that change from one term to the next in…

  3. Ecophysiological patterns in field crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langensiepen, M.; Stadler, A.; Kupisch, M.; Ewert, F.

    2013-12-01

    Soils in agricultural fields are often characterized by different degrees of heterogeneities in physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Plants may respond distinctively to these patterns by adjusting ecophysiological processes and architectural growth at different organizational, spatial, and temporal, scales. The purpose of this research was to quantify the heterogeneity in physical soil conditions at a key research field of the Transregio 32 collaborative research center (www.tr32.de) near Jülich (50°52' N , 6° 27‧ E) and to characterize their effects on the magnitudes of photosynthesis, transpiration, and sap-flow rates at the leaf, point, and field scales. Such information is a necessary prerequisite for deciding which theoretical model representations should be taken for quantifying these processes and which routines are appropriate for scaling the chosen model types from point to field level and beyond. Outputs from the gas-exchange and sap-flow equipment were initially validated against independent eddy-covariance measurements of H2O and CO2 fluxes in a uniform wheat-field 10 km apart from the research site to ensure good data quality. The actual experiment was subsequently carried during two wheat growing years (2010/11 and 2011/12) at the actual field site in. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) and soil measurements were carried out to quantify heterogeneities in soil physical conditions which showed distinctive patterns. These patterns were reflected in observed spatial and temporal patterns of leaf area development and biomass growth which were carried out at bi-weekly intervals. Surprisingly, spatial patterns in soil heterogeneity did not significantly affect field patterns of stomatal conductance, leaf gas-exchange and sap-flow which reflects whole-plant transpiration, whereas canopy fluxes of H2O and CO2 were strongly distinct in different field locations. Morphological adaptations at the plant and canopy levels to soil heterogeneity were

  4. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of

  5. Strain Pattern in Supercooled Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illing, Bernd; Fritschi, Sebastian; Hajnal, David; Klix, Christian; Keim, Peter; Fuchs, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    Investigations of strain correlations at the glass transition reveal unexpected phenomena. The shear strain fluctuations show an Eshelby-strain pattern [˜cos (4 θ ) /r2 ], characteristic of elastic response, even in liquids, at long times. We address this using a mode-coupling theory for the strain fluctuations in supercooled liquids and data from both video microscopy of a two-dimensional colloidal glass former and simulations of Brownian hard disks. We show that the long-ranged and long-lived strain signatures follow a scaling law valid close to the glass transition. For large enough viscosities, the Eshelby-strain pattern is visible even on time scales longer than the structural relaxation time τ and after the shear modulus has relaxed to zero.

  6. Historic Patterns in Astronomical Incomprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2006-04-01

    Because astronomy is old, it has had a chance to display some very prolonged battles in the war between ideas (theories) and observations (data) that we call science. It is possible to discern two major patterns -- data leading vs. ideas leading -- and very short to very long durations of the events that eventually led to understanding. A variant has the community converging with vigor around a wrong answer (gamma ray bursters are a recent example). The talk will explore some of the author's favorite examples of each pattern. These include the rapid basic understanding of quasars and pulsars vs. the extremely long times required to figure out the solar corona and pulsating variable stars. Among the cases where theory has led via prediction, discovery was almost immediate for 21 cm radio emission and superluminal motion in quasars, but very slow for fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation, certain kinds of polarization, and (surely a record never to be broken) heliocentric parallax.

  7. Pattern Transformation with DNA Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Chirieleison, Steven M.; Allen, Peter B.; Simpson, Zack B.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Chen, Xi

    2014-01-01

    Readily programmable chemical networks are important tools as the scope of chemistry expands from individual molecules to larger molecular systems. While many complex systems have been constructed using conventional organic and inorganic chemistry, the programmability of biological molecules such as nucleic acids allows for precise, high-throughput, and automated design, as well as simple, rapid, and robust implementation. Here we show that systematic and quantitative control over the diffusivity and reactivity of DNA molecules yields highly programmable chemical reaction networks (CRNs) that execute at the macroscale. In particular, we design and implement non-enzymatic DNA circuits capable of performing pattern transformation algorithms such as edge detection. We also show that it is possible to fine-tune and multiplex such circuits. We believe these strategies will provide programmable platforms for prototyping CRNs, for discovering bottom-up construction principles, and for generating patterns in materials. PMID:24256862

  8. Visual pattern image sequence coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silsbee, Peter; Bovik, Alan C.; Chen, Dapang

    1990-01-01

    The visual pattern image coding (VPIC) configurable digital image-coding process is capable of coding with visual fidelity comparable to the best available techniques, at compressions which (at 30-40:1) exceed all other technologies. These capabilities are associated with unprecedented coding efficiencies; coding and decoding operations are entirely linear with respect to image size and entail a complexity that is 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than any previous high-compression technique. The visual pattern image sequence coding to which attention is presently given exploits all the advantages of the static VPIC in the reduction of information from an additional, temporal dimension, to achieve unprecedented image sequence coding performance.

  9. Gene Insertion Patterns and Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vain, Philippe; Thole, Vera

    During the past 25 years, the molecular analysis of transgene insertion patterns and sites in plants has greatly contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying transgene integration, expression, and stability in the nuclear genome. Molecular characterization is also an essential step in the safety assessment of genetically modified crops. This chapter describes the standard experimental procedures used to analyze transgene insertion patterns and loci in cereals and grasses transformed using Agrobacterium tumefaciens or direct transfer of DNA. Methods and protocols enabling the determination of the number and configuration of transgenic loci via a combination of inheritance studies, polymerase chain reaction, and Southern analyses are presented. The complete characterization of transgenic inserts in plants is, however, a holistic process relying on a wide variety of experimental approaches. In this chapter, these additional approaches are not detailed but references to relevant bibliographic records are provided.

  10. Patterns of pronoun case error.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, M

    1998-10-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether the rate and patterns of pronoun case error are influenced by the composition of an individual pronoun's paradigm. Twenty-nine children, aged 2;6 to 4;0 were audiotaped for two 1-hour sessions, interacting with their primary caregivers engaged in free play, book reading and family album viewing. It was found that her was overextended for she at a significantly higher rate than him for he and them for they, providing evidence of a 'double-cell' effect that increases the incidence of error in the feminine pronoun. It was also found that the overextension of nominative forms (e.g. he for him), were antagonistic to the more frequently occurring type of overextension, objective for nominative (e.g. him for he). These findings indicate that the composition of a pronoun's paradigm influenced the patterns of pronoun case error observed.

  11. Theory of electrochemical pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christoph, J.; Eiswirth, M.

    2002-03-01

    The spatial coupling in electrochemical systems is mediated by ion migration under the influence of the electric field. Since field effects spread very rapidly, every point of an electrode can communicate with every other one practically instantaneously through migration coupling. Based on mathematical potential theory we present the derivation of a generally applicable reaction-migration equation, which describes the coupling via an integral over the whole electrode area. The corresponding coupling function depends only on the geometry of the electrode setup and has been computed for commonly used electrode shapes (such as ring, disk, ribbon or rectangle). The pattern formation observed in electrochemical systems in the bistable, excitable and oscillatory regime can be reproduced in computer simulations, and the types of patterns occurring under different geometries can be rationalized.

  12. Programming of DNA methylation patterns.

    PubMed

    Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation represents a form of genome annotation that mediates gene repression by serving as a maintainable mark that can be used to reconstruct silent chromatin following each round of replication. During development, germline DNA methylation is erased in the blastocyst, and a bimodal pattern is established anew at the time of implantation when the entire genome gets methylated while CpG islands are protected. This brings about global repression and allows housekeeping genes to be expressed in all cells of the body. Postimplantation development is characterized by stage- and tissue-specific changes in methylation that ultimately mold the epigenetic patterns that define each individual cell type. This is directed by sequence information in DNA and represents a secondary event that provides long-term expression stability. Abnormal methylation changes play a role in diseases, such as cancer or fragile X syndrome, and may also occur as a function of aging or as a result of environmental influences.

  13. Broadband patterned magnetic microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Wu, Tianlong; Wang, Wei; Guan, Jianguo; Zhai, Pengcheng

    2014-07-28

    It is a tough task to greatly improve the working bandwidth for the traditional flat microwave absorbers because of the restriction of available material parameters. In this work, a simple patterning method is proposed to drastically broaden the absorption bandwidth of a conventional magnetic absorber. As a demonstration, an ultra-broadband microwave absorber with more than 90% absorption in the frequency range of 4–40 GHz is designed and experimentally realized, which has a thin thickness of 3.7 mm and a light weight equivalent to a 2-mm-thick flat absorber. In such a patterned absorber, the broadband strong absorption is mainly originated from the simultaneous incorporation of multiple λ/4 resonances and edge diffraction effects. This work provides a facile route to greatly extend the microwave absorption bandwidth for the currently available absorbing materials.

  14. Dense pattern multiple pass cells

    DOEpatents

    Silver, Joel A.; Bomse, David S.

    2010-09-21

    An optical cell and a method of operating an optical cell comprising employing a first mirror comprising a first hole therein at approximately a center of the first mirror and through which laser light enters the cell, employing a second mirror comprising a second hole therein at approximately a center of the second mirror and through which laser light exits the cell, and forming a Lissajous pattern of spots on the mirrors by repeated reflection of laser light entering the cell.

  15. Photomask and pattern programming manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschman, R. K.

    1978-01-01

    A user's manual for a set of computer programs written in FORTRAN for the layout and generation of photomasks is presented. A limited amount of related information on photomasks, their design, and use is included. Input to the programs includes data describing the photomask design. Possible outputs include plots of the layout and a magnetic tape for controlling generation of the photomask by a pattern generator.

  16. Perception of Complex Auditory Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-14

    Detection thresholds for vowels . Kewley-Port and C. Watson In an initial study, vowel detection thresholds for normal hearing listeners were found to...differ by 20 dB across ten synthetic English vowels (Kewley-Port, 1989, 1991). One model (Average Excitation which calculated the average intensity in...dB over the entire excitation pattern) accounted for most of the variance in the vowel thresholds (Kewley-Port, 1991). Further studies, following the

  17. Transverse patterning and human amnesia.

    PubMed

    Rickard, Timothy C; Verfaellie, Mieke; Grafman, Jordan

    2006-10-01

    The transverse patterning (TP) task (A+ B-, B+ C-, C+ A-) has played a central role in testing the hypothesis that medial-temporal (and, in particular, hippocampal) brain damage selectively impairs learning on at least some classes of configural (i.e., nonlinear) learning tasks. Results in the animal and human literature generally support that hypothesis. Reed and Squire [Impaired transverse patterning in human amnesia is a special case of impaired memory for two-choice discrimination tasks. Behavioral Neuroscience, 113, 3-9, 1999], however, advanced an alternative account in which impaired TP performance in amnesia reflects a generic scaling artifact arising from the greater difficulty of the TP task compared to the elemental (i.e., linear) control task that is typically used. We begin with a critique of Reed and Squire, countering their conceptual arguments and showing that their results, when analyzed appropriately, support the configural deficit hypothesis. We then report results from eight new amnesic patients and controls on an improved version of the TP task. Despite substantial practice, accuracy of patients with bilateral hippocampal damage due to anoxia reached and maintained an asymptote of only 54% correct, well below the maximum accuracy obtainable (67%) in the absence of configural learning. A patient with selective bilateral damage to the anterior thalamic nuclei exhibited a TP accuracy asymptote that was near 67%, a pattern of two out of three correct consecutive trials, and a pattern of nearly always answering correctly for two of the three TP item pairs. These results are consistent with a set of unique and parameter-free predictions of the configural deficit hypothesis.

  18. Spatial patterns of tidal heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthe, Mikael

    2013-03-01

    In a body periodically strained by tides, heating produced by viscous friction is far from homogeneous. The spatial distribution of tidal heating depends in a complicated way on the tidal potential and on the internal structure of the body. I show here that the distribution of the dissipated power within a spherically stratified body is a linear combination of three angular functions. These angular functions depend only on the tidal potential whereas the radial weights are specified by the internal structure of the body. The 3D problem of predicting spatial patterns of dissipation at all radii is thus reduced to the 1D problem of computing weight functions. I compute spatial patterns in various toy models without assuming a specific rheology: a viscoelastic thin shell stratified in conductive and convective layers, an incompressible homogeneous body and a two-layer model of uniform density with a liquid or rigid core. For a body in synchronous rotation undergoing eccentricity tides, dissipation in a mantle surrounding a liquid core is highest at the poles. Within a soft layer (or asthenosphere) in contact with a more rigid layer, the same tides generate maximum heating in the equatorial region with a significant degree-four structure if the soft layer is thin. The asthenosphere can be a layer of partial melting in the upper mantle or, very differently, an icy layer in contact with a silicate mantle or solid core. Tidal heating patterns are thus of three main types: mantle dissipation (with the icy shell above an ocean as a particular case), dissipation in a thin soft layer and dissipation in a thick soft layer. Finally, I show that the toy models predict well patterns of dissipation in Europa, Titan and Io. The formalism described in this paper applies to dissipation within solid layers of planets and satellites for which internal spherical symmetry and viscoelastic linear rheology are good approximations.

  19. Polar patterns of driven filaments.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Volker; Weber, Christoph; Semmrich, Christine; Frey, Erwin; Bausch, Andreas R

    2010-09-02

    The emergence of collective motion exhibited by systems ranging from flocks of animals to self-propelled microorganisms to the cytoskeleton is a ubiquitous and fascinating self-organization phenomenon. Similarities between these systems, such as the inherent polarity of the constituents, a density-dependent transition to ordered phases or the existence of very large density fluctuations, suggest universal principles underlying pattern formation. This idea is followed by theoretical models at all levels of description: micro- or mesoscopic models directly map local forces and interactions using only a few, preferably simple, interaction rules, and more macroscopic approaches in the hydrodynamic limit rely on the systems' generic symmetries. All these models characteristically have a broad parameter space with a manifold of possible patterns, most of which have not yet been experimentally verified. The complexity of interactions and the limited parameter control of existing experimental systems are major obstacles to our understanding of the underlying ordering principles. Here we demonstrate the emergence of collective motion in a high-density motility assay that consists of highly concentrated actin filaments propelled by immobilized molecular motors in a planar geometry. Above a critical density, the filaments self-organize to form coherently moving structures with persistent density modulations, such as clusters, swirls and interconnected bands. These polar nematic structures are long lived and can span length scales orders of magnitudes larger than their constituents. Our experimental approach, which offers control of all relevant system parameters, complemented by agent-based simulations, allows backtracking of the assembly and disassembly pathways to the underlying local interactions. We identify weak and local alignment interactions to be essential for the observed formation of patterns and their dynamics. The presented minimal polar-pattern-forming system

  20. Persistent Patterns in Accretion Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Frolov, Andrei V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-04-03

    We present a set of new characteristic frequencies associated with accretion disks around compact objects. These frequencies arise from persistent rotating patterns in the disk that are finite in radial extent and driven purely by the gravity of the central body. Their existence depends on general relativistic corrections to orbital motion and, if observed, could be used to probe the strong gravity region around a black hole. We also discuss a possible connection to the puzzle of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  1. Three-Dimensional Moire Pattern

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1991-01-01

    Use of moire patterns to determine positions extended to three dimensions. Concept requires two moire templates or grids, separated from each other. Template on side closer to observer contains alternating black and transparent areas. Template farther from observer contains alternating black and white areas. Observer determines position of center of perspective, also receiving indication of depth even without stereoscopic view. Used in rangefinding applications in which precision not required. Also used to gauge location of mobile robot in environment hostile to humans.

  2. Steenbeek Brace: Patterns of Wear.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anil; Shaharyar, Abbas; Kumar, Anubrat; Bhat, Mohd Shafi; Mishra, Madhusudan

    2016-02-01

    Steenbeek foot abduction brace (SFAB) is an essential orthotic for maintaining correction in congenital talipes equinovarus treated with Ponseti method. As the brace is used up to 3 to 4 years of age, we examined the brace wear pattern according to a child's development and age. We studied 100 SFABs that were rendered unusable or returned by parents due to advanced brace wear. SFABs returned due to other reasons such as foot outgrowing shoe size were excluded. Each part of the brace (outer sole, insole, upper leather, abduction bar, shoe laces) was carefully inspected to observe any pattern of damage. We grouped the pattern of brace wear as per the probable causative factors into 3 broad categories: due to general use in all age groups, sitters and crawlers, and walking children. Shredded tongue, elongated/torn shoelace hole, peeled paint of metal abduction bar, shredded outer sole, and frayed shoelace were due to general use. Due to sitting and crawling with the brace on, shoe wore on its anteromedial, anterolateral, and posterolateral parts at the junction of the upper leather and outer sole. The commonest area of shoe wear in walkers was the abduction bar, which either broke from the welded junction between bar and metal or was bent at midpoint. The SFAB wear pattern was related to the age of the child and his/her activities. The reusability of the brace can probably be extended with simple improvisations and instructing parents about the correct use of the brace. Prognostic, Level IV: Case series. © 2015 The Author(s).

  3. The Reliability of Pattern Classification in Bloodstain Pattern Analysis, Part 1: Bloodstain Patterns on Rigid Non-absorbent Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael C; Laber, Terry L; Kish, Paul E; Owens, Glynn; Osborne, Nikola K P

    2016-07-01

    This study was designed to produce the first baseline measure of reliability in bloodstain pattern classification. A panel of experienced bloodstain pattern analysts examined over 400 spatter patterns on three rigid non-absorbent surfaces. The patterns varied in spatter type and extent. A case summary accompanied each pattern that either contained neutral information, information to suggest the correct pattern (i.e., was positively biasing), or information to suggest an incorrect pattern (i.e., was negatively biasing). Across the variables under examination, 13% of classifications were erroneous. Generally speaking, where the pattern was more difficult to recognize (e.g., limited staining extent or a patterned substrate), analysts became more conservative in their judgment, opting to be inconclusive. Incorrect classifications increased as a function of the negatively biasing contextual information. The implications of the findings for practice are discussed.

  4. Dynamic Patterns of Modern Epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Dirk; Hufnagel, Lars; Geisel, Theo

    2004-03-01

    We investigate the effects of scale-free travelling of humans and their inhomogeneous geographic distribution on the dynamic patterns of spreading epidemics. Our approach combines the susceptible/infected/recovered paradigm for the infection dynamics with superdiffusive dispersion of individuals and their inhomogeneous spatial distribution. We show that scale-free motion of individuals and their variable spatial distribution leads to the absence of wavefronts in dynamic epidemic patterns which are typical for the limiting cases of ordinary diffusion and spatially homogeneous populations. Instead, patterns emerge with isolated hotspots on highly populated areas from which regional epidemic outbursts are triggered. Hotspot sizes are independent of the correlation length in the spatial distribution of individuals and occur on all scales. Our theory predicts that highly populated areas are reached by an epidemic in advance and must receive special attention in control measure strategies. Furthermore, our analysis predicts strong fluctuations in the time course of the total infection which cannot be accounted for by ordinary reaction-diffusion models for epidemics.

