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Sample records for pure dysarthria due

  1. Pure dysarthria due to an insular infarction.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Saiko; Kamitsukasa, Ikuo

    2010-06-01

    Cortical infarction presenting with pure dysarthria is rarely reported. Previous studies have reported pure dysarthria due to cortical stroke at the precentral gyrus or middle frontal gyrus. We report a 72-year-old man who developed pure dysarthria caused by an acute cortical infarction in the insular cortex. The role of the insula in language has been difficult to assess clinically because of the rarity of pure insular strokes. Our patient showed pure dysarthria without aphasia, indicating that pure dysarthria can be the sole manifestation of insular infarctions.

  2. Dysarthria

    MedlinePlus

    ... pathology treatments for dysarthria? ASHA produced a treatment efficacy summary on dysarthria [PDF] that describes evidence about ... Language Child Speech and Language Swallowing and Feeding Self-Help Groups Find a Professional Advertising Disclaimer Advertise ...

  3. Dysarthria

    MedlinePlus

    ... a condition in which you have difficulty saying words because of problems with the muscles that help you talk. Causes In a person with dysarthria, a nerve, brain, or muscle disorder makes it difficult to use or control the muscles of the mouth, tongue, larynx, or vocal cords. The muscles may ...

  4. Isolated dysarthria due to extracerebellar lacunar stroke: a central monoparesis of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Urban, P.; Wicht, S.; Hopf, H. C.; Fleischer, S.; Nickel, O.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The pathophysiology of dysarthria can preferentially be studied in patients with the rare lacunar stroke syndrome of "isolated dysarthria".
METHODS— A single study was carried out on seven consecutive patients with sudden onset of isolated dysarthria due to single ischaemic lesion. The localisation of the lesion was identified using MRI. The corticolingual, cortico-orofacial, and corticospinal tract functions were investigated using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Corticopontocerebellar tract function was assessed using 99mTc hexamethylpropylene amine oxime-single photon emission computerised tomography (HMPAO-SPECT) in six patients. Sensory functions were evaluated clinically and by somatosensory evoked potentials.
RESULTS—Brain MRI showed the lesions to be located in the corona radiata (n=4) and the internal capsule (n=2). No morphological lesion was identified in one patient. Corticolingual tract function was impaired in all patients. In four patients with additional cortico-orofacial tract dysfunction, dysarthria did not differ from that in patients with isolated corticolingual tract dysfunction. Corticospinal tract functions were normal in all patients. HMPAO-SPECT showed no cerebellar diaschisis, suggesting unimpaired corticopontocerebellar tract function. Sensory functions were not affected.
CONCLUSION—Interruption of the corticolingual pathways to the tongue is crucial in the pathogenesis of isolated dysarthria after extracerebellar lacunar stroke.

 PMID:10201423

  5. Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

  6. Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

  7. Relationship between kinematics, F2 slope and speech intelligibility in dysarthria due to cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-09-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant, and the related submental muscle activities and relating these measures to speech intelligibility. The results show that larger reductions of F2 slope are correlated with lower intelligibility in CP-related dysarthria. Among the three speakers with CP, the speaker with the lowest F2 slope and intelligibility showed smallest tongue release movement and largest jaw opening movement. The other two speakers with CP were comparable in the amplitude and velocity of tongue movements, but one speaker had abnormally prolonged jaw movement. The tongue-jaw coordination pattern found in the speakers with CP could be either compensatory or subject to an incompletely developed oromotor control system.

  8. Interventions for dysarthria due to stroke and other adult-acquired, non-progressive brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Claire; Bowen, Audrey; Tyson, Sarah; Butterfint, Zoe; Conroy, Paul

    2017-01-25

    Dysarthria is an acquired speech disorder following neurological injury that reduces intelligibility of speech due to weak, imprecise, slow and/or unco-ordinated muscle control. The impact of dysarthria goes beyond communication and affects psychosocial functioning. This is an update of a review previously published in 2005. The scope has been broadened to include additional interventions, and the title amended accordingly. To assess the effects of interventions to improve dysarthric speech following stroke and other non-progressive adult-acquired brain injury such as trauma, infection, tumour and surgery. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (May 2016), CENTRAL (Cochrane Library 2016, Issue 4), MEDLINE, Embase, and CINAHL on 6 May 2016. We also searched Linguistics and Language Behavioral Abstracts (LLBA) (1976 to November 2016) and PsycINFO (1800 to September 2016). To identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials, we searched major trials registers: WHO ICTRP, the ISRCTN registry, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and contacted academic institutions and other researchers regarding other published, unpublished or ongoing trials. We did not impose any language restrictions. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing dysarthria interventions with 1) no intervention, 2) another intervention for dysarthria (this intervention may differ in methodology, timing of delivery, duration, frequency or theory), or 3) an attention control. Three review authors selected trials for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We attempted to contact study authors for clarification and missing data as required. We calculated standardised mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI), using a random-effects model, and performed sensitivity analyses to assess the influence of methodological quality. We planned to conduct subgroup analyses for underlying clinical

  9. A distinct variant of mixed dysarthria reflects parkinsonism and dystonia due to ephedrone abuse.

    PubMed

    Rusz, Jan; Megrelishvili, Marika; Bonnet, Cecilia; Okujava, Michael; Brožová, Hana; Khatiashvili, Irine; Sekhniashvili, Madona; Janelidze, Marina; Tolosa, Eduardo; Růžička, Evžen

    2014-06-01

    A distinctive alteration of speech has been reported in patients suffering from ephedrone-induced parkinsonism. However, an objective assessment of dysarthria has not been performed in ephedrone users. We studied 28 young Caucasian men from Georgia with a previous history of ephedrone abuse and compared them to 25 age-matched healthy controls. Speech examination, brain MRI, and NNIPPS-Parkinson plus scale were performed in all patients. The accurate differential diagnosis of dysarthria subtypes was based on the quantitative acoustic analyses of 15 speech dimensions. We revealed a distinct variant of mixed dysarthria with a combination of hyperkinetic and hypokinetic components representing the altered motor programming of dystonia and bradykinesia in ephedrone-induced parkinsonism. According to acoustic analyses, all patients presented at least one affected speech dimension, whereas dysarthria was moderate in 43% and severe in 36% of patients. Further findings indicated relationships between motor subscores of dystonia and bradykinesia and speech components of loudness (r = -0.54, p < 0.01), articulation (r = 0.40, p < 0.05), and timing (r = -0.53, p < 0.01). In ephedrone-induced parkinsonism a prominent mixed hyperkinetic-hypokinetic dysarthria occurs that appears related to marked dystonia and bradykinesia and probably reflects manganese induced toxic and neurodegenerative damage to the globus pallidus internus and substantia nigra.

  10. Acoustic Characteristics of the Question-Statement Contrast in Severe Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Rupal

    2003-01-01

    Studies of prosodic control in severe dysarthria (DYS) have focused on differences between impaired and nonimpaired speech in terms of the range and variation of fundamental frequency (F0), intensity, and duration. Whether individuals with severe DYS can adequately signal prosodic contrasts and "which" acoustic cues they use to do so has received…

  11. Acoustic Characteristics of the Question-Statement Contrast in Severe Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Rupal

    2003-01-01

    Studies of prosodic control in severe dysarthria (DYS) have focused on differences between impaired and nonimpaired speech in terms of the range and variation of fundamental frequency (F0), intensity, and duration. Whether individuals with severe DYS can adequately signal prosodic contrasts and "which" acoustic cues they use to do so has received…

  12. Speech and language therapy for dysarthria due to non-progressive brain damage.

    PubMed

    Sellars, C; Hughes, T; Langhorne, P

    2001-01-01

    Dysarthria is a common sequel of non-progressive brain damage (typically stroke and traumatic brain damage). Impairment-based therapy and a wide variety of compensatory management strategies are undertaken by speech and language therapists with this patient population. To determine the efficacy of speech and language therapy interventions for adults with dysarthria following non-progressive brain damage. This review has drawn on the search strategies developed for the following Cochrane Groups as a whole: Stroke, Injuries, and Infectious Diseases. Relevant trials were identified in the Specialised Registers of Controlled Trials (see Review Group Details for more information). We also searched the trials register of the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycLIT, and Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts were electronically searched. Hand-searching of The International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders and of reference lists from relevant articles and conference proceedings was also undertaken. Colleagues were approached to identify other possible published and unpublished studies. Date of most recent searches: May 2000. Unconfounded randomised controlled trials. One reviewer assessed trial quality. Two co-reviewers were available to examine any potential trials for possible inclusion in the review. No trials of the required standard were identified. There is no evidence of the quality required by this review to support or refute the effectiveness of Speech and Language Therapy interventions for dysarthria following non-progressive brain damage. There is an urgent need for good quality research in this area.

  13. Speech and language therapy for dysarthria due to nonprogressive brain damage: a systematic Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Sellars, Cameron; Hughes, Thomas; Langhorne, Peter

    2002-02-01

    Dysarthria is a common sequel of nonprogressive brain damage (typically stroke and traumatic brain damage). Impairment-based therapy and a wide variety of compensatory management strategies are undertaken by speech and language therapists with this patient population. To determine the efficacy of speech and language therapy interventions for adults with dysarthria following nonprogressive brain damage. Systematic review. This review has drawn on the search strategies developed for the following Cochrane Groups as a whole: Stroke, Injuries, and Infectious Diseases. Relevant trials were identified in the Specialised Registers of Controlled Trials. We also searched the trials register of the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycLIT, and Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts were electronically searched. Hand-searching of the International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders and of reference lists from relevant articles and conference proceedings was also undertaken. Colleagues were approached to identify other possible published and unpublished studies. Unconfounded randomized controlled trials. One reviewer assessed trial quality. Two co-reviewers were available to examine any potential trials for possible inclusion in the review. No trials of the required standard were identified. There is no evidence of the quality required by this review to support or refute the effectiveness of speech and language therapy interventions for dysarthria following nonprogressive brain damage. There is an urgent need for good quality research in this area.

  14. Speech and language therapy for dysarthria due to non-progressive brain damage.

    PubMed

    Sellars, C; Hughes, T; Langhorne, P

    2002-01-01

    Dysarthria is a common sequel of non-progressive brain damage (typically stroke and traumatic brain damage). Impairment-based therapy and a wide variety of compensatory management strategies are undertaken by speech and language therapists with this patient population. To determine the efficacy of speech and language therapy interventions for adults with dysarthria following non-progressive brain damage. This review has drawn on the search strategies developed for the following Cochrane Groups as a whole: Stroke, Injuries, Movement Disorders and Infectious Diseases. Relevant trials were identified in the Specialised Registers of Controlled Trials (see Review Group details for more information). We also searched the trials register of the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field. The Trials Registers were last searched in December 2001. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library 2002, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1966-December 2001), EMBASE (1980-December 2001), CINAHL (1983-December 2001), PsycINFO (1974-February 2002) and Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (1983-October 2001) were searched electronically. We handsearched the International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders (1966-2002, Issue 1) and selected conference proceedings, and scanned the reference lists of relevant articles. Colleagues were approached to identify other possible published and unpublished studies. Unconfounded randomised controlled trials. One reviewer assessed trial quality. Two co-reviewers were available to examine any potential trials for possible inclusion in the review. No trials of the required standard were identified. There is no evidence of the quality required by this review to support or refute the effectiveness of Speech and Language Therapy interventions for dysarthria following non-progressive brain damage. There is an urgent need for good quality research in this area.

  15. Speech and language therapy for dysarthria due to non-progressive brain damage.

    PubMed

    Sellars, C; Hughes, T; Langhorne, P

    2005-07-20

    Dysarthria is a common sequel of non-progressive brain damage (typically stroke and traumatic brain damage). Impairment-based therapy and a wide variety of compensatory management strategies are undertaken by speech and language therapists with this patient population. To determine the efficacy of speech and language therapy interventions for adults with dysarthria following non-progressive brain damage. We searched the trials registers of the following Cochrane Groups: Stroke, Injuries, Movement Disorders and Infectious Diseases. We also searched the trials register of the Cochrane Rehabilitation and Related Therapies Field. The trials registers were last searched in September 2004. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to September 2004), EMBASE (1980 to September 2004), CINAHL (1983 to September 2004), PsycINFO (1974 to October 2004), and Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (1983 to December 2004) were searched electronically. We handsearched the International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders (1966 to 2005, Issue 1) and selected conference proceedings, and scanned the reference lists of relevant articles. We approached colleagues and speech and language therapy training institutions to identify other possible published and unpublished studies. Unconfounded randomised controlled trials (RCTs). One author assessed trial quality. Two co-authors were available to examine any potential trials for possible inclusion in the review. No trials of the required standard were identified. There is no evidence of the quality required by this review to support or refute the effectiveness of speech and language therapy interventions for dysarthria following non-progressive brain damage. Despite the recent commencement of a RCT of optimised speech and language therapy for communication difficulties after stroke, there continues to be an urgent need for good quality research in this

  16. Hyponatremia due to hypothyroidism: a pure renal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, P H; de Meijer, P H; Meinders, A E

    2001-03-01

    Hyponatremia is a common disorder. When hyponatremia is the result of hypothyroidism it can be successfully treated with thyroid hormone substitution. We followed cumulative sodium- and fluid balances of a patient with hyponatremia, resulting from hypothyroidism. We concluded that hyponatremia in hypothyroidism is due to a pure renal mechanism, and cannot be ascribed to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone.

  17. Ataxic dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Kent, R D; Kent, J F; Duffy, J R; Thomas, J E; Weismer, G; Stuntebeck, S

    2000-10-01

    Although ataxic dysarthria has been studied with various methods in several languages, questions remain concerning which features of the disorder are most consistent, which speaking tasks are most sensitive to the disorder, and whether the different speech production subsystems are uniformly affected. Perceptual and acoustic data were obtained from 14 individuals (seven men, seven women) with ataxic dysarthria for several speaking tasks, including sustained vowel phonation, syllable repetition, sentence recitation, and conversation. Multidimensional acoustic analyses of sustained vowel phonation showed that the largest and most frequent abnormality for both men and women was a long-term variability of fundamental frequency. Other measures with a high frequency of abnormality were shimmer and peak amplitude variation (for both sexes) and jitter (for women). Syllable alternating motion rate (AMR) was typically slow and irregular in its temporal pattern. In addition, the energy maxima and minima often were highly variable across repeated syllables, and this variability is thought to reflect poorly coordinated respiratory function and inadequate articulatory/voicing control. Syllable rates tended to be slower for sentence recitation and conversation than for AMR, but the three rates were highly similar. Formant-frequency ranges during sentence production were essentially normal, showing that articulatory hypometria is not a pervasive problem. Conversational samples varied considerably across subjects in intelligibility and number of words/ morphemes in a breath group. Qualitative analyses of unintelligible episodes in conversation showed that these samples generally had a fairly well-defined syllable pattern but subjects differed in the degree to which the acoustic contrasts typical of consonant and vowel sequences were maintained. For some individuals, an intelligibility deficit occurred in the face of highly distinctive (and contrastive) acoustic patterns.

  18. Disorders of communication: dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Enderby, Pam

    2013-01-01

    Dysarthria is a motor speech disorder which can be classified according to the underlying neuropathology and is associated with disturbances of respiration, laryngeal function, airflow direction, and articulation resulting in difficulties of speech quality and intelligibility. There are six major types of dysarthria: flaccid dysarthria associated with lower motor neuron impairment, spastic dysarthria associated with damaged upper motor neurons linked to the motor areas of the cerebral cortex, ataxic dysarthria primarily caused by cerebellar dysfunction, and hyperkinetic dysarthria and hypokinetic dysarthria, which are related to a disorder of the extrapyramidal system. The sixth is generally termed a mixed dysarthria and is associated with damage in more than one area, resulting in speech characteristics of at least two groups. The features of the speech disturbance of these six major types of dysarthria are distinctive and can assist with diagnosis. Dysarthria is a frequent symptom of many neurological conditions and is commonly associated with progressive neurological disease. It has a profound effect upon the patient and their families as communication is integrally related with expressing personality and social relationships. Speech and language therapy can be used to encourage the person to use the speech that is already available to them more effectively, can increase the range and consistency of sound production, can teach strategies for improving intelligibility and communicative effectiveness, can guide the individual to use methods that are less tiring and more successful, and can introduce the appropriate Augmentative and Alternative Communication approaches as and when required.

  19. [Pure sensory stroke due to midbrain hemorrhage--case report].

    PubMed

    Ueki, H; Nishimaru, K

    1985-02-01

    We had a case of patient with pure sensory stroke which was caused by the rapture of a cryptic angioma located on the mesencephalon. The patient was a 41-year-old woman. She visited our clinic with sudden onset of numbness in the left hand, arm, trunk, leg, and face, and of hyposmia of the left side on arising. CT scans revealed a small hematoma with calcification located on the right dorsal mesencephalon, which diminished in size correlating with her recovery of the sensation. Her symptoms were considered to be caused by this hematoma which destroyed only the trigeminothalamic and the spinothalamic tracts excluding the superior colliculi, oculomotor nucleus, and the medial leminiscus. By angiography we failed to demonstrate a cause of the hemorrhage, but the presence of a cryptic angioma was suggested, because the post angiographic CT scan exhibited enhancement of the lesion. Her olfactory sensation was also restored accompanied with the recovery of the superficial sensation, therefore the hyposmia seemed to be due to the damage of the trigeminothalamic tract.

  20. Dysarthria and mutism.

    PubMed

    Sternic, Nadezda; Mijajlovic, Milija; Tomic, Gordana; Pavlovic, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Dysarthria is a speech disorder associated with impairments of intelligibility, smoothness, loudness, and clarity of articulations. Dysarthria involves disability of reproducing various physical, tonal, and sound features of speech sounds in oral speech; unintelligible and slurred articulation with swallowing of sounds is characteristic. Articulatory movements and speech are slow, patients complain to the sensations of a 'thick' tongue and 'porridge' in the mouth. Patients'phrases are constructed correctly, vocabulary is not affected, and the grammatical structure of words is preserved. Reading, writing, internal speech, and understanding of speech are unaffected. Several types of dysarthria have been described on the basis of the lesion locations. Dysarthria can be associated with lacunar syndromes as well. Mutism represents a condition when patient cannot speak and answer the questions, but remains conscious and is able to produce written speech.

  1. Relationship Between Prosody and Intelligibility in Children with Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal; Hustad, Katherine C.; Connaghan, Kathryn P.; Furr, William

    2013-01-01

    Exaggerated and redundant prosodic cue use has been noted among adults with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (CP) (Patel, 2004; van Doorn & Sheard, 2001). A possible explanation may be that speakers heighten prosodic contrasts to increase intelligibility. The current work examined whether children with dysarthria due to CP also produce exaggerated prosodic contours and if so, how prosodic cue use in these speakers impacts intelligibility. Acoustic analyses were conducted on a previously collected dataset of 2-7 word utterances produced by fourteen children with CP (7 with dysarthria and 7 without) (Hustad, Gorton & Lee, 2010). The dataset also included sentence-level transcriptions obtained from five listeners per speaker. Word intelligibility scores were derived from these transcripts and used to determine whether prosodic modulation differed for words with high versus low intelligibility. Although mean fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity range were similar across groups, words produced by children with dysarthria were slower and more variable in F0 than the group without dysarthria. Moreover, intelligibility decreased when children with dysarthria increased F0 and duration beyond the range used by children without dysarthria. Thus findings suggest that interventions targeting appropriate prosody may be beneficial in improving intelligibility in children with dysarthria and CP. PMID:25614728

  2. Implementing two treatment approaches to childhood dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Levy, Erika S

    2014-08-01

    The paucity of evidence and detail in the literature regarding speech treatment for children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) renders it difficult for researchers to replicate studies and make further inroads into this area in need of exploration. Furthermore, for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) wishing to follow treatments that the literature indicates have promise, little guidance is available on the details of the treatments that yielded the positive results. The present article details the implementation of two treatment approaches in speech treatment research for children with dysarthria: Speech Systems Intelligibility Treatment (SSIT) and the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment LOUD (LSVT LOUD). Specific strategies, primarily for treatment, but also for outcome measurement and acoustic analysis of dysarthric speech, are described. These techniques are provided for researchers and clinicians to consider implementing in order to advance speech treatment for this population. New data from research using these approaches are presented, including findings of acoustic vowel space changes following both speech treatments.

  3. Pure monoparesis of the leg due to cerebral infarctions: a diffusion-weighted imaging study.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Saiko; Ogawara, Kazue; Kamitsukasa, Ikuo

    2009-11-01

    Pure monoparesis of the leg due to cerebral infarction is rare compared to that of the hand. The anterior cerebral artery (ACA) territory is the most common lesion site in leg monoparesis, but diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI has not commonly been used for lesion detection. The purpose of this study was to use DW MRI to evaluate the radiological correlation with lesion location in patients presenting with pure leg monoparesis. We retrospectively studied six cerebral infarct patients with pure leg monoparesis who had undergone DW MRI. Patients were scanned within 3 days of symptom onset. DW MRI identified lesions in the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC) in two patients, in the corona radiata (two patients), in the subcortical white matter of the posterior frontal lobe (one patient), and in the frontal and parietal cortex, including the paracentral lobule and precuneus (one patient). The two patients with PLIC infarctions had characteristic linear infarction abnormalities along the long axis of the internal capsule. Corona radiata infarction were located posteriorly, and the two subcortical and cortical infarction were thought to be in the territory of the ACA. We thus concluded that in leg monoparesis due to infarctions, lesions may be located in the PLIC, corona radiata, or in the ACA territory. Recently, magnetic resonance tractography has shown that foot fibres of the corticospinal tract in the PLIC somatotopically may be posteromedial to hand fibres along the short axis of the internal capsule, rather than posterolateral along the long axis as has been thought. Thus, damage along the long axis of the PLIC by linear infarctions can cause pure monoparesis of the leg.

  4. Perceptual Ratings of Subgroups of Ataxic Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Kristie A.; France, Ashley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The speech characteristics of ataxic dysarthria are known to be quite diverse. The varied presentation of this dysarthria challenges researchers and clinicians alike, and brings into question whether it is a single entity. While the possibility of subtypes of ataxic dysarthria has been suggested, the nature of these putative groups…

  5. Perceptual Ratings of Subgroups of Ataxic Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Kristie A.; France, Ashley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The speech characteristics of ataxic dysarthria are known to be quite diverse. The varied presentation of this dysarthria challenges researchers and clinicians alike, and brings into question whether it is a single entity. While the possibility of subtypes of ataxic dysarthria has been suggested, the nature of these putative groups…

  6. Dissipation due to pure spin-current generated by spin pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Saslow, Wayne M.

    2014-12-01

    Based on spin-dependent transport theory and thermodynamics, we develop a generalized theory of the Joule heating in the presence of a spin current. Along with the conventional Joule heating consisting of an electric current and electrochemical potential, it is found that the spin current and spin accumulation give an additional dissipation because the spin-dependent scatterings inside bulk and ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic interface lead to a change of entropy. The theory is applied to investigate the dissipation due to pure spin-current generated by spin pumping across a ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic/ferromagnetic multilayer. The dissipation arises from an interface because the spin pumping is a transfer of both the spin angular momentum and the energy from the ferromagnet to conduction electrons near the interface. It is found that the dissipation is proportional to the enhancement of the Gilbert damping constant by spin pumping.

  7. Pure Motor Monoparesis in the Leg due to a Lateral Medullary Infarction.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Kozue; Kishida, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man with essential hypertension abruptly presented with slight left-sided leg weakness, despite normal strength in the other extremities. Left-sided Babinski's reflex was detected. There were no other neurologic abnormalities. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a small infarction in the lower lateral medulla oblongata on the left side. Cranial magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated an absence of flow of the left vertebral artery. He became asymptomatic within 10 days under intravenous antiplatelet agent. The corticospinal tract fibers innervating the lower extremity caudal to the pyramidal decussation might be involved. We emphasize that this is a first reported case of pure motor monoparesis in the leg due to lateral medullary infarction.

  8. Pure red cell aplasia due to antibody against erythropoietin in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, Maryam; Chitsazian, Zahra; Abdoli, Firoozeh; Moeini Taba, Seyed-Masoud; Akbari, Hosein

    2017-01-01

    Background Anemia is a common complication of chronic renal failure due to reduce erythropoietin production by kidneys. Anemia treated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHu-EPO). Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) due to antibody productionagainst rHu-EPO is a rare but major complication of this drug. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of PRCA due to antibodies in dialysis patients with resistant anemia who received erythropoietin. Patients and Methods We studied 128 under maintenance hemodialysis patients more than 3 month in Kashan. In patients with anemia who received erythropoietin with dose requirements based on weight and anemia and without any another cause for anemia, evaluate for PRCA and anti-rHu-EPO antibody level were measured by ELISA. Results In this research, 75 patients (58.6%) were male and 53 patients (41.4%) were female. The mean age of the patients was 59.05 ± 16.66 years. The result of analysis showed that 55 (43%) patients had anemia with hemoglobin level less than 10 mg/dL. Only 3 patients had PRCA and antibodies against erythropoietin in serum. There were no correlation between age, gender, cause of renal failure, hemodialysis duration, hemoglobin level, rHu-EPO dose and levels of anti-rHu-EPO antibody serum value. Conclusions The result of this study indicated that administration of rHu-EPO in dialysis patients afflicted to kidney failure may cause PRCA especially through intravenous injection. However, this change is not statistically significant. PMID:28042550

  9. Dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Tomik, Barbara; Guiloff, Roberto J

    2010-01-01

    Dysarthria is a motor disorder of speech characterized by abnormalities of the articulation and intelligibility of speech. Phonation and the rate of facial movements may also be affected. Understanding the nature and course of dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is important because loss of communication prevents patients from participating in many activities, may lead to social isolation, and reduces the quality of life. The goal of management of dysarthria in ALS patients is to optimize communication effectiveness for as long as possible. The information about dysarthria in ALS is dispersed in physiological, pathological, speech therapy, otorhinolaringological and neurological publications. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on the clinical features, differential diagnosis, pathophysiology, investigations and management of dysarthria in ALS patients. There is a need to compare the different methods used to assess dysarthria and for controlled clinical trials to assess therapeutic strategies.

  10. Intensive Treatment of Dysarthria Secondary to Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Leslie A.; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a well-defined behavioral dysarthria treatment on acoustic and perceptual measures of speech in four adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke. A single-subject A-B-A experimental design was used to measure the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) on the speech of individual…

  11. Intensive Treatment of Dysarthria Secondary to Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Leslie A.; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a well-defined behavioral dysarthria treatment on acoustic and perceptual measures of speech in four adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke. A single-subject A-B-A experimental design was used to measure the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT[R]LOUD) on the speech of individual…

  12. Three-dimensional effects on pure tone fan noise due to inflow distortion. [rotor blade noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobayashi, H.

    1978-01-01

    Two dimensional, quasi three dimensional and three dimensional theories for the prediction of pure tone fan noise due to the interaction of inflow distortion with a subsonic annular blade row were studied with the aid of an unsteady three dimensional lifting surface theory. The effects of compact and noncompact source distributions on pure tone fan noise in an annular cascade were investigated. Numerical results show that the strip theory and quasi three-dimensional theory are reasonably adequate for fan noise prediction. The quasi three-dimensional method is more accurate for acoustic power and model structure prediction with an acoustic power estimation error of about plus or minus 2db.

  13. Pure red cell aplasia due to azathioprine therapy for Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Nagesh; Pai, C Ganesh; Deltombe, Thylbert

    2016-01-01

    Various mechanisms contribute to anemia in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), drug-related causes being less frequent. The hematological and other adverse events of azathioprine (AZA) therapy are well documented, but drug-associated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is an uncommon event. We hereby describe two cases of AZA-associated PRCA in patients with Crohn's disease. The diagnosis was supported by pathological reports, and prompt hematological recovery was seen with discontinuation of the offending drug. This report highlights the need to consider this rare entity in IBD patients in appropriate settings and for adopting adequate precautionary measures.

  14. Pure sensory stroke due to bilateral basal ganglion hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terzi, Murat; Akkaya, Omer; Onar, Musa

    2010-07-01

    Bilateral simultaneous hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhages are extremely rare. The predisposing factors and pathophysiological mechanisms leading to the development of this picture are not well known. Possible mechanisms of simultaneous multiple hemorrhages include concomitant primary hemorrhages in two or more regions, or development of a second hemorrhage in another region shortly after the primary hemorrhage. The etiology of the cases presenting with bilateral simultaneous basal ganglion hemorrhage include migraine, lightning stroke, hyperglycemic hyperosmolar coma, hypertension and diabetic ketoacidosis coma. Bilateral simultaneous hemorrhage has a poor prognosis. The case of bilateral simultaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presented here had a good clinical course similar to a pure sensorial stroke.

  15. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  16. Patients' Experiences of Disruptions Associated with Post-Stroke Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Sylvia; Barbour, Rosaline S.; Brady, Marian; Clark, Alexander M.; Paton, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Background: Post-stroke dysarthria rehabilitation should consider social participation for people with dysarthria, but before this approach can be adopted, an understanding of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria is required. Despite the prevalence of dysarthria as a result of stroke, there is a paucity of research into this communication…

  17. Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Iorio, R; Capone, F; Plantone, D; Batocchi, A P

    2014-01-01

    Paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria are part of the spectrum of transient neurological disturbances that can be frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS). Prompt recognition of these symptoms is important because they can be the only manifestation of a MS relapse and symptomatic therapy is often beneficial. We report a patient who developed paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria, documented by video imaging, while he was recovering from a MS relapse. Treatment with carbamazepine resulted in the complete reversal of the paroxysmal ataxia and dysarthria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dysarthria in Friedreich's ataxia: a perceptual analysis.

    PubMed

    Folker, Joanne; Murdoch, Bruce; Cahill, Louise; Delatycki, Martin; Corben, Louise; Vogel, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) evaluate the perceptual speech dimensions, speech intelligibility and dysarthria severity of a group of individuals diagnosed with Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA); (2) determine the presence of subgroups within FRDA dysarthria; (3) investigate the relationship between the speech outcome and the clinical factors of disease progression. The study included 38 individuals (21 female, 17 male) with a confirmed diagnosis of FRDA. A group of 20 non-neurologically impaired individuals served as controls. Perceptual analysis, investigating 30 different dimensions of speech, was conducted on a speech sample obtained from each participant. In addition, the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthria Speech was administered. All FRDA participants presented with dysarthria with severities ranging from mild to moderate. Cluster analysis revealed 3 subgroups, the first presenting with mild dysarthric symptoms, the second with increased velopharyngeal involvement and the third characterized by increased laryngeal dysfunction. Dysarthria severity showed a significant correlation to disease duration but to no other clinical measure. The findings support the notion of subgroups in FRDA dysarthria, representing distinct impairments of the speech mechanism and perhaps reflective of differing evolutions beyond the cerebellum.

  19. Quantifying Speech Rhythm Abnormalities in the Dysarthrias

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L.; Lansford, Kaitlin; Lotto, Andrew J.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In this study, the authors examined whether rhythm metrics capable of distinguishing languages with high and low temporal stress contrast also can distinguish among control and dysarthric speakers of American English with perceptually distinct rhythm patterns. Methods Acoustic measures of vocalic and consonantal segment durations were obtained for speech samples from 55 speakers across 5 groups (hypokinetic, hyperkinetic, flaccid-spastic, ataxic dysarthrias, and controls). Segment durations were used to calculate standard and new rhythm metrics. Discriminant function analyses (DFAs) were used to determine which sets of predictor variables (rhythm metrics) best discriminated between groups (control vs. dysarthrias; and among the 4 dysarthrias). A cross-validation method was used to test the robustness of each original DFA. Results The majority of classification functions were more than 80% successful in classifying speakers into their appropriate group. New metrics that combined successive vocalic and consonantal segments emerged as important predictor variables. DFAs pitting each dysarthria group against the combined others resulted in unique constellations of predictor variables that yielded high levels of classification accuracy. Conclusions: This study confirms the ability of rhythm metrics to distinguish control speech from dysarthrias and to discriminate dysarthria subtypes. Rhythm metrics show promise for use as a rational and objective clinical tool. PMID:19717656

  20. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  1. Behavioural Intervention Effects in Dysarthria Following Stroke: Communication Effectiveness, Intelligibility and Dysarthria Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a common post-stroke presentation. Its management falls within the remit of the speech and language therapy profession. Little controlled evaluation of the effects of intervention for dysarthria in stroke has been reported. Aims: The study aimed to determine the effects of a period of behavioural communication…

  2. An Acoustic Study of the Relationships among Neurologic Disease, Dysarthria Type, and Severity of Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yunjung; Kent, Raymond D.; Weismer, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined acoustic predictors of speech intelligibility in speakers with several types of dysarthria secondary to different diseases and conducted classification analysis solely by acoustic measures according to 3 variables (disease, speech severity, and dysarthria type). Method: Speech recordings from 107 speakers with…

  3. Behavioural Intervention Effects in Dysarthria Following Stroke: Communication Effectiveness, Intelligibility and Dysarthria Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a common post-stroke presentation. Its management falls within the remit of the speech and language therapy profession. Little controlled evaluation of the effects of intervention for dysarthria in stroke has been reported. Aims: The study aimed to determine the effects of a period of behavioural communication…

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Interutterance Stability: Application to Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Fred; Lowit, Anja; van Brenk, Frits

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Following recent attempts to quantify articulatory impairment in speech, the present study evaluates the usefulness of a novel measure of motor stability to characterize dysarthria. Method: The study included 8 speakers with ataxic dysarthria (AD), 16 speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) as a result of Parkinson's disease, and…

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Interutterance Stability: Application to Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Fred; Lowit, Anja; van Brenk, Frits

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Following recent attempts to quantify articulatory impairment in speech, the present study evaluates the usefulness of a novel measure of motor stability to characterize dysarthria. Method: The study included 8 speakers with ataxic dysarthria (AD), 16 speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria (HD) as a result of Parkinson's disease, and…

  6. Physiologic deficits in the orofacial system underlying dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Langmore, S E; Lehman, M E

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate some of the physiological deficits in the orofacial musculature of patients with dysarthria associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and to relate the physiologic deficits to perceived severity of dysarthria. Strain gauge force transducers placed on the lower lip, jaw, and tongue tip were used to measure maximum strength and maximum rate of repeated contractions. Diadochokinetic rates for repeated /pe/ and and /te/ were also determined. Fourteen ALS patients and 15 normal subjects were tested. It was found that the ALS patients with dysarthria were impaired in all tasks compared to the normal subjects, and that some measures revealed impairment even in those ALS patients who were not yet dysarthric. Bulbar ALS patients were generally more severely affected than the corticobulbar or spinal ALS patients, and the tongue was generally the most affected structure in all ALS groups. Perceived severity of dysarthria was more highly correlated with the measures of repeated contraction rate than with the measures of strength, suggesting that more severe dysarthria may be largely due to slower movement of the orofacial structures until substantial muscle strength has been lost.

  7. Pure and complete trisomy 18p due to a supernumerary marker chromosome associated with moderate mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Mabboux, P; Brisset, S; Aboura, A; Pineau, D; Koubi, V; Joannidis, S; Labrune, P; Tachdjian, G

    2007-04-01

    Trisomy for the short arm of chromosome 18 or trisomy 18p, is rarely described. We report on a 13-year-old boy with minor facial anomalies, mental retardation, bilateral cryptorchidism associated with a de novo supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization analyses, this SMC corresponded to the p arm of chromosome 18 associated with a centromere of either chromosome 13 or 21 and nucleolus organizing regions (NORs). We report here the first case of a pure and complete trisomy 18p due to a SMC. This report and review of literature confirm that the main phenotypic anomaly associated with trisomy 18p is moderate mental retardation.

  8. Intensive treatment of dysarthria secondary to stroke.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Leslie A; Ramig, Lorraine O

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of a well-defined behavioral dysarthria treatment on acoustic and perceptual measures of speech in four adults with dysarthria secondary to stroke. A single-subject A-B-A experimental design was used to measure the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT(®) LOUD) on the speech of individual participants. Dependent measures included vocal sound pressure level, phonatory stability, vowel space area, and listener ratings of speech, voice and intelligibility. Statistically significant improvements (p <  0.05) in vocal dB SPL and phonatory stability as well as larger vowel space area were present for all participants. Listener ratings suggested improved voice quality and more natural speech post-treatment. Speech intelligibility scores improved for one of four participants. These data suggest that people with dysarthria secondary to stroke can respond positively to intensive speech treatments such as LSVT. Further studies are needed to investigate speech treatments specific to stroke.

  9. Clinical and acoustical variability in hypokinetic dysarthria

    SciTech Connect

    Metter, E.J.; Hanson, W.R.

    1986-10-01

    Ten male patients with parkinsonism secondary to Parkinson's disease or progressive supranuclear palsy had clinical neurological, speech, and acoustical speech evaluations. In addition, seven of the patients were evaluated by x-ray computed tomography (CT) and (F-18)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET). Extensive variability of speech features, both clinical and acoustical, were found and seemed to be independent of the severity of any parkinsonian sign, CT, or FDG PET. In addition, little relationship existed between the variability across each measured speech feature. What appeared to be important for the appearance of abnormal acoustic measures was the degree of overall severity of the dysarthria. These observations suggest that a better understanding of hypokinetic dysarthria may result from more extensive examination of the variability between patients. Emphasizing a specific feature such as rapid speaking rate in characterizing hypokinetic dysarthria focuses on a single and inconstant finding in a complex speech pattern.

  10. [Dysarthria across Parkinson's disease progression. Natural history of its components: dysphonia, dysprosody and dysarthria].

    PubMed

    Pinto, S; Ghio, A; Teston, B; Viallet, F

    2010-10-01

    Dysarthria refers to a collective name for a group of neurologic motor speech disorders, resulting from central and/or peripheral nervous system abnormalities. Speech alteration in Parkinson's disease, so-called hypokinetic dysarthria, presents with prosodic insufficiency, related to a monotony of pitch and intensity, a reduction of accentuation, variable speech rate and possible phoneme imprecision. In most cases, voice is harsh and breathy. This symptom can affect both voice and speech quality, as well as prosody and intelligibility. As a consequence, many patients complain about speech impairments, which affect their communication in daily living activities. Perceptual and instrumental assessments require different and numerous investigation methods, which use may help to further understand the specific dysarthria pathophysiology. This is of importance in order to adjust treatments for dysarthria; as a matter of fact, dopa-therapy, functional neurosurgery or even behavioural speech therapy have variable effects on voice and speech quality in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Mapping to Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Method: Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were…

  12. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Mapping to Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Method: Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were…

  13. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  14. Discriminating Dysarthria Type from Envelope Modulation Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the…

  15. Classifications of Vocalic Segments from Articulatory Kinematics: Healthy Controls and Speakers with Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary G.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors classified vocalic segments produced by control speakers (C) and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's disease (PD); classification was based on movement measures. The researchers asked the following questions: (a) Can vowels be classified on the basis of selected…

  16. Vowel Intelligibility in Children with and without Dysarthria: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Erika S.; Leone, Dorothy; Moya-Gale, Gemma; Hsu, Sih-Chiao; Chen, Wenli; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2016-01-01

    Children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) present with decreased vowel space area and reduced word intelligibility. Although a robust relationship exists between vowel space and word intelligibility, little is known about the intelligibility of vowels in this population. This exploratory study investigated the intelligibility of American…

  17. Classifications of Vocalic Segments from Articulatory Kinematics: Healthy Controls and Speakers with Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary G.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors classified vocalic segments produced by control speakers (C) and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's disease (PD); classification was based on movement measures. The researchers asked the following questions: (a) Can vowels be classified on the basis of selected…

  18. Articulatory Movements during Vowels in Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Westbury, John R.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared movement characteristics of markers attached to the jaw, lower lip, tongue blade, and dorsum during production of selected English vowels by normal speakers and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson disease (PD). The study asked the following questions: (a) Are movement…

  19. Vowel Intelligibility in Children with and without Dysarthria: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Erika S.; Leone, Dorothy; Moya-Gale, Gemma; Hsu, Sih-Chiao; Chen, Wenli; Ramig, Lorraine O.

    2016-01-01

    Children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) present with decreased vowel space area and reduced word intelligibility. Although a robust relationship exists between vowel space and word intelligibility, little is known about the intelligibility of vowels in this population. This exploratory study investigated the intelligibility of American…

  20. Articulatory Movements during Vowels in Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Westbury, John R.; Lindstrom, Mary J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study compared movement characteristics of markers attached to the jaw, lower lip, tongue blade, and dorsum during production of selected English vowels by normal speakers and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson disease (PD). The study asked the following questions: (a) Are movement…

  1. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Speech Disorder Diagnosis and Classification

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vowel metrics are capable of distinguishing healthy from dysarthric speech and among different forms of dysarthria. Method A variety of vowel metrics were derived from spectral and temporal measurements of vowel tokens embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria and 12 speakers with no history of neurological disease. Via means testing and discriminant function analysis (DFA), the acoustic metrics were used to (a) detect the presence of dysarthria and (b) classify the dysarthria subtype. Results Significant differences between dysarthric and healthy control speakers were revealed for all vowel metrics. However, the results of the DFA demonstrated some metrics (particularly metrics that capture vowel distinctiveness) to be more sensitive and specific predictors of dysarthria. Only the vowel metrics that captured slope of the second formant (F2) demonstrated between-group differences across the dysarthrias. However, when subjected to DFA, these metrics proved unreliable classifiers of dysarthria subtype. Conclusion The results of these analyses suggest that some vowel metrics may be useful clinically for the detection of dysarthria but may not be reliable indicators of dysarthria subtype using the current dysarthria classification scheme. PMID:24687467

  2. Vowel acoustics in dysarthria: speech disorder diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Liss, Julie M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vowel metrics are capable of distinguishing healthy from dysarthric speech and among different forms of dysarthria. A variety of vowel metrics were derived from spectral and temporal measurements of vowel tokens embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria and 12 speakers with no history of neurological disease. Via means testing and discriminant function analysis (DFA), the acoustic metrics were used to (a) detect the presence of dysarthria and (b) classify the dysarthria subtype. Significant differences between dysarthric and healthy control speakers were revealed for all vowel metrics. However, the results of the DFA demonstrated some metrics (particularly metrics that capture vowel distinctiveness) to be more sensitive and specific predictors of dysarthria. Only the vowel metrics that captured slope of the second formant (F2) demonstrated between-group differences across the dysarthrias. However, when subjected to DFA, these metrics proved unreliable classifiers of dysarthria subtype. The results of these analyses suggest that some vowel metrics may be useful clinically for the detection of dysarthria but may not be reliable indicators of dysarthria subtype using the current dysarthria classification scheme.

  3. Changes to articulation following LSVT(R) and traditional dysarthria therapy in non-progressive dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Wenke, Rachel J; Cornwell, Petrea; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2010-06-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT(R)) on acoustic and perceptual measures of articulation in non-progressive dysarthria in comparison to traditional dysarthria therapy. The study involved 26 individuals with non-progressive dysarthria who were randomly allocated to receive either LSVT(R) or traditional dysarthria therapy (TRAD), both of which were administered for 16 hourly sessions over 4 weeks. Participants' speech samples were collected over a total of six testing sessions during three assessment phases: (1) prior to treatment, (2) immediately post-treatment, and (3) 6 months post-treatment (FU). Speech samples were analysed perceptually to determine articulatory precision and intelligibility as well as acoustically using vowel space (and vowel formant measures) and first moment differences. Results revealed short and long-term significant increases in vowel space area following LSVT(R). Significantly increased intelligibility was also found at FU in the LSVT(R) group. No significant differences between groups for any variables were found. The study reveals that LSVT(R) may be a suitable treatment option for improving vowel articulation and subsequent intelligibility in some individuals with non-progressive dysarthria.

  4. Friedreich ataxia: dysarthria profile and clinical data.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Bettina; Ackermann, Hermann; Berg, Daniela; Lindig, Tobias; Schölderle, Theresa; Schöls, Ludger; Synofzik, Matthis; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2013-08-01

    Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is the most frequent recessive ataxia in the Western world. Dysarthria is a cardinal feature of FRDA, often leading to severe impairments in daily functioning, but its exact characteristics are only poorly understood so far. We performed a comprehensive evaluation of dysarthria severity and the profile of speech motor deficits in 20 patients with a genetic diagnosis of FRDA based on a carefully selected battery of speaking tasks and two widely used paraspeech tasks, i.e., oral diadochokinesis and sustained vowel productions. Perceptual ratings of the speech samples identified respiration, voice quality, voice instability, articulation, and tempo as the most affected speech dimensions. Whereas vocal instability predicted ataxia severity, tempo turned out as a significant correlate of disease duration. Furthermore, articulation predicted the overall intelligibility score as determined by a systematic speech pathology assessment tool. In contrast, neurologists' ratings of intelligibility--a component of the "Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia"--were found to be related to perceived speech tempo. Obviously, clinicians are more sensitive to slowness of speech than to any other feature of spoken language during dysarthria evaluation. Our results suggest that different components of speech production and trunk/limb motor functions are differentially susceptible to FRDA pathology. Furthermore, evidence emerged that paraspeech tasks do not allow for an adequate scaling of speech deficits in FRDA.

  5. Physiological investigation of dysarthria: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Bruce E

    2011-02-01

    Recent years have seen the development and introduction of a range of new physiological instruments for investigating various aspects of articulatory function in persons with dysarthria. Included among these techniques are electromagnetic articulography (EMA), electropalatography (EPG), and pressure-sensing EPG. The aim of this paper is to describe and evaluate these techniques, highlighting their relative advantages, disadvantages, and specific applications in assessing articulation in speakers with dysarthria associated with a variety of neurological disorders. Emphasis will be given to those instruments that enable researchers and clinicians to examine articulatory functions in 3-dimensions, such as 3D-EMA (AG500) and 3D-EPG. In addition the application of pressure-sensing EPG and ultrasonography will be outlined. Each of these physiological techniques will be fully described in terms of their component hardware and underlying principles of operation. The use of each technique in the assessment of dysarthria will be illustrated wherever possible by reference to specific case examples, and especially cases drawn from various neuropathological groups. Research findings reported to date based on each of the above physiological instruments will be reviewed and the research summarized.

  6. Discriminating Dysarthria Type From Envelope Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Liss, Julie M.; LeGendre, Sue; Lotto, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous research demonstrated the ability of temporally based rhythm metrics to distinguish among dysarthrias with different prosodic deficit profiles (J. M. Liss et al., 2009). The authors examined whether comparable results could be obtained by an automated analysis of speech envelope modulation spectra (EMS), which quantifies the rhythmicity of speech within specified frequency bands. Method EMS was conducted on sentences produced by 43 speakers with 1 of 4 types of dysarthria and healthy controls. The EMS consisted of the spectra of the slow-rate (up to 10 Hz) amplitude modulations of the full signal and 7 octave bands ranging in center frequency from 125 to 8000 Hz. Six variables were calculated for each band relating to peak frequency and amplitude and relative energy above, below, and in the region of 4 Hz. Discriminant function analyses (DFA) determined which sets of predictor variables best discriminated between and among groups. Results Each of 6 DFAs identified 2–6 of the 48 predictor variables. These variables achieved 84%–100% classification accuracy for group membership. Conclusions Dysarthrias can be characterized by quantifiable temporal patterns in acoustic output. Because EMS analysis is automated and requires no editing or linguistic assumptions, it shows promise as a clinical and research tool. PMID:20643800

  7. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group for Post-Stroke Dysarthria: The Participant Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, C.; Kelly, S.; Paton, G.; Brady, M.; Muir, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background:The "Living with Dysarthria" group programme, devised for people with post-stroke dysarthia and family members, was piloted twice. Feedback from those who experience an intervention contributes to the evaluation of speech and language therapy programmes, giving the participant view of the intervention's value and guiding…

  8. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group for Post-Stroke Dysarthria: The Participant Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, C.; Kelly, S.; Paton, G.; Brady, M.; Muir, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background:The "Living with Dysarthria" group programme, devised for people with post-stroke dysarthia and family members, was piloted twice. Feedback from those who experience an intervention contributes to the evaluation of speech and language therapy programmes, giving the participant view of the intervention's value and guiding…

  9. Acquired Dysarthria in Conversation: Identifying Sources of Understandability Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Steven; Wilkinson, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Background: Acquired progressive dysarthria is traditionally assessed, rated, and researched using measures of speech perception and intelligibility. The focus is commonly on the individual with dysarthria and how speech deviates from a normative range. A complementary approach is to consider the features and consequences of dysarthric speech as…

  10. Breath-Group Intelligibility in Dysarthria: Characteristics and Underlying Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.; Rusche, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether within-speaker fluctuations in speech intelligibility occurred among speakers with dysarthria who produced a reading passage, and, if they did, whether selected linguistic and acoustic variables predicted the variations in speech intelligibility. Method: Participants with dysarthria included a…

  11. Breath-Group Intelligibility in Dysarthria: Characteristics and Underlying Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.; Rusche, Nicole M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine whether within-speaker fluctuations in speech intelligibility occurred among speakers with dysarthria who produced a reading passage, and, if they did, whether selected linguistic and acoustic variables predicted the variations in speech intelligibility. Method: Participants with dysarthria included a…

  12. Rate and Loudness Manipulations in Dysarthria: Acoustic and Perceptual Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Gregory E.

    2004-01-01

    Both rate reduction and increased loudness reportedly are associated with an increase in the size of the articulatory-acoustic working space and improved acoustic distinctiveness for speakers with dysarthria. Improved intelligibility also has been reported. Few studies have directly compared rate and loudness effects for speakers with dysarthria,…

  13. Rate and Loudness Manipulations in Dysarthria: Acoustic and Perceptual Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Gregory E.

    2004-01-01

    Both rate reduction and increased loudness reportedly are associated with an increase in the size of the articulatory-acoustic working space and improved acoustic distinctiveness for speakers with dysarthria. Improved intelligibility also has been reported. Few studies have directly compared rate and loudness effects for speakers with dysarthria,…

  14. Pure red cell aplasia due to treatment with epoietin beta: first case report of PRCA from Poland.

    PubMed

    Sułowicz, Władysław; Bentkowski, Wacław; Stompór, Tomasz; Gross, Johann; Biłyk, Anna; Rudzki, Zbigniew

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) emerged recently as the potentially life-threatening condition secondary to anti-Epo antibodies. Vast majority of cases were reported from Western European countries and were secondary to subcutaneous injections of Epoietin alpha. Here we describe possibly for the first time in the literature the case of PRCA from Poland or even Central and Eastern Europe in patient treated exclusively with Epoietin beta from multi-dose vial. In the last section of the paper the current epidemiological, diagnostic and therapeutic aspect of PRCA were discussed.

  15. Experimental study of NIR absorption due to Nb4+ polarons in pure and Cr- or Ce-doped SBN crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Kapphan, S.; Porcher, S.; Pankrath, R.

    1999-06-01

    A broad absorption band around 0.72 eV, assigned to the absorption of Nb4+ polarons, is observed in strontium barium niobate (SBN) crystals (nominally pure or Cr- or Ce-doped) either under illumination at low temperature or after a previous reduction treatment. The absorption spectra of Nb4+ polarons at low temperature show considerable dichroism, which in reduced SBN crystals exists even far above room temperature. The peak position of the Nb4+ polaron absorption in reduced SBN crystals shifts to higher energies with decreasing temperature. The dependence on light intensity and temperature of the Nb4+ polaron absorption during the build-up process under illumination and the decay process after the illumination is switched off are investigated in detail. Compared with pure SBN, doping with Ce or Cr creates additional absorption bands in the visible (2.6 eV) and red (1.9 eV for Cr doping) spectral regions. Illumination in these absorption bands at low temperature gives rise to strong Nb4+ polaron absorption in the NIR (0.72 eV), giving evidence of the enhanced sensitivity even in the red spectral region for SBN:Cr. The light-induced charge transfer process and formation of Nb4+ polarons in SBN are briefly discussed.