  5. Visualizing Dynamic Bitcoin Transaction Patterns.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Dan; Birch, David; Akroyd, David; Molina-Solana, Miguel; Guo, Yike; Knottenbelt, William J

    2016-06-01

    This work presents a systemic top-down visualization of Bitcoin transaction activity to explore dynamically generated patterns of algorithmic behavior. Bitcoin dominates the cryptocurrency markets and presents researchers with a rich source of real-time transactional data. The pseudonymous yet public nature of the data presents opportunities for the discovery of human and algorithmic behavioral patterns of interest to many parties such as financial regulators, protocol designers, and security analysts. However, retaining visual fidelity to the underlying data to retain a fuller understanding of activity within the network remains challenging, particularly in real time. We expose an effective force-directed graph visualization employed in our large-scale data observation facility to accelerate this data exploration and derive useful insight among domain experts and the general public alike. The high-fidelity visualizations demonstrated in this article allowed for collaborative discovery of unexpected high frequency transaction patterns, including automated laundering operations, and the evolution of multiple distinct algorithmic denial of service attacks on the Bitcoin network.

  6. Visualizing Dynamic Bitcoin Transaction Patterns

    PubMed Central

    McGinn, Dan; Birch, David; Akroyd, David; Molina-Solana, Miguel; Guo, Yike; Knottenbelt, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This work presents a systemic top-down visualization of Bitcoin transaction activity to explore dynamically generated patterns of algorithmic behavior. Bitcoin dominates the cryptocurrency markets and presents researchers with a rich source of real-time transactional data. The pseudonymous yet public nature of the data presents opportunities for the discovery of human and algorithmic behavioral patterns of interest to many parties such as financial regulators, protocol designers, and security analysts. However, retaining visual fidelity to the underlying data to retain a fuller understanding of activity within the network remains challenging, particularly in real time. We expose an effective force-directed graph visualization employed in our large-scale data observation facility to accelerate this data exploration and derive useful insight among domain experts and the general public alike. The high-fidelity visualizations demonstrated in this article allowed for collaborative discovery of unexpected high frequency transaction patterns, including automated laundering operations, and the evolution of multiple distinct algorithmic denial of service attacks on the Bitcoin network. PMID:27441715

  7. Compact Structure Patterns in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chitturi, Bhadrachalam; Shi, Shuoyong; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-10-23

    Globular proteins typically fold into tightly packed arrays of regular secondary structures. We developed a model to approximate the compact parallel and antiparallel arrangement of α-helices and β-strands, enumerated all possible topologies formed by up to five secondary structural elements (SSEs), searched for their occurrence in spatial structures of proteins, and documented their frequencies of occurrence in the PDB. The enumeration model grows larger super-secondary structure patterns (SSPs) by combining pairs of smaller patterns, a process that approximates a potential path of protein fold evolution. The most prevalent SSPs are typically present in superfolds such as the Rossmann-like fold, the ferredoxin-like fold, and the Greek key motif, whereas the less frequent SSPs often possess uncommon structure features such as split β-sheets, left-handed connections, and crossing loops. This complete SSP enumeration model, for the first time, allows us to investigate which theoretically possible SSPs are not observed in available protein structures. All SSPs with up to four SSEs occurred in proteins. However, among the SSPs with five SSEs, approximately 20% (218) are absent from existing folds. Of these unobserved SSPs, 80% contain two or more uncommon structure features. To facilitate future efforts in protein structure classification, engineering, and design, we provide the resulting patterns and their frequency of occurrence in proteins at: http://prodata.swmed.edu/ssps/. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, C. O.; Larionova, Ye

    2007-02-01

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far—including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems.

  9. Dietary Patterns and CKD Progression.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanushree; Liu, Yang; Crews, Deidra C

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and their clinicians seek ways to mitigate the risk of CKD progression and its associated complications. Emerging data suggest that dietary modifications may be beneficial adjuvant approaches to reducing the risk of adverse CKD outcomes. This review focuses on several different dietary patterns, including the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension and Mediterranean diets, and their kidney health benefits. We discuss how healthful dietary patterns are lower in dietary acid load and how improving diet quality may slow the progression of CKD. We also discuss some barriers that may impede socially disadvantaged individuals from following healthful diets. Dietary patterns low in dietary acid load might slow the progression of CKD. Current evidence suggests that a reduction in dietary acid load could be beneficial in patients with CKD, but the supremacy of any particular diet is yet to be established. Additional randomized controlled dietary interventions among CKD patients are needed to inform evidence-based recommendations, which can be tailored to an individual's preferences and ability to access healthful foods. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-08-29

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications - minoxidil and finasteride - are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss.

  11. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Lauren L; Emer, Jason J

    2013-01-01

    Hair loss is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice, with men presenting with a distinctive pattern involving hairline recession and vertex balding (Norwood-Hamilton classification) and women exhibiting diffuse hair thinning over the crown (increased part width) and sparing of the frontal hairline (Ludwig classification). Female pattern hair loss has a strikingly overwhelming psychological effect; thus, successful treatments are necessary. Difficulty lies in successful treatment interventions, as only two medications – minoxidil and finasteride – are approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia, and these medications offer mediocre results, lack of a permanent cure, and potential complications. Hair transplantation is the only current successful permanent option, and it requires surgical procedures. Several other medical options, such as antiandrogens (eg, spironolactone, oral contraceptives, cyproterone, flutamide, dutasteride), prostaglandin analogs (eg, bimatoprost, latanoprost), and ketoconazole are reported to be beneficial. Laser and light therapies have also become popular despite the lack of a profound benefit. Management of expectations is crucial, and the aim of therapy, given the current therapeutic options, is to slow or stop disease progression with contentment despite patient expectations of permanent hair regrowth. This article reviews current perspectives on therapeutic options for female pattern hair loss. PMID:24039457

  12. Understanding individual human mobility patterns.

    PubMed

    González, Marta C; Hidalgo, César A; Barabási, Albert-László

    2008-06-05

    Despite their importance for urban planning, traffic forecasting and the spread of biological and mobile viruses, our understanding of the basic laws governing human motion remains limited owing to the lack of tools to monitor the time-resolved location of individuals. Here we study the trajectory of 100,000 anonymized mobile phone users whose position is tracked for a six-month period. We find that, in contrast with the random trajectories predicted by the prevailing Lévy flight and random walk models, human trajectories show a high degree of temporal and spatial regularity, each individual being characterized by a time-independent characteristic travel distance and a significant probability to return to a few highly frequented locations. After correcting for differences in travel distances and the inherent anisotropy of each trajectory, the individual travel patterns collapse into a single spatial probability distribution, indicating that, despite the diversity of their travel history, humans follow simple reproducible patterns. This inherent similarity in travel patterns could impact all phenomena driven by human mobility, from epidemic prevention to emergency response, urban planning and agent-based modelling.

  13. Understanding individual human mobility patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Marta C.; Hidalgo, César A.; Barabási, Albert-László

    2008-06-01

    Despite their importance for urban planning, traffic forecasting and the spread of biological and mobile viruses, our understanding of the basic laws governing human motion remains limited owing to the lack of tools to monitor the time-resolved location of individuals. Here we study the trajectory of 100,000 anonymized mobile phone users whose position is tracked for a six-month period. We find that, in contrast with the random trajectories predicted by the prevailing Lévy flight and random walk models, human trajectories show a high degree of temporal and spatial regularity, each individual being characterized by a time-independent characteristic travel distance and a significant probability to return to a few highly frequented locations. After correcting for differences in travel distances and the inherent anisotropy of each trajectory, the individual travel patterns collapse into a single spatial probability distribution, indicating that, despite the diversity of their travel history, humans follow simple reproducible patterns. This inherent similarity in travel patterns could impact all phenomena driven by human mobility, from epidemic prevention to emergency response, urban planning and agent-based modelling.

  14. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns.

  15. Raman Radiation Patterns of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the angular distribution of the G and 2D Raman scattering from graphene on glass by detecting back focal plane patterns. The G Raman emission can be described by a superposition of two incoherent orthogonal point dipoles oriented in the graphene plane. Due to double resonant Raman scattering, the 2D emission can be represented by the sum of either three incoherent dipoles oriented 120° with respect to each other, or two orthogonal incoherent ones with a 3:1 weight ratio. Parameter-free calculations of the G and 2D intensities are in excellent agreement with the experimental radiation patterns. We show that the 2D polarization ratio and the 2D/G intensity ratio depend on the numerical aperture of the microscope objective. This is due to the depolarization of the emission and excitation light when graphene is on a dielectric substrate, as well as to tight focusing. The polarization contrast decreases substantially for increasing collection angle, due to polarization mixing caused by the air-dielectric interface. This also influences the intensity ratio I(2D)/I(G), a crucial quantity for estimating the doping in graphene. Our results are thus important for the quantitative analysis of the Raman intensities in confocal microscopy. In addition, they are relevant for understanding the influence of signal enhancing plasmonic antenna structures, which typically modify the sample’s radiation pattern. PMID:26651030

  16. 'Festoon' Pattern in Meridiani Outcrop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Close-Up of 'Festoon' Pattern

    This image from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows the best examples yet seen in Meridiani Planum outcrop rocks of well-preserved, fine-scale layering and what geologists call 'cross-lamination.' Opportunity acquired this image of a rock called 'Overgaard' at the edge of 'Erebus Crater' during the rover's 690th Martian day (Jan. 2, 2006).

    The uppermost part of the rock, just above the center of the image and in the enlargement at top, shows distinctive centimeter-sized, smile-shaped features that sedimentary geologists call 'festoons.' The detailed geometric patterns of such nested sets of concave-upward layers in sedimentary rocks imply the presence of small, sinuous sand ripples that form only in water on Earth. Similar festoon cross-lamination and other distinctive sedimentary layer patterns are also visible in the lower parts of the rock, just left of center, and in other rocks near the rim of Erebus. Essentially, these features are the preserved remnants of tiny (centimeter-sized) underwater sand dunes formed long ago by waves in shallow water on the surface of Mars.

    This image was obtained in the late afternoon (4:15 p.m. local solar time) using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  17. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, L.; Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-11-01

    Evaporating suspensions of colloidal particles lead to the formation of a variety of patterns, ranging from rings left behind a coffee drop to periodic bands or uniform solid films deposited on a substrate suspended vertically in a container of the colloidal solution. To characterize the transition between different types of patterns, we develop minimal models of the liquid meniscus deformation due to the evaporation and colloidal deposition. A complementary multiphase model allows us to investigate the detailed dynamics of patterning in a drying solvent. This approach couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving liquid-air interface to the dynamics inside the suspension, i.e. the liquid flow, local variations of the particle concentration, and the propagation of the deposition front where the solute forms a wet, incompressible porous medium at high concentrations. The results of our theory are in good agreement with direct observations. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) under Award FA9550-09-1-0669-DOD35CAP and the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.

  18. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    PubMed

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite.

  19. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  20. Airflow patterns in complex workplaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, J.; Selby, J.M.; Lynch, T.P.; Langer, G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    There are many considerations in obtaining an accurate evaluation of aerosols. One aspect that has been neglected is the study of airflow patterns within the workplace. In many nuclear facilities, the operations performed required extensive equipment (e.g., glove boxes, piping) that create complex arrangements of physical barriers to flow. To provide samples of the airborne materials, particularly particles, knowledge of these complex airflow patterns is required for sampler placement. Recent studies have shown that materials introduced into the air flow within a workplace act as plumes embedded in major airflow streams. Portions of the plumes can recycle through the ventilated area, be lost to dead air pockets, or exhaust through unusual, unexpected outlets. Unusual flow patterns are observed even in relatively uncomplicated arrangements of equipment. This behavior must be factored into sampling/monitoring programs for evaluation of the airborne hazard to personnel within the workplace consistent with the objective of the program. Other factors that also must be considered to provide valid samples of airborne particulate materials are objectives of the sampling program, characteristics of the airborne particulate materials, nonsegregatory transport for the extracted materials, and requirements for the measurement techniques used.

  1. Intrinsic Patterns of Human Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kun; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven

    2003-03-01

    Activity is one of the defining features of life. Control of human activity is complex, being influenced by many factors both extrinsic and intrinsic to the body. The most obvious extrinsic factors that affect activity are the daily schedule of planned events, such as work and recreation, as well as reactions to unforeseen or random events. These extrinsic factors may account for the apparently random fluctuations in human motion observed over short time scales. The most obvious intrinsic factors are the body clocks including the circadian pacemaker that influences our sleep/wake cycle and ultradian oscillators with shorter time scales [2, 3]. These intrinsic rhythms may account for the underlying regularity in average activity level over longer periods of up to 24 h. Here we ask if the known extrinsic and intrinsic factors fully account for all complex features observed in recordings of human activity. To this end, we measure activity over two weeks from forearm motion in subjects undergoing their regular daily routine. Utilizing concepts from statistical physics, we demonstrate that during wakefulness human activity possesses previously unrecognized complex dynamic patterns. These patterns of activity are characterized by robust fractal and nonlinear dynamics including a universal probability distribution and long-range power-law correlations that are stable over a wide range of time scales (from minutes to hours). Surprisingly, we find that these dynamic patterns are unaffected by changes in the average activity level that occur within individual subjects throughout the day and on different days of the week, and between subjects. Moreover, we find that these patterns persist when the same subjects undergo time-isolation laboratory experiments designed to account for the phase of the circadian pacemaker, and control the known extrinsic factors by restricting behaviors and manipulating scheduled events including the sleep/wake cycle. We attribute these newly

  2. Inspection of imprint lithography patterns for semiconductor and patterned media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Douglas J.; Haase, Gaddi; Singh, Lovejeet; Curran, David; Schmid, Gerard M.; Luo, Kang; Brooks, Cindy; Selinidis, Kosta; Fretwell, John; Sreenivasan, S. V.

    2010-03-01

    Imprint lithography has been shown to be an effective technique for replication of nano-scale features. Acceptance of imprint lithography for manufacturing will require demonstration that it can attain defect levels commensurate with the requirements of cost-effective device production. This work summarizes the results of defect inspections of semiconductor masks, wafers and hard disks patterned using Jet and Flash Imprint Lithography (J-FILTM). Inspections were performed with optical and e-beam based automated inspection tools. For the semiconductor market, a test mask was designed which included dense features (with half pitches ranging between 32 nm and 48 nm) containing an extensive array of programmed defects. For this work, both e-beam inspection and optical inspection were used to detect both random defects and the programmed defects. Analytical SEMs were then used to review the defects detected by the inspection. Defect trends over the course of many wafers were observed with another test mask using a KLA-T 2132 optical inspection tool. The primary source of defects over 2000 imprints were particle related. For the hard drive market, it is important to understand the defectivity of both the template and the imprinted disk. This work presents a methodology for automated pattern inspection and defect classification for imprint-patterned media. Candela CS20 and 6120 tools from KLA-Tencor map the optical properties of the disk surface, producing highresolution grayscale images of surface reflectivity, scattered light, phase shift, etc. Defects that have been identified in this manner are further characterized according to the morphology

  3. Unitary pattern: a review of theoretical literature.

    PubMed

    Musker, Kathleen M

    2012-07-01

    It is the purpose of this article to illuminate the phenomenon of unitary pattern through a review of theoretical literature. Unitary pattern is a phenomenon of significance to the discipline of nursing because it is manifested in and informs all person-environment health experiences. Unitary pattern was illuminated by: addressing the barriers to understanding the phenomenon, presenting a definition of unitary pattern, and exploring Eastern and Western theoretical literature which address unitary pattern in a way that is congruent with the definition presented. This illumination of unitary pattern will expand nursing knowledge and contribute to the discipline of nursing.

  4. Pattern Search Algorithms for Bound Constrained Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Torczon, Virginia

    1996-01-01

    We present a convergence theory for pattern search methods for solving bound constrained nonlinear programs. The analysis relies on the abstract structure of pattern search methods and an understanding of how the pattern interacts with the bound constraints. This analysis makes it possible to develop pattern search methods for bound constrained problems while only slightly restricting the flexibility present in pattern search methods for unconstrained problems. We prove global convergence despite the fact that pattern search methods do not have explicit information concerning the gradient and its projection onto the feasible region and consequently are unable to enforce explicitly a notion of sufficient feasible decrease.

  5. Capillaroscopic pattern in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Background There are limited data about the role of nailfold capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis. Objectives To study the role of capillaroscopy in inflammatory arthritis — rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and early arthritis. Methods Patients from the following groups were included in the study: 62 patients with RA; 34 patients with PsA with involvement of the joints of the hands; 9 women with early arthritis. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed with videocapillaroscope. Results Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) was found in 30.6% (19/62) of RA patients, in 32.4% (11/34) of PsA patients and 44.4%, (4/9) of cases with early arthritis. The most frequent found capillaroscopic changes in RA patients were presence of elongated capillaries in 58% of cases (36/62) and prominent subpapillary plexus in 69% (43/62). Dilated capillaries were found in 78.9% (15/19) of patients with secondary RP and in 62.8% (27/43) of those without RP. “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was observed with low frequency in RA patients (14.5%/9/62). “Scleroderma-like” capillaroscopic pattern was also found in 11.1% (1/9) in the group of patients with early arthritis. The low frequency of the last type of capillaroscopic pattern in RA requires patients with such changes to be observed during regular follow-up for the development of systemic rheumatic disease different from inflammatory arthritis. In patients with PsA capillaries with specific morphology (tight terminal convolutions) were found in 58.8% (20/34) of cases. Conclusions Results from the present study confirm the necessity for inclusion of the nailfold capillaroscopy in the diagnostic algorithm in patients with inflammatory arthritis. PMID:22426123

  6. Invarient patterns in articulatory movements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaventura, Patrizia

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of the reported study is to discover an effective method of characterizing movement patterns of the crucial articulator as the function of an abstract syllable magnitude and the adjacent boundary, and at the same time to investigate effects of prosodic control on utterance organization. In particular, the speed of movement when a flesh point on the tongue blade or the lower lip crosses a selected position relative to the occlusion plane is examined. The time of such crossing provides an effective measure of syllable timing and syllable duration according to previous work. In the present work, using a very limited vocabulary with only a few consonants and one vowel as the key speech materials, effects of contrastive emphasis on demisyllabic movement patterns were studied. The theoretical framework for this analysis is the C/D model of speech production in relation to the concept of an invariant part of selected articulatory movements. The results show evidence in favor of the existence of ``iceberg'' patterns, but a linear dependence of slope on the total excursion of the demisyllabic movement, instead of the approximate constancy of the threshold crossing speed as suggested in the original proposal of the iceberg, has been found. Accordingly, a revision of the original concept of iceberg, seems necessary. This refinement is consistent with the C/D model assumption on ``prominence control'' that the syllable magnitude determines the movement amplitude, accompanying directly related syllable duration change. In this assumption, the movement of a consonantal component should also be proportional to syllable magnitude. The results suggests, however, systematic outliers deviating from the linear dependence of movement speed on excursion. This deviation may be caused by the effect of the immediately following boundary, often referred to as phrase-final elongation. Thesis advisor: Osamu Fujimura Copies of this thesis written in English can be obtained from

  7. Psychosocial behavioral patterns for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Diana M; Armbruster, Paul C

    2006-01-01

    Among the many formative issues in adolescents, determinants for health behaviors are being shaped. The development of positive oral health behavior in adolescents is a complex process. Areas specifically related to oral health include self-concept and its relation-ship to oral health and compliance with orthodontic care; tobacco use; special considerations including anorexia, bulimia, and troubled youths; and health promotions. Knowledge is necessary, but there must also be shifts in attitudes and the development of health-related behaviors. Establishing these attitudes and behaviors in adolescence is crucial, because patterns of behavior developed in adolescence can form the basis for future health.