  16. Progressive Dysarthria and Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Conversation: Establishing the Reliability of the Dysarthria-in-Interaction Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Steven; Tuomainen, Jyrki

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Dysarthria-in-Interaction Profile's potential contribution to the clinical assessment of dysarthria-in-conversation has been outlined in the literature, but its consistency of use across different users has yet to be reported. Aims: To establish the level of consistency across raters on four different interaction categories. That…

  17. Progressive Dysarthria and Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Conversation: Establishing the Reliability of the Dysarthria-in-Interaction Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Steven; Tuomainen, Jyrki

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Dysarthria-in-Interaction Profile's potential contribution to the clinical assessment of dysarthria-in-conversation has been outlined in the literature, but its consistency of use across different users has yet to be reported. Aims: To establish the level of consistency across raters on four different interaction categories. That…

  18. Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia in remitting-relapsing Bickerstaff's-like encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Piffer, Silvio; Turri, Giulia; Acler, Michele; Richelli, Silvia; Cerini, Roberto; Fiaschi, Antonio; Monaco, Salvatore; Bonetti, Bruno

    2014-06-15

    Paroxysmal dysarthria-ataxia is a rare neurological condition due to ephaptic transmission, generally appearing in multiple sclerosis patients characterized by stereotyped attacks of slurred speech usually accompanied by ataxia, appearing many times a day. Here we describe a patient with an unusual remitting-relapsing form of Bickerstaff's-like brainstem encephalitis who manifested PDA after a relapse with the involvement of a peculiar region below the red nuclei and benefited from lamotrigine.

  19. Free-classification of perceptually similar speakers with dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Liss, Julie M; Norton, Rebecca E

    2014-12-01

    In this investigation, the construct of perceptual similarity was explored in the dysarthrias. Specifically, we employed an auditory free-classification task to determine whether listeners could cluster speakers by perceptual similarity, whether the clusters mapped to acoustic metrics, and whether the clusters were constrained by dysarthria subtype diagnosis. Twenty-three listeners blinded to speakers' medical and dysarthria subtype diagnoses participated. The task was to group together (drag and drop) the icons corresponding to 33 speakers with dysarthria on the basis of how similar they sounded. Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling (MDS) modeled the perceptual dimensions underlying similarity. Acoustic metrics and perceptual judgments were used in correlation analyses to facilitate interpretation of the derived dimensions. Six clusters of similar-sounding speakers and 3 perceptual dimensions underlying similarity were revealed. The clusters of similar-sounding speakers were not constrained by dysarthria subtype diagnosis. The 3 perceptual dimensions revealed by MDS were correlated with metrics for articulation rate, intelligibility, and vocal quality, respectively. This study shows (a) feasibility of a free-classification approach for studying perceptual similarity in dysarthria, (b) correspondence between acoustic and perceptual metrics to clusters of similar-sounding speakers, and (c) similarity judgments transcended dysarthria subtype diagnosis.

  20. Studies of Chinese speakers with dysarthria: informing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, Tara L

    2010-01-01

    Most theoretical models of dysarthria have been developed based on research using individuals speaking English or other Indo-European languages. Studies of individuals with dysarthria speaking other languages can allow investigation into the universality of such models, and the interplay between language-specific and language-universal aspects of dysarthria. In this article, studies of Cantonese- and Mandarin-Chinese speakers with dysarthria are reviewed. The studies focused on 2 groups of speakers: those with cerebral palsy and those with Parkinson's disease. Key findings are compared with similar studies of English speakers. Since Chinese is tonal in nature, the impact of dysarthria on lexical tone has received considerable attention in the literature. The relationship between tone [which involves fundamental frequency (F(0)) control at the syllable level] and intonation (involving F(0) control at the sentential level) has received more recent attention. Many findings for Chinese speakers with dysarthria support earlier findings for English speakers, thus affirming the language-universal aspect of dysarthria. However, certain differences, which can be attributed to the distinct phonologies of Cantonese and Mandarin, highlight the language-specific aspects of the condition. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Treatment of dysarthria following subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Tripoliti, Elina; Strong, Laura; Hickey, Freya; Foltynie, Tom; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Candelario, Joseph; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Speech impairment is a frequent side effect of the surgery. This study examined the efficacy of an intensive speech treatment (the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, LSVT) on dysarthria after STN-DBS. The LSVT was administered in ten patients with STN-DBS (surgical group) and ten patients without (medical group). Patients were assessed before, immediately after and six months following the speech treatment using sustained phonation, a speech intelligibility scale and monologue. Vocal loudness, speech intelligibility and perceptual ratings were the primary outcome measures. Vocal loudness and perceptual scores improved significantly across tasks for the medical group only. Speech intelligibility did not significantly change for either group. Results in the surgical group were variable with some patients deteriorating. Treatment of dysarthria following STN-DBS needs further investigation due to the variable response to LSVT. PMID:21953693

  2. Acoustic and Perceptual Consequences of Speech Cues for Children With Dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Levy, Erika S; Chang, Younghwa M; Ancelle, Joséphine A; McAuliffe, Megan J

    2017-06-22

    Reductions in articulatory working space and vocal intensity have been linked to intelligibility deficits in children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy. However, few studies have examined the outcomes of behavioral treatments aimed at these underlying impairments or investigated which treatment cues might best facilitate improved intelligibility. This study assessed the effects of cues targeting clear speech (i.e., "Speak with your big mouth") and greater vocal intensity (i.e., "Speak with your strong voice") on acoustic measures of speech production and intelligibility. Eight children with spastic dysarthria due to cerebral palsy repeated sentence- and word-level stimuli across habitual, big mouth, and strong voice conditions. Acoustic analyses were conducted, and 48 listeners completed orthographic transcription and scaled intelligibility ratings. Both cues resulted in significant changes to vocal intensity and speech rate although the degree of change varied by condition. In a similar manner, perceptual analysis revealed significant improvements to intelligibility with both cues; however, at the single-word level, big mouth outperformed strong voice. Children with dysarthria are capable of changing their speech styles differentially in response to cueing. Both the big mouth and strong voice cues hold promise as intervention strategies to improve intelligibility in this population. https://doi.org/10.23641/asha.5116843.

  3. Rehabilitation of impaired speech function (dysarthria, dysglossia)

    PubMed Central

    Schröter-Morasch, Heidrun; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2005-01-01

    Speech disorders can result (1) from sensorimotor impairments of articulatory movements = dysarthria, or (2) from structural changes of the speech organs, in adults particularly after surgical and radiochemical treatment of tumors = dysglossia. The decrease of intelligibility, a reduced vocal stamina, the stigmatization of a conspicuous voice and manner of speech, the reduction of emotional expressivity all mean greatly diminished quality of life, restricted career opportunities and diminished social contacts. Intensive therapy based on the pathophysiological facts is absolutely essential: Functional exercise therapy plays a central role; according to symptoms and their progression it can be complemented with prosthetic and surgical approaches. In severe cases communicational aids have to be used. All rehabilitation measures have to take account of frequently associated disorders of body motor control and/or impairment of cognition and behaviour. PMID:22073063

  4. Isolated paroxysmal dysarthria caused by a single demyelinating midbrain lesion.

    PubMed

    Codeluppi, Luca; Bigliardi, Guido; Chiari, Annalisa; Meletti, Stefano

    2013-10-16

    Paroxysmal dysarthria is an unusual condition characterised by brief episodes of dysarthria with the sudden onset and frequent recurrence. It has been mainly reported in multiple sclerosis and an association with midbrain lesions has been claimed; however, most of the reported patients had multiple brain alterations so it was difficult to associate this symptom with a specific lesion site. We illustrate the cases of two patients with an isolated demyelinating midbrain lesion presenting paroxysmal dysarthria as the only symptom; both participants had oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid and an unremarkable follow-up. Both patients had benefit from carbamazepine treatment, similarly to previously reported cases. Our report confirms that a demyelinating midbrain lesion is sufficient to provoke paroxysmal dysarthria. It is noteworthy that an erroneous diagnosis of psychogenic disorders was initially made in both cases, highlighting the importance not to underestimate isolated paroxysmal symptoms in clinical practice.

  5. Articulatory movements during vowels in speakers with dysarthria and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Westbury, John R; Lindstrom, Mary J

    2008-06-01

    This study compared movement characteristics of markers attached to the jaw, lower lip, tongue blade, and dorsum during production of selected English vowels by normal speakers and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson disease (PD). The study asked the following questions: (a) Are movement measures different for healthy controls and speakers with ALS or PD, and (b) Are articulatory profiles comparable for speakers with ALS and speakers with PD? Nineteen healthy controls and 15 speakers with dysarthria participated in this study. The severity of dysarthria varied across individuals and between the 2 disorder groups. The stimuli were 10 words (i.e., seed, feed, big, dish, too, shoo, bad, cat, box, and dog) embedded into sentences read at a comfortable reading rate. Movement data were collected using the X-ray microbeam. Movement measures included distances, durations, and average speeds of vowel-related movement strokes. Differences were found (a) between speakers with ALS and healthy controls and (b) between speakers with ALS and PD, particularly in movement speed. Tongue movements in PD and ALS were more consistently different from healthy controls than jaw and lower lip movements. This study showed that the effects of neurologic disease on vowel production are often articulator-, vowel-, and context-specific. Differences in severity between the speakers with PD and ALS may have accounted for some of the differences in movement characteristics between the groups. These factors need to be carefully considered when describing the nature of speech disorder and developing empirically based evaluation and treatment strategies for dysarthria.

  6. Harry Lee Parker and paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia

    PubMed Central

    Klaas, James P.; Burkholder, David B.; Singer, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review descriptions of paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in multiple sclerosis (MS), with special attention given to Parker and his 1946 case series. Methods: Evaluation of original publications describing paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia, bibliographic information, writings, and unpublished letters from the Mayo Clinic Historical Unit. Results: In 1940, Störring described a patient with MS with paroxysmal symptoms that included dizziness and trouble speaking, but also unilateral extremity weakness. In 1946, Parker published a series of 11 patients with paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia. Six of these patients had MS, and he recognized this phenomenon as a manifestation of the disease. The term “paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia” was first used in 1959 by Andermann and colleagues. Since that time, paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia has become a well-recognized phenomenon in MS. More recent reports have suggested that the responsible lesion is located in the midbrain, near or involving the red nucleus. Conclusions: Parker was the first to accurately describe paroxysmal dysarthria and ataxia in patients with MS. PMID:23319475

  7. Neurogenic Orofacial Weakness and Speech in Adults With Dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Makashay, Matthew J; Helou, Leah B; Clark, Heather M

    2017-08-15

    This study compared orofacial strength between adults with dysarthria and neurologically normal (NN) matched controls. In addition, orofacial muscle weakness was examined for potential relationships to speech impairments in adults with dysarthria. Matched groups of 55 adults with dysarthria and 55 NN adults generated maximum pressure (Pmax) against an air-filled bulb during lingual elevation, protrusion and lateralization, and buccodental and labial compressions. These orofacial strength measures were compared with speech intelligibility, perceptual ratings of speech, articulation rate, and fast syllable-repetition rate. The dysarthria group demonstrated significantly lower orofacial strength than the NN group on all tasks. Lingual strength correlated moderately and buccal strength correlated weakly with most ratings of speech deficits. Speech intelligibility was not sensitive to dysarthria severity. Individuals with severely reduced anterior lingual elevation Pmax (< 18 kPa) had normal to profoundly impaired sentence intelligibility (99%-6%) and moderately to severely impaired speech (26%-94% articulatory imprecision; 33%-94% overall severity). Results support the presence of orofacial muscle weakness in adults with dysarthrias of varying etiologies but reinforce tenuous links between orofacial strength and speech production disorders. By examining individual data, preliminary evidence emerges to suggest that speech, but not necessarily intelligibility, is likely to be impaired when lingual weakness is severe.

  8. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Mapping to Perception

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Method Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were compared with orthographic transcriptions of these phrases collected from 120 healthy listeners. First, correlation and stepwise multiple regressions were conducted to identify acoustic metrics that had predictive value for perceptual measures. Next, discriminant function analysis misclassifications were compared with listeners’ misperceptions to examine more directly the perceptual consequences of degraded vowel acoustics. Results Several moderate correlative relationships were found between acoustic metrics and perceptual measures, with predictive models accounting for 18%–75% of the variance in measures of intelligibility and vowel accuracy. Results of the second analysis showed that listeners better identified acoustically distinctive vowel tokens. In addition, the level of agreement between misclassified-to-misperceived vowel tokens supports some specificity of degraded acoustic profiles on the resulting percept. Conclusion Results provide evidence that degraded vowel acoustics have some effect on human perceptual performance, even in the presence of extravowel variables that naturally exert influence in phrase perception. PMID:24687468

  9. Vowel Contrast and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Perlman, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims This study examined the spectral characteristics of American English vowels in dysarthria associated with cerebral palsy (CP), and investigated the relationship between a speaker's overall speech intelligibility and vowel contrast. Methods The data were collected from 12 American English native speakers (9 speakers with a diagnosis of CP and 3 controls). Primary measures were F1 and F2 frequencies of 3 corner vowels /i, a, u/ and 3 noncorner vowels /I, ε, . Six acoustic variables were derived from the formant measures, and were regressed against intelligibility: corner vowel space, noncorner vowel space, mean distance between vowels, F1 and F2 variability, and overlap degree among vowels. Results First, the effect of vowel was significant for both F1 and F2 measures for all speakers, but post hoc analysis revealed a reduced distinction at lower intelligibility. Second, regression functions relating intelligibility and acoustic variables were significant for overlap degree among vowels, F1 variability, corner vowel space and mean distance between vowels. Overlap degree among vowels accounted for the greatest amount of variance in intelligibility scores. Conclusion A speaker's overall intelligibility in dysarthric speech is better represented by the overlap degree among vowels than by the vowel space. PMID:20938200

  10. Vowel contrast and speech intelligibility in dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark; Perlman, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the spectral characteristics of American English vowels in dysarthria associated with cerebral palsy (CP), and investigated the relationship between a speaker's overall speech intelligibility and vowel contrast. The data were collected from 12 American English native speakers (9 speakers with a diagnosis of CP and 3 controls). Primary measures were F(1) and F(2) frequencies of 3 corner vowels /i, a, u/ and 3 noncorner vowels /I, 3, */. Six acoustic variables were derived from the formant measures, and were regressed against intelligibility: corner vowel space, noncorner vowel space, mean distance between vowels, F(1) and F(2) variability, and overlap degree among vowels. First, the effect of vowel was significant for both F(1) and F(2) measures for all speakers, but post hoc analysis revealed a reduced distinction at lower intelligibility. Second, regression functions relating intelligibility and acoustic variables were significant for overlap degree among vowels, F(1) variability, corner vowel space and mean distance between vowels. Overlap degree among vowels accounted for the greatest amount of variance in intelligibility scores. A speaker's overall intelligibility in dysarthric speech is better represented by the overlap degree among vowels than by the vowel space. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Vowel acoustics in dysarthria: mapping to perception.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Liss, Julie M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present report was to explore whether vowel metrics, demonstrated to distinguish dysarthric and healthy speech in a companion article (Lansford & Liss, 2014), are able to predict human perceptual performance. Vowel metrics derived from vowels embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with dysarthria were compared with orthographic transcriptions of these phrases collected from 120 healthy listeners. First, correlation and stepwise multiple regressions were conducted to identify acoustic metrics that had predictive value for perceptual measures. Next, discriminant function analysis misclassifications were compared with listeners' misperceptions to examine more directly the perceptual consequences of degraded vowel acoustics. Several moderate correlative relationships were found between acoustic metrics and perceptual measures, with predictive models accounting for 18%-75% of the variance in measures of intelligibility and vowel accuracy. Results of the second analysis showed that listeners better identified acoustically distinctive vowel tokens. In addition, the level of agreement between misclassified-to-misperceived vowel tokens supports some specificity of degraded acoustic profiles on the resulting percept. Results provide evidence that degraded vowel acoustics have some effect on human perceptual performance, even in the presence of extravowel variables that naturally exert influence in phrase perception.

  12. Representation Learning Based Speech Assistive System for Persons With Dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Chandrakala, S; Rajeswari, Natarajan

    2017-09-01

    An assistive system for persons with vocal impairment due to dysarthria converts dysarthric speech to normal speech or text. Because of the articulatory deficits, dysarthric speech recognition needs a robust learning technique. Representation learning is significant for complex tasks such as dysarthric speech recognition. We focus on robust representation for dysarthric speech recognition that involves recognizing sequential patterns of varying length utterances. We propose a hybrid framework that uses a generative learning based data representation with a discriminative learning based classifier. In this hybrid framework, we propose to use Example Specific Hidden Markov Models (ESHMMs) to obtain log-likelihood scores for a dysarthric speech utterance to form fixed dimensional score vector representation. This representation is used as an input to discriminative classifier such as support vector machine.The performance of the proposed approach is evaluatedusingUA-Speechdatabase.The recognitionaccuracy is much better than the conventional hidden Markov model based approach and Deep Neural Network-Hidden Markov Model (DNN-HMM). The efficiency of the discriminative nature of score vector representation is proved for "very low" intelligibility words.

  13. Acoustic analysis of dysarthria profile in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Tomik, B; Krupinski, J; Glodzik-Sobanska, L; Bala-Slodowska, M; Wszolek, W; Kusiak, M; Lechwacka, A

    1999-10-31

    Dysarthria is a leading disability in ALS patients with motor neurone degeneration in the bulbar region. Although different approaches have been tried in the past, currently, no test is available to detect and follow the progression of dysarthria. We studied 53 patients with definite (n=27) or probable (n=26) ALS (the bulbar onset group n=15, the limb onset group n=38, mean age 53. 66/29-76 years/) according to El Escorial criteria. Each patient was seen by a neurologist every 10-12 weeks and clinical performance was assessed using the Norris scale. To evaluate dysarthria we developed a computer-based acoustic method. All patients had computer-analysed speech sound tests done three times. The most significantly affected vowels were selected for further studies. A method based on the Euclidian principle was used and the results were compared with 30 age, sex-matched, healthy control subjects. Our results demonstrated the existence of a specific dysarthria profile in ALS patients with most significantly affected vowels: 'B', 'O', 'I', 'W', 'T' in the bulbar group, and: 'B', 'I', 'T', 'W', 'O' in the limb group. This study suggests that it is possible to detect and monitor the progression of the disease based on the acoustic analysis of only several sounds. Abnormalities detected in the dysarthria profile may appear prior to any clinical symptoms of the disease.

  14. The visual encoding of purely proprioceptive intermanual tasks is due to the need of transforming joint signals, not to their interhemispheric transfer.

    PubMed

    Arnoux, Léo; Fromentin, Sebastien; Farotto, Dario; Beraneck, Mathieu; McIntyre, Joseph; Tagliabue, Michele

    2017-09-01

    To perform goal-oriented hand movement, humans combine multiple sensory signals (e.g., vision and proprioception) that can be encoded in various reference frames (body centered and/or exo-centered). In a previous study (Tagliabue M, McIntyre J. PLoS One 8: e68438, 2013), we showed that, when aligning a hand to a remembered target orientation, the brain encodes both target and response in visual space when the target is sensed by one hand and the response is performed by the other, even though both are sensed only through proprioception. Here we ask whether such visual encoding is due 1) to the necessity of transferring sensory information across the brain hemispheres, or 2) to the necessity, due to the arms' anatomical mirror symmetry, of transforming the joint signals of one limb into the reference frame of the other. To answer this question, we asked subjects to perform purely proprioceptive tasks in different conditions: Intra, the same arm sensing the target and performing the movement; Inter/Parallel, one arm sensing the target and the other reproducing its orientation; and Inter/Mirror, one arm sensing the target and the other mirroring its orientation. Performance was very similar between Intra and Inter/Mirror (conditions not requiring joint-signal transformations), while both differed from Inter/Parallel. Manipulation of the visual scene in a virtual reality paradigm showed visual encoding of proprioceptive information only in the latter condition. These results suggest that the visual encoding of purely proprioceptive tasks is not due to interhemispheric transfer of the proprioceptive information per se, but to the necessity of transforming joint signals between mirror-symmetric limbs.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Why does the brain encode goal-oriented, intermanual tasks in a visual space, even in the absence of visual feedback about the target and the hand? We show that the visual encoding is not due to the transfer of proprioceptive signals between brain

  15. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer with temporary dysarthria associated with irinotecan].

    PubMed

    Sogabe, Susumu; Yuki, Satoshi; Takano, Hironobu; Kobayashi, Yoshimitsu; Nakatsumi, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Takahide; Kawamoto, Yasuyuki; Fukushima, Hiraku; Iwanaga, Ichiro; Uehata, Yasuko; Komatsu, Yoshito; Asaka, Masahiro

    2011-08-01

    A40 -year-old woman visited our hospital with adenocaricinoma of the sigmoid colon with multiple liver metastases and ovarian metastasis. Because of a stenosis of the primary tumor, she underwent a colostomy before chemotherapy. 5-fluorouracil and irinotecan and leucovorin(FOLFIRI)was selected as first-line chemotherapy. At the start of chemotherapy, just after the end of irinotecan and leucovorin administration, the patient developed dysarthria. There were no neurological abnormalities or hematological abnormalities. The treatment was temporarily discontinued, and the dysarthria completely disappeared within 90 minutes. 5-fluorouracil was administered after the disappearance of dysarthria. Within 60 minutes of the administration of irinotecan and leucovorin at the second chemotherapy treatment, the patient developed dysarthria again. The patient had no neurological or hematological abnormalities. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed no abnormalities. The treatment was stopped and dysarthria disappeared within 60 minutes as it did the first time. At each time, no treatment for dysarthria was performed. This patient refused to continue irinotecan because of dysarthria. Therefore, chemotherapy without irinotecan was continued for the third time onward. In the previous literature, 8 cases of dysarthria caused by irinotecan were reported as a rare toxicity. In all cases, dysarthria was temporary and reversible. Because the mechanism of dysarthria is unclear, specific treatment and precaution for dysarthria is not recommended. Since dysarthria is reversible, however, irinotecan might be continued until progression.

  16. Speech motor programming in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Kristie A; Rogers, Margaret A

    2005-09-01

    It is widely accepted that the cerebellar and basal ganglia control circuits contribute to the programming of movement. Converging evidence from neuroimaging, limb control, and neuropsychological studies suggests that (1) people with cerebellar disease have reduced ability to program movement sequences in advance of movement onset and (2) people with Parkinson's disease are unable to maintain a programmed response or to rapidly switch between responses. Despite a substantial supporting literature, no studies have addressed these potential areas of speech programming disruption for speakers with ataxic and hypokinetic dysarthria. Control participants and adults with dysarthria completed speech reaction time protocols designed to capture these aspects of utterance preparation. Results provided initial support for processing deficits in speakers with ataxic and hypokinetic dysarthria that are separable from motor execution impairments.

  17. Rate and loudness manipulations in dysarthria: acoustic and perceptual findings.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Gregory E

    2004-08-01

    Both rate reduction and increased loudness reportedly are associated with an increase in the size of the articulatory-acoustic working space and improved acoustic distinctiveness for speakers with dysarthria. Improved intelligibility also has been reported. Few studies have directly compared rate and loudness effects for speakers with dysarthria, however, although rate reduction and increasing vocal loudness are common treatment techniques. In the current study, 15 speakers with dysarthria secondary to multiple sclerosis, 12 speakers with dysarthria secondary to Parkinson's disease (PD), and 15 healthy controls read a passage in habitual, loud, and slow conditions. Rate and loudness variations were elicited using magnitude production. Acoustic measures included articulatory rate, sound pressure level, vowel space area, first moment difference measures, and F2 trajectory characteristics for diphthongs. Ten listeners scaled intelligibility for reading passages produced by the speakers with dysarthria. Relationships between intelligibility estimates and acoustic measures were determined by regression analysis. All speaker groups reduced articulatory rate for the slow condition and increased vocal intensity for the loud condition, relative to the habitual condition. Vowel acoustic distinctiveness, as indexed by vowel space area, was maximized in the slow condition, but stop consonant acoustic distinctiveness, as indexed by first moment difference measures, was maximized in the loud condition. F2 slope measures for diphthongs were not consistently affected by rate or loudness. Scaled intelligibility for speakers with PD also improved in the loud condition relative to both the habitual and slow conditions. Intelligibility estimates for speakers with dysarthria, however, were not strongly related to acoustic measures of supraglottal behavior. Findings are compared with previous studies, and hypotheses for future treatment studies are discussed.

  18. Degraded Vowel Acoustics and the Perceptual Consequences in Dysarthria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.

    Distorted vowel production is a hallmark characteristic of dysarthric speech, irrespective of the underlying neurological condition or dysarthria diagnosis. A variety of acoustic metrics have been used to study the nature of vowel production deficits in dysarthria; however, not all demonstrate sensitivity to the exhibited deficits. Less attention has been paid to quantifying the vowel production deficits associated with the specific dysarthrias. Attempts to characterize the relationship between naturally degraded vowel production in dysarthria with overall intelligibility have met with mixed results, leading some to question the nature of this relationship. It has been suggested that aberrant vowel acoustics may be an index of overall severity of the impairment and not an "integral component" of the intelligibility deficit. A limitation of previous work detailing perceptual consequences of disordered vowel acoustics is that overall intelligibility, not vowel identification accuracy, has been the perceptual measure of interest. A series of three experiments were conducted to address the problems outlined herein. The goals of the first experiment were to identify subsets of vowel metrics that reliably distinguish speakers with dysarthria from non-disordered speakers and differentiate the dysarthria subtypes. Vowel metrics that capture vowel centralization and reduced spectral distinctiveness among vowels differentiated dysarthric from non-disordered speakers. Vowel metrics generally failed to differentiate speakers according to their dysarthria diagnosis. The second and third experiments were conducted to evaluate the relationship between degraded vowel acoustics and the resulting percept. In the second experiment, correlation and regression analyses revealed vowel metrics that capture vowel centralization and distinctiveness and movement of the second formant frequency were most predictive of vowel identification accuracy and overall intelligibility. The third

  19. Modeling listener perception of speaker similarity in dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Lansford, Kaitlin L; Berisha, Visar; Utianski, Rene L

    2016-06-01

    The current investigation contributes to a perceptual similarity-based approach to dysarthria characterization by utilizing an innovative statistical approach, multinomial logistic regression with sparsity constraints, to identify acoustic features underlying each listener's impressions of speaker similarity. The data-driven approach also permitted an examination of the effect of clinical experience on listeners' impressions of similarity. Listeners, irrespective of level of clinical experience, were found to rely on similar acoustic features during the perceptual sorting task, known as free classification. Overall, the results support the continued advancement of a similarity-based approach to characterizing the communication disorders associated with dysarthria.

  20. The effect of pacing strategies on the variability of speech movement sequences in dysarthria.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Monica A

    2003-06-01

    There are many potential sources of variability in speech production, particularly in individuals with dysarthria. The degree and time course of stabilization of the speech production system during recovery from a neurological insult is not constant across individuals. Another source of variability in speech production is speaking rate. Although individuals with no neurological impairments typically show increased variability at reduced speaking rates, this phenomenon has not been explored extensively in individuals with dysarthria. Because rate control strategies are commonly used in dysarthria treatment, it is of clinical importance to know if individuals with dysarthria produce less variable speech with rate reduction. Six individuals with mild dysarthria, 6 with moderate-to-severe dysarthria, and 6 matched normal controls repeated an utterance in four speaking rate conditions: habitual, fast, breaks between words, and stretched. Data were analyzed using the spatiotemporal index (STI), a composite measure of spatial and temporal variability across token repetitions. The normal controls consistently demonstrated the least variability, regardless of rate condition. Both groups with dysarthria were the least variable in the stretched condition and the most variable in the fast condition. The STI values of the group with moderate-to-severe dysarthria were significantly different from both the individuals with mild dysarthria and the normal controls. There were no significant differences between the group with mild dysarthria and the normal controls. In general, slowing the speaking rate in individuals with dysarthria reduces spatiotemporal variability; however, the effect of reduced spatiotemporal variability on intelligibility requires further investigation.

  1. The scale for the assessment and rating of ataxia correlates with dysarthria assessment in Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Eigentler, Andreas; Rhomberg, Johanna; Nachbauer, Wolfgang; Ritzer, Irmgard; Poewe, Werner; Boesch, Sylvia

    2012-03-01

    Dysarthria is an acquired neurogenic sensorimotor speech symptom and an integral part within the clinical spectrum of ataxia syndromes. Ataxia measurements and disability scores generally focus on the assessment of motor functions. Since comprehensive investigations of dysarthria in ataxias are sparse, we assessed dysarthria in ataxia patients using the Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment is a ten-item validated test in which eight items focus on the observation of oral structures and speech functions. Fifteen Friedreich's ataxia patients and 15 healthy control individuals were analyzed using clinical and logopedic methodology. All patients underwent neurological assessment applying the Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia. In Friedreich's ataxia patients, the Frenchay sub-item voice showed to be most affected compared to healthy individuals followed by items such as reflexes, palate, tongue, and intelligibility. Scoring of lips, jaw, and respiration appeared to be mildly affected. Ataxia severity in Friedreich's ataxia patients revealed a significant correlation with the Frenchay dysarthria sum score. The introduction of a binary Adapted Dysarthria Score additionally allowed allocation to distinct dysarthria pattern in ataxias. The Frenchay Dysarthria Assessment proved to be a valid dysarthria measure in Friedreich's ataxia. Its availability in several languages provides a major advantage regarding the applicability in international clinical studies. Shortcomings of the Frenchay test are the multiplicity of items tested and its alphabetic coding. Numerical scoring and condensation of assessments in a modified version may, however, provide an excellent clinical tool for the measurement and scoring of dysarthria in ataxic speech disorders.

  2. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Speech Disorder Diagnosis and Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vowel metrics are capable of distinguishing healthy from dysarthric speech and among different forms of dysarthria. Method: A variety of vowel metrics were derived from spectral and temporal measurements of vowel tokens embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with…

  3. Listener Agreement for Auditory-Perceptual Ratings of Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunton, Kate; Kent, Raymond D.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Rosenbek, John C.; Kent, Jane F.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Darley, Aronson, and Brown (1969a, 1969b) detailed methods and results of auditory-perceptual assessment for speakers with dysarthrias of varying etiology. They reported adequate listener reliability for use of the rating system as a tool for differential diagnosis, but several more recent studies have raised concerns about listener…

  4. Assessing Vowel Centralization in Dysarthria: A Comparison of Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Annalise R.; McAuliffe, Megan J.; Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The strength of the relationship between vowel centralization measures and perceptual ratings of dysarthria severity has varied considerably across reports. This article evaluates methods of acoustic-perceptual analysis to determine whether procedural changes can strengthen the association between these measures. Method: Sixty-one…

  5. Voicing Status of Word Final Plosives in Friedreich's Ataxia Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, B. E.; Hewlett, N.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified final plosive voicing contrast as the highest single error source in dysarthria associated with Friedreich's Ataxia in a group of Irish English-speaking participants. This study aimed to determine the acoustic features underlying misperceptions of voicing status and implications for clinical management.…

  6. Vowel Acoustics in Dysarthria: Speech Disorder Diagnosis and Classification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which vowel metrics are capable of distinguishing healthy from dysarthric speech and among different forms of dysarthria. Method: A variety of vowel metrics were derived from spectral and temporal measurements of vowel tokens embedded in phrases produced by 45 speakers with…

  7. Perception of Coarticularity Information in Normal Speech and Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Sussman, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study addressed three research questions: (a) Can listeners use anticipatory vowel information in prevocalic consonants produced by talkers with dysarthria to identify the upcoming vowel? (b) Are listeners sensitive to interspeaker variation in anticipatory coarticulation during prevocalic consonants produced by healthy talkers…

  8. Dysarthria of Motor Neuron Disease: Clinician Judgments of Severity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seikel, J. Anthony; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between the temporal-acoustic parameters of the speech of 15 adults with motor neuron disease. Differences in predictions of the progression of the disease and clinician judgments of dysarthria severity were found to relate to the linguistic systems of both speaker and judge. (Author/JDD)

  9. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  10. Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Dysarthria following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Kent, Jane Finley; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.

    2009-01-01

    Although perceptual studies indicate the likelihood of voice disorders in persons with stroke, there have been few objective instrumental studies of voice dysfunction in dysarthria following stroke. This study reports automatic analysis of sustained vowel phonation for 61 speakers with stroke. The results show: (1) men with stroke and healthy…

  11. Voicing Status of Word Final Plosives in Friedreich's Ataxia Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, B. E.; Hewlett, N.

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors identified final plosive voicing contrast as the highest single error source in dysarthria associated with Friedreich's Ataxia in a group of Irish English-speaking participants. This study aimed to determine the acoustic features underlying misperceptions of voicing status and implications for clinical management.…

  12. Dysarthria and Friedreich's Ataxia: What Can Intelligibility Assessment Tell Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Bronagh; Hewlett, Nigel

    2007-01-01

    Background: Friedreich's ataxia is one of the most common hereditary disorders of the nervous system. Dysarthria is a pervasive symptom of Friedreich's ataxia, yet the clinical presentation of speech symptoms remains poorly understood, leaving clinicians without the evidence required to develop therapy interventions. Aims: The research reported…

  13. Characteristics of the Lax Vowel Space in Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Rivera, Deanna; Wilding, Gregory; Turner, Greg S.

    2005-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that lax vowels may be relatively unaffected by dysarthria, owing to the reduced vocal tract shapes required for these phonetic events (G. S. Turner, K. Tjaden, & G. Weismer, 1995). It also has been suggested that lax vowels may be especially susceptible to speech mode effects (M. A. Picheny, N. I. Durlach, & L. D. Braida,…

  14. Interarticulator Coordination in Dysarthria: An X-Ray Microbeam Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Gary; Yunusova, Yana; Westbury, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Articulatory discoordination is often said to be an important feature of the speech production disorder in dysarthria, but little experimental work has been done to identify and specify the coordination difficulties. The present study evaluated the coordination of labial and lingual gestures for /u/ production in persons with Parkinson's disease…

  15. Interarticulator Coordination in Dysarthria: An X-Ray Microbeam Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Gary; Yunusova, Yana; Westbury, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Articulatory discoordination is often said to be an important feature of the speech production disorder in dysarthria, but little experimental work has been done to identify and specify the coordination difficulties. The present study evaluated the coordination of labial and lingual gestures for /u/ production in persons with Parkinson's disease…

  16. Characteristics of the Lax Vowel Space in Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Rivera, Deanna; Wilding, Gregory; Turner, Greg S.

    2005-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that lax vowels may be relatively unaffected by dysarthria, owing to the reduced vocal tract shapes required for these phonetic events (G. S. Turner, K. Tjaden, & G. Weismer, 1995). It also has been suggested that lax vowels may be especially susceptible to speech mode effects (M. A. Picheny, N. I. Durlach, & L. D. Braida,…

  17. Identification of Dysarthria Types Based on Perceptual Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zyski, Barbara Jean; Weisiger, Bradford E.

    1987-01-01

    The study evaluated the degree of accuracy with which three groups of listeners (all speech language pathologists) could use perceptual analysis alone for identification of the following specific dysarthria types: flaccid, spastic, ataxic, hypokinetic, hyperkinetic chorea, hyperkinetic dystonia, and mixed. Listeners demonstrated minimal success in…

  18. Perception of Coarticularity Information in Normal Speech and Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Kris; Sussman, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study addressed three research questions: (a) Can listeners use anticipatory vowel information in prevocalic consonants produced by talkers with dysarthria to identify the upcoming vowel? (b) Are listeners sensitive to interspeaker variation in anticipatory coarticulation during prevocalic consonants produced by healthy talkers…

  19. Acoustic Analysis of Voice in Dysarthria following Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yu-Tsai; Kent, Ray D.; Kent, Jane Finley; Duffy, Joseph R.; Thomas, Jack E.

    2009-01-01

    Although perceptual studies indicate the likelihood of voice disorders in persons with stroke, there have been few objective instrumental studies of voice dysfunction in dysarthria following stroke. This study reports automatic analysis of sustained vowel phonation for 61 speakers with stroke. The results show: (1) men with stroke and healthy…

  20. Classifications of vocalic segments from articulatory kinematics: healthy controls and speakers with dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary G; Lindstrom, Mary J

    2011-10-01

    In this study, the authors classified vocalic segments produced by control speakers (C) and speakers with dysarthria due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Parkinson's disease (PD); classification was based on movement measures. The researchers asked the following questions: (a) Can vowels be classified on the basis of selected measures of articulatory motions? and (b) Can classification models that are constructed from control productions classify vowels produced by speakers with dysarthria that is related to ALS and PD? Nineteen C, 7 PD, and 8 ALS speakers participated in this study. The severity of dysarthria varied across individuals and between the 2 disorder groups. The stimuli were 6 vowels produced in 10 words embedded into sentences read at a comfortable reading rate. Movement data were collected using the x-ray microbeam. Movement measures included distances traveled, durations, and average speeds of vowel-related movement strokes. Vowels and words were classified by linear discriminant analysis with measures of articulatory motion as input variables. The study showed that vocalic segments could be classified using articulatory movement characteristics with up to 80% accuracy. The classification accuracy of the movement-based models depended largely on the number of articulators involved and, to a lesser extent, on the movement measure (e.g., distance, duration, speed). Classification of PD vowels was similar to that of the C group, suggesting a simple scaling of gestures as an explanation of the movement deficit in this disease. Classification performance for ALS vowels appeared to be different from that of C and PD productions. Classification of vowels was possible on the basis of their articulatory motions. ALS vowels appeared categorically different from those of C and PD speakers.

  1. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group: Implementation and Feasibility of a Group Intervention for People with Dysarthria Following Stroke and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Paton, Gillian; Kelly, Shona; Brady, Marian; Muir, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: The broad life implications of acquired dysarthria are recognized, but they have received little attention in stroke management. Reports of group therapy, which may be a suitable approach to intervention, are not available for stroke-related dysarthria. Aims: To examine the operational feasibility of and response to a new eight-session…

  2. The "Living with Dysarthria" Group: Implementation and Feasibility of a Group Intervention for People with Dysarthria Following Stroke and Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Paton, Gillian; Kelly, Shona; Brady, Marian; Muir, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Background: The broad life implications of acquired dysarthria are recognized, but they have received little attention in stroke management. Reports of group therapy, which may be a suitable approach to intervention, are not available for stroke-related dysarthria. Aims: To examine the operational feasibility of and response to a new eight-session…

  3. [The left central gyral lesion and pure anarthria].

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, M; Odashima, K; Fujii, T; Suzuki, K; Saitou, J; Yamadori, A

    2000-05-01

    We report a very rare case of pure anarthria with lesion analysis. A 44-year-old right-handed man suffered from a cerebral infarction with a mild right hemiparesis and speech disturbance. An MRI of the brain 1.5 months post onset revealed a lesion confined to the left central gyrus. One month after the onset, his spontaneous speech was dysprosodic and laborious. It was contaminated with dysarthria and phonological paraphasias. However, language comprehension, repetition and naming abilities were normal. Most remarkably he showed no impairment in writing with his left hand. Over the following months, his difficulties in verbal output showed general amelioration, but the isolated impairment in the domain of articulation characterized by dysprosody, dysarthria, and phonological paraphasia persisted. As for the symptomatology of pure anarthria resulting from precentral gyral lesions, there have been controversies about its pureness. Some argue that the so called pure anarthria always shows some degree of writing disturbances, albeit mild in degree. Others maintain there certainly exists the pure type without any signs of agraphia. In the present case lesions were limited to the central gyrus but spared the lowest opercular portion. The previous reports of pure anarthria that had mild agraphia all had lesions involving the opercular portion. We conclude the sparing of this area is most likely related with sparing of writing capacity in pure anarthria.

  4. An internal carotid artery aneurysm presenting with dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Davey, P T; Rychlik, I; O'Donnell, M; Baker, R; Rennie, I

    2013-10-01

    A 72-year-old woman presented to her general practitioner with a 4-week history of right neck swelling. Clinical examination elicited a pulsatile mass consistent with a carotid artery aneurysm. Five days later the patient noticed her tongue movements had become awkward with associated dysarthria. Computed tomography confirmed a 4cm internal carotid artery aneurysm arising just distally to the carotid bifurcation. She proceeded to transfemoral diagnostic carotid angiography. Balloon occlusion of the right internal carotid artery origin was performed for a ten-minute period without any neurological deficit. The decision was taken to proceed to surgical ligation of the origin of the internal carotid artery. Her symptoms of dysarthria have resolved.

  5. Automatic Severity Assessment of Dysarthria using State-Specific Vectors.

    PubMed

    Sriranjani, R; Umesh, S; Reddy, M Ramasubba

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to assess the severity of the dysarthria using state-specific vector (SSV) of phone-cluster adaptive training (phone-CAT) acoustic modeling technique is proposed. The dominant component of the SSV represents the actual pronunciations of a speaker. Comparing the dominant component for unimpaired and each dysarthric speaker, a phone confusion matrix is formed. The diagonal elements of the matrix capture the number of correct pronunciations for each dysarthric speaker. As the degree of impairment increases, the number of phones correctly pronounced by the speaker decreases. Thus the trace of the confusion matrix can be used as objective cue to assess di?erent severity levels of dysarthria based on a threshold rule. Our proposed objective measure correlates with the standard Frenchay dysarthric assessment scores by 74 % on Nemours database. The measure also correlates with the intelligibility scores by 82 % on universal access dysarthric speech database.

  6. Relationship between quality of life and dysarthria in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Valentina; Mauri, Ilaria; Cattaneo, Davide; Gilardone, Marco; Montesano, Angelo; Schindler, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate dysarthria and dysarthria-related quality of life (QOL) and analyze its relations with duration of disease, severity, and general QOL in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Cross-sectional observational study. Rehabilitation center. Consecutive patients with MS (N=163) were recruited (mean age, 52 ± 10.4 y; mean MS duration, 19 ± 10.4 y). Not applicable. Presence of dysarthria; dysarthria characteristics; MS severity and duration; and dysarthria-related and generic QOL were evaluated by means of the therapy outcome measure scale; Robertson profile; Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), years of disease; QOL of the dysarthric speaker questionnaire; and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), respectively. The mean EDSS score was 6.5 ± 1.3. Dysarthria affected 57 (35%) of the 163 patients. Dysarthria severity was mild in most of the 57 patients with dysarthria. Median Robertson profile scores were slightly but significantly higher in the nondysarthric group compared with the dysarthric group (P=.001). The QOL for the dysarthric speaker questionnaire was significantly more compromised in patients with dysarthria (P=.001). No difference on the SF-36 scores between patients with and without dysarthria was found, with the exception of the physical activity and physical pain subscales. The QOL for the dysarthric speaker questionnaire showed no correlation with MS duration and a weak correlation with EDSS score (r=.25). Correlations between the SF-36 and QOL for the dysarthric speaker scores were few and weak, with the exception of the role limitations because of emotions (r=-.428) and mental health subscales (r=-.383). Dysarthria-related QOL is compromised in patients with MS and dysarthria and might be used as a supplementary measure in clinical practice and research for patients who have MS. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparison of speech and language therapy techniques for dysarthria in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deane, K H; Whurr, R; Playford, E D; Ben-Shlomo, Y; Clarke, C E

    2001-01-01

    . Ramig 95 examined a wide range of vocal characteristics, activities of daily living affected by speech, depression and the carer's impressions of the patient's speech quality. Some of these outcomes were measured up to 24 months after the end of the therapy. However, in neither study were changes in outcomes due to 'Therapy A' compared with the changes due to 'Therapy B' statistically. Therefore no comment on the comparative efficacy of these types of speech and language therapy can be made. Considering the methodological flaws in both of these studies, the small number of patients examined, and the possibility of publication bias, there is insufficient evidence to support or refute the efficacy of any given form of S & LT over another to treat dysarthria in Parkinson's disease. Given the lack of evidence from RCTs to support or refute the efficacy of S & LT in Parkinson's disease (see Cochrane review 'Speech and Language therapy for Dysarthria in Patients with Parkinson's Disease'), the consensus as to what is considered 'best-practice' S & LT must be proved first through a large well-designed placebo-controlled randomised trial before examining variations in S & LT methodology. The design of these trials should minimise bias and be reported fully using CONSORT guidelines (CONSORT 1996). Outcome measures with particular relevance to patients, their carers, physicians and speech and language therapists should be chosen and the patients followed for at least 6 months to determine the duration of any improvement.

  8. Acoustic and Perceptual Cues to Contrastive Stress in Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Rupal; Campellone, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors sought to understand acoustic and perceptual cues to contrastive stress in speakers with dysarthria (DYS) and healthy controls (HC). Method: The production experiment examined the ability of 12 DYS (9 male, 3 female; M = 39 years of age) and 12 age- and gender-matched HC (9 male, 3 female; M = 37.5 years of age)…

  9. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome due to pure and translocation forms of monosomy 4p16.1 → pter.

    PubMed

    Iwanowski, Piotr S; Panasiuk, Barbara; Van Buggenhout, Griet; Murdolo, Marina; Myśliwiec, Marta; Maas, Nicole M C; Lattante, Serena; Korniszewski, Lech; Posmyk, Renata; Pilch, Jacek; Zajączek, Stanislaw; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Zollino, Marcella; Midro, Alina T

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain a quantitative definition of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) through systematic phenotypic analyses in a group of six children with 4p15.32 → pter, 4p15.33 → pter, or 4p16.1 → pter monosomy (considered together as M4p16.1). These results were used for evaluation of the phenotypic effects of a double chromosome imbalance in one child with 4p16.1 → pter monosomy and additional 11q23.3 → qter trisomy. Children with pure M4p16.1 presented with a total of 227 clinical and morphological traits, of which 119 were positive in at least two of them. These traits overlap to a great extent with clinical criteria defining the WHS phenotype. Among the 103 traits identified in the child with unbalanced translocation der(4)t(4;11)(p16.1;q23.3), most clinical and developmental traits (but only 11 morphological) were found to be shared by WHS children with pure M4p16.1 and at least one reported patient with pure 11q trisomy. Forty-six traits of this child corresponded solely to those identified in at least one child with pure M4p16.1. Only five traits of the hybrid phenotype were present in at least one child with pure distal 11q trisomy but in none of the present children with pure M4p16.1. In conclusion, most of the morphological traits of the hybrid phenotype in the child with der(4)t(4;11)(p16.1;q23.3) can be attributed to the M4p16.1, whereas their overlap with those associated with pure distal 11q trisomy is less evident. Phenotype analyses based on the same systematic data acquisition may be useful in understanding the phenotypic effects of different chromosome regions in complex rearrangements. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Listeners' attitudes: speech supplementation strategies for improving effectiveness of speakers with mixed dysarthria as a result of motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Toy, Natalie; Joubert, Karin

    2008-01-01

    This study examined unfamiliar and familiar listener attitudes towards the use of combined alphabet-topic cues and a control condition (habitual speech with no cues) associated with the speech of three individuals with severe mixed dysarthria. Two listener groups (N = 36) were shown experimentally imposed visual images of the combined alphabet-topic cue strategy in conjunction with recorded auditory presentations with the habitual speech of three individuals with mixed dysarthria. Using a 7-point Likert scale, listeners were asked to rate how effective they thought the speakers communicated; how comfortable they were communicating with the speakers; and how persistent they were in trying to understand the speakers. The results revealed that there were no significant differences in the attitude ratings of familiar listeners as compared to unfamiliar listeners. However, results revealed that rating of communicative effectiveness, comfort communicating with speakers and listener persistence were each more favourable when using the combined cue condition than purely habitual speech.The results suggest that augmentative and alternative communication strategies providing frequent and specific cues regarding the content and constituent words of a message may enhance the attitudes of listeners.

  11. Dysarthria Impact Profile: Development of a Scale to Measure Psychosocial Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshe, Margaret; Peach, Richard K.; Miller, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of acquired dysarthria on the speaker is well recognized. To date, speech-and-language therapists have no instrument available to measure this construct. This has implications for outcome measurement and for planning intervention. This paper describes the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP), an instrument that has…

  12. Addressing the Needs of Speakers with Longstanding Dysarthria: Computerized and Traditional Therapy Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pam; Hawley, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background: In clinical practice, it is common for speech and language therapists to discontinue dysarthria treatment when a plateau in spontaneous recovery is reached. However, there is some evidence from single-case research studies that people with chronic dysarthria can improve their speech with intervention several years after the onset of…

  13. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  14. Addressing the Needs of Speakers with Longstanding Dysarthria: Computerized and Traditional Therapy Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pam; Hawley, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background: In clinical practice, it is common for speech and language therapists to discontinue dysarthria treatment when a plateau in spontaneous recovery is reached. However, there is some evidence from single-case research studies that people with chronic dysarthria can improve their speech with intervention several years after the onset of…

  15. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercise Use in Acquired Dysarthria Management: Regimes and Rationales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Muir, Margaret; Allen, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are described in speech and language therapy manuals and are thought to be much used in acquired dysarthria intervention, though there is no robust evidence of an influence on speech outcome. Opinions differ as to whether, and for which dysarthria presentations, NSOMExs are appropriate. Aims:…

  16. Therapeutic Intervention in a Case of Ataxic Dysarthria Associated with a History of Amateur Boxing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) describe the presenting features of ataxic dysarthria present in a participant with a long history of amateur boxing, (b) describe a novel application of behavioral principles in the treatment of this participant, and (c) discuss implications in the treatment of ataxic dysarthria secondary to boxing. The…

  17. Dysarthria in Adults with Cerebral Palsy: Clinical Presentation and Impacts on Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schölderle, Theresa; Staiger, Anja; Lampe, Renée; Strecker, Katrin; Ziegler, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although dysarthria affects the large majority of individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) and can substantially complicate everyday communication, previous research has provided an incomplete picture of its clinical features. We aimed to comprehensively describe characteristics of dysarthria in adults with CP and to elucidate the impact of…

  18. Therapeutic Intervention in a Case of Ataxic Dysarthria Associated with a History of Amateur Boxing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMicken, Betty L.; Ostergren, Jennifer A.; Vento-Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this study were to (a) describe the presenting features of ataxic dysarthria present in a participant with a long history of amateur boxing, (b) describe a novel application of behavioral principles in the treatment of this participant, and (c) discuss implications in the treatment of ataxic dysarthria secondary to boxing. The…

  19. Dysarthria Impact Profile: Development of a Scale to Measure Psychosocial Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walshe, Margaret; Peach, Richard K.; Miller, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of acquired dysarthria on the speaker is well recognized. To date, speech-and-language therapists have no instrument available to measure this construct. This has implications for outcome measurement and for planning intervention. This paper describes the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP), an instrument that has…

  20. Voice Dysfunction in Dysarthria: Application of the Multi-Dimensional Voice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, R. D.; Vorperian, H. K.; Kent, J. F.; Duffy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper recommends procedures and standards for the acoustic analysis of voice in individuals with dysarthria. In Part 2, acoustic data are reviewed for dysarthria associated with Parkinson disease (PD), cerebellar disease, amytrophic lateral sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, unilateral hemispheric stroke, and essential tremor.…

  1. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercise Use in Acquired Dysarthria Management: Regimes and Rationales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Muir, Margaret; Allen, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Background: Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are described in speech and language therapy manuals and are thought to be much used in acquired dysarthria intervention, though there is no robust evidence of an influence on speech outcome. Opinions differ as to whether, and for which dysarthria presentations, NSOMExs are appropriate. Aims:…

  2. Survey of UK Speech and Language Therapists' Assessment and Treatment Practices for People with Progressive Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Jessica; Bloch, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria knowledge is predominantly impairment-based. As a result, speech and language therapists (SLTs) have traditionally adopted impairment-focused management practices. However, guidance for best practice suggests that SLTs should consider the client holistically, including the impact of dysarthria beyond the impairment. Aims: To…

  3. Survey of UK Speech and Language Therapists' Assessment and Treatment Practices for People with Progressive Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Jessica; Bloch, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria knowledge is predominantly impairment-based. As a result, speech and language therapists (SLTs) have traditionally adopted impairment-focused management practices. However, guidance for best practice suggests that SLTs should consider the client holistically, including the impact of dysarthria beyond the impairment. Aims: To…

  4. Primary Sjögren syndrome presenting with hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia following delivery due to Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Yohei; Higuchi, Takakazu; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Haji, Youichiro; Okada, Masato; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Okada, Sadamu

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with hemolytic anemia without a reticulocyte response 38 days after delivery. A marked reduction in erythroid cells and an increase in macrophages with active hemophagocytosis were noted in the bone marrow. While conventional Coombs' tests were negative, the level of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) was increased. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) based on her symptoms, positive anti-SS-A antibodies, Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia associated with RBC-bound IgG and hemophagocytosis. The unique presentation was considered to be a consequence of immunological derangement associated with pSS, pregnancy and delivery.

  5. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  6. Calculation of the false alarm in pure frequency detection due to zero crossings of a narrow-band process - The possibility of estimating its autocorrelation envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, J.

    Consideration is given to problems of pure frequency detection in the magnetic recording of acoustic noise in the presence of zero crossings by sinusoidal reference waves and narrow-band random processes. The principle of the partial detection of a sine wave based on isochronous zero crossings near a given coherent sequence threshold is reviewed, and a track detection criterion is introduced. A model of the signal detection process is then presented based on a probabilistic description of zero crossings which permits the definition of the normalized duration of a coherent sequence of zero crossings, and the model is validated in an experimental study of a narrow band process centered at 3240 Hz. The probability of the simultaneous detection of two channels is also calculated. The application of the model to parasitic detection in a two-frequency code is considered. Attention is then given to the relation between the isochronism of the coherent sequences of zero crossings and spectral sharpness, and a means for the direct estimation of the autocorrelation envelope of the narrowband noise process is derived.

  7. Dysarthria in stroke: a narrative review of its description and the outcome of intervention.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine

    2011-04-01

    Dysarthria is a frequent and persisting sequel to stroke and arises from varied lesion locations. Although the presence of dysarthria is well documented, for stroke there are scant data on presentation and intervention outcome. A literature search was undertaken to evaluate (a) the features of dysarthria in adult stroke populations relative to the conventional Mayo system for classification, which was developed from diverse pathological groups, and (b) the current status of evidence for the effectiveness of intervention in dysarthria caused by stroke. A narrative review of results is presented. The limited data available indicate that, regardless of stroke location, imprecise articulation and slow speaking rate are consistent features, and voice disturbances, especially harshness, and reduced prosodic variation are also common. Dysarthria is more prevalent in left than in right hemisphere lesions. There is a need for comprehensive, thorough analysis of dysarthria features, involving larger populations, with stroke and other variables controlled and with appropriate age-referenced control data. There is low level evidence for benefits arising from intervention in stroke-related dysarthria. Because studies involve few participants, without external control, and sometimes include stroke with other aetiologies, their results lack the required weight for confident evidence-based practice.

  8. The pulvinar nucleus is associated with the presence of dysarthria in patients with basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Kyeong, Sunghyon; Ahn, Sung Jun; Park, Yoon Ghil

    2017-08-10

    Dysarthria is a frequent symptom in patients with stroke. The anatomical structures responsible for dysarthria have been reported in patients with lacunar infarcts, but the related lesions in patients with basal ganglia hemorrhage (BGH) have not been investigated. The aim of this study was to identify associations between the lesion location and the presence/absence of dysarthria in patients with BGH using voxel-based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) analyses. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 26 patients with acute BGH (mean age, 54.0 years; men:women, 14:12) who underwent conservative management. The patients were classified into groups based on the presence or absence of dysarthria at the time of admission, which was determined by reviewing the patients' medical records. Brain lesions were traced on magnetic resonance images that were acquired within the first 3 weeks after BGH onset, and then separate high-resolution region-of-interest images were generated. Associations between dysarthria and the lesion location were determined with the VLSM analyses. The average volume of the delimited lesions was 7.38±5.75cm(3). The VLSM analyses identified several voxel clusters, mainly in the pulvinar nucleus of the left thalamus, that were significantly related to the presence of dysarthria at admission. These findings suggest that patients with BGH extending into the left pulvinar nucleus should be monitored for dysarthria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Language as Pure Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul

    2016-01-01

    Language occupies a crucial position in neoliberalism, due to the reimagination of language as commodified skill. This paper studies the role of language ideology in this transformation by identifying a particular ideology that facilitates this process, namely the ideology which views language as pure potential. Neoliberalism treats language as a…

  10. Language as Pure Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul

    2016-01-01

    Language occupies a crucial position in neoliberalism, due to the reimagination of language as commodified skill. This paper studies the role of language ideology in this transformation by identifying a particular ideology that facilitates this process, namely the ideology which views language as pure potential. Neoliberalism treats language as a…

  11. Speech rate treatments for individuals with dysarthria: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Blanchet, Paul G; Snyder, Gregory J

    2010-06-01

    Research confirms the long-standing clinical observation that patients with dysarthria exhibit variability in speech rate. Thus, modifying speech rate has been documented as one of the best treatment options for these patients. In this tutorial, several published rate control interventions for dysarthric speakers are presented. Studies discussed utilized various interventions, including pacing boards, alphabet board supplementation, visual and auditory feedback, cueing and pacing strategies, and delayed auditory feedback. Interventions discussed represent a hierarchy from "rigid" strategies, which impose maximal rate control, to techniques allowing for greater speech naturalness and independent rate control. All procedures are examined with respect to effectiveness in reducing rate, effect on intelligibility and prosody, training requirements, specific alterations made to speech rate, and other relevant aspects.

  12. Assessment of voice and speech symptoms in early Parkinson's disease by the Robertson dysarthria profile.

    PubMed

    Defazio, Giovanni; Guerrieri, Marta; Liuzzi, Daniele; Gigante, Angelo Fabio; di Nicola, Vincenzo

    2016-03-01

    Changes in voice and speech are thought to involve 75-90% of people with PD, but the impact of PD progression on voice/speech parameters is not well defined. In this study, we assessed voice/speech symptoms in 48 parkinsonian patients staging <3 on the modified Hoehn and Yahr scale and 37 healthy subjects using the Robertson dysarthria profile (a clinical-perceptual method exploring all components potentially involved in speech difficulties), the Voice handicap index (a validated measure of the impact of voice symptoms on quality of life) and the speech evaluation parameter contained in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III). Accuracy and metric properties of the Robertson dysarthria profile were also measured. On Robertson dysarthria profile, all parkinsonian patients yielded lower scores than healthy control subjects. Differently, the Voice Handicap Index and the speech evaluation parameter contained in the UPDRS-III could detect speech/voice disturbances in 10 and 75% of PD patients, respectively. Validation procedure in Parkinson's disease patients showed that the Robertson dysarthria profile has acceptable reliability, satisfactory internal consistency and scaling assumptions, lack of floor and ceiling effects, and partial correlations with UPDRS-III and Voice Handicap Index. We concluded that speech/voice disturbances are widely identified by the Robertson dysarthria profile in early parkinsonian patients, even when the disturbances do not carry a significant level of disability. Robertson dysarthria profile may be a valuable tool to detect speech/voice disturbances in Parkinson's disease.

  13. The impact of rate reduction and increased vocal intensity on coarticulation in dysarthria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjaden, Kris

    2003-04-01

    The dysarthrias are a group of speech disorders resulting from impairment to nervous system structures important for the motor execution of speech. Although numerous studies have examined how dysarthria impacts articulatory movements or changes in vocal tract shape, few studies of dysarthria consider that articulatory events and their acoustic consequences overlap or are coarticulated in connected speech. The impact of rate, loudness, and clarity on coarticulatory patterns in dysarthria also are poorly understood, although these prosodic manipulations frequently are employed as therapy strategies to improve intelligibility in dysarthria and also are known to affect coarticulatory patterns for at least some neurologically healthy speakers. The current study examined the effects of slowed rate and increased vocal intensity on anticipatory coarticulation for speakers with dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis (MS), as inferred from the acoustic signal. Healthy speakers were studied for comparison purposes. Three repetitions of twelve target words embedded in the carrier phrase ``It's a -- again'' were produced in habitual, loud, and slow speaking conditions. F2 frequencies and first moment coefficients were used to infer coarticulation. Both group and individual speaker trends will be examined in the data analyses.

  14. Acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel space in speakers with and without dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimin; Littlejohn, Meghan Anne; Simmons, Zachary

    2017-04-01

    The purpose is to investigate acoustic and tongue body kinematic vowel dispersion patterns and vowel space in speakers with and without dysarthria secondary to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel spaces were examined at the same time sampling point using electromagnetic articulography in 11 speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS and 11 speakers without dysarthria. Tongue kinematic data were collected from the tongue body sensor (∼25 mm posterior from the tongue apex). A number of acoustic and tongue body kinematic variables were tested. The result showed that the acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel dispersion patterns are different between the groups. Acoustic and tongue body kinematic vowel spaces are highly correlated; however, unlike acoustic vowel space, tongue body kinematic vowel space was not significantly different between the groups. Both acoustic and tongue kinematic vowel dispersion patterns are sensitive to the group difference, especially with high vowels. The tongue kinematic vowel space approach is too crude to differentiate the speakers with dysarthria secondary to ALS from speakers without dysarthria. To examine tongue range of motion in speakers with dysarthria, a more refined articulatory kinematic approach needs to be examined in the future.

  15. Acute Isolated Dysarthria Is Associated with a High Risk of Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Beliavsky, Alina; Perry, Jeffrey J.; Dowlatshahi, Dar; Wasserman, Jason; Sivilotti, Marco L.A.; Sutherland, Jane; Worster, Andrew; Émond, Marcel; Stotts, Grant; Jin, Albert Y.; Oczkowski, Wieslaw J.; Sahlas, Demetrios J.; Murray, Heather E.; MacKey, Ariane; Verreault, Steve; Wells, George A.; Stiell, Ian G.; Sharma, Mukul

    2014-01-01

    Background Isolated dysarthria is an uncommon presentation of transient ischemic attack (TIA)/minor stroke and has a broad differential diagnosis. There is little information in the literature about how often this presentation is confirmed to be a TIA/stroke, and therefore there is debate about the risk of subsequent vascular events. Given the uncertain prognosis, it is unclear how to best manage patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with isolated dysarthria. The objective of this study was to prospectively identify and follow a cohort of patients presenting to EDs with isolated dysarthria in order to explore their natural history and risk of recurrent cerebrovascular events. Specifically, we sought to determine early outcomes of individuals with this nonspecific and atypical presentation in order to appropriately expedite their management. Methods Patients with isolated dysarthria having presented to 8 Canadian EDs between October 2006 and April 2009 were analyzed as part of a prospective multicenter cohort study of patients with acute neurological symptoms as assessed by emergency physicians. The study inclusion criteria were age ≥18 years, a normal level of consciousness, and a symptom onset <1 week prior to presentation without an established nonvascular etiology. The primary outcome was a subsequent stroke within 90 days of the index visit. The secondary outcomes were the rate of TIA, myocardial infarction, and death. Isolated dysarthria was defined as slurring with imprecise articulation but without evidence of language dysfunction. The overall rate of stroke in this cohort was compared with that predicted by the median ABCD2 score for this group. Results Between 2006 and 2009, 1,528 patients were enrolled and had a 90-day follow-up. Of these, 43 patients presented with isolated acute-onset dysarthria (2.8%). Recurrent stroke occurred in 6/43 (14.0%) within 90 days of enrollment. The predicted maximal 90-day stroke rate was 9.8% (based on a

  16. [A rare complication of dysarthria in a patient with inclusion body myositis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Isayama, Reina; Shiga, Kensuke; Tanaka, Eijirou; Itsukage, Masahiro; Tokuda, Takahiko; Nakagawa, Masanori

    2010-10-01

    We reported a 71-year-old man with inclusion body myositis with clinically overt dysarthria. He had been suffering from gradual progression of weakness in the hand muscles and lower extremities as well as dysarthria three years before admission. His neurological examination revealed muscle atrophy and weakness in the tongue, the forearm flexors, and the vastus medialis muscles. He had dysarthria to a moderate degree, while he denied any dysphasia. A biopsy from vastus lateralis muscle showed variation in fiber size, infiltration of mononucleated cells, and numerous fibers with rimmed vacuoles, leading to the diagnosis of definite inclusion body myositis. The EMG findings of the tongue demonstrated low amplitude motor unit potentials during voluntary contraction, abundant fibrillation potentials at rest, and preserved interference pattern at maximal contraction, implying myogenic changes. We surmised the dysarthria seen in this patient, an atypical clinical feature in IBM, presumably caused by muscle involvement in the tongue muscle. Dysphasia is common symptom in IBM patient and has been much reported previously. But dysarthria in IBM patient has not been aware, for this reason this report should be the rare case.

  17. Management of Non-Progressive Dysarthria: Practice Patterns of Speech and Language Therapists in the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Aifric; Walshe, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a commonly acquired speech disorder. Rising numbers of people surviving stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) mean the numbers of people with non-progressive dysarthria are likely to increase, with increased challenges for speech and language therapists (SLTs), service providers and key stakeholders. The evidence base…

  18. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercises in Post-Stroke Dysarthria Intervention: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, C.; Muir, M.; Allen, C.; Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been little robust evaluation of the outcome of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention for post-stroke dysarthria. Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are a common component of dysarthria intervention. A feasibility study was designed and executed, with participants randomized into two groups, in one of which…

  19. Non-Speech Oro-Motor Exercises in Post-Stroke Dysarthria Intervention: A Randomized Feasibility Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, C.; Muir, M.; Allen, C.; Jensen, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: There has been little robust evaluation of the outcome of speech and language therapy (SLT) intervention for post-stroke dysarthria. Non-speech oro-motor exercises (NSOMExs) are a common component of dysarthria intervention. A feasibility study was designed and executed, with participants randomized into two groups, in one of which…

  20. Management of Non-Progressive Dysarthria: Practice Patterns of Speech and Language Therapists in the Republic of Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Aifric; Walshe, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria is a commonly acquired speech disorder. Rising numbers of people surviving stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) mean the numbers of people with non-progressive dysarthria are likely to increase, with increased challenges for speech and language therapists (SLTs), service providers and key stakeholders. The evidence base…

  1. Perceptual and acoustic analysis of lexical stress in Greek speakers with dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Papakyritsis, Ioannis; Müller, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the abilities of Greek speakers with dysarthria to signal lexical stress at the single word level. Three speakers with dysarthria and two unimpaired control participants were recorded completing a repetition task of a list of words consisting of minimal pairs of Greek disyllabic words contrasted by lexical stress location only. Fourteen listeners were asked to determine the attempted stress location for each word pair. Acoustic analyses of duration and intensity ratios, both within and across words, were undertaken to identify possible acoustic correlates of the listeners' judgments concerning stress location. Acoustic and perceptual data indicate that while each participant with dysarthria in this study had some difficulty in signaling stress unambiguously, the pattern of difficulty was different for each speaker. Further, it was found that the relationship between the listeners' judgments of stress location and the acoustic data was not conclusive.

  2. Formant trajectory characteristics in speakers with dysarthria and homogeneous speech intelligibility scores: Further data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunjung; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Ray D.

    2005-09-01

    In previous work [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 117, 2605 (2005)], we reported on formant trajectory characteristics of a relatively large number of speakers with dysarthria and near-normal speech intelligibility. The purpose of that analysis was to begin a documentation of the variability, within relatively homogeneous speech-severity groups, of acoustic measures commonly used to predict across-speaker variation in speech intelligibility. In that study we found that even with near-normal speech intelligibility (90%-100%), many speakers had reduced formant slopes for some words and distributional characteristics of acoustic measures that were different than values obtained from normal speakers. In the current report we extend those findings to a group of speakers with dysarthria with somewhat poorer speech intelligibility than the original group. Results are discussed in terms of the utility of certain acoustic measures as indices of speech intelligibility, and as explanatory data for theories of dysarthria. [Work supported by NIH Award R01 DC00319.

  3. Myasthenia gravis mimicking stroke: a case series with sudden onset dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Tremolizzo, Lucio; Giopato, Federico; Piatti, Maria Luisa; Rigamonti, Andrea; Ferrarese, Carlo; Appollonio, Ildebrando

    2015-06-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by fluctuating fatigue of skeletal muscles, often involving extrinsic ocular or bulbar districts. Myasthenia gravis in the elderly is an under-recognized condition, sometimes confused with cerebrovascular disease. Here we present a case series of myasthenia patients which onset was characterized by sudden dysarthria, clearly raising this diagnostic dilemma. In the workout of sudden onset isolated dysarthria, MG should be always considered. In fact, even if myasthenia is a rare condition, lacunar stroke only with this clinical presentation is also unusual, and significant risks may arise (e.g., unexpected myasthenic crisis).

  4. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers with Dysarthria: A First Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Methods: Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a…

  5. The effects of familiarization on intelligibility and lexical segmentation in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Julie M.; Spitzer, Stephanie M.; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles

    2002-12-01

    This study is the third in a series that has explored the source of intelligibility decrement in dysarthria by jointly considering signal characteristics and the cognitive-perceptual processes employed by listeners. A paradigm of lexical boundary error analysis was used to examine this interface by manipulating listener constraints with a brief familiarization procedure. If familiarization allows listeners to extract relevant segmental and suprasegmental information from dysarthric speech, they should obtain higher intelligibility scores than nonfamiliarized listeners, and their lexical boundary error patterns should approximate those obtained in misperceptions of normal speech. Listeners transcribed phrases produced by speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria after being familiarized with other phrases produced by these speakers. Data were compared to those of nonfamiliarized listeners [Liss et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 107, 3415-3424 (2000)]. The familiarized groups obtained higher intelligibility scores than nonfamiliarized groups, and the effects were greater when the dysarthria type of the familiarization procedure matched the dysarthria type of the transcription task. Remarkably, no differences in lexical boundary error patterns were discovered between the familiarized and nonfamiliarized groups. Transcribers of the ataxic speech appeared to have difficulty distinguishing strong and weak syllables in spite of the familiarization. Results suggest that intelligibility decrements arise from the perceptual challenges posed by the degraded segmental and suprasegmental aspects of the signal, but that this type of familiarization process may differentially facilitate mapping segmental information onto existing phonological categories.

  6. The Relationship between Listener Comprehension and Intelligibility Scores for Speakers with Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustad, Katherine C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the relationship between listener comprehension and intelligibility scores for speakers with mild, moderate, severe, and profound dysarthria. Relationships were examined across all speakers and their listeners when severity effects were statistically controlled, within severity groups, and within individual speakers…

  7. Speech Recognition for Environmental Control: Effect of Microphone Type, Dysarthria, and Severity on Recognition Results.

    PubMed

    Fager, Susan Koch; Burnfield, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the use of commercially available automatic speech recognition (ASR) across microphone options as access to environmental control for individuals with and without dysarthria. A study of two groups of speakers (typical speech and dysarthria), was conducted to understand their performance using ASR and various microphones for environmental control. Specifically, dependent variables examined included attempts per command, recognition accuracy, frequency of error type, and perceived workload. A further sub-analysis of the group of participants with dysarthria examined the impact of severity. Results indicated a significantly larger number of attempts were required (P = 0.007), and significantly lower recognition accuracies were achieved by the dysarthric participants (P = 0.010). A sub-analysis examining severity demonstrated no significant differences between the typical speakers and participants with mild dysarthria. However, significant differences were evident (P = 0.007, P = 0.008) between mild and moderate-severe dysarthric participants. No significant differences existed across microphones. A higher frequency of threshold errors occurred for typical participants and no response errors for moderate-severe dysarthrics. There were no significant differences on the NASA Task Load Index.

  8. The Impact of Contrastive Stress on Vowel Acoustics and Intelligibility in Dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Connaghan, Kathryn P; Patel, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    To compare vowel acoustics and intelligibility in words produced with and without contrastive stress by speakers with spastic (mixed-spastic) dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (DYSCP) and healthy controls (HCs). Fifteen participants (9 men, 6 women; age M = 42 years) with DYSCP and 15 HCs (9 men, 6 women; age M = 36 years) produced sentences containing target words with and without contrastive stress. Forty-five healthy listeners (age M = 25 years) completed a vowel identification task of DYSCP productions. Vowel acoustics were compared across stress conditions and groups using 1st (F1) and 2nd (F2) formant measures. Perceptual intelligibility was compared across stress conditions and dysarthria severity. F1 and F2 significantly increased in stressed words for both groups, although the degree of change differed. Mean Euclidian distance between vowels also increased with stress. The relative probability of vowels falling within the target F1 × F2 space was greater for HCs but did not differ with stress. Stress production resulted in greater listener vowel identification accuracy for speakers with mild dysarthria. Contrastive stress affected vowel formants for both groups. Perceptual results suggest that some speakers with dysarthria may benefit from a contrastive stress strategy to improve vowel intelligibility.

  9. The Impact of Contrastive Stress on Vowel Acoustics and Intelligibility in Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare vowel acoustics and intelligibility in words produced with and without contrastive stress by speakers with spastic (mixed-spastic) dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (DYSCP) and healthy controls (HCs). Method Fifteen participants (9 men, 6 women; age M = 42 years) with DYSCP and 15 HCs (9 men, 6 women; age M = 36 years) produced sentences containing target words with and without contrastive stress. Forty-five healthy listeners (age M = 25 years) completed a vowel identification task of DYSCP productions. Vowel acoustics were compared across stress conditions and groups using 1st (F1) and 2nd (F2) formant measures. Perceptual intelligibility was compared across stress conditions and dysarthria severity. Results F1 and F2 significantly increased in stressed words for both groups, although the degree of change differed. Mean Euclidian distance between vowels also increased with stress. The relative probability of vowels falling within the target F1 × F2 space was greater for HCs but did not differ with stress. Stress production resulted in greater listener vowel identification accuracy for speakers with mild dysarthria. Conclusions Contrastive stress affected vowel formants for both groups. Perceptual results suggest that some speakers with dysarthria may benefit from a contrastive stress strategy to improve vowel intelligibility. PMID:28114612

  10. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  11. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  12. Direct Magnitude Estimates of Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria: Effects of a Chosen Standard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weismer, Gary; Laures, Jacqueline S.

    2002-01-01

    This study applied four direct magnitude estimation (DME) standards to the evaluation of speech from four individuals with dysarthria and three neurologically normal speakers. It found a fixed set of sentence-level utterances was scaled differently depending on the specific standard used. Results are discussed in terms of possible standardization…

  13. Parametric Quantitative Acoustic Analysis of Conversation Produced by Speakers with Dysarthria and Healthy Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Kristin M.; Kent, Raymond D.; Delaney, Amy L.; Duffy, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This study's main purpose was to (a) identify acoustic signatures of hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD) that are robust to phonetic variation in conversational speech and (b) determine specific characteristics of the variability associated with HKD. Method: Twenty healthy control (HC) participants and 20 participants with HKD associated with…

  14. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers with Dysarthria: A First Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mefferd, Antje

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Methods: Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a…

  15. Implementing speech supplementation strategies: effects on intelligibility and speech rate of individuals with chronic severe dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Hustad, Katherine C; Jones, Tabitha; Dailey, Suzanne

    2003-04-01

    A growing body of experimental research suggests that speech supplementation strategies can markedly increase speech intelligibility for individuals with dysarthria (D. Beukelman & K. Yorkston, 1977; E. Crow & P. Enderby, 1989; L. Hunter, T. Pring, & S. Martin, 1991; K. C. Hustad & D. R. Beukelman, 2001). However, studies in which speech supplementation strategies were actually implemented by speakers with dysarthria are limited, leaving their clinical efficacy unknown. The present study compared intelligibility and speech rate differences following speaker implementation of 3 strategies (topic, alphabet, and combined topic and alphabet supplementation) and a habitual (noncued) speech control condition for 5 speakers with severe dysarthria. Results revealed that combined cues and alphabet cues yielded significantly higher intelligibility scores and slower speech rates than topic cues and noncued speech. Overall, topic cues and noncued speech did not differ from one another with regard to intelligibility or speech rate. Combined cues and alphabet cues did not differ from one another with regard to intelligibility; however, speech rate was significantly different between the 2 strategies. Individual differences among speakers were generally consistent with group findings. Results were somewhat different from previous research in which strategies were experimentally superimposed on the habitual speech signal. However, findings provide evidence that alphabet cues and combined cues can have an important effect on intelligibility for speakers with severe dysarthria.

  16. Telediagnostic Assessment of Intelligibility in Dysarthria: A Pilot Investigation of MVP-Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Wolfram; Zierdt, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background: A most important index of functional impairment in dysarthria is "intelligibility". The "Munich Intelligibility Profile" (MVP) is a computer-based method for the assessment of the intelligibility of dysarthric patients. A multi-user online version of MVP is now available. Aims: To describe the structure of…

  17. Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT LOUD) for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy and Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Cynthia Marie; Boliek, Carol Ann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an intensive voice treatment (Lee Silverman Voice Treatment, commonly known as LSVT LOUD) for children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) and dysarthria. Method: A nonconcurrent multiple baseline single-subject design with replication across 5 children with spastic CP was used.…

  18. Intonation Contrast in Cantonese Speakers with Hypokinetic Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joan K.-Y.; Whitehill, Tara L.; So, Susanne Y.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Method: Speech materials with a question-statement contrast…

  19. The Impact of Contrastive Stress on Vowel Acoustics and Intelligibility in Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaghan, Kathryn P.; Patel, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare vowel acoustics and intelligibility in words produced with and without contrastive stress by speakers with spastic (mixed-spastic) dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (DYS[subscript CP]) and healthy controls (HCs). Method: Fifteen participants (9 men, 6 women; age M = 42 years) with DYS[subscript CP] and 15 HCs (9 men, 6…

  20. Effects of Sensory Modality Stimulation on the Dysarthria of Cerebral Palsy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Love, Russel J.

    To explore the efficacy of improving the dysarthria of cerebral palsy under conditions of aural stimulation, visual stimulation, and combined aural-visual stimulation, 22 subjects (aged 7.6 to 19.0 years) received intensive stimulation for word limitation for 22 consecutive school days. The 87 words of the Irwin Integrated Articulation Test were…

  1. The Impact of Contrastive Stress on Vowel Acoustics and Intelligibility in Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connaghan, Kathryn P.; Patel, Rupal

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To compare vowel acoustics and intelligibility in words produced with and without contrastive stress by speakers with spastic (mixed-spastic) dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy (DYS[subscript CP]) and healthy controls (HCs). Method: Fifteen participants (9 men, 6 women; age M = 42 years) with DYS[subscript CP] and 15 HCs (9 men, 6…

  2. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation and Dysarthria in Parkinson's Disease: A PET Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Serge; Thobois, Stephane; Costes, Nicolas; Le Bars, Didier; Benabid, Alim-Louis; Broussolle, Emmanuel; Pollak, Pierre; Gentil, Michele

    2004-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, functional imaging studies during limb motor tasks reveal cerebral activation abnormalities that can be reversed by subthalamic nucleus (STN) stimulation. The effect of STN stimulation on parkinsonian dysarthria has not, however, been investigated using PET. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of STN…

  3. A new neurological entity manifesting as involuntary movements and dysarthria with possible abnormal copper metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tagawa, A; Ono, S; Shibata, M; Imai, T; Suzuki, M; Shimizu, N

    2001-01-01

    A few patients with an affected CNS involving abnormalities in copper metabolism have been described that do not fit any known nosological entities such as Wilson's disease or Menkes' disease.
Three sporadic patients (two men and one woman) were examined with involuntary movements and dysarthria associated with abnormal concentrations of serum copper, serum ceruloplasmin, and urinary copper excretion. The onset of neurological symptoms occurred at the age of 15 to 17 years. The common clinical symptoms were involuntary movements and dysarthria. The involuntary movements included dystonia in the neck, myoclonus in the shoulder, athetosis in the neck, and rapid orobuccal movements. The dysarthria consisted of unclear, slow, and stuttering speech. Two of the three patients did not have dementia. A cousin of the female patient had been diagnosed as having Wilson's disease and had died of liver cirrhosis. Laboratory findings showed a mild reduction in serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations, whereas urinary copper excretion was significantly reduced in all three patients. Two of the three patients showed a high signal intensity in the basal ganglia on T2 weighted brain MRI.
In conclusion, the unique findings of involuntary movements, dysarthria, and abnormal serum copper and urinary copper concentrations suggest that the three patients may constitute a new clinical entity that is distinct from either Wilson's or Menkes disease.

 PMID:11723201

  4. Intonation Contrast in Cantonese Speakers with Hypokinetic Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Joan K.-Y.; Whitehill, Tara L.; So, Susanne Y.-S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Method: Speech materials with a question-statement contrast…

  5. Impact of Co-occurring Dysarthria and Aphasia on Functional Recovery in Post-stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the impact of co-occurring dysarthria and aphasia on functional recovery in post-stroke patients. Methods The medical records, including results of primary screening tests and secondary definite examinations for language problems, of 130 patients admitted to our institute's Department of Rehabilitation Medicine were retrospectively reviewed. Functional outcomes were assessed longitudinally using the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC), Mini-Mental State Examination-Korean version (MMSE-K), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions 3-Level version (EQ-5D-3L), the Korean version of the Modified Barthel index (K-MBI), and Motricity Index (MI) of the hemiplegic side. Results Patients were classified into four groups regarding language function: aphasia only (group A, n=9), dysarthria only (group D, n=12), aphasia and dysarthria (group AD, n=46), and none (group N, n=55). The initial functional outcome scores in the group AD were significantly poor compared to those of the groups N and A. Within groups, there were significant improvements in all outcome measurements in the groups AD and N. A between-group analysis revealed significant improvements in K-MBI for the group AD after adjusting for the initial severity and patient's age compared to other groups. Conclusion Post-stroke patients suffering from aphasia with dysarthria showed significantly lower initial functional level and relatively wide range of recovery potential in activities of daily living compared to patients without language problems. PMID:28119830

  6. Influence of Familiarity on Identifying Prosodic Vocalizations Produced by Children with Severe Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Rupal; Schroeder, Bethany

    2007-01-01

    Familiarity is thought to aid listeners in decoding disordered speech; however, as the speech signal degrades, the "familiarity advantage" becomes less beneficial. Despite highly unintelligible speech sound production, many children with dysarthria vocalize when interacting with familiar caregivers. Perhaps listeners can understand these…

  7. Automatic Evaluation of Speech Rhythm Instability and Acceleration in Dysarthrias Associated with Basal Ganglia Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rusz, Jan; Hlavnička, Jan; Čmejla, Roman; Růžička, Evžen

    2015-01-01

    Speech rhythm abnormalities are commonly present in patients with different neurodegenerative disorders. These alterations are hypothesized to be a consequence of disruption to the basal ganglia circuitry involving dysfunction of motor planning, programing, and execution, which can be detected by a syllable repetition paradigm. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to design a robust signal processing technique that allows the automatic detection of spectrally distinctive nuclei of syllable vocalizations and to determine speech features that represent rhythm instability (RI) and rhythm acceleration (RA). A further aim was to elucidate specific patterns of dysrhythmia across various neurodegenerative disorders that share disruption of basal ganglia function. Speech samples based on repetition of the syllable /pa/ at a self-determined steady pace were acquired from 109 subjects, including 22 with Parkinson’s disease (PD), 11 progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 9 multiple system atrophy (MSA), 24 ephedrone-induced parkinsonism (EP), 20 Huntington’s disease (HD), and 23 healthy controls. Subsequently, an algorithm for the automatic detection of syllables as well as features representing RI and RA were designed. The proposed detection algorithm was able to correctly identify syllables and remove erroneous detections due to excessive inspiration and non-speech sounds with a very high accuracy of 99.6%. Instability of vocal pace performance was observed in PSP, MSA, EP, and HD groups. Significantly increased pace acceleration was observed only in the PD group. Although not significant, a tendency for pace acceleration was observed also in the PSP and MSA groups. Our findings underline the crucial role of the basal ganglia in the execution and maintenance of automatic speech motor sequences. We envisage the current approach to become the first step toward the development of acoustic technologies allowing automated assessment of rhythm in dysarthrias. PMID

  8. Deep brain stimulation exacerbates hypokinetic dysarthria in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    King, Nathaniel O; Anderson, Collin J; Dorval, Alan D

    2016-02-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms, such as tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia, but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. This study proposes an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We use the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. The individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-OHDA rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life.

  9. Deep Brain Stimulation Exacerbates Hypokinetic Dysarthria in a Rat Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    King, Nathaniel O.; Anderson, Collin J.; Dorval, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) follow the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) treats some parkinsonian symptoms – tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia – but may worsen certain medial motor symptoms, including hypokinetic dysarthria. The mechanisms by which DBS exacerbates dysarthria while improving other symptoms are unclear and difficult to study in human patients. In this work, we propose an animal model of DBS-exacerbated dysarthria. We used the unilateral, 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of PD to test the hypothesis that DBS exacerbates quantifiable aspects of vocalization. Mating calls were recorded from sexually-experienced male rats under healthy and parkinsonian conditions, and during DBS of the subthalamic nucleus. Relative to healthy rats, parkinsonian animals made fewer calls with shorter and less complex vocalizations. In the parkinsonian rats, putatively therapeutic DBS further reduced call frequency, duration, and complexity. Interestingly, the individual utterances of parkinsonian rats spanned a greater bandwidth than those of healthy rats, potentially reducing the effectiveness of the vocal signal. This utterance bandwidth was further increased by DBS. We propose that the parkinsonism-associated changes in call frequency, duration, complexity, and dynamic range combine to constitute a rat analog of parkinsonian dysarthria. Because DBS exacerbates the parkinsonism-associated changes in each of these metrics, the subthalamic stimulated 6-hydroxydopamine rat is a good model of DBS-induced hypokinetic dysarthria in PD. This model will help researchers examine how DBS alleviates many motor symptoms of PD, while exacerbating parkinsonian speech deficits that can greatly diminish patient quality of life. PMID:26498277

  10. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  11. Post-stroke pure apraxia of speech - A rare experience.

    PubMed

    Polanowska, Katarzyna Ewa; Pietrzyk-Krawczyk, Iwona

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder, most typically caused by stroke, which in its "pure" form (without other speech-language deficits) is very rare in clinical practice. Because some observable characteristics of AOS overlap with more common verbal communication neurologic syndromes (i.e. aphasia, dysarthria) distinguishing them may be difficult. The present study describes AOS in a 49-year-old right-handed male after left-hemispheric stroke. Analysis of his articulatory and prosodic abnormalities in the context of intact communicative abilities as well as description of symptoms dynamics over time provides valuable information for clinical diagnosis of this specific disorder and prognosis for its recovery. This in turn is the basis for the selection of appropriate rehabilitative interventions.

  12. Speech therapy for children with dysarthria acquired before three years of age.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Lindsay; Parker, Naomi K; Kelly, Helen; Miller, Nick

    2016-07-18

    Children with motor impairments often have the motor speech disorder dysarthria, a condition which effects the tone, strength and co-ordination of any or all of the muscles used for speech. Resulting speech difficulties can range from mild, with slightly slurred articulation and breathy voice, to profound, with an inability to produce any recognisable words. Children with dysarthria are often prescribed communication aids to supplement their natural forms of communication. However, there is variation in practice regarding the provision of therapy focusing on voice and speech production. Descriptive studies have suggested that therapy may improve speech, but its effectiveness has not been evaluated. To assess whether any speech and language therapy intervention aimed at improving the speech of children with dysarthria is more effective in increasing children's speech intelligibility or communicative participation than no intervention at all , and to compare the efficacy of individual types of speech language therapy in improving the speech intelligibility or communicative participation of children with dysarthria. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015 , Issue 7 ), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL , LLBA, ERIC, PsychInfo, Web of Science, Scopus, UK National Research Register and Dissertation Abstracts up to July 2015, handsearched relevant journals published between 1980 and July 2015, and searched proceedings of relevant conferences between 1996 to 2015. We placed no restrictions on the language or setting of the studies. A previous version of this review considered studies published up to April 2009. In this update we searched for studies published from April 2009 to July 2015. We considered randomised controlled trials and studies using quasi-experimental designs in which children were allocated to groups using non-random methods. One author (LP) conducted searches of all databases, journals and conference reports. All searches

  13. "Pure" motor hemiplegia.

    PubMed Central

    Chokroverty, S; Rubino, F A

    1975-01-01

    Attenuation of cerebral evoked responses after stimulation of the median nerve in the hemiplegic limbs suggested that an apparently pure motor hemiplegia in some patients may not have pure involvement of the corticospinal system. Frontoparietal metastasis, infarction in basis pontis and medullary pyramid, and occlusion of internal carotid artery in the neck resulted in pure motor hemiplegia in some individuals. Images PMID:1185228

  14. A curious case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity: recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Ranjit; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2014-10-01

    This report presents a unique case of oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity featuring acute, recurrent, self-limiting dysarthria following multiple subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin. A 65-year-old man started chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with oxaliplatin-irinotecan-leucovorin-5-fluorouracil (FOLFIRINOX). During the first and subsequent infusions of oxaliplatin, the patient developed episodes of dysarthria that lasted between 2 and 4 h after oxaliplatin infusions, followed by their complete and uneventful resolution. A thorough neurological examination showed no new neurologic deficits except for very fine tongue fasciculations. Recognizing this self-limiting toxic effect of oxaliplatin is important in order to avoid dose reductions that may affect clinical outcomes.

  15. Sensory ataxic neuropathy with dysarthria/dysphagia and ophthalmoplegia (SANDO). Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Gáti, István; Danielsson, Olof; Jonasson, Jon; Landtblom, Anne-Marie

    2011-12-01

    Case histories of two unrelated patients suffering from sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria/dysphagia and external ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) are reported. Both patients showed compound heterozygosity for POLG1 gene mutations, and presented with symptom of the clinical characteristics of SANDO. A patient with a p.A467T and p.W748S, well-known mutations showed a progressive course with early onset and multisystem involvement, including symptoms characteristics for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE). The second patient showed a less well-known p.T251I and p.G848S mutations with late onset and dysphagia/dysarthria dominated, moderate symptoms. This later is the second published case history, when these POLG1 gene mutations are the possible background of late onset SANDO, dominantly presenting with bulbar symptoms.

  16. A case of cerebellar dysarthria as the presenting symptom of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Zeba; Karoli, Ritu; Fatima, Jalees; Dey, Rahul; Kazmi, Khursheed

    2014-08-01

    A 37 year old man presented with progressive dysarthria for 2 weeks. A week later he developed ataxia and bilateral cerebellar signs including intention tremors, dysmetria and dysdiadokokinesia. During evaluation for aetiology of cerebellar dysarthria, MRI brain revealed asymmetric altered signal intensities in bilateral cerebellar hemispheres and right side of pons suggesting demyelinating lesions. ELISA for Human Immune Deficiency virus-1 was positive. We kept a presumptive diagnosis of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) on the basis of clinico-radiological picture. PML is an under investigated and under diagnosed CNS infection seen in HIV patients with advanced disease. We present an unusual case report where isolated cerebellar involvement occurred as the first AIDS defining event in the absence of appreciable immunodeficiency in a patient with previously undiagnosed HIV infection.

  17. A Cognitive-Perceptual Approach to Conceptualizing Speech Intelligibility Deficits and Remediation Practice in Hypokinetic Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.; Caviness, John N.; Utianski, Rene L.

    2011-01-01

    Hypokinetic dysarthria is a common manifestation of Parkinson's disease, which negatively influences quality of life. Behavioral techniques that aim to improve speech intelligibility constitute the bulk of intervention strategies for this population, as the dysarthria does not often respond vigorously to medical interventions. Although several case and group studies generally support the efficacy of behavioral treatment, much work remains to establish a rigorous evidence base. This absence of definitive research leaves both the speech-language pathologist and referring physician with the task of determining the feasibility and nature of therapy for intelligibility remediation in PD. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel framework for medical practitioners in which to conceptualize and justify potential targets for speech remediation. The most commonly targeted deficits (e.g., speaking rate and vocal loudness) can be supported by this approach, as well as underutilized and novel treatment targets that aim at the listener's perceptual skills. PMID:21918728

  18. Association between dysarthria and cognitive impairment in ALS: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Laurie E; Jawaid, Ali; Salamone, Alicia R; Murthy, Santosh B; Mosnik, Diane M; McDowell, Emily; Wheaton, Michael; Strutt, Adriana M; Simpson, Ericka; Appel, Stanley; Schulz, Paul E

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated impaired cognition in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, but it has been difficult to identify risk factors for this impairment. An association between cognitive changes and bulbar site of onset or dysarthria has been suggested, but the findings are variable. We tested for both associations in a large cohort of ALS patients. At the time of diagnosis of sporadic ALS, all patients (n=355) in this prospective study underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing. In addition, a subset of 175 patients underwent a detailed assessment of dysarthria, which was quantified using the Appel ALS Score (AALSS). ALS patients with bulbar site of onset performed significantly worse than limb onset patients on a few timed ((VSAT-time, p<0.05), (Stroop Color, p<0.05), (Stroop Word, p<0.05)) tests of frontal lobe functions, but the significance could not be replicated when motor impairment was accommodated into the tests ((VSAT-errors, p=0.73), (Stroop interference, p=0.08)). ALS patients with dysarthria performed significantly worse than non-dysarthrics on multiple timed ((BD, p<0.05), (VSAT-time, p<0.05), (Stroop Color, p<0.05), (Stroop Word, p<0.05), (Trails A, p<0.05), (Trails B, p<0.05)) neuropsychological tests, and the significance was maintained when motor impairment was accommodated into one of these tests (Stroop interference, p<0.05). Additionally, dysarthrics performed significantly worse on two untimed measures of cognition ((Similarities, p<0.05), (Rey Copy, p<0.05)). Cognitive functioning in ALS does not associate with the site of onset and has a moderate association with dysarthria.

  19. Phonological markers of sentence stress in ataxic dysarthria and their relationship to perceptual cues.

    PubMed

    Lowit, Anja; Kuschmann, Anja; Kavanagh, Kimberley

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of literature is available on the features of ataxic dysarthria, investigating segmental and prosodic characteristics by acoustic and perceptual means. However, very few studies have been published that look closely at the relationship between the observed phonetic disturbances and their perceptual sequelae, particularly in the area of prosody. The aim of the current study was therefore to examine the stress production of eight individuals with ataxic dysarthria and matched healthy controls, and to relate the results of phonological and perceptual evaluations to phonetic performances to better understand the relationship between these three components for speech outcomes. Speakers performed a sentence stress task which was analysed phonologically in terms of inventory, distribution, implementation and function of pitch accentuation. These data were then evaluated in relation to previously published phonetic and perceptual results on the same speaker group by the authors. Results indicated that the speakers with ataxia used a wide range of pitch patterns, but pitch-accented a higher number of words, and produced shorter phrases. The increased number of pitch accents per phrase was furthermore reflected in a reduced percentage of de-accented words in post-focal position. Perceptual results established this pattern as the main cause for listener errors in identifying the intended stressed item in an utterance. In addition, the performances of two speakers are discussed in greater detail. Although they were unable to de-accent, they nevertheless marked stress appropriately through phonetic compensatory strategies. After reading this article the reader will be able to (1) explain the relevance of phonology and phonetics in the perception of stress production in ataxic dysarthria; (2) describe the different levels of intonational analysis; and (3) understand the observed intonation patterns in ataxic dysarthria as well as the compensatory mechanisms speakers

  20. Effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients.

    PubMed

    Yano, J; Shirahige, C; Oki, K; Oisaka, N; Kumakura, I; Tsubahara, A; Minagi, S

    2015-08-01

    Articulation is driven by various combinations of movements of the lip, tongue, soft palate, pharynx and larynx, where the tongue plays an especially important role. In patients with cerebrovascular disorder, lingual motor function is often affected, causing dysarthria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback of posterior tongue movement on articulation rehabilitation in dysarthria patients with cerebrovascular disorder. Fifteen dysarthria patients (10 men and 5 women; mean age, 70.7 ± 10.3 years) agreed to participate in this study. A device for measuring the movement of the posterior part of the tongue was used for the visual biofeedback. Subjects were instructed to produce repetitive articulation of [ka] as fast and steadily as possible between a lungful with/without visual biofeedback. For both the unaffected and affected sides, the range of ascending and descending movement of the posterior tongue with visual biofeedback was significantly larger than that without visual biofeedback. The coefficient of variation for these movements with visual biofeedback was significantly smaller than that without visual biofeedback. With visual biofeedback, the range of ascent exhibited a significant and strong correlation with that of descent for both the unaffected and affected sides. The results of this study revealed that the use of visual biofeedback leads to prompt and preferable change in the movement of the posterior part of the tongue. From the standpoint of pursuing necessary rehabilitation for patients with attention and memory disorders, visualization of tongue movement would be of marked clinical benefit.

  1. Improved status following behavioural intervention in a case of severe dysarthria with stroke aetiology.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Lowit, Anja

    2012-08-01

    There is little published intervention outcome literature concerning dysarthria acquired from stroke. Single case studies have potential for more detailed specification and interpretation than is generally possible in larger studies so are informative for clinicians dealing with similar cases. Such research also contributes to planning of larger scale investigations. Behavioural intervention is described which was carried out between 7-9 months after stroke with a 69-year-old man with severe dysarthria. Pre-intervention stability between 5-7 months contrasted with post-intervention gains. Significant improvement was demonstrated using randomized, blinded assessment by 10 judges on measures of word and reading intelligibility and communication effectiveness in conversation. A range of speech analyses were undertaken (rate, pause, and intonation characteristics in connected speech and single word phonetic transcription), with the aim of identifying speech components which might explain the listeners' perceptions of improvement. Changes were detected mainly in parameters related to utterance segmentation and intonation. The basis of post-intervention improvement in dysarthria is complex, both in terms of the active therapeutic dimensions and also the specific speech alterations which account for changes to intelligibility and effectiveness.

  2. The Impact of Rate Reduction and Increased Loudness on Fundamental Frequency Characteristics in Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Tjaden, Kris; Wilding, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined the extent to which articulatory rate reduction and increased loudness were associated with adjustments in utterance-level measures of fundamental frequency (F0) variability for speakers with dysarthria and healthy controls that have been shown to impact on intelligibility in previously published studies. More generally, the current study sought to compare and contrast how a slower-than-normal rate and increased vocal loudness impact on a variety of utterance-level F0 characteristics for speakers with dysarthria and healthy controls. Patients and Methods Eleven speakers with Parkinson's disease, 15 speakers with multiple sclerosis, and 14 healthy control speakers were audio recorded while reading a passage in habitual, loud, and slow conditions. Magnitude production was used to elicit variations in rate and loudness. Acoustic measures of duration, intensity and F0 were obtained. Results and Conclusions For all speaker groups, a slower-than-normal articulatory rate and increased vocal loudness had distinct effects on F0 relative to the habitual condition, including a tendency for measures of F0 variation to be greater in the loud condition and reduced in the slow condition. These results suggest implications for the treatment of dysarthria. PMID:20938199

  3. The Dysarthria Impact Profile: A Preliminary French Experience with Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Letanneux, Alban; Walshe, Margaret; Viallet, François

    2013-01-01

    This preliminary study aimed to adapt the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP) in French and to confirm its relevance for the assessment of the psychosocial impact of dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD). The DIP scale was administered to 10 people with PD and 10 age-matched control subjects. The DIP psychometric properties were calculated (discriminant validity, internal consistency, and concurrent validity), notably by using the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) for interscale comparisons. The French version of the DIP discriminated people with PD from control subjects (χ 2 test, P < 0.05). Good internal consistency was observed in both populations (Cronbach's α = 0.93 for PD people and α = 0.76 for control subjects). The DIP was highly correlated with the VHI (Spearman's ρ = −0.70, P < 0.01), confirming the external validity of the scale. There was no direct relationship between PD speech and quality of life as assessed by the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39). Our preliminary data suggest that the French version of the DIP has the potential to make a useful contribution for the assessment and outcome management in acquired dysarthria for both clinicians and researchers. PMID:23766926

  4. Statistical Models of F2 Slope in Relation to Severity of Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunjung; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Raymond D.; Duffy, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the distribution of second-formant (F2) slopes in a relatively large number of speakers with dysarthria associated with two different underlying diseases. Patients and Methods Forty speakers with dysarthria (20 with Parkinson's disease, PD; 20 with stroke) and 5 control speakers without a history of neurological disease were asked to repeat six words (coat, hail, sigh, shoot, row and wax) 10 times. Acoustic analysis was performed to derive F2 slope, and speech intelligibility data were collected using a direct magnitude estimate technique to examine its relationship to F2 slope. Results Statistical analysis revealed that both clinical groups showed significantly reduced F2 slopes compared to healthy speakers for all words but row. No group difference was found between speakers with PD and stroke; however, different words showed varying sensitivity to the speech motor control problems. The F2 slopes of only two words, shoot and wax, were significantly correlated with scaled speech intelligibility. Conclusion The findings support the idea that distributional characteristics of acoustic variables, such as F2 slope, could be used to develop a quantitative metric of severity of speech motor control deficits in dysarthria, when the materials are appropriately selected and additional distributional characteristics are studied. PMID:19864914

  5. MRI-Based Neuroanatomical Predictors of Dysphagia, Dysarthria, and Aphasia in Patients with First Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Heather L.; AlHarbi, Mohammed A.; Mikulis, David; Silver, Frank L.; Rochon, Elizabeth; Streiner, David; Martino, Rosemary

    2017-01-01

    Background Due to the high post-stroke frequency of dysphagia, dysarthria, and aphasia, we developed comprehensive neuroanatomical, clinical, and demographic models to predict their presence after acute ischemic stroke. Methods The sample included 160 randomly selected first-ever stroke patients with confirmed infarction on magnetic resonance imaging from 1 tertiary stroke center. We documented acute lesions within 12 neuroanatomical regions and their associated volumes. Further, we identified concomitant chronic brain disease, including atrophy, white matter hyperintensities, and covert strokes. We developed predictive models using logistic regression with odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) including demographic, clinical, and acute and chronic neuroanatomical factors. Results Predictors of dysphagia included medullary (OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5–25.8), insular (OR 4.8, 95% CI 2.0–11.8), and pontine (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2–10.1) lesions, followed by brain atrophy (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.04–8.6), internal capsular lesions (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.2–6.6), and increasing age (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1–1.8). Predictors of dysarthria included pontine (OR 7.8, 95% CI 2.7–22.9), insular (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.8–11.4), and internal capsular (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.6–7.9) lesions. Predictors of aphasia included left hemisphere insular (OR 34.4, 95% CI 4.2–283.4), thalamic (OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.6–24.4), and cortical middle cerebral artery (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.5–14.2) lesions. Conclusion Predicting outcomes following acute stroke is important for treatment decisions. Determining the risk of major post-stroke impairments requires consideration of factors beyond lesion localization. Accordingly, we demonstrated interactions between localized and global brain function for dysphagia and elucidated common lesion locations across 3 debilitating impairments. PMID:28208139

  6. Speech serial control in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria: effects of sequence length and practice.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Kevin J; Spencer, Kristie A

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the processes responsible for selection of sounds and syllables during production of speech sequences in 10 adults with hypokinetic dysarthria from Parkinson's disease, five adults with ataxic dysarthria, and 14 healthy control speakers. Speech production data from a choice reaction time task were analyzed to evaluate the effects of sequence length and practice on speech sound sequencing. Speakers produced sequences that were between one and five syllables in length over five experimental runs of 60 trials each. In contrast to the healthy speakers, speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria demonstrated exaggerated sequence length effects for both inter-syllable intervals (ISIs) and speech error rates. Conversely, speakers with ataxic dysarthria failed to demonstrate a sequence length effect on ISIs and were also the only group that did not exhibit practice-related changes in ISIs and speech error rates over the five experimental runs. The exaggerated sequence length effects in the hypokinetic speakers with Parkinson's disease are consistent with an impairment of action selection during speech sequence production. The absent length effects observed in the speakers with ataxic dysarthria is consistent with previous findings that indicate a limited capacity to buffer speech sequences in advance of their execution. In addition, the lack of practice effects in these speakers suggests that learning-related improvements in the production rate and accuracy of speech sequences involves processing by structures of the cerebellum. Together, the current findings inform models of serial control for speech in healthy speakers and support the notion that sequencing deficits contribute to speech symptoms in speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. In addition, these findings indicate that speech sequencing is differentially impaired in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria.