  8. Glycosylation patterns of membrane proteins of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    PubMed

    Schetz, J A; Anderson, P A

    1995-02-01

    Integral and membrane-associated proteins extracted from neuron-enriched perirhopalial tissue of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata were probed with a panel of lectins that recognize sugar epitopes of varying complexity. Of the 13 lectins tested, only concanavalin A, jacalin lectin and tomato lectin stained distinct bands on Western blots, indicating the presence of repeating alpha-1,6-mannoses, terminal Gal-alpha-1,6-GalNAc and repeating beta-1,4-linked GlcNAc, respectively. In whole-mounted perirhopalial tissue, jacalin lectin stained several cell types, including neurons, muscle, cilia and mucus strands. Tomato lectin stained secretory cells intensely, and neurons in a punctate fashion. Concanavalin A stained cytoplasmic epitopes in both ecto- and endodermal cells, and ectodermal secretory cells and the mucus strands emanating from them. With the exception of tomato lectin's sugar epitope, the other sugar epitopes identified in this study are "non-complex". This study suggests that while glycosylation of integral and membrane-associated proteins occurs in Cyanea, the sugars post-translationally linked to these proteins tend to be simple.

  9. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, N.M.I.

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base is described. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  10. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, Michiyuki

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Also, apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  11. A positive patterning advantage with complex but not simple patterning: a cue constellation approach.

    PubMed

    Whitlow, J W

    2013-01-01

    Determinants of a positive patterning advantage (that is, an advantage for positive patterning over negative patterning) in human causal reasoning were examined in an experiment that compared simple patterning discriminations (A, B vs. AB) to complex patterning discriminations (AB, BC, AC vs. ABC). As predicted by a cue constellation analysis of complex discriminations, a positive patterning advantage was found with complex patterning but not with simple patterning discriminations. This result may explain why some recent studies have found a positive patterning advantage where earlier studies had failed to find one. The interaction of patterning complexity with the positive patterning advantage appears to pose problems for rule-based accounts of patterning. The results support the view that associative theories of human causal reasoning are more easily distinguished from rule-based approaches when applied to conditions that make simple rules difficult to identify or implement.

  12. Precursory Seismic Migration Patterns Examined by Improved Pattern Informatics Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Chen, C.; Rundle, J. B.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    The pattern informatics (PI) method is a statistical method for forecasting earthquakes based on the concept of pattern dynamics. It could detect precursory seismic activation or quiescence. Here we apply the PI method with the frequency- magnitude distribution (FMD) of events, based on the self-organized spinodal (SOS) behavior, on the Chi-Chi and Pingtung earthquakes using the earthquake catalog provided by the Central Weather Bureau. By the FMD test, two important times before a large earthquake when the number of intermediate-sized events has significant increase are found. The PI hotspots which indicate the location with anomalous seismicity are around the epicentral area in stage 2 of the SOS behavior. When it proceeded to stage 3, the hotspots migrate to the epicenter. This migration is not only observed in the PI maps but also quantified and visualized from the calculation of the distances between the epicenter and hotspots. Investigating the evolution of the distance in time yields a slope that indicates the trend suggesting how the hotspots propagate relative to sites. After imaging all slopes on a map, we can get a donut-like pattern that illustrates the migration process. In general, migration occurs intensively in stage 2. The migration process might be introduced by the nucleation of earthquakes, and its duration and range depend on the size of the mainshock. After migration in stage 2, the number of intermediate-sized events increases during stage 3, called the precursory period, in SOS behavior. Such an increase occurs on the epicentral region and might be associated with accelerating seismicity observed in many studies. The improved PI method shows that anomalous precursor signature would be exposed by the seismicity rate not only in a static form but also in a dynamic form. The static form means that the PI hotspots point out a location with high hazard, while the dynamic form shows the preparing process (migration) before a large earthquake. Thus

  13. A typology of street patterns.

    PubMed

    Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

    2014-12-06

    We propose a quantitative method to classify cities according to their street pattern. We use the conditional probability distribution of shape factor of blocks with a given area and define what could constitute the 'fingerprint' of a city. Using a simple hierarchical clustering method, these fingerprints can then serve as a basis for a typology of cities. We apply this method to a set of 131 cities in the world, and at an intermediate level of the dendrogram, we observe four large families of cities characterized by different abundances of blocks of a certain area and shape. At a lower level of the classification, we find that most European cities and American cities in our sample fall in their own sub-category, highlighting quantitatively the differences between the typical layouts of cities in both regions. We also show with the example of New York and its different boroughs, that the fingerprint of a city can be seen as the sum of the ones characterizing the different neighbourhoods inside a city. This method provides a quantitative comparison of urban street patterns, which could be helpful for a better understanding of the causes and mechanisms behind their distinct shapes.

  14. Pattern Formation and Complexity Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    Success of nonlinear modelling of pattern formation and self-organization encourages speculations on informational and number theoretical foundations of complexity emergence. Pythagorean "unreasonable effectiveness of integers" in natural processes is perhaps extrapolatable even to universal emergence "out-of-nothing" (Leibniz, Wheeler). Because rational numbers (R = M/N) are everywhere dense on real axis, any digital string (hence any "book" from "Library of Babel" of J.L.Borges) is "recorded" infinitely many times in arbitrary many rationals. Furthermore, within any arbitrary small interval there are infinitely many Rs for which (either or both) integers (Ms and Ns) "carry" any given string of any given length. Because any iterational process (such as generation of fractal features of Mandelbrot Set) is arbitrary closely approximatable with rational numbers, the infinite pattern of integers expresses itself in generation of complexity of the world, as well as in emergence of the world itself. This "tunnelling" from Platonic World ("Platonia" of J.Barbour) to a real (physical) world is modern recast of Leibniz's motto ("for deriving all from nothing there suffices a single principle").

  15. Fault Tolerant Frequent Pattern Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Shohdy, Sameh; Vishnu, Abhinav; Agrawal, Gagan

    2016-12-19

    FP-Growth algorithm is a Frequent Pattern Mining (FPM) algorithm that has been extensively used to study correlations and patterns in large scale datasets. While several researchers have designed distributed memory FP-Growth algorithms, it is pivotal to consider fault tolerant FP-Growth, which can address the increasing fault rates in large scale systems. In this work, we propose a novel parallel, algorithm-level fault-tolerant FP-Growth algorithm. We leverage algorithmic properties and MPI advanced features to guarantee an O(1) space complexity, achieved by using the dataset memory space itself for checkpointing. We also propose a recovery algorithm that can use in-memory and disk-based checkpointing, though in many cases the recovery can be completed without any disk access, and incurring no memory overhead for checkpointing. We evaluate our FT algorithm on a large scale InfiniBand cluster with several large datasets using up to 2K cores. Our evaluation demonstrates excellent efficiency for checkpointing and recovery in comparison to the disk-based approach. We have also observed 20x average speed-up in comparison to Spark, establishing that a well designed algorithm can easily outperform a solution based on a general fault-tolerant programming model.

  16. Urban biodiversity: patterns and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Faeth, Stanley H; Bang, Christofer; Saari, Susanna

    2011-03-01

    The patterns of biodiversity changes in cities are now fairly well established, although diversity changes in temperate cities are much better studied than cities in other climate zones. Generally, plant species richness often increases in cities due to importation of exotic species, whereas animal species richness declines. Abundances of some groups, especially birds and arthropods, often increase in urban areas despite declines in species richness. Although several models have been proposed for biodiversity change, the processes underlying the patterns of biodiversity in cities are poorly understood. We argue that humans directly control plants but relatively few animals and microbes-the remaining biological community is determined by this plant "template" upon which natural ecological and evolutionary processes act. As a result, conserving or reconstructing natural habitats defined by vegetation within urban areas is no guarantee that other components of the biological community will follow suit. Understanding the human-controlled and natural processes that alter biodiversity is essential for conserving urban biodiversity. This urban biodiversity will comprise a growing fraction of the world's repository of biodiversity in the future.

  17. Labor patterns in twin gestations

    PubMed Central

    Leftwich, Heidi K.; Zaki, Mary N.; Wilkins, Isabelle; Hibbard, Judith U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare labor progression in twin vs singleton gestations. Study Design Retrospective review of electronic database created by Consortium on Safe Labor, reflecting labor and delivery information from 12 clinical centers 2002-2008. Women with twin gestations, cephalic presentation of presenting twin, gestational age ≥34 weeks, with ≥2 cervical examinations were included. Exclusion criteria were fetal anomalies or demise. Singleton controls were selected by the same criteria. Categorical variables were analyzed by χ2; continuous by Student t test. Interval censored regression was used to determine distribution for time of cervical dilation in centimeters, or “traverse times,” and controlled for confounding factors. Repeated-measures analysis constructed mean labor curves by parity and number of fetuses. Results A total of 891 twin gestations were compared with 100,513 singleton controls. Twin gestations were more often older, white or African American, earlier gestational age, increased prepregnancy body mass index, and with lower birthweight. There was no difference in number of prior cesarean deliveries, induction, or augmentation, or epidural use. Median traverse times increased at every centimeter interval in nulliparous twins, in both unadjusted and adjusted analysis (P < .01). A similar pattern was noted for multiparas in both analyses. Labor curves demonstrated a delayed inflection point in the labor pattern for nulliparous and multiparous twin gestations. Conclusion Both nulliparous and multiparous women have slower progression of active phase labor with twins even when controlling for confounding factors. PMID:23871795

  18. Micronodular pattern of organizing pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lebargy, François; Picard, Davy; Hagenburg, Jean; Toubas, Olivier; Perotin, Jeanne-Marie; Sandu, Sebastian; Deslee, Gaëtan; Dury, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Organizing pneumonia (OP) is a clinicopathological entity characterized by granulation tissue plugs in the lumen of small airways, alveolar ducts, and alveoli. OP can be cryptogenic (primary) (COP) or secondary to various lung injuries. Patient concerns: We report the case of a 38-year-old male smoker with COP presenting in the form of diffuse micronodules on computed tomography (CT) scan and describe the clinical, radiological, and functional characteristics of micronodular pattern of organizing pneumonia (MNOP) based on a review of the literature including 14 cases. Patients were younger (36.3 ± 15.5 years) than those with the classical form of OP. The clinical presentation was subacute in all cases with a mean duration of symptoms before admission of 14.5 ± 13.2 days. The radiological pattern was characterized by centrilobular nodules and “bud-in-tree” sign in 86.7% of patients. The diagnosis was based on histological examination of transbronchial (28.6%) or surgical biopsies (71.4%). Diagnosis: An associated condition was identified in 65% of cases and included illicit substance abuse (44.5%), myeloproliferative disease (33.5%), and infections (22%). Outcomes: Steroid therapy was effective in all patients with improvement of symptoms and documented radiologic resolution. No relapse was recorded. Lessons: MNOP should be recognized and distinguished from other diagnoses, mainly infectious bronchiolitis and disseminated tumor, as it requires early specific steroid therapy. PMID:28099335

  19. Patterned surfaces segregate compliant microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Alexeev, Alexander; Verberg, Rolf; Balazs, Anna C

    2007-01-30

    For both biological cells and synthetic microcapsules, mechanical stiffness is a key parameter since it can reveal the presence of disease in the former case and the quality of the fabricated product in the latter case. To date, however, assessing the mechanical properties of such micron-scale particles in an efficient, cost-effective means remains a critical challenge. By developing a three-dimensional computational model of fluid-filled, elastic spheres rolling on substrates patterned with diagonal stripes, we demonstrate a useful method for separating cells or microcapsules by their compliance. In particular, we examine the fluid-driven motion of these capsules over a hard adhesive surface that contains soft stripes or a weakly adhesive surface that contains "sticky" stripes. As a result of their inherently different interactions with the heterogeneous substrate, particles with dissimilar stiffness are dispersed to distinct lateral locations on the surface. Since mechanically and chemically patterned surfaces can be readily fabricated through soft lithography and can easily be incorporated into microfluidic devices, our results point to a facile method for carrying out continuous "on the fly" separation processes.

  20. Smart Skin Patterns Protect Springtails

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ralf; Nickerl, Julia; Neinhuis, Christoph; Werner, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Springtails, arthropods who live in soil, in decaying material, and on plants, have adapted to demanding conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust anti-adhesive skin patterns. However, details of these unique properties and their structural basis are still unknown. Here we demonstrate that collembolan skin can resist wetting by many organic liquids and at elevated pressures. We show that the combination of bristles and a comb-like hexagonal or rhombic mesh of interconnected nanoscopic granules distinguish the skin of springtails from anti-adhesive plant surfaces. Furthermore, the negative overhang in the profile of the ridges and granules were revealed to be a highly effective, but as yet neglected, design principle of collembolan skin. We suggest an explanation for the non-wetting characteristics of surfaces consisting of such profiles irrespective of the chemical composition. Many valuable opportunities arise from the translation of the described comb-like patterns and overhanging profiles of collembolan skin into man-made surfaces that combine stability against wear and friction with superior non-wetting and anti-adhesive characteristics. PMID:21980383

  1. (Air flow patterns within buildings)

    SciTech Connect

    Harrje, D.T.

    1990-10-15

    As Annex 20 enters the final year, deliverables in the form of reports, guidelines, and data formats are nearing completion. The Reporting Guidelines for the Measurement of Air Flows and Related Factors in Buildings will be published by the AIVC next month and was presented to the research community at the 11th AIVC Conference. Measurement guidelines and state-of-the-art equipment descriptions are part of a comprehensive manual, Measurement Techniques Related to Air Flow Patterns Within Buildings -- An Application Guide, in the final stages of preparation in Part 2 of Annex 20, together with reports on how to estimate the effects of flow through large openings, as well as contaminant movements in buildings. The Measurement Manual will include the latest information from the AIVC. The next AIVC Conference, in Ottawa, September 1991, will feature more than 12 presentations of Annex 20 results, including the information from Part 1 which has focused on the detailed air flow patterns in a variety of single-room configurations. Both complex modelling (including CFD) and detailed measurements have been completed, and it is now desirable that added tests be made in the next months by the University of Illinois, BERL, representing the US in Part 1 for the first time.

  2. Global patterns of drought recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Michalak, Anna M.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Biondi, Franco; Koch, George; Litvak, Marcy; Ogle, Kiona; Shaw, John D.; Wolf, Adam; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schaefer, Kevin; Cook, Robert; Wei, Yaxing; Fang, Yuanyuan; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Jain, Atul; Tian, Hanqin

    2017-08-01

    Drought, a recurring phenomenon with major impacts on both human and natural systems, is the most widespread climatic extreme that negatively affects the land carbon sink. Although twentieth-century trends in drought regimes are ambiguous, across many regions more frequent and severe droughts are expected in the twenty-first century. Recovery time—how long an ecosystem requires to revert to its pre-drought functional state—is a critical metric of drought impact. Yet the factors influencing drought recovery and its spatiotemporal patterns at the global scale are largely unknown. Here we analyse three independent datasets of gross primary productivity and show that, across diverse ecosystems, drought recovery times are strongly associated with climate and carbon cycle dynamics, with biodiversity and CO2 fertilization as secondary factors. Our analysis also provides two key insights into the spatiotemporal patterns of drought recovery time: first, that recovery is longest in the tropics and high northern latitudes (both vulnerable areas of Earth’s climate system) and second, that drought impacts (assessed using the area of ecosystems actively recovering and time to recovery) have increased over the twentieth century. If droughts become more frequent, as expected, the time between droughts may become shorter than drought recovery time, leading to permanently damaged ecosystems and widespread degradation of the land carbon sink.

  3. Global patterns of drought recovery.

    PubMed

    Schwalm, Christopher R; Anderegg, William R L; Michalak, Anna M; Fisher, Joshua B; Biondi, Franco; Koch, George; Litvak, Marcy; Ogle, Kiona; Shaw, John D; Wolf, Adam; Huntzinger, Deborah N; Schaefer, Kevin; Cook, Robert; Wei, Yaxing; Fang, Yuanyuan; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Jain, Atul; Tian, Hanqin

    2017-08-09

    Drought, a recurring phenomenon with major impacts on both human and natural systems, is the most widespread climatic extreme that negatively affects the land carbon sink. Although twentieth-century trends in drought regimes are ambiguous, across many regions more frequent and severe droughts are expected in the twenty-first century. Recovery time-how long an ecosystem requires to revert to its pre-drought functional state-is a critical metric of drought impact. Yet the factors influencing drought recovery and its spatiotemporal patterns at the global scale are largely unknown. Here we analyse three independent datasets of gross primary productivity and show that, across diverse ecosystems, drought recovery times are strongly associated with climate and carbon cycle dynamics, with biodiversity and CO2 fertilization as secondary factors. Our analysis also provides two key insights into the spatiotemporal patterns of drought recovery time: first, that recovery is longest in the tropics and high northern latitudes (both vulnerable areas of Earth's climate system) and second, that drought impacts (assessed using the area of ecosystems actively recovering and time to recovery) have increased over the twentieth century. If droughts become more frequent, as expected, the time between droughts may become shorter than drought recovery time, leading to permanently damaged ecosystems and widespread degradation of the land carbon sink.

  4. Dietary patterns and prostatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sebastiano, Cimino; Vincenzo, Favilla; Tommaso, Castelli; Giuseppe, Sortino; Marco, Russo; Ivana, Caldarella; Giorgio, Russo; Massimo, Madonia; Giuseppe, Morgia

    2012-01-01

    Dietary patterns play a role on prostatic diseases in association with genetic, behavioral, occupational and environmental ones. Data from reviewed literature provide evidences of a possible relationship between dietary habits and the incidence of prostate disorders, even if it is not enough to justify a widespread adoption of new dietary habits. In this review the role of dietary patterns, including the use of supplements, in the prevention and treatment of the most frequent and known prostatic diseases, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PC) was analyzed. A limited number of well designed trials were identified in which diet and dietary supplement intervention appeared to slow disease progression. Although conclusive evidences are limited, the current data suggest that a diet low in total calories and fat, high in vegetables and fruits and that body weight control could be possibly effective in preventing prostatic diseases. On the other hand care must be taken to ensure that over-consumption of dietary supplements does not occur because it may be harmful.