  7. Speech serial control in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria: effects of sequence length and practice

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Spencer, Kristie A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the processes responsible for selection of sounds and syllables during production of speech sequences in 10 adults with hypokinetic dysarthria from Parkinson’s disease, five adults with ataxic dysarthria, and 14 healthy control speakers. Speech production data from a choice reaction time task were analyzed to evaluate the effects of sequence length and practice on speech sound sequencing. Speakers produced sequences that were between one and five syllables in length over five experimental runs of 60 trials each. In contrast to the healthy speakers, speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria demonstrated exaggerated sequence length effects for both inter-syllable intervals (ISIs) and speech error rates. Conversely, speakers with ataxic dysarthria failed to demonstrate a sequence length effect on ISIs and were also the only group that did not exhibit practice-related changes in ISIs and speech error rates over the five experimental runs. The exaggerated sequence length effects in the hypokinetic speakers with Parkinson’s disease are consistent with an impairment of action selection during speech sequence production. The absent length effects observed in the speakers with ataxic dysarthria is consistent with previous findings that indicate a limited capacity to buffer speech sequences in advance of their execution. In addition, the lack of practice effects in these speakers suggests that learning-related improvements in the production rate and accuracy of speech sequences involves processing by structures of the cerebellum. Together, the current findings inform models of serial control for speech in healthy speakers and support the notion that sequencing deficits contribute to speech symptoms in speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. In addition, these findings indicate that speech sequencing is differentially impaired in hypokinetic and ataxic dysarthria. PMID:24137121

  8. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  9. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  10. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  11. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  12. [Pilot study of the acoustic values of the vowels in Spanish as indicators of the severity of dysarthria].

    PubMed

    Delgado-Hernandez, J

    2017-02-01

    The acoustic analysis is a tool that provides objective data on changes of speech in dysarthria. To evaluate, in the ataxic dysarthria, the relationship between the vowel space area (VSA), the formant centralization ratio (FCR) and the mean of the primary distances with the speech intelligibility. A sample of fourteen Spanish speakers, ten with dysarthria and four controls, was used. The values of first and second formants in 140 vowels extracted of 140 words were analyzed. To calculate the level of intelligibility seven listeners were involved and a task of identification verbal stimuli was used. The dysarthric subjects have less contrast between middle and high vowels and between back vowels. Significant differences in the VSA, FCR and mean of the primary distances compared to control subjects (p = 0.007, 0.005 and 0.030, respectively) are observed. Regression analysis show the relationship between VSA and the mean of primary distances with the level of speech intelligibility (r = 0.60 and 0.74, respectively). Ataxic dysarthria subjects have lower contrast and vowel centralization in carrying out the vowels. The acoustic measures studied in this preliminary work have a high sensitivity in the detection of dysarthria but only the VSA and the mean of primary distances provide information on the severity of this type of speech disturbance.

  13. Purely lytic osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Santos, L.A.; Eideken, B.

    1982-11-01

    The radiographic features of 42 purely lytic osteosarcomas are presented. Purely lytic osteosarcoma is identified as a lytic lesion of bone with no demonstrable osteoid matrix by conventional radiographic modalities. Purely lytic osteosarcoma represented 13.7% of a group of 305 osteosarcomas. The most common presentation was that of a lytic illdefined lesion with a moderate to large extraosseous mass component. Nine lesions presented with benign radiographic features. The differential diagnosis is outlined. The need for awareness of this type of presentation of osteosarcoma is stressed.

  14. Listener deficits in hypokinetic dysarthria: Which cues are most important in speech segmentation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Carolyn Ann

    Listeners use prosodic cues to help them quickly process running speech. In English, listeners effortlessly use strong syllables to help them to find words in the continuous stream of speech produced by neurologically-intact individuals. However, listeners are not always presented with speech under such ideal circumstances. This thesis explores the question of word segmentation of English speech under one of these less ideal conditions; specifically, when the speaker may be impaired in his/her production of strong syllables, as in the case of hypokinetic dysarthria. Further, we attempt to discern which acoustic cue(s) are most degraded in hypokinetic dysarthria and the effect that this degradation has on listeners' segmentation when no additional semantic or pragmatic cues are present. Two individuals with Parkinson's disease, one with a rate disturbance and one with articulatory disruption, along with a typically aging control, were recorded repeating a series of nonsense syllables. Young adult listeners were then presented with recordings from one of these three speakers producing non-words (imprecise consonant articulation, rate disturbance, and control). After familiarization, the listeners were asked to rate the familiarity of the non-words produced by a second typically aging speaker. Results indicated speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria were able to modulate their intensity and duration for stressed and unstressed syllables in a way similar to that of control speakers. In addition, their mean and peak fundamental frequency for both stressed and unstressed syllables were significantly higher than that of the normally aging controls. ANOVA results revealed a marginal main effect of frequency in normal and consonant conditions for word versus nonwords listener ratings.

  15. Acoustic variation during passage reading for speakers with dysarthria and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Christina; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic variation in a passage read by speakers with dysarthria and healthy speakers was examined. 15 speakers with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), 12 speakers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 14 healthy speakers were studied. Acoustic variables included measures of global speech timing (e.g., articulation rate, pause characteristics), vocal intensity (e.g., mean sound pressure level and intensity modulation), and segmental articulation (i.e., utterance-level second formant interquartile range (F2 IQR)). Acoustic measures were obtained from three segments operationally defined to represent the beginning, middle, and end of a reading passage. Two speaking conditions associated with common treatment techniques for dysarthria were included for comparison to a habitual speaking condition. These conditions included a slower-than-habitual rate (Slow) and greater-than-habitual intensity (Loud). There was some degree of acoustic variation across the three operationally-defined segments of the reading passage. The Slow, Loud and Habitual conditions yielded comparable characteristics of variation. Patterns of acoustic variation across the three passage segments also were largely similar across speaker groups. Within-task acoustic variation during passage reading should be considered when making decisions regarding speech sampling in clinical practice and research. The contributions of speech disorder severity and linguistic variables to within-task acoustic change warrant further investigation. Readers will be able to (1) discuss the motivation for studying and understanding within-task variation in contextual speech, (2) describe patterns of acoustic variation for speakers with dysarthria and healthy speakers during passage reading, (3) discuss the relationship between non-habitual speaking conditions and within-task variation, (4) understand the need to consider within-speaker, within-task variation in speech sampling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acoustic variation during passage reading for speakers with dysarthria and healthy controls

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Christina; Tjaden, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Acoustic variation in a passage read by speakers with dysarthria and healthy speakers was examined. Method 15 speakers with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), 12 speakers with Parkinson’s disease (PD), and 14 healthy speakers were studied. Acoustic variables included measures of global speech timing (e.g., articulation rate, pause characteristics), vocal intensity (e.g., mean sound pressure level and intensity modulation), and segmental articulation (i.e., utterance-level second formant interquartile range (F2 IQR)). Acoustic measures were obtained from three segments operationally defined to represent the beginning, middle, and end of a reading passage. Two speaking conditions associated with common treatment techniques for dysarthria were included for comparison to a habitual speaking condition. These conditions included a slower-than-habitual rate (Slow) and greater-than-habitual intensity (Loud). Results There was some degree of acoustic variation across the three operationally-defined segments of the reading passage. The Slow, Loud and Habitual conditions yielded comparable characteristics of variation. Patterns of acoustic variation across the three passage segments also were largely similar across speaker groups. Conclusions Within-task acoustic variation during passage reading should be considered when making decisions regarding speech sampling in clinical practice and research. The contributions of speech disorder severity and linguistic variables to within-task acoustic change warrant further investigation. Learning outcomes Readers will be able to (1) discuss the motivation for studying and understanding within-task variation in contextual speech, (2) describe patterns of acoustic variation for speakers with dysarthria and healthy speakers during passage reading, (3) discuss the relationship between non-habitual speaking conditions and within-task variation, (4) understand the need to consider within-speaker, within-task variation in speech sampling

  17. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  18. The redesign and re-evaluation of an internet-based telerehabilitation system for the assessment of dysarthria in adults.

    PubMed

    Hill, Anne J; Theodoros, Deborah G; Russell, Trevor G; Ward, Elizabeth C

    2009-11-01

    A previous study revealed that reliable assessment of dysarthria was feasible. However, that study also revealed a number of system limitations and suggested that technological enhancements and improvements in study design and clinical assessment protocols were needed before validity and reliability of assessment of dysarthria via telerehabilitation could be confirmed. In the current study, improvements in technology, study design, and clinical assessment protocols were implemented in order to re-examine the validity and reliability of assessing and diagnosing dysarthria via the telerehabilitation medium. The aim of this study was to explore the validity and reliability of assessing dysarthria using both formal standardized and informal assessments via a purpose-built telerehabilitation system. Twenty-four participants with an acquired dysarthria were assessed simultaneously via telerehabilitation and face-to-face (FTF) on a battery of assessments. A custom-built telerehabilitation system enabled real-time telerehabilitation assessment over a 128 Kbps Internet connection. Data analysis included an analysis of strength of agreement between the two methods using percentage agreement and weighted ? statistics. Inter-rater and intrarater reliability were also examined for both the FTF and telerehabilitation-led assessments. Good strength of agreement was found between the FTF and telerehabilitation assessment methods. High intrarater and inter-rater reliability within both the FTF and telerehabilitation assessment methods supported these findings. Participants reported high overall satisfaction in the telerehabilitatin environment. This study describes the improvements made to the telerehabilitation system reported previously and confirms that valid and reliable assessment of dysarthria using both standardized and informal assessments over the Internet is possible using this system.

  19. Use of the extended therapy outcome measure for children with dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Enderby, Pam

    2014-08-01

    Increasing demand on healthcare resources has led to a greater emphasis on the examination of the impact of service delivery on outcomes. Clinical assessments frequently do not cover all aspects of change associated with interventions for those with complex conditions. This paper reviews the need for more comprehensive outcome measurement suitable for clinical practice and benchmarking. It describes an extension of the Therapy Outcome Measure for specific use in reflecting the impact of the broad range of interventions commonly required when managing children with dysarthria. Three case histories are used to illustrate the approach, and data from four speech-language pathology services are used to illustrate the value of benchmarking.

  20. When the word doesn't come out: A synthetic overview of dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Rampello, Liborio; Rampello, Luigi; Patti, Francesco; Zappia, Mario

    2016-10-15

    Motor speech disorders are common in a number of neurological conditions including diseases involving impairment of the pyramidal, extrapyramidal, and cerebellar pathways, cranial nerves, muscular apparatus, neuromuscular plaque, and of cognitive, symbolic and mnestic activities. The diagnosis of speech disorders, namely the dysarthrias, involves the assessment of characteristic structural cerebral, prosodic, phonetic and phonemic changes, often flanked by concomitant functional, clinical, neuroradiological, neurophysiological and behavioral impairment. This paper presents a brief outline of the most significant associations to facilitate prompt differential diagnosis and thereby reduce the number of instrumental examinations required for diagnostic testing.

  1. Ataxic dysarthria: treatment sequences based on intelligibility and prosodic considerations.

    PubMed

    Yorkston, K M; Beukelman, D R

    1981-11-01

    Treatment programs of four improving ataxic dysarthric speakers are reviewed. Treatment sequences were based on two overall measures of speech performance-intelligibility and prosody. Increases in intelligibility were initially achieved by control of speaking rate. A hierarchy of rate control strategies, ranging from a rigid imposition of rate through thythmic cueing to self-monitored rate control is discussed. As speakers improved their monitoring skills, a compromise was made between intelligibility and rate. Normal prosodic patterns were not achieved by the ataxic speakers due to difficulty in precisely coordinating the subtle fundamental frequency, loudness and timing adjustments needed to signal stress. Three of the four subjects were taught to use only durational adjustments to signal stress. In this way, they were able to achieve stress on targeted words consistently and minimize bizarreness which resulted from sweeping changes in fundamental frequency and bursts of loudness. The need for further clinically oriented research is discussed.

  2. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, <300/μL) and persistent HPV B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure.

  3. A case of recurrent autoimmune hemolytic anemia during remission associated with acute pure red cell aplasia and hemophagocytic syndrome due to human parvovirus B19 infection successfully treated by steroid pulse therapy with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Yasunobu; Shimada, Asami; Imai, Hidenori; Wakabayashi, Mutsumi; Sugimoto, Keiji; Nakamura, Noriko; Sawada, Tomohiro; Komatsu, Norio; Noguchi, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    The patient was a 47-year-old man diagnosed as having autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in April 2011. He also had a congenital chromosomal abnormality, a balanced translocation. Treatment with prednisolone (PSL) 60 mg/day resulted in resolution of the AIHA, and the treatment was completed in November 2011. While the patient no longer had anemia, the direct and indirect Coombs tests remained positive. In May 2013, he developed recurrent AIHA associated with acute pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) caused by human parvovirus B19 (HPV B19) infection. Tests for anti-erythropoietin and anti-erythropoietin receptor antibodies were positive. Steroid pulse therapy resulted in resolution of the AIHA, PRCA, as well as HPS. The serum test for anti-erythropoietin antibodies also became negative after the treatment. However, although the serum was positive for anti-HPV B19 IgG antibodies, the patient continued to have a low CD4 lymphocyte count (CD4, <300/μL) and persistent HPV B19 infection (HPV B19 DNA remained positive), suggesting the risk of recurrence and bone marrow failure. PMID:24966977

  4. The Effects of Topic Knowledge on Intelligibility and Lexical Segmentation in Hypokinetic and Ataxic Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Utianski, Rene L.; Lansford, Kaitlin L.; Liss, Julie M.; Azuma, Tamiko

    2013-01-01

    Benefits to speech intelligibility can be achieved by enhancing a listener’s ability to decipher it. However, much remains to be learned about the variables that influence the effectiveness of various listener-based manipulations. This study examined the benefit of providing listeners with the topic of some phases produced by speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Total and topic word accuracy, topic-related substitutions, and lexical boundary errors were calculated from the listener transcripts. Data were compared with those who underwent a familiarization process (reported by Liss, Spitzer, Caviness, & Adler, 2002) and with those inexperienced with disordered speech (reported by Liss Spitzer, Caviness, & Adler, 2000). Results revealed that listeners of ataxic speech provided with topic knowledge obtained higher intelligibility scores than naïve listeners. The magnitude of benefit was similar to the familiarization condition. However, topic word and word substitution analyses revealed different underlying perceptual mechanisms responsible for the observed benefit. No differences attributable to listening condition were discovered in lexical segmentation patterns. Overall, the results support the need for further study of listener-based manipulations to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the observed perceptual benefits for each dysarthria type. PMID:24569812

  5. Effects of listeners' working memory and noise on speech intelligibility in dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngmee; Sung, Jee Eu; Sim, Hyunsub

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of listeners' working memory (WM), types of noise and signal to noise ratios (SNRs) on speech intelligibility in dysarthria. Speech intelligibility was judged by using a word transcription task. A three-way mixed design (2 × 3 × 2) was used with the WM group (high/low group) as a between-subject factor and the types of noise (multi-talker babble/environmental noise) and SNRs (0, +10 and +20 dB) as within-subject factors. The dependent measure was the percentage of correctly transcribed words. The results revealed that the high WM group performed significantly better than the low WM group and listeners performed significantly better at higher levels of SNRs on the speech intelligibility test. The findings of this study suggested that listeners' cognitive abilities and SNRs should be considered as important factors when evaluating speech intelligibility in dysarthria.

  6. Jaw Rotation in Dysarthria Measured With a Single Electromagnetic Articulography Sensor.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Kolb, Andrew; Schroeder, James; Johnson, Michael T

    2017-06-22

    This study evaluated a novel method for characterizing jaw rotation using orientation data from a single electromagnetic articulography sensor. This method was optimized for clinical application, and a preliminary examination of clinical feasibility and value was undertaken. The computational adequacy of the single-sensor orientation method was evaluated through comparisons of jaw-rotation histories calculated from dual-sensor positional data for 16 typical talkers. The clinical feasibility and potential value of single-sensor jaw rotation were assessed through comparisons of 7 talkers with dysarthria and 19 typical talkers in connected speech. The single-sensor orientation method allowed faster and safer participant preparation, required lower data-acquisition costs, and generated less high-frequency artifact than the dual-sensor positional approach. All talkers with dysarthria, regardless of severity, demonstrated jaw-rotation histories with more numerous changes in movement direction and reduced smoothness compared with typical talkers. Results suggest that the single-sensor orientation method for calculating jaw rotation during speech is clinically feasible. Given the preliminary nature of this study and the small participant pool, the clinical value of such measures remains an open question. Further work must address the potential confound of reduced speaking rate on movement smoothness.

  7. The Effects of Topic Knowledge on Intelligibility and Lexical Segmentation in Hypokinetic and Ataxic Dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Utianski, Rene L; Lansford, Kaitlin L; Liss, Julie M; Azuma, Tamiko

    2011-12-01

    Benefits to speech intelligibility can be achieved by enhancing a listener's ability to decipher it. However, much remains to be learned about the variables that influence the effectiveness of various listener-based manipulations. This study examined the benefit of providing listeners with the topic of some phases produced by speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Total and topic word accuracy, topic-related substitutions, and lexical boundary errors were calculated from the listener transcripts. Data were compared with those who underwent a familiarization process (reported by Liss, Spitzer, Caviness, & Adler, 2002) and with those inexperienced with disordered speech (reported by Liss Spitzer, Caviness, & Adler, 2000). Results revealed that listeners of ataxic speech provided with topic knowledge obtained higher intelligibility scores than naïve listeners. The magnitude of benefit was similar to the familiarization condition. However, topic word and word substitution analyses revealed different underlying perceptual mechanisms responsible for the observed benefit. No differences attributable to listening condition were discovered in lexical segmentation patterns. Overall, the results support the need for further study of listener-based manipulations to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the observed perceptual benefits for each dysarthria type.

  8. Sequence complexity effects on speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Kevin J; Spencer, Kristie A

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of sequence complexity, defined in terms of phonemic similarity and phonotoactic probability, on the timing and accuracy of serial ordering for speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Sequences were comprised of strings of consonant-vowel (CV) syllables with each syllable containing the same vowel, /a/, paired with a different consonant. High complexity sequences contained phonemically similar consonants, and sounds and syllables that had low phonotactic probabilities; low complexity sequences contained phonemically dissimilar consonants and high probability sounds and syllables. Sequence complexity effects were evaluated by analyzing speech error rates and within-syllable vowel and pause durations. This analysis revealed that speech error rates were significantly higher and speech duration measures were significantly longer during production of high complexity sequences than during production of low complexity sequences. Although speakers with dysarthria produced longer overall speech durations than healthy speakers, the effects of sequence complexity on error rates and speech durations were comparable across all groups. These findings indicate that the duration and accuracy of processes for selecting items in a speech sequence is influenced by their phonemic similarity and/or phonotactic probability. Moreover, this robust complexity effect is present even in speakers with damage to subcortical circuits involved in serial control for speech.

  9. Sequence Complexity Effects on Speech Production in Healthy Speakers and Speakers with Hypokinetic or Ataxic Dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Spencer, Kristie A.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of sequence complexity, defined in terms of phonemic similarity and phonotoactic probability, on the timing and accuracy of serial ordering for speech production in healthy speakers and speakers with either hypokinetic or ataxic dysarthria. Sequences were comprised of strings of consonant-vowel (CV) syllables with each syllable containing the same vowel, /a/, paired with a different consonant. High complexity sequences contained phonemically similar consonants, and sounds and syllables that had low phonotactic probabilities; low complexity sequences contained phonemically dissimilar consonants and high probability sounds and syllables. Sequence complexity effects were evaluated by analyzing speech error rates and within-syllable vowel and pause durations. This analysis revealed that speech error rates were significantly higher and speech duration measures were significantly longer during production of high complexity sequences than during production of low complexity sequences. Although speakers with dysarthria produced longer overall speech durations than healthy speakers, the effects of sequence complexity on error rates and speech durations were comparable across all groups. These findings indicate that the duration and accuracy of processes for selecting items in a speech sequence is influenced by their phonemic similarity and/or phonotactic probability. Moreover, this robust complexity effect is present even in speakers with damage to subcortical circuits involved in serial control for speech. PMID:24146997

  10. Pure-tone Audiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapul, A. A.; Zubova, E. I.; Torgaev, S. N.; Drobchik, V. V.

    2017-08-01

    The research focuses on a pure-tone audiometer designing. The relevance of the study is proved by high incidence of an auditory analyser in older people and children. At first, the article provides information about subjective and objective audiometry methods. Secondly, we offer block-diagram and basic-circuit arrangement of device. We decided to base on STM32F407VG microcontroller and use digital pot in the function of attenuator. Third, we implemented microcontroller and PC connection. C programming language is used for microcontroller’s program and PC’s interface. Fourthly, we created the pure-tone audiometer prototype. In the future, we will implement the objective method ASSR in addition to pure-tone audiometry.

  11. Study of accent-based music speech protocol development for improving voice problems in stroke patients with mixed dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Ji; Jo, Uiri

    2013-01-01

    Based on the anatomical and functional commonality between singing and speech, various types of musical elements have been employed in music therapy research for speech rehabilitation. This study was to develop an accent-based music speech protocol to address voice problems of stroke patients with mixed dysarthria. Subjects were 6 stroke patients with mixed dysarthria and they received individual music therapy sessions. Each session was conducted for 30 minutes and 12 sessions including pre- and post-test were administered for each patient. For examining the protocol efficacy, the measures of maximum phonation time (MPT), fundamental frequency (F0), average intensity (dB), jitter, shimmer, noise to harmonics ratio (NHR), and diadochokinesis (DDK) were compared between pre and post-test and analyzed with a paired sample t-test. The results showed that the measures of MPT, F0, dB, and sequential motion rates (SMR) were significantly increased after administering the protocol. Also, there were statistically significant differences in the measures of shimmer, and alternating motion rates (AMR) of the syllable /K$\\inve$/ between pre- and post-test. The results indicated that the accent-based music speech protocol may improve speech motor coordination including respiration, phonation, articulation, resonance, and prosody of patients with dysarthria. This suggests the possibility of utilizing the music speech protocol to maximize immediate treatment effects in the course of a long-term treatment for patients with dysarthria.

  12. Role of Cerebellum in Fine Speech Control in Childhood: Persistent Dysarthria after Surgical Treatment for Posterior Fossa Tumour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, A. T.; Liegeois, F.; Liederkerke, C.; Vogel, A. P.; Hayward, R.; Harkness, W.; Chong, K.; Vargha-Khadem, F.

    2011-01-01

    Dysarthria following surgical resection of childhood posterior fossa tumour (PFT) is most commonly documented in a select group of participants with mutism in the acute recovery phase, thus limiting knowledge of post-operative prognosis for this population of children as a whole. Here we report on the speech characteristics of 13 cases seen…

  13. Effects of Visual Information on Intelligibility of Open and Closed Class Words in Predictable Sentences Produced by Speakers with Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Dardis, Caitlin M.; Mccourt, Kelly A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the independent and interactive effects of visual information and linguistic class of words on intelligibility of dysarthric speech. Seven speakers with dysarthria participated in the study, along with 224 listeners who transcribed speech samples in audiovisual (AV) or audio-only (AO) listening conditions. Orthographic…

  14. Role of Cerebellum in Fine Speech Control in Childhood: Persistent Dysarthria after Surgical Treatment for Posterior Fossa Tumour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, A. T.; Liegeois, F.; Liederkerke, C.; Vogel, A. P.; Hayward, R.; Harkness, W.; Chong, K.; Vargha-Khadem, F.

    2011-01-01

    Dysarthria following surgical resection of childhood posterior fossa tumour (PFT) is most commonly documented in a select group of participants with mutism in the acute recovery phase, thus limiting knowledge of post-operative prognosis for this population of children as a whole. Here we report on the speech characteristics of 13 cases seen…

  15. Effects of Visual Information on Intelligibility of Open and Closed Class Words in Predictable Sentences Produced by Speakers with Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hustad, Katherine C.; Dardis, Caitlin M.; Mccourt, Kelly A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the independent and interactive effects of visual information and linguistic class of words on intelligibility of dysarthric speech. Seven speakers with dysarthria participated in the study, along with 224 listeners who transcribed speech samples in audiovisual (AV) or audio-only (AO) listening conditions. Orthographic…

  16. Use of palatal lift and palatal augmentation prostheses to improve dysarthria in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Esposito, S J; Mitsumoto, H; Shanks, M

    2000-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, adult onset neurodegenerative disorder manifesting itself as a loss of motor capabilities and untimely death. The dysarthria seen in patients with ALS who have bulbar symptoms causes severe problems with communication. The struggle to be understood comes at a time when progressive cumulative disabilities make communication with family, friends, and healthcare workers vital. The use of palatal lift/augmentation prostheses for dysarthria in ALS is not a frequently requested procedure by neurologists. The purpose of this retrospective outcomes study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment on improving speech function and intelligibility in this group of patients. This study also reviews the history, incidence, pathogenesis, and speech characteristics of the patient with ALS. A retrospective study of 25 patients treated with a prosthesis was performed using chart reviews and phone/office interviews to evaluate the efficacy of a palatal lift and/or augmentation prosthesis to improve speech in ALS patients. Twenty-one patients (84%) treated with a palatal lift demonstrated improvement in their dysarthria, specifically in reduction of hypernasality, with 19 (76%) benefiting at least moderately for 6 months. Of the 10 patients treated with a combination palatal lift and augmentation prosthesis, 6 (60%) demonstrated improvement in articulation. A majority of patients indicated it was easier to speak with less effort involved when wearing the prosthesis. On the basis of this preliminary retrospective study, the use of a palatal lift/augmentation prosthesis should be considered in ALS patients with dysarthria.

  17. Toxicological evaluation of pure hydroxytyrosol.

    PubMed

    Auñon-Calles, David; Canut, Lourdes; Visioli, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Of all the phenolic constituents of olives and extra virgin olive oil, hydroxytyrosol is currently being actively exploited as a potential supplement or preservative to be employed in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and food industry. In terms of safety profile, hydroxytyrosol has only been investigated as the predominant part of raw olive mill waste water extracts, due to the previous unavailability of appropriate quantities of the pure compound. We report the toxicological evaluation of hydroxytyrosol and, based on the results, propose a No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL) of 500mg/kg/d.

  18. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  19. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  20. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  1. Management of non-progressive dysarthria: practice patterns of speech and language therapists in the Republic of Ireland.

    PubMed

    Conway, Aifric; Walshe, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Dysarthria is a commonly acquired speech disorder. Rising numbers of people surviving stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) mean the numbers of people with non-progressive dysarthria are likely to increase, with increased challenges for speech and language therapists (SLTs), service providers and key stakeholders. The evidence base for assessment and intervention approaches with this population remains limited with clinical guidelines relying largely on clinical experience, expert opinion and limited research. Furthermore, there is currently little evidence on the practice behaviours of SLTs available. To investigate whether SLTs in the Republic of Ireland (ROI) vary in how they assess and manage adults with non-progressive dysarthria; to explore SLTs' use of the theoretical principles that influence therapeutic approaches; to identify challenges perceived by SLTs when working with adults with non-progressive dysarthria; and to determine SLTs' perceptions of further training needs. A 33-item survey questionnaire was devised and disseminated electronically via SurveyMonkey to SLTs working with non-progressive dysarthria in the ROI. SLTs were identified through e-mail lists for special-interest groups, SLT manager groups and general SLT mailing lists. A reminder e-mail was sent to all SLTs 3 weeks later following the initial e-mail containing the survey link. The survey remained open for 6 weeks. Questionnaire responses were analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative comments to open-ended questions were analysed through thematic analysis. Eighty SLTs responded to the survey. Sixty-seven of these completed the survey in full. SLTs provided both quantitative and qualitative data regarding their assessment and management practices in this area. Practice varied depending on the context of the SLT service, experience of SLTs and the resources available to them. Not all SLTs used principles such as motor programming or neural plasticity to direct clinical work

  2. Dark fermentation on biohydrogen production: Pure culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Show, Kuan-Yeow; Su, Ay

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is regarded as an attractive future clean energy carrier due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. While biohydrogen production is still in the early stage of development, there have been a variety of laboratory- and pilot-scale systems developed with promising potential. This work presents a review of literature reports on the pure hydrogen-producers under anaerobic environment. Challenges and perspective of biohydrogen production with pure cultures are also outlined.

  3. Characterizing intonation deficit in motor speech disorders: an autosegmental-metrical analysis of spontaneous speech in hypokinetic dysarthria, ataxic dysarthria, and foreign accent syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lowit, Anja; Kuschmann, Anja

    2012-10-01

    The autosegmental-metrical (AM) framework represents an established methodology for intonational analysis in unimpaired speaker populations but has found little application in describing intonation in motor speech disorders (MSDs). This study compared the intonation patterns of unimpaired participants (CON) and those with Parkinson's disease (PD), ataxic dysarthria (AT), and foreign accent syndrome (FAS) to evaluate the approach's potential for distinguishing types of MSDs from each other and from unimpaired speech. Spontaneous speech from 8 PD, 8 AT, 4 FAS, and 10 CON speakers were analyzed in relation to inventory and prevalence of pitch patterns, accentuation, and phrasing. Acoustic-phonetic baseline measures (maximum-phonation-duration, speech rate, and F0-variability) were also performed. The analyses yielded differences between MSD and CON groups and between the clinical groups in regard to prevalence, accentuation, and phrasing. AT and FAS speakers used more rising and high pitch accents than PD and CON speakers. The AT group used the highest number of pitch accents per phrase, and all 3 MSD groups produced significantly shorter phrases than the CON group. The study succeeded in differentiating MSDs on the basis of intonational performances by using the AM approach, thus, demonstrating its potential for charting intonational profiles in clinical populations.

  4. Acoustic and Perceptual Effects of Dysarthria in Greek with a Focus on Lexical Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papakyritsis, Ioannis

    The field of motor speech disorders in Greek is substantially underresearched. Additionally, acoustic studies on lexical stress in dysarthria are generally very rare (Kim et al. 2010). This dissertation examined the acoustic and perceptual effects of Greek dysarthria focusing on lexical stress. Additional possibly deviant speech characteristics were acoustically analyzed. Data from three dysarthric participants and matched controls was analyzed using a case study design. The analysis of lexical stress was based on data drawn from a single word repetition task that included pairs of disyllabic words differentiated by stress location. This data was acoustically analyzed in terms of the use of the acoustic cues for Greek stress. The ability of the dysarthric participants to signal stress in single words was further assessed in a stress identification task carried out by 14 naive Greek listeners. Overall, the acoustic and perceptual data indicated that, although all three dysarthric speakers presented with some difficulty in the patterning of stressed and unstressed syllables, each had different underlying problems that gave rise to quite distinct patterns of deviant speech characteristics. The atypical use of lexical stress cues in Anna's data obscured the prominence relations of stressed and unstressed syllables to the extent that the position of lexical stress was usually not perceptually transparent. Chris and Maria on the other hand, did not have marked difficulties signaling lexical stress location, although listeners were not 100% successful in the stress identification task. For the most part, Chris' atypical phonation patterns and Maria's very slow rate of speech did not interfere with lexical stress signaling. The acoustic analysis of the lexical stress cues was generally in agreement with the participants' performance in the stress identification task. Interestingly, in all three dysarthric participants, but more so in Anna, targets stressed on the 1st

  5. Dysarthria - care

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways of communicating, such as: Using hand gestures Writing by hand what you are saying Using a ... conversation Using alphabet boards, if muscles used for writing and typing are also affected If you do ...

  6. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  7. Interlabial contact pressures exhibited in dysarthria following traumatic brain injury during speech and nonspeech tasks.

    PubMed

    Goozée, Justine V; Murdoch, Bruce E; Theodoros, Deborah G

    2002-01-01

    A miniature pressure transducer was used to assess the interlabial contact pressures produced by a group of 19 adults (mean age 30.6 years) with dysarthria following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) during a set of speech and nonspeech tasks. Ten parameters relating to lip strength, endurance, rate of movement and lip pressure accuracy and stability were measured from the nonspeech tasks. The results attained by the TBI group were compared against a group of 19 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Significant differences between the groups were found for maximum interlabial contact pressure, maximum rate of repetition of maximum pressure, and lip pressure accuracy at 50 and 10% levels of maximum pressure. In regards to speech, the interlabial contact pressures generated by the TBI group and control group did not differ significantly. When expressed as percentages of maximum pressure, however, the TBI group's interlabial pressures appeared to have been generated with greater physiological effort. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. The production effect in adults with dysarthria: improving long-term verbal memory by vocal production.

    PubMed

    Icht, Michal; Bergerzon-Biton, Orly; Mama, Yaniv

    2016-12-29

    People show better memory for words read aloud relative to words read silently, the Production Effect (PE). Vocalisation at study makes the produced (aloud) words more distinct than the non-produced (silent) words, hence more memorable. Such encoding distinctiveness is related to the additional processing of aloud words that is later used during retrieval. This study investigated the PE in dysarthric adults, characterised by speech production difficulties. Their memory performance (recognition) was compared to a group of healthy adults. Results showed a PE for both groups. The production benefit was significantly larger for the dysarthric adults, despite their overall memory performance being reduced relative to controls. The results demonstrate long-term verbal memory deficits in dysarthria, and suggest that vocalisation (although impaired) may assist in remembering. Hence, vocalisation may be used in intervention contexts with this population, to compensate for memory decrease.

  9. Pure Intrathoracic Scapular Dislocation.

    PubMed

    Demirkiran, Nihat Demirhan; Kar, Adem

    2016-01-01

    Scapular dislocation, also known as locked scapula or scapulothoracic dislocation, is a rare entity that can be identified as extrathoracic or intrathoracic dislocation, depending on the penetration of the scapula into the thoracic cavity. The 3 reported cases of intrathoracic scapular dislocations in the literature are associated with a preexisting condition, such as sternoclavicular separation, prior rib fracture, thoracotomy for a lung transplant procedure, or surgical resection of superior ribs during breast or pulmonary tumor excisions. There are also 3 published cases of intrathoracic scapular impaction, involving comminuted scapular fractures with intrathoracic impaction of the inferior fragment through intercostal space. We report an intrathoracic scapular dislocation that was not associated with fracture of the scapula or predisposing factors. To our knowledge, this is the first case of pure intrathoracic dislocation.

  10. Pure parsimony xor haplotyping.

    PubMed

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper, we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  11. Pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty.

    PubMed

    Rebouças, Rafael B; Monteiro, Rodrigo C; Souza, Thiago N S de; Aragão, Augusto J de; Burity, Camila R T; Nóbrega, Júlio C de A; Oliveira, Natália S C de; Abrantes, Ramon B; Dantas Júnior, Luiz B; Cartaxo Filho, Ricardo; Negromonte, Gustavo R P; Sampaio, Rafael da C R; Britto, Cesar A

    2014-01-01

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is an acute neuropathy that rarely compromises bladder function. Conservative management including clean intermittent catheterization and pharmacotherapy is the primary approach for hypocompliant contracted bladder. Surgical treatment may be used in refractory cases to improve bladder compliance and capacity in order to protect the upper urinary tract. We describe a case of pure laparoscopic augmentation ileocystoplasty in a patient affected by Guillain-Barre syndrome. A 15-year-old female, complaining of voiding dysfunction, recurrent urinary tract infection and worsening renal function for three months. A previous history of Guillain-Barre syndrome on childhood was related. A voiding cystourethrography showed a pine-cone bladder with moderate post-void residual urine. The urodynamic demonstrated a hypocompliant bladder and small bladder capacity (190 mL) with high detrusor pressure (54 cmH2O). Nonsurgical treatments were attempted, however unsuccessfully.

  12. Pure right ventricular infarction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Katsuji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Hideo; Koyama, Yasushi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Ito, Taketoshi

    2002-02-01

    A 76-year-old man with chest pain was admitted to hospital where electrocardiography (ECG) showed ST-segment elevation in leads V1-4, indicative of acute anterior myocardial infarction. ST-segment elevation was also present in the right precordial leads V4R-6R. Emergency coronary angiography revealed that the left coronary artery was dominant and did not have significant stenosis. Aortography showed ostial occlusion of the right coronary artery (RCA). Left ventriculography showed normal function and right ventriculography showed a dilated right ventricle and severe hypokinesis of the right ventricular free wall. Conservative treatment was selected because the patient's symptoms soon ameliorated and his hemodynamics was stable. 99mTc-pyrophosphate and 201Tl dual single-photon emission computed tomography showed uptake of 99mTc-pyrophosphate in only the right ventricular free wall, but no uptake of 99mTc-pyrophosphate and no perfusion defect of 201Tl in the left ventricle. The peak creatine kinase (CK) and CK-MB were 1,381 IU/L and 127 IU/L, respectively. His natural course was favorable and the chest pain disappeared under medication. Two months after the onset, the ECG showed poor R progression in leads V1-4 indicating an old anterior infarction. Coronary angiography confirmed the ostial stenosis of the hypoplastic RCA. This was a case of pure right ventricular free wall infarction because of the occlusion of the ostium of the hypoplastic RCA, but not of the right ventricular branch. Because the electrocardiographic findings resemble those of an acute anterior infarction, it is important to consider pure right ventricular infarction in the differential diagnosis.

  13. [A case of sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis with multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Koji; Tateishi, Takahisa; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Urata, Michiyo; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 62-year-old man with sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO). He developed gait disturbance at 54 years of age, muscle weakness at 56 years, and difficulty hearing at 58 years. His brother had muscle weakness in both legs from age 20 years, and was diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease because he had muscle weakness of the four extremities, decreased CMAP and SNAP amplitudes on peripheral nerve conduction tests, and loss of large myelinated fibers and onion-bulb formations on sural nerve biopsy. His brother died aged 46 years, but no accurate cause of death was identified. Neurological examination of the present patient revealed bilateral ptosis, external ophthalmoparesis, dysarthria, dysphagia, sensorineural hearing loss, mild weakness and atrophy of proximal muscles in all four limbs, severe sensory ataxia, and disturbance of deep sensation in his legs. He showed elevation of lactate and pyruvate levels in cerebrospinal fluid and serum. An aerobic exercise test disclosed a marked increase in lactate and pyruvate levels in serum. On nerve conduction study, amplitudes of CMAP and SNAP, and F wave-evoked frequency were decreased. Needle electromyography showed chronic neurogenic patterns with fibrillation potentials in the extremity muscles. Head MRI demonstrated T2 prolonged lesions in the bilateral basal ganglia, while brain MRS revealed a small lactate peak. Biopsy of his left lateral vastus muscle showed ragged-red fibers and group atrophy, and some muscle fibers had decreased cytochrome c activity. Left sural nerve biopsy revealed a marked loss of large myelinated fibers, and some onion-bulb formations. Genetic testing disclosed a large mtDNA deletion in the biopsied muscle. Among nuclear genes, we found point mutations in ANT-1 (exon 1 c.105G>A, 5' untranslated region) and POLG-1 (exon 4, c.1218G>A, p. and exon 23 c.3920C>T, p.A1217V). We diagnosed SANDO. This is the first case of SANDO with large

  14. [A 49-year-old man with progressive dysarthria, dysphagia, and left hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Nishimiya, J; Yamaji, Y; Nitta, T; Mori, H; Yamamura, A; Shirai, T; Kondo, T; Sato, K; Mizuno, Y

    1995-11-01

    We report a 49-year-old man who presented progressive dysarthria, dysphagia, and left hemiparesis. The patient was well until June 28th of 1993 when he noted 'weakness' in his both legs; despite his weakness, he could play golf on that day. In the beginning of July, he noted difficulty in swallowing solid foods. He was admitted to the neurosurgery service of our hospital on July 15th of 1993 and a neurologic consultation was asked on July 17th. Neurologic examination at that time revealed an alert but somewhat childish man who appeared to have some difficulty in paying attention to questions. He was disoriented to time and showed difficulty in recent memory and calculation. Higher cerebral functions were intact. The optic fundi were normal; pupils were isocoric and reacted to light promptly; ocular movements were intact, however, he showed difficulty in convergence. Facial sensation and facial muscles were intact. He had no deafness. He showed slurred speech and difficulty in swallowing solid foods. The remaining cranial nerves were intact. Motor-wise, he was able to walk normally and no weakness or atrophy was noted. Mild ataxia was noted in the finger-to-nose and the heel-to-knee test on the left. Muscle stretch reflexes were normal and symmetric, however, the plantar response was extensor bilaterally. Sensation was intact and no meningeal signs were noted. General routine laboratory findings were unremarkable. CSF was under a normal pressure containing 1 cell/microliter, 68 mg/dl of protein, and 54 mg/dl of glucose. Cranial CT scan showed low density areas involving the pons, midbrain, left thalamus, and the left parietal cortex. In MRI, these areas presented low signal intensity in T1-weighted images and high signal intensity in T2-weighted in images. The brain stem appeared swollen. Gadolinium enhancement was negative. He was given a course of steroid pulse with 1 g/day of DIV methylprednisolone for three days followed by oral steroid. He showed only temporary

  15. PURE CULTURES OF CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis

    1912-01-01

    In experiment I a group of ameboid cells was isolated from a culture of cardiac muscle sixty-three days old, and cultivated in plasma. After several passages, they formed a dense tissue from which ameboid cells radiated. The culture was divided into two parts. The part cultivated in plasma alone kept its morphological characters and continued to produce ameboid cells. The part cultivated upon silk in plasma became modified; the cells lost their ameboid characters, and were transformed into large elongated cells which were united in chains, or interlaced to form a network. In experiment II the round cells taken from a culture of connective tissue seventy-four days old multiplied rapidly. They transformed themselves into elongated cells and produced, after a few passages, a mass of dense connective tissue. From the tissue a large number of elongated cells were constantly growing. In both experiments the tissues originated from the ameboid or round cells extirpated from cultures that were sixty-three and seventy-four days old respectively. These cultures were still growing actively thirty and forty days later; that is, more than one hundred days after the extirpation of the original fragments from the organism. These experiments show that from old cultures it is possible to isolate and propagate cells that belong to a definite type. A tissue, formed by a pure strain of cells, can be obtained in this way, and this new method may be of value in cytological investigations. PMID:19867562

  16. Within-speaker speech intelligibility in dysarthria: Variation across a reading passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary; Westbury, John; Rusche, Nicole

    2004-05-01

    Understanding factors underlying intelligibility deficits in dysarthria is important for clinical and theoretical reasons. Correlation/regression analyses between intelligibility measures and various speech production measures (e.g., acoustic or phonetic) are often reported in the literature. However, the analyses rarely control for the effect of a third variable (severity of speech disorder, in this case) likely to be correlated with the primary correlated variables. The current report controls for this effect by using a within-speaker analysis approach. Factors that were hypothesized to underlie the intelligibility variations in multiple breath groups within a connected discourse included structural elements (e.g., number of total words) as well as acoustic measures (e.g., F2 variation). Results showed that speech intelligibility in dysarthric speakers with two forms of neurological disease (Parkinson and ALS) does, in fact, vary across breath groups extracted from a connected discourse, and that these variations are related in some cases to a per breath estimate of F2 variation. [Work supported by NIDCD Award No. R01 DC03723.

  17. Impact of cognitive function and dysarthria on spoken language and perceived speech severity in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feenaughty, Lynda

    Purpose: The current study sought to investigate the separate effects of dysarthria and cognitive status on global speech timing, speech hesitation, and linguistic complexity characteristics and how these speech behaviors impose on listener impressions for three connected speech tasks presumed to differ in cognitive-linguistic demand for four carefully defined speaker groups; 1) MS with cognitive deficits (MSCI), 2) MS with clinically diagnosed dysarthria and intact cognition (MSDYS), 3) MS without dysarthria or cognitive deficits (MS), and 4) healthy talkers (CON). The relationship between neuropsychological test scores and speech-language production and perceptual variables for speakers with cognitive deficits was also explored. Methods: 48 speakers, including 36 individuals reporting a neurological diagnosis of MS and 12 healthy talkers participated. The three MS groups and control group each contained 12 speakers (8 women and 4 men). Cognitive function was quantified using standard clinical tests of memory, information processing speed, and executive function. A standard z-score of ≤ -1.50 indicated deficits in a given cognitive domain. Three certified speech-language pathologists determined the clinical diagnosis of dysarthria for speakers with MS. Experimental speech tasks of interest included audio-recordings of an oral reading of the Grandfather passage and two spontaneous speech samples in the form of Familiar and Unfamiliar descriptive discourse. Various measures of spoken language were of interest. Suprasegmental acoustic measures included speech and articulatory rate. Linguistic speech hesitation measures included pause frequency (i.e., silent and filled pauses), mean silent pause duration, grammatical appropriateness of pauses, and interjection frequency. For the two discourse samples, three standard measures of language complexity were obtained including subordination index, inter-sentence cohesion adequacy, and lexical diversity. Ten listeners

  18. Articulatory-to-Acoustic Relations in Talkers With Dysarthria: A First Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mefferd, Antje

    2015-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the strength of interspeaker and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations of vowel contrast produced by talkers with dysarthria and controls. Six talkers with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), six talkers with Parkinson's disease (PD), and 12 controls repeated a sentence at typical, slow, and fast rates. Tongue displacements and acoustic vowel distances were measured to determine articulatory and acoustic vowel contrasts. Interspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations were strong for talkers with PD and controls but weak for talkers with ALS and controls. Further, predominantly moderate and strong intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations were found in response to rate modulations; however, correlation coefficients were significantly lower in talkers with ALS than in controls. The findings on interspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations suggested that the degree of tongue displacement can be accurately inferred from the degree of acoustic vowel contrast in talkers with PD but not in talkers with ALS. Findings on intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations generally supported the longstanding notion that speaking rate-induced changes in tongue displacement evoke similar changes in acoustic vowel contrast. Differential effects of the pathophysiology on inter- and intraspeaker articulatory-to-acoustic relations are discussed.

  19. Small intragenic deletion in FOXP2 associated with childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Turner, Samantha J; Hildebrand, Michael S; Block, Susan; Damiano, John; Fahey, Michael; Reilly, Sheena; Bahlo, Melanie; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Morgan, Angela T

    2013-09-01

    Relatively little is known about the neurobiological basis of speech disorders although genetic determinants are increasingly recognized. The first gene for primary speech disorder was FOXP2, identified in a large, informative family with verbal and oral dyspraxia. Subsequently, many de novo and familial cases with a severe speech disorder associated with FOXP2 mutations have been reported. These mutations include sequencing alterations, translocations, uniparental disomy, and genomic copy number variants. We studied eight probands with speech disorder and their families. Family members were phenotyped using a comprehensive assessment of speech, oral motor function, language, literacy skills, and cognition. Coding regions of FOXP2 were screened to identify novel variants. Segregation of the variant was determined in the probands' families. Variants were identified in two probands. One child with severe motor speech disorder had a small de novo intragenic FOXP2 deletion. His phenotype included features of childhood apraxia of speech and dysarthria, oral motor dyspraxia, receptive and expressive language disorder, and literacy difficulties. The other variant was found in a family in two of three family members with stuttering, and also in the mother with oral motor impairment. This variant was considered a benign polymorphism as it was predicted to be non-pathogenic with in silico tools and found in database controls. This is the first report of a small intragenic deletion of FOXP2 that is likely to be the cause of severe motor speech disorder associated with language and literacy problems.

  20. Intonation contrast in Cantonese speakers with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ma, Joan K-Y; Whitehill, Tara L; So, Susanne Y-S

    2010-08-01

    Speech produced by individuals with hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a number of features including impaired speech prosody. The purpose of this study was to investigate intonation contrasts produced by this group of speakers. Speech materials with a question-statement contrast were collected from 14 Cantonese speakers with PD. Twenty listeners then classified the productions as either questions or statements. Acoustic analyses of F0, duration, and intensity were conducted to determine which acoustic cues distinguished the production of questions from statements, and which cues appeared to be exploited by listeners in identifying intonational contrasts. The results show that listeners identified statements with a high degree of accuracy, but the accuracy of question identification ranged from 0.56% to 96% across the 14 speakers. The speakers with PD used similar acoustic cues as nondysarthric Cantonese speakers to mark the question-statement contrast, although the contrasts were not observed in all speakers. Listeners mainly used F0 cues at the final syllable for intonation identification. These data contribute to the researchers' understanding of intonation marking in speakers with PD, with specific application to the production and perception of intonation in a lexical tone language.

  1. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  2. Purely flavored leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Nardi, Enrico; Munoz, Luis Alfredo

    2009-07-01

    We study a model for leptogenesis in which the total CP asymmetries in the decays and scatterings involving the SU(2) singlet seesaw neutrinos N{sub {alpha}} vanish ({epsilon}{sub N{sub {alpha}}}=0). Leptogenesis is possible due to nonvanishing CP violating lepton flavor asymmetries, realizing a situation in which the baryon asymmetry is due exclusively to flavor effects. We study the production of a net lepton asymmetry by solving the Boltzmann equations specific to this model, and we show that successful leptogenesis can be obtained at a scale as low as the TeV. We also discuss constraints on the model parameter space arising from current experimental upper limits on lepton flavor violating decays.

  3. Large pure intracranial vagal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Costanzo, De Bonis; Carotenuto, Vincenzo; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    2009-04-01

    We report a patient with a large, pure intracranial vagal schwannoma, compressing the medulla who presented with essential hypertension. Based on this and on previous cases, we suggest that a differentiation of pure intracranial schwannomas (subtype A1) from intracranial schwannomas with some extension in the jugular foramen (type A) should be used.