  5. A typology of street patterns

    PubMed Central

    Louf, Rémi; Barthelemy, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We propose a quantitative method to classify cities according to their street pattern. We use the conditional probability distribution of shape factor of blocks with a given area and define what could constitute the ‘fingerprint’ of a city. Using a simple hierarchical clustering method, these fingerprints can then serve as a basis for a typology of cities. We apply this method to a set of 131 cities in the world, and at an intermediate level of the dendrogram, we observe four large families of cities characterized by different abundances of blocks of a certain area and shape. At a lower level of the classification, we find that most European cities and American cities in our sample fall in their own sub-category, highlighting quantitatively the differences between the typical layouts of cities in both regions. We also show with the example of New York and its different boroughs, that the fingerprint of a city can be seen as the sum of the ones characterizing the different neighbourhoods inside a city. This method provides a quantitative comparison of urban street patterns, which could be helpful for a better understanding of the causes and mechanisms behind their distinct shapes. PMID:25297318

  6. Dynamics of evaporative colloidal patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, C. Nadir; Wu, Ning; Mandre, Shreyas; Aizenberg, Joanna; Mahadevan, L.

    2015-09-01

    Drying suspensions often leave behind complex patterns of particulates, as might be seen in the coffee stains on a table. Here, we consider the dynamics of periodic band or uniform solid film formation on a vertical plate suspended partially in a drying colloidal solution. Direct observations allow us to visualize the dynamics of band and film deposition, where both are made of multiple layers of close packed particles. We further see that there is a transition between banding and filming when the colloidal concentration is varied. A minimal theory of the liquid meniscus motion along the plate reveals the dynamics of the banding and its transition to the filming as a function of the ratio of deposition and evaporation rates. We also provide a complementary multiphase model of colloids dissolved in the liquid, which couples the inhomogeneous evaporation at the evolving meniscus to the fluid and particulate flows and the transition from a dilute suspension to a porous plug. This allows us to determine the concentration dependence of the bandwidth and the deposition rate. Together, our findings allow for the control of drying-induced patterning as a function of the colloidal concentration and evaporation rate.

  7. Crowding by a repeating pattern

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G.

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target–flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker. PMID:26024457

  8. Cultural Patterns of Soil Understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzel, Nikola; Feller, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Living soil supports all terrestrial ecosystems. The only global threat to earth's soils comes from human societies' land use and resource consuming activities. Soil perception and understanding by soil scientists are mainly drawn from biophysical parameters and found within Cartesian rationality, and not, or much less consciously from its rather intangible cultural dimension. But nevertheless, human soil perception, soil awareness, and soil relation are a cultural phenomenon, too. Aiming at soil awareness and education, it is of first order importance for the soil science community and the IUSS to study, discuss and communicate also about the cultural perceptions and representations of soil. For any society, cultural patterns in their relation to soil encompass: (i) General culturally underlying structures like (religious or 'secular') myths and belief systems. (ii) The personal, individual relation to/with and behaviour towards soil. This includes implicit concepts of soil being part integral concepts of landscape because the large majority of humans don't see soil as a distinct object. This communication would be to make evident: (i) the importance of cultural patterns and psychic/psychological background concerning soil, by case studies and overviews on different cultural areas, (ii) the necessity to develop reflections on this topic as well to communicate about soil with large public, as to raise awareness soil scientists to the cultural dimension of soils. A working group was recently founded at IUSS (Division 4) on this topic.

  9. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  10. Global patterns of drought recovery

    DOE PAGES

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Anderegg, William R. L.; Michalak, Anna M.; ...

    2017-08-09

    Drought has major impacts on natural and human systems, and is especially important for land carbon sink variability due to its influence on terrestrial biosphere climate regulation. While 20th Century trends in drought regimes have been varied, “more extreme extremes”, including more frequent and severe droughts, are expected in the 21st Century. Recovery time, the length of time an ecosystem requires to revert to its pre-drought functional state, is a critical metric of drought impact. Yet the factors influencing drought recovery and its spatiotemporal patterns are largely unknown. Here we use three independent global data products of gross primary productivitymore » to show that, across diverse terrestrial ecosystems, drought recovery times are strongly associated with climate and carbon cycle dynamics, with biodiversity and CO2 fertilization as secondary factors. Our analysis also provides two key insights into the spatiotemporal patterns of drought recovery time: (1) Across the globe, recovery is longest in the tropics and high northern latitudes—critical tipping elements in Earth’s climate system. (2) Drought impacts, the area of ecosystems under active recovery and recovery times, have increased over the 20th century. If future droughts become more frequent, time between droughts may become shorter than drought recovery time, leading to chronically impacted ecosystems.« less

  11. Smart skin patterns protect springtails.

    PubMed

    Helbig, Ralf; Nickerl, Julia; Neinhuis, Christoph; Werner, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Springtails, arthropods who live in soil, in decaying material, and on plants, have adapted to demanding conditions by evolving extremely effective and robust anti-adhesive skin patterns. However, details of these unique properties and their structural basis are still unknown. Here we demonstrate that collembolan skin can resist wetting by many organic liquids and at elevated pressures. We show that the combination of bristles and a comb-like hexagonal or rhombic mesh of interconnected nanoscopic granules distinguish the skin of springtails from anti-adhesive plant surfaces. Furthermore, the negative overhang in the profile of the ridges and granules were revealed to be a highly effective, but as yet neglected, design principle of collembolan skin. We suggest an explanation for the non-wetting characteristics of surfaces consisting of such profiles irrespective of the chemical composition. Many valuable opportunities arise from the translation of the described comb-like patterns and overhanging profiles of collembolan skin into man-made surfaces that combine stability against wear and friction with superior non-wetting and anti-adhesive characteristics.

  12. Hidden Patterns of Light Revealed by Spitzer

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-07

    Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA Spitzer Space Telescope.

  13. A patterns catalog for RTSJ software designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benowitz, E. G.; Niessner, A. F.

    2003-01-01

    In this survey paper, we bring together current progress to date in identifying design patterns for use with the real-time specification for Java in a format consistent with contemporary patterns descriptions.

  14. Predicting network functions with nested patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganter, Mathias; Kaltenbach, Hans-Michael; Stelling, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Identifying suitable patterns in complex biological interaction networks helps understanding network functions and allows for predictions at the pattern level: by recognizing a known pattern, one can assign its previously established function. However, current approaches fail for previously unseen patterns, when patterns overlap and when they are embedded into a new network context. Here we show how to conceptually extend pattern-based approaches. We define metabolite patterns in metabolic networks that formalize co-occurrences of metabolites. Our probabilistic framework decodes the implicit information in the networks’ metabolite patterns to predict metabolic functions. We demonstrate the predictive power by identifying ‘indicator patterns’, for instance, for enzyme classification, by predicting directions of novel reactions and of known reactions in new network contexts, and by ranking candidate network extensions for gap filling. Beyond their use in improving genome annotations and metabolic network models, we expect that the concepts transfer to other network types.

  15. Derivative Sign Patterns in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Given a function defined on a subset of the plane whose partial derivatives never change sign, the signs of the partial derivatives form a two-dimensional pattern. We explore what patterns are possible for various planar domains.

  16. Hierarchically UVO patterned elastomeric and thermoplastic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying; Kulkarni, Manish; Marshall, Allan; Karim, Alamgir

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate a simple yet versatile method to fabricate tunable hierarchical micro-nanostructures on flexible Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer and thermoplastic polymer surface by a two-step process. Nanoscale patterned PDMS was obtained by imprinting compact disc (CD)/digital video disc (DVD) patterns. The second micro pattern was superposed by selective densification of PDMS by exposing to ultraviolet-ozone radiation (UVO) through micro-patterned TEM grid as a mask. The nanoscale patterns are preserved through UVO exposure step leading to formation of deep hierarchical patterns, so that for a 19 um square mesh, the micro pattern has a depth of 600nm with 6h PDMS UVO exposure time. This simple method can be promoted to fabricate hierarchical structures of thermoplastic materials (such as polystyrene), from which the mechanism of capillary imprinting and thermal stability of hierarchical patterns are investigated. This study is potentially important to various applications ranging from biomimetic scaffolds to solar cell.

  17. Derivative Sign Patterns in Two Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schilling, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Given a function defined on a subset of the plane whose partial derivatives never change sign, the signs of the partial derivatives form a two-dimensional pattern. We explore what patterns are possible for various planar domains.

  18. Optimal temporal patterns for dynamical cellular signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2016-11-01

    Cells use temporal dynamical patterns to transmit information via signaling pathways. As optimality with respect to the environment plays a fundamental role in biological systems, organisms have evolved optimal ways to transmit information. Here, we use optimal control theory to obtain the dynamical signal patterns for the optimal transmission of information, in terms of efficiency (low energy) and reliability (low uncertainty). Adopting an activation-deactivation decoding network, we reproduce several dynamical patterns found in actual signals, such as steep, gradual, and overshooting dynamics. Notably, when minimizing the energy of the input signal, the optimal signals exhibit overshooting, which is a biphasic pattern with transient and steady phases; this pattern is prevalent in actual dynamical patterns. We also identify conditions in which these three patterns (steep, gradual, and overshooting) confer advantages. Our study shows that cellular signal transduction is governed by the principle of minimizing free energy dissipation and uncertainty; these constraints serve as selective pressures when designing dynamical signaling patterns.

  19. Quantification of variability in trichome patterns

    PubMed Central

    Greese, Bettina; Hülskamp, Martin; Fleck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While pattern formation is studied in various areas of biology, little is known about the noise leading to variations between individual realizations of the pattern. One prominent example for de novo pattern formation in plants is the patterning of trichomes on Arabidopsis leaves, which involves genetic regulation and cell-to-cell communication. These processes are potentially variable due to, e.g., the abundance of cell components or environmental conditions. To elevate the understanding of regulatory processes underlying the pattern formation it is crucial to quantitatively analyze the variability in naturally occurring patterns. Here, we review recent approaches toward characterization of noise on trichome initiation. We present methods for the quantification of spatial patterns, which are the basis for data-driven mathematical modeling and enable the analysis of noise from different sources. Besides the insight gained on trichome formation, the examination of observed trichome patterns also shows that highly regulated biological processes can be substantially affected by variability. PMID:25431575

  20. Quantification of variability in trichome patterns.

    PubMed

    Greese, Bettina; Hülskamp, Martin; Fleck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    While pattern formation is studied in various areas of biology, little is known about the noise leading to variations between individual realizations of the pattern. One prominent example for de novo pattern formation in plants is the patterning of trichomes on Arabidopsis leaves, which involves genetic regulation and cell-to-cell communication. These processes are potentially variable due to, e.g., the abundance of cell components or environmental conditions. To elevate the understanding of regulatory processes underlying the pattern formation it is crucial to quantitatively analyze the variability in naturally occurring patterns. Here, we review recent approaches toward characterization of noise on trichome initiation. We present methods for the quantification of spatial patterns, which are the basis for data-driven mathematical modeling and enable the analysis of noise from different sources. Besides the insight gained on trichome formation, the examination of observed trichome patterns also shows that highly regulated biological processes can be substantially affected by variability.

  1. Hybrid Neural Network for Pattern Recognition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-02-03

    two one-layer neural networks and the second stage comprises a feedforward two-layer neural network . A method for recognizing patterns is also...topological representations of the input patterns using the first and second neural networks. The method further comprises providing a third neural network for...classifying and recognizing the inputted patterns and training the third neural network with a back-propagation algorithm so that the third neural network recognizes at least one interested pattern.

  2. Antenna with Dielectric Having Geometric Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Kenneth L. (Inventor); Elliott, Holly A. (Inventor); Cravey, Robin L. (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Ghose, Sayata (Inventor); Watson, Kent A. (Inventor); Smith, Jr., Joseph G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An antenna includes a ground plane, a dielectric disposed on the ground plane, and an electrically-conductive radiator disposed on the dielectric. The dielectric includes at least one layer of a first dielectric material and a second dielectric material that collectively define a dielectric geometric pattern, which may comprise a fractal geometry. The radiator defines a radiator geometric pattern, and the dielectric geometric pattern is geometrically identical, or substantially geometrically identical, to the radiator geometric pattern.

  3. Making digit patterns in the vertebrate limb.

    PubMed

    Tickle, Cheryll

    2006-01-01

    The vertebrate limb has been a premier model for studying pattern formation - a striking digit pattern is formed in human hands, with a thumb forming at one edge and a little finger at the other. Classic embryological studies in different model organisms combined with new sophisticated techniques that integrate gene-expression patterns and cell behaviour have begun to shed light on the mechanisms that control digit patterning, and stimulate re-evaluation of the current models.

  4. Mask pattern correction for an advanced device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Minemura, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Okada, Tomoyuki; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2000-07-01

    By generating supplementary patterns for EB data and using a system that corrects patten line widths, we improved the shape of a pattern formed on a photomask and the CD linearity. For the EB lithography system, trapezoidal and hammerhead supplementary patterns were applied in order to suppress the increase in EB data volume. As a result, it became possible to reduce the supplementary patterns generated to about 60 percent of the existing serif supplementary patterns. The formed pattern shapes were also equivalent. Since the laser lithography system requires bigger correction pattern shapes than the EB lithography system, triangle supplementary patterns were used. As a result, the corner round was improved with the number of patterns equivalent to that of existing rectangle supplementary patterns. For the CD-linearity, the CD correction amount was set for each line width from the experiment result. For 5 micrometers to 0.7 micrometers patterns on a photomask, a CD-linearity could be achieved within 40nm. We developed the system with above method, when the system is applied to 0.18 micrometers logic contact holes, the elapse time is 1.4 hours and the EB data file size is for 2.5 to 10.8 times the number of original patterns. We judged that it was in the practical level.

  5. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    SciTech Connect

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Henry, M. David; Resnick, Paul J.; Jarecki, Jr., Robert L.

    2016-04-05

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicontopography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  6. Teaching Design Patterns through Computer Game Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gestwicki, Paul; Sun, Fu-Shing

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach for teaching design patterns that emphasizes object-orientation and patterns integration. The context of computer game development is used to engage and motivate students, and it is additionally rich with design patterns. A case study is presented based on "EEClone," an arcade-style computer game implemented in Java. Our…

  7. Higher-Order Neural Networks Recognize Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Spirkovska, Lilly; Ochoa, Ellen

    1996-01-01

    Networks of higher order have enhanced capabilities to distinguish between different two-dimensional patterns and to recognize those patterns. Also enhanced capabilities to "learn" patterns to be recognized: "trained" with far fewer examples and, therefore, in less time than necessary to train comparable first-order neural networks.

  8. Psychological and Demographic Correlates of Career Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzle, Matthias; Korner, Astrid; Vondracek, Fred W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing diversity of career patterns, resulting from the relative decline of stable employment. In the present study of 1368 employed and self-employed German adults career pattern diversity was assessed using nine pictograms. The goal was to identify psychological and demographic correlates of these patterns and to…

  9. Orthogonal Patterns In A Binary Neural Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1991-01-01

    Report presents some recent developments in theory of binary neural networks. Subject matter relevant to associate (content-addressable) memories and to recognition of patterns - both of considerable importance in advancement of robotics and artificial intelligence. When probed by any pattern, network converges to one of stored patterns.

  10. Taoist Thinking Pattern as Reflected in Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Ringo

    Students' exposure to the Taoist thinking pattern should have a significant meaning in their cognitive development and life enrichment. The thinking pattern reflected in Taoist discourse is in sharp contrast to what is demonstrated in Aristotelian rhetoric. The circular thinking pattern usually resided in a paradoxical and/or relativistic…

  11. 78 FR 5055 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... January 23, 2013 Part IV Department of Labor Mine Safety and Health Administration 30 CFR Part 104 Pattern... RIN 1219-AB73 Pattern of Violations AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health Administration, Labor. ACTION... regulation for pattern of violations (POV). MSHA has determined that the existing regulation does...

  12. Visual Templates in Pattern Generalization Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.

    2010-01-01

    In this research article, I present evidence of the existence of visual templates in pattern generalization activity. Such templates initially emerged from a 3-week design-driven classroom teaching experiment on pattern generalization involving linear figural patterns and were assessed for existence in a clinical interview that was conducted four…

  13. Demonstrations of Beats as Moving Interference Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, T. S.; Dishman, L. G.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a ripple tank demonstration that displays interference patterns responsible for producing beats and provides photographs of computer simulations of various beat interference patterns. Includes programs for the computer simulation and equations of constructive interference paths in beat interference patterns. (Author/SK)

  14. Pattern recognition using asymmetric attractor neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Tao; Zhao Hong

    2005-12-15

    The asymmetric attractor neural networks designed by the Monte Carlo- (MC-) adaptation rule are shown to be promising candidates for pattern recognition. In such a neural network with relatively low symmetry, when the members of a set of template patterns are stored as fixed-point attractors, their attraction basins are shown to be isolated islands embedded in a ''chaotic sea.'' The sizes of these islands can be controlled by a single parameter. We show that these properties can be used for effective pattern recognition and rejection. In our method, the pattern to be identified is attracted to a template pattern or a chaotic attractor. If the difference between the pattern to be identified and the template pattern is smaller than a predescribed threshold, the pattern is attracted to the template pattern automatically and thus is identified as belonging to this template pattern. Otherwise, it wanders in a chaotic attractor for ever and thus is rejected as an unknown pattern. The maximum sizes of these islands allowed by this kind of neural networks are determined by a modified MC-adaptation rule which are shown to be able to dramatically enlarge the sizes of the islands. We illustrate the use of our method for pattern recognition and rejection with an example of recognizing a set of Chinese characters.

  15. Visual Templates in Pattern Generalization Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera, F. D.

    2010-01-01

    In this research article, I present evidence of the existence of visual templates in pattern generalization activity. Such templates initially emerged from a 3-week design-driven classroom teaching experiment on pattern generalization involving linear figural patterns and were assessed for existence in a clinical interview that was conducted four…

  16. 78 FR 11902 - Pattern of Violations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-20

    ... Safety and Health Administration RIN 1219-AB73 Pattern of Violations AGENCY: Mine Safety and Health... requirements contained in the final rule on Pattern of Violations. DATES: The Office of Management and Budget... existing regulation for pattern of violations. The effective date of the final rule is March 25, 2013...

  17. Discursive Hierarchical Patterning in Economics Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lung, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to apply Lung's (2008) model of the discursive hierarchical patterning of cases to a closer and more specific study of Economics cases and proposes a model of the distinct discursive hierarchical patterning of the same. It examines a corpus of 150 Economics cases with a view to uncovering the patterns of discourse construction.…

  18. Discursive Hierarchical Patterning in Economics Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lung, Jane

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to apply Lung's (2008) model of the discursive hierarchical patterning of cases to a closer and more specific study of Economics cases and proposes a model of the distinct discursive hierarchical patterning of the same. It examines a corpus of 150 Economics cases with a view to uncovering the patterns of discourse construction.…

  19. Nonlinear pattern selection in explosive crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtze, Douglas A.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown analytically, in a suitable limit, that a sharp pattern-selection mechanism exists in driven explosive crystallization: after the onset of a morphological instability of the steady-state crystallization front, nonlinear effects cause the front to develop a spatial pattern with a definite wavelength. The amplitude, wavelength, and shape of the selected pattern are calculated analytically.

  20. Detection and recognition of angular frequency patterns.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Hugh R; Propp, Roni

    2015-05-01

    Previous research has extensively explored visual encoding of smoothly curved, closed contours described by sinusoidal variation of pattern radius as a function of polar angle (RF patterns). Although the contours of many biologically significant objects are curved, we also confront shapes with a more jagged and angular appearance. To study these, we introduce here a novel class of visual stimuli that deform smoothly from a circle to an equilateral polygon with N sides (AF patterns). Threshold measurements reveal that both AF and RF patterns can be discriminated from circles at the same deformation amplitude, approximately 18.0arcsec, which is in the hyperacuity range. Thresholds were slightly higher for patterns with 3.0 cycles than for those with 5.0 cycles. Discrimination between AF and RF patterns was 75% correct at an amplitude that was approximately 3.0 times the threshold amplitude, which implies that AF and RF patterns activate different neural populations. Experiments with jittered patterns in which the contour was broken into several pieces and shifted inward or outward had much less effect on AF patterns than on RF patterns. Similarly, thresholds for single angles of AF patterns showed no significant difference from thresholds for the entire AF pattern. Taken together, these results imply that the visual system incorporates angles explicitly in the representation of closed object contours, but it suggests that angular contours are represented more locally than are curved contours.

  1. Psychological and Demographic Correlates of Career Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitzle, Matthias; Korner, Astrid; Vondracek, Fred W.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing diversity of career patterns, resulting from the relative decline of stable employment. In the present study of 1368 employed and self-employed German adults career pattern diversity was assessed using nine pictograms. The goal was to identify psychological and demographic correlates of these patterns and to…

  2. Oblique patterned etching of vertical silicon sidewalls

    DOE PAGES

    Burckel, D. Bruce; Finnegan, Patrick S.; Henry, M. David; ...

    2016-04-05

    A method for patterning on vertical silicon surfaces in high aspect ratio silicontopography is presented. A Faraday cage is used to direct energetic reactive ions obliquely through a patterned suspended membrane positioned over the topography. The technique is capable of forming high-fidelity pattern (100 nm) features, adding an additional fabrication capability to standard top-down fabrication approaches.

  3. Optimization of landscape pattern [Chapter 8

    Treesearch

    John Hof; Curtis Flather

    2007-01-01

    A fundamental assumption in landscape ecology is that spatial patterns have significant influences on the flows of materials, energy, and information while processes create, modify, and maintain spatial patterns. Thus, it is of paramount importance in both theory and practice to address the questions of landscape pattern optimization ... For example, can landscape...

  4. Southern Hemisphere Polygonal Patterned Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Earth, periglacial is a term that refers to regions and processes where cold climate contributes to the evolution of landforms and landscapes. Common in periglacial environments on Earth, such as the arctic of northern Canada,Siberia, and Alaska, is a phenomenon called patterned ground. The 'patterns' in patterned ground often take the form of large polygons, each bounded by either troughs or ridges made up of rock particles different in size from those seen in the interior of the polygon. On Earth, many polygons in periglacial environments are directly linked to water: they typically form from stresses induced by repeated freezing and thawing of water, contraction from stress induced by changing temperatures, and sorting of rocks brought to the surface along polygon boundaries by the freeze-thaw processes. Although not exclusively formed by freezing and thawing of water, that is often the dominant mechanism on Earth.

    Polygons similar to those found in Earth's arctic and antarctic regions are also found in the polar regions of Mars. Typically, they occur on crater floors, or on intercrater plains, between about 60o and 80o latitude. The polygons are best seen when bright frost or dark sand has been trapped in the troughs that form the polygon boundaries. Three examples of martian polygons seen by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are shown here. Each is located in the southern hemisphere:(left) Polygon troughs highlighted by frost as the south polar cap retreats during spring. The circular features are the locations of buried craters that were originally formed by meteor impact. This image, E09-00029, is located at 75.1oS, 331.3oW, and was acquired on 1 October 2001.(center) Summertime view of polygons, highlighted by dark, windblown sand, on the floor of a crater at 71.2oS, 282.6oW. The image, E12-02319, was obtained on 21January 2002.(right) Polygon troughs highlighted by the retreating south polar frost cap during southern summer

  5. Supplementation patterns in marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Nieman, D C; Gates, J R; Butler, J V; Pollett, L M; Dietrich, S J; Lutz, R D

    1989-11-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the use of supplements in a large group of endurance runners (no. = 347) who had participated in the 1987 Los Angeles Marathon. Three-day dietary records were analyzed for nutrient content and supplement usage. The runners' supplementation patterns with respect to demographics, dietary quality, training habits, and race performance were investigated. In general, no significant associations were found between supplement use and the aforementioned variables. Use of supplements, especially vitamins C and E, calcium, and zinc, increased with age (p less than .05). Daily use of at least one type of supplement was reported by 29% of the runners; 48% reported use of at least one type of supplement within the 3-day period.

  6. Quantitative patterns in drone wars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Bernardo, Javier; Dodds, Peter Sheridan; Johnson, Neil F.

    2016-02-01

    Attacks by drones (i.e., unmanned combat air vehicles) continue to generate heated political and ethical debates. Here we examine the quantitative nature of drone attacks, focusing on how their intensity and frequency compare with that of other forms of human conflict. Instead of the power-law distribution found recently for insurgent and terrorist attacks, the severity of attacks is more akin to lognormal and exponential distributions, suggesting that the dynamics underlying drone attacks lie beyond these other forms of human conflict. We find that the pattern in the timing of attacks is consistent with one side having almost complete control, an important if expected result. We show that these novel features can be reproduced and understood using a generative mathematical model in which resource allocation to the dominant side is regulated through a feedback loop.

  7. Nonlinear growth of periodic patterns.

    PubMed

    Villain-Guillot, Simon; Josserand, Christophe

    2002-09-01

    We study the growth of a periodic pattern in one dimension for a model of spinodal decomposition, the Cahn-Hilliard equation. We particularly focus on the intermediate region, where the nonlinearity cannot be neglected anymore, and before the coalescence dominates. The dynamics is captured through the standard technique of a solubility condition performed over a particular family of quasistatic solutions. The main result is that the dynamics along this particular class of solutions can be expressed in terms of a simple ordinary differential equation. The density profile of the stationary regime found at the end of the nonlinear growth is also well characterized. Numerical simulations correspond satisfactorily to the analytical results through three different methods and asymptotic dynamics are well recovered, even far from the region where the approximations hold.

  8. Emerging patterns of epigenomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Fuelled by new sequencing technologies, epigenome mapping projects are revealing epigenomic variation at all levels of biological complexity, from species to cells. Comparisons of methylation profiles among species reveal evolutionary conservation of gene body methylation patterns, pointing to the fundamental role of epigenomes in gene regulation. At the human population level, epigenomic changes provide footprints of the effects of genomic variants within the vast non-protein coding fraction of the genome while comparisons of the epigenomes of parents and their offspring point to quantitative epigenomic parent-of-origin effects confounding classical Mendelian genetics. At the organismal level, comparisons of epigenomes from diverse cell types provide insights into cellular differentiation. Finally, comparisons of epigenomes from monozygotic twins help dissect genetic and environmental influences on human phenotypes and longitudinal comparisons reveal aging-associated epigenomic drift. The development of new bioinformatic frameworks for comparative epigenome analysis is putting epigenome maps within reach of researchers across a wide spectrum of biological disciplines. PMID:21507501

  9. Star patterns on lake ice.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Victor C; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-06-01

    Star patterns, reminiscent of a wide range of diffusively controlled growth forms from snowflakes to Saffman-Taylor fingers, are ubiquitous features of ice-covered lakes. Despite the commonality and beauty of these "lake stars," the underlying physical processes that produce them have not been explained in a coherent theoretical framework. Here we describe a simple mathematical model that captures the principal features of lake-star formation; radial fingers of (relatively warm) water-rich regions grow from a central source and evolve through a competition between thermal and porous media flow effects in a saturated snow layer covering the lake. The number of star arms emerges from a stability analysis of this competition and the qualitative features of this meter-scale natural phenomenon are captured in laboratory experiments.

  10. Star patterns on lake ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Victor C.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    Star patterns, reminiscent of a wide range of diffusively controlled growth forms from snowflakes to Saffman-Taylor fingers, are ubiquitous features of ice-covered lakes. Despite the commonality and beauty of these “lake stars,” the underlying physical processes that produce them have not been explained in a coherent theoretical framework. Here we describe a simple mathematical model that captures the principal features of lake-star formation; radial fingers of (relatively warm) water-rich regions grow from a central source and evolve through a competition between thermal and porous media flow effects in a saturated snow layer covering the lake. The number of star arms emerges from a stability analysis of this competition and the qualitative features of this meter-scale natural phenomenon are captured in laboratory experiments.

  11. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  12. Anastomosing Rivers are Disequilibrium Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavooi, E.; de Haas, T.; Kleinhans, M. G.; Makaske, B.; Smith, D. G.

    2010-12-01

    Anastomosing rivers have multiple interconnected channels that enclose floodbasins. Various theories have been proposed to explain this pattern, including an increased discharge conveyance and sediment transport capacity of multiple channels, or, alternatively, a tendency to avulse due to upstream sediment overloading. The former implies an equilibrium pattern whereas the latter implies a temporary increase of the number of channels. Our objective was to test these hypotheses on a well-documented case: the upper Columbia River. We combined a geological approach with physics-based morphological modelling. Three geological sections across the entire valley were constructed based on hand auger data, covering a depth up to 8.6 m corresponding to the last 4000 years, corroborated by 14C dating. The sections were integrated with surface mapping to derive proportions of channel and floodplain sediment volumes and sedimentation rates along the river. Existing sediment transport measurements at a location upstream and downstream of the study area were re-analysed and time-integrated for comparison. A network model was built based on gradually varied flow equations, sediment transport prediction, mass conservation and detailed transverse slope and spiral meander flow effects at the bifurcations. The geological sections show a clear downstream trend of decreasing number of channels and decreasing bed sediment deposition in channels and crevasses, indicating bed sediment overloading from upstream and subsequent avulsions. The measured suspended sediment is much larger than the amount captured in the floodplains, indicating that this is not limiting the aggradation in the valley. Extensive crevasse splays in the upstream section and an increased bed elevation and gradient demonstrate a tendency to avulse due to overloading of bed sediment. The measured bedload transport indeed indicates bed material overloading. The 14C dating confirms that long-term average floodplain

  13. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-01-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical "heartprints" which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing approximately 10(5) heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  14. Patterning of the turtle shell.

    PubMed

    Moustakas-Verho, Jacqueline E; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Gilbert, Scott F

    2017-08-01

    Interest in the origin and evolution of the turtle shell has resulted in a most unlikely clade becoming an important research group for investigating morphological diversity in developmental biology. Many turtles generate a two-component shell that nearly surrounds the body in a bony exoskeleton. The ectoderm covering the shell produces epidermal scutes that form a phylogenetically stable pattern. In some lineages, the bones of the shell and their ectodermal covering become reduced or lost, and this is generally associated with different ecological habits. The similarity and diversity of turtles allows research into how changes in development create evolutionary novelty, interacting modules, and adaptive physiology and anatomy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sexual activity patterns in rams.

    PubMed Central

    Bernon, D E; Shrestha, J N

    1984-01-01

    Behaviour was measured in reproductively experienced rams from three crossbred strains and two pure breeds (Suffolk and Finnish Landrace) in an attempt to develop a method for rapid screening of sexually aggressive rams and to measure breed differences in sexual activity. A set sequential pattern of activity need not occur in sexually experienced rams, and components of their sexual behaviour may be influenced by the estrual status of the ewe. The data indicate that the number of attempted mounts is an acceptable selection tool, with a mount following a short period of investigation most likely to be followed by coitus. Two sequential ten minute periods are sufficient for rapid screening of rams for short-term sexual activity levels. PMID:6713255

  16. Revisiting radiation patterns in collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, N.; Gieseke, S.; Plätzer, S.; Skands, P.

    2014-04-01

    We propose four simple event-shape variables for semi-inclusive -jet events. The observables and cuts are designed to be especially sensitive to subleading aspects of the event structure, and allow to test the reliability of phenomenological QCD models in greater detail. Three of them, , , and , focus on soft emissions off 3-jet topologies with a small opening angle, for which coherence effects beyond the leading QCD dipole pattern are expected to be enhanced. A complementary variable, , measures the ratio of the hemisphere masses in 4-jet events with a compressed scale hierarchy (Durham -), for which subleading splitting effects are expected to be enhanced. We consider several different parton-shower models, spanning both conventional and dipole/antenna ones, all tuned to the same reference data, and show that a measurement of the proposed observables would allow for additional significant discriminating power between the models.

  17. Morphological patterns and their colour.

    PubMed

    Dadam, James; Albertazzi, Liliana; Da Pos, Osvaldo; Canal, Luisa; Micciolo, Rocco

    2012-04-01

    This study analyzed qualitative aspects in perception, particularly the relationship between morphological aspects of biological shapes and colour. The experiment reported by the study assessed the functional relation between shape and colour and, in particular, the relations among the patterns of shapes appearing in perceptual configurations, as well as certain characteristics of colour. Participants were shown 32 natural images and were asked to match them with a colour. The results indicated that some figures were more frequently associated (positively or negatively) with some colours instead of others. Type of shape, texture, and three-dimensionality were important elements in the participants' choices. Rounded figures and non-holed figures had positive matches with red; elongated figures were associated with colours between blue and green; and holed figures showed positive matches with colours between green and yellow. Type of shape and texture also exhibited a relationship with the warmth of the colour.

  18. Pattern recognition systems and procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, G. D.; Serreyn, D. V.

    1972-01-01

    The objectives of the pattern recognition tasks are to develop (1) a man-machine interactive data processing system; and (2) procedures to determine effective features as a function of time for crops and soils. The signal analysis and dissemination equipment, SADE, is being developed as a man-machine interactive data processing system. SADE will provide imagery and multi-channel analog tape inputs for digitation and a color display of the data. SADE is an essential tool to aid in the investigation to determine useful features as a function of time for crops and soils. Four related studies are: (1) reliability of the multivariate Gaussian assumption; (2) usefulness of transforming features with regard to the classifier probability of error; (3) advantage of selecting quantizer parameters to minimize the classifier probability of error; and (4) advantage of using contextual data. The study of transformation of variables (features), especially those experimental studies which can be completed with the SADE system, will be done.

  19. Fuzzy automata and pattern matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setzer, C. B.; Warsi, N. A.

    1986-01-01

    A wide-ranging search for articles and books concerned with fuzzy automata and syntactic pattern recognition is presented. A number of survey articles on image processing and feature detection were included. Hough's algorithm is presented to illustrate the way in which knowledge about an image can be used to interpret the details of the image. It was found that in hand generated pictures, the algorithm worked well on following the straight lines, but had great difficulty turning corners. An algorithm was developed which produces a minimal finite automaton recognizing a given finite set of strings. One difficulty of the construction is that, in some cases, this minimal automaton is not unique for a given set of strings and a given maximum length. This algorithm compares favorably with other inference algorithms. More importantly, the algorithm produces an automaton with a rigorously described relationship to the original set of strings that does not depend on the algorithm itself.

  20. Changing patterns of wildlife diseases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was not to analyze the effects of global warming on wildlife disease patterns, but to serve as a springboard for future efforts to identify those wildlife diseases, including zoonotic diseases, that could be influenced the most by warming climates and to encourage the development of models to examine the potential effects. Hales et al. (1999) examined the relationship of the incidence of a vector-borne human disease, Dengue fever, and El Nino southern oscillations for South Pacific Island nations. The development of similar models on specific wildlife diseases which have environmental factors strongly associated with transmission would provide information and options for the future management of our wildlife resources.

  1. Anomaly detection: eye movement patterns.

    PubMed

    Ni, W; Fodor, J D; Crain, S; Shankweiler, D

    1998-09-01

    The symptom of a garden path in sentence processing is an important anomaly in the input string. This anomaly signals to the parser that an error has occurred, and provides cues for how to repair it. Anomaly detection is thus an important aspect of sentence processing. In the present study, we investigated how the parser responds to unambiguous sentences that contain syntactic anomalies and pragmatic anomalies, examining records of eye movement during reading. While sensitivity to the two kinds of anomaly was very rapid and essentially simultaneous, qualitative differences existed in the patterns of first-pass reading times and eye regressions. The results are compatible with the proposal that syntactic information and pragmatic information are used differently in garden-path recovery.

  2. Complex patterns of abnormal heartbeats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Frohlinde, Verena; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Goldberger, Ary L.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Costa, Madalena; Morley-Davies, Adrian; Stanley, H. Eugene; Glass, Leon

    2002-09-01

    Individuals having frequent abnormal heartbeats interspersed with normal heartbeats may be at an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. However, mechanistic understanding of such cardiac arrhythmias is limited. We present a visual and qualitative method to display statistical properties of abnormal heartbeats. We introduce dynamical ``heartprints'' which reveal characteristic patterns in long clinical records encompassing ~105 heartbeats and may provide information about underlying mechanisms. We test if these dynamics can be reproduced by model simulations in which abnormal heartbeats are generated (i) randomly, (ii) at a fixed time interval following a preceding normal heartbeat, or (iii) by an independent oscillator that may or may not interact with the normal heartbeat. We compare the results of these three models and test their limitations to comprehensively simulate the statistical features of selected clinical records. This work introduces methods that can be used to test mathematical models of arrhythmogenesis and to develop a new understanding of underlying electrophysiologic mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia.