  4. A retrospective study of long-term treatment outcomes for reduced vocal intensity in hypokinetic dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Watts, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Reduced vocal intensity is a core impairment of hypokinetic dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD). Speech treatments have been developed to rehabilitate the vocal subsystems underlying this impairment. Intensive treatment programs requiring high-intensity voice and speech exercises with clinician-guided prompting and feedback have been established as effective for improving vocal function. Less is known, however, regarding long-term outcomes of clinical benefit in speakers with PD who receive these treatments. A retrospective cohort design was utilized. Data from 78 patient files across a three year period were analyzed. All patients received a structured, intensive program of voice therapy focusing on speaking intent and loudness. The dependent variable for all analyses was vocal intensity in decibels (dBSPL). Vocal intensity during sustained vowel production, reading, and novel conversational speech was compared at pre-treatment, post-treatment, six month follow-up, and twelve month follow-up periods. Statistically significant increases in vocal intensity were found at post-treatment, 6 months, and 12 month follow-up periods with intensity gains ranging from 5 to 17 dB depending on speaking condition and measurement period. Significant treatment effects were found in all three speaking conditions. Effect sizes for all outcome measures were large, suggesting a strong degree of practical significance. Significant increases in vocal intensity measured at 6 and 12 moth follow-up periods suggested that the sample of patients maintained treatment benefit for up to a year. These findings are supported by outcome studies reporting treatment outcomes within a few months post-treatment, in addition to prior studies that have reported long-term outcome results. The positive treatment outcomes experienced by the PD cohort in this study are consistent with treatment responses subsequent to other treatment approaches which focus on high-intensity, clinician guided motor

  5. Clinical study of 35 patients with dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, A; Bell, Y; Garcia-Eroles, L; Massons, J; Comes, E; Balcells, M; Targa, C

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Although dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome (DCHS) is a well known and infrequent lacunar syndrome, there are few data regarding the spectrum of associated clinical characteristics, anatomical site of lesion, and aetiopathogenetic mechanisms. We report a clinical description of this subtype of lacunar stroke based on data collected from a prospective acute stroke registry. Methods: From 2500 acute stroke patients included in a hospital based prospective stroke registry over a 12-year period, 35 patients were identified as having DCHS. Results: DCHS accounted for 1.6% of all acute stroke patients (35/2110), 1.9% of acute ischaemic stroke (35/1840), and 6.1% of lacunar syndromes (35/570) admitted consecutively to a neurology department and included in the stroke registry over this period. The results supported the lacunar hypothesis in 94.3% of patients (n = 33). Atherothrombotic and cardioembolic infarction occurred in only one patient each (2.9%). No patient with DCHS had an intracerebral haemorrhage. Outcome was good (mortality in hospital 0%, symptom free at discharge 45.7%). After multivariate analysis, absence of limitation at discharge, limb weakness but not cerebellar-type ataxia, and internal capsule (40%), pons (17%), and corona radiata (8.6%) location were significantly associated with DCHS. Conclusions: DCHS is a rare cerebrovascular syndrome, and supports the criteria of the lacunar hypothesis. The majority of patients in this study had internal capsule infarcts. The prognosis is good with striking similarity compared with other types of lacunar strokes. There are important differences between DCHS and non-lacunar strokes. Internal capsule and pons are the most frequent cerebral sites. PMID:14742595

  6. Characterizing commercial pureed foods: sensory, nutritional, and textural analysis.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Laurel; Keller, Heather H; Duizer, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Dysphagia (swallowing impairment) is a common consequence of stroke and degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Limited research is available on pureed foods, specifically the qualities of commercial products. Because research has linked pureed foods, specifically in-house pureed products, to malnutrition due to inferior sensory and nutritional qualities, commercial purees also need to be investigated. Proprietary research on sensory attributes of commercial foods is available; however direct comparisons of commercial pureed foods have never been reported. Descriptive sensory analysis as well as nutritional and texture analysis of commercially pureed prepared products was performed using a trained descriptive analysis panel. The pureed foods tested included four brands of carrots, of turkey, and two of bread. Each commercial puree was analyzed for fat (Soxhlet), protein (Dumas), carbohydrate (proximate analysis), fiber (total fiber), and sodium content (Quantab titrator strips). The purees were also texturally compared with a line spread test and a back extrusion test. Differences were found in the purees for sensory attributes as well as nutritional and textural properties. Findings suggest that implementation of standards is required to reduce variability between products, specifically regarding the textural components of the products. This would ensure all commercial products available in Canada meet standards established as being considered safe for swallowing.

  7. Defense Mechanisms in "Pure" Anxiety and "Pure" Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Colovic, Olga; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica; Perunicic Mladenovic, Ivana; Milosavljevic, Maja; Munjiza, Ana

    2016-10-01

    Our study was intended to test whether there are any differences in the way defense mechanisms are used by patients suffering from pure anxiety and those with pure depressive disorders. The sample size was as follows: depressive disorders without psychotic symptoms 30, anxiety disorders 30, and the healthy control group 30. The assessment of defense mechanisms was made using the DSQ-40 questionnaire. Our findings show that "pure" anxiety disorders differ from "pure" depressive disorders only in the use of immature defense mechanisms. The group with depressive disorders was significantly more prone to use immature defense mechanisms than the group with anxiety disorders (p = 0.005), primarily projection (p = 0.001) and devaluation (p = 0.003). These defense mechanisms may therefore be used both to differentiate between anxiety and depressive disorders and also to determine which symptoms (anxiety or depressive disorders) are dominant at any given stage of treatment.

  8. Pure autonomic failure without synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Isonaka, Risa; Holmes, Courtney; Cook, Glen A; Sullivan, Patti; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2017-04-01

    Pure autonomic failure is a rare form of chronic autonomic failure manifesting with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and evidence of sympathetic noradrenergic denervation unaccompanied by signs of central neurodegeneration. It has been proposed that pure autonomic failure is a Lewy body disease characterized by intra-neuronal deposition of the protein alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies and neurites. A middle-aged man with previously diagnosed pure autonomic failure experienced a sudden, fatal cardiac arrest. He was autopsied, and tissues were harvested for neurochemical and immunofluorescence studies. Post-mortem microscopic neuropathology showed no Lewy bodies, Lewy neurites, or alpha-synuclein deposition by immunohistochemistry anywhere in the brain. The patient had markedly decreased immunofluorescent tyrosine hydroxylase in sympathetic ganglion tissue without detectable alpha-synuclein even in rare residual nests of tyrosine hydroxylase-containing ganglionic fibers. In pure autonomic failure, sympathetic noradrenergic denervation can occur without concurrent Lewy bodies or alpha-synuclein deposition in the brain or sympathetic ganglion tissue.

  9. Tumour type and size are high risk factors for the syndrome of "cerebellar" mutism and subsequent dysarthria

    PubMed Central

    Catsman-Berrevoet..., C.; Van Dongen, H. R; Mulder, P.; y, G; Paquier, P.; Lequin, M.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—"Cerebellar mutis" and subsequent dysarthria (MSD) is a documented complication of posterior fossa surgery in children. In this prospective study the following risk factors for MSD were assessed: type, size and site of the tumour; hydrocephalus at presentation and after surgery, cerebellar incision site, postoperative infection, and cerebellar swelling.
METHODS—In a consecutive series of 42 children with a cerebellar tumour, speech and neuroradiological studies (CT and MRI) were systematically analysed preoperatively and postoperatively. Speech was assessed using the Mayo Clinic lists and the severity of dysarthria using the Michigan rating scale.
RESULTS—Twelve children (29%) developed MSD postoperatively. The type of tumour, midline localisation, and vermal incision were significant single independent risk factors. In addition, an interdependency of possible risk factors (tumour>5 cm, medulloblastoma) was found.
CONCLUSION—MSD often occurs after paediatric cerebellar tumour removal and is most likely after removal of a medulloblastoma with a maximum lesion diameter>5 cm.

 PMID:10567492

  10. The role of mnemonic processes in pure-target and pure-foil recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Koop, Gregory J; Criss, Amy H; Malmberg, Kenneth J

    2015-04-01

    Surprisingly, response patterns in a recognition memory test are very similar regardless of whether the test list contains both targets and foils or just one class of items. To better understand these effects, we evaluate performance over the course of testing. Output interference (OI) is the decrease in performance across test trials due to an increase in noise caused by encoded test items. Critically, OI is predicted on pure lists if the mnemonic evidence for each test item is evaluated. In two experiments, participants received accurate feedback, no feedback, or random feedback that was unrelated to the response on each test trial and pure or standard test lists. When no feedback was provided, performance was nearly identical for standard and pure test lists, replicating previous findings. Only in the presence of accurate feedback were participants able to successfully adapt to pure list environments and improve their accuracy. Critically, OI was observed, demonstrating that participants continued to evaluate mnemonic evidence even in pure list conditions. We discuss the implication of these data for models of memory.

  11. Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT)[R] on Hypernasality in Non-Progressive Dysarthria: The Need for Further Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenke, Rachel J.; Theodoros, Deborah; Cornwell, Petrea

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypernasality is a common feature of non-progressive dysarthria. However, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of treatments for this impairment. Preliminary research has revealed positive effects on nasalance when using increased loudness in certain non-progressive dysarthric speakers. However, the long-term effects of…

  12. Multiple Factors Are Involved in the Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease: A Review with Implications for Clinical Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapir, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motor speech abnormalities are highly common and debilitating in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). These abnormalities, collectively termed hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD), have been traditionally attributed to hypokinesia and bradykinesia secondary to muscle rigidity and dopamine deficits. However, the role of…

  13. Effectiveness of Lee Silverman Voice Treatment (LSVT)[R] on Hypernasality in Non-Progressive Dysarthria: The Need for Further Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenke, Rachel J.; Theodoros, Deborah; Cornwell, Petrea

    2010-01-01

    Background: Hypernasality is a common feature of non-progressive dysarthria. However, limited research has investigated the effectiveness of treatments for this impairment. Preliminary research has revealed positive effects on nasalance when using increased loudness in certain non-progressive dysarthric speakers. However, the long-term effects of…

  14. Multiple Factors Are Involved in the Dysarthria Associated with Parkinson's Disease: A Review with Implications for Clinical Practice and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapir, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Motor speech abnormalities are highly common and debilitating in individuals with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD). These abnormalities, collectively termed hypokinetic dysarthria (HKD), have been traditionally attributed to hypokinesia and bradykinesia secondary to muscle rigidity and dopamine deficits. However, the role of…

  15. [The effect of time-compressed speech on the perception of ataxic dysarthria: a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Woisard-Bassols, Virginie; Espesser, Robert; Ghio, Alain; Nguyen, Noël; Duez, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    In cerebellar dysarthria, the lack of precision in the articulatory motions leads to a temporal dysregulation with a decreased rate of speech. That is, our hypothesis is that the signal distortions are linked to the slowness of speech and that the acceleration of the rate improves the intelligibility of speech. Two patients with a cerebellar pathology and an ataxic dysarthria participated in the present study. Speech intelligibility was assessed subjectively by a visual analog scale, and objectively by the constant-stimulus method associated with an identification task of a target phoneme in real time. The SOLA algorithm was used to accelerate the speech stimuli. 144 test sentences were created at 3 speed rates: 48 sentences at 'natural speed' (without compression, VN), 48 sentences at 'intermediate speed' (50% of the maximum rate, VI) and 48 sentences at 'maximum speed' (mean rate of a control group of speakers, VM). The 144 test sentences, in 3 experimental conditions, were distributed over 3 lists, each listener hearing each sentence only once; 8 subjects were assigned to each list. The sentences were presented in random order. A subjective assessment was performed for the whole corpus. The statistical analysis was performed with a mixed logit model for the subjective scores and the reaction time and with a chi2 test for the errors. For each patient, the odds of an improved intelligibility were significantly greater for the VI or VM condition than for the VN condition. The effect tended to be stronger for patient Z. From the VN to the VI condition, the satisfaction rate regarding the intelligibility increased from 78 to 87% for patient B and from 46 to 63% for patient Z (p = 0.03). There were fewer errors for the accelerated speech for patient Z. The acceleration had no effect on the reaction times in the phoneme identification task (F 2,(1,024) = 2.14, p = 0.12). In 2 cases of ataxic dysarthria, the perceived intelligibility was improved by a temporal

  16. Graphical calculus for Gaussian pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-04-15

    We provide a unified graphical calculus for all Gaussian pure states, including graph transformation rules for all local and semilocal Gaussian unitary operations, as well as local quadrature measurements. We then use this graphical calculus to analyze continuous-variable (CV) cluster states, the essential resource for one-way quantum computing with CV systems. Current graphical approaches to CV cluster states are only valid in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing, and the associated graph transformation rules only apply when the initial and final states are of this form. Our formalism applies to all Gaussian pure states and subsumes these rules in a natural way. In addition, the term 'CV graph state' currently has several inequivalent definitions in use. Using this formalism we provide a single unifying definition that encompasses all of them. We provide many examples of how the formalism may be used in the context of CV cluster states: defining the 'closest' CV cluster state to a given Gaussian pure state and quantifying the error in the approximation due to finite squeezing; analyzing the optimality of certain methods of generating CV cluster states; drawing connections between this graphical formalism and bosonic Hamiltonians with Gaussian ground states, including those useful for CV one-way quantum computing; and deriving a graphical measure of bipartite entanglement for certain classes of CV cluster states. We mention other possible applications of this formalism and conclude with a brief note on fault tolerance in CV one-way quantum computing.

  17. Production of substantially pure fructose

    DOEpatents

    Hatcher, Herbert J.; Gallian, John J.; Leeper, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of substantially pure fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.

  18. Effect of humidity on fretting wear of several pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goto, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Fretting wear experiments with several pure metals were conducted in air at various relative humidity levels. The materials used were iron, aluminum, copper, silver, chromium, titanium, and nickel. Each pure metal had a maximum fretting wear volume at a specific humidity level RH sub max that was not dependent on mechanical factors such as contact load, fretting amplitude, and frequency in the ranges studied. The weight loss due to fretting wear at RH sub max for each pure metal decreased with increasing heat of oxygen adsorption on the metal, indicating that adhesive wear dominated at RH sub max.

  19. Bilateral Vestibulopathy Aggravates Balance and Gait Disturbances in Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria, and Ophthalmoparesis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Roeland B; Smits, Bart W; Rodenburg, Richard J; van Engelen, Baziel G

    2016-09-01

    In patients with a triad of sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis (SANDO), the presenting features are mainly ataxia or ptosis. SANDO patients often have impaired balance and gait, which is not surprising considering the combination of sensory ataxic neuropathy, and additional symptoms like cerebellar ataxia and limb girdle weakness. We describe a SANDO patient who noticed an increasingly impaired balance and gait, without any dizziness. Neurological investigation revealed an external ophthalmeplegia and a cerebellar ataxia; the head impulse test was not reliable because of eye movement disorders. The caloric reflex tests showed lack of responses on both sides, compatible with severe bilateral vestibulopathy. Making the diagnosis of bilateral vestibulopathy in SANDO patients may have implications for the management of the patient, because specific vestibular rehabilitation can improve gaze and postural stability.

  20. The theoretical polarization of pure scattering axisymmetric circumstellar envelopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, G. K.

    1994-01-01

    The Sobolev approach to the scattering of starlight through a pure scattering circumstellar envelope is developed. The theoretical polarization due to electron scattering in Be star envelopes is calculated for two geometries (an equatorially enhanced envelope and a spheroidal envelope). Only the disk-type envelope is found to yield a maximum polarization consistent with the observed range for Be stars. A lower limit, analytical approximation to the theoretical polarization from a pure scattering envelope is obtained.

  1. [Analysis of dysarthria in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis--MRI of the tongue and formant analysis of vowels].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, S; Arasaki, K; Nagata, H; Shouji, S

    1994-03-01

    To evaluate dysarthria in patients with ALS, we used MRI (gradient rephasing echo method) and compared it with the computed acoustic analysis. Five ALS male patients of progressive bulbar palsy type and five normal male were asked to phonate the five Japanese vowels, /a/./i/./u/./e/./o/. MRI of the sagittal tongue and vocal tract was obtained by the gradient rephasing echo method (0.2 Tesla, TR:30 ms, TE:10 ms, FA 25 degrees C, Hitachi). We could clearly visualize the change of tongue shape and the narrow site of the vocal tract for each vowel phonation. In normal subjects, the tongue shape and the narrow site of the vocal tract were distinguishable between each vowel, but unclear in ALS. Acoustic analysis showed that the first formant frequency of /i/./u/ in ALS was higher than normal and the second formant frequency of /i/./e/ in ALS was significantly lower than normal. The discrepancy from the normal first, second and third formant frequency for each vowel of ALS was most seen in /i/./e/. It was speculated that /i/ and /e/ were the most disturbed vowels in ALS. The first and second formant frequency of vowel depends on the tongue shape and the width of the oral cavity. Therefore the results of the acoustic analysis in ALS indicated poor movement of tongue in /i/./u/./e/ and were compatible with the findings of the sagittal tongue MRI. The sagittal view of the tongue in the gradient rephasing echo MRI and the acoustic analysis are useful in evaluation dysarthria in ALS.

  2. Inherited peripheral neuropathies due to mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Cassereau, J; Codron, P; Funalot, B

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are frequently responsible for neuropathies with variable severity. Mitochondrial diseases causing peripheral neuropathies (PNP) may be due to mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), as is the case in MERRF and MELAS syndromes, or to mutations of nuclear genes. Secondary abnormalities of mtDNA (such as multiple deletions of muscle mtDNA) may result from mitochondrial disorders due to mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA maintenance. This is the case in several syndromes caused by impaired mtDNA maintenance, such as Sensory Ataxic Neuropathy, Dysarthria and Ophthalmoplegia (SANDO) due to recessive mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mtDNA polymerase (DNA polymerase gamma), or Mitochondrial Neuro-Gastro-Intestinal Encephalomyopathy (MNGIE), due to recessive mutations in the TYMP gene, which encodes thymidine phosphorylase. The last years have seen a growing list of evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics might be dysfunctional in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT2), and these mechanisms might present a common link between dissimilar CMT2-causing genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. The neuroanatomy of pure apraxia of speech in stroke.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Jones, David T; Strand, Edythe A; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Duffy, Joseph R; Josephs, Keith A

    2014-02-01

    The left insula or Broca's area have been proposed as the neuroanatomical correlate for apraxia of speech (AOS) based on studies of patients with both AOS and aphasia due to stroke. Studies of neurodegenerative AOS suggest the premotor area and the supplementary motor areas as the anatomical correlates. The study objective was to determine the common infarction area in patients with pure AOS due to stroke. Patients with AOS and no or equivocal aphasia due to ischemic stroke were identified through a pre-existing database. Seven subjects were identified. Five had pure AOS, and two had equivocal aphasia. MRI lesion analysis revealed maximal overlap spanning the left premotor and motor cortices. While both neurodegenerative AOS and stroke induced pure AOS involve the premotor cortex, further studies are needed to establish whether stroke-induced AOS and neurodegenerative AOS share a common anatomic substrate.

  4. The neuroanatomy of pure apraxia of speech in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Jones, David T.; Strand, Edythe A.; Rabinstein, Alejandro A.; Duffy, Joseph R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    The left insula or Broca’s area have been proposed as the neuroanatomical correlate for apraxia of speech (AOS) based on studies of patients with both AOS and aphasia due to stroke. Studies of neurodegenerative AOS suggest the premotor area and the supplementary motor areas as the anatomical correlates. The study objective was to determine the common infarction area in patients with pure AOS due to stroke. Patients with AOS and no or equivocal aphasia due to ischemic stroke were identified through a pre-existing database. Seven subjects were identified. Five had pure AOS, and two had equivocal aphasia. MRI lesion analysis revealed maximal overlap spanning the left premotor and motor cortices. While both neurodegenerative AOS and stroke induced pure AOS involve the premotor cortex, further studies are needed to establish whether stroke-induced AOS and neurodegenerative AOS share a common anatomic substrate. PMID:24556336

  5. Production of substantially pure fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, H.J.; Gallian, J.J.; Leeper, S.A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production of a substantially pure product containing greater than 60% fructose. It comprises: combining a sucrose-containing substrate with effective amounts of a levansucrase enzyme preparation to form levan and glucose; purifying the levan by at least one of the following purification methods: ultrafiltration, diafiltration, hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, liquid--liquid partition, solvent extraction, chromatography, and precipitation; hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose substantially free of glucose and sucrose; and recovering the fructose by at least one of the following recovery methods: hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, evaporation, drying, crystallization, and chromatography.

  6. Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Anthracyclinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara

    The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.

  7. Multiple pure tone noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Sharma, Anupam; Paliath, Umesh; Shieh, Chingwei

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a fully numerical method for predicting multiple pure tones, also known as “Buzzsaw” noise. It consists of three steps that account for noise source generation, nonlinear acoustic propagation with hard as well as lined walls inside the nacelle, and linear acoustic propagation outside the engine. Noise generation is modeled by steady, part-annulus computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A linear superposition algorithm is used to construct full-annulus shock/pressure pattern just upstream of the fan from part-annulus CFD results. Nonlinear wave propagation is carried out inside the duct using a pseudo-two-dimensional solution of Burgers' equation. Scattering from nacelle lip as well as radiation to farfield is performed using the commercial solver ACTRAN/TM. The proposed prediction process is verified by comparing against full-annulus CFD simulations as well as against static engine test data for a typical high bypass ratio aircraft engine with hardwall as well as lined inlets. Comparisons are drawn against nacelle unsteady pressure transducer measurements at two axial locations as well as against near- and far-field microphone array measurements outside the duct. This is the first fully numerical approach (no experimental or empirical input is required) to predict multiple pure tone noise generation, in-duct propagation and far-field radiation. It uses measured blade coordinates to calculate MPT noise.

  8. Particle Transport in Pure Electron Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriesel, J. M.; Driscoll, C. F.

    1998-10-01

    At UCSD we confine pure-electron plasmas in Penning-Malmberg traps, which consist of cylindrical electrodes in an axial magnetic field (B ~ 100G). The trap is under ultra-high vacuum (10-10 Torr) so that transport due to electron-neutral collisions is negligible. Instead, cross-field particle transport is due to electron-electron collsions or from interactions with external fields. A plasma in one of our traps is roughly cylindrical in shape and rotates about its own axis due to the E x B drift from the space-charge field. Electron-electron collisions bring the plasma to a thermal equilibrium state of rigid rotation and uniform temperature. We find that the transport is driven by shears in the rotation velocity, and measure a coefficient of viscosity which is as much as 10,000 times larger than classical theory. This transport is driven by long-range ``E × B drift Coulomb collisions'' with impact parameters on the order of a Debye length rather than a cyclotron radius, as in classical theory. In our plasmas λD >> r_c, and O'Neil and Dubin have developed theories(Daniel H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 5), 1688 (1998) of transport in this regime. In addition to this work, I will also present measurements on the transport due to externally applied fields. The scalings provide insight into the overall confinement properties of our traps.

  9. Acoustic changes in the speech of children with cerebral palsy following an intensive program of dysarthria therapy.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Lindsay; Lombardo, Eftychia; Steen, Nick; Miller, Nick

    2017-07-17

    The speech intelligibility of children with dysarthria and cerebral palsy has been observed to increase following therapy focusing on respiration and phonation. To determine if speech intelligibility change following intervention is associated with change in acoustic measures of voice. We recorded 16 young people with cerebral palsy and dysarthria (nine girls; mean age 14 years, SD = 2; nine spastic type, two dyskinetic, four mixed; one Worster-Drought) producing speech in two conditions (single words, connected speech) twice before and twice after therapy focusing on respiration, phonation and rate. In both single-word and connected speech we measured vocal intensity (root mean square-RMS), period-to-period variability (Shimmer APQ, Jitter RAP and PPQ) and harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR). In connected speech we also measured mean fundamental frequency, utterance duration in seconds and speech and articulation rate (syllables/s with and without pauses respectively). All acoustic measures were made using Praat. Intelligibility was calculated in previous research. In single words statistically significant but very small reductions were observed in period-to-period variability following therapy: Shimmer APQ -0.15 (95% CI = -0.21 to -0.09); Jitter RAP -0.08 (95% CI = -0.14 to -0.01); Jitter PPQ -0.08 (95% CI = -0.15 to -0.01). No changes in period-to-period perturbation across phrases in connected speech were detected. However, changes in connected speech were observed in phrase length, rate and intensity. Following therapy, mean utterance duration increased by 1.11 s (95% CI = 0.37-1.86) when measured with pauses and by 1.13 s (95% CI = 0.40-1.85) when measured without pauses. Articulation rate increased by 0.07 syllables/s (95% CI = 0.02-0.13); speech rate increased by 0.06 syllables/s (95% CI = < 0.01-0.12); and intensity increased by 0.03 Pascals (95% CI = 0.02-0.04). There was a gradual reduction in mean fundamental frequency across all time points (-11.85 Hz, 95

  10. Fracture behaviors under pure shear loading in bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cen; Gao, Meng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-12-23

    Pure shear fracture test, as a special mechanical means, had been carried out extensively to obtain the critical information for traditional metallic crystalline materials and rocks, such as the intrinsic deformation behavior and fracture mechanism. However, for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the pure shear fracture behaviors have not been investigated systematically due to the lack of a suitable test method. Here, we specially introduce a unique antisymmetrical four-point bend shear test method to realize a uniform pure shear stress field and study the pure shear fracture behaviors of two kinds of BMGs, Zr-based and La-based BMGs. All kinds of fracture behaviors, the pure shear fracture strength, fracture angle and fracture surface morphology, are systematically analyzed and compared with those of the conventional compressive and tensile fracture. Our results indicate that both the Zr-based and La-based BMGs follow the same fracture mechanism under pure shear loading, which is significantly different from the situation of some previous research results. Our results might offer new enlightenment on the intrinsic deformation and fracture mechanism of BMGs and other amorphous materials.

  11. Fracture behaviors under pure shear loading in bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cen; Gao, Meng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-01-01

    Pure shear fracture test, as a special mechanical means, had been carried out extensively to obtain the critical information for traditional metallic crystalline materials and rocks, such as the intrinsic deformation behavior and fracture mechanism. However, for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the pure shear fracture behaviors have not been investigated systematically due to the lack of a suitable test method. Here, we specially introduce a unique antisymmetrical four-point bend shear test method to realize a uniform pure shear stress field and study the pure shear fracture behaviors of two kinds of BMGs, Zr-based and La-based BMGs. All kinds of fracture behaviors, the pure shear fracture strength, fracture angle and fracture surface morphology, are systematically analyzed and compared with those of the conventional compressive and tensile fracture. Our results indicate that both the Zr-based and La-based BMGs follow the same fracture mechanism under pure shear loading, which is significantly different from the situation of some previous research results. Our results might offer new enlightenment on the intrinsic deformation and fracture mechanism of BMGs and other amorphous materials. PMID:28008956

  12. Fracture behaviors under pure shear loading in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cen; Gao, Meng; Wang, Chao; Wang, Wei-Hua; Wang, Tzu-Chiang

    2016-12-01

    Pure shear fracture test, as a special mechanical means, had been carried out extensively to obtain the critical information for traditional metallic crystalline materials and rocks, such as the intrinsic deformation behavior and fracture mechanism. However, for bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), the pure shear fracture behaviors have not been investigated systematically due to the lack of a suitable test method. Here, we specially introduce a unique antisymmetrical four-point bend shear test method to realize a uniform pure shear stress field and study the pure shear fracture behaviors of two kinds of BMGs, Zr-based and La-based BMGs. All kinds of fracture behaviors, the pure shear fracture strength, fracture angle and fracture surface morphology, are systematically analyzed and compared with those of the conventional compressive and tensile fracture. Our results indicate that both the Zr-based and La-based BMGs follow the same fracture mechanism under pure shear loading, which is significantly different from the situation of some previous research results. Our results might offer new enlightenment on the intrinsic deformation and fracture mechanism of BMGs and other amorphous materials.

  13. Pure optical dynamical color encryption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Fredy Barrera, John; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a pure optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts.

  14. Pure optical dynamical color encryption.

    PubMed

    Mosso, Fabian; Tebaldi, Myrian; Barrera, John Fredy; Bolognini, Néstor; Torroba, Roberto

    2011-07-18

    We introduce a way to encrypt-decrypt a color dynamical phenomenon using a pure optical alternative. We split the three basic chromatic channels composing the input, and then each channel is processed through a 4f encoding method and a theta modulation applied to the each encrypted frame in every channel. All frames for a single channel are multiplexed. The same phase mask is used to encode all the information. Unlike the usual procedure we do not multiplex the three chromatic channels into a single encoding media, because we want to decrypt the information in real time. Then, we send to the decoding station the phase mask and the three packages each one containing the multiplexing of a single channel. The end user synchronizes and decodes the information contained in the separate channels. Finally, the decoding information is conveyed together to bring the decoded dynamical color phenomenon in real-time. We present material that supports our concepts.

  15. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No. 731-TA-696...

  16. Analysis of pure maple syrup consumers

    Treesearch

    Paul E. Sendak

    1974-01-01

    Virtually all of the pure maple syrup productim in the United States is in the northern states of Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Wisconsin. Pure maple syrup users living in the maple production area and users living in other areas of the United States were asked a series of questions about their use of pure...

  17. Association between objective measurement of the speech intelligibility of young people with dysarthria and listener ratings of ease of understanding.

    PubMed

    Landa, Sophie; Pennington, Lindsay; Miller, Nick; Robson, Sheila; Thompson, Vicki; Steen, Nick

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between listeners' ratings of how much effort it took to understand the speech of young people with cerebral palsy and the percentage of words listeners actually understood. Thirty-one young people with dysarthria and cerebral palsy (16 males, 15 females; mean age = 11 years, SD = 3) were audio recorded repeating single words and producing speech. Objective measures of intelligibility were calculated for multiple familiar and unfamiliar listeners using a forced choice paradigm for single words and verbatim orthographic transcriptions for connected speech. Listeners rated how much effort it took to understand speech in each condition using a 5-point ordinal ease of listening (EOL) scale. Agreement on EOL within rater groups was high (ICC > 0.71). An effect of listener was observed for familiar listeners, but not for unfamiliar listeners. EOL agreement between familiar and unfamiliar listeners was weak-moderate (ICC = 0.46). EOL predicted the percentage of speech actually understood by familiar and unfamiliar listeners (r > 0.56, p < 0.001 for all predictions). Strongest associations between EOL and intelligibility were observed for speakers with mild and profound impairments. The findings of this study demonstrate that listeners can judge how well they have understood dysarthric speech. EOL is associated with listener familiarity, speech task and speech impairment severity. EOL is appropriate for use in clinical practice as a measure of communication activity.

  18. Dual Target Search is Neither Purely Simultaneous nor Purely Successive.

    PubMed

    Cave, Kyle R; Menneer, Tamaryn; Nomani, Mohammad S; Stroud, Michael J; Donnelly, Nick

    2017-08-31

    Previous research shows that visual search for two different targets is less efficient than search for a single target. Stroud, Menneer, Cave and Donnelly (2012) concluded that two target colours are represented separately based on modeling the fixation patterns. Although those analyses provide evidence for two separate target representations, they do not show whether participants search simultaneously for both targets, or first search for one target and then the other. Some studies suggest that multiple target representations are simultaneously active, while others indicate that search can be voluntarily simultaneous, or switching, or a mixture of both. Stroud et al.'s participants were not explicitly instructed to use any particular strategy. These data were revisited to determine which strategy was employed. Each fixated item was categorised according to whether its colour was more similar to one target or the other. Once an item similar to one target is fixated, the next fixated item is more likely to be similar to that target than the other, showing that at a given moment during search, one target is generally favoured. However, the search for one target is not completed before search for the other begins. Instead, there are often short runs of one or two fixations to distractors similar to one target, with each run followed by a switch to the other target. Thus, the results suggest that one target is more highly weighted than the other at any given time, but not to the extent that search is purely successive.

  19. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, M.M. Galapon, E.A.

    2016-09-15

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  20. Quasimonoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in pure nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, M. Z.; Ali, A.; Fedosejevs, R.; Fourmaux, S.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2012-02-13

    Quasimonoenergetic electron beams with maximum energy >0.5 GeV and 2 mrad divergence have been generated in pure nitrogen gas via wakefield acceleration with 80 TW, 30 fs laser pulses. Long low energy tail features were typically observed due to continuous ionization injection. The measured peak electron energy decreased with the plasma density, agreeing with the predicted scaling for electrons. The experiments showed a threshold electron density of 3x10{sup 18}cm{sup -3} for self-trapping. Our experiments suggest that pure Nitrogen is a potential candidate gas to achieve GeV monoenergetic electrons using the ionization induced injection scheme for laser wakefield acceleration.

  1. Social cognition in "pure" delusional disorder.

    PubMed

    Bömmer, Isabel; Brüne, Martin

    2006-09-01

    Introduction. Delusional disorders are characterised by monothematic, "encapsulated" and incorrigible false beliefs and misinterpretations of social signals. Due to the rarity of cases with "pure" delusional disorder (DD) in clinical settings most studies of social cognition in delusional patients have focused on patients with paranoid schizophrenia. In the present study we sought to examine emotion recognition, theory of mind abilities, and pragmatic language comprehension in patients with delusional disorder. Methods. Social cognition was assessed in 21 patients recruited over a 3-year period who were diagnosed with delusional disorder, paranoid, erotomanic, or jealous type. In addition to an emotion recognition and theory of mind test battery, we included a novel German Proverb Test, which has been found indicative of subtle theory of mind deficits in schizophrenic patients. Executive functioning was assessed using the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Psychopathology was measured using the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS). Patients' task performance was compared to a group of 22 healthy control persons paralleled for verbal intelligence, education, and age. Results. Patients with DD made significantly more perseverative errors in the WCST, they performed more poorly on the theory of mind tasks and the proverb test, but were unimpaired in basic emotion recognition abilities relative to controls. When executive functioning was co-varied out, the group differences in theory of mind disappeared, whereas the greater propensity of patients with DD to interpret proverbs literally remained significant. Conclusions. In "pure" DD the basic social cognitive abilities appear to be preserved. Difficulties in metaphorical speech comprehension and executive functioning could, however, indicate more subtle social cognitive deficits in these patients.

  2. Due process traditionalism.

    PubMed

    Sunstein, Cass R

    2008-06-01

    In important cases, the Supreme Court has limited the scope of "substantive due process" by reference to tradition, but it has yet to explain why it has done so. Due process traditionalism might be defended in several distinctive ways. The most ambitious defense draws on a set of ideas associated with Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek, who suggested that traditions have special credentials by virtue of their acceptance by many minds. But this defense runs into three problems. Those who have participated in a tradition may not have accepted any relevant proposition; they might suffer from a systematic bias; and they might have joined a cascade. An alternative defense sees due process traditionalism as a second-best substitute for two preferable alternatives: a purely procedural approach to the Due Process Clause, and an approach that gives legislatures the benefit of every reasonable doubt. But it is not clear that in these domains, the first-best approaches are especially attractive; and even if they are, the second-best may be an unacceptably crude substitute. The most plausible defense of due process traditionalism operates on rule-consequentialist grounds, with the suggestion that even if traditions are not great, they are often good, and judges do best if they defer to traditions rather than attempting to specify the content of "liberty" on their own. But the rule-consequentialist defense depends on controversial and probably false assumptions about the likely goodness of traditions and the institutional incapacities of judges.

  3. Gate-Driven Pure Spin Current in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaoyang; Su, Li; Si, Zhizhong; Zhang, Youguang; Bournel, Arnaud; Zhang, Yue; Klein, Jacques-Olivier; Fert, Albert; Zhao, Weisheng

    2017-09-01

    The manipulation of spin current is a promising solution for low-power devices beyond CMOS. However, conventional methods, such as spin-transfer torque or spin-orbit torque for magnetic tunnel junctions, suffer from large power consumption due to frequent spin-charge conversions. An important challenge is, thus, to realize long-distance transport of pure spin current, together with efficient manipulation. Here, the mechanism of gate-driven pure spin current in graphene is presented. Such a mechanism relies on the electrical gating of carrier-density-dependent conductivity and spin-diffusion length in graphene. The gate-driven feature is adopted to realize the pure spin-current demultiplexing operation, which enables gate-controllable distribution of the pure spin current into graphene branches. Compared with the Elliott-Yafet spin-relaxation mechanism, the D'yakonov-Perel spin-relaxation mechanism results in more appreciable demultiplexing performance. The feature of the pure spin-current demultiplexing operation will allow a number of logic functions to be cascaded without spin-charge conversions and open a route for future ultra-low-power devices.

  4. [A case report of central respiratory failure due to hemimedullary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Minami, M; Ono, S; Nawa, T; Miki, K; Mizutani, T

    2000-07-01

    A hemimedullary infarction, in which both medial and lateral medullary infarctions occur simultaneously, is a rare cerebrovascular disease. Pontomedullary lesions often cause central respiratory failure, and the majority of central respiratory failures are due to bilateral pontomedullary lesions. We report a 66-year-old man with central respiratory failure due to a hemimedullary infarction detected by magnetic resonance imaging. He was admitted to our hospital on March 7, 1998, because of a sudden onset of dysarthria, and both numbness and weakness on his left side. Soon after arriving at the hospital, his spontaneous respiration ceased. Therefore, he was intubated and artificial ventilation was started. Pertinent neurological abnormalities on admission consisted of dysarthria, dysphagia, right Horner's sign, right gaze evoked horizontal nystagmus, right soft palate palsy, and tongue deviation to the right. In addition, left hemiparesis, left Babinski's sign, sensory impairment on the left side including the face, and central respiratory failure were noted. Although voluntary respiration recovered in 12 days, sleep apnea continued for 5 months, which was considered to be due to the automatic respiratory failure. An important feature of this patient was that the hemimedullary infarction caused the central respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the third patient whose central respiratory failure occurred because of a hemimedullary infarction.

  5. Method of preparing pure fluorine gas

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, Larned B.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for purifying and storing pure fluorine is described. The method utilizes alkali metal-nickel fluorides to absorb tank fluorine by forming nickel complex salts and leaving the gaseous impurities which are pumped away. The complex nickel fluoride is then heated to evolve back pure gaseous fluorine.

  6. Pure ovarian choriocarcinoma: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Mood, Narges Izadi; Samadi, Nasrin; Rahimi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Sarmadi, Soheila; Eftekhar, Zahra; Yarandi, Fariba

    2009-01-01

    Pure primary ovarian choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare condition of gestational or nongestational origin. The possibility of gestational origin can be suspected by the presence of a corpus luteum of pregnancy but definite diagnosis would be based on genetic analysis. Here, we present two cases of pure ovarian choriocarcinoma in the forth decade of life with the possibility of gestational origin. PMID:21772904

  7. Pure red cell hypoplasia secondary to isoniazid.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. R.; Manoharan, A.

    1987-01-01

    We describe a 77 year old man who developed pure red cell aplasia while receiving antituberculous therapy including isoniazid. Prompt recovery occurred following cessation of isoniazid. In this paper we also review previously described case reports of isoniazid-induced pure red cell aplasia. PMID:3120168

  8. Reduction of hydrogen content in pure Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogiwara, N.; Suganuma, K.; Hikichi, Y.; Kamiya, J.; Kinsho, M.; Sukenobu, S.

    2008-03-01

    Pure Ti is adopted as a material for ducts and bellows at the proton accelerator 3 GeV-RCS in J-PARC project, because of its small residual radioactivity. In the particle accelerator, the H2 outgassing due to ion impact is often the dominant source of gas release. As the reduction of hydrogen content will probably suppress ion induced desorption, we attempted to reduce the hydrogen content in the Ti by in-situ vacuum baking. First, thermal desorption behavior and the change in hydrogen content after the heat treatment were investigated. Vacuum firing at temperatures higher than 550°C was effective in reducing the hydrogen content in the Ti. At the same time, the mechanical properties were monitored because grain growth leads to decrease in mechanical strength. Even after treatment at 750°C for 12 hr, the decreases in tensile and yield strength were so small (~10%) that we have no anxiety about the reduction of mechanical strength. Based upon the results of this study, vacuum firing has been applied to reduce the hydrogen content in the Ti bellows and ducts of the RCS machine.

  9. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  10. Individual and environmental contributions to treatment outcomes following a neuroplasticity-principled speech treatment (LSVT LOUD) in children with dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy: a case study review.

    PubMed

    Boliek, Carol A; Fox, Cynthia M

    2014-08-01

    This study describes the use of a neuroplasticity-principled speech treatment approach (LSVT(®)LOUD) with children who have dysarthria secondary to cerebral palsy. To date, the authors have treated 25 children with mild-to-severe dysarthria, a continuum of gross and fine motor functions, and variable cognitive abilities. From this data set, two case studies are presented that represent as weak or strong responders to LSVT LOUD. These case studies demonstrate how individual and environmental features may impact immediate and lasting responses to treatment. Principles that drive activity-dependent neuroplasticity are embedded in LSVT LOUD and may contribute to positive therapeutic and acoustic outcomes. However, examination of the response patterns indicated that intensity (within and across treatment sessions) is necessary but not sufficient for change. Weak responders may require a longer treatment phase, better timing (e.g., developmentally, socially), and a more prominent desire to communicate successfully during daily activities. Strong responders appear to benefit from the intensity and saliency of treatment as well as from intrinsic and extrinsic rewards for using the trained skills for everyday communication. Finally, possibilities are presented for technological solutions designed to promote accessibility to the intensive task repetition and maintenance required to drive lasting changes.

  11. Lateral Stress Measurements in Pure Tungsten during Shock Loading

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, J. C. F.; Gray, G. T. III; Bourne, N. K.

    2006-07-28

    Longitudinal and lateral stresses during the shock loading of pure tungsten have been measured using manganin stress gauges. The Hugoniot has been compared to the previous work of others and shown to be in close agreement. Lateral stresses have been shown to increase behind the shock front, implying that the shear strength decreases. Whilst this is similar to results in tantalum, comparison with recovery experiments in the literature suggests that this may be due in part to a brittle failure process.

  12. Pharmacological aspects and neurological speech therapy: target of dysphony, dysarthria and dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Megna, M; Cortese, R; Dellomonaco, A; Bellomo, R G; Salonna, I; Cristella, G; Ranieri, M

    2012-01-01

    The word dysphagy was suggested by Nicolatopoulos (1907) and derives from the ancient Greek "duz", which means "difficulty" and "katapinein", which means "to swallow". Generally, the dysphagia is defined on the basis of its origin: oral, pharynx and oesophagus, otherwise by its mechanical or neurological aetiology. The symptoms are dependent on the nature of the lesions in the affected organs. The swallow is a complex motor sequence dependent on the coordinate contraction of the muscle of mouth, of larynx and of the oesophagus. The mechanical action of the swallow helps the liquid or solid food progression from mouth to stomach thanks to cooperation of 31 muscles and 5 cranial nerves and allows swallowing about 580 times approximately. The dysphagy in neurological diseases is mainly due to the following reasons. Increase of vascular cerebral disease, increase of population age and increase of road and work traumas. The difficulties in swallowing causes heavy social problems like meager diet, social isolation and worsening of quality of life. The speech rehabilitation requires the involvement of care givers through a re-educational program that takes place in two periods: the first of relaxation, and the second of restoration of phonodeglutition praxis.

  13. Pure dephasing of single Mn spin in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dingyang; Lai, Wenxi; Yang, Wen

    2017-08-01

    We present comprehensive analytical and numerical studies on the pure dephasing of a single Mn spin in a semiconductor quantum dot due to (i) its sp-d exchange interaction with an electronic environment, and (ii) its hyperfine interaction with the nuclear spin environment. For (i), by modeling the electronic environment by an open two-level system, we provide exact analytical expressions and present detailed analysis for the Mn spin pure dephasing in both the Markovian and non-Markovian regimes. This provides a clear physical picture and a general theoretical framework based on which we estimate the Mn spin pure dephasing due to various fluctuations (such as thermal excitation, optical pumping, tunneling, or electron/hole spin relaxation) of the electronic environment and reveals a series of interesting behaviors, such as thermal, optical, and electrical control of the crossover between the Markov and non-Markov regimes. In particular, we find rapid Mn spin pure dephasing on a nanosecond time scale by the thermal fluctuation and optical pumping, but these mechanisms can be strongly suppressed by shifting the electron envelope function relative to the Mn atom with an external electric field through the quantum-confined Stark effect. The thermal fluctuation mechanism is also exponentially suppressed at low temperature. For (ii), we find that the Mn spin dephasing time is limited by the thermal fluctuation of the nuclear spins to a few microseconds even at low temperature and its value varies from sample to sample, depending on the distribution of spinful isotopes on the nearest-neighbor sites surrounding the substitutional Mn atom. Our findings may be useful to understand and suppress the Mn spin pure dephasing for its applications in quantum information processing.

  14. Effectiveness of enhanced communication therapy in the first four months after stroke for aphasia and dysarthria: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Anne; Patchick, Emma; Young, Alys; Davies, Linda; Vail, Andy; Long, Andrew F; Watkins, Caroline; Wilkinson, Mo; Pearl, Gill; Ralph, Matthew A Lambon; Tyrrell, Pippa

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of enhanced communication therapy in the first four months after stroke compared with an attention control (unstructured social contact). Design Externally randomised, pragmatic, parallel, superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment. Setting Twelve UK hospital and community stroke services. Participants 170 adults (mean age 70 years) randomised within two weeks of admission to hospital with stroke (December 2006 to January 2010) whom speech and language therapists deemed eligible, and 135 carers. Interventions Enhanced, agreed best practice, communication therapy specific to aphasia or dysarthria, offered by speech and language therapists according to participants’ needs for up to four months, with continuity from hospital to community. Comparison was with similarly resourced social contact (without communication therapy) from employed visitors. Outcome measures Primary outcome was blinded, functional communicative ability at six months on the Therapy Outcome Measure (TOM) activity subscale. Secondary outcomes (unblinded, six months): participants’ perceptions on the Communication Outcomes After Stroke scale (COAST); carers’ perceptions of participants from part of the Carer COAST; carers’ wellbeing on Carers of Older People in Europe Index and quality of life items from Carer COAST; and serious adverse events. Results Therapist and visitor contact both had good uptake from service users. An average 22 contacts (intervention or control) over 13 weeks were accepted by users. Impairment focused therapy was the approach most often used by the speech and language therapists. Visitors most often provided general conversation. In total, 81/85 of the intervention group and 72/85 of the control group completed the primary outcome measure. Both groups improved on the TOM activity subscale. The estimated six months group difference was not statistically significant, with 0.25 (95% CI –0.19 to 0.69) points in favour of

  15. Clinical study of 222 patients with pure motor stroke

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, A; Padilla, I; Massons, J; Garcia-Eroles, L; Comes, E; Targa, C

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to assess the frequency of pure motor stroke caused by different stroke subtypes and to compare demographic, clinical, neuroimaging, and outcome data of pure motor stroke with those of patients with other lacunar stroke as well as with those of patients with non-lacunar stroke.
Data from 2000 patients with acute stroke (n=1761) or transient ischaemic attack (n=239) admitted consecutively to the department of neurology of an acute care 350 bed teaching hospital were prospectively collected in the Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona stroke registry over a 10 year period. For the purpose of the study 222 (12.7%) patients with pure motor stroke were selected. The other study groups included 218 (12.3%) patients with other lacunar strokes and 1321 (75%) patients with non-lacunar stroke.
In relation to stroke subtype, lacunar infarcts were found in 189 (85%) patients, whereas ischaemic lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts occurred in 23 (10.4%) patients (atherothrombotic stroke in 12, cardioembolic stroke in seven, infarction of undetermined origin in three, and infarction of unusual aetiology in one) and haemorrhagic lacunar syndromes in 10 (4.5%). Patients with pure motor stroke showed a better outcome than patients with non-lacunar stroke with a significantly lower number of complications and in hospital mortality rate, shorter duration of hospital stay, and a higher number of symptom free patients at hospital discharge. After multivariate analysis, hypertension, diabetes, obesity, hyperlipidaemia, non-sudden stroke onset, internal capsule involvement, and pons topography seemed to be independent factors of pure motor stroke in patients with acute stroke.
In conclusion, about one of every 10 patients with acute stroke had a pure motor stroke. Pure motor stroke was caused by a lacunar infarct in 85% of patients and by other stroke subtypes in 15%. Several clinical features are more frequent in patients with pure motor stroke than in

  16. Conformal pure radiation with parallel rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistner, Thomas; Nurowski, Paweł

    2012-03-01

    We define pure radiation metrics with parallel rays to be n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian metrics that admit a parallel null line bundle K and whose Ricci tensor vanishes on vectors that are orthogonal to K. We give necessary conditions in terms of the Weyl, Cotton and Bach tensors for a pseudo-Riemannian metric to be conformal to a pure radiation metric with parallel rays. Then, we derive conditions in terms of the tractor calculus that are equivalent to the existence of a pure radiation metric with parallel rays in a conformal class. We also give analogous results for n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian pp-waves.

  17. Simplified D = 11 pure spinor b ghost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, Nathan; Guillen, Max

    2017-07-01

    A b-ghost was constructed for the D = 11 non-minimal pure spinor superparticle by requiring that { Q, b} = T where Q={Λ}^{α }{D}_{α }+{R}^{α }{\\overline{W}}_{α } is the usual non-minimal pure spinor BRST operator. As was done for the D = 10 b-ghost, we will show that the D = 11 b-ghost can be simplified by introducing an SO(10, 1) fermionic vector {\\overline{Σ}}^i constructed out of the fermionic spinor D α and pure spinor variables. This simplified version will be shown to satisfy { Q, b} = T and { b, b} = BRST - trivial.

  18. In vitro degradation of pure Mg in response to glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Han, En-Hou

    2015-08-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biodegradable biomaterials but are still challenging to be used in person with high levels of blood glucose or diabetes. To date, the influence of glucose on magnesium degradation has not yet been elucidated, this issue requires more attention. Herein, we present pure Mg exhibiting different corrosion responses to saline and Hank’s solutions with different glucose contents, and the degradation mechanism of pure Mg in the saline solution with glucose in comparison with mannitol as a control. On one hand, the corrosion rate of pure Mg increases with the glucose concentration in saline solutions. Glucose rapidly transforms into gluconic acid, which attacks the oxides of the metal and decreases the pH of the solution; it also promotes the absorption of chloride ions on the Mg surface and consequently accelerates corrosion. On the other hand, better corrosion resistance is obtained with increasing glucose content in Hank’s solution due to the fact that glucose coordinates Ca2+ ions in Hank’s solution and thus improves the formation of Ca-P compounds on the pure Mg surface. This finding will open up new avenues for research on the biodegradation of bio-Mg materials in general, which could yield many new and interesting results.

  19. In vitro degradation of pure Mg in response to glucose

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rong-Chang; Li, Xiao-Ting; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zhang, Fen; Han, En-Hou

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are promising biodegradable biomaterials but are still challenging to be used in person with high levels of blood glucose or diabetes. To date, the influence of glucose on magnesium degradation has not yet been elucidated, this issue requires more attention. Herein, we present pure Mg exhibiting different corrosion responses to saline and Hank’s solutions with different glucose contents, and the degradation mechanism of pure Mg in the saline solution with glucose in comparison with mannitol as a control. On one hand, the corrosion rate of pure Mg increases with the glucose concentration in saline solutions. Glucose rapidly transforms into gluconic acid, which attacks the oxides of the metal and decreases the pH of the solution; it also promotes the absorption of chloride ions on the Mg surface and consequently accelerates corrosion. On the other hand, better corrosion resistance is obtained with increasing glucose content in Hank’s solution due to the fact that glucose coordinates Ca2+ ions in Hank’s solution and thus improves the formation of Ca-P compounds on the pure Mg surface. This finding will open up new avenues for research on the biodegradation of bio-Mg materials in general, which could yield many new and interesting results. PMID:26264413

  20. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  1. Quantifying the coherence of pure quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Grogan, Shane; Johnston, Nathaniel; Li, Chi-Kwong; Plosker, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, several measures have been proposed for characterizing the coherence of a given quantum state. We derive several results that illuminate how these measures behave when restricted to pure states. Notably, we present an explicit characterization of the closest incoherent state to a given pure state under the trace distance measure of coherence. We then use this result to show that the states maximizing the trace distance of coherence are exactly the maximally coherent states. We define the trace distance of entanglement and show that it coincides with the trace distance of coherence for pure states. Finally, we give an alternate proof to a recent result that the ℓ1 measure of coherence of a pure state is never smaller than its relative entropy of coherence.