  3. The stress pattern of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Moritz; Rajabi, Mojtaba; Heidbach, Oliver; Hersir, Gylfi Páll; Ágústsson, Kristján; Árnadóttir, Sigurveig; Zang, Arno

    2016-04-01

    Iceland is located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge which is the plate boundary between the Eurasian and the North American plates. It is one of the few places on earth where an active spreading centre is located onshore but the stress pattern has not been extensively investigated so far. In this paper we present a comprehensive compilation of the orientation of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax). In particular we interpret borehole breakouts and drilling induced fractures from borehole image logs in 57 geothermal wells onshore Iceland. The borehole results are combined with other stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanism solutions, geological information and overcoring measurements resulting in a dataset with 495 data records for the SHmax orientation. The reliability of each indicator is assessed according to the quality criteria of the World Stress Map project. The majority of SHmax orientation data records in Iceland is derived from earthquake focal mechanism solutions (35%) and geological fault slip inversions (26%). 20% of the data are borehole related stress indicators. In addition minor shares of SHmax orientations are compiled, amongst others, from focal mechanism inversions and the alignment of fissure eruptions. The results show that the SHmax orientations derived from different depths and stress indicators are consistent with each other. The resulting pattern of the present-day stress in Iceland has four distinct subsets of SHmax orientations. The SHmax orientation is parallel to the rift axes in the vicinity of the active spreading regions. It changes from NE-SW in the South to approximately N-S in central Iceland and NNW-SSE in the North. In the Westfjords which is located far away from the ridge the regional SHmax rotates and is parallel to the plate motion.

  4. Patterns of Saccharina latissima Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Guri Sogn

    2013-01-01

    The lack of recovery in Norwegian populations of the kelp Saccharina latissima (Linnaeus) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes, Druehl & G. W. Saunders after a large-scale disturbance that occurred sometime between the late 1990s and early 2000s has raised considerable concerns. Kelp forests are areas of high production that serve as habitats for numerous species, and their continued absence may represent the loss of an entire ecosystem. Some S. latissima populations remain as scattered patches within the affected areas, but today, most of the areas are completely devoid of kelp. The question is if natural recolonization by kelp and the reestablishment of the associated ecosystem is possible. Previous studies indicate that a high degree of reproductive synchrony in macrophytes has a positive effect on their potential for dispersal and on the connectivity between populations, but little is known about the patterns of recruitment in Norwegian S. latissima. More is, however, known about the development of fertile tissue (sori) on adult individuals, which is easily observed. The present study investigated the degree of coupling between the appearance of sori and the recruitment on clean artificial substrate beneath adult specimens. The pattern of recruitment was linked to the retreat of visible sori (i.e. spore release) and a seasonal component unrelated to the fertility of the adults. The formation and the retreat of visible sori are processes that seem synchronized along the south coast of Norway, and the link between sori development and recruitment may therefore suggest that the potential for S. latissima dispersal is relatively large. These results support the notion that the production and dispersal of viable spores is unlikely to be the bottleneck preventing recolonization in the south of Norway, but studies over larger temporal and spatial scales are still needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:24349034

  5. Patterns of Saccharina latissima recruitment.

    PubMed

    Sogn Andersen, Guri

    2013-01-01

    The lack of recovery in Norwegian populations of the kelp Saccharina latissima (Linnaeus) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes, Druehl & G. W. Saunders after a large-scale disturbance that occurred sometime between the late 1990s and early 2000s has raised considerable concerns. Kelp forests are areas of high production that serve as habitats for numerous species, and their continued absence may represent the loss of an entire ecosystem. Some S. latissima populations remain as scattered patches within the affected areas, but today, most of the areas are completely devoid of kelp. The question is if natural recolonization by kelp and the reestablishment of the associated ecosystem is possible. Previous studies indicate that a high degree of reproductive synchrony in macrophytes has a positive effect on their potential for dispersal and on the connectivity between populations, but little is known about the patterns of recruitment in Norwegian S. latissima. More is, however, known about the development of fertile tissue (sori) on adult individuals, which is easily observed. The present study investigated the degree of coupling between the appearance of sori and the recruitment on clean artificial substrate beneath adult specimens. The pattern of recruitment was linked to the retreat of visible sori (i.e. spore release) and a seasonal component unrelated to the fertility of the adults. The formation and the retreat of visible sori are processes that seem synchronized along the south coast of Norway, and the link between sori development and recruitment may therefore suggest that the potential for S. latissima dispersal is relatively large. These results support the notion that the production and dispersal of viable spores is unlikely to be the bottleneck preventing recolonization in the south of Norway, but studies over larger temporal and spatial scales are still needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  6. Prolegomenon to patterns in evolution.

    PubMed

    Kauffman, Stuart A

    2014-09-01

    Despite Darwin, we remain children of Newton and dream of a grand theory that is epistemologically complete and would allow prediction of the evolution of the biosphere. The main purpose of this article is to show that this dream is false, and bears on studying patterns of evolution. To do so, I must justify the use of the word "function" in biology, when physics has only happenings. The concept of "function" lifts biology irreducibly above physics, for as we shall see, we cannot prestate the ever new biological functions that arise and constitute the very phase space of evolution. Hence, we cannot mathematize the detailed becoming of the biosphere, nor write differential equations for functional variables we do not know ahead of time, nor integrate those equations, so no laws "entail" evolution. The dream of a grand theory fails. In place of entailing laws, I propose a post-entailing law explanatory framework in which Actuals arise in evolution that constitute new boundary conditions that are enabling constraints that create new, typically unprestatable, adjacent possible opportunities for further evolution, in which new Actuals arise, in a persistent becoming. Evolution flows into a typically unprestatable succession of adjacent possibles. Given the concept of function, the concept of functional closure of an organism making a living in its world becomes central. Implications for patterns in evolution include historical reconstruction, and statistical laws such as the distribution of extinction events, or species per genus, and the use of formal cause, not efficient cause, laws. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A bio-inspired spatial patterning circuit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Yuan; Joe, Danial J; Shealy, James B; Land, Bruce R; Shen, Xiling

    2014-01-01

    Lateral Inhibition (LI) is a widely conserved patterning mechanism in biological systems across species. Distinct from better-known Turing patterns, LI depend on cell-cell contact rather than diffusion. We built an in silico genetic circuit model to analyze the dynamic properties of LI. The model revealed that LI amplifies differences between neighboring cells to push them into opposite states, hence forming stable 2-D patterns. Inspired by this insight, we designed and implemented an electronic circuit that recapitulates LI patterning dynamics. This biomimetic system serve as a physical model to elucidate the design principle of generating robust patterning through spatial feedback, regardless of the underlying devices being biological or electrical.

  8. Composite patterning devices for soft lithography

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne

    2007-03-27

    The present invention provides methods, devices and device components for fabricating patterns on substrate surfaces, particularly patterns comprising structures having microsized and/or nanosized features of selected lengths in one, two or three dimensions. The present invention provides composite patterning devices comprising a plurality of polymer layers each having selected mechanical properties, such as Young's Modulus and flexural rigidity, selected physical dimensions, such as thickness, surface area and relief pattern dimensions, and selected thermal properties, such as coefficients of thermal expansion, to provide high resolution patterning on a variety of substrate surfaces and surface morphologies.

  9. General aviation air traffic pattern safety analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, L. C.

    1973-01-01

    A concept is described for evaluating the general aviation mid-air collision hazard in uncontrolled terminal airspace. Three-dimensional traffic pattern measurements were conducted at uncontrolled and controlled airports. Computer programs for data reduction, storage retrieval and statistical analysis have been developed. Initial general aviation air traffic pattern characteristics are presented. These preliminary results indicate that patterns are highly divergent from the expected standard pattern, and that pattern procedures observed can affect the ability of pilots to see and avoid each other.

  10. Mask pattern generator employing EPL technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Nobuyuki; Yamabe, Masaki; Wakamiya, Wataru; Endo, Nobuhiro

    2003-08-01

    Mask cost is one of crucial issues in device fabrication, especially in SoC (System on a Chip) with small-volume production. The cost mainly depends on productivity of mask manufacturing tools such as mask writers and defect inspection tools. EPL (Electron Projection Lithography) has been developing as a high-throughput electron beam exposure technology that will succeed optical lithography. The application of EPL technology to mask writing will result in high productivity and contribute to decrease the mask cost. The concept of a mask pattern generator employing EPL technology is proposed in this paper. It is very similar to EPL technology used for pattern printing on a wafer. The mask patterns on the glass substrate are exposed by projecting the basic circuit patterns formed on the mother EPL mask. One example of the mother EPL mask is a stencil type made with 200-mm Si wafer. The basic circuit patterns are IP patterns and logical primitive patterns such as cell libraries (AND, OR, Inverter, Flip-Flop and etc.) to express the SoC device patterns. Since the SoC patterns are exposed with its collective units such as IP and logical primitive patterns by using this method, the high throughput will be expected comparing with conventional mask E-beam writers. In this paper, the mask pattern generator with the EPL technology is proposed. The concept, its advantages and issues to be solved are discussed.

  11. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Varner, Victor D; Gleghorn, Jason P; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C; Nelson, Celeste M

    2015-07-28

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo.

  12. A Formal Basis for Safety Case Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen; Pai, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    By capturing common structures of successful arguments, safety case patterns provide an approach for reusing strategies for reasoning about safety. In the current state of the practice, patterns exist as descriptive specifications with informal semantics, which not only offer little opportunity for more sophisticated usage such as automated instantiation, composition and manipulation, but also impede standardization efforts and tool interoperability. To address these concerns, this paper gives (i) a formal definition for safety case patterns, clarifying both restrictions on the usage of multiplicity and well-founded recursion in structural abstraction, (ii) formal semantics to patterns, and (iii) a generic data model and algorithm for pattern instantiation. We illustrate our contributions by application to a new pattern, the requirements breakdown pattern, which builds upon our previous work

  13. Mechanically patterning the embryonic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Miller, Erin; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2015-01-01

    Collections of cells must be patterned spatially during embryonic development to generate the intricate architectures of mature tissues. In several cases, including the formation of the branched airways of the lung, reciprocal signaling between an epithelium and its surrounding mesenchyme helps generate these spatial patterns. Several molecular signals are thought to interact via reaction-diffusion kinetics to create distinct biochemical patterns, which act as molecular precursors to actual, physical patterns of biological structure and function. Here, however, we show that purely physical mechanisms can drive spatial patterning within embryonic epithelia. Specifically, we find that a growth-induced physical instability defines the relative locations of branches within the developing murine airway epithelium in the absence of mesenchyme. The dominant wavelength of this instability determines the branching pattern and is controlled by epithelial growth rates. These data suggest that physical mechanisms can create the biological patterns that underlie tissue morphogenesis in the embryo. PMID:26170292

  14. Pattern activation/recognition theory of mind

    PubMed Central

    du Castel, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In his 2012 book How to Create a Mind, Ray Kurzweil defines a “Pattern Recognition Theory of Mind” that states that the brain uses millions of pattern recognizers, plus modules to check, organize, and augment them. In this article, I further the theory to go beyond pattern recognition and include also pattern activation, thus encompassing both sensory and motor functions. In addition, I treat checking, organizing, and augmentation as patterns of patterns instead of separate modules, therefore handling them the same as patterns in general. Henceforth I put forward a unified theory I call “Pattern Activation/Recognition Theory of Mind.” While the original theory was based on hierarchical hidden Markov models, this evolution is based on their precursor: stochastic grammars. I demonstrate that a class of self-describing stochastic grammars allows for unifying pattern activation, recognition, organization, consistency checking, metaphor, and learning, into a single theory that expresses patterns throughout. I have implemented the model as a probabilistic programming language specialized in activation/recognition grammatical and neural operations. I use this prototype to compute and present diagrams for each stochastic grammar and corresponding neural circuit. I then discuss the theory as it relates to artificial network developments, common coding, neural reuse, and unity of mind, concluding by proposing potential paths to validation. PMID:26236228

  15. Preparation of patterned ultrathin polymer films.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huige; Su, Meng; Li, Kaiyong; Jiang, Lei; Song, Yanlin; Doi, Masao; Wang, Jianjun

    2014-08-12

    Though patterned ultrathin polymer films (<100 nm) are of great importance in the fields of sensors and nanoelectronic devices, the fabrication of patterned ultrathin polymer films remains a great challenge. Herein, patterned ultrathin polymer films are fabricated facilely on hydrophobic substrates with different hydrophilic outline patterns by the pinning of three-phase contact lines of polymer solution on the hydrophilic outlines. This method is universal for most of the water-soluble polymers, and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) has been selected as a model polymer due to its biocompatibility and good film-forming property. The results indicate that the morphologies of ultrathin polymer films can be precisely adjusted by the size of the hydrophilic outline pattern. Specifically, patterned hydrophilic outlines with sizes of 100, 60, and 40 μm lead to the formation of concave-shaped ultrathin PVA films, whereas uniform ultrathin PVA films are formed on 20 and 10 μm patterned substrates. The controllabilities of morphologies can be interpreted through the influences of the slip length and coffee ring effect. Theoretical analysis shows that when the size of the hydrophilic outline patterns is smaller than a critical value, the coffee ring effect disappears and uniform patterned ultrathin polymer films can be formed for all polymer concentrations. These results provide an effective methodology for the fabrication of patterned ultrathin polymer films and enhance the understanding of the coffee ring effect.

  16. Pattern activation/recognition theory of mind.

    PubMed

    du Castel, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    In his 2012 book How to Create a Mind, Ray Kurzweil defines a "Pattern Recognition Theory of Mind" that states that the brain uses millions of pattern recognizers, plus modules to check, organize, and augment them. In this article, I further the theory to go beyond pattern recognition and include also pattern activation, thus encompassing both sensory and motor functions. In addition, I treat checking, organizing, and augmentation as patterns of patterns instead of separate modules, therefore handling them the same as patterns in general. Henceforth I put forward a unified theory I call "Pattern Activation/Recognition Theory of Mind." While the original theory was based on hierarchical hidden Markov models, this evolution is based on their precursor: stochastic grammars. I demonstrate that a class of self-describing stochastic grammars allows for unifying pattern activation, recognition, organization, consistency checking, metaphor, and learning, into a single theory that expresses patterns throughout. I have implemented the model as a probabilistic programming language specialized in activation/recognition grammatical and neural operations. I use this prototype to compute and present diagrams for each stochastic grammar and corresponding neural circuit. I then discuss the theory as it relates to artificial network developments, common coding, neural reuse, and unity of mind, concluding by proposing potential paths to validation.

  17. Inspiratory flow pattern in humans.

    PubMed

    Lafortuna, C L; Minetti, A E; Mognoni, P

    1984-10-01

    The theoretical estimation of the mechanical work of breathing during inspiration at rest is based on the common assumption that the inspiratory airflow wave is a sine function of time. Different analytical studies have pointed out that from an energetic point of view a rectangular wave is more economical than a sine wave. Visual inspection of inspiratory flow waves recorded during exercise in humans and various animals suggests that a trend toward a rectangular flow wave may be a possible systematic response of the respiratory system. To test this hypothesis, the harmonic content of inspiratory flow waves that were recorded in six healthy subjects at rest, during exercise hyperventilation, and during a maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) maneuver were evaluated by a Fourier analysis, and the results were compared with those obtained on sinusoidal and rectangular models. The dynamic work inherent in the experimental waves and in the sine-wave model was practically the same at rest; during exercise hyperventilation and MVV, the experimental wave was approximately 16-20% more economical than the sinusoidal one. It was concluded that even though at rest the sinusoidal model is a reasonably good approximation of inspiratory flow, during exercise and MVV, a physiological controller is probably operating in humans that can select a more economical inspiratory pattern. Other peculiarities of airflow wave during hyperventilation and some optimization criteria are also discussed.

  18. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    1997-03-01

    In this talk I give a short review of the history and the current state of theoretical research on spiral wave patterns in excitable media. I start with the theoretical model of wave propagation in excitable media proposed in 1946 by Wiener and Rosenblueth(N. Wiener and A. Rosenblueth, The mathematical formulation of the problem of conduction of impulses in a network of connected excitable elements, specifically in cardiac muscle, Arch. Inst. Cardiol. Mexico 16 (1946) 205). This model describes spiral waves rotating around obstacles. I show how, by taking additionally into account curvature effects and gradual recovery of the medium after passage of an excitation wave, the model is generalized to describe freely rotating spiral waves and the breakup which produces spirals. In the context of this kinematic model, complex dynamics of spiral waves, i.e. their meandering, drift and resonance, is discussed. Instabilities of spiral waves in confined geometries, i.e. inside a circular region and on a sphere, are analyzed. At the end, I show how spiral waves in such systems can be efficiently controlled by application of a delayed global feedback. The talk is based on the review paper(A. S. Mikhailov, V. A. Davydov, and V. S. Zykov, Complex dynamics of spiral waves and motion of curves, Physica D 70 (1994) 1) and the monograph(A. S. Mikhailov, Foundations of Synergetics I, 2nd revised edition (Springer, Berlin, 1994)).

  19. Anisotropic assembly and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Brecht, James H.; Uminsky, David T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of anisotropy in two classes of individual-based models for self-organization, collective behavior and self-assembly. We accomplish this via first-order dynamical systems of pairwise interacting particles that incorporate anisotropic interactions. At a continuum level, these models represent the natural anisotropic variants of the well-known aggregation equation. We leverage this framework to analyze the impact of anisotropic effects upon the self-assembly of co-dimension one equilibrium structures, such as micelles and vesicles. Our analytical results reveal the regularizing effect of anisotropy, and isolate the contexts in which anisotropic effects are necessary to achieve dynamical stability of co-dimension one structures. Our results therefore place theoretical limits on when anisotropic effects can be safely neglected. We also explore whether anisotropic effects suffice to induce pattern formation in such particle systems. We conclude with brief numerical studies that highlight various aspects of the models we introduce, elucidate their phase structure and partially validate the analysis we provide.

  20. Vasculitis: determinants of disease patterns.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Gary S; Calabrese, Leonard H

    2014-08-01

    The vasculitides are a large group of heterogeneous diseases for which it has been assumed that pathogenesis is largely autoimmune. As clinicians, we distinguish one form of vasculitis from another on the basis of observed patterns of organ injury, the size of the vessels affected and histopathological findings. The terms 'small-vessel', 'medium-vessel' and 'large-vessel' vasculitis are useful clinical descriptors, but fail to inform us about why vessels of a certain calibre are favoured by one disease and not another. Classification based on vessel size also fails to consider that vessels of a specific calibre are not equally prone to injury. Distinct vulnerabilities undoubtedly relate to the fact that same-size vessels in different tissues may not be identical conduits. In fact, vessels become specialized, from the earliest stages of embryonic development, to suit the needs of different anatomical locations. Vessels of the same calibre in different locations and organs are as different as the organ parenchymal cells through which they travel. The dialogue between developing vessels and the tissues they perfuse is designed to meet special local needs. Added to the story of vascular diversity and vulnerability are changes that occur during growth, development and ageing. An improved understanding of the unique territorial vulnerabilities of vessels could form the basis of new hypotheses for the aetiopathogenesis of the vasculitides. This Review considers how certain antigens, including infectious agents, might become disease-relevant and how vascular diversity could influence disease phenotypes and the spectrum of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  1. Proteomic patterns associated with heterosis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jiewen; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2016-08-01

    Heterosis is characterized by higher seed yields, plant biomass or other traits in heterozygotes or hybrids compared with their genetically divergent parents, which are often homozygous. Despite extensive investigation of heterosis and its wide application in crops such as maize, rice, wheat and sorghum, its molecular basis is still enigmatic. In the past century, some pioneers have proposed multigene models referring to the complementation of allelic and gene expression variation, which is likely to be an important contributor to heterosis. In addition, there are potential interactions of epigenetic variation involved in heterosis via novel mechanisms. At the level of gene expression, many recent studies have revealed that the heterosis phenomenon can be deciphered not only at the transcriptional level but also at the proteomic level. This review presents an update on the information supporting the involvement of proteomic patterns in heterosis and a possible future direction of the field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  2. The Informational Patterns of Laughter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bea, José A.; Marijuán, Pedro C.

    2003-06-01

    Laughter is one of the most characteristic -and enigmatic- communicational traits of human individuals. Its analysis has to take into account a variety of emotional, social, cognitive, and communicational factors densely interconnected. In this article we study laughter just as an auditive signal (as a 'neutral' information carrier), and we compare its structure with the regular traits of linguistic signals. In the experimental records of human laughter that we have performed, the most noticeable trait is the disorder content of frequencies. In comparison with the sonograms of vowels, the information content of which appears as a characteristic, regular function of the first vibration modes of the dynamic system formed, for each vowel, by the vocal cords and the accompanying resonance of the vocalization apparatus, the sonograms of laughter are highly irregular. In the episodes of laughter, a highly random content in frequencies appears, reason why it cannot be considered as a genuine codification of patterned information like in linguistic signals. In order to numerically gauge the disorder content of laughter frequencies, we have performed several "entropy" measures of the spectra -trying to unambiguously identify spontaneous laughter from "faked", articulated laughter. Interestingly, Shannon's entropy (the most natural candidate) performs rather poorly.

  3. Gender differences in collaboration patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiaohan; Duch, Jordi; Sales-Pardo, Marta; Radicchi, Filippo; Ribeiro, Haroldo V.; Woodruff, Teresa K.; Amaral, Luis A. N.

    2014-03-01

    Collaboration plays an increasingly important role in research productivity and impact. However, it remains unclear whether female and male researchers in science, technology, engineering and mathematical (STEM) disciplines differ significantly from each other in their collaboration propensity. Here, we report on an empirical analysis of the complete publication records of 3,920 faculty members in six STEM disciplines at selected top U.S. research universities. We find that while female faculty have significantly fewer co-authors over their careers, this can be fully explained by their lower number of publications. Indeed, we also find that females tend to distribute their co-authoring opportunities among their co-authors more evenly than males do. Our results suggest that females have had a greater propensity to collaborate, in order to succeed in a historically men-dominated academic world. Surprisingly, we find evidence that in molecular biology there has been a gender segregation within sub-disciplines. Female faculty in molecular biology departments tend to collaborate with smaller teams and publish in journals and fields where typical team size is smaller. Our results identify gender-specific collaborative behaviors as well as disciplines with distinct patterns. The authors thank the support from the following grants: NSF SBE 0624318, NSF IIS 0830388, and Spanish DGICYT under project FIS2010-18639.

  4. Retinoblastoma Referral Pattern in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyamori, Joseph M.; Kimani, Kahaki; Njuguna, Margaret W.; Dimaras, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Kenya is a large country with a widely dispersed population. As retinoblastoma requires specialized treatment, we determined the referral pattern for patients with retinoblastoma in Kenya to facilitate the formulation of a national policy. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was performed for retinoblastoma patients who presented from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. Data were collected on the referral process from presenting health facility to the hospital where patient was treated. Data were also collected on the time interval when the first symptoms were noticed to the time of presentation at a health facility (lag time). For cases that could be traced to a referral hospital, the time delay due to referral (referral lag time) was recorded. Results: There were 206 patients diagnosed with retinoblastoma in 51 Kenyan and 2 foreign healthcare facilities, and they received final treatment at a Kenyan hospital. Mean lag time was 6.8 months (±6.45). Of all patients, 18% (38/206) were treated at the hospital where they first presented and 82% (168/206) were referred elsewhere. Of those referred, 35% (58/168) were lost to follow-up. The mean referral lag time was 1.7 months (±2.5). Conclusions: A significant proportion of cases presented late, and either delayed seeking further treatment or were lost after initial referral. We recommend the implementation of a national strategy that emphasizes early detection, documentation and follow up of retinoblastoma patients. PMID:25371638

  5. Cell patterning with mucin biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Crouzier, T.; Jang, H.; Ahn, J.; Stocker, R.; Ribbeck, K.

    2014-01-01

    The precise spatial control of cell adhesion to surfaces is an endeavor that has enabled discoveries in cell biology and new possibilities in tissue engineering. The generation of cell-repellent surfaces currently requires advanced chemistry techniques and could be simplified. Here we show that mucins, glycoproteins of high structural and chemical complexity, spontaneously adsorb on hydrophobic substrates to form coatings that prevent the surface adhesion of mammalian epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and myoblasts. These mucin coatings can be patterned with micrometer precision using a microfluidic device, and are stable enough to support myoblast differentiation over seven days. Moreover, our data indicate that the cell-repellent effect is dependent on mucin-associated glycans because their removal results in a loss of effective cell-repulsion. Last, we show that a critical surface density of mucins, which is required to achieve cell-repulsion, is efficiently obtained on hydrophobic surfaces, but not on hydrophilic glass surfaces. However, this limitation can be overcome by coating glass with hydrophobic fluorosilane. We conclude that mucin biopolymers are attractive candidates to control cell adhesion on surfaces. PMID:23980712

  6. Dynamic patterns of adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Vose, Aaron

    2005-12-13

    Adaptive radiation is defined as the evolution of ecological and phenotypic diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage. When it occurs, adaptive radiation typically follows the colonization of a new environment or the establishment of a "key innovation," which opens new ecological niches and/or new paths for evolution. Here, we take advantage of recent developments in speciation theory and modern computing power to build and explore a large-scale, stochastic, spatially explicit, individual-based model of adaptive radiation driven by adaptation to multidimensional ecological niches. We are able to model evolutionary dynamics of populations with hundreds of thousands of sexual diploid individuals over a time span of 100,000 generations assuming realistic mutation rates and allowing for genetic variation in a large number of both selected and neutral loci. Our results provide theoretical support and explanation for a number of empirical patterns including "area effect," "overshooting effect," and "least action effect," as well as for the idea of a "porous genome." Our findings suggest that the genetic architecture of traits involved in the most spectacular radiations might be rather simple. We show that a great majority of speciation events are concentrated early in the phylogeny. Our results emphasize the importance of ecological opportunity and genetic constraints in controlling the dynamics of adaptive radiation.

  7. Suction patterns in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Martell, M; Martínez, G; González, M; Díaz Rosselló, J L

    1993-01-01

    The suction pattern for breast and bottle feeding in two groups of preterm infants is described. The time elapsed between birth and the moment of suction was longer in preterm neonates born at lower gestational ages for both groups studied, breast and bottle fed (figure 1). The evolution of suckling in breastfeeding was analyzed in a composite study (longitudinal and transverse) in a group of 16 neonates starting from 32 weeks of gestation. The velocity of milk extraction during suckling varied with gestational age. It was uniform at lower gestational ages, then it became faster in the first minutes and at the 36th week, it was very similar to that of mature neonates (figure 2 and table I). The evaluation of bottle feeding was performed in a transverse study in 46 preterm neonates which had been exclusively bottle fed during 1 or 2 weeks. All of them had previously been fed using an orogastric tube. Nourishing time was shorter than in breastfeeding; the average duration was 3.7 minutes (table II). The greatest volume was ingested in the first minute, 40% (range between 44 and 25%) (figure 3). The frequency of suction did not change the duration of feeding, but it was found that the efficiency of suction (number of suctions to ingest 1 cc) was significantly lower in the first minute (Anova, p < 0.05) (figure 4).

  8. Distributed Search and Pattern Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Reaz; Boutaba, Raouf

    Peer-to-peer (P2P) technology has triggered a wide range of distributed applications including file-sharing, distributed XML databases, distributed computing, server-less web publishing and networked resource/service sharing. Despite of the diversity in application, these systems share common requirements for searching due to transitory nodes population and content volatility. In such dynamic environment, users do not have the exact information about available resources. Queries are based on partial information. This mandates the search mechanism to be emphflexible. On the other hand, the search mechanism is required to be bandwidth emphefficient to support large networks. Variety of search techniques have been proposed to provide satisfactory solution to the conflicting requirements of search efficiency and flexibility. This chapter highlights the search requirements in large scale distributed systems and the ability of the existing distributed search techniques in satisfying these requirements. Representative search techniques from three application domains, namely, P2P content sharing, service discovery and distributed XML databases, are considered. An abstract problem formulation called Distributed Pattern Matching (DPM) is presented as well. The DPM framework can be used as a common ground for addressing the search problem in these three application domains.

  9. Fractal pattern of canine trichoblastoma.

    PubMed

    De Vico, Gionata; Cataldi, Marielda; Maiolino, Paola; Carella, Francesca; Beltraminelli, Stefano; Losa, Gabriele A

    2011-06-01

    To assess by fractal analysis the specific architecture, growth pattern, and tissue distribution that characterize subtypes of canine trichoblastoma, a benign tumor derived from or reduplicating the primitive hair germ of embryonic follicular development. Tumor masks and outlines obtained from immunohistologic images by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components were analyzed by fractal and conventional morphometry. The fractal dimension [FD] of each investigated case was determined from the slope of the regression line describing the fractal region within a bi-asymptotic curve experimentally established. All tumor masks and outlines obtained by gray threshold segmentation of epithelial components showed fractal self-similar properties that were evaluated by peculiar FDs. However, only masks revealed significantly different FD values, ranging from 1.75 to 1.85, enabling the discrimination of canine trichoblastoma subtypes. The FD data suggest that an iterative morphogenetic process, involving both the air germ and associated dermal papilla, may be responsible of the peculiar tissue architecture of trichoblastoma. The present study emphasized the reliability of fractal analysis in achieving the objective characterization of canine trichoblastoma.

  10. Cellular monosaccharide patterns of Neisseriaceae.

    PubMed

    Jantzen, E; Bryn, K; Bovre, K

    1976-08-01

    Sixty-four strains of Neisseria, Moraxella, and Acinetobacter were screened for cellular monosaccharides by gas-liquid chromatography and other chromatographic techniques. The four sugars ribose, glucose, glucosamine, and 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate (KDO) were detected in all strains. Heptose was detected only in "true neisseriae" (Neisseria gonorrhoeae, N. meningitidis, N. sicca, N. cinerea, N. flavescens, and N. elongata) and in the tentaively named species Moraxella urethralis. Some marked interspecies dissimilarities within groups were revealed. Thus, N. ovis and M. atlantae were characterized by the presence of mannose. Intraspecies differences were also encountered. N. meningitidis strains of serogroups B and C were distinguished from strains of serogroup A by their sialic acid content. This sugar was also detected in two out of three examined strains of M. nonliquefaciens. In Acinetobacter, heterogeneity of monosaccharide patterns was rather pronounced. The results show the applicability of gas chromatographic "monosaccharide" profiles fo whole cells or extracted carbohydrate in bacterial classification and identification, including differentiation at the subspecies level. In addition, such profiles may be useful for monitoring during purification of cellular polysaccharides.

  11. Analysis of normal discourse patterns.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebecca; Heuerman, Maranda; Wilson, Brenda M; Proctor, Adele

    2003-11-01

    Twenty-five normal young adult college students provided speaking and writing samples using two elicitation procedures: picture description and personal narrative. Patterns of productivity, efficiency, and coherence were investigated while considering the demands imposed by mode of expression, task elicitation, cognitive distance, and verbal working memory. Samples were divided into top (S1) and bottom (S2) halves. Within group (S1/S2) and between group (pictured activity description/personal narrative) comparisons were made for oral vs. written samples, and performance measures were correlated with verbal working memory scores. Results indicated that the productivity measure was influenced by the type of elicitation task and was not related to verbal working memory scores. Efficiency was influenced by mode of expression and demonstrated a low correlation with verbal working memory scores. Coherence ratings were not influenced by type of elicitation task, mode of expression, or length of sample, and were not related to verbal working memory scores. Results are discussed in terms of the clinical utility of these discourse measures.

  12. Global patterns of methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Chomchai, Chulathida; Chomchai, Summon

    2015-07-01

    As the most popular psychostimulant in the world, methamphetamine use has reached epidemic proportions. Its enormous popularity has created subcultures of methamphetamine users all over the globe. The purpose of this review is to describe the geographic availability of different types of methamphetamine, the characteristics of each user population, and the psychosocial impact the two have on society. Methamphetamine has diversified immensely from the early days of its use. Different forms of methamphetamine - ICE, powder, and pills - have different pharmacokinetic characteristics that make them popular among certain types of users. New studies have shown that addiction to methamphetamine results in a very characteristic loss of inhibition that augments various risk-taking behaviors in its users. Also, recent seizure data suggest that its production and trafficking is spreading into new areas of the globe. From recreational use to addiction, methamphetamine use represents a serious risk to health and wellbeing of the community. Recognizing the pattern of abuse in specific populations is the key to assessing the risk, implementing prevention, and harm reduction measures, as well as making public policies.

  13. Breathing patterns during eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Lechauve, J B; Perrault, H; Aguilaniu, B; Isner-Horobeti, M E; Martin, V; Coudeyre, E; Richard, R

    2014-10-01

    Eccentric (ECC) work is interesting for rehabilitation purposes because it is more efficient than concentric (CON). This study assessed respiratory patterns and electromyographic activity (EMG) during ECC and CON cycling, both at similar power outputs and VO2 in eight healthy male subjects. Measurements include ventilation (VE), tidal volume (Vt), breathing frequency (Fb), arterial blood gases, and vastus lateralis (VL) and biceps brachii (BB) EMG. At the same mechanical power, VO2 and VE were fivefold lower in ECC as was VL EMG while BB EMG, Vd/Vt, PaO2 and PaCO2, were not different between modalities. At the same VO2, there was no difference in VE but Vt was lower and Fb higher in ECC. VL EMG was not different between modalities while BB EMG was higher in ECC. The latter observation suggests that ECC cycling may result in arm bracing and restricted chest expansion. Since hyperpnea is a known trigger of exaggerated dynamic hyperinflation, the prescription of ECC cycling for patient rehabilitation requires further assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Family Patterns of Gender Role Attitudes.

    PubMed

    Marks, Jaime; Bun, Lam Chun; McHale, Susan M

    2009-08-01

    Study goals were to identify family patterns of gender role attitudes, to examine the conditions under which these patterns emerged, and to assess the implications of gender attitude patterns for family conflict. Participants were mothers, fathers, and first- and second-born adolescents from 358 White, working and middle-class US families. Results of cluster analysis revealed three gender role attitude patterns: egalitarian parents and children, traditional parents and children, and a divergent pattern, with parents more traditional and children more egalitarian. Mixed-model ANOVAs indicated that these family patterns were related to socioeconomic status, parents' time spent in gendered household tasks and with children, and the gender constellation of the sibling dyad. The traditional family group reported the most family conflict.

  15. The Pattern Speeds of NGC 6946

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, S.; Fathi, K.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Beckman, J. E.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    2008-06-01

    We study the kinematics of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 6946 by investigating the velocity field from Hα Fabry-Perot observations, determine the pattern speed of the bar by using the Tremaine-Weinberg method, and find a main pattern speed of 21.7+4.0-0.8 km-1 s-1 kpc-1. Our data clearly suggest the presence of an additional pattern with a pattern speed more than twice that of the large pattern in this galaxy. We use the epicycle approximation to deduce the location of the resonance radii and subsequently determine the pattern speed between the radii, and find that inside the inner inner Lindblad resonance radius a bar-like system has evolved.

  16. Minimal perceptrons for memorizing complex patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor, Marissa; Song, Juyong; Hoang, Danh-Tai; Jo, Junghyo

    2016-11-01

    Feedforward neural networks have been investigated to understand learning and memory, as well as applied to numerous practical problems in pattern classification. It is a rule of thumb that more complex tasks require larger networks. However, the design of optimal network architectures for specific tasks is still an unsolved fundamental problem. In this study, we consider three-layered neural networks for memorizing binary patterns. We developed a new complexity measure of binary patterns, and estimated the minimal network size for memorizing them as a function of their complexity. We formulated the minimal network size for regular, random, and complex patterns. In particular, the minimal size for complex patterns, which are neither ordered nor disordered, was predicted by measuring their Hamming distances from known ordered patterns. Our predictions agree with simulations based on the back-propagation algorithm.

  17. Family Patterns of Gender Role Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Jaime; Bun, Lam Chun; McHale, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Study goals were to identify family patterns of gender role attitudes, to examine the conditions under which these patterns emerged, and to assess the implications of gender attitude patterns for family conflict. Participants were mothers, fathers, and first- and second-born adolescents from 358 White, working and middle-class US families. Results of cluster analysis revealed three gender role attitude patterns: egalitarian parents and children, traditional parents and children, and a divergent pattern, with parents more traditional and children more egalitarian. Mixed-model ANOVAs indicated that these family patterns were related to socioeconomic status, parents' time spent in gendered household tasks and with children, and the gender constellation of the sibling dyad. The traditional family group reported the most family conflict. PMID:22308059

  18. Simple expressions model antenna radiation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, K. M.

    1982-12-01

    A simple method is developed for determining the radiation pattern of antennas, including more directive antennas with irregularly shaped patterns. The method uses the coefficients of a Fourier series determined from field-strength samples taken from the antenna. A computer program is used to provide the solution of several simultaneous equations. This Fourier series technique can be used effectively to represent the main beam region of almost any type of radiation pattern shape. Examples of the use of this method for calculating the radiation pattern of several types of antennas are presented, including a microstrip patch antenna E-plane pattern and the H-plane pattern for an X-band gain horn.

  19. Orthogonal patterns in binary neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baram, Yoram

    1988-01-01

    A binary neural network that stores only mutually orthogonal patterns is shown to converge, when probed by any pattern, to a pattern in the memory space, i.e., the space spanned by the stored patterns. The latter are shown to be the only members of the memory space under a certain coding condition, which allows maximum storage of M=(2N) sup 0.5 patterns, where N is the number of neurons. The stored patterns are shown to have basins of attraction of radius N/(2M), within which errors are corrected with probability 1 in a single update cycle. When the probe falls outside these regions, the error correction capability can still be increased to 1 by repeatedly running the network with the same probe.

  20. Excitation and Characterization of Chladni Plate Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourke, Shannon; Behringer, Ernest

    2011-04-01

    When a thin metal plate with a small amount of sand on it is made to vibrate, aesthetically pleasing sand patterns can form along the nodal lines of the plate. These symmetric patterns are called Chladni Patterns. Students taking PHY 101 Physical Science in the Arts at Eastern Michigan University create these patterns by pulling a violin bow across the edge of a plate, or by using a mechanical oscillator to drive the center of a plate. These two methods only allow a small subset of all possible points on the plate to be excited. We designed and built an electronic device that allows its user to excite the plate at any point. We present patterns created with this electronic device and other methods, and describe ways to model the observed patterns.