  2. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  3. Purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Aytar, Murat Hamit; Yener, Ulaş; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Kaya, Behram; Özgen, Serdar; Sav, Aydin; Alanay, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas present mostly as intradural-extradurally. Purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastoma is a very rare entity. In this study, we aimed to analyze epidemiological perspectives of purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas presented in English medical literature in addition to our own exemplary case. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched using the terms “hemangioblastoma,” “extradural,” “spinal,” and “nerve root.” Demographical variables of age, gender, concomitant presence of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease; spinal imaging and/or intraoperative findings for tumor location were surveyed from retrieved articles. There are 38 patients with purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastoma. The median age is 45 years (range = 24–72 years). Female:male ratio is 0.6. Spinal levels for purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas, in order of decreasing frequency, are thoracic (48.6%), cervical (13.5%), lumbar (13.5%), lumbosacral (10.8%), sacral (8.1%), and thoracolumbar (5.4%). Concomitant presence of VHL disease is 45%. Purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas are very rare and can be confused with other more common extradural spinal cord tumors. Concomitant presence of VHL disease is observed in less than half of the patients with purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas. Surgery is the first-line treatment in these tumors. PMID:27891027

  4. Rehabilitation of pure alexia: A review

    PubMed Central

    Starrfelt, Randi; Ólafsdóttir, Rannveig Rós; Arendt, Ida-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Acquired reading problems caused by brain injury (alexia) are common, either as a part of an aphasic syndrome, or as an isolated symptom. In pure alexia, reading is impaired while other language functions, including writing, are spared. Being in many ways a simple syndrome, one would think that pure alexia was an easy target for rehabilitation efforts. We review the literature on rehabilitation of pure alexia from 1990 to the present, and find that patients differ widely on several dimensions, such as alexia severity and associated deficits. Many patients reported to have pure alexia in the reviewed studies, have associated deficits such as agraphia or aphasia and thus do not strictly conform to the diagnosis. Few studies report clear and generalisable effects of training, none report control data, and in many cases the reported findings are not supported by statistics. We can, however, tentatively conclude that Multiple Oral Re-reading techniques may have some effect in mild pure alexia where diminished reading speed is the main problem, while Tacile-Kinesthetic training may improve letter identification in more severe cases of alexia. There is, however, still a great need for well-designed and controlled studies of rehabilitation of pure alexia. PMID:23808895

  5. Pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic pringle maneuver in patients with severe cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Shigehito; Nakanishi, Chikashi; Kawagishi, Naoki; Kamei, Takashi; Satomi, Susumu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy is a standard surgical procedure. However, it is difficult to perform in patients with severe cirrhosis because of fibrosis and a high risk of hemorrhage. We report our recent experience in five cases of pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver in patients with severe cirrhosis. From 2012 to 2014, we performed pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy in five patients with severe liver cirrhosis (indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min [ICG R15] >30% and fibrosis stage f4). A pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver was employed in all patients. We investigated operative time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization and the days when discharge was possible, and compared these findings with those of patients with a normal liver (ICG R15 <10%, f0) who underwent pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy during the same period (n = 7). As a result, operative time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization and the days when discharge was possible were similar in patients with cirrhosis undergoing pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver to those in patients with a normal liver undergoing pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. In conclusion, pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver appears to be safe in patients with severe cirrhosis.

  6. Direct Observation of High Photoresponsivity in Pure Graphene Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qinglin; He, Jun; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-02-01

    Ultrafast and broad spectral bandwidth photodetectors are desirable attributable to their unique bandstructures. Photodetectors based on graphene have great potential due to graphene's outstanding optical and electrical properties. However, the highest reported values of the photoresponsivity of pure graphene are less than 10 mA/W at room temperature, which significantly limits its potential applications. Here, we report a photoresponsivity of 32 A/W in pure monolayer graphene photodetectors, an improvement of over one order of magnitude for functional graphene nanostructures (<3 A/W). The high photocurrent generation in our devices can be attributed to the high sensitivity of graphene's resistivity to a local change of the electric field induced by photo-excited carriers generated in the light-doping substrate. This dramatically increases the feasibility of using graphene for the next generation of photodetectors.

  7. Direct Observation of High Photoresponsivity in Pure Graphene Photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanping; Xia, Qinglin; He, Jun; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-12-01

    Ultrafast and broad spectral bandwidth photodetectors are desirable attributable to their unique bandstructures. Photodetectors based on graphene have great potential due to graphene's outstanding optical and electrical properties. However, the highest reported values of the photoresponsivity of pure graphene are less than 10 mA/W at room temperature, which significantly limits its potential applications. Here, we report a photoresponsivity of 32 A/W in pure monolayer graphene photodetectors, an improvement of over one order of magnitude for functional graphene nanostructures (<3 A/W). The high photocurrent generation in our devices can be attributed to the high sensitivity of graphene's resistivity to a local change of the electric field induced by photo-excited carriers generated in the light-doping substrate. This dramatically increases the feasibility of using graphene for the next generation of photodetectors.

  8. A case of pure autotopagnosia following Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Itaru; Hamada, Shinsuke; Soma, Hiroyuki; Moriwaka, Fumio; Tashiro, Kunio

    2016-12-02

    A 69-year-old male (N.A.) with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease showed pure autotopagnosia. We administered tests evaluating his ability to name his own body parts, to point to body parts (his own and examiner's), and to recognize positional relationships between his body parts by verbal questions and responses. We found impaired localization of the patient's own body parts by pointing and impaired recognition of positional relationships between his body parts. However, there was no impairment in naming his own body parts or in localizing the examiner's body parts. The results suggest a pure autotopagnosia in N.A. leading to an impairment of recognition of the spatial position of his body parts in a three-dimensional body representation within the egocentric reference frame. We were able to rule out the possibility that his pattern of performance could have been due to a disability in programming reaching movements of the arm.

  9. Nokia PureView oversampling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuori, Tero; Alakarhu, Juha; Salmelin, Eero; Partinen, Ari

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes Nokia's PureView oversampling imaging technology as well as the product, Nokia 808 PureView, featuring it. The Nokia PureView imaging technology is the combination of a large, super high resolution 41Mpix with high performance Carl Zeiss optics. Large sensor enables a pixel oversampling technique that reduces an image taken at full resolution into a lower resolution picture, thus achieving higher definition and light sensitivity. One oversampled super pixel in image file is formed by using many sensor pixels. A large sensor enables also a lossless zoom. If a user wants to use the lossless zoom, the sensor image is cropped. However, up-scaling is not needed as in traditional digital zooming usually used in mobile devices. Lossless zooming means image quality that does not have the digital zooming artifacts as well as no optical zooming artifacts like zoom lens system distortions. Zooming with PureView is also completely silent. PureView imaging technology is the result of many years of research and development and the tangible fruits of this work are exceptional image quality, lossless zoom, and superior low light performance.

  10. Structural anatomy of pure and hemianopic alexia.

    PubMed

    Leff, A P; Spitsyna, G; Plant, G T; Wise, R J S

    2006-09-01

    The two most common types of acquired reading disorder resulting from damage to the territory of the dominant posterior cerebral artery are hemianopic and pure alexia. Patients with pronounced hemianopic alexia have a right homonymous hemianopia that encroaches into central or parafoveal vision; they read individual words well, but generate inefficient reading saccades when reading along a line of text. Patients with pure alexia also often have a hemianopia but are more disabled, making frequent errors on individual words; they have sustained damage to a brain region that supports efficient word identification. To investigate the differences in lesion site between hemianopic alexia and pure alexia groups, as rehabilitative techniques differ between the two conditions. High-resolution magnetic resonance images were obtained from seven patients with hemianopic alexia and from six patients with pure alexia caused by a left occipital stroke. The boundary of each lesion was defined and lesion volumes were then transformed into a standard stereotactic space so that regional comparisons could be made. The two patient groups did not differ in terms of damage to the medial left occipital lobe, but those with pure alexia had additional lateral damage to the posterior fusiform gyrus and adjacent tissue. Clinicians will be able to predict the type of reading disorder patients with left occipital lesions have from simple tests of reading speed and the distribution of damage to the left occipital lobe on brain imaging. This information will aid management decisions, including recommendations for reading rehabilitation.

  11. Dysarthria in individuals with Parkinson's disease: a protocol for a binational, cross-sectional, case-controlled study in French and European Portuguese (FraLusoPark)

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Rita; Mercier, Céline; Santos, Helena; Atkinson-Clement, Cyril; Carvalho, Joana; Welby, Pauline; Oliveira, Pedro; D'Imperio, Mariapaola; Frota, Sónia; Letanneux, Alban; Vigario, Marina; Cruz, Marisa; Martins, Isabel Pavão; Viallet, François

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) have to deal with several aspects of voice and speech decline and thus alteration of communication ability during the course of the disease. Among these communication impairments, 3 major challenges include: (1) dysarthria, consisting of orofacial motor dysfunction and dysprosody, which is linked to the neurodegenerative processes; (2) effects of the pharmacological treatment, which vary according to the disease stage; and (3) particular speech modifications that may be language-specific, that is, dependent on the language spoken by the patients. The main objective of the FraLusoPark project is to provide a thorough evaluation of changes in PD speech as a result of pharmacological treatment and disease duration in 2 different languages (French vs European Portuguese). Methods and analysis Individuals with PD are enrolled in the study in France (N=60) and Portugal (N=60). Their global motor disability and orofacial motor functions is assessed with specific clinical rating scales, without (OFF) and with (ON) pharmacological treatment. 2 groups of 60 healthy age-matched volunteers provide the reference for between-group comparisons. Along with the clinical examinations, several speech tasks are recorded to obtain acoustic and perceptual measures. Patient-reported outcome measures are used to assess the psychosocial impact of dysarthria on quality of life. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the local responsible committees on human experimentation and is conducted in accordance with the ethical standards. A valuable large-scale database of speech recordings and metadata from patients with PD in France and Portugal will be constructed. Results will be disseminated in several articles in peer-reviewed journals and in conference presentations. Recommendations on how to assess speech and voice disorders in individuals with PD to monitor the progression and management of symptoms will be provided

  12. PURE conversations: enhancing communication and teamwork.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Larry; Larison, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    Communications failures have been identified as a significant cause of adverse outcomes in obstetrics. Following the lead of some high reliability organizations, healthcare has introduced structured communication such as SBAR as a way to make sure communications between professionals are direct, complete and effective. The authors have observed, however, that structured communication in healthcare often requires a cultural change in the way that professionals relate to each other; PURE conversations (Purposeful/prepared/productive, Unambiguous, Respectful and Effective) can facilitate this cultural shift. PURE conversations stress the mental processes necessary to conduct and monitor structured communications in real time by taking into account the context and relationships that exist among professionals. This article describes the elements of a multidisciplinary workshop based on clinical scenarios incorporating the PURE concept to improve the effectiveness and adoption of structured communication by the perinatal team.

  13. Pure agraphia: a discrete form of aphasia.

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, G; De Bastiani, P

    1979-01-01

    A 62 year old, right handed man developed a pure agraphia as the result of a left temporal lobe stroke. Isolated writing disturbances persisted for seven months until he had a second cerebrovascular accident resulting in total aphasia and right hemiplegia. A CAT scan obtained four months after the first episode showed a localised dilatation of the posterior portion of the left Sylvian cistern and patchy areas of low absorption in the left temporal lobe. The report supports suggestions that localised damage to the language area can produce a pure agraphia as the sole detectable disorder of language organisation. Images PMID:438836

  14. Pure Apraxia of Speech - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Ae; Yun, Sang Jin

    2011-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is the impairment of motor programming. However, the exact nature of this deficit remains unclear. In particular, AOS without other speech-language deficit is called pure AOS, but it is very rare. When diagnosing AOS, the characteristic of articulation is considered a crucial criterion, which has been proposed for differentiating AOS from phonological and dysarthric disorders. The present study reports on pure AOS in a 37-year-old right-handed male after a left insular, front, temporal infarction. This report may be useful for further AOS study and diagnosis in the clinical setting. PMID:22506197

  15. BRST and the pure spinor formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J. Antonio

    2008-03-06

    The aim of this talk is to show the relation between the standard BRST approach of the GS superstring with the quantization technics used in the pure spinor approach to superstring. To that end we will use the Batalin-Fradkin-Tyutin (BFT) conversion program of second class constraints to first class constraints in the GS superstring using light cone coordinates. By applying this systematic procedure we were able to obtain a gauge system that is equivalent to the recent model proposed in [1] to relate the GS superstring to the pure spinor formalism.

  16. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d-4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  17. Diagnosing pure-electron plasmas with internal particle flux probes.

    PubMed

    Kremer, J P; Pedersen, T Sunn; Marksteiner, Q; Lefrancois, R G; Hahn, M

    2007-01-01

    Techniques for measuring local plasma potential, density, and temperature of pure-electron plasmas using emissive and Langmuir probes are described. The plasma potential is measured as the least negative potential at which a hot tungsten filament emits electrons. Temperature is measured, as is commonly done in quasineutral plasmas, through the interpretation of a Langmuir probe current-voltage characteristic. Due to the lack of ion-saturation current, the density must also be measured through the interpretation of this characteristic thereby greatly complicating the measurement. Measurements are further complicated by low densities, low cross field transport rates, and large flows typical of pure-electron plasmas. This article describes the use of these techniques on pure-electron plasmas in the Columbia Non-neutral Torus (CNT) stellarator. Measured values for present baseline experimental parameters in CNT are phi(p)=-200+/-2 V, T(e)=4+/-1 eV, and n(e) on the order of 10(12) m(-3) in the interior.

  18. Regulation mechanisms in mixed and pure culture microbial fermentation.

    PubMed

    Hoelzle, Robert D; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J

    2014-11-01

    Mixed-culture fermentation is a key central process to enable next generation biofuels and biocommodity production due to economic and process advantages over application of pure cultures. However, a key limitation to the application of mixed-culture fermentation is predicting culture product response, related to metabolic regulation mechanisms. This is also a limitation in pure culture bacterial fermentation. This review evaluates recent literature in both pure and mixed culture studies with a focus on understanding how regulation and signaling mechanisms interact with metabolic routes and activity. In particular, we focus on how microorganisms balance electron sinking while maximizing catabolic energy generation. Analysis of these mechanisms and their effect on metabolism dynamics is absent in current models of mixed-culture fermentation. This limits process prediction and control, which in turn limits industrial application of mixed-culture fermentation. A key mechanism appears to be the role of internal electron mediating cofactors, and related regulatory signaling. This may determine direction of electrons towards either hydrogen or reduced organics as end-products and may form the basis for future mechanistic models. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Experiments on viscous transport in pure-electron plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriesel, Jason M.; Driscoll, C. Fred

    1999-12-01

    Viscous transport in pure-electron plasmas is a rearrangement of particles due to like-particle interactions, eventually leading to a confined global thermal equilibrium state. The measured transport is observed to be proportional to the shear in the total (E×B+diamagnetic) fluid rotation of the plasma, for both hollow and monotonic rotation profiles. We determine the local kinematic viscosity, κ, from measurements of the local flux of electrons. The measured viscosity is 50-104 times larger than expected from classical transport due to short-range velocity-scattering collisions, but is within a factor of 10 of recent theories by O'Neil and Dubin of transport due to long-range drift collisions. The measured viscosity scales with magnetic field and plasma length roughly as κ∝B/L. This scaling suggests a finite-length transport enhancement caused by particles interacting multiple times as they bounce axially between the ends of the plasma.

  20. Uniform and accelerated degradation of pure iron patterned by Pt disc arrays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-04-01

    Pure iron has been confirmed as a promising biodegradable metal. However, the degradation rate of pure iron should be accelerated to meet the clinical requirements. In this work, two different designs of platinum disc arrays, including sizes of Φ20 μm × S5 μm and Φ4 μm × S4 μm, have been coated on the surface of pure iron. Corrosion tests showed the platinum discs formed plenty of galvanic cells with the iron matrix which significantly accelerated the degradation of pure iron. Simultaneously, due to the designability of the shape, size as well as distribution of Pt discs, the degradation rate as well as degradation uniformity of pure iron can be effectively controlled by coating with platinum discs. The cytotoxicity test results unveiled that Pt discs patterned pure iron exhibited almost no toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but a significant inhibition on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, the hemolysis rate of Pt discs patterned pure iron was lower than 1%. Moreover, Pt discs also effectively reduced the number of adhered platelets. All these results indicated that Pt discs patterning is an effective way to accelerate degradation and improve biocompatibility of pure iron.

  1. Uniform and accelerated degradation of pure iron patterned by Pt disc arrays

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been confirmed as a promising biodegradable metal. However, the degradation rate of pure iron should be accelerated to meet the clinical requirements. In this work, two different designs of platinum disc arrays, including sizes of Φ20 μm × S5 μm and Φ4 μm × S4 μm, have been coated on the surface of pure iron. Corrosion tests showed the platinum discs formed plenty of galvanic cells with the iron matrix which significantly accelerated the degradation of pure iron. Simultaneously, due to the designability of the shape, size as well as distribution of Pt discs, the degradation rate as well as degradation uniformity of pure iron can be effectively controlled by coating with platinum discs. The cytotoxicity test results unveiled that Pt discs patterned pure iron exhibited almost no toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but a significant inhibition on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, the hemolysis rate of Pt discs patterned pure iron was lower than 1%. Moreover, Pt discs also effectively reduced the number of adhered platelets. All these results indicated that Pt discs patterning is an effective way to accelerate degradation and improve biocompatibility of pure iron. PMID:27033380

  2. Uniform and accelerated degradation of pure iron patterned by Pt disc arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng

    2016-04-01

    Pure iron has been confirmed as a promising biodegradable metal. However, the degradation rate of pure iron should be accelerated to meet the clinical requirements. In this work, two different designs of platinum disc arrays, including sizes of Φ20 μm × S5 μm and Φ4 μm × S4 μm, have been coated on the surface of pure iron. Corrosion tests showed the platinum discs formed plenty of galvanic cells with the iron matrix which significantly accelerated the degradation of pure iron. Simultaneously, due to the designability of the shape, size as well as distribution of Pt discs, the degradation rate as well as degradation uniformity of pure iron can be effectively controlled by coating with platinum discs. The cytotoxicity test results unveiled that Pt discs patterned pure iron exhibited almost no toxicity to human umbilical vein endothelial cells, but a significant inhibition on proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, the hemolysis rate of Pt discs patterned pure iron was lower than 1%. Moreover, Pt discs also effectively reduced the number of adhered platelets. All these results indicated that Pt discs patterning is an effective way to accelerate degradation and improve biocompatibility of pure iron.

  3. Pure word deafness and pure anarthria in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, O; Suzuki, K; Endo, K; Fujii, T; Mori, E

    2007-04-01

    A 66-year-old right-handed man developed pure anarthria following pure word deafness. In addition to language disorders, his behavior gradually changed and finally included violence against his wife. Brain magnetic resonance imagings revealed atrophy of the left perisylvian area, which included the inferior half of the precentral gyrus and the upper portion of the superior temporal gyrus, consistent with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It has been documented as either a disorder of expressive language or as an impaired understanding of word meaning. Unlike with pure anarthria, pure word deafness is not included in the clinical diagnostic current criteria for FTD. However, a large variety of language symptoms can appear in FTD according to the distribution of pathological changes in the frontotemporal cortices. This case suggests that pure word deafness could be a prodomal symptom of FTD.

  4. Generation of Pure Bulk Valley Current in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongjin; Low, Tony; Chang, Kai; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.; Guinea, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The generation of valley current is a fundamental goal in graphene valleytronics but no practical ways of its realization are known yet. We propose a workable scheme for the generation of bulk valley current in a graphene mechanical resonator through adiabatic cyclic deformations of the strains and a chemical potential in the suspended region. The accompanied strain gauge fields can break the spatial mirror symmetry of the problem within each of the two inequivalent valleys, leading to a finite valley current due to quantum pumping. An all-electrical measurement configuration is designed to detect the novel state with pure bulk valley currents.

  5. Pure trisomy 10p involving an isochromosome 10p.

    PubMed

    Berend, S A; Shaffer, L G; Bejjani, B A

    1999-05-01

    We report a child with trisomy 10p due to a translocation of the long arm of chromosome 10 to the short arm of chromosome 14 and isochromosome formation of 10p [46,XX,i(10)(p10),der(14)t(10;14)(q10;p10)]. Most reported cases of trisomy 10p involve double segmental imbalance. In contrast, the clinical features described in the current case represent pure trisomy 10p and, thus, delineate the 10p trisomy syndrome phenotype. Mechanisms of the chromosomal rearrangements in this case are suggested.

  6. Yttria Nanoparticle Reinforced Commercially Pure (CP) Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    nanoparticles as well as titanium boride (TiB) reinforcements were produced through gas atomization. After consolidation and extrusion, room temperature...pure FE iron O oxygen Ti titanium TiB titanium boride TYS tensile yield strength UTS ultimate tensile strength wt% weight percent Y2O3

  7. Purely competitive evolutionary dynamics for games.

    PubMed

    Veller, Carl; Rajpaul, Vinesh

    2012-10-01

    We introduce and analyze a purely competitive dynamics for the evolution of an infinite population subject to a three-strategy game. We argue that this dynamics represents a characterization of how certain systems, both natural and artificial, are governed. In each period, the population is randomly sorted into pairs, which engage in a once-off play of the game; the probability that a member propagates its type to its offspring is proportional only to its payoff within the pair. We show that if a type is dominant (obtains higher payoffs in games with both other types), its "pure" population state, comprising only members of that type, is globally attracting. If there is no dominant type, there is an unstable "mixed" fixed point; the population state eventually oscillates between the three near-pure states. We then allow for mutations, where offspring have a nonzero probability of randomly changing their type. In this case, the existence of a dominant type renders a point near its pure state globally attracting. If no dominant type exists, a supercritical Hopf bifurcation occurs at the unique mixed fixed point, and above a critical (typically low) mutation rate, this fixed point becomes globally attracting: the implication is that even very low mutation rates can stabilize a system that would, in the absence of mutations, be unstable.

  8. Implicit Reading in Chinese Pure Alexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Chunlei; Zhu, Renjing; Xu, Mingwei; Luo, Benyan; Weng, Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that some patients with pure alexia display evidence of implicit access to lexical and semantic information about words that they cannot read explicitly. This phenomenon has not been investigated systematically in Chinese patients. We report here a case study of a Chinese patient who met the criteria for pure…

  9. Pure science and the problem of progress.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Heather

    2014-06-01

    How should we understand scientific progress? Kuhn famously discussed science as its own internally driven venture, structured by paradigms. He also famously had a problem describing progress in science, as problem-solving ability failed to provide a clear rubric across paradigm change--paradigm changes tossed out problems as well as solving them. I argue here that much of Kuhn's inability to articulate a clear view of scientific progress stems from his focus on pure science and a neglect of applied science. I trace the history of the distinction between pure and applied science, showing how the distinction came about, the rhetorical uses to which the distinction has been put, and how pure science came to be both more valued by scientists and philosophers. I argue that the distinction between pure and applied science does not stand up to philosophical scrutiny, and that once we relinquish it, we can provide Kuhn with a clear sense of scientific progress. It is not one, though, that will ultimately prove acceptable. For that, societal evaluations of scientific work are needed.

  10. Primary pure choriocarcinoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Fernández Alonso, J; Sáez, C; Pérez, P; Montaño, A; Japón, M A

    1992-04-01

    We report a pure choriocarcinoma of the liver studied at necropsy. The tumour was diagnosed ante-mortem and treated by chemotherapy with no satisfactory response. Previous cases of hepatic choriocarcinoma are reviewed and criteria to diagnose this extragonadal neoplasm are recommended.

  11. Pure Dephasing of a Vibrational Adbond.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    that pure dephasing terms Involve only one (real) level of the adbond, and that sIngle-phonon proceses are Impossible. Figure 4. The logarithm of the...Crane, Indiana 47522-5050 China Lake, California 93555 Scientific Advisor Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory 1 Commandant of the Marine Corps Attn: Dr. R

  12. Implicit Reading in Chinese Pure Alexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Chunlei; Zhu, Renjing; Xu, Mingwei; Luo, Benyan; Weng, Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that some patients with pure alexia display evidence of implicit access to lexical and semantic information about words that they cannot read explicitly. This phenomenon has not been investigated systematically in Chinese patients. We report here a case study of a Chinese patient who met the criteria for pure…

  13. Predict thermal conductivities of pure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The programs presented for the TI-59 programmable calculator can determine the thermal conductivity of pure gases and gases at low pressures as well as the effect of pressure on conductivity. They are based on correlations by Eucken, Stiel-Thodos, Misic-Thodos, Roy-Thodos, and Redlich-Kwong.

  14. In Vitro Degradation of Pure Magnesium―The Effects of Glucose and/or Amino Acid

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Cui, Lan-Yue; Li, Shuo-Qi; Zou, Yu-Hong; Han, En-Hou

    2017-01-01

    The influences of glucose and amino acid (L-cysteine) on the degradation of pure magnesium have been investigated using SEM, XRD, Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and immersion tests. The results demonstrate that both amino acid and glucose inhibit the corrosion of pure magnesium in saline solution, whereas the presence of both amino acid and glucose accelerates the corrosion rate of pure magnesium. This may be due to the formation of -C=N- bonding (a functional group of Schiff bases) between amino acid and glucose, which restricts the formation of the protective Mg(OH)2 precipitates. PMID:28773085

  15. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed....

  16. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed....

  17. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed. [5 FR 35,...

  18. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed....

  19. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed. [5 FR 35,...

  20. Heat engine driven by purely quantum information.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Kang-Hwan; Sagawa, Takahiro; Kim, Sang Wook

    2013-12-06

    The key question of this Letter is whether work can be extracted from a heat engine by using purely quantum mechanical information. If the answer is yes, what is its mathematical formula? First, by using a bipartite memory we show that the work extractable from a heat engine is bounded not only by the free energy change and the sum of the entropy change of an individual memory but also by the change of quantum mutual information contained inside the memory. We then find that the engine can be driven by purely quantum information, expressed as the so-called quantum discord, forming a part of the quantum mutual information. To confirm it, as a physical example we present the Szilard engine containing a diatomic molecule with a semipermeable wall.

  1. Black Hole Attractors and Pure Spinors

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Jonathan P.; Maloney, Alexander; Tomasiello, Alessandro

    2006-02-21

    We construct black hole attractor solutions for a wide class of N = 2 compactifications. The analysis is carried out in ten dimensions and makes crucial use of pure spinor techniques. This formalism can accommodate non-Kaehler manifolds as well as compactifications with flux, in addition to the usual Calabi-Yau case. At the attractor point, the charges fix the moduli according to {Sigma}f{sub k} = Im(C{Phi}), where {Phi} is a pure spinor of odd (even) chirality in IIB (A). For IIB on a Calabi-Yau, {Phi} = {Omega} and the equation reduces to the usual one. Methods in generalized complex geometry can be used to study solutions to the attractor equation.

  2. Pure field theories and MACSYMA algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ament, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    A pure field theory attempts to describe physical phenomena through singularity-free solutions of field equations resulting from an action principle. The physics goes into forming the action principle and interpreting specific results. Algorithms for the intervening mathematical steps are sketched. Vacuum general relativity is a pure field theory, serving as model and providing checks for generalizations. The fields of general relativity are the 10 components of a symmetric Riemannian metric tensor; those of the Einstein-Straus generalization are the 16 components of a nonsymmetric. Algebraic properties are exploited in top level MACSYMA commands toward performing some of the algorithms of that generalization. The light cone for the theory as left by Einstein and Straus is found and simplifications of that theory are discussed.

  3. How Pure Components Control Polymer Blend Miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ronald; Lipson, Jane; Higgins, Julia

    2012-02-01

    We present insight into some intriguing relationships revealed by our recent studies of polymer mixture miscibility. Applying our simple lattice-based equation of state, we discuss some of the patterns observed over a sample of experimental blends. We focus on the question of how much key information can one determine from a knowledge of just the pure components only, and further, on the role of separate enthalpic and entropic contributions to the miscibility behavior. One interesting correlation connects the value of the difference in pure component energetic parameters with that of the mixed segment interactions, suggesting new possibilities for predictive modeling. We also show how in some cases these two parameter groupings act as separate controls determining the entropy and enthalpy of mixing. Also discussed are the different patterns exhibited for UCST-type and LCST-type blends, these being revealed in some cases by simple examination of the underlying microscopic parameters.

  4. Physics with chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E.

    1993-05-01

    Chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors offer a wealth of interesting physics. We review a number of impurity complexes which were discovered in ultrapure Germanium. The have led the way to the widely pursued studies of hydrogen in numerous semiconductors. Isotope related effects and processes include neutron transmutation doping, a technique used for a number of silicon and germanium devices. Isotopically pure and deliberately mixed crystals of germanium have been grown recently and have been used to study the dependence of the indirect bandgap and phonon properties on the mass and mass disorder of the nuclei. The large number of stable isotopes of the various semiconductors present a great potential for basic and applied studies. Semi-conductor isotope engineering may become a reality because of the new economic and political world order.

  5. Physics with chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1993-05-01

    Chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors offer a wealth of interesting physics. We review a number of impurity complexes which were discovered in ultrapure Germanium. They have led the way to the widely pursued studies of hydrogen in numerous semiconductors. Isotope related effects and processes include neutron transmutation doping, a technique used for a number of silicon and germanium devices. Isotopically pure and deliberately mixed crystals of germanium have been grown recently and have been used to study the dependence of the indirect bandgap and phonon properties on the mass and mass disorder of the nuclei. The large number of stable isotopes of the various semiconductors present a great potential for basic and applied studies. Semi-conductor isotope engineering may become a reality because of the new economic and political world order.

  6. Pure field theories and MACSYMA algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ament, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    A pure field theory attempts to describe physical phenomena through singularity-free solutions of field equations resulting from an action principle. The physics goes into forming the action principle and interpreting specific results. Algorithms for the intervening mathematical steps are sketched. Vacuum general relativity is a pure field theory, serving as model and providing checks for generalizations. The fields of general relativity are the 10 components of a symmetric Riemannian metric tensor; those of the Einstein-Straus generalization are the 16 components of a nonsymmetric. Algebraic properties are exploited in top level MACSYMA commands toward performing some of the algorithms of that generalization. The light cone for the theory as left by Einstein and Straus is found and simplifications of that theory are discussed.

  7. Computing Properties Of Pure And Mixed Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    GASPLUS created as two-part code: first designed for use with pure fluids and second designed for use with mixtures of fluids and phases. Offers routines for mathematical modeling of conditions of fluids in pumps, turbines, compressors and other machines. Other routines for calculating performance of para/ortho-hydrogen reactor and heat of para/normal-hydrogen reaction as well as unique convergence routine demonstrates engineering flavor of GASPLUS. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  8. Pure connection action principle for general relativity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2011-06-24

    It has already been known for two decades that general relativity can be reformulated as a certain gauge theory, so that the only dynamical field is an SO(3) connection and the spacetime metric appears as a derived object. However, no simple action principle realizing these ideas has been available. A new elegant action principle for such a "pure connection" formulation of GR is described.

  9. Computing Properties Of Pure And Mixed Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    GASPLUS created as two-part code: first designed for use with pure fluids and second designed for use with mixtures of fluids and phases. Offers routines for mathematical modeling of conditions of fluids in pumps, turbines, compressors and other machines. Other routines for calculating performance of para/ortho-hydrogen reactor and heat of para/normal-hydrogen reaction as well as unique convergence routine demonstrates engineering flavor of GASPLUS. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  10. Les Problemes de l'alexie pure (Problems of Pure Alexia)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kremin, Helgard

    1976-01-01

    This article reviews studies done on alexia and describes experiments designed to distinguish qualitatively between pure alexia (marked by the absence of oral and written problems) and other forms of alexia. (Text is in French.) (CLK)

  11. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  12. Spectrum of supernova neutrinos in ultra-pure scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Lujan-Peschard, C.; Pagliaroli, G.; Vissani, F. E-mail: giulia.pagliaroli@lngs.infn.it

    2014-07-01

    There is a great interest in measuring the non-electronic component of neutrinos from core collapse supernovae by observing, for the first time, also neutral-current reactions. In order to assess the physics potential of the ultra-pure scintillators in this respect, we study the entire expected energy spectrum in the Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ detectors. We examine the various sources of uncertainties in the expectations, and in particular, those due to specific detector features and to the relevant cross sections. We discuss the possibility to identify the different neutrino flavors, and we quantify the effect of confusion, due to other components of the energy spectrum, overlapped with the neutral-current reactions of interest.

  13. A Literature Review and Case Report of Metastatic Pure Choriocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Diwei; Tan, Amanda Jia Hui; Singh-Rai, Rajinder

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, testicular cancer was estimated to account for 940 disability adjusted life years in Australia; of these, 450 were years lost due to premature death and 500 were years of healthy life lost due to disease, disability, or injury (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and Australasian Association of Cancer Registries, 2012). Testicular choriocarcinoma is one of the rarest variants of testicular germ cell tumours, accounting for less than 1% of testicular germ cell tumours and only about 0.19% of all testicular tumours. Management involves radical orchidectomy and chemotherapy. Even then, prognosis is poor. This case report describes a 20-year-old male with pure testicular choriocarcinoma with pulmonary metastases which showed sustained and complete response to adjuvant chemotherapy consisting of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin. PMID:26649213

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields on Pure Dephasing of Exciton Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun-Fei; Xiao, Jing-Lin

    2009-03-01

    In a two-dimensional quantum dot (QD) with parabolic confinement potential, we investigate pure dephasing due to deformation potential exciton-bulk longitudinal acoustic phonons (LAP) interaction for exciton qubits under the influence of external static electric and magnetic fields by adopting the full quantum-mechanical method of Kunihiro Kojima and Akihisa Tomita. The wave function is found and the dependence of the pure dephasing factor on the confinement length of the QD and time and temperature is discussed. We find the external electric and magnetic fields have important effects on pure dephasing of exciton qubits because exciton-LAP interaction increases, leading to more pure dephasing.

  15. Reflection on Teaching and Epistemological Structure: Reflective and Critically Reflective Processes in "Pure/Soft" and "Pure/Hard" Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreber, Carolin; Castleden, Heather

    2009-01-01

    We empirically explored whether academics from pure/soft and pure/hard fields engage in reflective practice on teaching differently and, if so, whether these differences could be partially explained by the epistemological structure of their discipline. Interview data from academics in pure/hard (N = 30) and pure/soft fields (N = 10) were…

  16. Preparation of ultra-pure water and acids and investigation of background of an ICP-MS laboratory.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Hu, S; Tong, J; Zhao, L; Lin, S; Gao, S

    2000-09-05

    Ultra-pure water is prepared by distillation, and followed by ion exchange and passing through an E-PURE water purifier. The resulting ultra-pure water has an electrical conductivity of 18 MOmega. Ultra-pure nitric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids are prepared by sub-boiling distillation. Spectra for mass range 3-240 amu are scanned by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for tap, distilled, deionized and ultra-pure waters, and extra- and ultra-pure acids. The results show that the sub-boiling distillation greatly improves the quality of all the four acids under investigation. Metal impurities such as 75, 93, 121, 123, 134-138, 181 and 206-209 amu were remarkably reduced (sub-ppb level) after sub-boiling distillation. Configuration of peaks due to the formation of polyatomic ions was similar to the literature values reported elsewhere (S.H. Tan, G. Horlick, Appl. Spectrosc. 40 (4) (1986) 445).

  17. Thermotropic Behavior of Membranes Containing DMPC and Chemically and Stereochemically Pure Sphingomyelin upon Cholesterol Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibakami, Motonari; Sonoyama, Masashi; Goto, Rie; Mori, Michiko; Suzuki, Hikokazu; Mitaku, Shigeki

    2004-12-01

    High sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry is applied to the problem of interaction between phospholipids and cholesterol in bilayers, i.e., whether or not cholesterol shows a preferential interaction with sphingomyelins over glycerophospholipids. The simplest system yet used for exploring this problem is designed—one composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), chemically and stereochemically pure N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (pure-C16:0-SM), and cholesterol, based on a belief that chemically and stereochemically purity excludes chain length mismatch and chiral interaction that may affect the interaction from this system. Incremental addition of cholesterol to mixtures of DMPC and pure-C16:0-SM with a ratio of 6:4 or 4:6 leads to a continuous shift in endotherm due to DMPC toward a lower temperature. Such results indicate that cholesterol favors pure-C16:0-SM.

  18. A new nanospray drying method for the preparation of nicergoline pure nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martena, Valentina; Censi, Roberta; Hoti, Ela; Malaj, Ledjan; Di Martino, Piera

    2012-06-01

    Three different batches of pure nanoparticles (NPs) of nicergoline (NIC) were prepared by spray drying a water:ethanol solution by a new Nano Spray Dryer Büchi B-90. Spherical pure NPs were obtained, and several analytical techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry permitted to assess their amorphous character. A comparison of the solubility, intrinsic dissolution, and drug release of original particles and pure amorphous NPs were determined, revealing an interesting improvement of biopharmaceutical properties of amorphous NPs, due to both amorphous properties and nanosize dimensions. Since in a previous work, the high-thermodynamic stability of amorphous NIC was demonstrated, this study is addressed toward the formulation of NIC as pure amorphous NPs.

  19. Microstructures and Dry Sliding Wear Resistance of the Laser Ceramics Composite Coating on Pure Ti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Zhang, Yuanbin; Luo, Hui; Huo, Yushuang

    2012-06-01

    In this study, Al-Ti-Co was used to improve the surface performance of pure Ti. Laser cladding is an important surface modification technique, which can be used to improve the surface performance of pure Ti. Laser cladding of the Al-Ti-Co + TiB2 pre-placed powders on pure Ti can form ceramics reinforced the composite coating, which improved the wear resistance of the substrate. Characteristics of the composite coating were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), microhardness and wear tests. And the laser-cladded coating can also have major dilution from the substrate. Due to the action of the fine grain strengthening and the phase constituent, the wear resistance and microhardness of pure Ti surface were greatly improved.

  20. Hippocampal body changes in pure partial onset sleep and pure partial onset waking epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Mahmood; Zandieh, Ali; Hajimirzabeigi, Alireza; Tahsini, Majid; Vakhshiteh, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Elham

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate for the first time the hippocampal changes in patients with pure sleep and pure waking epilepsy. A total of 35 patients with pure partial onset sleep epilepsy and 35 patients with pure partial onset waking epilepsy matched for age and sex ratio were enrolled. MR images were analyzed to determine hippocampal body changes. Rounding ratio of hippocampal body was defined as short axis divided by long axis and hippocampal bodies with ratios ≥ 0.70 were considered rounded. Hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy were found in nine (25.7 %) and seven (20.0 %) patients with pure sleep epilepsy, and in 12 (34.3 %) and 11 (31.4 %) patients with pure waking epilepsy, respectively (P > 0.05 for the comparison between sleep and waking epilepsy). However, proportion of subjects with rounded hippocampal bodies (15, 42.9 % vs. 3, 8.6 % for patients with sleep and waking epilepsy, respectively) and rounding ratios of both left and right hippocampal bodies (0.66 ± 0.13 and 0.61 ± 0.12, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in sleep epileptic patients vs. 0.57 ± 0.11 and 0.55 ± 0.11, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in waking epileptic patients) were increased in patients with sleep epilepsy (P < 0.05). Further, in sleep epileptic patients with left sided hippocampal body rounding, epileptiform discharges were more readily lateralized to the left temporal lobe (P < 0.05). In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy are not different between pure partial onset sleep and waking epileptic patients. However, rounding ratio and frequency of hippocampal body rounding are increased in sleep epileptic patients.

  1. chemf: A purely functional chemistry toolkit.

    PubMed

    Höck, Stefan; Riedl, Rainer

    2012-12-20

    Although programming in a type-safe and referentially transparent style offers several advantages over working with mutable data structures and side effects, this style of programming has not seen much use in chemistry-related software. Since functional programming languages were designed with referential transparency in mind, these languages offer a lot of support when writing immutable data structures and side-effects free code. We therefore started implementing our own toolkit based on the above programming paradigms in a modern, versatile programming language. We present our initial results with functional programming in chemistry by first describing an immutable data structure for molecular graphs together with a couple of simple algorithms to calculate basic molecular properties before writing a complete SMILES parser in accordance with the OpenSMILES specification. Along the way we show how to deal with input validation, error handling, bulk operations, and parallelization in a purely functional way. At the end we also analyze and improve our algorithms and data structures in terms of performance and compare it to existing toolkits both object-oriented and purely functional. All code was written in Scala, a modern multi-paradigm programming language with a strong support for functional programming and a highly sophisticated type system. We have successfully made the first important steps towards a purely functional chemistry toolkit. The data structures and algorithms presented in this article perform well while at the same time they can be safely used in parallelized applications, such as computer aided drug design experiments, without further adjustments. This stands in contrast to existing object-oriented toolkits where thread safety of data structures and algorithms is a deliberate design decision that can be hard to implement. Finally, the level of type-safety achieved by Scala highly increased the reliability of our code as well as the productivity of

  2. chemf: A purely functional chemistry toolkit

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although programming in a type-safe and referentially transparent style offers several advantages over working with mutable data structures and side effects, this style of programming has not seen much use in chemistry-related software. Since functional programming languages were designed with referential transparency in mind, these languages offer a lot of support when writing immutable data structures and side-effects free code. We therefore started implementing our own toolkit based on the above programming paradigms in a modern, versatile programming language. Results We present our initial results with functional programming in chemistry by first describing an immutable data structure for molecular graphs together with a couple of simple algorithms to calculate basic molecular properties before writing a complete SMILES parser in accordance with the OpenSMILES specification. Along the way we show how to deal with input validation, error handling, bulk operations, and parallelization in a purely functional way. At the end we also analyze and improve our algorithms and data structures in terms of performance and compare it to existing toolkits both object-oriented and purely functional. All code was written in Scala, a modern multi-paradigm programming language with a strong support for functional programming and a highly sophisticated type system. Conclusions We have successfully made the first important steps towards a purely functional chemistry toolkit. The data structures and algorithms presented in this article perform well while at the same time they can be safely used in parallelized applications, such as computer aided drug design experiments, without further adjustments. This stands in contrast to existing object-oriented toolkits where thread safety of data structures and algorithms is a deliberate design decision that can be hard to implement. Finally, the level of type-safety achieved by Scala highly increased the reliability of our code

  3. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  4. Purely cubic action for string field theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Lykken, J.; Rohm, R.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's (1986) open-bosonic-string field-theory action and a closed-string analog can be written as a purely cubic interaction term. The conventional form of the action arises by expansion around particular solutions of the classical equations of motion. The explicit background dependence of the conventional action via the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator is eliminated in the cubic formulation. A closed-form expression is found for the full nonlinear gauge-transformation law.

  5. Critical speeding up in pure fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boukari, Hacene; Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The extreme compressibility of a pure fluid near its critical point significantly affects its bulk dynamic response to temperature changes through adiabatic processes. Equations that describe the dynamics in the absence of gravity are developed, and the magnitude of the effect is illustrated with numerical solutions in one dimension. The results are remarkable: 5 mm of critical xenon, quenched from 20 to 10 mK above its critical temperature, cools by over 99 percent in less than 5 s. Moreover, adiabatic cooling is faster when the fluid is closer to the critical point.

  6. Hydroxyl X2Pi pure rotational transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorvitch, D.; Goldman, A.; Dothe, Hoang; Tipping, R. H.; Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    We present a list of frequencies, term values, Einstein A values, and assignments for the pure rotational transitions of the X2Pi state of the OH molecule. This list includes transitions from 3 to 2015/cm for Delta-v = 0, v-double-prime = 0-4, and J-double-prime = 0.5-49.5. The A values were computed using recent advances in calculating wave functions for a coupled system and an experimentally derived electric dipole moment function (Nelson et al., 1990) which exhibits curvature.

  7. Stress induced hypotension in pure autonomic failure

    PubMed Central

    Thijs, R D; van Dijk, J G

    2006-01-01

    A 47 year old woman with pure autonomic failure complained of dizziness during emotional stress. Emotional stimuli have not previously been reported to cause hypotension in patients with autonomic failure. In the patient, ambulatory blood pressure recording revealed severe hypotension (50/30 mm Hg) after a stressful event. During a tilt table test, hyperventilation was shown to cause a significant fall of blood pressure. This suggests that emotional stress can induce hypotension, probably through hyperventilation, in subjects with autonomic failure. PMID:16354738

  8. Needleless Electrospinning of Pure and Blended Chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimmelsmann, Nils; Homburg, Sarah Vanessa; Ehrmann, Andrea

    2017-08-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with bactericidal, fungicidal, hemostatic and other interesting properties. It can be used, e.g., in medical products, as a filter medium, in biotechnological purposes etc. For these possible applications, nanofiber mats with a large inner surface will be most efficient. This is why in a recent project, the electrospinning properties of pure chitosan as well as chitosan blended with poly(ethylene oxide) were investigated. Using a needleless nanospinning process, the technology under examination can be upscaled from lab to industrial scale, enabling direct transfer of the gained experiences to the intended application.

  9. Pure phase decoherence in a ring geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Aharony, A.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2010-06-15

    We study the dynamics of pure phase decoherence for a particle hopping around an N-site ring, coupled both to a spin bath and to an Aharonov-Bohm flux which threads the ring. Analytic results are found for the dynamics of the influence functional and of the reduced density matrix of the particle, both for initial single wave-packet states, and for states split initially into two separate wave packets moving at different velocities. We also give results for the dynamics of the current as a function of time.

  10. Noble gases in pure lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Valdez, F J; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2013-03-21

    The mechanism of how a noble gas modifies the excitability of nerve cells and how such excitability can be recovered under hyperbaric pressure remains unclear. Here we present a calorimetric study where the melting point depression of pure lipid membranes induced by noble gases and its recovery with a hydrostatic pressure is addressed. A correlation is found between the electric polarizability (α) of these gases and their effect on the melting transition of the membranes. These results concur with other findings to support the idea that general anesthesia only depends on the ability of a certain atom or molecule to increase the general disorder of the membrane.

  11. PURE CULTURES OF LARGE MONONUCLEAR LEUCOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Carrel, Alexis; Ebeling, Albert H.

    1922-01-01

    1. Pure strains of mononuclear leucocytes were isolated from the blood of adult chickens and keptin active condition for nearly 3 months. 2. The cultures were composed of large mononuclear leucocytes which migrated and proliferated in vitro at a slower rate than fibroblasts. The cells had no tendency to form a tissue, as do fibroblasts and epithelial cells. They were much less resistant than fibroblasts. 3. Differentiation of the large mononuclears into cells assuming the appearance of fibroblasts took place under certain conditions. 4. The activity of the large mononuclears was increased by embryonic tissue juice and inhibited by homologous serum. PMID:19868678

  12. Pure perceptual-based sequence learning.

    PubMed

    Remillard, Gilbert

    2003-07-01

    Learning a sequence of target locations when the sequence is uncorrelated with a sequence of responses and target location is not the response dimension (pure perceptual-based sequence learning) was examined. Using probabilistic sequences of target locations, the author shows that such learning can be implicit, is unaffected by distance between target locations, and is mostly limited to first-order transition probabilities. Moreover, the mechanism underlying learning affords processing of information at anticipated target locations and appears to be attention based. Implications for hypotheses of implicit sequence learning are discussed.

  13. [XX 'pure' gonadal dysgenesis and XYY syndrome].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2004-02-01

    XX 'pure' gonadal dysgenesis is a disease related to Turner's syndrome. Patients of this disease are characterized by normal female external genitalia, bilateral streak gonads, amenorrhea and sexual infantilism. Recently, it has been reported that point mutations of the FSH receptor gene may be one of cause of this disease. The relationship between criminal behavior and XYY syndrome is still controversial. Increased incidence of disomic sperm in 47,XYY males has been reported by fluorescent in situ hybridization(FISH). Genetic counseling should be done when they undergo intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  14. Defective spatial imagery with pure Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carota, Antonio; Di Pietro, Marie; Ptak, Radek; Poglia, Davide; Schnider, Armin

    2004-01-01

    Gerstmann's syndrome comprises finger agnosia, peripheral agraphia, anarithmetia, and right-left confusion. We here report a single-case study of an 85-year-old ambidextrous man who exhibited pure Gerstmann's syndrome (i.e., without aphasia) 10 weeks after a stroke involving the angular gyrus in the left parietal lobe. We hypothesize that, in this case, the main cognitive denominator of Gerstmann's tetrad was a severe dysfunction in mental rotation and translation. This report provides further evidence for the spatial nature of Gerstmann's syndrome.

  15. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, Stephen E.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Prorok, Barton C.; Lanagan, Michael T.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1995-01-01

    An article and method of manufacture of (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor.

  16. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, S.E.; Poeppel, R.B.; Prorok, B.C.; Lanagan, M.T.; Maroni, V.A.

    1995-11-21

    An article and method of manufacture (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor are disclosed. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. 5 figs.

  17. Pure seminoma: A review and update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pure seminoma is a rare pathology of the young adult, often discovered in the early stages. Its prognosis is generally excellent and many therapeutic options are available, especially in stage I tumors. High cure rates can be achieved in several ways: standard treatment with radiotherapy is challenged by surveillance and chemotherapy. Toxicity issues and the patients' preferences should be considered when management decisions are made. This paper describes firstly the management of primary seminoma and its nodal involvement and, secondly, the various therapeutic options according to stage. PMID:21819630

  18. From dizziness to severe ataxia and dysarthria: New cases of anti-Ca/ARHGAP26 autoantibody-associated cerebellar ataxia suggest a broad clinical spectrum.

    PubMed

    Wallwitz, Ulrike; Brock, Sebastian; Schunck, Antje; Wildemann, Brigitte; Jarius, Sven; Hoffmann, Frank

    2017-08-15

    In 2010, a novel anti-neuronal autoantibody, termed anti-Ca, was described in a patient with subacute cerebellar ataxia, and Rho GTPase-activating protein 26 (ARHGAP26) was identified as the target antigen. Recently, three additional cases of anti-Ca-positive cerebellar ataxia have been published. In addition to ataxia, cognitive decline and depression have been observed in some patients. Here, we report two new cases of anti-Ca-associated autoimmune cerebellar ataxia. Patient 1 presented with dizziness and acute yet mild limb and gait ataxia. Symptoms stabilized with long-term oral corticosteroid therapy but transiently worsened when steroids were tapered. Interestingly, both initial occurrence and worsening of the patient's neurological symptoms after steroid withdrawal were accompanied by spontaneous cutaneous hematomas. Patient 2 initially presented with an increased startle response and myoclonic jerks, and subsequently developed severe limb and gait ataxia, dysarthria, oculomotor disturbances, head and voice tremor, dysphagia, cognitive symptoms and depression. Steroid treatment was started five years after disease onset. The symptoms then responded only poorly to corticosteroids. At most recent follow-up, 19 years after disease onset, the patient was wheelchair-bound. These cases extend the clinical spectrum associated with anti-ARHGAP26 autoimmunity and suggest that early treatment may be important in patients with this rare syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Legionella pneumophila infection presenting as headache, confusion and dysarthria in a human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) positive patient: case report.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Nathaniel M; Kumar, Aditi; Blair, Barbra M

    2012-09-22

    Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia. Central nervous system dysfunction is common, and diagnosis in the absence of pulmonary symptoms can be challenging. Here we describe an atypical clinical presentation of Legionella infection in a patient with HIV who was found to have an unusual neuroradiologic lesion that further served to obscure the diagnosis. This is the first such description in a patient with Legionellosis and HIV coinfection. A 43 year-old HIV positive man presented to our hospital with dysarthria, fevers, headache, and altered mental status. Initial work-up revealed pneumonia and a lesion of the splenium of the corpus callosum on magnetic resonance imaging. He was subsequently diagnosed with Legionella pneumonia and treated with complete symptom resolution. Neurologic abnormalities are frequent in Legionellosis, but the diagnosis may be difficult in the absence of overt respiratory symptoms and in the presence of HIV coinfection. A high index of suspicion and early initiation of empiric antibiotics is imperative since early treatment may help prevent long-term sequelae. Neuroimaging abnormalities, though rare, can help the physician narrow down the diagnosis and avoid unnecessary invasive testing. Future studies should aim to elucidate the as yet unknown role of neuroimaging in the diagnoses and prognostication of Legionellosis, as well as the interaction between Legionella infection and HIV.

  20. A novel ANO3 variant identified in a 53-year-old woman presenting with hyperkinetic dysarthria, blepharospasm, hyperkinesias, and complex motor tics.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Patrick R; Zimmermann, Michael T; Gass, Jennifer M; Harris, Kimberly G; Cousin, Margot A; Boczek, Nicole J; Ross, Owen A; Klee, Eric W; Brazis, Paul W; Van Gerpen, Jay A; Atwal, Paldeep S

    2016-12-05

    Cervical dystonias have a variable presentation and underlying etiology, but collectively represent the most common form of focal dystonia. There are a number of known genetic forms of dystonia (DYT1-27); however the heterogeneity of disease presentation does not always make it easy to categorize the disease by phenotype-genotype comparison. In this report, we describe a 53-year-old female who presented initially with hand tremor following a total hip arthroplasty. The patient developed a mixed hyperkinetic disorder consisting of chorea, dystonia affecting the upper extremities, dysarthria, and blepharospasm. Whole exome sequencing of the patient revealed a novel heterozygous missense variant (Chr11(GRCh38): g.26525644C > G; NM_031418.2(ANO3): c.702C > G; NP_113606.2. p.C234W) in exon 7 in the ANO3 gene. ANO3 encodes anoctamin-3, a Ca(+2)-dependent phospholipid scramblase expressed in striatal-neurons, that has been implicated in autosomal dominant craniocervical dystonia (Dystonia-24, DYT24, MIM# 615034). To date, only a handful of cases of DYT-24 have been described in the literature. The complex clinical presentation of the patient described includes hyperkinesias, complex motor movements, and vocal tics, which have not been reported in other patients with DYT24. This report highlights the utility of using clinical whole exome sequencing in patients with complex neurological phenotypes that would not normally fit a classical presentation of a defined genetic disease.

  1. Geometrical control of pure spin current induced domain wall depinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, A.; Reeve, R. M.; Voto, M.; Savero-Torres, W.; Richter, N.; Vila, L.; Attané, J. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Kläui, Mathias

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the pure spin-current assisted depinning of magnetic domain walls in half ring based Py/Al lateral spin valve structures. Our optimized geometry incorporating a patterned notch in the detector electrode, directly below the Al spin conduit, provides a tailored pinning potential for a transverse domain wall and allows for a precise control over the magnetization configuration and as a result the domain wall pinning. Due to the patterned notch, we are able to study the depinning field as a function of the applied external field for certain applied current densities and observe a clear asymmetry for the two opposite field directions. Micromagnetic simulations show that this can be explained by the asymmetry of the pinning potential. By direct comparison of the calculated efficiencies for different external field and spin current directions, we are able to disentangle the different contributions from the spin transfer torque, Joule heating and the Oersted field. The observed high efficiency of the pure spin current induced spin transfer torque allows for a complete depinning of the domain wall at zero external field for a charge current density of 6\\centerdot {{10}11} A m-2, which is attributed to the optimal control of the position of the domain wall.

  2. Purely endoscopic removal of a parasagittal/falx meningioma.

    PubMed

    Spektor, Sergey; Margolin, Emil; Eliashar, Ron; Moscovici, Samuel

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic techniques are an integral part of the neurosurgical armamentarium with a growing list of indications. We describe the purely endoscopic removal of an atypical parasagittal meningioma in a patient who could not undergo standard craniotomy due to severe scalp atrophy following childhood irradiation for tinea capitis. A 68-year-old man in good general health presented with a parasagittal meningioma that recurred following subtotal removal and adjuvant fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (FSR). The scalp above the tumor location was very diseased and precluded a regular craniotomy for tumor removal. A 4-cm craniotomy was made in the midline forehead, where the skin was normal. A rigid endoscope was advanced under neuronavigation through the interhemispheric fissure, which provided good access with limited retraction, until the tumor was encountered at a depth of 7-8 cm. Two surgeons performed the surgery using a "four-hands technique". The tumor was removed and the insertion area was resected and coagulated. The surgery was uneventful, with no coagulation or transection of major veins. A subtotal resection was achieved, and the patient recovered with no neurological deficit. Safe resection of parasagittal meningiomas with a purely endoscopic technique is feasible. This option needs further exploration as an alternative strategy in patients with severely atrophic scalp skin that greatly increases the risk of significant healing complications with calvarian craniotomy.

  3. A pure hydrodynamic origin of accretion disk turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Sujit Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-07-01

    Accretion disks consist of flows for which angular velocity decreases but specific angular momentum increases with increasing radial coordinate. Such flows are Rayleigh stable, but must be turbulent in order to explain observed data. Since molecular viscosity is negligible in these systems, scientists have argued for turbulent viscosity for energy dissipation and hence to explain infall of matter. However, so far, the success to explain the origin of turbulence in accretion disks is done with caveats. Here we investigate the evolution of pure hydrodynamic perturbations in stochastically driven accretion disks. We show that the accretion flows, which are inevitably driven by stochastic noise, are hydrodynamically unstable under linear perturbations. We also argue that in accretion disks, stochastic forcing appears generically due to the presence of shear between different annuli of the disk. This work resolves the turbulence problem of accretion disks from pure hydrodynamics and explains the infall of matter for both hot and cold disks. This would help in explaining the origin of timing and spectral features in the disk flows generically.

  4. Light Higgsinos in pure gravity mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jason L.; Ibe, Masahiro; Olive, Keith A.; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2015-03-01

    Pure gravity mediation, with two free parameters, is a minimalistic approach to supergravity models, yet it is capable of incorporating radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, a Higgs mass in agreement with the experimental measurement, without violating any phenomenological constraints. The model may also contain a viable dark matter candidate in the form of a wino. Here, we extend the minimal model by allowing the μ term to be a free parameter equivalent to allowing the two Higgs soft masses, m1 and m2, to differ from other scalar masses, which are set by the gravitino mass. In particular, we examine the region of parameter space where μ ≪m3 /2, in which case the Higgsino becomes the lightest supersymmetric particle and a dark matter candidate. We also consider a generalization of pure gravity mediation that incorporates a Peccei-Quinn symmetry which determines the μ term dynamically. In this case we show that the dark matter may either be in the form of an axion and/or a neutralino and that the lightest supersymmetric particle may be either a wino, bino, or Higgsino.

  5. Underwater loudness for pure tones: Duration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudahy, Edward A.; Schwaller, Derek; Fothergill, David; Wolgemuth, Keith

    2003-04-01

    The loudness of underwater pure tones was measured by loudness matching for pure tones from 100 to 16,000 Hz. The standard was a one second tone at 1000 Hz. The signal duration was varied from 20 milliseconds to 5 seconds. Subjects were instructed to match the loudness of the comparison tone at one of the test frequencies to the loudness of the standard tone. Loudness was measured at the threshold, the most comfortable loudness, and the maximum tolerable loudness. The intensity of the standard was varied randomly across the test series. The subjects were bareheaded U.S. Navy divers tested at a depth of 3 meters. All subjects had normal in-air hearing. Tones were presented to the right side of the subject from an array of underwater sound projectors. The sound pressure level was calibrated at the location of the subject's head with the subject absent. Loudness increased and threshold decreased as duration increased. The effect was greatest at the lowest and highest frequencies. The shape of the loudness contours across frequency and duration derived from these measurements are different from in-air measurements. [Research supported by ONR.

  6. Dead regions and noisiness of pure tones.

    PubMed

    Huss, Martina; Moore, Brian C J

    2005-10-01

    Some hearing-impaired subjects report pure tones as sounding highly distorted and noise-like. We assessed whether such reports indicate that the tone frequency falls inside a dead region (DR). Nine hearing-impaired and four normally hearing subjects rated pure tones on a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 indicates clear tone and 7 indicates noise. A white noise was presented as a reference for a sound that should be rated as 7. Stimuli covered the whole audible range of frequencies and levels. The noisiness ratings were, on average, higher for hearing-impaired subjects than for normally hearing subjects. For the former, the ratings were not markedly different for tones with frequencies just outside or inside a DR. However, ratings always exceeded 3 for tones falling more than 1.5 octaves inside a DR. The results indicate that judgement of a tone as sounding noise-like does not reliably indicate that the tone frequency falls in a DR. Both normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects rated 0.125 kHz and 12 kHz tones as somewhat noise-like, independently of the existence of a DR.

  7. Electrokinetics of pure clay minerals revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sondi, I.; Biscan, J.; Pravdic, V.

    1996-03-25

    Clay minerals have long attracted the attention of colloid scientists. This paper considers, specifically, their important role in the transport of various contaminants from land to sea, e.g., metal ions and organic detrital and man-made material in watercourses. Advance in experimental techniques have enabled precise characterization of clays and then electrokinetic experiments at high electrolyte concentrations, such as in seawater. Three of the most important clay minerals encountered in suspended matter in natural waters, montmorillonite, illite, and chlorite, were prepared in a very pure state. Electrokinetic experiments were done in pure aqueous single and complex electrolyte solutions and in solutions in which natural organic matter was simulated using a humic substance, fulvic acid, of defined provenance and properties, typical of riverine waters. An isoelectric point was found at pH 5.0 {+-} 0.2 for chlorite; none were found for illite and montmorillonite. Only Ca{sup 2+} showed a charging effect on chlorite, indeed a reversal of sign from negative to positive at 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mol dm{sup {minus}3}. Addition of fulvic acid affected only chlorite, illite less, and Na montmorillonite not at all.

  8. Time Evolution of Pure Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyama, S. M.

    1981-03-01

    Numerical solutions to the Einstein equations in the case of pure gravitational waves are given. The system is assumed to be axially symmetric and non-rotating. The time symmetric initial data and the conformally flat initial data are obtained by solving the constraint equations at t=0. The time evolution of these initial data depends strongly on the initial amplitude of the gravitational waves. In the case of the low initial amplitude, waves only disperse to null infinity. By comparing the initial gravitational energy with the total energy loss through an r=constant surface, it is concluded that the Newman-Penrose method and the Gibbon-Hawking method are the most desirable for measuring the energy flux of gravitational radiation numerically. In the case that the initial ratio of the spatial extent of the gravitational waves to the Schwarzschild radius (M/2) is smaller than about 300, the waves collapse by themselves, leading to formation of a black hole. The analytic solutions of the linearized Einstein equations for the pure gravitational waves are also shown.

  9. Pure spin current devices based on ferromagnetic topological insulators

    PubMed Central

    Götte, Matthias; Joppe, Michael; Dahm, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional topological insulators possess two counter propagating edge channels with opposite spin direction. Recent experimental progress allowed to create ferromagnetic topological insulators realizing a quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. In the QAH state one of the two edge channels disappears due to the strong ferromagnetic exchange field. We investigate heterostructures of topological insulators and ferromagnetic topological insulators by means of numerical transport calculations. We show that spin current flow in such heterostructures can be controlled with high fidelity. Specifically, we propose spintronic devices that are capable of creating, switching and detecting pure spin currents using the same technology. In these devices electrical currents are directly converted into spin currents, allowing a high conversion efficiency. Energy independent transport properties in combination with large bulk gaps in some topological insulator materials may allow operation even at room temperature. PMID:27782187

  10. Deformation microstructure of neutron-irradiated pure polycrystalline metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, N.; Byun, T. S.; Farrell, K.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2004-08-01

    The effects of neutron-irradiation near 80 °C on the deformation behavior of pure polycrystalline metals vanadium (body centered cubic, BCC), copper (face centered cubic, FCC) and zirconium (hexagonal close packed, HCP) have been investigated. Dislocation channel deformation is observed in all metals, and is coincident with prompt plastic instability at yield. Dislocation pileup was observed at grain boundaries in the deformed vanadium irradiated to 0.012 dpa, indicating that channel formation could lead to dislocation pileup and the resulting stress localization could be a source of grain boundary cracking. TEM analysis suggests that the loss of work hardening capacity in irradiated V, Cu, and Zr at higher doses is mainly due to dislocation channeling in local regions that experience a high resolved shear stress.

  11. Pure spin current devices based on ferromagnetic topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Götte, Matthias; Joppe, Michael; Dahm, Thomas

    2016-10-26

    Two-dimensional topological insulators possess two counter propagating edge channels with opposite spin direction. Recent experimental progress allowed to create ferromagnetic topological insulators realizing a quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state. In the QAH state one of the two edge channels disappears due to the strong ferromagnetic exchange field. We investigate heterostructures of topological insulators and ferromagnetic topological insulators by means of numerical transport calculations. We show that spin current flow in such heterostructures can be controlled with high fidelity. Specifically, we propose spintronic devices that are capable of creating, switching and detecting pure spin currents using the same technology. In these devices electrical currents are directly converted into spin currents, allowing a high conversion efficiency. Energy independent transport properties in combination with large bulk gaps in some topological insulator materials may allow operation even at room temperature.

  12. Biocorrosion properties and blood and cell compatibility of pure iron as a biodegradable biomaterial.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erlin; Chen, Haiyan; Shen, Feng

    2010-07-01

    Biocorrosion properties and blood- and cell compatibility of pure iron were studied in comparison with 316L stainless steel and Mg-Mn-Zn magnesium alloy to reveal the possibility of pure iron as a biodegradable biomaterial. Both electrochemical and weight loss tests showed that pure iron showed a relatively high corrosion rate at the first several days and then decreased to a low level during the following immersion due to the formation of phosphates on the surface. However, the corrosion of pure iron did not cause significant increase in pH value to the solution. In comparison with 316L and Mg-Mn-Zn alloy, the pure iron exhibited biodegradable property in a moderate corrosion rate. Pure iron possessed similar dynamic blood clotting time, prothrombin time and plasma recalcification time to 316L and Mg-Mn-Zn alloy, but a lower hemolysis ratio and a significant lower number density of adhered platelets. MTT results revealed that the extract except the one with 25% 24 h extract actually displayed toxicity to cells and the toxicity increased with the increasing of the iron ion concentration and the incubation time. It was thought there should be an iron ion concentration threshold in the effect of iron ion on the cell toxicity.

  13. Lattice Strain Due to an Atomic Vacancy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shidong; Sellers, Michael S.; Basaran, Cemal; Schultz, Andrew J.; Kofke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Volumetric strain can be divided into two parts: strain due to bond distance change and strain due to vacancy sources and sinks. In this paper, efforts are focused on studying the atomic lattice strain due to a vacancy in an FCC metal lattice with molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The result has been compared with that from a continuum mechanics method. It is shown that using a continuum mechanics approach yields constitutive results similar to the ones obtained based purely on molecular dynamics considerations. PMID:19582230

  14. Purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory.

    PubMed

    Kosub, Tobias; Kopte, Martin; Hühne, Ruben; Appel, Patrick; Shields, Brendan; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hübner, René; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G; Makarov, Denys

    2017-01-03

    Magnetic random access memory schemes employing magnetoelectric coupling to write binary information promise outstanding energy efficiency. We propose and demonstrate a purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory (AF-MERAM) that offers a remarkable 50-fold reduction of the writing threshold compared with ferromagnet-based counterparts, is robust against magnetic disturbances and exhibits no ferromagnetic hysteresis losses. Using the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3, we demonstrate reliable isothermal switching via gate voltage pulses and all-electric readout at room temperature. As no ferromagnetic component is present in the system, the writing magnetic field does not need to be pulsed for readout, allowing permanent magnets to be used. Based on our prototypes, we construct a comprehensive model of the magnetoelectric selection mechanisms in thin films of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, revealing misfit induced ferrimagnetism as an important factor. Beyond memory applications, the AF-MERAM concept introduces a general all-electric interface for antiferromagnets and should find wide applicability in antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  15. Purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosub, Tobias; Kopte, Martin; Hühne, Ruben; Appel, Patrick; Shields, Brendan; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hübner, René; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic random access memory schemes employing magnetoelectric coupling to write binary information promise outstanding energy efficiency. We propose and demonstrate a purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory (AF-MERAM) that offers a remarkable 50-fold reduction of the writing threshold compared with ferromagnet-based counterparts, is robust against magnetic disturbances and exhibits no ferromagnetic hysteresis losses. Using the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3, we demonstrate reliable isothermal switching via gate voltage pulses and all-electric readout at room temperature. As no ferromagnetic component is present in the system, the writing magnetic field does not need to be pulsed for readout, allowing permanent magnets to be used. Based on our prototypes, we construct a comprehensive model of the magnetoelectric selection mechanisms in thin films of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, revealing misfit induced ferrimagnetism as an important factor. Beyond memory applications, the AF-MERAM concept introduces a general all-electric interface for antiferromagnets and should find wide applicability in antiferromagnetic spintronics.

  16. Fock expansion of multimode pure Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Cariolaro, Gianfranco; Pierobon, Gianfranco

    2015-12-15

    The Fock expansion of multimode pure Gaussian states is derived starting from their representation as displaced and squeezed multimode vacuum states. The approach is new and appears to be simpler and more general than previous ones starting from the phase-space representation given by the characteristic or Wigner function. Fock expansion is performed in terms of easily evaluable two-variable Hermite–Kampé de Fériet polynomials. A relatively simple and compact expression for the joint statistical distribution of the photon numbers in the different modes is obtained. In particular, this result enables one to give a simple characterization of separable and entangled states, as shown for two-mode and three-mode Gaussian states.

  17. Synaptic devices based on purely electronic memristors

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ruobing; Li, Jun; Zhuge, Fei E-mail: h-cao@nimte.ac.cn; Zhu, Liqiang; Liang, Lingyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Gao, Junhua; Cao, Hongtao E-mail: h-cao@nimte.ac.cn; Fu, Bing; Li, Kang

    2016-01-04

    Memristive devices have been widely employed to emulate biological synaptic behavior. In these cases, the memristive switching generally originates from electrical field induced ion migration or Joule heating induced phase change. In this letter, the Ti/ZnO/Pt structure was found to show memristive switching ascribed to a carrier trapping/detrapping of the trap sites (e.g., oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials) in ZnO. The carrier trapping/detrapping level can be controllably adjusted by regulating the current compliance level or voltage amplitude. Multi-level conductance states can, therefore, be realized in such memristive device. The spike-timing-dependent plasticity, an important Hebbian learning rule, has been implemented in this type of synaptic device. Compared with filamentary-type memristive devices, purely electronic memristors have potential to reduce their energy consumption and work more stably and reliably, since no structural distortion occurs.

  18. Primate communication in the pure ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ramsier, Marissa A.; Cunningham, Andrew J.; Moritz, Gillian L.; Finneran, James J.; Williams, Cathy V.; Ong, Perry S.; Gursky-Doyen, Sharon L.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Few mammals—cetaceans, domestic cats and select bats and rodents—can send and receive vocal signals contained within the ultrasonic domain, or pure ultrasound (greater than 20 kHz). Here, we use the auditory brainstem response (ABR) method to demonstrate that a species of nocturnal primate, the Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta), has a high-frequency limit of auditory sensitivity of ca 91 kHz. We also recorded a vocalization with a dominant frequency of 70 kHz. Such values are among the highest recorded for any terrestrial mammal, and a relatively extreme example of ultrasonic communication. For Philippine tarsiers, ultrasonic vocalizations might represent a private channel of communication that subverts detection by predators, prey and competitors, enhances energetic efficiency, or improves detection against low-frequency background noise. PMID:22319094

  19. Allergic contact dermatitis to pure henna.

    PubMed

    Polat, Muhterem; Dikilitaş, Meltem; Oztaş, Pinar; Alli, Nuran

    2009-01-15

    Henna is a naturally occurring brown dye made from the leaves of the tree Lawsonia inermis. The active ingredient of henna is lawsone (2-hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone). It is traditionally used in Islamic and Hindu cultures as a hair coloring and as a dye for decorating the nails or making temporary skin tattoos. Actually, henna has a very low allergic potential. In most cases, allergic reactions not caused by henna, but by the chemical coloring additives that are added to henna mixtures. These additives include agents such as daiminotoluenes and diaminobenzenes. In this article, we report a case of allergic contact dermatitis from pure henna that is also used for the relief of rheumatic pain.

  20. Pure Rotational Spectroscopy of Vinyl Mercaptan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Zingsheim, Oliver; Thorwirth, Sven; Müller, Holger S. P.; Lewen, Frank; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    Vinyl mercaptan (ethenethiol, CH_2=CHSH) exists in the gas phase in two distinct rotameric forms, syn (planar) and anti (quasi-planar in the ground vibrational state). The microwave spectra of these two isomers were investigated previously, however not exceeding frequencies of about 65 GHz. In the present investigation, the pure rotational spectra of both species have been investigated at millimeter wavelengths. Vinyl mercaptan was produced in a radiofrequency discharge through a constant flow of ethanedithiol at low pressure. Both syn and anti rotamers were observed and new extensive sets of molecular parameters were obtained. Owing to its close structural relationship to vinyl alcohol and the astronomical abundance of complex sulfur-bearing molecules, vinyl mercaptan is a plausible candidate for future radio astronomical searches. M. Tanimoto et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 78, 95--105 & 106--119 (1979)

  1. 77 FR 59979 - Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium (Granular) From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the... antidumping duty order on pure magnesium (granular) from China would be likely to lead to continuation or...), entitled Pure Magnesium (Granular) from China: Investigation No.731-TA- 895 (Second Review). Issued...

  2. ThermoData Engine Database - Pure Compounds and Binary Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 103b NIST ThermoData Engine Version 6.0 - Pure CompoThermoData Engine Database - Pure Compounds and Binary Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   This database contains property data for more than 21,000 pure compounds, 37,500 binary mixtures, 10,000 ternary mixtures, and 6,000 chemical reactions.

  3. Self-Esteem in Pure Bullies and Bully/Victims: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollastri, Alisha R.; Cardemil,, Esteban V.; O'Donnell, Ellen H.

    2010-01-01

    Past research on the self-esteem of bullies has produced equivocal results. Recent studies have suggested that the inconsistent findings may be due, in part, to the failure to account for bully/victims: those children who both bully and are victims of bullying. In this longitudinal study, we examined the distinctions among pure bullies, pure…

  4. Self-Esteem in Pure Bullies and Bully/Victims: A Longitudinal Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollastri, Alisha R.; Cardemil,, Esteban V.; O'Donnell, Ellen H.

    2010-01-01

    Past research on the self-esteem of bullies has produced equivocal results. Recent studies have suggested that the inconsistent findings may be due, in part, to the failure to account for bully/victims: those children who both bully and are victims of bullying. In this longitudinal study, we examined the distinctions among pure bullies, pure…

  5. Experiments on Viscous Transport in Pure-Electron Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriesel, J. M.; Driscoll, C. F.

    1999-11-01

    Viscous transport in pure-electron plasmas is a rearrangement of particles due to like-particle interactions, leading to the confined global thermal equilibrium state. The measured transport is observed to be proportional to the shear in the total (E × B + diamagnetic) fluid rotation of the plasma for both hollow and monotonic rotation profiles. We determine the local viscosity coefficient η in the plasma from measurements of the local flux of particles. The measured viscosity is 50-10^4 times larger than expected from classical transport due to short-range velocity-scattering collisions, but is within a factor of 10 agreement with recent theories by O'Neil and Dubin of transport due to long-range drift collisions. The measured viscosity scales with magnetic field B and length L roughly as η ∝ B/L. This scaling suggests a finite length enhancement of the viscosity, which occurs because particles interact many times as they bounce axially before they are sheared apart azimuthally.

  6. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-12-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications.

  7. Stable pure state quantum tomography from five orthonormal bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kech, Michael; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    For any finite-dimensional Hilbert space, we construct explicitly five orthonormal bases such that the corresponding measurements allow for efficient tomography of an arbitrary pure quantum state. This means that such measurements can be used to distinguish an arbitrary pure state from any other state, pure or mixed, and the pure state can be reconstructed from the outcome distribution in a feasible way. The set of measurements we construct is independent of the unknown state, and therefore our results provide a fixed scheme for pure state tomography, as opposed to the adaptive (state-dependent) scheme proposed by Goyeneche et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett., 115 (2015) 090401). We show that our scheme is robust with respect to noise, in the sense that any measurement scheme which approximates these measurements well enough is equally suitable for pure state tomography. Finally, we present two convex programs which can be used to reconstruct the unknown pure state from the measurement outcome distributions.

  8. Accelerating degradation rate of pure iron by zinc ion implantation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Zheng, Yufeng; Han, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Pure iron has been considered as a promising candidate for biodegradable implant applications. However, a faster degradation rate of pure iron is needed to meet the clinical requirement. In this work, metal vapor vacuum arc technology was adopted to implant zinc ions into the surface of pure iron. Results showed that the implantation depth of zinc ions was about 60 nm. The degradation rate of pure iron was found to be accelerated after zinc ion implantation. The cytotoxicity tests revealed that the implanted zinc ions brought a slight increase on cytotoxicity of the tested cells. In terms of hemocompatibility, the hemolysis of zinc ion implanted pure iron was lower than 2%. However, zinc ions might induce more adhered and activated platelets on the surface of pure iron. Overall, zinc ion implantation can be a feasible way to accelerate the degradation rate of pure iron for biodegradable applications. PMID:27482462

  9. AgraPure Mississippi Biomass Project

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell,D.A; Broadhead, L.W.; Harrell, W.J.

    2006-03-31

    The AgraPure Mississippi Biomass project was a congressionally directed project, initiated to study the utilization of Mississippi agricultural byproducts and waste products in the production of bio-energy and to determine the feasibility of commercialization of these agricultural byproducts and waste products as feedstocks in the production of energy. The final products from this project were two business plans; one for a Thermal plant, and one for a Biodiesel/Ethanol plant. Agricultural waste fired steam and electrical generating plants and biodiesel plants were deemed the best prospects for developing commercially viable industries. Additionally, oil extraction methods were studied, both traditional and two novel techniques, and incorporated into the development plans. Mississippi produced crop and animal waste biomasses were analyzed for use as raw materials for both industries. The relevant factors, availability, costs, transportation, storage, location, and energetic value criteria were considered. Since feedstock accounts for more than 70 percent of the total cost of producing biodiesel, any local advantages are considered extremely important in developing this particular industry. The same factors must be evaluated in assessing the prospects of commercial operation of a steam and electrical generation plant. Additionally, the access to the markets for electricity is more limited, regulated and tightly controlled than the liquid fuel markets. Domestically produced biofuels, both biodiesel and ethanol, are gaining more attention and popularity with the consuming public as prices rise and supplies of foreign crude become less secure. Biodiesel requires no major modifications to existing diesel engines or supply chain and offers significant environmental benefits. Currently the biodiesel industry requires Federal and State incentives to allow the industry to develop and become self-sustaining. Mississippi has available the necessary feedstocks and is

  10. Pure Culture Fermentation of Brined Cucumbers1

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, J. L.; Costilow, R. N.; Anderson, T. E.; Bell, T. A.

    1964-01-01

    The relative abilities of Pediococcus cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, and several other species of lactic acid bacteria to grow and produce acid in brined cucumbers were evaluated in pure culture fermentations. Such fermentations were made possibly by the use of two techniques, gamma radiation (0.83 to 1.00 Mrad) and hot-water blanching (66 to 80 C for 5 min), designed first to rid the cucumbers of naturally occurring, interfering, and competitive microbial groups prior to brining, followed by inoculation with the desired lactic acid bacteria. Of the nine species tested, strains of the three common to cucumber fermentations, P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis, grew to the highest populations, and produced the highest levels of brine acidity and the lowest pH values in fermentations at 5.4 to 5.6% NaCl by weight; also, their sequence of active development in fermentations, with the use of a three-species mixture for inoculation, was in the species order just named. This sequence of occurrence was similar to that estimated by others for natural fermentations. The rates of growth and acid production in fermentations with a mixture of P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis increased as the incubation temperature was increased from 21 to 27 to 32 C; however, the maximal populations and acidities attained were essentially the same for fermentations at each temperature. Further, these same three species were found to be the most salt tolerant of those tested; their upper limit for appreciable growth and measurable acid production was about 8% salt, whereas thermophilic species such as L. thermophilus, L. lactis, L. helveticus, L. fermenti, and L. delbrueckii exhibited a much lower salt tolerance, ranging from about 2.5 to 4.0%. However, certain strains of L. delbrueckii grew very rapidly in cucumbers brined at 2.5 to 3.0% salt, and produced sufficient acid in about 30 hr at 48 C to reduce the brine pH from above 7.0 to below 4.0. An inexpensive

  11. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, Francois

    2008-11-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low frequency branch of electrostatic plasma waves; these waves exist in neutralized plasmas, pure electrons, and pure ion plasmas. The EAWs typically have a phase velocity Vphase / Vth ˜1.4, quite low compared to typical plasma waves. Linear Landau damping would suggest that such slow phase velocity waves are strongly damped; but at finite wave amplitudes, trapping of particles at the phase velocity effectively flattens the distribution function, resulting in a ``BGK-like'' state with weak damping. Our experiments on standing mz= 1, mθ= 0 waves show that the small-amplitude dispersion relation for both fast Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) and slow (EAW) plasma modes is in close agreement with the ``thumb-shaped'' dispersion relation predicted by kinetic theory neglecting damping. However, the surprise here is that a moderate amplitude ``off-resonant'' drive readily modifies the velocity distribution so as to make the plasma mode resonant with the drive frequency. We have observed the plasma adjusting its velocity distribution so as to become resonant with a 100 cycle drive ranging from 10 kHz to 30 kHz. With a chirped frequency drive, the particle velocity distribution suffers extreme distortion, and the resulting plasma wave is almost undamped with γ/ φ˜10-5. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence measurements of the wave-coherent particle distribution f (vz, t), clearly show particle trapping in the EAW, with trapping widths as expected from theory considering two non-interacting traveling waves forming the standing wave. The coherent f (vz, t ) measurement also shows that particles slower than the wave phase velocity vph oscillate in phase with the wave, contrasting with the 180^o out-of-phase response of the particles moving faster than vph. The differing response of the fast and slow particles results in a small net fluid velocity, because the electrostatic restoring force is almost totally balanced by the kinetic pressure, consistent

  12. Pure Culture Fermentation of Brined Cucumbers.

    PubMed

    Etchells, J L; Costilow, R N; Anderson, T E; Bell, T A

    1964-11-01

    The relative abilities of Pediococcus cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, and several other species of lactic acid bacteria to grow and produce acid in brined cucumbers were evaluated in pure culture fermentations. Such fermentations were made possibly by the use of two techniques, gamma radiation (0.83 to 1.00 Mrad) and hot-water blanching (66 to 80 C for 5 min), designed first to rid the cucumbers of naturally occurring, interfering, and competitive microbial groups prior to brining, followed by inoculation with the desired lactic acid bacteria. Of the nine species tested, strains of the three common to cucumber fermentations, P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis, grew to the highest populations, and produced the highest levels of brine acidity and the lowest pH values in fermentations at 5.4 to 5.6% NaCl by weight; also, their sequence of active development in fermentations, with the use of a three-species mixture for inoculation, was in the species order just named. This sequence of occurrence was similar to that estimated by others for natural fermentations. The rates of growth and acid production in fermentations with a mixture of P. cerevisiae, L. plantarum, and L. brevis increased as the incubation temperature was increased from 21 to 27 to 32 C; however, the maximal populations and acidities attained were essentially the same for fermentations at each temperature. Further, these same three species were found to be the most salt tolerant of those tested; their upper limit for appreciable growth and measurable acid production was about 8% salt, whereas thermophilic species such as L. thermophilus, L. lactis, L. helveticus, L. fermenti, and L. delbrueckii exhibited a much lower salt tolerance, ranging from about 2.5 to 4.0%. However, certain strains of L. delbrueckii grew very rapidly in cucumbers brined at 2.5 to 3.0% salt, and produced sufficient acid in about 30 hr at 48 C to reduce the brine pH from above 7.0 to below 4.0. An inexpensive

  13. Multiple nerve abscesses on cutaneous radial nerve--a case of pure neural leprosy.

    PubMed

    Ankad, B S; Jawalgi, A; Dombale, V D; Telkar, S

    2013-01-01

    Leprosy is a unique infectious disease due to varied spectrum of clinical signs it exhibits. Pure neural leprosy (PNL) is an unusual form of leprosy and accounts for 4-8% of all leprosy cases. It can manifest as a simple tingling sensation to complex and tragic motor paralysis. Here we report a case of PNL involving isolated cutaneous radial nerve as multiple abscesses along the course of the nerve. To the best of our knowledge, this is rarest presentation of pure neural leprosy.

  14. Application of cellulase and hemicellulase to pure xylan, pure cellulose, and switchgrass solids from leading pretreatments.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat A; Yang, Bin; Garlock, Rebecca J; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Pallapolu, V Ramesh; Lee, Y Y; Kim, Youngmi; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R; Holtzapple, Mark T; Falls, Matthew; Sierra-Ramirez, Rocio; Donohoe, Bryon S; Vinzant, Todd B; Elander, Richard T; Hames, Bonnie; Thomas, Steve; Warner, Ryan E; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-12-01

    Accellerase 1000 cellulase, Spezyme CP cellulase, β-glucosidase, Multifect xylanase, and beta-xylosidase were evaluated for hydrolysis of pure cellulose, pure xylan, and switchgrass solids from leading pretreatments of dilute sulfuric acid, sulfur dioxide, liquid hot water, lime, soaking in aqueous ammonia, and ammonia fiber expansion. Distinctive sugar release patterns were observed from Avicel, phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC), xylan, and pretreated switchgrass solids, with accumulation of significant amounts of xylooligomers during xylan hydrolysis. The strong inhibition of cellulose hydrolysis by xylooligomers could be partially attributed to the negative impact of xylooligomers on cellulase adsorption. The digestibility of pretreated switchgrass varied with pretreatment but could not be consistently correlated to xylan, lignin, or acetyl removal. Initial hydrolysis rates did correlate well with cellulase adsorption capacities for all pretreatments except lime, but more investigation is needed to relate this behavior to physical and compositional properties of pretreated switchgrass. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reexamination of pure qubit work extraction.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Max F; Jennings, David; Rudolph, Terry

    2014-11-01

    Many work extraction or information erasure processes in the literature involve the raising and lowering of energy levels via external fields. But even if the actual system is treated quantum mechanically, the field is assumed to be classical and of infinite strength, hence not developing any correlations with the system or experiencing back-actions. We extend these considerations to a fully quantum mechanical treatment by studying a spin-1/2 particle coupled to a finite-sized directional quantum reference frame, a spin-l system, which models an external field. With this concrete model together with a bosonic thermal bath, we analyze the back-action a finite-size field suffers during a quantum-mechanical work extraction process and the effect this has on the extractable work and highlight a range of assumptions commonly made when considering such processes. The well-known semiclassical treatment of work extraction from a pure qubit predicts a maximum extractable work W=kTlog2 for a quasistatic process, which holds as a strict upper bound in the fully quantum mechanical case and is attained only in the classical limit. We also address the problem of emergent local time dependence in a joint system with a globally fixed Hamiltonian.

  16. The Pure Rotational Spectrum of KO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Mark; Russ, Benjamin; Sheridan, Phillip M.; Bucchino, Matthew; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2017-06-01

    The pure rotational spectrum of potassium monoxide (KO) has been recorded using millimeter-wave direct absorption spectroscopy. KO was synthesized by the reaction of potassium vapor, produced in a Broida-type oven, with nitrous oxide. No DC discharge was necessary. Eleven rotational transitions belonging to the ^{2}Π_{3/2} spin-orbit component have been measured and have been fit successfully to a case (c) Hamiltonian. Rotational and lambda-doubling constants for this spin-orbit component have been determined. It has been suggested that the ground electronic state of KO is either ^{2}Π (as for LiO and NaO) or ^{2}Σ (as for RbO and CsO), both of which lie close in energy. Recent computational studies favor a ^{2}Σ ground state. Further measurements of the rotational transitions of the ^{2}Π_{1/2} spin-orbit component and the ^{2}Σ state are currently in progress, as well as the potassium hyperfine structure.

  17. Calibration of sound velocimeter in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiwei; Zhang, Baofeng; Li, Tao; Zhu, Junchao; Xie, Ziming

    2016-01-01

    Accurate measurement of sound speed is important to calibrate a sound velocity profiler which provides real-time sound velocity to the sonar equipment in oceanographic survey. The sound velocity profiler calculates the sound speed by measuring the time-of-flight of a 1 MHz single acoustic pulse to travel over about 300 mm path. A standard sound velocimeter instrument was invited to calibrate the sound velocity profiler in pure water at temperatures of 278,283, 288, 293, 298, 303 and 308K in a thermostatic vessel at one atmosphere. The sound velocity profiler was deployed in the thermostatic vessel alongside the standard sound velocimeter instrument and two platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) which were calibrated to 0.002k by comparison with a standard PRT. Time of flight circuit board was used to measure the time-of-flight to 22 picosecond precision. The sound speed which was measured by the sound velocity profiler was compared to the standard sound speed calculated by UNESCO to give the laboratory calibration coefficients and was demonstrated agreement with CTD-derived sound speed using Del Grosso's seawater equation after removing a bias.

  18. Twofold symmetries of the pure gravity action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2017-01-01

    We recast the action of pure gravity into a form that is invariant under a twofold Lorentz symmetry. To derive this representation, we construct a general parameterization of all theories equivalent to the Einstein-Hilbert action up to a local field redefinition and gauge fixing. We then exploit this freedom to eliminate all interactions except those exhibiting two sets of independently contracted Lorentz indices. The resulting action is local, remarkably simple, and naturally expressed in a field basis analogous to the exponential parameterization of the nonlinear sigma model. The space of twofold Lorentz invariant field redefinitions then generates an infinite class of equivalent representations. By construction, all off-shell Feynman diagrams are twofold Lorentz invariant while all on-shell tree amplitudes are automatically twofold gauge invariant. We extend our results to curved spacetime and calculate the analogue of the Einstein equations. While these twofold invariances are hidden in the canonical approach of graviton perturbation theory, they are naturally expected given the double copy relations for scattering amplitudes in gauge theory and gravity.

  19. Ponytail headache: a pure extracranial headache.

    PubMed

    Blau, J N

    2004-05-01

    Fifty of 93 females experienced headache from wearing a ponytail. Pain was experienced only at the site of the hair tie in 10 subjects, extending in others, forwards to the vertex (n = 5) or forehead (n = 7), laterally to the parietal region (n = 8) or temples (n = 3), downwards to the neck (n = 5), or to other areas (n = 12). Loosening the hair relieved pain immediately in 4 subjects, within half an hour in 32, and within an hour in 5 subjects; the remaining 9 subjects were uncertain of pain duration. This headache was preventable by wearing the ponytail more loosely tied. Ponytail headache, well known to females, is not described in the medical literature because the remedy is obvious, therefore those affected do not seek medical advice. This seemingly common headache provides an example of a pure extracranial headache arising from pericranial muscle fascia and tendon traction. Males almost certainly have similar experiences, but were not questioned in this study. Distinguishing intracranial from extracranial headache is essential in diagnosis and treatment. Further research on ponytail and other extracranial headaches could shed light on the mechanism of tension-type headache.

  20. Memory for pure tone sequences without contour.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Christine; Jolicœur, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    We presented pure tones interspersed with white noise sounds to disrupt contour perception in an acoustic short-term memory (ASTM) experiment during which we recorded the electroencephalogram. The memory set consisted of seven stimuli, 0, 1, 2, 3, or 4 of which were to-be-remembered tones. We estimated each participant׳s capacity, K, for each set size and measured the amplitude of the SAN (sustained anterior negativity, an ERP related to acoustic short-term memory). We correlated their K slopes with their SAN amplitude slopes as a function of set size, and found a significant link between performance and the SAN: a larger increase in SAN amplitude was linked with a larger number of stimuli maintained in ASTM. The SAN decreased in amplitude in the later portion of the silent retention interval, but the correlation between the SAN and capacity remained strong. These results show the SAN is not an index of contour but rather an index of the maintenance of individual objects in STM. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory

    PubMed Central

    Kosub, Tobias; Kopte, Martin; Hühne, Ruben; Appel, Patrick; Shields, Brendan; Maletinsky, Patrick; Hübner, René; Liedke, Maciej Oskar; Fassbender, Jürgen; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Makarov, Denys

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic random access memory schemes employing magnetoelectric coupling to write binary information promise outstanding energy efficiency. We propose and demonstrate a purely antiferromagnetic magnetoelectric random access memory (AF-MERAM) that offers a remarkable 50-fold reduction of the writing threshold compared with ferromagnet-based counterparts, is robust against magnetic disturbances and exhibits no ferromagnetic hysteresis losses. Using the magnetoelectric antiferromagnet Cr2O3, we demonstrate reliable isothermal switching via gate voltage pulses and all-electric readout at room temperature. As no ferromagnetic component is present in the system, the writing magnetic field does not need to be pulsed for readout, allowing permanent magnets to be used. Based on our prototypes, we construct a comprehensive model of the magnetoelectric selection mechanisms in thin films of magnetoelectric antiferromagnets, revealing misfit induced ferrimagnetism as an important factor. Beyond memory applications, the AF-MERAM concept introduces a general all-electric interface for antiferromagnets and should find wide applicability in antiferromagnetic spintronics. PMID:28045029

  2. Electron Acoustic Waves in Pure Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; O'Neil, T. M.; Valentini, F.

    2012-10-01

    Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) are the low-frequency branch of near-linear Langmuir (plasma) waves: the frequency is such that the complex dielectric function (Dr, Di) has Dr= 0; and ``flattening'' of f(v) near the wave phase velocity vph gives Di=0 and eliminates Landau damping. Here, we observe standing axisymmetric EAWs in a pure ion column.footnotetextF. Anderegg, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 095001 (2009). At low excitation amplitudes, the EAWs have vph˜1.4 v, in close agreement with near-linear theory. At moderate excitation strengths, EAW waves are observed over a range of frequencies, with 1.3 v < vph< 2.1 v. Here, the final wave frequency may differ from the excitation frequency since the excitation modifies f (v); and recent theory analyzes frequency shifts from ``corners'' of a plateau at vph.footnotetextF. Valentini et al., arXiv:1206.3500v1. Large amplitude EAWs have strong phase-locked harmonic content, and experiments will be compared to same-geometry simulations, and to simulations of KEENfootnotetextB. Afeyan et al., Proc. Inertial Fusion Sci. and Applications 2003, A.N.S. Monterey (2004), p. 213. waves in HEDLP geometries.

  3. Pure inorganic separator for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    He, Meinan; Zhang, Xinjie; Jiang, Kuiyang; Wang, Joe; Wang, Yan

    2015-01-14

    Battery safety is critical for many applications including portable electronics, hybrid and electric vehicles, and grid storage. For lithium ion batteries, the conventional polymer based separator is unstable at 120 °C and above. In this research, we have developed a pure aluminum oxide nanowire based separator; this separator does not contain any polymer additives or binders; additionally, it is a bendable ceramic. The physical and electrochemical properties of the separator are investigated. The separator has a pore size of about 100 nm, and it shows excellent electrochemical properties under both room and high temperatures. At room temperature, the ceramic separator shows a higher rate capability compared to the conventional Celgard 2500 separator and life cycle performance does not show any degradation. At 120 °C, the cell with the ceramic separator showed a much better cycle performance than the conventional Celgard 2500 separator. Therefore, we believe that this research is really an exciting scientific breakthrough for ceramic separators and lithium ion batteries and could be potentially used in the next generation lithium ion batteries requiring high safety and reliability.

  4. Triplet pairing in pure neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Sarath; Ramanan, S.

    2016-12-01

    We study the zero-temperature BCS gaps for the triplet channel in pure neutron matter using similarity renormalization group (SRG) evolved interactions. We use the dependence of the results on the SRG resolution scale as a tool to analyze medium and many-body corrections. In particular, we study the effects of including the three-body interactions at leading order, which appear at next-to-next-to leading order (N2LO) in the chiral effective field theory (EFT), as well as that of the first-order self-energy corrections on the zero-temperature gap. In addition we also extract the transition temperature as a function of densities and verify the BCS scaling of the zero-temperature gaps to the transition temperature. We observe that the self-energy effects are very crucial in order to reduce the SRG resolution scale dependence of the results, while the three-body effects at the leading order do not change the two-body resolution scale dependence. On the other hand, the results depend strongly on the three-body cutoff, emphasizing the importance of the missing higher-order three-body effects. We also observe that self-energy effects reduce the overall gap as well as shift the gap closure to lower densities.

  5. Triplet pairing in pure neutron matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Sarath; Ramanan, Sunethra

    2016-09-01

    We study the zero temperature BCS gaps for the triplet channel in pure neutron matter using Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) evolved interactions. We use the dependence of the results on the SRG resolution scale, as a tool to analyze medium and many-body corrections. In particular, we study the effects of including the three-body interactions at leading order, which appear at N2LO in the Chiral EFT, as well as that of the first-order self-energy corrections on the zero temperature gap. In addition we also extract the transition temperature as a function of densities and verify the BCS scaling of the zero temperature gaps to the transition temperature. We observe that the self-energy effects are very crucial in order to reduce the resolution scale dependence of the results, while the three-body effects at the leading order do not change the two-body resolution scale depdendence. On the other hand, the results depend strongly on the three-body cut-off, emphasizing the importance of the missing higher-order three-body effects. We also observe that self-energy effects reduce the overall gap as well as shift the gap closure to lower densities.

  6. Localization of aerial pure tones by pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Holt, Marla M; Schusterman, Ronald J; Kastak, David; Southall, Brandon L

    2005-12-01

    In this study, minimum audible angles (MAAs) of aerial pure tones were measured in and compared between a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Testing was conducted between 0.8 and 16 kHz in the elephant seal and 0.8 and 20 kHz in the harbor seal and sea lion in a hemi-anechoic chamber using a left/right psychophysical procedure. Performance for the same frequencies was also quantified for discrete speaker separation of 5 degrees from the mid-line. For all subjects, MAAs ranged from approximately 3 degrees to 15 degrees and were generally equal to or larger than those previously measured in the same subjects with a broadband signal. Performance at 5 degrees ranged from chance to 97% correct, depending on frequency and subject. Poorest performance in the sea lion and harbor seal occurred at intermediate frequencies, which is consistent with the duplex theory of sound localization. In contrast, the elephant seal's poorest performance occurred at higher frequencies. The elephant seal's result suggests an inferior ability to utilize interaural level differences and is perhaps related to best hearing sensitivity shifted toward lower frequencies in this species relative to other pinnipeds.

  7. Localization of aerial pure tones by pinnipeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Marla M.; Schusterman, Ronald J.; Kastak, David; Southall, Brandon L.

    2005-12-01

    In this study, minimum audible angles (MAAs) of aerial pure tones were measured in and compared between a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Testing was conducted between 0.8 and 16 kHz in the elephant seal and 0.8 and 20 kHz in the harbor seal and sea lion in a hemi-anechoic chamber using a left/right psychophysical procedure. Performance for the same frequencies was also quantified for discrete speaker separation of 5° from the mid-line. For all subjects, MAAs ranged from approximately 3° to 15° and were generally equal to or larger than those previously measured in the same subjects with a broadband signal. Performance at 5° ranged from chance to 97% correct, depending on frequency and subject. Poorest performance in the sea lion and harbor seal occurred at intermediate frequencies, which is consistent with the duplex theory of sound localization. In contrast, the elephant seal's poorest performance occurred at higher frequencies. The elephant seal's result suggests an inferior ability to utilize interaural level differences and is perhaps related to best hearing sensitivity shifted toward lower frequencies in this species relative to other pinnipeds.

  8. Three new enantiomerically pure ferrocenylphosphole compounds.

    PubMed

    López Cortés, José Guadalupe; Vincendeau, Sandrine; Daran, Jean Claude; Manoury, Eric; Gouygou, Maryse

    2006-05-01

    The absolute configurations of three new enantiomerically pure ferrocenylphosphole compounds, namely (2S,4S,S(Fc))-4-methoxymethyl-2-[2-(9-thioxo-9lambda5-phosphafluoren-9-yl)ferrocenyl]-1,3-dioxane, [Fe(C5H5)(C23H22O3PS)], (III), (S(Fc))-[2-(9-thioxo-9lambda5-phosphafluoren-9-yl)ferrocenyl]methanol, [Fe(C5H5)(C18H14OPS)], (V), and (S(Fc))-diphenyl[2-(9-thioxo-9lambda5-phosphafluoren-9-yl]ferrocenylmethyl]phosphine, [Fe(C5H5)(C30H23P2)], (VIII), have been unambiguously established. All three ligands contain a planar chiral ferrocene group, bearing a dibenzophosphole and either a dioxane, a methanol or a diphenylphosphinomethane group on the same cyclopentadienyl. In compound (V), the occurrence of O-H...S and C-H...S hydrogen bonds results in the formation of a two-dimensional network parallel to (001). The geometry of the ferrocene frameworks agrees with related reported structures.

  9. Pure gauge spin-orbit couplings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shikakhwa, M. S.

    2017-01-01

    Planar systems with a general linear spin-orbit interaction (SOI) that can be cast in the form of a non-Abelian pure gauge field are investigated using the language of non-Abelian gauge field theory. A special class of these fields that, though a 2×2 matrix, are Abelian are seen to emerge and their general form is given. It is shown that the unitary transformation that gauges away these fields induces at the same time a rotation on the wave function about a fixed axis but with a space-dependent angle, both of which being characteristics of the SOI involved. The experimentally important case of equal-strength Rashba and Dresselhaus SOI (R+D SOI) is shown to fall within this special class of Abelian gauge fields, and the phenomenon of persistent spin helix (PSH) that emerges in the presence of this latter SOI in a plane is shown to fit naturally within the general formalism developed. The general formalism is also extended to the case of a particle confined to a ring. It is shown that the Hamiltonian on a ring in the presence of equal-strength R+D SOI is unitarily equivalent to that of a particle subject to only a spin-independent but θ-dependent potential with the unitary transformation relating the two being again the space-dependent rotation operator characteristic of R+D SOI.

  10. Twofold symmetries of the pure gravity action

    DOE PAGES

    Cheung, Clifford; Remmen, Grant N.

    2017-01-25

    Here, we recast the action of pure gravity into a form that is invariant under a twofold Lorentz symmetry. To derive this representation, we construct a general parameterization of all theories equivalent to the Einstein-Hilbert action up to a local field redefinition and gauge fixing. We then exploit this freedom to eliminate all interactions except those exhibiting two sets of independently contracted Lorentz indices. The resulting action is local, remarkably simple, and naturally expressed in a field basis analogous to the exponential parameterization of the nonlinear sigma model. The space of twofold Lorentz invariant field redefinitions then generates an infinitemore » class of equivalent representations. By construction, all off-shell Feynman diagrams are twofold Lorentz invariant while all on-shell tree amplitudes are automatically twofold gauge invariant. We extend our results to curved spacetime and calculate the analogue of the Einstein equations. Finally, while these twofold invariances are hidden in the canonical approach of graviton perturbation theory, they are naturally expected given the double copy relations for scattering amplitudes in gauge theory and gravity.« less

  11. Degradable quantum channels using pure-state to product-of-pure-state isometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddhu, Vikesh; Griffiths, Robert B.