  1. Classifications of Patterned Hair Loss: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mysore, Venkataram

    2016-01-01

    Patterned hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss seen in both the sexes after puberty. Numerous classification systems have been proposed by various researchers for grading purposes. These systems vary from the simpler systems based on recession of the hairline to the more advanced multifactorial systems based on the morphological and dynamic parameters that affect the scalp and the hair itself. Most of these preexisting systems have certain limitations. Currently, the Hamilton-Norwood classification system for males and the Ludwig system for females are most commonly used to describe patterns of hair loss. In this article, we review the various classification systems for patterned hair loss in both the sexes. Relevant articles were identified through searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Search terms included but were not limited to androgenic alopecia classification, patterned hair loss classification, male pattern baldness classification, and female pattern hair loss classification. Further publications were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed articles. PMID:27081243

  2. Classifications of Patterned Hair Loss: A Review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Mysore, Venkataram

    2016-01-01

    Patterned hair loss is the most common cause of hair loss seen in both the sexes after puberty. Numerous classification systems have been proposed by various researchers for grading purposes. These systems vary from the simpler systems based on recession of the hairline to the more advanced multifactorial systems based on the morphological and dynamic parameters that affect the scalp and the hair itself. Most of these preexisting systems have certain limitations. Currently, the Hamilton-Norwood classification system for males and the Ludwig system for females are most commonly used to describe patterns of hair loss. In this article, we review the various classification systems for patterned hair loss in both the sexes. Relevant articles were identified through searches of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Search terms included but were not limited to androgenic alopecia classification, patterned hair loss classification, male pattern baldness classification, and female pattern hair loss classification. Further publications were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed articles.

  3. Patterning proteins and cells using soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Kane, R S; Takayama, S; Ostuni, E; Ingber, D E; Whitesides, G M

    1999-12-01

    This review describes the pattering of proteins and cells using a non-photolithographic microfabrication technology, which we call 'soft lithography' because it consists of a set of related techniques, each of which uses stamps or channels fabricated in an elastomeric ('soft') material for pattern transfer. The review covers three soft lithographic techniques: microcontact printing, patterning using microfluidic channels, and laminar flow patterning. These soft lithographic techniques are inexpensive, are procedurally simple, and can be used to pattern a variety of planar and non-planar substrates. Their successful application does not require stringent regulation of the laboratory environment, and they can be used to pattern surfaces with delicate ligands. They provide control over both the surface chemistry and the cellular environment. We discuss both the procedures for patterning based on these soft lithographic techniques, and their applications in biosensor technology, in tissue engineering, and for fundamental studies in cell biology.

  4. Pattern Discovery in Time-Ordered Data

    SciTech Connect

    CONRAD, GREGORY N.; BRITANIK, JOHN M.; DELAND, SHARON M.; JENKIN, CHRISTINA L.

    2002-02-01

    This report describes the results of a Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project on techniques for pattern discovery in discrete event time series data. In this project, we explored two different aspects of the pattern matching/discovery problem. The first aspect studied was the use of Dynamic Time Warping for pattern matching in continuous data. In essence, DTW is a technique for aligning time series along the time axis to optimize the similarity measure. The second aspect studied was techniques for discovering patterns in discrete event data. We developed a pattern discovery tool based on adaptations of the A-priori and GSP (Generalized Sequential Pattern mining) algorithms. We then used the tool on three different application areas--unattended monitoring system data from a storage magazine, computer network intrusion detection, and analysis of robot training data.

  5. The concept of pattern in craniofacial growth.

    PubMed

    Moyers, R E; Bookstein, F L; Guire, K E

    1979-08-01

    1. There are semantic and associated problems with the word pattern in biology, particularly in orthodontics and facial growth. 2. Pattern, as we use the term, is invariance of relationships--"a set of constraints operating to preserve the integration of parts under varying conditions and through time." 3. Craniofacial pattern can be described and quantified by the identification of craniofacial constants, measures that are relatively invariant. 4. Growth is change and is best identified by studying those measures of size and shape that vary most sensitively through time over development stages. 5. The many traditional cephalometric measures that represent well neither pattern nor growth (mixed) are of less clinical utility than either pure pattern indices or growth indices. 6. The analytical and conceptual separation of pattern and growth seems useful in analysis of morphology, analysis of growth, prediction of growth, and clinical treatment planning.

  6. Safety Case Patterns: Theory and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denney, Ewen W.; Pai, Ganesh J.

    2015-01-01

    We develop the foundations for a theory of patterns of safety case argument structures, clarifying the concepts involved in pattern specification, including choices, labeling, and well-founded recursion. We specify six new patterns in addition to those existing in the literature. We give a generic way to specify the data required to instantiate patterns and a generic algorithm for their instantiation. This generalizes earlier work on generating argument fragments from requirements tables. We describe an implementation of these concepts in AdvoCATE, the Assurance Case Automation Toolset, showing how patterns are defined and can be instantiated. In particular, we describe how our extended notion of patterns can be specified, how they can be instantiated in an interactive manner, and, finally, how they can be automatically instantiated using our algorithm.

  7. Advanced precision expendable pattern casting technology. 1994 Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Casting technology is described. The following areas are reported on: precision pattern production; pattern coating; sand fill and compaction; pattern gating; mechanical properties; and technology transfer efforts.

  8. Pattern Selection by Dynamical Biochemical Signals

    PubMed Central

    Palau-Ortin, David; Formosa-Jordan, Pau; Sancho, José M.; Ibañes, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves cells to decide their fate upon the action of biochemical signals. This decision is often spatiotemporally coordinated such that a spatial pattern arises. The dynamics that drive pattern formation usually involve genetic nonlinear interactions and positive feedback loops. These complex dynamics may enable multiple stable patterns for the same conditions. Under these circumstances, pattern formation in a developing tissue involves a selection process: why is a certain pattern formed and not another stable one? Herein we computationally address this issue in the context of the Notch signaling pathway. We characterize a dynamical mechanism for developmental selection of a specific pattern through spatiotemporal changes of the control parameters of the dynamics, in contrast to commonly studied situations in which initial conditions and noise determine which pattern is selected among multiple stable ones. This mechanism can be understood as a path along the parameter space driven by a sequence of biochemical signals. We characterize the selection process for three different scenarios of this dynamical mechanism that can take place during development: the signal either 1) acts in all the cells at the same time, 2) acts only within a cluster of cells, or 3) propagates along the tissue. We found that key elements for pattern selection are the destabilization of the initial pattern, the subsequent exploration of other patterns determined by the spatiotemporal symmetry of the parameter changes, and the speeds of the path compared to the timescales of the pattern formation process itself. Each scenario enables the selection of different types of patterns and creates these elements in distinct ways, resulting in different features. Our approach extends the concept of selection involved in cellular decision-making, usually applied to cell-autonomous decisions, to systems that collectively make decisions through cell

  9. Urban street patterns detectable from ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The major street patterns in Lincoln, Nebraska, are detectable on the January 24, 1973 ERTS MSS-4 image. To further study and identify the street patterns, a 3x Polaroid enlargement was made of the city from the image. An overlay of the enlargement was used to map the street patterns, with reference to the original image for clarity. The technique seems to be adaptable for updating standard road maps.

  10. Interpolating Spherical Harmonics for Computing Antenna Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    and Antenna Patterns 1 2 Short-Wire Antennas 3 3 Spherical Harmonic Expansions 10 4 Adaptive Spline Interpolation ( ASI ) 14 5 Testing the ASI Algorithm...frequency band is possible. This report offers a simple adaptive spline interpolation ( ASI ) algorithm to benchmark more sophisticated pattern...θ, φ) and their expansions. Sec- tion 4 uses one of the antenna patterns to develop the ASI algorithm and the error bounds. Section 5 tests the ASI

  11. Weather pattern climatology of the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Barchet, W.R.; Davis, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    In this study the geographic domain covered the 48 conterminous states of the United States. The daily synoptic weather pattern was classified into nine types for the 10-year period January 1, 1969 to December 31, 1978. Weather pattern types were defined relative to the classical polar front model of a mid-latitude cyclonic storm system and its associated air masses. Guidelines for classifying weather patterns on an operational basis were developed. These were applied to 3652 daily surface weather maps to produce a time series of weather pattern type at 120 grid points of a 160 point, 3/sup 0/ latitude by 4/sup 0/ longitude array over the United States. Statistics on the frequency of occurrence, persistence and alternation of weather patterns were calculated for each grid point. Summary statistics for the entire grid and for six regions were also presented. Frequency of occurrence and persistence were found to depend on the size and speed of movement of the weather pattern. Large, slow moving air masses had higher frequency of occurrence and longer persistence than small (fronts) or rapidly moving (or changing) features (fronts, storm centers). Some types showed distinct regional preferences. The subtropical maritime high occurred mainly in the south central and southeast. An indeterminate weather pattern type accounted for those weather patterns that did not fit the polar front model or were too disorganized to be classified. The intermountain thermal low of the desert southwest was one such feature that dominated both frequency of occurrence and persistence in this region. Alternation from one weather pattern to another followed the polar front model of a moving cyclonic storm. The tendency for anticyclonic weather patterns to become disorganized as they weakened was seen in the high percentage of these patterns that changed to an indeterminate pattern as they aged.

  12. ``Coffee-ring'' patterns of polymer droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Nupur; Datta, Alokmay

    2013-02-01

    Dried droplets of polymer solutions carries the self-assembly behavior of polymer molecules by forming various patterns. Pattern formation is a consequence of deposition of molecules depending on motion of the contact line during the drying process. The contact line motion depends on initial polymer concentrations and hence entanglement. Thus depending on entanglement the patterns represent the `particle' like or `collective' behavior of polymer molecules.

  13. Patterns in Calabi-Yau Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yang-Hui; Jejjala, Vishnu; Pontiggia, Luca

    2017-09-01

    We explore the distribution of topological numbers in Calabi-Yau manifolds, using the Kreuzer-Skarke dataset of hypersurfaces in toric varieties as a testing ground. While the Hodge numbers are well-known to exhibit mirror symmetry, patterns in frequencies of combination thereof exhibit striking new patterns. We find pseudo-Voigt and Planckian distributions with high confidence and exact fit for many substructures. The patterns indicate typicality within the landscape of Calabi-Yau manifolds of various dimension.

  14. Generating Weighted Test Patterns for VLSI Chips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siavoshi, Fardad

    1990-01-01

    Improved built-in self-testing circuitry for very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) digital circuits based on version of weighted-test-pattern-generation concept, in which ones and zeros in pseudorandom test patterns occur with probabilities weighted to enhance detection of certain kinds of faults. Requires fewer test patterns and less computation time and occupies less area on circuit chips. Easy to relate switching activity in outputs with fault-detection activity by use of probabilistic fault-detection techniques.

  15. [Migration patterns of health professionals].

    PubMed

    Kingma, Mireille

    2005-01-01

    The past three decades have seen the number of international migrants double, to reach the unprecedented total of 175 million people in 2003. National health systems are often the biggest national employer, responsible for an estimated 35 million workers worldwide. Health professionals are part of the expanding global labour market. Today, foreign-educated health professionals represent more than a quarter of the medical and nursing workforces of Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States. Destination countries, however, are not limited to industrialised nations. For example, 50 per cent of physicians in the Namibia public services are expatriates and South Africa continues to recruit close to 80% of its rural physicians from other countries. International migration often imitates patterns of internal migration. The exodus from rural to urban areas, from lower to higher income urban neighbourhoods and from lower-income to higher-income sectors contributes challenges to the universal coverage of the population. International migration is often blamed for the dramatic health professional shortages witnessed in the developing countries. A recent OECD study, however, concludes that many registered nurses in South Africa (far exceeding the number that emigrate) are either inactive or unemployed. These dire situations constitute a modern paradox which is for the most part ignored. Shared language, promises of a better quality of life and globalization all support the continued existence of health professionals' international migration. The ethical dimension o this mobility is a sensitive issue that needs to be addressed. A major paradigm shift, however, is required in order to lessen the need to migrate rather than artificially curb the flows.

  16. Patterns of smoking in Russia

    PubMed Central

    McKee, M.; Bobak, M.; Rose, R.; Shkolnikov, V.; Chenet, L.; Leon, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Tobacco is a leading cause of avoidable death in Russia but there is, as yet, relatively little information in the public domain on who is smoking and how this is changing. This information is important for those seeking to develop effective policies to tackle this issue.
OBJECTIVE—To determine the prevalence of smoking in Russia and its association with sociodemographic factors.
DESIGN—Cross-sectional survey on patterns of tobacco consumption.
SETTING—Data were collected using the New Russia Barometer, a multi-stage stratified-sample survey of the population of the Russian Federation undertaken in the summer of 1996.
PARTICIPANTS—Data were available on 1587 individuals (response rate 65.7%). Respondents differed little from the overall Russian population in terms of age, sex, education, and voting intention.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Prevalence of current and past smoking.
RESULTS—Smoking is common among males of all ages and in all areas. Of those aged 18-24 years, 65% smoke, rising to 73% in those aged 25-34 and then falling steadily to reach 41% in those aged 65 and older. Among women, smoking is much more common among the young (27% in those aged 18-34) than among the middle-aged and elderly (5% in those aged 55 and older), and more common among those living in urban areas than in rural areas. Smoking is also more common among men and women suffering material deprivation but there is no independent association with education. Among men, but not women, church attendance is inversely associated with smoking. In both sexes, but especially women, heavy drinking and smoking are associated.
CONCLUSIONS—Tobacco poses a major threat to the health of future generations in Russia, especially among women. A robust policy response is required.


Keywords: prevalence; Russia; smoking PMID:9706750

  17. The perception of prominence patterns.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Klaus J

    2008-01-01

    The term 'stress' is used to refer to the perceptual salience at certain places in strings of syllables, but it has several different referents: (a) relative syllable salience in an utterance; this is syllable-, not word-oriented; (b) stress in a word; this is part of the lexical phonology; (c) stressing of words in utterances for various aspects of propositional and expressive meaning, often called 'accent(uation)'. Referents b and c are word- and meaning-oriented. In this article, the terms are more stringently defined. 'Stress' is only used to refer to a lexical stress position (referent b), i.e. a syllable in a word that becomes the docking place for various types of 'accent' to weight words in utterances (referent c). 'Stress' has no physical attributes by itself. 'Prominence' refers to the patterns of salience in syllable strings (referent a). The article reports results of an experiment in prominence perception of the logatome baba, in which the physical parameters F0, syllabic duration, and overall acoustic energy were systematically varied across the bisyllable. Sixteen German subjects had to indicate, by pressing buttons of a computerized reaction time device, whether the first or the second syllable was more prominent. F(0) was a more powerful cue than the other two. Equal syllable duration on a monotone resulted in more first-syllable judgements, which could be counteracted by a slightly falling F(0) contour on the second syllable to reach equal response frequencies for the two syllables. This ties in with Lehiste's earlier findings that F(0) movement increases the perception of duration. Extrapolating from the results, a research programme for prominence perception is developed that will eventually shed new light on the investigation into the nature and manifestation of speech rhythm. 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Irrelevant relations and the active search for pattern structure in rat serial pattern learning

    PubMed Central

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; Fountain, Stephen B.

    2012-01-01

    Hersh (Mem Cogn 2:771–774, 1974) investigated the role of irrelevant relations in college students’ pattern learning and performance for letter series completion problems. He created irrelevant relations in sequences by inserting items to make pattern structure ambiguous such that it was open to multiple interpretations during initial pattern processing. He reported irrelevant relations impaired humans’ performance more when placed at the beginning of patterns than at the end. However, once pattern structure was induced, irrelevant relations were not impairing. Here, we examined the impact on rat serial pattern learning of irrelevant relations positioned at the beginning or end of a serial pattern. Rats pressed levers in a circular array according to the same structured serial pattern, 123 234 345 456 567, where digits indicated the clockwise position of the correct lever. This structured serial pattern was interleaved with repeating responses on lever 2 to produce irrelevant relations at the beginning of the pattern (Beginning: 122232 223242 324252 425262 526272), on lever 6 to produce irrelevant relations at the end of the pattern (End: 162636 263646 364656 465666 566676), or on lever 8 to produce no irrelevant relations (No Irrelevant Relations: 182838 283848 384858 485868 586878. Irrelevant relations significantly retarded learning regardless of their placement within the pattern. However, irrelevant relations retarded learning significantly more when placed at the pattern beginning versus end. The results indicate that rats, like humans, process patterns from beginning to end. PMID:21246231

  19. Field patterns: a new mathematical object.

    PubMed

    Milton, Graeme W; Mattei, Ornella

    2017-02-01

    Field patterns occur in space-time microstructures such that a disturbance propagating along a characteristic line does not evolve into a cascade of disturbances, but rather concentrates on a pattern of characteristic lines. This pattern is the field pattern. In one spatial direction plus time, the field patterns occur when the slope of the characteristics is, in a sense, commensurate with the space-time microstructure. Field patterns with different spatial shifts do not generally interact, but rather evolve as if they live in separate dimensions, as many dimensions as the number of field patterns. Alternatively one can view a collection as a multi-component potential, with as many components as the number of field patterns. Presumably, if one added a tiny nonlinear term to the wave equation one would then see interactions between these field patterns in the multi-dimensional space that one can consider them to live, or between the different field components of the multi-component potential if one views them that way. As a result of [Formula: see text]-symmetry many of the complex eigenvalues of an appropriately defined transfer matrix have unit norm and hence the corresponding eigenvectors correspond to propagating modes. There are also modes that blow up exponentially with time.

  20. Patterns in randomly evolving networks: Idiotypic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, Markus; Behn, Ulrich

    2003-03-01

    We present a model for the evolution of networks of occupied sites on undirected regular graphs. At every iteration step in a parallel update, I randomly chosen empty sites are occupied and occupied sites having occupied neighbor degree outside of a given interval (tl,tu) are set empty. Depending on the influx I and the values of both lower threshold and upper threshold of the occupied neighbor degree, different kinds of behavior can be observed. In certain regimes stable long-living patterns appear. We distinguish two types of patterns: static patterns arising on graphs with low connectivity and dynamic patterns found on high connectivity graphs. Increasing I patterns become unstable and transitions between almost stable patterns, interrupted by disordered phases, occur. For still larger I the lifetime of occupied sites becomes very small and network structures are dominated by randomness. We develop methods to analyze the nature and dynamics of these network patterns, give a statistical description of defects and fluctuations around them, and elucidate the transitions between different patterns. Results and methods presented can be applied to a variety of problems in different fields and a broad class of graphs. Aiming chiefly at the modeling of functional networks of interacting antibodies and B cells of the immune system (idiotypic networks), we focus on a class of graphs constructed by bit chains. The biological relevance of the patterns and possible operational modes of idiotypic networks are discussed.