    2016-11-01

    We consider a family of quantum channels characterized by the fact that certain (in general nonorthogonal) pure states at the channel entrance are mapped to (tensor) products of pure states (PPP; hence "pcubed") at the complementary outputs (the main output and the "environment") of the channel. The pcubed construction, a reformulation of the twisted-diagonal procedure by M. M. Wolf and D. Pérez-García [Phys. Rev. A 75, 012303 (2007)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.012303, can be used to produce a large class of degradable quantum channels; degradable channels are of interest because their quantum capacities are easy to calculate. Several known types of degradable channels are either pcubed channels, or subchannels (employing a subspace of the channel entrance), or continuous limits of pcubed channels. The pcubed construction also yields channels which are neither degradable nor antidegradable (i.e., the complement of a degradable channel); a particular example of a qutrit channel of this type is studied in some detail. Determining whether a pcubed channel is degradable or antidegradable or neither is quite straightforward given the pure input and output states that characterize the channel. Conjugate degradable pcubed channels are always degradable.

  12. [Studies on application of pure titanium for cast plate].

    PubMed

    Sakai, M

    1990-06-01

    Pure titanium produced by a commercial pure titanium casting system was studied for use as a cast plate for clinical application. The mechanical properties, elemental analysis, castability, adaptability of pure titanium and adhesion to denture base resin were investigated. The interfacial zone of the pure titanium castings was composed of a layered structure obtained by reaction with phosphate bonded Al2O3/SiO2 investment material. Vicher's hardness at 100 microns thick from the surface was higher than that in the inner part by oxidation. Cast pure titanium showed tensile strength, elongation and hardness close to those of the type III or IV dental gold alloy. The castability of pure titanium was lower than that of Co-Cr alloy and pure titanium castings also had large casting defects. Adaptability between pure titanium cast plate and the working model was satisfactory when reversible hydrocolloid impression material was used with heating-bath treatment in the refractory model. The tensile and compressive shear bonding strength of pure titanium to heat-curing or self-curing resin were similar to that of the Co-Cr alloy, and surface treatment using a solution containing 2-vol% 3-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane produced a higher bonding strength than non-treatment, MKV treatment and 4-META treatment. These findings suggest that pure titanium castings produced by this system have suitable mechanical properties, adaptability and adhesion to denture base resin, and is available for cast plate in clinical application.

  13. TMED-4 INTERIM REPORT PURE ZR EQUILIBRIUM TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.; Morgan, G.

    2010-12-17

    Due to higher than expected permeation rates in the production of tritium in the TVA, a development and testing program was implemented to develop the understanding of why the higher rates were occurring. In addition, improved data are needed for both the design as well as the predictive models. One part of the program was to determine the equilibrium pressure of hydrogen and tritium over NPZ (1). During the course of this testing, some curious results were discovered (2) compared to the published literature data (3). Due to these apparently results, a follow-on task was undertaken to determine the equilibrium pressure of protium and deuterium over pure zirconium. A series of experiments were conducted to determine equilibrium pressures and isotherm data for the zirconium - protium and zirconium - deuterium systems. The data match the published literature data reasonably well with the plateau extending to loadings of about 1.4. There is a significant pressure rise for loadings greater than 1.7.

  14. Pure-phase and pure-amplitude hologram design using the method of generalized projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catino, William Charles

    The overall contribution of the research presented in this dissertation is a systematic procedure for designing computer-generated holograms subject to far-field image constraints. The method of generalized projections is used to design pure-phase and pure-amplitude diffraction holograms that generate prescribed gray-scale images in the Fourier frequency plane. Performance is demonstrated with objective measures (error, efficiency, and variance), as well as with subjective comparison of images. Test images include a photographic quality image of Lena, a uniform intensity spot array, and a binary amplitude block text image. Projection algorithms are derived for pure-phase holograms with both continuous and quantized phase characteristics from a prescribed far-field magnitude constraint. The performance of the pure-phase hologram designs, as measured in the far-field image, is always very good for the continuous phase case and for the quantized phase case with a large number of phase quantization levels. However, as the number of quantization levels decreases, the performance typically degrades. Performance is significantly improved by constraining the energy in mutually exclusive cliques, that is, groups of image plane (far-field) pixels, instead of constraining the intensity of each individual pixel. Even for the binary phase case, acceptable images are generated with the clique energy algorithm. The method of generalized projections is also used to design pure-amplitude diffraction holograms using a prescribed image intensity constraint. Two algorithms are derived: the direct method, which nonlinearly constrains the hologram transmittance to the range of real values in (0,1); and the indirect method, which constrains the transmittance values to the real axis, and linearly transforms the resulting values to the range (0,1). Digital amplitude holograms are simulated by quantizing the amplitude holograms resulting from the indirect method. The indirect method

  15. Study on pure IL VIV of a free spanning pipeline under general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wan-hai; Xu, Jing-yu; Wu, Ying-xiang; Ji, Chun-ning

    2017-03-01

    Pipeline spans may occur due to natural seabed irregularities or local scour of bed sediment. The pure in-line (IL) vortex-induced vibrations (VIV) analysis of the free spans is an important subject for design of pipeline in uneven seabed. The main objective of this paper is to analyze the characteristics of pure IL VIV of a free spanning pipeline under general boundary conditions. An IL wake oscillator model which can describe the coupling of pipeline structure and fluctuating drag is introduced and employed. The coupled partial differential equations of structure and wake are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations using two-mode Galerkin method. Some case studies are presented and thoroughly discussed in order to investigate the effects of internal fluid, axial force and boundary conditions on the pure IL VIV.

  16. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Xiao, Huajun; Shi, Weiru; Wen, Dongqing; Yu, Lihua; Chen, Jianzhang

    2015-01-01

    Positive pressure breathing (PPB) can cause circulatory dysfunction due to peripheral pooling of blood. This study explored a better way at ground level to simulate pure oxygen PPB at 59,055 ft (18,000 m) by comparing the physiological changes during PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen at ground level. Six subjects were exposed to 3 min of 69-mmHg PPB and 3 min of 59-mmHg PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen while wearing the thoracic counterpressure jerkin inflated to 1× breathing pressure and G-suit inflated to 3 and 4× breathing pressure. Stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), and peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) were measured. Subjects completed a simulating flying task (SFT) during 3-min PPB and scores were recorded. HR and SV responses differed significantly between breathing pure oxygen and low oxygen. CO response was not significantly different for pure oxygen and low oxygen, the two levels of PPB, and the two levels of G-suit pressure. Spo2 declined as a linear function of time during low-oxygen PPB and there was a significant difference in Spo2 response for the two levels of PPB. The average score of SFT during pure oxygen PPB was 3970.5 ± 1050.4, which was significantly higher than 2708.0 ± 702.7 with low oxygen PPB. Hypoxia and PPB have a synergistic negative effect on both the cardiovascular system and SFT performance. PPB with low oxygen was more appropriate at ground level to investigate physiological responses during PPB and evaluate the protective performance of garments. Liu X, Xiao H, Shi W, Wen D, Yu L, Chen J. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

  17. Predictions of pure liquid shock Hugoniots

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, M.L.; Baer, M.R.

    1998-06-01

    Determination of product species and associated equations-of-state (EOS) for energetic materials such as pyrotechnics with complex elemental compositions remains a major unsolved problem. Although, empirical EOS models may be calibrated to replicate detonation conditions within experimental variability (5--10%), different states, e.g. expansion, may produce significant discrepancy with data if the basic form of the EOS model is incorrect. A more physically realistic EOS model based on intermolecular potentials, such as the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler (JCZ3) EOS, is needed to predict detonation states as well as expanded states. Predictive capability for any EOS requires a large species data base composed of a wide variety of elements. Unfortunately, only 20 species have known exponential 6 (EXP 6) molecular force constants which are used in the JCZ3-EOS. Of these 20 species, only 10 have been adequately compared to experimental data such as molecular scattering or shock Hugoniot data. Since data in the strongly repulsive region of the molecular potential is limited, alternative methods must be found to deduce force constants for a larger number of species. The objective of the present study is to determine JCZ3 product species force constants using corresponding state theory. Intermolecular potential parameters were obtained for a variety of gas species using a simple corresponding states technique with critical volume and critical temperature. A more complex, four parameter corresponding state method with shape and polarity corrections was also used to obtain intermolecular potential parameters. Both corresponding state methods were used to predict shock Hugoniot data obtained from pure liquids. The simple corresponding state method is shown to give adequate agreement with shock Hugoniot data.

  18. Metabolism of phenolic compounds by Lactobacillus spp. during fermentation of cherry juice and broccoli puree.

    PubMed

    Filannino, Pasquale; Bai, Yunpeng; Di Cagno, Raffaela; Gobbetti, Marco; Gänzle, Michael G

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the metabolism of phenolic acids and flavonoids during lactic acid fermentation of cherry juice and broccoli puree for potential food and pharmaceutical purposes. When fermenting cherry juice and broccoli puree, Lactobacillus spp. exhibited strain-specific metabolism of phenolic acid derivatives. The metabolism of protocatechuic, caffeic and p-coumaric acids through phenolic acid decarboxylases and reductases differed between mMRS and cherry juice and broccoli puree. The synthesis of reduced compounds was the highest during food fermentations and the substrate seemed to modulate the metabolism of phenolic compounds. The reduction of phenolic acids involves a hydrogen donor and the re-oxidation of the reduced co-factor NADH, which may provide a metabolic advantage through NAD(+) regeneration. Quinic acid reduction may replace fructose and pyruvate as hydrogen acceptors, and it may provide an energetic advantage to heterofermentative bacteria when growing in broccoli puree lacking of fructose. This study demonstrated that phenolics metabolism may confer a selective advantage for lactobacilli in vegetable and fruit fermentation, and the metabolic routes are strongly dependent on the intrinsic factors of substrate. Fermented cherry juice and broccoli puree, due to the selected bacterial bioconversion pathways, are enriched in phenolic derivative with high human bioavailability and biological activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Too Little, Too Late: Reduced Visual Span and Speed Characterize Pure Alexia

    PubMed Central

    Habekost, Thomas; Leff, Alexander P.

    2009-01-01

    Whether normal word reading includes a stage of visual processing selectively dedicated to word or letter recognition is highly debated. Characterizing pure alexia, a seemingly selective disorder of reading, has been central to this debate. Two main theories claim either that 1) Pure alexia is caused by damage to a reading specific brain region in the left fusiform gyrus or 2) Pure alexia results from a general visual impairment that may particularly affect simultaneous processing of multiple items. We tested these competing theories in 4 patients with pure alexia using sensitive psychophysical measures and mathematical modeling. Recognition of single letters and digits in the central visual field was impaired in all patients. Visual apprehension span was also reduced for both letters and digits in all patients. The only cortical region lesioned across all 4 patients was the left fusiform gyrus, indicating that this region subserves a function broader than letter or word identification. We suggest that a seemingly pure disorder of reading can arise due to a general reduction of visual speed and span, and explain why this has a disproportionate impact on word reading while recognition of other visual stimuli are less obviously affected. PMID:19366870

  20. Too little, too late: reduced visual span and speed characterize pure alexia.

    PubMed

    Starrfelt, Randi; Habekost, Thomas; Leff, Alexander P

    2009-12-01

    Whether normal word reading includes a stage of visual processing selectively dedicated to word or letter recognition is highly debated. Characterizing pure alexia, a seemingly selective disorder of reading, has been central to this debate. Two main theories claim either that 1) Pure alexia is caused by damage to a reading specific brain region in the left fusiform gyrus or 2) Pure alexia results from a general visual impairment that may particularly affect simultaneous processing of multiple items. We tested these competing theories in 4 patients with pure alexia using sensitive psychophysical measures and mathematical modeling. Recognition of single letters and digits in the central visual field was impaired in all patients. Visual apprehension span was also reduced for both letters and digits in all patients. The only cortical region lesioned across all 4 patients was the left fusiform gyrus, indicating that this region subserves a function broader than letter or word identification. We suggest that a seemingly pure disorder of reading can arise due to a general reduction of visual speed and span, and explain why this has a disproportionate impact on word reading while recognition of other visual stimuli are less obviously affected.

  1. Entanglement bound for multipartite pure states based on local measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lizhen; Chen Xiaoyu; Ye Tianyu

    2011-10-15

    An entanglement bound based on local measurements is introduced for multipartite pure states. It is the upper bound of the geometric measure and the relative entropy of entanglement. It is the lower bound of the minimal-measurement entropy. For pure bipartite states, the bound is equal to the entanglement entropy. The bound is applied to pure tripartite qubit states and the exact tripartite relative entropy of entanglement is obtained for a wide class of states.

  2. Typical pure nonequilibrium steady states and irreversibility for quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Monnai, Takaaki; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2016-07-01

    It is known that each single typical pure state in an energy shell of a large isolated quantum system well represents a thermal equilibrium state of the system. We show that such typicality holds also for nonequilibrium steady states (NESS's). We consider a small quantum system coupled to multiple infinite reservoirs. In the long run, the total system reaches a unique NESS. We identify a large Hilbert space from which pure states of the system are to be sampled randomly and show that the typical pure states well describe the NESS. We also point out that the irreversible relaxation to the unique NESS is important to the typicality of the pure NESS's.

  3. Pure endoscopic management of epileptogenic hypothalamic hamartomas.

    PubMed

    Chibbaro, S; Cebula, H; Scholly, J; Todeschi, J; Ollivier, I; Timofeev, A; Ganau, M; Di Emidio, P; Valenti, M P; Staack, A M; Bast, T; Steinhoff, B J; Hirsch, E; Kehrli, P; Proust, F

    2017-02-07

    Hypothalamic hamartomas (HH) are rare congenital malformations located in the region of the tuber cinereum and third ventricle. Their usual clinical presentation is characterized by gelastic/dacrystic seizures which often become pharmaco-resistant and progress to secondary focal/generalized intractable epilepsy causing mostly in children cognitive and behavioral problems (particularly in cases of progressive epileptic encephalopathy) and precocious puberty. Whereas gelastic seizures can be surgically controlled either by resection of the lesion or disconnection (tissue-destructive) procedures, aimed at functionally prevent the spreading of the epileptic burst; generalized seizures tend to respond better to HH excision rather than isolated neocortical resections, which generally fail to control them. Prospective analysis of 14 consecutive patients harboring HH treated in an 8-year period; 12 patients had unilateral and two bilateral HH. All patients were managed by pure endoscopic excision of the HH. The mean operative time was 48 min and mean hospital stay was 2 days; perioperative blood loss was negligible in all cases. Two patients showed a transient diabetes insipidus (DI); no transient or permanent postoperative neurological deficit or memory impairment was recorded. Complete HH excision was achieved in 10/14 patients. At a mean follow-up of 48 months, no wound infection, meningitis, postoperative hydrocephalus, and/or mortality were recorded in this series of patients. Eight patients became seizure free (Engel class I), 2 other experienced worthwhile improvement of disabling seizures (Engel class II); 2 patients were cured from gelastic attacks while still experiencing focal dyscognitive seizures; and 2, having bilateral HH (both undergoing unilateral HH excision), did not experience significant improvement and required later on a temporal lobectomy coupled to amygdalohyppocampectomy. Overall, the followings resulted to be predictive factors for better

  4. Pure Culture Fermentation of Green Olives1

    PubMed Central

    Etchells, J. L.; Borg, A. F.; Kittel, I. D.; Bell, T. A.; Fleming, H. P.

    1966-01-01

    The method previously developed by us for the pure-culture fermentation of brined cucumbers and other vegetables has been applied successfully to Manzanillo variety olives. Field-run grade fruit was processed first by conventional procedures to remove most of the bitterness. Then the relative abilities of Lactobacillus plantarum, L. brevis, Pediococcus cerevisiae, and Leuconostoc mesenteroides to become established and produce acid in both heat-shocked (74 C for 3 min) and unheated olives, brined at 4.7 to 5.9% NaCl (w/v basis), were evaluated. The heat-shock treatment not only proved effective in ridding the fruit of naturally occurring, interfering, and competitive microbial groups prior to brining and inoculation, but also made the olives highly fermentable with respect to growth and acid production by the introduced culture, particularly L. plantarum. Of the four species used as inocula, L. plantarum was by far the most vigorous in fermentation ability. It consistently produced the highest levels of brine acidity (1.0 to 1.2% calculated as lactic acid) and the lowest pH values (3.8 to 3.9) during the fermentation of heat-shocked olives. Also, L. plantarum completely dominated fermentations when used in two-species (with P. cerevisiae) and three-species (with P. cerevisiae and L. brevis) combinations as inocula. In contrast, when L. plantarum was inoculated into the brines of unheated olives it failed to become properly established; the same was true for the other species tested, but even to a more pronounced degree. L. brevis was the only species used that failed to develop in brines of both heat-shocked and unheated olives. Modification of the curing brine by the addition of lactic acid at the outset, either with or without dextrose, led to a much earlier onset of fermentation with accompanying acid development, as compared to treatments with dextrose alone or nonadditive controls. Reasons for the marked improvement of the fermentability of Manzanillo olives

  5. Physical and Spiritual Education within the Framework of Pure Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagheri Noaparast, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at showing the dimensions of spirituality in childhood education by suggesting a new analysis of the concept of "pure life" used in the Qur'an. Putting spirituality in the framework of the pure life provides us with a rich framework in dealing with spirituality as the latter will be extended to all dimensions of a life. In the…

  6. 1. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATION OF ILLINOIS PURE ALUMINUM (IPA) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATION OF ILLINOIS PURE ALUMINUM (IPA) COMPANY FACTORY; SOUTH ELEVATION FACING ILLINOIS CENTRAL GULF RAILROAD TRACKS AND MAIN STREET. THE ONE-STORY BRICK BUILDING TO THE LEFT IS AN ABANDONED COMMONWEALTH EDISON COMPANY ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION. - Illinois Pure Aluminum Company, 109 Holmes Street, Lemont, Cook County, IL

  7. Physical and Spiritual Education within the Framework of Pure Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagheri Noaparast, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at showing the dimensions of spirituality in childhood education by suggesting a new analysis of the concept of "pure life" used in the Qur'an. Putting spirituality in the framework of the pure life provides us with a rich framework in dealing with spirituality as the latter will be extended to all dimensions of a life. In the…

  8. Auditory Repetition Priming Is Impaired in Pure Alexic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Diane; Miller, Kimberly M.; Larsen, Jary

    2004-01-01

    Alexia without agraphia, or ''pure'' alexia, is an acquired impairment in reading that leaves writing skills intact. Repetition priming for visually presented words is diminished in pure alexia. However, it is not possible to verify whether this priming deficit is modality-specific or modality independent because reading abilities are compromised.…

  9. Early stages during plasma nitriding of pure iron

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios, M.D.; Martinez, O.; Oseguera, J.

    1995-12-31

    The sequence of nitride formation during the early stages of plasma nitriding of pure iron was studied by optical microscopy, SEM, TEM and x-ray diffraction. Plasma nitriding at {approximately}490 C in a 25 vol.%H{sub 2} + 75 vol.%N{sub 2} mixture starts with the formation of {gamma}{prime}-Fe{sub 4}N after 40s. Once {gamma}{prime} nucleates, it mainly spreads laterally due to diffusion shortcuts in the discontinuous surface nitride layer. Before {gamma}{prime} is continuous on the surface, {epsilon} nucleates on top of it shortly after 40S. Epsilon is then observed to grow, both inwardly and laterally along with {gamma}{prime}. A compact {gamma}{prime}/{epsilon} bilayer forms on the surface at around 100s. The kinetics of nucleation, growth and compactation of the nitrides observed in the present work was significantly more rapid than in any of the nitriding process reported in the literature, including plasma nitriding. The acceleration of the nitriding kinetics in the early stages of plasma nitriding may be attributed to enhanced diffusion resulting from a high nitrogen flux from the plasma atmosphere. The results presented are consistent with the findings of a companion work on modeling the kinetics of nitride layer growth.

  10. Tailoring properties of commercially pure titanium by gradation extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Markus; Rautenstrauch, Anja; Selbmann, René; de Oliveira, Raoni Barreto; Coelho, Rodrigo Santiago; Landgrebe, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) is of great importance in medical applications due to its attractive properties, such as high biocompatibility, excellent corrosion resistance and relatively low density and suitable stiffness. Compared to the commonly used Ti-6Al-4V alloy, its lower strength has to be increased. The most attractive approach is to subject CP Ti to severe plastic deformation (SPD) processes such as Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP). The resulting decreased grain size in CP Ti yields a significant increase in hardness and strength. Common SPD-processes typically provide a uniform modification of the material. Their material efficiency and productivity are critical and limiting factors. A new approach is to tailor the material properties by using Gradation Extrusion, which produces a distinct gradient in microstructure and strength. The forming process combines a regular impact extrusion process and severe plastic deformation in the lateral area of the material. This efficient process can be integrated easily into forming process chains, for instance for dental implants. This paper presents the forming process and the applied die geometry. The results of numerical simulations are used to illustrate the potential of the process to modify and strengthen the titanium material. Experiments show that the material is successfully processed by gradation extrusion. By characterizing the hardness and its distribution within the formed parts the effects of the process are investigated.

  11. Invasive Thymoma with Pure Red Cell Aplasia and Amegakaryocytic Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Kiyoki, Yusuke; Ueda, Sho; Yamaoka, Masatoshi; Shimizu, Seiich; Inagaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    We here describe a case involving a 67-yearold female patient who was referred to our hospital due to severe anemia (hemoglobin, 5.0 g/dL), thrombocytopenia (platelet count, 0.6 × 104/μL), and a mediastinal shadow with calcification noted on X-ray. On admission, an anterior mediastinal tumor was detected, and bone marrow biopsy revealed few megakaryocytes and severely reduced numbers of erythroid cells. The diagnosis was thymoma with pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and acquired amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia (AAMT). On Day 8 of admission, the patient received immunosuppressive therapy together with cyclosporine for the 2 severe hematologic diseases, which were stabilized within 2 months. Subsequently, total thymectomy was performed. The diagnosis of the tumor invading the left lung was invasive thymoma, Masaokakoga stage III. The histological diagnosis was World Health Organization type AB. Thymoma accompanied with PRCA and AAMT is very rare, and, based on our case, immunotherapeutic therapy for the hematologic disorders should precede surgical intervention. PMID:28053696

  12. RELAXATION OF WARPED DISKS: THE CASE OF PURE HYDRODYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-05-10

    Orbiting disks may exhibit bends due to a misalignment between the angular momentum of the inner and outer regions of the disk. We begin a systematic simulational inquiry into the physics of warped disks with the simplest case: the relaxation of an unforced warp under pure fluid dynamics, i.e., with no internal stresses other than Reynolds stress. We focus on the nonlinear regime in which the bend rate is large compared to the disk aspect ratio. When warps are nonlinear, strong radial pressure gradients drive transonic radial motions along the disk's top and bottom surfaces that efficiently mix angular momentum. The resulting nonlinear decay rate of the warp increases with the warp rate and the warp width, but, at least in the parameter regime studied here, is independent of the sound speed. The characteristic magnitude of the associated angular momentum fluxes likewise increases with both the local warp rate and the radial range over which the warp extends; it also increases with increasing sound speed, but more slowly than linearly. The angular momentum fluxes respond to the warp rate after a delay that scales with the square root of the time for sound waves to cross the radial extent of the warp. These behaviors are at variance with a number of the assumptions commonly used in analytic models to describe linear warp dynamics.

  13. Relaxation of Warped Disks: The Case of Pure Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorathia, Kareem A.; Krolik, Julian H.; Hawley, John F.

    2013-05-01

    Orbiting disks may exhibit bends due to a misalignment between the angular momentum of the inner and outer regions of the disk. We begin a systematic simulational inquiry into the physics of warped disks with the simplest case: the relaxation of an unforced warp under pure fluid dynamics, i.e., with no internal stresses other than Reynolds stress. We focus on the nonlinear regime in which the bend rate is large compared to the disk aspect ratio. When warps are nonlinear, strong radial pressure gradients drive transonic radial motions along the disk's top and bottom surfaces that efficiently mix angular momentum. The resulting nonlinear decay rate of the warp increases with the warp rate and the warp width, but, at least in the parameter regime studied here, is independent of the sound speed. The characteristic magnitude of the associated angular momentum fluxes likewise increases with both the local warp rate and the radial range over which the warp extends; it also increases with increasing sound speed, but more slowly than linearly. The angular momentum fluxes respond to the warp rate after a delay that scales with the square root of the time for sound waves to cross the radial extent of the warp. These behaviors are at variance with a number of the assumptions commonly used in analytic models to describe linear warp dynamics.

  14. Pure Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma Originating from the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Takashi; Naiki, Taku; Kawai, Noriyasu; Iida, Keitaro; Etani, Toshiki; Ando, Ryosuke; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Sugiyama, Yosuke; Okada, Atsushi; Mizuno, Kentaro; Umemoto, Yukihiro; Yasui, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder (LELCB) is a rare variant of infiltrating urothelial carcinoma. We report a case of LELCB in a 43-year-old man. Ultrasonography and cystoscopy revealed two bladder tumors, one on the left side of the trigone and the other on the right side of the trigone. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumors was performed and pathological analysis revealed undifferentiated carcinoma. We therefore performed radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization as found for previous cases of LELCB. The final pathological diagnosis was a lymphoepithelioma-like variant of urothelial carcinoma with perivesical soft tissue invasion. For adjuvant systemic chemotherapy, three courses of cisplatin were administered. The patient subsequently became free of cancer 72 months postoperatively. Based on the literature, pure or predominant LELCB types show favorable prognoses due to their sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. An analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of bladder tumors examined in our institution revealed that the ADC value measured for this LELCB was relatively low compared to conventional urothelial carcinomas. This suggests that measuring the ADC value of a lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma prior to operation may be helpful in predicting LELCB. PMID:27099604

  15. Fabrication of Ultralow Density Interconnected Pure Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Edward C.; Gilbert, Dustin A.; Liu, Kai; Kucheyev, Sergei O.; Colvin, Jeffrey D.; Felter, Thomas E.

    Ultra-low density metallic nanostructures have been shown to possess interesting thermal, electrical, magnetic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their extremely high surface areas, nanoscale geometries and high porosities. Here we report the synthesis of pure metal foams using interconnected metallic nanowires with densities as low as 0.1% of their bulk density that are still mechanically stable. The highly porous monoliths are macroscopic in size (several mm) and can be created in a wide variety of shapes for application-specific needs. Preliminary studies of such metal foams have already revealed fascinating mechanical and magnetic properties, since the physical dimensions of the foams are below some of the basic length scales that govern the material properties. These foams have been used as targets for ultrabright x-ray sources. They also have a wide variety of other potential applications such as photovoltaic devices, supercapacitors, catalysts, coatings, fuel cells, etc. This work has been supported by DTRA #BRCALL08-Per3-C-2-0006, and in part by NSF DMR-1008791 and DMR-1543582. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  16. Viscous Transport Measurements in Pure-Electron Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, C. F.; Kriesel, J. M.

    2000-10-01

    Measurements of the kinematic viscosity κ in a quiescent pure-electron plasma are up to 10^8 × larger than predicted by Boltzmann collisional theory. This viscosity acts on radial shears in the total (E × B and diamagnetic) azimuthal rotation velocity v_θ, resulting in radially inward or outward particle fluxes Γ_r. Experimental values of κ are obtained from the measured density n(r,t) and temperature T(r,t), which give both v_θ (r,t) and Γr (r,t). The viscosity is due to long range ``E × B drift collisions'' with impact parameters rc < ρ < λ_D, whereas Boltzmann transport theory describes only velocity-scattering collisions with ρ < r_c. The measured viscosity scales as κ ∝ B^1 L_p-1, suggesting that multiple correlated long-range collisions are important. The B^1 scaling is qualitatively similar to recent ``bounce-averaged'' or ``2D'' theories;(D.H.E. Dubin, Phys. Plasmas 5), 1688 (1998). but the surprising L_p-1 dependence on plasma length is as yet unexplained. Empirically, we find κ = νc λ_D^2 [1 + Nb ], where νc ≡ n barv b^2 and Nb is the number of axial bounces made by a thermal particle before shears separate it from a neighboring particle by a distance λ_D.

  17. Temperature dependent deformation mechanisms in pure amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, M. S. R. N. Haberl, B.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2014-03-21

    High temperature nanoindentation has been performed on pure ion-implanted amorphous silicon (unrelaxed a-Si) and structurally relaxed a-Si to investigate the temperature dependence of mechanical deformation, including pressure-induced phase transformations. Along with the indentation load-depth curves, ex situ measurements such as Raman micro-spectroscopy and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy analysis on the residual indents reveal the mode of deformation under the indenter. While unrelaxed a-Si deforms entirely via plastic flow up to 200 °C, a clear transition in the mode of deformation is observed in relaxed a-Si with increasing temperature. Up to 100 °C, pressure-induced phase transformation and the observation of either crystalline (r8/bc8) end phases or pressure-induced a-Si occurs in relaxed a-Si. However, with further increase of temperature, plastic flow rather than phase transformation is the dominant mode of deformation. It is believed that the elevated temperature and pressure together induce bond softening and “defect” formation in structurally relaxed a-Si, leading to the inhibition of phase transformation due to pressure-releasing plastic flow under the indenter.

  18. Keeping consumers safe: food providers' perspectives on pureed food.

    PubMed

    Keller, Heather H; Duizer, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Twelve focus groups were conducted in five sites with 80 allied health providers to identify their perspectives on providing pureed food to consumers. Thematic care analysis was completed to summarize and interpret these data. Providers' greatest concern was keeping consumers safe, and the right texture was prioritized over sensory appeal and acceptance. Providers recognized that these foods impacted the quality of life of consumers and worked to rationalize these diets with residents/patients and their families. In addition, offering foods they knew to be poorly accepted affected their self-concept as providers. As a result of these challenges, they did whatever they could in the kitchen and tableside to promote intake of pureed foods. Those in the "food chain" of pureed food provision suggested several ways to further improve these products. Greater communication between those who assist consumers with eating and those who produce the pureed food they consume is needed to promote acceptable pureed products.

  19. Thickness-dependent electronic structure modulation of ferromagnetic films on shape memory alloy substrates based on a pure strain effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chun; Hu, Di; Gong, Kui; Jiang, Xumin; Yin, Jianjuan; Cao, Yi; Tang, Xiao-Lei; Yang, Feng; Zhou, Zhongfu; Yu, Guanghua; Andrew Evans, D.

    2016-11-01

    Pure strain-induced electronic structure modulation in ferromagnetic films is critical for developing reliable strain-assisted spintronic devices with low power consumption. For the conventional electricity-controlled strain engineering, it is difficult to reveal the pure strain effect on electronic structure tunability due to the inseparability of pure strain effect and surface charge effect. Here, a non-electrically controlled NiTi shape memory alloy was utilized as a strain output substrate to induce a pure strain on attached Fe films through a thermally controlled shape memory effect. The pure strain induced electronic structure evolution was revealed by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and correlated with first-principles calculations and magnetic anisotropy measurements. A compressive strain enhances the shielding effect for core electrons and significantly tunes their binding energy. Meanwhile, the strain modifies the partial density of states of outer d orbits, which may affect spin-orbit coupling strength and related magnetic anisotropy. This work helps for clarifying the physical nature of the pure strain effect and developing the pure-strain-assisted spintronic devices.

  20. Electron transport in pure and doped hematite.

    PubMed

    Liao, Peilin; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Carter, Emily A

    2011-04-13

    Hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)) is a promising candidate for photoelectrochemical splitting of water. However, its intrinsically poor conductivity is a major drawback. Doping hematite to make it either p-type or n-type enhances its measured conductivity. We use quantum mechanics to understand how titanium, zirconium, silicon, or germanium n-type doping affects the electron transport mechanism in hematite. Our results suggest that zirconium, silicon, or germanium doping is superior to titanium doping because the former dopants do not act as electron trapping sites due to the higher instability of Zr(III) compared to Ti(III) and the more covalent interactions between silicon (germanium) and oxygen. This suggests that use of n-type dopants that easily ionize completely or promote covalent bonds to oxygen can provide more charge carriers while not inhibiting transport.

  1. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  2. Mechanism of Pt(IV) sonochemical reduction in formic acid media and pure water.

    PubMed

    Chave, Tony; Navarro, Nathalie M; Nitsche, Serge; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2012-03-26

    Sonochemical synthesis of platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in formic acid solutions and pure water was investigated using a 20 kHz ultrasonic irradiation. The obtained results gave new insights on the underneath Pt(IV)  reduction mechanism in formic acid media under argon and in pure water under Ar/CO atmosphere. It was shown that in pure water sonochemical reduction of platinum ions occurs by hydrogen issued from homolytic water molecule split. Pt(IV) ion reduction appears to be a very slow process under argon atmosphere in pure water due to formation of oxidizing species like OH radicals and H(2)O(2) leading to reoxidation of intermediate Pt(II)  ions. Sonochemical reduction is accelerated manifold in the presence of formic acid or Ar/CO gas mixture. Solution and gas-phase analyses reveal that both CO and HCOOH act as OH(.) radical scavenger and reducing agent under ultrasonic irradiation. Their ability to reduce platinum ions at room temperature is enhanced due to the local heating in the liquid shell surround the cavitation bubble. An innovative synthesis route for monodispersed Pt NPs in pure water without any templates or capping agents in the presence of Ar/CO gas mixture is then proposed. Obtained Pt NPs within the range of 2-3 nm exhibited a strong stability towards sedimentation in water. Since Ar/CO atmosphere is the only restriction of the process, this procedure can be applied in various media and is also compatible with a large array of experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Buffer-regulated biocorrosion of pure magnesium.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Nicholas T; Waterman, Jay; Birbilis, Nick; Dias, George; Woodfield, Tim B F; Hartshorn, Richard M; Staiger, Mark P

    2012-02-01

    Magnesium (Mg) alloys are being actively investigated as potential load-bearing orthopaedic implant materials due to their biodegradability in vivo. With Mg biomaterials at an early stage in their development, the screening of alloy compositions for their biodegradation rate, and hence biocompatibility, is reliant on cost-effective in vitro methods. The use of a buffer to control pH during in vitro biodegradation is recognised as critically important as this seeks to mimic pH control as it occurs naturally in vivo. The two different types of in vitro buffer system available are based on either (i) zwitterionic organic compounds or (ii) carbonate buffers within a partial-CO(2) atmosphere. This study investigated the influence of the buffering system itself on the in vitro corrosion of Mg. It was found that the less realistic zwitterion-based buffer did not form the same corrosion layers as the carbonate buffer, and was potentially affecting the behaviour of the hydrated oxide layer that forms on Mg in all aqueous environments. Consequently it was recommended that Mg in vitro experiments use the more biorealistic carbonate buffering system when possible.

  4. Photonuclear activation of pure isotopic mediums.

    SciTech Connect

    Grohman, Mark A.; Lukosi, Eric Daniel

    2010-06-01

    This work simulated the response of idealized isotopic U-235, U-238, Th-232, and Pu-239 mediums to photonuclear activation with various photon energies. These simulations were conducted using MCNPX version 2.6.0. It was found that photon energies between 14-16 MeV produce the highest response with respect to neutron production rates from all photonuclear reactions. In all cases, Pu-239 responds the highest, followed by U-238. Th-232 produces more overall neutrons at lower photon energies then U-235 when material thickness is above 3.943 centimeters. The time it takes each isotopic material to reach stable neutron production rates in time is directly proportional to the material thickness and stopping power of the medium, where thicker mediums take longer to reach stable neutron production rates and thinner media display a neutron production plateau effect, due to the lack of significant attenuation of the activating photons in the isotopic mediums. At this time, no neutron sensor system has time resolutions capable of verifying these simulations, but various indirect methods are possible and should be explored for verification of these results.

  5. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse.

  6. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beama)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm2 at the peak of the pulse.

  7. Pure midbrain ischemia and hypoplastic vertebrobasilar circulation.

    PubMed

    Gilberti, Nicola; Gamba, Massimo; Costa, Angelo; Vergani, Veronica; Spezi, Raffaella; Pezzini, Alessandro; Volonghi, Irene; Mardighian, Dikran; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Magoni, Mauro

    2014-02-01

    Isolated midbrain infarction is rare and little is known about etiology and patient's long-term follow up. We aimed to describe the clinical features, the causative diseases and the outcome of patients with isolated midbrain infarction who were admitted to our center, focusing on vascular abnormalities of posterior circulation. All patients with first acute ischemic stroke limited to the midbrain were included and their demographic features, neurological symptoms, neuroimaging data, and cardiovascular risk factors were recorded. Functional outcome, using modified Rankin scale, was assessed at discharge and at the 3 month follow up evaluation. We found nine patients with acute isolated midbrain infarction, representing 0.61 % of all ischemic stroke admitted to our center. The most common cause of stroke was small-vessel disease (88.8 %). At stroke onset, none of the patients had consciousness disturbances, and four patients (44.4 %) had gait impairment, five patients (55.5 %) presented with diplopia due to involvement of the third nerve or fascicular type of third-nerve palsy, seven patients (77.7 %) had vascular anomalies of vertebrobasilar circulation: the most frequent was vertebral artery hypoplasia [four patients (44.4 %)]. At follow up evaluation, seven patients (77.7 %) had a good functional outcome and no patients experienced recurrence of cerebrovascular events. As isolated midbrain infarction is uncommon, specific ocular motor signs, mainly third-nerve palsy, may help to identify and localize the mesencephalic infarct. Abnormalities in vertebrobasilar circulation, such as hypoplastic basilar or vertebral artery, are frequently associated with isolated midbrain ischemia. The hypoplastic vertebrobasilar system may predispose to posterior ischemic stroke.

  8. Faster and cleaner real-time pure shift NMR experiments.

    PubMed

    Mauhart, Johannes; Glanzer, Simon; Sakhaii, Peyman; Bermel, Wolfgang; Zangger, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    Real-time pure shift experiments provide highly resolved proton NMR spectra which do not require any special processing. Although being more sensitive than their pseudo 2D counterparts, their signal intensities per unit time are still far below regular NMR spectra. In addition, scalar coupling evolution during the individual data chunks produces decoupling sidebands. Here we show that faster and cleaner real-time pure shift spectra can be obtained through the implementation of two parameter alterations. Variation of the FID chunk lengths between individual transients significantly suppresses decoupling sidebands for any kind of real-time pure shift spectra and thus allows for example the analysis of minor components in compound mixtures. Shifting the excitation frequency between individual scans of real-time slice-selective pure shift spectra increases their sensitivity obtainable in unit time by allowing faster repetitions of acquisitions.

  9. Gravitation, Electromagnetism and the Cosmological Constant in Purely Affine Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popławski, Nikodem J.

    The Eddington Lagrangian in the purely affine formulation of general relativity generates the Einstein equations with the cosmological constant. The Ferraris-Kijowski purely affine Lagrangian for the electromagnetic field, which has the form of the Maxwell Lagrangian with the metric tensor replaced by the symmetrized Ricci tensor, is dynamically equivalent to the Einstein-Maxwell Lagrangian in the metric formulation. We show that the sum of the two affine Lagrangians is dynamically inequivalent to the sum of the analogous Lagrangians in the metric-affine/metric formulation. We also show that such a construction is valid only for weak electromagnetic fields. Therefore the purely affine formulation that combines gravitation, electromagnetism and the cosmological constant cannot be a simple sum of terms corresponding to separate fields. Consequently, this formulation of electromagnetism seems to be unphysical, unlike the purely metric and metric-affine pictures, unless the electromagnetic field couples to the cosmological constant.

  10. Production of fermented chestnut purees by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Blaiotta, G; Di Capua, M; Coppola, R; Aponte, M

    2012-09-03

    The objective of this study was to develop a new chestnut-based puree, in order to seasonally adjust the offer and use the surplus of undersized production, providing, at the same time, a response to the growing demand for healthy and environmentally friendly products. Broken dried chestnuts have been employed to prepare purees to be fermented with six different strains of Lactobacillus (Lb.) rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei. The fermented purees were characterized by a technological and sensorial point of view, while the employed strains were tested for their probiotic potential. Conventional in vitro tests have indicated the six lactobacilli strains as promising probiotic candidates; moreover, being the strains able to grow and to survive in chestnut puree at a population level higher than 8 log₁₀ CFU/mL along 40 days of storage at 4 °C, the bases for the production of a new food, lactose-free and with reduced fat content, have been laid.

  11. All entangled pure states violate a single Bell's inequality.

    PubMed

    Yu, Sixia; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Chengjie; Lai, C H; Oh, C H

    2012-09-21

    We show that a single Bell's inequality with two dichotomic observables for each observer, which originates from Hardy's nonlocality proof without inequalities, is violated by all entangled pure states of a given number of particles, each of which may have a different number of energy levels. Thus Gisin's theorem is proved in its most general form from which it follows that for pure states Bell's nonlocality and quantum entanglement are equivalent.

  12. Preserving Ultra-Pure Uranium-233

    SciTech Connect

    Krichinsky, Alan M; Goldberg, Dr. Steven A.; Hutcheon, Dr. Ian D.

    2011-10-01

    Uranium-233 ({sup 233}U) is a synthetic isotope of uranium formed under reactor conditions during neutron capture by natural thorium ({sup 232}Th). At high purities, this synthetic isotope serves as a crucial reference material for accurately quantifying and characterizing uranium-bearing materials assays and isotopic distributions for domestic and international nuclear safeguards. Separated, high purity {sup 233}U is stored in vaults at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These materials represent a broad spectrum of {sup 233}U from the standpoint of isotopic purity - the purest being crucial for precise analyses in safeguarding uranium. All {sup 233}U at ORNL is currently scheduled to be disposed of by down-blending with depleted uranium beginning in 2015. This will reduce safety concerns and security costs associated with storage. Down-blending this material will permanently destroy its potential value as a certified reference material for use in uranium analyses. Furthermore, no credible options exist for replacing {sup 233}U due to the lack of operating production capability and the high cost of restarting currently shut down capabilities. A study was commissioned to determine the need for preserving high-purity {sup 233}U. This study looked at the current supply and the historical and continuing domestic need for this crucial isotope. It examined the gap in supplies and uses to meet domestic needs and extrapolated them in the context of international safeguards and security activities - superimposed on the recognition that existing supplies are being depleted while candidate replacement material is being prepared for disposal. This study found that the total worldwide need by this projection is at least 850 g of certified {sup 233}U reference material over the next 50 years. This amount also includes a strategic reserve. To meet this need, 18 individual items totaling 959 g of {sup 233}U were identified as candidates for establishing a lasting supply of

  13. SPECTRALLY RESOLVED PURE ROTATIONAL LINES OF WATER IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M.; Salyk, Colette; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Kaeufl, Hans Ulrich

    2010-10-20

    We present ground-based high-resolution N-band spectra ({Delta}v = 15 km s{sup -1}) of pure rotational lines of water vapor in two protoplanetary disks surrounding the pre-main-sequence stars AS 205N and RNO 90, selected based on detections of rotational water lines by the Spitzer InfraRed Spectrograph. Using VISIR on the Very Large Telescope, we spectrally resolve individual lines and show that they have widths of 30-60 km s{sup -1}, consistent with an origin in Keplerian disks at radii of {approx}1 AU. The water lines have similar widths to those of the CO at 4.67 {mu}m, indicating that the mid-infrared water lines trace similar radii. The rotational temperatures of the water are 540 and 600 K in the two disks, respectively. However, the line ratios show evidence of non-LTE excitation, with low-excitation line fluxes being overpredicted by two-dimensional disk LTE models. Due to the limited number of observed lines and the non-LTE line ratios, an accurate measure of the water ortho/para (O/P) ratio is not available, but a best estimate for AS 205N is O/P =4.5 {+-} 1.0, apparently ruling out a low-temperature origin of the water. The spectra demonstrate that high-resolution spectroscopy of rotational water lines is feasible from the ground, and further that ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy is likely to significantly improve our understanding of the inner disk chemistry revealed by recent Spitzer observations.

  14. Physics of pure and non-pure positron emitters for PET: a review and a discussion.

    PubMed

    Conti, Maurizio; Eriksson, Lars

    2016-12-01

    With the increased interest in new PET tracers, gene-targeted therapy, immunoPET, and theranostics, other radioisotopes will be increasingly used in clinical PET scanners, in addition to (18)F. Some of the most interesting radioisotopes with prospective use in the new fields are not pure short-range β(+) emitters but can be associated with gamma emissions in coincidence with the annihilation radiation (prompt gamma), gamma-gamma cascades, intense Bremsstrahlung radiation, high-energy positrons that may escape out of the patient skin, and high-energy gamma rays that result in some e (+)/e (-) pair production. The high level of sophistication in data correction and excellent quantitative accuracy that has been reached for (18)F in recent years can be questioned by these effects. In this work, we review the physics and the scientific literature and evaluate the effect of these additional phenomena on the PET data for each of a series of radioisotopes: (11)C, (13)N, (15)O, (18)F, (64)Cu, (68)Ga, (76)Br, (82)Rb, (86)Y, (89)Zr, (90)Y, and (124)I. In particular, we discuss the present complications arising from the prompt gammas, and we review the scientific literature on prompt gamma correction. For some of the radioisotopes considered in this work, prompt gamma correction is definitely needed to assure acceptable image quality, and several approaches have been proposed in recent years. Bremsstrahlung photons and (176)Lu background were also evaluated.

  15. Pure-tone birdsong by resonance filtering of harmonic overtones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckers, Gabriël J. L.; Suthers, Roderick A.; Ten Cate, Carel

    2003-06-01

    Pure-tone song is a common and widespread phenomenon in birds. The mechanistic origin of this type of phonation has been the subject of long-standing discussion. Currently, there are three hypotheses. (i) A vibrating valve in the avian vocal organ, the syrinx, generates a multifrequency harmonic source sound, which is filtered to a pure tone by a vocal tract filter ("source-filter" model, analogous to human speech production). (ii) Vocal tract resonances couple with a vibrating valve source, suppressing the normal production of harmonic overtones at this source ("soprano" model, analogous to human soprano singing). (iii) Pure-tone sound is produced as such by a sound-generating mechanism that is fundamentally different from a vibrating valve. Here we present direct evidence of a source-filter mechanism in the production of pure-tone birdsong. Using tracheal thermistors and air sac pressure cannulae, we recorded sound signals close to the syringeal sound source during spontaneous, pure-tone vocalizations of two species of turtledove. The results show that pure-tone dove vocalizations originate through filtering of a multifrequency harmonic sound source.

  16. Testing effects in mixed- versus pure-list designs.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Christopher A; Littrell-Baez, Megan K; Sensenig, Amanda E; DeLosh, Edward L

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, we investigated the role of list composition in the testing effect. Across three experiments, participants learned items through study and initial testing or study and restudy. List composition was manipulated, such that tested and restudied items appeared either intermixed in the same lists (mixed lists) or in separate lists (pure lists). In Experiment 1, half of the participants received mixed lists and half received pure lists. In Experiment 2, all participants were given both mixed and pure lists. Experiment 3 followed Erlebacher's (Psychological Bulletin, 84, 212-219, 1977) method, such that mixed lists, pure tested lists, and pure restudied lists were given to independent groups. Across all three experiments, the final recall results revealed significant testing effects for both mixed and pure lists, with no reliable difference in the magnitude of the testing advantage across list designs. This finding suggests that the testing effect is not subject to a key boundary condition-list design-that impacts other memory phenomena, including the generation effect.

  17. A Simple Protein Synthesis Model for the PURE System Operation.

    PubMed

    Mavelli, Fabio; Marangoni, Roberto; Stano, Pasquale

    2015-06-01

    The encapsulation of transcription-translation (TX-TL) cell-free machinery inside lipid vesicles (liposomes) is a key element in synthetic cell technology. The PURE system is a TX-TL kit composed of well-characterized parts, whose concentrations are fine tunable, which works according to a modular architecture. For these reasons, the PURE system perfectly fulfils the requirements of synthetic biology and is widely used for constructing synthetic cells. In this work, we present a simplified mathematical model to simulate the PURE system operations. Based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics and differential equations, the model describes protein synthesis dynamics by using 9 chemical species, 6 reactions and 16 kinetic parameters. The model correctly predicts the time course for messenger RNA and protein production and allows quantitative predictions. By means of this model, it is possible to foresee how the PURE system species affect the mechanism of proteins synthesis and therefore help in understanding scenarios where the concentration of the PURE system components has been modified purposely or as a result of stochastic fluctuations (for example after random encapsulation inside vesicles). The model also makes the determination of response coefficients for all species involved in the TX-TL mechanism possible and allows for scrutiny on how chemical energy is consumed by the three PURE system modules (transcription, translation and aminoacylation).

  18. PURE ribosome display and its application in antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Takashi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Ueda, Takuya

    2014-11-01

    Ribosome display utilizes formation of the mRNA-ribosome-polypeptide ternary complex in a cell-free protein synthesis system to link genotype (mRNA) to phenotype (polypeptide). However, the presence of intrinsic components, such as nucleases in the cell-extract-based cell-free protein synthesis system, reduces the stability of the ternary complex, which would prevent attainment of reliable results. We have developed an efficient and highly controllable ribosome display system using the PURE (Protein synthesis Using Recombinant Elements) system. The mRNA-ribosome-polypeptide ternary complex is highly stable in the PURE system, and the selected mRNA can be easily recovered because activities of nucleases and other inhibitory factors are very low in the PURE system. We have applied the PURE ribosome display to antibody engineering approaches, such as epitope mapping and affinity maturation of antibodies, and obtained results showing that the PURE ribosome display is more efficient than the conventional method. We believe that the PURE ribosome display can contribute to the development of useful antibodies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody.

  19. Pure-tone birdsong by resonance filtering of harmonic overtones.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Suthers, Roderick A; ten Cate, Carel

    2003-06-10

    Pure-tone song is a common and widespread phenomenon in birds. The mechanistic origin of this type of phonation has been the subject of long-standing discussion. Currently, there are three hypotheses. (i) A vibrating valve in the avian vocal organ, the syrinx, generates a multifrequency harmonic source sound, which is filtered to a pure tone by a vocal tract filter ("source-filter" model, analogous to human speech production). (ii) Vocal tract resonances couple with a vibrating valve source, suppressing the normal production of harmonic overtones at this source ("soprano" model, analogous to human soprano singing). (iii) Pure-tone sound is produced as such by a sound-generating mechanism that is fundamentally different from a vibrating valve. Here we present direct evidence of a source-filter mechanism in the production of pure-tone birdsong. Using tracheal thermistors and air sac pressure cannulae, we recorded sound signals close to the syringeal sound source during spontaneous, pure-tone vocalizations of two species of turtledove. The results show that pure-tone dove vocalizations originate through filtering of a multifrequency harmonic sound source.

  20. Survival analysis of pure seminoma at post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection.

    PubMed

    Rice, Kevin R; Beck, Stephen D W; Bihrle, Richard; Cary, K Clint; Einhorn, Lawrence H; Foster, Richard S

    2014-11-01

    Viable seminoma encountered at post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for pure testicular seminoma is rare due to the chemosensitivity of this germ cell tumor. In this study we define the natural history of viable seminoma at post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. The Indiana University testis cancer database was queried from 1988 to 2011 to identify all patients with primary testicular or retroperitoneal pure seminoma and who were found to have pure seminoma at post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Clinical characteristics were reviewed and survival analysis was performed. A total of 36 patients met the study inclusion criteria. All patients received standard first line cisplatin based chemotherapy and 17 received salvage chemotherapy. The decision to proceed to retroperitoneal lymph node dissection was based on enlarging retroperitoneal mass and/or positron emission positivity in the majority of cases. Seven patients had undergone previous retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Additional surgical procedures were required in 19 patients to achieve a complete resection. The 5-year cancer specific survival rate was 54%. However, only 9 of 36 patients remained continuously free of disease and of these patients 4 received adjuvant chemotherapy. Mean time from post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection to death was 6.9 months. Second line chemotherapy, reoperative retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and earlier era of treatment were associated with poorer cancer specific survival. A total of 36 patients with pure seminoma were found to have viable pure seminoma at post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. While 5-year cancer specific survival was 54%, these surgeries are technically demanding and only a minority of patients achieves a durable cure from surgery alone. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights