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Sample records for pure magnetite crystals

  1. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K.; Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; Wentworth, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the origin of nanophase magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been widely debated for nearly a decade. Golden et al. have reported producing nearly chemically pure magnetite from thermal decomposition of chemically impure siderite [(Fe, Mg, Mn)CO3]. This claim is significant for three reasons: first, it has been argued that chemically pure magnetite present in the carbonate disks in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could have formed by the thermal decomposition of the impure carbonate matrix in which they are embedded; second, the chemical purity of magnetite has been previously used to identify biogenic magnetite; and, third, previous studies of thermal decomposition of impure (Mg,Ca,Mn)-siderites, which have been investigated under a wide variety of conditions by numerous researchers, invariably yields a mixed metal oxide phase as the product and not chemically pure magnetite. The explanation for this observation is that these siderites all possess the same crystallographic structure (Calcite; R3c) so solid solutions between these carbonates are readily formed and can be viewed on an atomic scale as two chemically different but structurally similar lattices.

  2. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  3. Non-chemically Pure Magnetites Produced from Thermal Decomposition of Ankerites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez López, C.; Romanek, C.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A.; Pérez-González, T.; Rodríguez Navarro, C.

    2008-12-01

    It has been claimed that chemically pure magnetites (Fe3O4) can be obtained from thermal decomposition of (Fe, Mg, Ca)CO3 (Golden et al., 2004). Such an observation is critical, since it opens the possibility of an inorganic way of formation of the magnetites found on Martian meteorite ALH84001. Such a chemical purity is one of the parameters used, so far, to recognize bacterial origin of natural magnetites (Thomas-Keptra et al., 2001), since it has been demonstrated that biologically-controlled magnetites are chemically pure (Bazylinski and Frankel, 2004) . However, while Golden et al. (2004) obtained pure magnetite from an almost pure precursor, the ankerite cores in ALH84001 in which magnetites are embedded are far from being chemically pure, since they contain considerable amounts of Ca and Mg (Kopp and Humayun, 2003). In this study we have performed several experiments to analyze the chemical purity of magnetites produced by thermal decomposition of four ankerite samples sinthetized in the laboratory, and containing different amounts of Ca, Fe and Mg. Such a thermal decomposition was achieved by two procedures: (1) by heating the samples at 470°C under CO2 pressure and (2) by decomposing the ankerite "in situ" under the TEM (Transmission electron Microscopy) electron beam. Magnetite produced by the first procedure was analyzed by XRD to determine whether or not the resulting solid was a mixture of oxides or rather a solid solution of (Ca, Fe and Mg)oxide. Magnetites formed by the two methods were studied by High Resolution TEM. The chemical composition of about 20 crystals of each experiment was analyzed by EDAX. Under our experimental conditions, ankerites decomposed in magnetite crystals of about 5 nanometers in size. Magentite crystals arranged to keep the morphology of the precursor. Our results confirm that any of these magnetites is chemically pure, but rather, each one of them is a solid solution of Ca and Mg. Therefore, chemically pure magnetites

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of magnetite crystals: From sheet to pseudo-octahedron

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ming; Ji, Rui-Ping; Jiang, Ji-Sen

    2010-12-15

    In this paper, we developed a hydrothermal method to fabricate sheet-like and pseudo-octahedral magnetite crystals. X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the products were pure spinel-structured magnetite. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphology of the obtained crystals. By carefully regulating the initial NaOH concentrations, the morphology of the products could be changed from sheet-like crystals to pseudo-octahedral crystals. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated the sheet-like crystals were the oriented aggregation of nanoparticles. Pseudo-octahedral magnetite crystals were single crystalline, and were obtained by dissolution-recrystallization of the sheet-like crystals. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM)) suggested the magnetic properties of the products were strongly related to the morphology. The coercivity of the sheet-like magnetite crystals was 100 Oe, larger than 30 Oe of the pseudo-octahedral crystals, but the saturation magnetization of the sheet-like magnetite crystals was 40 emu/g, smaller than 85 emu/g of the pseudo-octahedral crystals.

  5. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Clemett, S J; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; McKay, M F; Romanek, C S

    2001-02-27

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found. PMID:11226210

  6. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: Presumptive biosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, Hojatollah; Gibson, Everett K.; McKay, Mary Fae; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924–930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found. PMID:11226210

  7. Truncated hexa-octahedral magnetite crystals in ALH84001: presumptive biosignatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J. L.; McKay, D. S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, E. K. Jr; McKay, M. F.; Romanek, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    McKay et al. [(1996) Science 273, 924-930] suggested that carbonate globules in the meteorite ALH84001 contained the fossil remains of Martian microbes. We have characterized a subpopulation of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals present in abundance within the Fe-rich rims of these carbonate globules. We find these Martian magnetites to be both chemically and physically identical to terrestrial, biogenically precipitated, intracellular magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. Specifically, both magnetite populations are single-domain and chemically pure, and exhibit a unique crystal habit we describe as truncated hexa-octahedral. There are no known reports of inorganic processes to explain the observation of truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites in a terrestrial sample. In bacteria strain MV-1 their presence is therefore likely a product of Natural Selection. Unless there is an unknown and unexplained inorganic process on Mars that is conspicuously absent on the Earth and forms truncated hexa-octahedral magnetites, we suggest that these magnetite crystals in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were likely produced by a biogenic process. As such, these crystals are interpreted as Martian magnetofossils and constitute evidence of the oldest life yet found.

  8. Process for Making Single-Domain Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Lofgren, Gary E.; McKay, Gordan A.; Schwandt, Craig S.; Lauer, Howard V., Jr.; Socki, Richard A.

    2004-01-01

    A process for making chemically pure, single-domain magnetite crystals substantially free of structural defects has been invented as a byproduct of research into the origin of globules in a meteorite found in Antarctica and believed to have originated on Mars. The globules in the meteorite comprise layers of mixed (Mg, Fe, and Ca) carbonates, magnetite, and iron sulfides. Since the discovery of the meteorite was announced in August 1996, scientists have debated whether the globules are of biological origin or were formed from inorganic materials by processes that could have taken place on Mars. While the research that led to the present invention has not provided a definitive conclusion concerning the origin of the globules, it has shown that globules of a different but related chemically layered structure can be grown from inorganic ingredients in a multistep precipitation process. As described in more detail below, the present invention comprises the multistep precipitation process plus a subsequent heat treatment. The multistep precipitation process was demonstrated in a laboratory experiment on the growth of submicron ankerite crystals, overgrown by submicron siderite and pyrite crystals, overgrown by submicron magnesite crystals, overgrown by submicron siderite and pyrite. In each step, chloride salts of appropriate cations (Ca, Fe, and Mg) were dissolved in deoxygenated, CO2- saturated water. NaHCO3 was added as a pH buffer while CO2 was passed continuously through the solution. A 15-mL aliquot of the resulting solution was transferred into each of several 20 mL, poly(tetrafluoroethylene)-lined hydrothermal pressure vessels. The vessels were closed in a CO2 atmosphere, then transferred into an oven at a temperature of 150 C. After a predetermined time, the hydrothermal vessels were removed from the oven and quenched in a freezer. Supernatant solutions were decanted, and carbonate precipitates were washed free of soluble salts by repeated decantations with

  9. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbontes: Implications for Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Treiman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-03-01

    Pure (Mg-free) magnetite was synthesized by heating Mg-Fe-carbonate at 350°C in the presence of pyrite in an evacuated sealed glass tube. The Mg-free magnetite in the black rims of ALH84001 may have formed by a similar inorganic abiotic process from Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  10. Growing ZnO crystals on magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Turgeman, Rachel; Tirosh, Shay; Gedanken, Aharon

    2004-04-01

    We report herein on the oriented growth of ZnO crystals on magnetite nanoparticles. The ZnO crystals were grown by hydrolyzing a supersaturated aqueous solution of zinc nitrate. The seeds for the growth were magnetite nanoparticles with a diameter of 5.7 nm and a narrow size distribution. Hollowed ZnO hexagons of 0.15 microm width and 0.5 microm length filled with Fe(3)O(4) particles were obtained. HR-TEM (high-resolution transmission electron microscopy) and selected-area EDS (energy-dispersive spectroscopy) show that the nanoparticles are homogenously spread in the ZnO tubes. Zeta potential measurements were employed to understand the relationship between the nanoparticles and the oriented growth of the ZnO crystals. The results show that the surfactants induced the directional growth of the ZnO crystals.

  11. Elongated prismatic magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate globules: potential Martian magnetofossils.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Keprta, K L; Bazylinski, D A; Kirschvink, J L; Clemett, S J; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J; Vali, H; Gibson, E K; Romanek, C S

    2000-12-01

    Using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), we have analyzed magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals acid-extracted from carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We studied 594 magnetites from ALH84001 and grouped them into three populations on the basis of morphology: 389 were irregularly shaped, 164 were elongated prisms, and 41 were whisker-like. As a possible terrestrial analog for the ALH84001 elongated prisms, we compared these magnetites with those produced by the terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1. By TEM again, we examined 206 magnetites recovered from strain MV-1 cells. Natural (Darwinian) selection in terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria appears to have resulted in the formation of intracellular magnetite crystals having the physical and chemical properties that optimize their magnetic moment. In this study, we describe six properties of magnetite produced by biologically controlled mechanisms (e.g., magnetotactic bacteria), properties that, collectively, are not observed in any known population of inorganic magnetites. These criteria can be used to distinguish one of the modes of origin for magnetites from samples with complex or unknown histories. Of the ALH84001 magnetites that we have examined, the elongated prismatic magnetite particles (similar to 27% of the total) are indistinguishable from the MV-1 magnetites in five of these six characteristics observed for biogenically controlled mineralization of magnetite crystals. PMID:11543573

  12. Magnetotransport properties of a percolating network of magnetite crystals embedded in a glass-ceramic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allia, Paolo; Bretcanu, Oana; Vernè, Enrica; Celegato, Federica; Coisson, Marco; Tiberto, Paola; Vinai, Franco; Spizzo, Federico; Tamisari, Melissa

    2009-04-01

    Electrical resistance, magnetization, and magnetoresistance have been measured as functions of temperature from 50 to 300 K on three ferromagnetic glass ceramics containing different magnetite crystals by preparing conditions and crystal morphology. Magnetite crystals form a percolating network for electrons with weak links at crystal-crystal contact points. All samples exhibit a broadened Verwey transition, peaked at temperatures lower than measured in bulk stoichiometric magnetite. The negative magnetoresistance ratio increases in absolute value with sample cooling from RT down to the Verwey temperature and decreases on further cooling. This behavior indicates that electron transfer between magnetite crystals is achieved through spin-dependent and spin-independent channels acting in parallel. Magnetic correlation states for spins at contact points between magnetite crystals are studied by plotting the magnetoresistance as a function of reduced magnetization. The transition from activated hopping to variable range hopping affects the magnetoresistance versus magnetization curves.

  13. Ferromagnetic resonance of intact cells and isolated crystals from cultured and uncultured magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abraçado, Leida G; Wajnberg, Eliane; Esquivel, Darci M S; Keim, Carolina N; Silva, Karen T; Moreira, Emílio T S; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Most magnetotactic bacteria (MB) produce stable, single-domain magnetite nanocrystals with species-specific size, shape and chain arrangement. In addition, most crystals are elongated along the [111] direction, which is the easy axis of magnetization in magnetite, chemically pure and structurally perfect. These special characteristics allow magnetite crystal chains from MB to be recognized in environmental samples including old sedimentary rocks. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) has been proposed as a powerful and practical tool for screening large numbers of samples possibly containing magnetofossils. Indeed, several studies were recently published on FMR of cultured MB, mainly Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. In this work, we examined both uncultured magnetotactic cocci and the cultured MB M. gryphiswaldense using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and FMR from 10 K to room temperature (RT). The TEM data supported the FMR spectral characteristics of our samples. The FMR spectra of both bacteria showed the intrinsic characteristics of magnetite produced by MB, such as extended absorption at the low field region of the spectra and a Verwey transition around 100 K. As previously observed, the spectra of M. gryphiswaldense isolated crystals were more symmetrical than the spectra obtained from whole cells, reflecting the loss of chain arrangement due to the small size and symmetrical shape of the crystals. However, the FMR spectra of magnetic crystals isolated from magnetotactic cocci were very similar to the FMR spectra of whole cells, because the chain arrangement was maintained due to the large size and prismatic shape of the crystals. Our data support the use of FMR spectra to detect magnetotactic bacteria and magnetofossils in samples of present and past environments. Furthermore, the spectra suggest the use of the temperature transition of spectral peak-to-peak intensity to obtain the Verwey temperature for these systems. PMID:24828297

  14. Ferromagnetic resonance of intact cells and isolated crystals from cultured and uncultured magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Abraçado, Leida G; Wajnberg, Eliane; Esquivel, Darci M S; Keim, Carolina N; Silva, Karen T; Moreira, Emílio T S; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2014-06-01

    Most magnetotactic bacteria (MB) produce stable, single-domain magnetite nanocrystals with species-specific size, shape and chain arrangement. In addition, most crystals are elongated along the [111] direction, which is the easy axis of magnetization in magnetite, chemically pure and structurally perfect. These special characteristics allow magnetite crystal chains from MB to be recognized in environmental samples including old sedimentary rocks. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) has been proposed as a powerful and practical tool for screening large numbers of samples possibly containing magnetofossils. Indeed, several studies were recently published on FMR of cultured MB, mainly Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. In this work, we examined both uncultured magnetotactic cocci and the cultured MB M. gryphiswaldense using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and FMR from 10 K to room temperature (RT). The TEM data supported the FMR spectral characteristics of our samples. The FMR spectra of both bacteria showed the intrinsic characteristics of magnetite produced by MB, such as extended absorption at the low field region of the spectra and a Verwey transition around 100 K. As previously observed, the spectra of M. gryphiswaldense isolated crystals were more symmetrical than the spectra obtained from whole cells, reflecting the loss of chain arrangement due to the small size and symmetrical shape of the crystals. However, the FMR spectra of magnetic crystals isolated from magnetotactic cocci were very similar to the FMR spectra of whole cells, because the chain arrangement was maintained due to the large size and prismatic shape of the crystals. Our data support the use of FMR spectra to detect magnetotactic bacteria and magnetofossils in samples of present and past environments. Furthermore, the spectra suggest the use of the temperature transition of spectral peak-to-peak intensity to obtain the Verwey temperature for these systems.

  15. MMS6 protein regulates crystal morphology during nano-sized magnetite biomineralization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masayoshi; Mazuyama, Eri; Arakaki, Atsushi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2011-02-25

    Biomineralization, the process by which minerals are deposited by organisms, has attracted considerable attention because this mechanism has shown great potential to inspire bottom-up material syntheses. To understand the mechanism for morphological regulation that occurs during biomineralization, many regulatory proteins have been isolated from various biominerals. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the morphology of biominerals remain unclear because there is a lack of in vivo evidence. Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize intracellular magnetosomes that comprise membrane-enveloped single crystalline magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)). These nano-sized magnetite crystals (<100 nm) are bacterial species dependent in shape and size. Mms6 is a protein that is tightly associated with magnetite crystals. Based on in vitro experiments, this protein was first implicated in morphological regulation during nano-sized magnetite biomineralization. In this study, we analyzed the mms6 gene deletion mutant (Δmms6) of Magnetospirillum magneticum (M. magneticum) AMB-1. Surprisingly, the Δmms6 strain was found to synthesize the smaller magnetite crystals with uncommon crystal faces, while the wild-type and complementation strains synthesized highly ordered cubo-octahedral crystals. Furthermore, deletion of mms6 gene led to drastic changes in the profiles of the proteins tightly bound to magnetite crystals. It was found that Mms6 plays a role in the in vivo regulation of the crystal structure to impart the cubo-octahedral morphology to the crystals during biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria. Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetite crystals under ambient conditions via a highly controlled morphological regulation system that uses biological molecules.

  16. Analysis of magnetite crystals and inclusion bodies inside magnetotactic bacteria from different environmental locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oestreicher, Z.; Lower, B.; Lower, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Biomineralization occurs throughout the living world; a few common examples include iron oxide in chiton teeth, calcium carbonate in mollusk shells, calcium phosphate in animal bones and teeth, silica in diatom shells, and magnetite crystals inside the cells of magnetotactic bacteria. Biologically controlled mineralization is characterized by biominerals that have species-specific properties such as: preferential crystallographic orientation, consistent particle size, highly ordered spatial locations, and well-defined composition and structure. It is well known that magnetotactic bacteria synthesize crystals of magnetite inside of their cells, but how they mineralize the magnetite is poorly understood. Magnetosomes have a species-specific morphology that is due to specific proteins involved in the mineralization process. In addition to magnetite crystals, magnetotactic bacteria also produce inclusion bodies or granules that contain different elements, such as phosphorus, calcium, and sulfur. In this study we used the transmission electron microscope to analyze the structure of magnetite crystals and inclusion bodies from different species of magnetotactic bacteria in order to determine the composition of the inclusion bodies and to ascertain whether or not the magnetite crystals contain elements other than iron and oxygen. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy we found that different bacteria from different environments possess inclusion bodies that contain different elements such as phosphorus, calcium, barium, magnesium, and sulfur. These differences may reflect the conditions of the environment in which the bacteria inhabit.

  17. Properties of intracellular magnetite crystals produced by Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pósfai, Mihály; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Arató, Balázs; Schüler, Dirk; Flies, Christine; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Frankel, Richard B.

    2006-09-01

    Desulfovibrio magneticus strain RS-1 is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium. Cells form intracellular nanocrystals of magnetite but are only weakly magnetotactic. In order to understand the unusual magnetic response of this strain, we studied magnetite crystals within cells grown with fumarate and sulfate. Many cells grown under either condition did not form magnetic crystals while others contained only 1 to 18 small (˜ 40 nm) magnetite-containing magnetosomes. Bulk magnetic measurements of whole cells showed a superparamagnetic-like behavior, indicating that many of the magnetite crystals are too small to have a permanent magnetic moment at ambient temperature. The temperature of the Verwey transition is lower (˜ 86 K) than of magnetite from other magnetotactic strains, likely indicating partial oxidation of magnetite into maghemite. As a result of the small size and small number of magnetite magnetosomes, the magnetic moments of most cells grown anaerobically with fumarate or sulfate are insufficient for magnetotaxis. In addition to intracellular magnetite, in some cultures another iron oxide, hematite, formed on the surfaces of cells. The hematite grains are embedded in an extracellular polymeric material, indicating that the crystals likely resulted from a biologically-induced mineralization process. Although the hematite particles appear to consist of aggregations of many small (5 to 10 nm) grains, the grains have a consensus orientation and thus the whole particle diffracts as a single crystal. The aligned arrangement of nanoparticles within larger clusters may reflect either a templated nucleation of hematite crystallites in an extracellular organic matrix, or result from a self-assembling process during the crystallization of hematite from ferric gels or ferrihydrite.

  18. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  19. Did an Impact Make the Mysterious Microscopic Magnetite Crystals in ALH 84001?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2007-10-01

    Fervent debate swirls around microscopic crystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) in Martian meteorite ALH 84001. Some investigators suggest that the crystals are evidence of past life on Mars, citing magnetite crystals of similar chemical compositions and sizes made by magnetotactic bacteria on Earth. Others cite assorted experiments and observations to argue that the important little crystals formed entirely by non-biological processes, hence say nothing about life on Mars. One of those processes is the decomposition of iron carbonate (the mineral siderite), which occurs in ALH 84001. Researchers argue that heating this mineral causes it to decompose into magnetite and CO2 gas. Experiments showing this were done by heating siderite and observing that it decomposed and formed magnetite, but nobody had shock-heated siderite to see if magnetite crystals formed. (Shock is a rapid, strong rise and fall in pressure. It happens under many circumstances, including meteorite impacts.) The lack of shock experiments has been solved by Mary Sue Bell (University of Houston and Jacobs Engineering). She experimentally shocked samples of siderite at the Experimental Impact Laboratory at the Johnson Space Center. She shows that magnetite crystals of the right size and composition formed when samples were shocked to 49 GPa (about 500,000 times the pressure at the Earth's surface). This is more evidence for a non-biological origin for the magnetite crystals in ALH 84001 and is consistent with what we know about the impact history of the rock. There seems to be growing evidence against a biological origin, but don't expect these results to completely settle the debate!

  20. Crystal growth of bullet-shaped magnetite in magnetotactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Menguy, Nicolas; Gatel, Christophe; Boureau, Victor; Snoeck, Etienne; Patriarche, Gilles; Leroy, Eric; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-02-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are known to produce single-domain magnetite or greigite crystals within intracellular membrane organelles and to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines. MTB have been suggested as being one of the most ancient biomineralizing metabolisms on the Earth and they represent a fundamental model of intracellular biomineralization. Moreover, the determination of their specific crystallographic signature (e.g. structure and morphology) is essential for palaeoenvironmental and ancient-life studies. Yet, the mechanisms of MTB biomineralization remain poorly understood, although this process has been extensively studied in several cultured MTB strains in the Proteobacteria phylum. Here, we show a comprehensive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of magnetic and structural properties down to atomic scales on bullet-shaped magnetites produced by the uncultured strain MYR-1 belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum, a deeply branching phylogenetic MTB group. We observed a multiple-step crystal growth of MYR-1 magnetite: initial isotropic growth forming cubo-octahedral particles (less than approx. 40 nm), subsequent anisotropic growth and a systematic final elongation along [001] direction. During the crystal growth, one major {111} face is well developed and preserved at the larger basal end of the crystal. The basal {111} face appears to be terminated by a tetrahedral-octahedral-mixed iron surface, suggesting dimensional advantages for binding protein(s), which may template the crystallization of magnetite. This study offers new insights for understanding magnetite biomineralization within the Nitrospirae phylum.

  1. Co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins define the surface structure of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Yamagishi, Ayana; Fukuyo, Ayumi; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2014-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize magnetosomes comprised of membrane-enveloped single crystalline magnetite (Fe3 O4 ). The size and morphology of the nano-sized magnetite crystals (< 100 nm) are highly regulated and bacterial species dependent. However, the control mechanisms of magnetite crystal morphology remain largely unknown. The group of proteins, called Mms (Mms5, Mms6, Mms7, and Mms13), was previously isolated from the surface of cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. Analysis of an mms6 gene deletion mutant suggested that the Mms6 protein plays a major role in the regulation of magnetite crystal size and morphology. In this study, we constructed various mms gene deletion mutants and characterized the magnetite crystals formed by the mutant strains. Comparative analysis showed that all mms genes were involved in the promotion of crystal growth in different manners. The phenotypic characterization of magnetites also suggested that these proteins are involved in controlling the geometries of the crystal surface structures. Thus, the co-ordinated functions of Mms proteins regulate the morphology of the cubo-octahedral magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria.

  2. Chains of Magnetite Crystals in the Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biological Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, E. I.; Wierzchos, J.; Ascaso, C.; Winklhofer, M.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, missing evidence for their biological origin, as well as five morphological characteristics incompatible with a nonbiological origin are demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles crystallized in sodium-aluminoborosilicate glass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, M.; Tzankov, D.; Harizanova, R.; Avdeev, G.; Rüssel, C.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were crystallized from soda alumina borosilicate glasses with the composition (24- y)Na2O· yAl2O3·14B2O3·37SiO2·25Fe2O3, where y = 8, 12, 14, 16 mol%. All samples are phase separated into magnetite core, enriched in iron oxide, and a glass shell. The magnetic core phase consists of nanocrystallites with sizes ranging between 25 and 40 nm, depending on the respective glass composition. All samples show characteristic well-defined hysteresis loops at room temperature, indicating that the magnetite particles are ferrimagnetic. No evidence for the existence of superparamagnetic particles is found by measuring the ZFC and FC thermomagnetic curves.

  4. Hysteresis of Magnetite, Hematite and Pyrrhotite Crystals at High and Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Alternating gradient force magnetometers and sensitive vibrating-sample magnetometers operating above, at, and below room temperature have enabled rapid reliable measurements of hysteresis and remanence curves. The hysteresis parameters Ms, Mrs, Hc, plus the remanence coercivity Hcr, are routinely determined, at room temperature at least, and reported in the form of a Day plot as an indication of domain state and inferred grain size. Yet our knowledge of the hysteresis and remanence properties of individual crystals or sized crystal aggregates of magnetite, titanomagnetite, hematite, pyrrhotite and other important magnetic minerals has scarcely advanced beyond what was known at the end of the 1980's. Applications have indeed outstripped fundamental studies. This presentation will focus on new hysteresis measurements for well-sized magnetites of a variety of origins; magnetite inclusions in plagioclase, pyroxene, amphiboles and biotite; hematite; and pyrrhotite. Measurements were made at 20oC intervals from 25oC to the Curie point for all magnetites and hematites and at 10oC intervals for pyrrhotite. For one set of sized magnetites (0.6, 3, 6, 9, 14 and 110 micrometers), hysteresis and back-field remanence curves were also measured below room temperature (every 10 K from 10 K to 70 K, every 5 K from 80 K to 140 K, and every 10 K from 150 K to 300 K). These data give a wealth of information about the individual mineral crystals and trends linking crystals of common origin but different sizes. From Ms(T) we obtain precise Curie points and transition temperatures. Mrs(T)/Ms(T) tracks sometimes subtle changes in domain structure with changing temperature. Hc(T) gives an indication of the mechanism(s) of anisotropy, important for understanding TRM acquisition in crystals above single-domain size. Mrs(T) and Hc(T) often show substantial irreversible changes in the first heating- cooling cycle, particularly but not exclusively for synthetic crystals, stabilizing in

  5. Verwey transition of nano-sized magnetite crystals investigated by 57Fe NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sumin; Choi, Baek Soon; Lee, Soon Chil; Hong, Jaeyoung; Lee, Jisoo; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Taehun; Jeong, Jaehong; Park, Je-Geun

    It is well known that magnetite crystals undergo a metal-insulator transition at the Verwey transition temperature, TV = 123 K. In this work, we studied the Verwey transition of nano-sized crystals with 57Fe NMR. In the metallic state above Tv, the NMR spectrum shows a single sharp peak, which broadens below TV indicating the Verwey transition. We measured the spectra of the nano-crystals with radii of 16 nm, 25 nm, and 40 nm and compared with that of a bulk. The transition temperature obtained from the NMR spectra depends on both the crystal size and crystallinity. When the crystal size decreases from bulk to 16 nm, the transition temperature drops from 123 K to 100 K. The transition temperature of the samples kept dry air decrease due to aging.

  6. Size control of in vitro synthesized magnetite crystals by the MamC protein of Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Tercedor, C; Montalbán-López, M; Perez-Gonzalez, T; Sanchez-Quesada, M S; Prozorov, T; Pineda-Molina, E; Fernandez-Vivas, M A; Rodriguez-Navarro, A B; Trubitsyn, D; Bazylinski, Dennis A; Jimenez-Lopez, C

    2015-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes that share the unique ability of biomineralizing magnetosomes, which are intracellular, membrane-bounded crystals of either magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4). Magnetosome biomineralization is mediated by a number of specific proteins, many of which are localized in the magnetosome membrane, and thus is under strict genetic control. Several studies have partially elucidated the effects of a number of these magnetosome-associated proteins in the control of the size of magnetosome magnetite crystals. However, the effect of MamC, one of the most abundant proteins in the magnetosome membrane, remains unclear. In this present study, magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized inorganically in free-drift experiments at 25 °C in the presence of different concentrations of the iron-binding recombinant proteins MamC and MamCnts (MamC without its first transmembrane segment) from the marine, magnetotactic bacterium Magnetococcus marinus strain MC-1 and three commercial proteins [α-lactalbumin (α-Lac), myoglobin (Myo), and lysozyme (Lyz)]. While no effect was observed on the size of magnetite crystals formed in the presence of the commercial proteins, biomimetic synthesis in the presence of MamC and MamCnts at concentrations of 10-60 μg/mL resulted in the production of larger and more well-developed magnetite crystals (~30-40 nm) compared to those of the control (~20-30 nm; magnetite crystals grown protein-free). Our results demonstrate that MamC plays an important role in the control of the size of magnetite crystals and could be utilized in biomimetic synthesis of magnetite nanocrystals.

  7. Molarity (Aromic Density) of the Elements as Pure Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1985-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the atomic density of the elements as pure crystals. Atomic density is defined as the reciprocal of the atomic volume. Includes atomic-density diagrams which were prepared using the atomic-volume values given by Singman, supplemented by additional values for some allotropes. (JN)

  8. Plenty of Room at the Bottom: The Superparamagnetic Transition in Chains of Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newell, A.

    2009-05-01

    Among the few known fossil remnants of bacteria are chains of magnetite and greigite crystals left in sediments by magnetotactic bacteria. The information they provide about the abundance and nature of magnetotactic bacteria may provide useful information about environmental conditions back at least as far as the Cretaceous. Their usefulness depends on their readily identified features such as the size and shape of the crystals and their arrangement in chains. These features maximize the torque of the Earth's magnetic field on the bacteria by maximizing the magnetic remanence in the chains. The chains are in a single-domain (SD) state, with a uniform magnetization pointing along the chain axis. The single-domain state only occurs within a narrow range of crystal sizes. Smaller particles become superparamagnetic (SP), unable to hold any magnetic remanence, while larger particles are multidomain, having a smaller remanence per unit volume. Thus, one criterion for "magnetofossils" is that they fall within the single-domain size range. However, the SP size limit is only known for isolated crystals and many of the crystals in magnetotactic bacteria would be SP in isolation. They are SD only within chains, their magnetization stabilized by the magnetostatic interactions between crystals. The SP critical size is calculated for chains of magnetite crystals using a new algorithm that finds all the equilibrium magnetic states. From these the minima and saddle points in the energy surface are selected and energy gradients are followed from saddle points down to stable states. This network of connections determines the paths from positive to negative saturation and the decay rate for the magnetic moment of the chain. In turn, the decay rate determines the critical size. The transition paths depend on the ratio of the strength of the magnetostatic interactions to the internal magnetic anisotropy of the crystals. This ratio increases as the crystals get closer together or less

  9. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: evidence of biological origin.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, E I; Wierzchos, J; Ascaso, C; Winklhofer, M

    2001-02-27

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049-4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars. PMID:11226212

  10. Chains of magnetite crystals in the meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of biological origin

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, E. Imre; Wierzchos, Jacek; Ascaso, Carmen; Winklhofer, Michael

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, considered missing evidence for the biological origin of magnetite in ALH84001 [Thomas-Keprta, K. L., Bazylinski, D. A., Kirschvink, J. L., Clemett, S. J., McKay, D. S., Wentworth, S. J., Vali, H., Gibson, E. K., Jr., & Romanek, C. S. (2000) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 64, 4049–4081], is demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Five characteristics of such chains (uniform crystal size and shape within chains, gaps between crystals, orientation of elongated crystals along the chain axis, flexibility of chains, and a halo that is a possible remnant of a membrane around chains), observed or inferred to be present in magnetotactic bacteria but incompatible with a nonbiological origin, are shown to be present. Although it is unlikely that magnetotactic bacteria were ever alive in ALH84001, decomposed remains of such organisms could have been deposited in cracks in the rock while it was still on the surface on Mars. PMID:11226212

  11. Truncated Hexa-Octahedral Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biogenic Activity on Early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.; Clemett, S. J.; Schwartz, C.; McIntosh, J. R.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Kirschvink, J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Vali, H.; Romanek, C. S.

    2004-01-01

    The landmark paper by McKay et al. [1] cited four lines of evidence associated with the Martian meteorite ALH84001 to support the hypothesis that life existed on Mars approximately 4 Ga ago. Now, more than five years later, attention has focused on the ALH84001 magnetite grains embedded within carbonate globules in the ALH84001 meteorite. We have suggested that up to approx.25% of the ALH84001 magnetite crystals are products of biological activity [e.g., 2]. The remaining magnetites lack sufficient characteristics to constrain their origin. The papers of Thomas Keprta et al. were criticized arguing that the three dimensional structure of ALH84001 magnetite crystals can only be unambiguously determined using electron tomographic techniques. Clemett et al. [3] confirmed that magnetites produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-I display a truncated hexa-octahedral geometry using electron tomography and validated the use of the multi-tilt classical transmission microscopy technique used by [2]. Recently the geometry of the purported martian biogenic magnetites was shown be identical to that for MV-1 magnetites using electron tomography [6].

  12. A first test of the hypothesis of biogenic magnetite-based heterogeneous ice-crystal nucleation in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Golash, Harry N; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    An outstanding biophysical puzzle is focused on the apparent ability of weak, extremely low-frequency oscillating magnetic fields to enhance cryopreservation of many biological tissues. A recent theory holds that these weak magnetic fields could be inhibiting ice-crystal nucleation on the nanocrystals of biological magnetite (Fe3O4, an inverse cubic spinel) that are present in many plant and animal tissues by causing them to oscillate. In this theory, magnetically-induced mechanical oscillations disrupt the ability of water molecules to nucleate on the surface of the magnetite nanocrystals. However, the ability of the magnetite crystal lattice to serve as a template for heterogeneous ice crystal nucleation is as yet unknown, particularly for particles in the 10-100 nm size range. Here we report that the addition of trace-amounts of finely-dispersed magnetite into ultrapure water samples reduces strongly the incidence of supercooling, as measured in experiments conducted using a controlled freezing apparatus with multiple thermocouples. SQUID magnetometry was used to quantify nanogram levels of magnetite in the water samples. We also report a relationship between the volume change of ice, and the degree of supercooling, that may indicate lower degassing during the crystallization of supercooled water. In addition to supporting the role of ice-crystal nucleation by biogenic magnetite in many tissues, magnetite nanocrystals could provide inexpensive, non-toxic, and non-pathogenic ice nucleating agents needed in a variety of industrial processes, as well as influencing the dynamics of ice crystal nucleation in many natural environments. PMID:27087604

  13. A first test of the hypothesis of biogenic magnetite-based heterogeneous ice-crystal nucleation in cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Atsuko; Golash, Harry N; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2016-06-01

    An outstanding biophysical puzzle is focused on the apparent ability of weak, extremely low-frequency oscillating magnetic fields to enhance cryopreservation of many biological tissues. A recent theory holds that these weak magnetic fields could be inhibiting ice-crystal nucleation on the nanocrystals of biological magnetite (Fe3O4, an inverse cubic spinel) that are present in many plant and animal tissues by causing them to oscillate. In this theory, magnetically-induced mechanical oscillations disrupt the ability of water molecules to nucleate on the surface of the magnetite nanocrystals. However, the ability of the magnetite crystal lattice to serve as a template for heterogeneous ice crystal nucleation is as yet unknown, particularly for particles in the 10-100 nm size range. Here we report that the addition of trace-amounts of finely-dispersed magnetite into ultrapure water samples reduces strongly the incidence of supercooling, as measured in experiments conducted using a controlled freezing apparatus with multiple thermocouples. SQUID magnetometry was used to quantify nanogram levels of magnetite in the water samples. We also report a relationship between the volume change of ice, and the degree of supercooling, that may indicate lower degassing during the crystallization of supercooled water. In addition to supporting the role of ice-crystal nucleation by biogenic magnetite in many tissues, magnetite nanocrystals could provide inexpensive, non-toxic, and non-pathogenic ice nucleating agents needed in a variety of industrial processes, as well as influencing the dynamics of ice crystal nucleation in many natural environments.

  14. Imaging faces of shadowed magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals from magnetotactic bacteria with energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lins, U; Kachar, B; Farina, M

    We used energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy to image magnetite crystals isolated from uncultured magnetotactic bacteria. These magnetite crystals were shadowed in high vacuum with platinum at 45 degrees. The shadowed crystals were observed in a Zeiss (Thornwood, NY) CEM902 transmission electron microscope. Imaging shadowed crystals with inelastically scattered electrons provided information of the decoration pattern of small platinum particles over crystal surfaces, and thus information on surface characteristics of crystals. Results were comparable to those obtained from scanning electron microscopy using a field emitter gun. Electron energy loss spectra of the crystals as well as of the supporting film were recorded to evaluate variations of image contrast with energy losses. Results indicated that the contrast is attenuated with inelastic imaging and that the effect of contrast tuning caused a contrast inversion at a given point between 100 and 150 eV. We believe this approach can be useful for studying multilayered materials by transmission electron microscopy.

  15. Dendritic crystal growth in pure /sup 4/He

    SciTech Connect

    Franck, J.P.; Jung, J.

    1986-08-01

    Dendritic crystal growth of pure hcp and fcc /sup 4/He was observed at pressures between 210 and 6500 bar. Dendrite morphology depends on fluid supercooling and crystal phase. At large supercooling, dendrites with side arms are observed, whereas at low supercooling dendrites grow without side arms. The morpholpogy of hcp /sup 4/He dendrites is strongly influenced by crystalline anisotropy. Comparison with present theories of dendrite growth show good agreement with the power law dependencies of velocity, tip radius, and Peclet number on supercooling. Numerically, theory predicts much larger velocities than are observed. The stability parameter sigma is found to be much smaller than theoretically predicted.

  16. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  17. Structural and magnetic characterization of electro-crystallized magnetite nanoparticles under constant current

    SciTech Connect

    Mosivand, Saba; Kazeminezhad, Iraj

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Structural and magnetic properties of electro-crystallized magnetite nanoparticles under constant current were studied. All samples were characterized using XRD, SEM, VSM, and Mössbauer spectrometry. - Highlights: • The effect of applied current on morphology and properties of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} is studied. • The particle size and morphology are controllable by adjusting the current. • The magnetization depends on particle size, type of surfactant and applied current. • The clear correlation between magnetization and the mean particle size is observed. - Abstract: The effect of applied current on the morphology, particle size, structure, and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles prepared by electro-crystallization method was studied. The synthesis was performed in an electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes and an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate, and either thiourea, sodium butanoate, or β-cyclodextrine as organic stabilizer. All the samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, VSM, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction patterns, clearly confirmed that all products have the cubic spinel Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} crystal structure. Electron microscope images of the samples showed that their mean particle size is in the range 20–80 nm, and depends critically on the applied current and type of the organic additives. Specific magnetization of the samples at room temperature ranges from 60 to 90 A m{sup 2} kg{sup −1}, depending on the growth conditions. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe{sub 3−δ}O{sub 4}, with a small excess of Fe{sup 3+}, 0.06 ≤ δ ≤ 0.17.

  18. Discovery of superparamagnetism in sub-millimeter-sized magnetite porous single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ji; Chen, Kezheng

    2016-10-01

    In this work, sub-millimeter-sized magnetite porous single crystals were found to exhibit unique superparamagnetism rather than the known ferrimagnetism. This superparamagnetism was intimately related to the hydrothermal formation process, during which high lattice stress of ca. 6 GPa and large lattice strain of ca. - 1.21 ×10-2 would change the exchange constants of α, β, and ν to concurrently meet criterions of (i) ν1 =ν2 = β, (ii) α1 =α2 = α, and (iii) αβ = 1. These criterions, deduced from the molecular-field theory, were proposed to be the general transition conditions for any ferrimagnetic material exhibiting superparamagnetism when their size was beyond their superparamagnetic size limit.

  19. Sub-Micrometer-Scale Mapping of Magnetite Crystals and Sulfur Globules in Magnetotactic Bacteria Using Confocal Raman Micro-Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Stephan H. K.; Gigler, Alexander M.; Hanzlik, Marianne; Winklhofer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The ferrimagnetic mineral magnetite is biomineralized by magnetotactic microorganisms and a diverse range of animals. Here we demonstrate that confocal Raman microscopy can be used to visualize chains of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria, even though magnetite is a poor Raman scatterer and in bacteria occurs in typical grain sizes of only 35–120 nm, well below the diffraction-limited optical resolution. When using long integration times together with low laser power (<0.25 mW) to prevent laser induced damage of magnetite, we can identify and map magnetite by its characteristic Raman spectrum (303, 535, 665 ) against a large autofluorescence background in our natural magnetotactic bacteria samples. While greigite (cubic ; Raman lines of 253 and 351 ) is often found in the Deltaproteobacteria class, it is not present in our samples. In intracellular sulfur globules of Candidatus Magnetobacterium bavaricum (Nitrospirae), we identified the sole presence of cyclo-octasulfur (: 151, 219, 467 ), using green (532 nm), red (638 nm) and near-infrared excitation (785 nm). The Raman-spectra of phosphorous-rich intracellular accumulations point to orthophosphate in magnetic vibrios and to polyphosphate in magnetic cocci. Under green excitation, the cell envelopes are dominated by the resonant Raman lines of the heme cofactor of the b or c-type cytochrome, which can be used as a strong marker for label-free live-cell imaging of bacterial cytoplasmic membranes, as well as an indicator for the redox state. PMID:25233081

  20. Structural, optical, mechanical and dielectric studies of pure and doped L-Prolinium Trichloroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renuka, N.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Vijayan, N.; Vasanthakumar, Geetha; Krishna, Anuj; Ramamurthi, K.

    2015-02-01

    In the present work, pure and metal substituted L-Prolinium trichloroacetate (LPTCA) single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Visible-NIR, hardness, photoluminescence and dielectric studies. The dopant concentration in the crystals was measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the pure and metal substituted LPTCA revealed that the grown crystals belong to the trigonal system. Ni2+ and Co2+ doping slightly altered the lattice parameters of LPTCA without affecting the basic structure of the crystal. FTIR spectral analysis confirms the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystals. The mechanical behavior of pure and doped crystals was analyzed by Vickers's microhardness test. The optical transmittance, dielectric and photoluminescence properties of the pure and doped crystals were analyzed.

  1. Structural, optical, mechanical and dielectric studies of pure and doped L-Prolinium trichloroacetate single crystals.

    PubMed

    Renuka, N; Ramesh Babu, R; Vijayan, N; Vasanthakumar, Geetha; Krishna, Anuj; Ramamurthi, K

    2015-02-25

    In the present work, pure and metal substituted L-Prolinium trichloroacetate (LPTCA) single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD), powder X-ray diffraction, FTIR, UV-Visible-NIR, hardness, photoluminescence and dielectric studies. The dopant concentration in the crystals was measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of the pure and metal substituted LPTCA revealed that the grown crystals belong to the trigonal system. Ni(2+) and Co(2+) doping slightly altered the lattice parameters of LPTCA without affecting the basic structure of the crystal. FTIR spectral analysis confirms the presence of various functional groups in the grown crystals. The mechanical behavior of pure and doped crystals was analyzed by Vickers's microhardness test. The optical transmittance, dielectric and photoluminescence properties of the pure and doped crystals were analyzed.

  2. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals

    PubMed Central

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-01-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal. PMID:27477236

  3. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-01-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal. PMID:27477236

  4. Stress Wave Isolation by Purely Mechanical Topological Phononic Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaunsali, Rajesh; Li, Feng; Yang, Jinkyu

    2016-08-01

    We present an active, purely mechanical stress wave isolator that consists of short cylindrical particles arranged in a helical architecture. This phononic structure allows us to change inter-particle stiffness dynamically by controlling the contact angles of the cylinders. We use torsional travelling waves to control the contact angles, thereby imposing a desired spatio-temporal stiffness variation to the phononic crystal along the longitudinal direction. Such torsional excitation is a form of parametric pumping in the system, which results in the breakage of the time-reversal symmetry. We report that, in quasi-static sense, the system shows topologically non-trivial band-gaps. However, in a dynamic regime where the pumping effect is significant, these band-gaps become asymmetric with respect to the frequency and wavenumber domains in the dispersion relationship. By using numerical simulations, we show that such asymmetry has a direct correspondence to the topological invariant, i.e., Chern number, of the system. We propose that this asymmetry, accompanied by selective inter-band transition, can be utilized for directional isolation of the stress wave propagating along the phononic crystal.

  5. Crystallization Evolution of Cold-Sprayed Pure Ni Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavaliere, P.; Perrone, A.; Silvello, A.

    2016-08-01

    Cold spraying is a coating technology on the basis of aerodynamics and high-speed impact dynamics. Spray particles (usually 1-50 μm in diameter) are accelerated to high velocity (typically 300-1200 m/s) by a high-speed gas (preheated air, nitrogen, or helium) flow that is generated through a convergent-divergent de Laval type nozzle. The coating forms through the intensive plastic deformation of particles impacting on the substrate at temperatures well below the melting point of the spray material. In the present paper, the main processing parameters affecting the crystallization behavior of pure Ni cold spray deposits on IN718 alloy are described. Various experimental conditions have been analyzed: gas temperature and pressure, nozzle to substrate distance. In particular, the study deals with those conditions leading to a strong grain refinement, with an acceptable level of the deposits mechanical properties. In precise spray conditions, a shift toward amorphous phases has been observed and studied. A systematic analysis of microstructural evolution, performed through TEM observations, as a function of processing parameters is presented.

  6. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  7. The Verwey structure of a natural magnetite.

    PubMed

    Perversi, G; Cumby, J; Pachoud, E; Wright, J P; Attfield, J P

    2016-04-01

    A remarkably complex electronic order of Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) charges, Fe(2+) orbital states, and weakly metal-metal bonded Fe3 units known as trimerons, was recently discovered in stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3O4) below the 125 K Verwey transition. Here, the low temperature crystal structure of a natural magnetite from a mineral sample has been determined using the same microcrystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction method. Structure refinement demonstrates that the natural sample has the same complex electronic order as pure synthetic magnetite, with only minor reductions of orbital and trimeron distortions. Chemical analysis shows that the natural sample contains dopants such as Al, Si, Mg and Mn at comparable concentrations to extraterrestrial magnetites, for example, as reported in the Tagish Lake meteorite. Much extraterrestrial magnetite exists at temperatures below the Verwey transition and hence our study demonstrates that the low temperature phase of magnetite represents the most complex long-range electronic order known to occur naturally. PMID:26908195

  8. Unidirectional growth of pure and L-lysine added ADP crystals from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salarian, Samaneh; Dizaji, Hamid Rezagholipour

    2014-01-01

    Pure and L-lysine added ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) crystals were grown in the <001> direction by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (S-R) method. The grown crystals were characterized by X-Ray diffractometry (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Vicker's Microhardness analysis. XRD spectrum of each of the grown crystals proved its crystallinity. The crystals showed good transparency in the entire visible region. FT-IR spectra of the specimens revealed the presence of functional groups in them. The hardness of the pure and L-lysine added ADP crystals were measured and that of the added one was found higher. Meanwhile, it was found that the ADP crystals (pure and L-lysine added) grown by S-R method had higher hardness compared to ADP crystal grown by conventional method.

  9. Origin of magnetite crystals in Martian meteorite ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie; Clemett, Simon; McKay, David; Gibson, Everett; Wentworth, Susan

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. In-timately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate [1,2]. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate [3,4]. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterization of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our ob-servations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the carbonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates [5]. [1] McKay et al. (1996) Science 273, 924-930. [2] Thomas-Keprta et al. (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 98, 2164

  10. Cooling crystallization of aluminum sulfate in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaoxue; Sun, Yuzhu; Yu, Jianguo

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the cooling crystallization of aluminum sulfate to explore the basic data for the recovery of aluminum resources from coal spoil. First, the metastable zone width (MSZW) of aluminum sulfate was reported. A parallel synthesis platform (CrystalSCAN) was used to determine the solubility from 10 °C to 70 °C, and an automatic lab reactor (LabMax) equipped with focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) was adopted to determine the supersolubility. The effects of operating variables on MSZW were experimentally explored. Results show that the MSZW of aluminum sulfate decreases with increasing stirring speed, while it increases with increasing cooling rate. Second, the continuous crystallization kinetics of aluminum sulfate was investigated in a laboratory-scale mixed-suspension mixed-product removal (MSMPR) crystallizer at a steady state. Growth kinetics presented size-dependent growth rate, which was well fitted with the MJ3 model. Both the growth rate (G) and the total nucleation rate (BTOT) were correlated in the power law kinetic expressions with good correlation coefficients. Third, aluminum sulfate products were modified by sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS). Crystals with large sizes and regular hexagonal plate morphologies were obtained. These crystals reveal that SDBS can inhibit crystal nucleation and promote crystal growth.

  11. New insights into the origin of magnetite crystals in ALH84001 carbonate disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approximately 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  12. Field Ion Microscopy and Atom Probe Tomography of Metamorphic Magnetite Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, K.; Martens, R. L.; Kelly, T. F.; Evans, N. D.; Miller, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetite has been analysed using Field Ion Microscopy (FIM) and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), highly attractive techniques for the nanoanalysis of geological materials despite the difficulties inherent in analyzing semiconducting and insulating materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  14. Degeneration of biogenic superparamagnetic magnetite.

    PubMed

    Li, Y-L; Pfiffner, S M; Dyar, M D; Vali, H; Konhauser, K; Cole, D R; Rondinone, A J; Phelps, T J

    2009-01-01

    Magnetite crystals precipitated as a consequence of Fe(III) reduction by Shewanella algae BrY after 265 h incubation and 5-year anaerobic storage were investigated with transmission electron microscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetite crystals were typically superparamagnetic with an approximate size of 13 nm. The lattice constants of the 265 h and 5-year crystals are 8.4164A and 8.3774A, respectively. The Mössbauer spectra indicated that the 265 h magnetite had excess Fe(II) in its crystal-chemistry (Fe(3+) (1.990)Fe(2+) (1.015)O(4)) but the 5-year magnetite was Fe(II)-deficient in stoichiometry (Fe(3+) (2.388)Fe(2+) (0.419)O(4)). Such crystal-chemical changes may be indicative of the degeneration of superparamagnetic magnetite through the aqueous oxidization of Fe(II) anaerobically, and the concomitant oxidation of the organic phases (fatty acid methyl esters) that were present during the initial formation of the magnetite. The observation of a corona structure on the aged magnetite corroborates the anaerobic oxidation of Fe(II) on the outer layers of magnetite crystals. These results suggest that there may be a possible link between the enzymatic activity of the bacteria and the stability of Fe(II)-excess magnetite, which may help explain why stable nano-magnetite grains are seldom preserved in natural environments.

  15. Isolation of isoelectrically pure cholera toxin for crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Spangler, B.D.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    We have determined that the failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well results from its isoelectric heterogeneity, which is probably due to a post-translational process such as deamidation of its B subunit. Every sample of cholera toxin we have examined from commercial or academic suppliers has been heterogeneous; heterogeneous cholera toxin does not crystallize satisfactorily. We have overcome this problem by using ion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) to obtain an isoelectrically homogeneous species of cholera toxin. Homogeneous cholera toxin crystallizes readily, forming single, nonmosaic crystals suitable for x-ray diffraction studies. For this process, protein was applied to a MonoQ ion-exchange column, then eluted with an isocratic low salt buffer followed by a linear salt gradient (0-100 mM NaCl). Column fractions were analyzed on isoelectric focusing gels, and those fractions containing the desired homogeneous species were pooled and concentrated. Crystals formed within 24 to 48 hours in a MOPS/PEG buffer, which made use of slow isoelectric precipitation to induce crystallization. 23 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Isolation of isoelectrically pure cholera toxin for crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Brenda D.; Westbrook, Edwin M.

    1991-03-01

    We have determined that the failure of cholera toxin to crystallize well results from its isoelectric heterogeneity, which is probably due to a post-translational process such as deamidation of its B subunit. Every sample of cholera toxin we have examined from commercial or academic suppliers has been heterogeneous; heterogeneous cholera toxin does not crystallize satisfactorily. We have overcome this problem by using ion-exchange fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) to obtain an isoelectrically homogeneous species of cholera toxin. Homogeneous cholera toxin crystallizes readily, forming single, nonmosaic crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction studies. For this process, protein was applied to a MonoQ ion-exchange column, then eluted with an isocratic low salt buffer followed by a linear salt gradient (0-100 mM NaCl). Column fractions were analyzed on isoelectric focusing gels, and those fractions containing the desired homogeneous species were pooled and concentrated. Crystals formed within 24 to 48 h in a MOPS/PEG buffer, which made use of slow isoelectric precipitation to induce crystallization.

  17. Studies on optical properties of pure and Mg2+ doped ZTS single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumithra Devi, M.; Arthi, A. P.; Thamizharasan, K.

    2014-09-01

    Single crystal of semiorganic nonlinear optical material of pure and Mg2+ doped ZTS were grown by slow evaporation technique from its aqueous solution. The grown crystal was characterized by single crystal XRD to determine the cell parameters. The Mg2+ doped was characterized by SEM and EDX spectrum. The chemical composition of both the pure ZTS and doped Mg2+ crystals were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The optical absorption spectrum recorded in the wavelength was ranged from 200 to 2500 nm and its energy gap (Eg) for both pure ZTS is 4.47 eV and doped Mg2+ is 4.42 eV. The mechanical strength of the grown crystal was found from Vicker's microhardness measurements. It showed that pure and doped ZTS crystals are soft in nature. The dielectric measurement was carried out to study the different polarization mechanism and conductivity of the crystal. Photoconductivity studies revealed that the positive photoconductivity of the both were considered as grown crystals.

  18. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turnbull, D.

    1979-01-01

    Crystal nucleation behavior in metallic alloys known to form glasses in melt quenching was characterized and from this characterization the possibility that massive amounts of certain alloys could be slow cooled to the glass state was assessed. Crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquid metals was examined experimentally, under containerless conditions, and theoretically.

  19. Characterization and phylogenetic identification of a species of spherical multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes that produces both magnetite and greigite crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Yi-Ran; Du, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Pan, Hong-Miao; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-Fei

    2014-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a group of Gram-negative bacteria synthesizing magnetic crystals that allow them aligning along magnetic field lines. They have diverse morphologies including cocci, rods, vibrio, spirilla, and multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs). MMPs are composed of 10-57 cells with peritrichous flagella on their outer surfaces and swim as an entire unit. Here, we describe a species of spherical MMPs isolated from intertidal sediments of Lake Yuehu (Yellow Sea, China). They were mainly found in the subsurface layer of gray-black sediments. Microscopy revealed that these spherical MMPs were 5.6 ± 0.9 μm in diameter and composed of approximately 16-32 ovoid cells with a helical arrangement and peritrichous flagellation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that the MMPs contained both bullet-shaped magnetite and irregular greigite magnetosomes that were arranged in chains or clusters. These MMPs displayed typical escape motility and negative phototaxis. The 16S rRNA genes of micromanipulation-purified spherical MMPs were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMP species was affiliated with Deltaproteobacteria and displayed >2.8% sequence divergence with respect to previously reported MMPs. This is the first phylogenetic identification of a spherical MMP that produces both magnetite and greigite magnetosomes.

  20. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mirabello, Giulia; Lenders, Jos J M; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2016-09-21

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in many biological and geological systems, and also in many technological applications. The magnetic properties of magnetite crystals depend strongly on the size and shape of its crystals. Hence, engineering magnetite nanoparticles with specific shapes and sizes allows tuning their properties to specific applications in a wide variety of fields, including catalysis, magnetic storage, targeted drug delivery, cancer diagnostics and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, synthesis of magnetite with a specific size, shape and a narrow crystal size distribution is notoriously difficult without using high temperatures and non-aqueous media. Nevertheless, living organisms such as chitons and magnetotactic bacteria are able to form magnetite crystals with well controlled sizes and shapes under ambient conditions and in aqueous media. In these biomineralization processes the organisms use a twofold strategy to control magnetite formation: the mineral is formed from a poorly crystalline precursor phase, and nucleation and growth are controlled through the interaction of the mineral with biomolecular templates and additives. Taking inspiration from this biological strategy is a promising route to achieve control over the kinetics of magnetite crystallization under ambient conditions and in aqueous media. In this review we first summarize the main characteristics of magnetite and what is known about the mechanisms of magnetite biomineralization. We then describe the most common routes to synthesize magnetite and subsequently will introduce recent efforts in bioinspired magnetite synthesis. We describe how the use of poorly ordered, more soluble precursors such as ferrihydrite (FeH) or white rust (Fe(OH)2) can be employed to control the solution supersaturation, setting the conditions for continued growth. Further, we show how the use of various organic additives such as proteins, peptides and polymers allows

  1. Bioinspired synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mirabello, Giulia; Lenders, Jos J M; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2016-09-21

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a widespread magnetic iron oxide encountered in many biological and geological systems, and also in many technological applications. The magnetic properties of magnetite crystals depend strongly on the size and shape of its crystals. Hence, engineering magnetite nanoparticles with specific shapes and sizes allows tuning their properties to specific applications in a wide variety of fields, including catalysis, magnetic storage, targeted drug delivery, cancer diagnostics and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, synthesis of magnetite with a specific size, shape and a narrow crystal size distribution is notoriously difficult without using high temperatures and non-aqueous media. Nevertheless, living organisms such as chitons and magnetotactic bacteria are able to form magnetite crystals with well controlled sizes and shapes under ambient conditions and in aqueous media. In these biomineralization processes the organisms use a twofold strategy to control magnetite formation: the mineral is formed from a poorly crystalline precursor phase, and nucleation and growth are controlled through the interaction of the mineral with biomolecular templates and additives. Taking inspiration from this biological strategy is a promising route to achieve control over the kinetics of magnetite crystallization under ambient conditions and in aqueous media. In this review we first summarize the main characteristics of magnetite and what is known about the mechanisms of magnetite biomineralization. We then describe the most common routes to synthesize magnetite and subsequently will introduce recent efforts in bioinspired magnetite synthesis. We describe how the use of poorly ordered, more soluble precursors such as ferrihydrite (FeH) or white rust (Fe(OH)2) can be employed to control the solution supersaturation, setting the conditions for continued growth. Further, we show how the use of various organic additives such as proteins, peptides and polymers allows

  2. Influence of growth conditions on magnetite nanoparticles electro-crystallized in the presence of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Mosivand, Saba; Monzon, Lorena M A; Kazeminezhad, Iraj; Coey, J Michael D

    2013-05-17

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by electrocrystallization in the presence of thiourea or sodium butanoate as an organic stabilizer. The synthesis was performed in a thermostatic electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate as electrolyte. The effects of organic concentration, applied potential and growth temperature on particle size, morphology, structure and magnetic properties were investigated. The magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, magnetometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. When the synthesis is performed in the presence of sodium butanoate at 60 °C, a paramagnetic ferric salt is obtained as a second phase; it is possible to avoid formation of this phase, increase the specific magnetization and improve the structure of the oxide particles by tuning the growth conditions. Room-temperature magnetization values range from 45 to 90 Am2kg-1, depending on the particle size, type of surfactant and synthesis conditions. Mössbauer spectra, which were recorded at 290 K for all the samples, are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe3-δO4, with a small excess of Fe3+, 0.05 ≤ δ ≤ 0.15.

  3. Influence of Growth Conditions on Magnetite Nanoparticles Electro-Crystallized in the Presence of Organic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Mosivand, Saba; Monzon, Lorena M. A.; Kazeminezhad, Iraj; Coey, J. Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by electrocrystallization in the presence of thiourea or sodium butanoate as an organic stabilizer. The synthesis was performed in a thermostatic electrochemical cell containing two iron electrodes with an aqueous solution of sodium sulfate as electrolyte. The effects of organic concentration, applied potential and growth temperature on particle size, morphology, structure and magnetic properties were investigated. The magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, magnetometry and Mössbauer spectrometry. When the synthesis is performed in the presence of sodium butanoate at 60 °C, a paramagnetic ferric salt is obtained as a second phase; it is possible to avoid formation of this phase, increase the specific magnetization and improve the structure of the oxide particles by tuning the growth conditions. Room-temperature magnetization values range from 45 to 90 Am2kg−1, depending on the particle size, type of surfactant and synthesis conditions. Mössbauer spectra, which were recorded at 290 K for all the samples, are typical of nonstoichiometric Fe3−δO4, with a small excess of Fe3+, 0.05 ≤ δ ≤ 0.15. PMID:23685871

  4. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4)/Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardiyanti, Harlina; Suharyadi, Edi; Kato, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Ribbon of magnetite (Fe3O4)/Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated with various concentration of PVA synthesized by co-precipitation method. Particle size of nanoparticles Fe3O4 sample and ribbon Fe3O4/PVA 25% sample is about 9.34 nm and 11.29 nm, respectively. The result of Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) showed that saturation magnetization value decreased from 76.99 emu/g to 15.01 emu/g and coercivity increased from 49.30 Oe to 158.35 Oe as increasing concentration of PVA. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that encapsulated PVA given decreasing agglomeration, controlled shape of nanoparticles Fe3O4 more spherical and dispersed. Surface roughness decreased with increasing concentration of PVA.

  5. First principles calculation of thermal expansion coefficients of pure and Cr doped α-alumina crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohei, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Yuito; Lee, Hak-Sung; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    We have performed theoretical analysis of thermal expansion behavior of alumina crystals under finite temperature based on first principles phonon state calculations. Liner thermal expansion coefficients of a pure α-alumina crystal have been evaluated based on quasi-harmonic approximation including crystalline anisotropy. The Cr doping effect on the alumina crystal has also been examined and found that the doping can cause a noticeable change on the thermal expansion coefficient. The present results demonstrate that the first principles theoretical approach can be helpful for reproducing or predicting thermal expansion behaviors including dopant effects, which may pave a way for possible control of thermal expansion of materials by doping or alloying.

  6. Morphological Evidence for an Exclusively Inorganic Origin for Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.; McKay, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The origin of magnetite crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 is the focus of a debate about the possibility of past (and present) life on Mars. McKay et al. originally suggested that some of the magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic in ori-gin, because they are single magnetic domain, free of crystalline defects, chemically pure, and coexist with other metastable phases in apparent disequilibrium. Thomas-Keprta et al. reported that a subpopulation of magnetite crystals (approx. 25%) associated with carbonate globules in ALH84001 and magnetite crystals produced by magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 have similar morphologies with crystal elongation along the [111] crystallographic axis that they describe as "truncated hexa-octahedral" ([111-THO]) magnetite. Along with several other properties, the [111]-THO morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes), so that the presence of [111]-THO magnetite in ALH84001 may be evidence for past life on Mars.

  7. Longitudinal uniformity, time performances and irradiation test of pure CsI crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelucci, M.; Atanova, O.; Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A.; Cordelli, M.; Donghia, R.; Giovannella, S.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Sarra, I.; Soleti, S. R.

    2016-07-01

    To study an alternative to BaF2, as the crystal choice for the Mu2e calorimeter, 13 pure CsI crystals from Opto Materials and ISMA producers have been characterized by determining their light yield (LY) and longitudinal response uniformity (LRU), when read with a UV extended PMT. The crystals show a LY of ~100 p.e./MeV (~150 p.e./MeV) when wrapped with Tyvek and coupled to the PMT without (with) optical grease. The LRU is well represented by a linear slope that is on average δ~ -0.6%/cm. The timing performances of the Opto Materials crystal, read with a UV extended MPPC, have been evaluated with minimum ionizing particles. A timing resolution of ~330 ps (~ 440 ps) is achieved when connecting the photosensor to the MPPC with (without) optical grease. The crystal radiation hardness to a ionization dose has also been studied for one pure CsI crystal from SICCAS. After exposing it to a dose of 900 Gy, a decrease of 33% in the LY is observed while the LRU remains unchanged.

  8. Electromagnetic waves in uniaxial crystals with metallized boundaries: Mode conversion, pure reflections, and bulk polaritons

    SciTech Connect

    Alshits, V. I. Lyubimov, V. N.; Radowicz, A.

    2007-02-15

    A theory is constructed for the reflection of plane electromagnetic waves in uniaxial crystals with a positive definite permittivity tensor and an arbitrarily oriented metallized boundary. The problem is solved both for general-position orientations corresponding to three-partial reflection and for special conditions allowing two-partial reflections: mode conversions when the incident and reflected waves belong to different sheets of the refraction surface and 'pure' reflections when both waves belong to the same sheet. The space of pure reflections is shown to be formed by two types of optical-axis orientations: arbitrary directions in the plane of the crystal surface and in the plane of incidence. The configurations of the conversion surface for optically positive and negative crystals are investigated. A subspace of pure reflections that transform into one-partial bulk polaritons with the energy flux parallel to the surface at grazing incidence has been found. The domain of existence of such bulk eigenmodes is bounded by two 'lines' of solutions. These are any directions along the boundary containing the optical axis for ordinary polaritons and the direction along the projection of the optical axis onto the surface at an arbitrary orientation of the axis with respect to the boundary for extraordinary polaritons.

  9. Study on A.C. electrical properties of pure and L-serine doped ADP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, J. H.; Dixit, K. P.; Joshi, M. J.; Parikh, K. D.

    2016-05-01

    Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADP) crystals have a wide range of applications in integrated and nonlinear optics. Amino acids having significant properties like molecular chirality, zwitter ionic nature, etc. attracted many researchers to dope them in various NLO crystals. In the present study, pure and different weight percentage L-serine doped ADP crystals were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The A.C. electrical study was carried out for palletized samples at room temperature. The Nyquist plot showed two semi circles for pure ADP indicated the effect of grain and grain boundary, whereas the doped ADP samples exhibited the single semi circle suggesting the effect of grain. The values resistance and capacitance for grain and grain boundary were calculated. The effect of doping was clearly seen in the grain capacitance and resistance values. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreased with increase in frequency for all samples. The Jonscher power law was applied for A.C. conductivity for pure and doped ADP samples. The imaginary part of modulus and impedance versus frequency were drawn and the value of stretch exponent (β) was calculated for all the samples.

  10. Signatures in magnetites formed by (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 thermal decomposition: Terrestrial and extraterrestrial implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lauer, Howard V.; Romanek, Christopher S.

    2012-06-01

    It has never been demonstrated whether magnetite synthesized through the heat-dependent decomposition of carbonate precursors retains the chemical and structural features of the carbonates. In this study, synthetic (Ca,Mg,Fe)CO3 was thermally decomposed by heating from 25 to 700 °C under 1 atm CO2, and by in situ exposure under vacuum to the electron beam of a transmission electron microscope. In both cases, the decomposition of the carbonate was topotactic and resulted in porous pseudomorphs composed of oriented aggregates of magnetite nanocrystals. Both calcium and magnesium were incorporated into nanophase magnetite, forming (Ca,Mg)-magnetites and (Ca,Mg)-ferrites when these elements were present in the parent material, thus preserving the chemical signature of the precursor. These results show that magnetites synthesized in this way acquire a chemical and structural inheritance from their carbonate precursor that indicates how they were produced. These results are not only important in the determination of the origin of chemically-impure, oriented nanophase magnetite crystals in general, but they also provide important insights into the origin of the large, euhedral, chemically-pure, [111]-elongated magnetites found within Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates of the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Based on our experimental results, the chemically-pure magnetites within ALH84001 cannot be genetically related to the Ca-, Mg- and Fe-rich carbonate matrix within which they are embedded, and an alternative explanation for their occurrence is warranted.

  11. Release of gold-bearing fluids in convergent margin magmas prompted by magnetite crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weidong; Arculus, Richard J; Kamenetsky, Vadim S; Binns, Raymond A

    2004-10-21

    A relationship between convergent margin magmas and copper-gold ore mineralization has long been recognized. The nature of the genetic link is controversial, particularly whether the link is due to high-oxygen-fugacity (fO2) melts and fluids released from subducted slabs or to brine exsolution during magmatic evolution. For submarine, subduction-related volcanic glasses from the eastern Manus basin, Papua New Guinea, we here report abrupt decreases in gold and copper abundances, coupled with a switch in the behaviour of titanium and iron from concentration increases to decreases as SiO2 rises. We propose that the abrupt depletion in gold and copper results from concurrent sulphur reduction as a result of fO2 buffering, causing enhanced formation of copper-gold hydrosulphide complexes that become scavenged from crystallizing melts into cogenetic magmatic aqueous fluids. This process is particularly efficient in oxidized arc magmas with substantial sulphate. We infer that subsequent migration and cooling of exsolved aqueous fluids create links between copper-gold mineralization and arc magmatism in the Manus basin, and at convergent margins in general. PMID:15496920

  12. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, N. H. C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Lovley, D. R.; Jannasch, H. W.; Frankel, R. B.

    1990-04-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 × 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of 110 faces which are capped and truncated by 111 end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization.

  13. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sparks, N.H.C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D.A.; Lovley, D.R.; Jannasch, H.W.; Frankel, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo??ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 ?? 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of {110} faces which are capped and truncated by {111} end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization. ?? 1990.

  14. Magnetite as a prokaryotic biomarker: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Romanek, Christopher S.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2010-06-01

    Over the years, nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals have been recovered from many modern and ancient environments including sediments and soils and even meteorites. In some cases these crystals have been used as "magnetofossils" for evidence of the past presence of specific microbes. Magnetite nanocrystals can be formed by a number of different biological and inorganic mechanisms resulting in crystals with different physical and magnetic characteristics. Prokaryotes (bacteria) biomineralize magnetite through two methods that differ mechanistically, including: biologically induced mineralization (BIM) and biologically controlled mineralization (BCM). Magnetite nanocrystals produced by BIM are known to be synthesized by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria, are deposited external to the cell, and generally are physically indistinguishable from magnetite particles formed inorganically. BCM magnetites, in contrast, are synthesized by the magnetotactic bacteria and some higher organisms and are precipitated intracellularly as membrane-bounded structures called magnetosomes. These magnetites appear to have unique crystal morphologies and a narrow size range leading to their original use as magnetofossils. Because of the discovery of nanometer-sized crystals of magnetite in the Martian meteorite ALH84001, the use of these criteria for the determination of whether magnetite crystals could constitute a prokaryotic biomarker was questioned. Thus, there is currently great debate over what criteria to use in the determination of whether specific magnetite crystals are biogenic or not. In the last decade, additional criteria have been established (e.g., the Magnetite Assay for Biogenicity), and new tools and technologies have been developed to determine the origin of specific types of magnetite crystals.

  15. pH-responsive lyotropic liquid crystals for the preparation of pure cubic zirconia nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wei Yan; Liu, Jin Rong; He, Zhang; Cao, Zhen Zhu; Li, Cai Hong; Gao, Yan Fang

    2016-07-01

    We present a lyotropic liquid crystal system consisting of SDS/Triton X-100/water at 25 °C. This system is respond to pH variations with a phase switch. When pH is altered from alkaline (pH 13) to acidic (pH 2) conditions, phase change occurs from a bicontinuous hexagonal phase to a partially hexagonal phase until it disappears. The hexagonal phase under alkaline conditions is stable. Thus, this system is an ideal candidate for the preparation of pure cubic ZrO2 nanoparticles. XRD results confirm that the as-synthesized powder is composed of pure cubic ZrO2. These nanoparticles also exhibit a thermal stability of up to 800 °C. The size and morphological characteristics of the nanoparticles are greatly affected by ZrOCl2 concentration. The mechanism of zirconia nanoparticle synthesis in a lyotropic hexagonal phase was proposed.

  16. Extracellular synthesis of magnetite and metal-substituted magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Roh, Y; Vali, H; Phelps, T J; Moon, J W

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a novel microbial process that exploits the ability of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to produce copious amounts of extracellular magentites and metal-substituted magnetite nanoparticles. The Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (Theroanaerobacter ethanolicus and Shewanella sp.) have the ability to reduce Fe(III) and various metals in aqueous media and form various sized magnetite and metal-substituted magnetite nano-crystals. The Fe(III)-reducing bacteria formed metalsubstituted magnetites using iron oxide plus metals (e.g., Co, Cr, Mn, Ni) under conditions of relatively low temperature (<70 degrees C), ambient pressure, and pH values near neutral to slightly basic (pH = 6.5 to 9). Precise biological control over activation and regulation of the biosolid-state processes can produce magnetite particles of well-defined size (typically tens of nanometers) and crystallographic morphology, containing selected dopant metals into the magnetite (Fe(3-y)XyO4) structure (where X = Co, Cr, Mn, Ni). Magnetite yields of up to 20 g/L per day have been observed in 20-L vessels. Water-based ferrofluids were formed with the nanometer sized, magnetite, and metal-substituted biomagnetite particles.

  17. Electrohydrodynamic Pattern Formation in Nematic Liquid Crystals by External Pure Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jong-Hoon

    2010-12-01

    Pure noise-induced electrohydrodynamic convections (EHCs) in nematic liquid crystals are presented in comparison with ac field-induced ones. There exists a characteristic cutoff frequency fc* of noise dividing EHC patterns qualitatively. Sufficiently colored noise with fc < fc* can induce a variety of well-ordered patterns such as Williams domains, fluctuating Williams domains, and grid patterns. The amplitude of the primary pattern (Williams domains) and its wavelength are investigated with varying intensity VN and/or cutoff frequency fc of noise. The present noise-induced EHCs are discussed on the basis of the conventional (ac-based) Carr-Helfrich mechanism.

  18. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered). PMID:14577885

  19. Submicron Magnetite Grains and Carbon Compounds in Martian Meteorite ALH84001: Inorganic, Abiotic Formation by Shock and Thermal Metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    2003-06-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe3O4, reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered).

  20. Submicron magnetite grains and carbon compounds in Martian meteorite ALH84001: inorganic, abiotic formation by shock and thermal metamorphism.

    PubMed

    Treiman, Allan H

    2003-01-01

    Purported biogenic features of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite (the carbonate globules, their submicron magnetite grains, and organic matter) have reasonable inorganic origins, and a comprehensive hypothesis is offered here. The carbonate globules were deposited from hydrothermal water, without biological mediation. Thereafter, ALH84001 was affected by an impact shock event, which raised its temperature nearly instantaneously to 500-700K, and induced iron-rich carbonate in the globules to decompose to magnetite and other minerals. The rapidity of the temperature increase caused magnetite grains to nucleate in abundance; hence individual crystals were very small. Nucleation and growth of magnetite crystals were fastest along edges and faces of the precursor carbonate grains, forcing the magnetite grains to be platy or elongated, including the "truncated hexa-octahedra" shape. ALH84001 had formed at some depth within Mars where the lithostatic pressure was significantly above that of Mars' surface. Also, because the rock was at depth, the impact heat dissipated slowly. During this interval, magnetite crystals approached chemical equilibria with surrounding minerals and gas. Their composition, nearly pure Fe(3)O(4), reflects those of equilibria; elements that substitute into magnetite are either absent from iron-rich carbonate (e.g., Ti, Al, Cr), or partitioned into other minerals during magnetite formation (Mg, Mn). Many microstructural imperfections in the magnetite grains would have annealed out as the rock cooled. In this post-shock thermal regime, carbon-bearing gas from the decomposition of iron carbonates reacted with water in the rock (or from its surroundings) to produce organic matter via Fischer-Tropschlike reactions. Formation of such organic compounds like polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons would have been catalyzed by the magnetite (formation of graphite, the thermochemically stable phase, would be kinetically hindered).

  1. Morphology evolution and pure red upconversion mechanism of β-NaLuF4 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Li, Anming; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2016-06-01

    A series of β-NaLuF4 crystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Hexagonal phase microdisks, microprisms, and microtubes were achieved by simply changing the amount of citric acid in the initial reaction solution. Pure red upconversion (UC) luminescence can be observed in β-NaLuF4:Yb3+, Tm3+, Er3+ and Li+ doped β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+. Based on the rate equations, we report the theoretical model about the pure red UC mechanism in Yb3+/Tm3+/Er3+ doped system. It is proposed that the pure red UC luminescence is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer UC from Tm3+:3F4 → 3H6 to Er3+:4I11/2 → 4F9/2 and the cross-relaxation (CR) effect [Er3+:4S3/2 + 4I15/2 → 4I9/2 + 4I13/2] rather than the long-accepted mechanism [CR process among Er3+:4F7/2 + 4I11/2 → 4F9/2 + 4F9/2]. In addition, compared to the Li+-free counterpart, the pure red UC luminescence in β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+ with 15 mol% Li+ doping is enhanced by 13.7 times. This study provides a general and effective approach to obtain intense pure red UC luminescence, which can be applied to other synthetic strategies.

  2. Morphology evolution and pure red upconversion mechanism of β-NaLuF4 crystals.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Li, Anming; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2016-01-01

    A series of β-NaLuF4 crystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Hexagonal phase microdisks, microprisms, and microtubes were achieved by simply changing the amount of citric acid in the initial reaction solution. Pure red upconversion (UC) luminescence can be observed in β-NaLuF4:Yb(3+), Tm(3+), Er(3+) and Li(+) doped β-NaLuF4:20% Yb(3+), 1% Tm(3+), 20% Er(3+). Based on the rate equations, we report the theoretical model about the pure red UC mechanism in Yb(3+)/Tm(3+)/Er(3+) doped system. It is proposed that the pure red UC luminescence is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer UC from Tm(3+):(3)F4 → (3)H6 to Er(3+):(4)I11/2 → (4)F9/2 and the cross-relaxation (CR) effect [Er(3+):(4)S3/2 + (4)I15/2 → (4)I9/2 + (4)I13/2] rather than the long-accepted mechanism [CR process among Er(3+):(4)F7/2 + (4)I11/2 → (4)F9/2 + (4)F9/2]. In addition, compared to the Li(+)-free counterpart, the pure red UC luminescence in β-NaLuF4:20% Yb(3+), 1% Tm(3+), 20% Er(3+) with 15 mol% Li(+) doping is enhanced by 13.7 times. This study provides a general and effective approach to obtain intense pure red UC luminescence, which can be applied to other synthetic strategies. PMID:27306720

  3. Morphology evolution and pure red upconversion mechanism of β-NaLuF4 crystals

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Xu, Dekang; Li, Anming; Teng, Dongdong; Yang, Shenghong; Zhang, Yueli

    2016-01-01

    A series of β-NaLuF4 crystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. Hexagonal phase microdisks, microprisms, and microtubes were achieved by simply changing the amount of citric acid in the initial reaction solution. Pure red upconversion (UC) luminescence can be observed in β-NaLuF4:Yb3+, Tm3+, Er3+ and Li+ doped β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+. Based on the rate equations, we report the theoretical model about the pure red UC mechanism in Yb3+/Tm3+/Er3+ doped system. It is proposed that the pure red UC luminescence is mainly ascribed to the energy transfer UC from Tm3+:3F4 → 3H6 to Er3+:4I11/2 → 4F9/2 and the cross-relaxation (CR) effect [Er3+:4S3/2 + 4I15/2 → 4I9/2 + 4I13/2] rather than the long-accepted mechanism [CR process among Er3+:4F7/2 + 4I11/2 → 4F9/2 + 4F9/2]. In addition, compared to the Li+-free counterpart, the pure red UC luminescence in β-NaLuF4:20% Yb3+, 1% Tm3+, 20% Er3+ with 15 mol% Li+ doping is enhanced by 13.7 times. This study provides a general and effective approach to obtain intense pure red UC luminescence, which can be applied to other synthetic strategies. PMID:27306720

  4. Growth of pure and tin-doped indium oxide crystals and their electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shimado, S.; Kodaira, K.; Sato, I.; Matsushita, T.

    1988-12-01

    Indium oxide, In/sub 2/O/sub 3/, is an n-type semiconductor with the C-type oxide structure. Its electrical resistivity is greatly decreased by doping with Sn, so that Sn-doped In/sub 2/O/sub 3/(ITO) thin films are widely used as transparent conductive coating and as heat reflection filters. Single crystals of In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ have been grown by vapor phase, flux, chemical transport or hydrothermal method, but only one growth experiment by a vapor phase method has been reported and no growth experiment of Sn-doped In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crystals from the vapor phase has been carried out. The authors have brown the In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crystals by the vapor method, one of which utilized air-oxidation of indium or In/sub 2/O vapors which are produced by reduction of In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with carbon in a closed crucible. With this growth experiment it was, however, difficult to control the crystallization of In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ since the generation of In/sub 2/O or In vapors and oxidation of their vapors by air spontaneously occur in the crucible. The successful growth experiments for ZnP, GeO/sub 2/ and CdO crystals have been performed using the sophisticated method of controlling air-oxidation of Zn, GeO, and Cd vapors, respectively, which are generated by reduction of the oxides with carbon. The purpose of the present paper is to perform the prolonged growth of pure and Sn-doped In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ crystals by utilizing such a controlled reduction-oxidation process and investigating their electrical properties.

  5. Pure, single crystal Ge nanodots formed using a sandwich structure via pulsed UV excimer laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ting-Wei; Chen, Hung-Ming; Shen, Kuan-Yuan; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a sandwich structure comprising a SiO2 capping layer, amorphous Germanium (a-Ge) nanodots (NDs), and a pit-patterned Silicon (Si) substrate is developed, which is then annealed by utilizing a pulsed ultraviolet excimer laser in order to fabricate an array of pure, single crystal Ge NDs at room temperature. A wide bandgap SiO2 capping layer is used as a transparent thermally isolated layer to prevent thermal loss and Si-Ge intermixing. The two-dimensional pit-patterned Si substrate is designed to confine the absorbed laser energy, reduce the melting point, and block the surface migration of the Ge. After optimizing the laser radiation parameters such that the laser energy density is 200 mJ cm-2, the laser annealing period is 10 s, and the number of laser shots is 10, pure, single crystal Ge NDs that have both a regular arrangement and a uniform size distribution are obtained in the pits of the Si substrates. The Raman spectrum shows a highly symmetric Ge transversal optical peak with a full width at half maximum of 4.2 cm-1 at 300.7 cm-1, which is close to that of the original Ge wafer. In addition, the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image for the Ge NDs and the corresponding selected area electron diffraction pattern shows a clear single crystalline structure without any impurities.

  6. Microbial preparation of metal-substituted magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji-Won; Roh, Yul; Lauf, Robert J; Vali, Hojatollah; Yeary, Lucas W; Phelps, Tommy J

    2007-07-01

    A microbial process that exploits the ability of iron-reducing microorganisms to produce copious amounts of extra-cellular metal (M)-substituted magnetite nanoparticles using akaganeite and dopants of dissolved form has previously been reported. The objectives of this study were to develop methods for producing M-substituted magnetite nanoparticles with a high rate of metal substitution by biological processes and to identify factors affecting the production of nano-crystals. The thermophilic and psychrotolerant iron-reducing bacteria had the ability to form M-substituted magnetite nano-crystals (M(y)Fe(3-y)O(4)) from a doped precursor, mixed-M iron oxyhydroxide, (M(x)Fe(1-x)OOH, x< or =0.5, M is Mn, Zn, Ni, Co and Cr). Within the range of 0.01< or =x< or =0.3, using the mixed precursor material enabled the microbial synthesis of more heavily substituted magnetite compared to the previous method, in which the precursor was pure akaganeite and the dopants were present as soluble metal salts. The mixed precursor method was especially advantageous in the case of toxic metals such as Cr and Ni. Also this new method increased the production rate and magnetic properties of the product, while improving crystallinity, size control and scalability.

  7. Antimicrobial activity and second harmonic studies on organic non-centrosymmetric pure and doped ninhydrin single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Haris, M.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we report the successful growth of pure, Cu2+ ions and Cd2+ ions doped on ninhydrin single crystals by slow solvent evaporation technique. The presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+ ions in the specimen of ninhydrin single crystal has been determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The powder X-ray diffraction analysis was done to calculate the lattice parameters of the pure and doped crystals. The percentage of transmittance of the crystal was recorded using the UV-Vis Spectrophotometer. Thermal behaviors of the grown crystals have been examined by the thermal gravimetric/differential thermal analysis. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show the minor variation in the hardness value for the pure and doped ninhydrin samples. The value of the work hardening coefficient n was found to be 2.0, 1.0 and 1.06 for pure, copper and cadmium doped ninhydrin crystals respectively. The second harmonic generation efficiency of Cd2+ and Cu2+ doped ninhydrin is 8.3 and 6.3 times greater than well known nonlinear crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate respectively. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the title compound were performed by disk diffusion method against the standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillis niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  8. Kinetics and thermodynamics of sucrose crystallization from pure solution at different initial supersaturations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaddour, Issam A.; Bento, Luís S. M.; Ferreira, António M. A.; Rocha, Fernando A. N.

    2010-07-01

    Growth rates of sucrose crystallization from pure solutions of initial relative supersaturation levels between 0.094 and 0.181 were studied in agitated crystallizer at 313.13 K. Birth and spread model was applicable for the obtained growth rate data in this range of supersaturation and used to estimate the principal growth parameters. The estimated interfacial free energy varied inversely with supersaturation from 0.00842 to 0.00461 J/m 2, respectively. The obtained kinetic coefficient changed with the initial supersaturation from 9.45 × 10 - 5 to 2.79 × 10 - 7 m/s. The corresponding radius of the 2D (two dimensional) critical nucleus varied from 7.47 × 10 - 9 to 1.46 × 10 - 9 m. Predominance of surface integration or volume diffusion mechanism during the growth process was assessed using the calculated activation free energies of the 2D nucleation process. An acceptable confirmation of the calculated radius of the critical 2D nucleus was found using atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The calculated interfacial free energy between the saturated sucrose solution and the crystal surface was found to be 0.02325 J/m 2.

  9. Self-organized single crystal mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite films grown by infrared pulsed-laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Figuera, Juan; Quesada, Adrián; Martín-García, Laura; Sanz, Mikel; Oujja, Mohamed; Rebollar, Esther; Castillejo, Marta; Prieto, Pilar; Muñoz-Martín, Ángel; Aballe, Lucía; Marco, José F.

    2015-12-01

    We have grown mixed magnetite/cobalt ferrite epitaxial films on SrTiO3 by infrared pulsed-laser deposition. Diffraction experiments indicate epitaxial growth with a relaxed lattice spacing. The films are flat with two distinct island types: nanometric rectangular mounds in two perpendicular orientations, and larger square islands, attributed to the two main components of the film as determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy. The origin of the segregation is suggested to be the oxygen-deficiency during growth.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of pure and mixed gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Want, B.; Shah, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetic moment and susceptibility measurements of single crystals of pure and mixed rare earth fumarates of gadolinium and terbium were carried out at room temperature. The experimental values of molar susceptibilities for Gd2 (C4H2O4)3·7H2O, Tb2(C4H2O4)3·7H2O and GdTb (C4H2O4)3·7H2O are 2.68×10-2, 3.89×10-2, and 3.18×10-2 (in emu mol-1 Oe-1), respectively. The calculated effective magnetic moments are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions on rare earth ions.

  11. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. This article highlights recent advances in the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.

  12. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-09-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. As a result, this article highlights recent advances in the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.

  13. Statistical Analyses Comparing Prismatic Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Globules with those from the Terrestrial Magnetotactic Bacteria Strain MV-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; McKay, David S.; Wentworth, Susan J.; Vali, H.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2000-01-01

    Here we use rigorous mathematical modeling to compare ALH84001 prismatic magnetites with those produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacteria, MV-1. We find that this subset of the Martian magnetites appears to be statistically indistinguishable from those of MV-1.

  14. Evidence of direct crystal growth and presence of hollow microspheres in magnetite particles prepared by oxidation of Fe(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Vereda, Fernando; Rodríguez-González, Benito; de Vicente, Juan; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2008-02-15

    We provide new information relevant to the crystallinity and growth mechanism of magnetite particles that were fabricated following the method of Sugimoto and Matijević [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 74 (1980) 227]. These authors observed that in a small excess of Fe(2+), particles grew by aggregation and recrystallization of smaller units, so that until now the resulting particles were thought to be polycrystalline. With the help of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), we also detected the presence of monocrystalline particles, which are strong evidence of the occurrence of direct crystal growth. This growth mechanism seems to coexist with that of the aggregation of primary units proposed by Sugimoto and Matijević. Careful examination of electron microscopy micrographs also revealed the presence of many hollow polycrystalline microspheres. PMID:18061607

  15. Crystal Structure of Pure and Aluminous Calcium Silicate Perovskites at Mantle Related Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Shim, S. H.; Leinenweber, K. D.; Meng, Y.; Prakapenka, V.

    2015-12-01

    CaSiO3-perovskite (CaPv) is believed to be the third most abundant mineral (5 wt%) in the Earth's lower mantle (LM). Subducted slabs contain 23 wt% CaPv at the LM related pressure (P) and temperature (T), where Al2O3 could be incorporated into the crystal structure of CaPv (AlCaPv). However, there remains important discrepancy between computations and experiments on the crystal structure of CaPv at high P and low T. Some computations have predicted a tetragonal I4/mcm structure with a pseudo-cubic axial ratio (cp/ap) greater than 1, while X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies have suggested a tetragonal P4/mmm structure with cp/ap ~ 0.995. Using Ne as a pressure medium, we conducted in-situ XRD of CaSiO3 and 5 wt% Al-bearing CaSiO3 in the laser heated diamond anvil cell at the GSECARS and HPCAT sectors of the Advanced Photon Source. Rietveld refinements are performed on the diffraction patterns of CaPv at 300 K and 20-60 GPa. Similar to previous studies, we observed splitting of the 200 and 211 peaks after T-quench in pure CaPv. However, unlike previous experiments, diffraction patterns were more consistent with a tetragonal I4/mcm structure with cp/ap ~ 1.005 than P4/mmm. All the previous diffraction patterns have been measured with an Ar or MgO medium, or even without a medium, while we used more hydrostatic Ne medium. Considering the small free energy differences among different perovskite structures, the crystal structure of CaPv may be very sensitive to non-hydrostatic stresses. In runs with AlCaPv, asymmetrical 200 peaks are found up to 60 GPa and 2200 K, showing that non-cubic could be still stable at mantle geotherm temperatures in AlCaPv. The extreme sensitivity of CaPv on deviatoric stresses may have important implications for the elastic properties of the mantle regions with strong deformations, because the elastic anisotropy can change with the crystal structure of CaPv.

  16. Study of a pure CsI crystal readout by APD for Belle II end cap ECL upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Aihara, H.; Borshchev, O. V.; Epifanov, D. A.; Ponomarenko, S. A.; Surin, N. M.

    2016-07-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a pure CsI crystal and avalanche photodiodes (Hamamatsu APD S8664-55 and S8664-1010) has been studied for the upgrade of the end cap electromagnetic calorimeter of Belle II detector. An essential increase of the light output was achieved with wavelength shifters based on nanostructured organosilicon luminophores.

  17. Microbial synthesis of magnetite and Mn-substituted magnetite nanoparticles: influence of bacteria and incubation temperature.

    PubMed

    Roh, Yul; Jang, Hee-Dong; Suh, Yongjae

    2007-11-01

    Microbial synthesis of magnetite and metal (Co, Cr, Ni)-substituted magnetites has only recently been reported. The objective of this study was to examine the influence of Mn ion on the microbial synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. The reductive biotransformation of an akaganeite (beta-FeOOH) or a Mn-substituted (2-20 mol%) akaganeite (Fe(1-x)Mn(x)OOH) by Shewanella loiha (PV-4, 25 degrees C) and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus (TOR-39, 60 degrees C) was investigated under anaerobic conditions at circumneutral pH (pH = 7-8). Both bacteria formed magnetite nanoparticles using akaganeite as a magnetite precursor. By comparison of iron minerals formed by PV-4 and TOR-39 using Mn-mixed akaganeite as the precursor, it was shown that PV-4 formed siderite (FeCO3), green rust [Fe2+Fe3+(OH)16CO3 x 4H2O], and magnetite at 25 degrees C, whereas TOR-39 formed mainly nm-sized magnetite at 60 degrees C. The presence of Mn in the magnetite formed by TOR-39 was revealed by energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) is indicative of Mn substitution into magnetite crystals. EDX analysis of iron minerals formed by PV-4 showed that Mn was preferentially concentrated in the siderite and green rust. These results demonstrate that coprecipitated/sorbed Mn induced microbial formation of siderite and green rust by PV-4 at 25 degrees C, but the synthesis of Mn-substituted magnetite nanoparticles proceeded by TOR-39 at 60 degrees C. These results indicate that the bacteria have the ability to synthesize magnetite and Mn-substituted magnetite nano-crystals. Microbially facilitated synthesis of magnetite and metal-substituted magnetites at near ambient temperatures may expand the possible use of specialized ferromagnetic nano-particles.

  18. Growth, mechanical, thermal and dielectric properties of pure and doped KHP single crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M, Lakshmipriya.; Babu, D. Rajan; Vizhi, R. Ezhil

    2015-06-01

    L-Arginine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate and L-Histidine doped potassium hydrogen phthalate single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature. The grown crystal crystallizes in orthorhombic system which is confirmed by single crystal XRD analysis. The grown crystals are subjected to thermal, mechanical and dielectric analysis.

  19. Thermoluminescence in pure LiF crystals: Glow peaks and their connection with color centers

    SciTech Connect

    Baldacchini, G.; Montereali, R. M.; Nichelatti, E.; Kalinov, V. S.; Voitovich, A. P.; Davidson, A. T.; Kozakiewicz, A. G.

    2008-09-15

    Nominally pure LiF crystals were irradiated with the same dose (0.85 10{sup 6} R) of gamma rays at ambient and low temperatures (-60 deg. C) and the resulting thermoluminescence (TL) is reported. Various optical and thermal treatments were applied in order to change the concentration of color centers (CCs). The effect of such treatments on the glow curves is observed. Knowing the coloration from optical transmission and photoluminescence measurements made on the same samples, we attribute many of the glow peaks (GPs) to the annealing of F center aggregates. For the present conditions of irradiation and dose, TL processes begin with decay of F{sub 3}{sup +} centers that display a GP at 164 deg. C. F{sub 3}(R) centers follow and are responsible for GPs at 193 and 228 deg. C. A GP at 263 deg. C is ascribed to F{sub 2} centers. Several peaks at temperatures in the range of 280-380 deg. C are associated with impurity perturbed F centers. A GP at 410 deg. C is associated with a complex of aggregated F and H centers. These attributions are accomplished by means of TL spectra, optical transmission spectra, and annealing procedures, and are critically discussed. The experimental data confirm the general trend of thermal stability of CCs, which decreases by moving from simple F centers to more complex ones, and the existence of exchange dynamics among CCs.

  20. Influence of downsizing of zeolite crystals on the orthorhombic ↔ monoclinic phase transition in pure silica MFI-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalan, Ihab; Michelin, Laure; Rigolet, Séverinne; Marichal, Claire; Daou, T. Jean; Lebeau, Bénédicte; Paillaud, Jean-Louis

    2016-08-01

    The impact of crystal size on the transition orthorhombic ↔ monoclinic phase in MFI-type purely silica zeolites is investigated between 293 and 473 K using 29Si MAS NMR and powder X-ray diffraction. Three silicalite-1 zeolites are synthesized: a material constituted of micron-sized crystals, pseudospherical nanometer-sized crystals and hierarchical porous zeolites with a mesoporous network created by the use of a gemini-type diquaternary ammonium surfactant giving nanosheet zeolites. Our results show for the first time that the orthorhombic ↔ monoclinic phase transition already known for micron-sized particles also occurs in nanometer-sized zeolite crystals whereas our data suggest that the extreme downsizing of the zeolite crystal to one unit cell in thickness leads to an extinction of the phase transition.

  1. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation. PMID:26348458

  2. Composite Magnetite and Protein Containing CaCO3 Crystals. External Manipulation and Vaterite → Calcite Recrystallization-Mediated Release Performance.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, Alena; Sergeev, Roman; Lengert, Ekaterina; Zakharevich, Andrey; Parakhonskiy, Bogdan; Gorin, Dmitry; Sergeev, Sergey; Volodkin, Dmitry

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility and high loading capacity of mesoporous CaCO3 vaterite crystals give an option to utilize the polycrystals for a wide range of (bio)applications. Formation and transformations of calcium carbonate polymorphs have been studied for decades, aimed at both basic and applied research interests. Here, composite multilayer-coated calcium carbonate polycrystals containing Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles and model protein lysozyme are fabricated. The structure of the composite polycrystals and vaterite → calcite recrystallization kinetics are studied. The recrystallization results in release of both loaded protein and Fe3O4 nanoparticles (magnetic manipulation is thus lost). Fe3O4 nanoparticles enhance the recrystallization that can be induced by reduction of the local pH with citric acid and reduction of the polycrystal crystallinity. Oppositely, the layer-by-layer assembled poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) polyelectrolyte coating significantly inhibits the vaterite → calcite recrystallization (from hours to days) most likely due to suppression of the ion exchange giving an option to easily tune the release kinetics for a wide time scale, for example, for prolonged release. Moreover, the recrystallization of the coated crystals results in formulation of multilayer capsules keeping the feature of external manipulation. This study can help to design multifunctional microstructures with tailor-made characteristics for loading and controlled release as well as for external manipulation.

  3. Spectroscopic and optical studies on pure and doped single crystals of sulphate-mixed ?-arginine phosphate monohydrate—a nonlinear optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanuskodi, S.; Angeli Mary, P. A.; Vasantha, K.

    2003-03-01

    Single crystals of pure and transition metal ions (Cu 2+ and VO 2+)-doped L-arginine sulpho phosphate monohydrate (sulphate-mixed L-arginine phosphate monohydrate, abbreviated as LASP) have been grown by solvent evaporation of the saturated aqueous solution at room temperature and characterized by single-crystal XRD, FT-IR, UV-Vis-NIR and EPR (single-crystal rotation) spectral studies. Kurtz powder technique shows an enhanced second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency for LASP and its doped analogues than pure LAP. The EPR studies on LASP:VO 2+ reveal that the in-plane σ-bonding is moderately covalent and the out-of-plane π-bonding is highly covalent, which could be attributed to the cause of enhanced powder efficiency.

  4. Pure & crystallized 2D Boron Nitride sheets synthesized via a novel process coupling both PDCs and SPS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Linas, Sébastien; Journet, Catherine; Steyer, Philippe; Garnier, Vincent; Bonnefont, Guillaume; Brioude, Arnaud; Toury, Bérangère

    2016-02-01

    Within the context of emergent researches linked to graphene, it is well known that h-BN nanosheets (BNNSs), also referred as 2D BN, are considered as the best candidate for replacing SiO2 as dielectric support or capping layers for graphene. As a consequence, the development of a novel alternative source for highly crystallized h-BN crystals, suitable for a further exfoliation, is a prime scientific issue. This paper proposes a promising approach to synthesize pure and well-crystallized h-BN flakes, which can be easily exfoliated into BNNSs. This new accessible production process represents a relevant alternative source of supply in response to the increasing need of high quality BNNSs. The synthesis strategy to prepare pure h-BN is based on a unique combination of the Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) route with the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) process. Through a multi-scale chemical and structural investigation, it is clearly shown that obtained flakes are large (up to 30 μm), defect-free and well crystallized, which are key-characteristics for a subsequent exfoliation into relevant BNNSs.

  5. Growth and characterization of pure and KCl doped zinc thiourea chloride (ZTC) single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ruby Nirmala, L; Thomas Joseph Prakash, J

    2013-02-01

    Potassium Chloride (KCl) as an additive is added into zinc thiourea chloride solution in a small amount (1M%) by the method of slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature to get a new crystal. Due to the doping of the impurities on the crystals, remarkable changes in the physical properties were obtained. The grown crystals have been subjected to different instrumentation methods. The incorporation of the amount of potassium and zinc in the crystal lattices has been determined by AAS method. The lattice dimensions have been identified from single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements. The presence of functional group for the grown crystals has been identified by FTIR analysis. The optical, thermal and mechanical behaviors have been assessed by UV-Vis, TG/DTA and Vickers hardness methods respectively. The presence of dislocations of atoms has been identified by etching studies. PMID:23220671

  6. Growth of large, defect-free pure C60 single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, R. L.; Ramirez, D.; Jiang, X.; Chow, P. C.; Diaz, C.; Matsuishi, K.; Moss, S. C.; Hor, P. H.; Chu, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Millimeter-sized single crystals of C60 were grown by sublimation of C60 powder in a vacuum for 6-24 h. The crystals had excellent facets, were free of C70 or solvent, and showed face-centered cubic symmetry with a very small mosaic spread down to 0.01 deg.

  7. Magnetic microbes: Bacterial magnetite biomineralization

    DOE PAGES

    Prozorov, Tanya

    2015-09-14

    Magnetotactic bacteria are a diverse group of prokaryotes with the ability to orient and migrate along the magnetic field lines in search for a preferred oxygen concentration in chemically stratified water columns and sediments. These microorganisms produce magnetosomes, the intracellular nanometer-sized magnetic crystals surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer membrane, typically organized in chains. Magnetosomes have nearly perfect crystal structures with narrow size distribution and species-specific morphologies, leading to well-defined magnetic properties. As a result, the magnetite biomineralization in these organisms is of fundamental interest to diverse disciplines, from biotechnology to astrobiology. As a result, this article highlights recent advances inmore » the understanding of the bacterial magnetite biomineralization.« less

  8. Magnetite and its production

    SciTech Connect

    Koebbe, E.R.

    1993-12-31

    The supply of high quality magnetite for the cleaning of coal using dense medium cyclones and vessels is of concern to all coal preparation operations. This paper describes the production of high purity magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) from a domestic underground mining operation in Missouri, Pea Ridge Iron Ore Company. Emphasis will be placed on the mining and processing of the magnetite ore into the various magnetite products required by coal preparation plants.

  9. Organophosphorous functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kalska-Szostko, B; Rogowska, M; Satuła, D

    2013-11-01

    In this work magnetite nanoparticles covered by gold and silver shell were obtained. Analyzed particles were modified by two kinds of organophosphorous compounds: 3-phosphonopropionic acid and 16-phosphonohexadecanoic acid. Enzyme immobilization on particles modified in such a way was tested. The crystal structure of obtained nanoparticles was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Possible changes on the surfaces were analyzed by the use of infrared spectroscopy. Magnetic properties were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy.

  10. Biogenic Magnetite and EMF Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    1996-03-01

    Magnetite biomineralization is a genetically-controlled biochemical process through which organisms make perfect ferrimagnetic crystals, usually of single magnetic domain size. This process is an ancient one, having evolved about 2 billion years ago in the magnetotactic bacteria, and presumably was incorporated in the genome of higher organisms, including humans. During this time, DNA replication, protein synthesis, and many other biochemical processes have functioned in the presence of strong static fields of up to 400 mT adjacent to these magnetosomes without any obvious deleterious effects. Recent behavioral experiments using short but strong magnetic pulses in honeybees and birds demonstrates that ferromagnetic materials are involved in the sensory transduction of geomagnetic field information to the nervous system, and both behavioral and direct electrophysiological experiments indicate sensitivity thresholds to DC magnetic fields down to a few nT. However, far more biogenic magnetite is present in animal tissues than is needed for magnetoreception, and the biological function of this extra material is unknown. The presence of ferromagnetic materials in biological systems could provide physical transduction mechanisms for ELF magnetic fields, as well for microwave radiation in the .5 to 10 GHz band where magnetite has its peak ferromagnetic resonance. Elucidation of the cellular ultrastructure and biological function(s) of magnetite might help resolve the question of whether anthropogenic EMFs can cause deleterious biological effects. This work has been supported by grants from the NIH and EPRI.

  11. Cavity-assisted atomic frequency comb memory in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+ :YLiF4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedzhanov, R. A.; Gushchin, L. A.; Kalachev, A. A.; Nizov, N. A.; Nizov, V. A.; Sobgayda, D. A.; Zelensky, I. V.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present an implementation of cavity-assisted atomic frequency comb (AFC) memory protocol in an isotopically pure 143Nd3+ :YLiF4 crystal. We use a tunable confocal Fabry–Perot cavity that is placed inside the cryostat. For a 1 mm thick sample with optical depth of 0.2 we obtain total storage efficiency of 3%, which is a 15-fold enhancement compared to the no cavity case. The memory bandwidth is limited by the inhomogeneous broadening of the optical transition and allows us to store short 30 ns pulses.

  12. High field conduction and dielectric breakdown in nominally pure and nickel-doped MgO crystals at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, K.L.; Chen, Y.; O'Dwyer, J.J.

    1982-12-15

    The phenomenon of dielectric (or more aptly, electrothermal) breakdown of nominally pure and nickle-doped MgO crystals at 1473 K is studied with the use of a field of 1500 V cm/sup -1/. The current transients induced by constant and alternating fields as well as by field reversals, and open- and short-circuit conditions are investigated. Activation energies, obtained from the temperature dependence of current parameters, are also obtained. It is concluded that the mechanism leading to the breakdown involves the buildup of space charge caused by the injection of carriers from the electrodes and drift of ions.

  13. An Alignment Medium for Measuring Residual Dipolar Couplings in Pure DMSO: Liquid Crystals from Graphene Oxide Grafted with Polymer Brushes.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wen; Li, Gao-Wei; Cao, Jiang-Ming; Lei, Xinxiang; Hu, Mao-Lin; Sun, Han; Griesinger, Christian; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) have attracted attention in light of their great impact on the structural elucidation of organic molecules. However, the effectiveness of RDC measurements is limited by the shortage of alignment media compatible with widely used organic solvents, such as DMSO. Herein, we present the first liquid crystal (LC) based alignment medium that is compatible with pure DMSO, thus enabling RDC measurements of polar and intermediate polarity molecules. The liquid crystals were obtained by grafting polymer brushes onto graphene oxide (GO) using free radical polymerization. The resulting new medium offers several advantages, such as absence of background signals, narrow line shapes, and tunable alignment. Importantly, this medium is compatible with π-conjugated molecules. Moreover, sonication-induced fragmentation can reduce the size of GO sheets. The resulting anisotropic medium has moderate alignment strength, which is a prerequisite for an accurate RDC measurement.

  14. Dielectric response of pure and doped-GaSe crystals studied by an indigenously developed broadband THz-TDS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Amit C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Mandal, K. C.; Mondal, S.; Jewariya, M.; Ozaki, T.; Bhaktha, S. N. B.; Datta, P. K.

    2016-04-01

    Publisher's Note: This paper, originally published on 12 July 2016, was replaced with a corrected/revised version on 26 July 2016. If you downloaded the original PDF but are unable to access the revision, please contact SPIE Digital Library Customer Service for assistance. We have developed a terahertz time domain spectroscopy system (THz TDS). For THz generation, optical rectification process and for detection, electro-optic sampling processes are used. Identical < 110 > cut ZnTe crystals are used for both generation and detection of THz radiation.This spectroscopy system can be used for the noninvasive and contactless electrical and optical characterizations of various samples. In this work spectroscopic measurements of pure, Chromium and Indium doped GaSe crystals within 0.4 THz to 3 THz range are taken by the developed set-up to study the dielectric response of the samples.

  15. Utilization of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance spectroscopy for the study of pharmaceutical crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Pérez, S C; Cerioni, L; Wolfenson, A E; Faudone, S; Cuffini, S L

    2005-07-14

    Solid-state physical characterization of a pharmaceutical substance is necessary for successful development and approval of the final product. Different physical analytical techniques are available to do so: X-ray diffraction (XRD), IR, Raman, DSC, TG and NMR. Moreover, all of them detect the presence of excipients perturbing the analysis of the pure substance in low doses. In order to study polymorphism and pseudo polymorphism of drug, this paper introduces possible applications of pure nuclear quadrupole resonance, as a non-destructive technique in qualitative and quantitative approaches. Chlorpropamide and diclofenac sodium were used as examples. Unlike the mentioned techniques, the nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) signal of pharmaceutical compounds is not perturbed by the presence of solid excipient or other substances unless they possess resonance frequencies in the same frequency range of the compound studied.

  16. Antimony oxofluorides - a synthesis concept that yields phase pure samples and single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sk Imran; Johnsson, Mats

    2016-07-26

    The single crystals of the new isostructural compounds Sb3O4F and Y0.5Sb2.5O4F and the two previously known compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 were successfully grown by a hydrothermal technique at 230 °C. The new compound Sb3O4F crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c; a = 5.6107(5) Å, b = 4.6847(5) Å, c = 20.2256(18) Å, β = 94.145(8)°, z = 4. The replacing part of Sb with Y means a slight increase in the unit cell dimensions. The compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 have not been grown as single crystals before and it can be concluded that hydrothermal synthesis has proved to be a suitable technique for growing single crystals of antimony oxofluorides because of the relatively low solubility of such compounds compared to other antimony oxohalides that most often have been synthesised at high temperatures by solid state reactions or gas-solid reactions. PMID:27402498

  17. Antimony oxofluorides - a synthesis concept that yields phase pure samples and single crystals.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sk Imran; Johnsson, Mats

    2016-07-26

    The single crystals of the new isostructural compounds Sb3O4F and Y0.5Sb2.5O4F and the two previously known compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 were successfully grown by a hydrothermal technique at 230 °C. The new compound Sb3O4F crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/c; a = 5.6107(5) Å, b = 4.6847(5) Å, c = 20.2256(18) Å, β = 94.145(8)°, z = 4. The replacing part of Sb with Y means a slight increase in the unit cell dimensions. The compounds M-SbOF and α-Sb3O2F5 have not been grown as single crystals before and it can be concluded that hydrothermal synthesis has proved to be a suitable technique for growing single crystals of antimony oxofluorides because of the relatively low solubility of such compounds compared to other antimony oxohalides that most often have been synthesised at high temperatures by solid state reactions or gas-solid reactions.

  18. Growth, optical, mechanical and dielectric studies on NLO active pure and metal ion doped single crystals of bis-thiourea zinc chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parasuraman, K.; Sakthi Murugesan, K.; Uthrakumar, R.; Jerome Das, S.; Milton Boaz, B.

    2011-10-01

    Good quality single crystals of pure and metal ion (Ni 2+) doped bis-thiourea zinc chloride (BTZC) possessing excellent nonlinear optical properties have been grown from aqueous solution by the slow solvent evaporation technique. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals are determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The well defined sharp peaks in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern reveals the crystalline perfection and the EDAX spectrum confirms the presence of dopant in the lattice of the parent crystal. The DRS UV-visible spectral study reveals improved transparency for the doped crystal, ascertaining the inclusion of metal ion in the lattice. The optical band gap of the pure and doped crystals was calculated to be 4.8 and 5.2 eV respectively from the UV transmission spectrum. The vickers hardness test brings forth higher hardness value for Ni 2+doped BTZC as compared to pure BTZC crystal. The dielectric measurement exhibits very low dielectric constant and dielectric loss at higher frequencies for both the pure and Ni 2+doped BTZC. The existence of second harmonic generation signals in the crystal also has been confirmed by performing the Kurtz powder test.

  19. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Maher, Barbara A; Ahmed, Imad A M; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A; Foulds, Penelope G; Allsop, David; Mann, David M A; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-09-27

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683-7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <∼200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health. PMID:27601646

  20. Magnetite pollution nanoparticles in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Maher, Barbara A; Ahmed, Imad A M; Karloukovski, Vassil; MacLaren, Donald A; Foulds, Penelope G; Allsop, David; Mann, David M A; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Calderon-Garciduenas, Lilian

    2016-09-27

    Biologically formed nanoparticles of the strongly magnetic mineral, magnetite, were first detected in the human brain over 20 y ago [Kirschvink JL, Kobayashi-Kirschvink A, Woodford BJ (1992) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89(16):7683-7687]. Magnetite can have potentially large impacts on the brain due to its unique combination of redox activity, surface charge, and strongly magnetic behavior. We used magnetic analyses and electron microscopy to identify the abundant presence in the brain of magnetite nanoparticles that are consistent with high-temperature formation, suggesting, therefore, an external, not internal, source. Comprising a separate nanoparticle population from the euhedral particles ascribed to endogenous sources, these brain magnetites are often found with other transition metal nanoparticles, and they display rounded crystal morphologies and fused surface textures, reflecting crystallization upon cooling from an initially heated, iron-bearing source material. Such high-temperature magnetite nanospheres are ubiquitous and abundant in airborne particulate matter pollution. They arise as combustion-derived, iron-rich particles, often associated with other transition metal particles, which condense and/or oxidize upon airborne release. Those magnetite pollutant particles which are <∼200 nm in diameter can enter the brain directly via the olfactory bulb. Their presence proves that externally sourced iron-bearing nanoparticles, rather than their soluble compounds, can be transported directly into the brain, where they may pose hazard to human health.

  1. Magnetite Nanoparticles Prepared By Spark Erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorov, M.; Blums, E.; Kronkalns, G.; Krumina, A.; Lubane, M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present research, we study a possibility of using the electric spark erosion method as an alternative to the method of chemical co-precipitation for preparation of magnetic nanoparticles. Initiation of high frequency electric discharge between coarse iron particles under a layer of distilled water allows obtaining pure magnetite nanoparticles.

  2. Crystal nucleation in glass-forming alloy and pure metal melts under containerless and vibrationless conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.; Turnbull, D.

    1982-01-01

    The undercooling behavior of large spheroids of Pd40Ni40P40 was investigated. By surface etching, supporting the specimens on a fused silica substrate, and successive heating and cooling, crystallization can be eliminated, presumable due to the removal of surface heterogeneities. By this method samples up to 3.2g with a 0.53 mm minor diameter, were made entirely glassy, except for some superficial crystals comprising less than 0.5% of the volume. These experiments show that a cooling rate of approximately 1 K/sec is adequate to avoid copious homogeneous nucleation in the alloy, and that by eliminating or reducing the effectiveness of heterogeneous nucleation sites, it is possible to form bulk samples of this metallic glass with virtually unlimited dimensions.

  3. Morphologies and Chemical Composition of Individual Magnetite Grains in CI and CM Chondrites: A Potential Genetic Link to their Origin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohn, B.; El Goresy, A.

    1992-07-01

    Magnetite occurs in CI and CM chondrites as plaquettes, framboids, and radially structured spherolites (Jedwab, 1967, 1971). Recent ion microprobe investigations of the O-isotopic compositions of individual magnetite grains in Orgueil, Alais, Ivuna, and Revelstoke revealed enormous variations in delta^18O (-25 to +25) in the same meteorite (Hyman et al., (1991)). A planetary process involving water should lead to formation of grains of similar O-isotopic composition. Individual magnetites in Alais (CI1), Orgueil (CI1), Y-82162 (CI2), Essebi (CM2) and Acfer-207 have been studied in detail by us (e.g., more than 300 electron microprobe analyses). The fact that all morphological types occur together in clusters make an in situ formation not very probable. The stacking morphology of the plaquettes is in fact the strongest argument against epitaxial growth of magnetite along the rhombohedral surfaces of carbonates as suggested by Kerridge et al. (1979). The stacks occur as rounded or oval discs with the top and bottom discs displaying several oblique crystal surfaces and one perpendicular to the axis of the disc stacking. Epitaxial growth should--in contrast to the encountered plaquette morphology--produce three sets of stacks every one parallel to two opposing surfaces of the rhombohedral faces with diminishing disc sizes towards the centre of the rhombohedron. This epitaxial growth would also produce plaquettes with rhombohedral outlines and not circular or oval ones. In none of the studied meteorites were three directional rhombohedral magnetite plaquettes encountered. In Alais a sequence of formation: Magnetite--pyrrhotite--carbonate was found. The magnetites in all C-chondrites studied, are pure Fe3O4 regardless of their morphology and the assemblage in which they occur. Only the magnetites in Y-82162 are enriched in MgO and some of them in MnO. The present investigations, variability of the chemical composition of magnetite in Y-82162 and the oxygen isotopic

  4. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (∼350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (<5 μm) contain halite crystals indicating a saline environment during magnetite growth. The combination of these observations are consistent with a formation model for IOA deposits in northern Chile that involves crystallization of magnetite microlites from a silicate melt, nucleation of aqueous fluid bubbles on magnetite surfaces, and formation and ascent of buoyant fluid bubble-magnetite aggregates. Decompression of the fluid-magnetite aggregate

  5. Crystallography of Magnetite Plaquettes and their Significance as Asymmetric Catalysts for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  6. Structure and superparamagnetic behaviour of magnetite nanoparticles in cellulose beads

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Jose R.; Bordallo, Eduardo; Canetti, Dora; Leon, Vivian; Otero-Diaz, Luis C.; Negro, Carlos; Gomez, Adrian; Saez-Puche, Regino

    2010-08-15

    Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles were obtained starting from a mixture of iron(II) and iron(III) solutions in a preset total iron concentration from 0.04 to 0.8 mol l{sup -1} with ammonia at 25 and 70 {sup o}C. The regeneration of cellulose from viscose produces micrometrical spherical cellulose beads in which synthetic magnetite were embedded. The characterization of cellulose-magnetite beads by X-ray diffraction, Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy and magnetic measurement is reported. X-ray diffraction patterns indicate that the higher is the total iron concentration and temperature the higher is the crystal size of the magnetite obtained. Transmission Electron Microscopy studies of cellulose-magnetite beads revealed the distribution of magnetite nanoparticles inside pores of hundred nanometers. Magnetite as well as the cellulose-magnetite composites exhibit superparamagnetic characteristics. Field cooling and zero field cooling magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the superparamagnetic behaviour and the blocking temperature for the magnetite with a mean size of 12.5 nm, which is 200 K.

  7. {1 0 0} and {1 1 1} forms of the NaCl crystals coexisting in growth from pure aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilano, Dino; Pastero, Linda; Bruno, Marco; Rubbo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Many papers dealing with the NaCl crystal morphology have been published since the 1960s. It is commonly recognized that solution-grown halite crystals usually show a richer morphology compared with those obtained from the vapour growth. Beside the cube, the {1 1 1} octahedron occurs both in the presence of surface-specific impurities and under well-defined supersaturations, in pure aqueous solution. In this paper, we confine our attention to the occurrence of the octahedron in growth from pure aqueous solution. Experimentally this was achieved cooling a saturated solution at 95 °C and following different temperature gradients. The octahedron stability in pure solution is discussed on the basis of the "octopole hypothesis" about the stability of the reconstructed NaCl (1 1 1) surface.

  8. Scaffold of Asymmetric Organic Compounds - Magnetite Plaquettes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Martinez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Life on Earth shows preference towards the set of organics with particular spatial configurations, this 'selectivity' is a crucial criterion for life. With only rare exceptions, life prefers the left- (L-) form over the right- (D-) form of amino acids, resulting in an L-enantiomeric excess (L-ee). Recent studies have shown Lee for alpha-methyl amino acids in some chondrites. Since these amino acids have limited terrestrial occurrence, the origin of their stereoselectivity is nonbiological, and it seems appropriate to conclude that chiral asymmetry, the molecular characteristic that is common to all terrestrial life form, has an abiotic origin. A possible abiotic mechanism that can produce chiral asymmetry in meteoritic amino acids is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts, as mineral crystallization can produce spatially asymmetric structures. Magnetite is shown to be an effective catalyst for the formation of amino acids that are commonly found in chondrites. Magnetite 'plaquettes' (or 'platelets'), first described by Jedwab, show an interesting morphology of barrel-shaped stacks of magnetite disks with an apparent dislocation-induced spiral growth that seem to be connected at the center. A recent study by Singh et al. has shown that magnetites can self-assemble into helical superstructures. Such molecular asymmetry could be inherited by adsorbed organic molecules. In order to understand the distribution of 'spiral' magnetites in different meteorite classes, as well as to investigate their apparent spiral configurations and possible correlation to molecular asymmetry, we observed polished sections of carbonaceous chondrites (CC) using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. The sections were also studied by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) in order to reconstruct the crystal orientation along the stack of magnetite disks.

  9. Laser-assisted one-pot fabrication of calcium phosphate-based submicrospheres with internally crystallized magnetite nanoparticles through chemical precipitation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Maki; Oyane, Ayako; Sakamaki, Ikuko; Ishikawa, Yoshie; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Kawaguchi, Kenji

    2015-04-14

    In this paper, we have further developed our simple (one-pot) and rapid (short irradiation time) laser fabrication process of submicrometer spheres composed of amorphous calcium iron phosphate. In our previous process, laser irradiation was applied to a calcium phosphate (CaP) reaction mixture supplemented with ferric ions (Fe(3+)) as a light-absorbing agent. Because the intention of the present study was to fabricate magnetite-encapsulated CaP-based submicrometer spheres, ferrous ions (Fe(2+)) were used as a light-absorbing agent rather than ferric ions. The ferrous ions served as a light-absorbing agent and facilitated the fabrication of submicrometer and micrometer spheres of amorphous calcium iron phosphate. The sphere formation and growth were better promoted by the use of ferrous ions as compared with the use of ferric ions. The chemical composition of the spheres was controllable through adjustment of the experimental conditions. By the addition of sodium hydroxide to the CaP reaction mixture supplemented with ferrous ions, fabrication of CaP-based magnetic submicrometer spheres was successfully achieved. Numerous magnetite and wüstite nanoparticles were coprecipitated or segregated into the CaP-based spherical amorphous matrix via light-material interaction during the CaP precipitation process. The magnetic properties of the magnetite and wüstite formed in the CaP-based spheres were investigated by magnetization measurements. The present process and the resulting CaP-based spheres are expected to have great potential for biomedical applications.

  10. Gd-DTPA Adsorption on Chitosan/Magnetite Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pylypchuk, Ie. V.; Kołodyńska, D.; Kozioł, M.; Gorbyk, P. P.

    2016-03-01

    The synthesis of the chitosan/magnetite nanocomposites is presented. Composites were prepared by co-precipitation of iron(II) and iron(III) salts by aqueous ammonia in the 0.1 % chitosan solution. It was shown that magnetite synthesis in the chitosan medium does not affect the magnetite crystal structure. The thermal analysis data showed 4.6 % of mass concentration of chitosan in the hybrid chitosan/magnetite composite. In the concentration range of initial Gd-DTPA solution up to 0.4 mmol/L, addition of chitosan to magnetite increases the adsorption capacity and affinity to Gd-DTPA complex. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models were applied to describe adsorption processes. Nanocomposites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential thermal analysis (DTA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and specific surface area determination (ASAP) methods.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and anti-microbial activity of pure, Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped organic NLO l-arginine trifluoroacetate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanyaa, T.; Haris, M.; Jayaramakrishnan, V.; Amgalan, M.; Mathivanan, V.

    2013-10-01

    Optically transparent Cu2+ and Cd2+ doped l-arginine trifluoroacetate (LATF) single crystals were grown from its aqueous solution using the slow solvent evaporation technique. The grown crystals were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction to confirm the monoclinic crystal structure. The percentage of transmittance measured using the ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectrophotometer was found to be more than 80% for doped crystals. The functional group analysis of the grown crystals has been made by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis was performed for the grown crystals. An atomic absorption study was carried out to determine the presence of Cu2+ and Cd2+. The hardness of the grown crystals was assessed and the results show a significant variation in the hardness value between the pure and doped LATF crystals. The second harmonic generation measurements show that Cu2+ doped LATF is 2.8 times greater and Cd2+ doped is 2.6 times greater than KDP. The anti-bacterial and anti-fungal activities of the title compound were performed using the disc diffusion method against standard bacteria Escherichia coli, Xanthomonas oryzae and against the fungus Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus.

  12. Magnetite biomineralization in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L; Kobayashi-Kirschvink, A; Woodford, B J

    1992-08-15

    Although the mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is precipitated biochemically by bacteria, protists, and a variety of animals, it has not been documented previously in human tissue. Using an ultrasensitive superconducting magnetometer in a clean-lab environment, we have detected the presence of ferromagnetic material in a variety of tissues from the human brain. Magnetic particle extracts from solubilized brain tissues examined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and elemental analyses identify minerals in the magnetite-maghemite family, with many of the crystal morphologies and structures resembling strongly those precipitated by magnetotactic bacteria and fish. These magnetic and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements imply the presence of a minimum of 5 million single-domain crystals per gram for most tissues in the brain and greater than 100 million crystals per gram for pia and dura. Magnetic property data indicate the crystals are in clumps of between 50 and 100 particles. Biogenic magnetite in the human brain may account for high-field saturation effects observed in the T1 and T2 values of magnetic resonance imaging and, perhaps, for a variety of biological effects of low-frequency magnetic fields.

  13. VUV spectroscopy of nominally pure and rare-earth ions doped LiCaAIF6 single crystals as promising materials for 157 nm photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cefalas, Alkiviadis C.; Sarantopoulou, Evangelia; Kollia, Z.; Abdulsabirov, R. Y.; Korableva, S. L.; Naumov, A. K.; Semashko, V. V.; Kobe, S.; McGuiness, P. J.

    2002-07-01

    Recently it was found that birefringence is induced in CaF2 crystals when they are illuminated with laser light at 157 nm. Taking into consideration that CaF2 is the only optical material used in 157 nm photolithography today, the possibility to use new wide band gap fluoride crystals as optical elements for 157 nm photolithography, even those of non-cubic symmetry, should be considered. Additionally fluoride dielectric crystals with wide band gaps doped with trivalent rare-earth (RE) ions can be used as passive or active optical elements int eh VUV. For doped crystals, applications depend on the structure of the energy level pattern of the 4fn-15d electronic configuration and RE ion concentration. In this work we are exploiting the use of wide band gap fluoride dielectric crystals doped with RE ions. The laser induced fluorescence spectrum at 157 nm, and the absorption spectra of the LiCaAlF6 crystals, pure and doped with RE ions, were investigated in the VUV region of the spectrum. A new m4tehod for monitoring RE concentration in wide band gap fluoride crystals, that is based on vibrating sample magnetometer measurement is presented as well.

  14. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J M; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  15. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  16. Comments on recently published "L-threonine phthalate" and pure and doped "L-lysinium succinate" crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A. M.

    2016-04-01

    It is shown that the recently published papers on "L-threonine phthalate" (Theras et al. (2015) [2]) and pure and doped "L-lysinium succinate" (Kalaivani et al. (2015) [11,16]) misidentified the targeted compounds.

  17. Growth, optical and EPR properties of Li1.72Na0.28Ge4O9 single crystals pure and slightly doped with Cr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasik, Anna; Berkowski, Marek; Kaczmarek, Slawomir M.; Suchocki, Andrzej; Kaminska, Agata; Leniec, Grzegorz; Nowakowski, Piotr; Domukhovski, Viktor

    2012-04-01

    Single crystals of lithium-sodium-tetragermanate, a member of the solid solution series Li2-xNa x Ge4O9 with x=0.28, pure and slightly doped with Cr3+ ions (0.03 mol.% and 0.1 mol.%), were grown in ambient atmosphere by the Czochralski technique from stoichiometric melt. The crystals with dimensions up to 20 mm in diameter and 50 mm in length were obtained. The crystal structure has been determined by means of X-ray diffraction. Phase analysis and structural refinement of the Li1.72Na0.28Ge4O9 crystals were performed by X-ray powder diffraction using Ni-filtered Cu K α radiation with a Siemens D5000 diffractometer. The absorption, excitation and photoluminescence spectra of the crystals were measured in the UV-VIS and IR range at low temperatures. EPR investigations were performed using a conventional X-band Bruker ELEXSYS E 500 CW-spectrometer operating at 9.5 GHz with 100 kHz magnetic field modulation. Temperature and angular dependences of the EPR spectra of the crystal samples were recorded in the 3-300 K temperature range.

  18. Exsolution of Iron-Titanium Oxides in Magnetite in Miller Range (MIL) 03346 Nakhlite: Evidence for Post Crystallization Reduction in the Nakhlite Cumulate Pile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Righter, Kevin; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Christoffersen, R.

    2012-01-01

    MIL 03346 is one of the most mesostasis-rich nakhlites [1] and thought to have equilibrated at oxygen fugacities near the fayalite-magnetite-quartz oxygen (FMQ) buffer ([2,3]). Studies of FeTi oxides in nakhlites have led to additional constraints on their equilibration temperatures and fO2s [4,5,6,7]. Comparison of these results to fO2s calculated for shergottites indicates that nakhlites are among the most oxidized samples from the martian meteorite suite [2]. The mesostasis of MIL 03346 contains skeletal titanomagnetite. Several scientists noticed several years ago (e.g. [8]) that this titanomagnetite contains very fine oxidation-driven exsolution lamellae (Figure 1). However, the lamellae are so small that they cannot be characterized by electron microprobe analysis (EMPA). Here we select several areas for focused ion beam (FIB) extraction, prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) foils, and identify and analyze the lamellae using TEM at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The resulting analyses are combined with previous work on nakhlites to interpret the thermal and oxidation history of this meteorite group.

  19. Magnetite mineral nanoparticles synthesized naturally in an iron ore deposit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivas-Sanchez, M. L.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2013-05-01

    We performed a mineralogical characterization and mineral magnetism study of the Peña Colorada iron ore, Mexico. The ore is formed partly by intergranular magnetite intergrowed with berthierine (Fe,Mg,Al)6(Si,Al)4O10(OH)8. The magnetite nanoparticles are forming aggregates of wide grain size spectra, from micro to nanometer scale. The smallest aggregates are formed by magnetite nanoparticles 2 to 30 grain size range, showing unusual physical and chemical behavior. The continuous agglomeration of nanoparticles formed more denser and compact magnetite microparticles. A magnetite concentrate to micrometric scale was reduced and divided into distinct range sizes: 85-56 μm, 56-30 μm, 30-22 μm, 22-15 μm, 15-10 μm, 10-7 μm and 7-1 μm. Nanometric-scale magnetite 2-30 nm was identified by using high resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The magnetite and minerals associated were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmitted and reflected light polarization, microscope and electron probe X-ray micro-analyzer, differential thermal analysis, gravimetric thermal analysis, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Besides, results of Mössbauer spectroscopy, frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetization and magnetic susceptibility versus temperature were important in the research related to the origin of this deposit. To study magnetite nanoparticles, agglomeration processes and temperature effect implications, we developed an experimental process to re-create the environmental conditions that originated this nanoparticles. These processes start with direct precipitation to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles through a thermal and dehydration treatment of the berthierine base mineral, using diverse temperature ranges, from 360 °C to 750 °C and treatment time of two hours. This process allowed the nucleation and crystalline growth of a high number of magnetite nano-crystals with average size of 2 to 6 nm

  20. Bioinspired magnetite formation from a disordered ferrihydrite-derived precursor.

    PubMed

    Dey, Archan; Lenders, Jos J M; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-01-01

    We show that by reacting ferrihydrite (FeH) with Fe((II)) ions and subsequently increasing the pH, magnetite is formed through a multi-step nucleation process mediated by monodisperse FeH-Fe((II)) primary particles. The interaction of these primary particles with a transient green rust phase leads to the formation of smaller secondary particles which form the feedstock for magnetite formation. Surprisingly, the presence of a polypeptide additive prevents the formation of green rust as an Fe((II))-rich intermediate phase, and leads to the formation of amorphous aggregates of FeH-Fe((II)) particles which subsequently transform into the final magnetite nanocrystals. The observation of multiple transitions and the involvement of disordered precursor phases in this bioinspired crystallization route is important for our understanding of the nucleation of magnetite in geological and biological environments, and may lead to new approaches in the sustainable synthesis of this technologically important mineral.

  1. Synthesis, magnetic and ethanol gas sensing properties of semiconducting magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.; Al-Hazmi, Faten; Al-Tuwirqi, R. M.; Alnowaiser, F.; Al-Hartomy, Omar A.; El-Tantawy, Farid; Yakuphanoglu, F.

    2013-05-01

    The superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with an average size of 7 nm were synthesized using a rapid and facile microwave hydrothermal technique. The structure of the magnetite nanoparticles was characterized by X-ray diffraction (X-ray), field effect scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The prepared Fe3O4 was shown to have a cubic phase of pure magnetite. Magnetization hysteresis loop shows that the synthesized magnetite exhibits no hysteretic features with a superparamagnetic behavior. The ethanol gas sensing properties of the synthesized magnetite were investigated, and it was found that the responsibility time is less than 10 s with good reproducibility for ethanol sensor. Accordingly, it is evaluated that the magnetite nanoparticles can be effectively used as a solid state ethanol sensor in industrial commercial product applications.

  2. Nanophase Magnetite and Pyrrhotite in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite: Evidence for an Abiotic Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr. III; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2006-01-01

    The nanophase magnetite crystals in the black rims of pancake-shaped carbonate globules of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al.that they are biogenic in origin. A subpopulation of these magnetite crystals are reported to conform to a unique elongated shape called "truncated hexa-octahedral" or "THO" by Thomas-Keprta et al. They claim these THO magnetite crystals can only be produced by living bacteria thus forming a biomarker in the meteorite. In contrast, thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate has been suggested as an alternate hypothesis for the elongated magnetite formation in ALH84001 carbonates. The experimental and observational evidence for the inorganic formation of nanophase magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001 by decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate in the presence of pyrite are provided.

  3. Effect of cation trapping on thermal stability of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pati, S S; Philip, John

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the effect of sodium trapping on thermal stability of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The pure magnetite nanoparticles incubated in sodium hydroxide solutions and subsequently washed with water to remove the excess sodium. The amount of sodium in magnetite is measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. The size distribution obtained from Small angle X-ray scattering measurements show that particles are fairly monodisperse. The FTIR spectra of nanoparticles show transmission bands at 441 and 611 cm(-1) are due to the symmetric stretching vibrations (v) of Fe-O in octahedral and tetrahedral sites respectively. With 500 ppm of sodium ions (Na+) in magnetite, the cubic ferrite structure of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) to hexagonal hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) phase transition is enhanced by -150 degrees C in air. The Rietveld analysis of sodium doped magnetite nanoparticles show that above 99% of metastable gamma-Fe2O3 is converted to a thermodynamically stable alpha-Fe2O3 after air annealing at 700 degrees C. A decrease in enthalpy observed in doped magnetite unambiguously confirms that the activation energy for maghemite to hematite transition is increased due to the presence of trapped sodium ions. These results suggest that the trapped cations in ferrite nanoparticles can stabilize them by increasing the activation energy.

  4. Magnetite: What it reveals about the origin of the banded iron formations. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, D. E.; Mancinelli, R. L.; White, M. R.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetite, Fe3O4 is produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, magnetite is a late magmatic mineral and forms as a consequence of the cooling of iron rich magma. Biotically, magnetite is produced by several organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria. Hematite, Fe2O3, is also produced abiotically and biotically. Abiotically, hematite rarely occurs as a primary mineral in igneous rocks, but is common as an alteration product, fumarole deposit, and in some metamorphosed Fe-rich rocks. Biotically, hematite is produced by several types of microorganisms. Biologically-produced magnetite and hematite are formed under the control of the host organism, and consequently, have characteristics not found in abiotically produced magnetite and hematite crystals. To determine if the magnetite and hematite in the Banded Iron Formation was biologically or abiotically produced, the characteristics of biologically-produced magnetite and hematite (concentrated from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum) and abiotically-produced magnetite and hematite obtained from Wards Scientific Supply Company, were compared with characteristics of magnetite and hematite concentrated from the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation (Ontario, Canada) using thermal and crystallographic analytical techniques. Whole rock analysis of the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) revealed the presence of quartz, hematite, siderite and dolomite as the major minerals, and magnetite, greenalite, pyrite, pyrrhotite and apatite as the minor minerals. Analysis of a crude magnetic fraction of the Gunflint showed the minerals quartz, hematite, siderite, dolomite, and magnetite. Analysis of the crude magnetic fraction from Aquaspirillum magnetotacticum revealed organic compounds plus hematite and magnetite. The mineral identification and particle size distribution data obtained from the DTA along with XRD data indicate that the magnetite and hematite from the Gunflint

  5. Atmospheric ice crystals over complex terrain: Pure ice cloud conditions observed in CLACE2013 at Jungfraujoch, Switzerland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlenczek, Oliver; Fugal, Jacob P.; Bower, Keith N.; Crosier, Jonathan; Flynn, Michael J.; Henneberger, Jan; Krieger, Ulrich K.; Lloyd, Gary; Borrmann, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The CLACE2013 field campaign took place in January and February 2013 at the High Alpine Research Station, Jungfraujoch, in Switzerland. During this field campaign some events of atmospheric ice crystals in the absence of supercooled water droplets were observed. These included precipitation events from a cloud above and also ice crystals which likely formed in-situ under ice supersaturated conditions similar to "diamond-dust" events. From each event, approx. 1 hour of holographic measurements has been analysed (~1800 images with a 36x24x350 mm3 or ~0.3 L sample volume each). Ice crystals are detected and classified according to their shape to distinguish between different particle habit classes (e.g. columns and needles, plates, irregular crystals) and with this method, drifting snow and ice particles formed in-situ can be distinguished to a certain degree. The major axis length of detected ice particles varied between some tens of microns up to a few millimetres. Size distributions will be shown partitioned by crystal habit. Preliminary results show these ice particles appear similar to diamond dust events observed in Antarctica. For clarification of the meteorological conditions, we use the meteorological parameters from several instruments measured at the site as well as data from additional cloud hydrometeor probes and a ceilometer.

  6. Plagioclase-Hosted Magnetite Inclusions From the Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Scott, G. R.; Renne, P. R.; Wenk, H.

    2004-12-01

    Gabbros from the Main Zone of the 2.064 Ga Bushveld Complex have long been known to possess unusually stable magnetizations due to the presence of high coercivity, exsolved magnetite inclusions in plagioclase and clinopyroxene. The paleomagnetic pole for these rocks has been used to anchor apparent polar wander paths for the Kaapval craton during the Early-Mid Proterozoic. To better understand the rock magnetic properties of silicate-hosted magnetite inclusions, oriented paleomagnetic samples of gabbro were collected from quarries near Belfast and Rustenberg, South Africa, sampling the eastern and western limbs of the Complex, respectively. Plagioclase composition at both sites ranges from An55 (rims) to An65 (cores) based on optical and electron microprobe data. Four kinds of inclusions are present within the plagioclase: elongate magnetite needles, nanometer-scale magnetite particles (responsible for the "cloudy" appearance of some crystals), translucent brown hematite/ilmenite platelets, and colorless euhedral inclusions of pyroxene and/or feldspar. Magnetite inclusions are most abundant at the cores of the plagioclase crystals. Orientations of the needles and the platelets are crystallographically controlled by the silicate host. Although the elongation direction of the magnetite inclusions can occur in any of five possible orientations, only two or three of these directions dominates each plagioclase crystal. Alternating field demagnetization of bulk samples (NRM = 1.5 x 101 A m-1) shows univectorial remanence with average median destructive fields (MDF) of 115 mT (Belfast) and 90 mT (Rustenberg). AF demagnetization of single plagioclase crystals (NRM = 100 A m-1) also shows single component remanence with average MDFs >150 mT. The NRM coercivity spectra of single plagioclase crystals are indistinguishable from that of the bulk samples. When normalized to their abundance in bulk samples the magnetite-bearing plagioclase fully accounts for the NRM of Bushveld

  7. Experimental low-grade alteration of biogenic magnetite indicates microbial involvement in generation of banded iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Liang; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas; Hao, Xi-Luo

    2013-01-01

    During the deposition of banded iron formation (BIF), the downward flux of ferric oxyhydroxides and phytoplankton biomass should have facilitated Fe(III) reduction during burial, with the end product being ferrous iron-containing minerals including magnetite. Although earlier studies have attempted to quantify the significance of this pathway based on models of the ancient Fe cycle, the only direct evidences of a biological role in magnetite formation in BIF are their iron isotope compositions and unique crystallography which are reminiscent of biologically-generated magnetite. However, the biogenesis hypothesis lacks an explanation as to why modern biogenic magnetite crystals are generally a few hundred nm or smaller in size, yet the magnetite crystals in BIF are mostly tens of micrometers or larger in size. In this study, we demonstrate that biogenic magnetite crystals can grow in size upon reaction between oxyhydroxide and microbial biomass after compression and heating to 1 kbar and 150 °C, respectively. The magnetite crystals previously produced by Thermoanaerobacter spp. TOR39 reach sizes in excess of 700 nm after the P-T experiments, while new magnetite grains >400 nm formed from the superparamagnetic magnetite-dominated end product of Shewanella sp. culture. This study indicates that the large magnetite crystals observed in BIF can be derived through a three-stage sequence, beginning with dissimilatory iron reduction of an initial ferric iron-rich sediment coupled to the oxidation of dead phytoplankton biomass, followed by magnetite crystal aging, and ultimately pressure-temperature induced abiotic alteration of the biogenic magnetite during metamorphism.

  8. Magnetite morphology and life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Buseck, P R; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Devouard, B; Frankel, R B; McCartney, M R; Midgley, P A; Pósfai, M; Weyland, M

    2001-11-20

    Nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) in a meteorite from Mars provide the strongest, albeit controversial, evidence for the former presence of extraterrestrial life. The morphological and size resemblance of the crystals from meteorite ALH84001 to crystals formed by certain terrestrial bacteria has been used in support of the biological origin of the extraterrestrial minerals. By using tomographic and holographic methods in a transmission electron microscope, we show that the three-dimensional shapes of such nanocrystals can be defined, that the detailed morphologies of individual crystals from three bacterial strains differ, and that none uniquely match those reported from the Martian meteorite. In contrast to previous accounts, we argue that the existing crystallographic and morphological evidence is inadequate to support the inference of former life on Mars. PMID:11717421

  9. Magnetite morphology and life on Mars

    PubMed Central

    Buseck, Peter R.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Devouard, Bertrand; Frankel, Richard B.; McCartney, Martha R.; Midgley, Paul A.; Pósfai, Mihály; Weyland, Matthew

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) in a meteorite from Mars provide the strongest, albeit controversial, evidence for the former presence of extraterrestrial life. The morphological and size resemblance of the crystals from meteorite ALH84001 to crystals formed by certain terrestrial bacteria has been used in support of the biological origin of the extraterrestrial minerals. By using tomographic and holographic methods in a transmission electron microscope, we show that the three-dimensional shapes of such nanocrystals can be defined, that the detailed morphologies of individual crystals from three bacterial strains differ, and that none uniquely match those reported from the Martian meteorite. In contrast to previous accounts, we argue that the existing crystallographic and morphological evidence is inadequate to support the inference of former life on Mars. PMID:11717421

  10. Evidence for exclusively inorganic formation of magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Brearley, A. J.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Treiman, A. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Schwandt, C. S.; Lofgren, G. E.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetite crystals produced by terrestrial magnetotactic bacterium MV-1 are elongated on a [111] crystallographic axis, in a so-called truncated hexa-Octahedral shape. This morphology has been proposed to constitute a biomarker (i.e., formed only in biogenic processes). A subpopulation of magnetite crystals associated with carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 is reported to have this morphology, and the observation has been taken as evidence for biological activity on Mars. In this study, we present evidence for the exclusively inorganic origin of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals in ALH84001. We report three-dimensional(3-D) morphologies for approx.1000 magnetite crystals extracted from: (1) thermal decomposition products of Fe-rich carbonate produced by inorganic hydrothermal precipitation in laboratory experiments; (2) carbonate globules in Martian meteoriteeALH84001; and (3) cells of magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1. The 3-D morphologies were derived by fitting 3-D shape models to two-dimensional bright-field transmission-electron microscope (TEAM) images obtained at a series of viewing angles. The view down the {110} axes closest to the [111] elongation axis of magnetite crystals ([111]x{110) not equal to 0) provides a 2-D projection that uniquely discriminates among the three [111]-elongated magnetite morphologies found in these samples: [111]-elongated truncated hexaoctahedron ([111]-THO), [111]-elongated cubo-octahedron ([111]-ECO), and [111]-elongated simple octahedron ([111]-ESO). All [111] -elongated morphologies are present in the three types of sample, but in different proportions. In the ALH84001 Martian meteorite and in our inorganic laboratory products, the most common [111]-elongated magnetite crystal morphology is [111]-ECO. In contrast, the most common morphology for magnetotactic bacterial strain MV-1 is [111]-THO. These results show that: (1) the morphology of [111]-elongated magnetite crystals associated with the carbonate

  11. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant

    PubMed Central

    HE, Hongping; ZHONG, Yuanhong; LIANG, Xiaoliang; TAN, Wei; ZHU, Jianxi; Yan WANG, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature. PMID:25958854

  12. Natural Magnetite: an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminant.

    PubMed

    He, Hongping; Zhong, Yuanhong; Liang, Xiaoliang; Tan, Wei; Zhu, Jianxi; Wang, Christina Yan

    2015-01-01

    Iron (hydr)oxides are ubiquitous earth materials that have high adsorption capacities for toxic elements and degradation ability towards organic contaminants. Many studies have investigated the reactivity of synthetic magnetite, while little is known about natural magnetite. Here, we first report the reactivity of natural magnetites with a variety of elemental impurities for catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 to produce hydroxyl free radicals (•OH) and the consequent degradation of p-nitrophenol (p-NP). We observed that these natural magnetites show higher catalytic performance than that of the synthetic pure magnetite. The catalytic ability of natural magnetite with high phase purity depends on the surface site density while that for the magnetites with exsolutions relies on the mineralogical nature of the exsolved phases. The pleonaste exsolution can promote the generation of •OH and the consequent degradation of p-NP; the ilmenite exsolution has little effect on the decomposition of H2O2, but can increase the adsorption of p-NP on magnetite. Our results imply that natural magnetite is an efficient catalyst for the degradation of organic contaminants in nature.

  13. Iron isotopic fractionation factor between magnetite and hydrous silicic melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2006-12-01

    analysis of pure melt and the magnetite-melt mush with knowledge of the modes providing the ability to back out the fractionation factor. If we can prove attainment of equilibrium, this technique will bypass the difficulty of making pure separates of magnetite and melt. Fe isotopic composition of the melt and melt-magnetite layers will be measured by MC-ICP-MS.

  14. Low-temperature creation of Frenkel defects via hot electron-hole recombination in highly pure NaCl single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushchik, A.; Lushchik, Ch.; Nagirnyi, V.; Shablonin, E.; Vasil'chenko, E.

    2016-07-01

    The creation spectrum of stable F centres (being part of F-H pairs of Frenkel defects) by synchrotron radiation of 7-40 eV has been measured for highly pure NaCl single crystals at 12 K using a highly sensitive luminescent method. It is shown that the efficiency of F centre creation in a closely packed NaCl is low at the decay of anion or cation excitons (7.8-8.4 and 33.4 eV, respectively) or at the recombination of relaxed conduction electrons and valence holes. Only the recombination of nonrelaxed (hot) electrons with holes provides the energy exceeding threshold value EFD, which is sufficient for the creation of Frenkel defects at low temperature.

  15. Crystal Plasticity Analysis of Texture Evolution of Pure Aluminum During Processing by a New Severe Plastic Deformation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khajezade, Ali; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi; Mirzadeh, Hamed

    2016-02-01

    Texture evolution in a newly developed severe plastic deformation technique, named multi-axial incremental forging and shearing (MAIFS), was studied applying the visco-plastic self-consistent crystal plasticity formulation by consideration of macroscopic deformation history. The simulated texture evolutions revealed that although shear-like texture had developed by the MAIFS process, texture components rotated around normal to mid-plane section. This could be ascribed to the complex deformation history that naturally develops during processing by the MAIFS process. The increased complexity of the deformation history in the MAIFS process, compared to the techniques that are solely based on the simple shear deformation, causes more activated slip planes, which in turn can result in an enhanced grain refinement ability of this processing technique.

  16. Magnetite: from synthesis to applications.

    PubMed

    Unsoy, Gozde; Gunduz, Ufuk; Oprea, Ovidiu; Ficai, Denisa; Sonmez, Maria; Radulescu, Marius; Alexie, Mihaela; Ficai, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In this review the synthesis, functionalization and some applications of magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were highlighted. It is our intention to highlight the correlations between the synthesis routes, related synthesis parameters, functionalization strategies and the properties expected for the materials containing MNPs. The uses of MNPs are strongly influenced by the properties of the materials. Therefore this review is trying to discuss the applications of the magnetite and magnetite based nanomaterials by taking into account all the factors that can influence the properties of the final materials and consequently their potential applications. PMID:25877083

  17. Mechanical properties of natural chitosan/hydroxyapatite/magnetite nanocomposites for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Fatemeh; Razavi, Mehdi; E Bahrololoom, Mohammad; Bazargan-Lari, Reza; Vashaee, Daryoosh; Kotturi, Hari; Tayebi, Lobat

    2016-08-01

    Chitosan (CS), hydroxyapatite (HA), and magnetite (Fe3O4) have been broadly employed for bone treatment applications. Having a hybrid biomaterial composed of the aforementioned constituents not only accumulates the useful characteristics of each component, but also provides outstanding composite properties. In the present research, mechanical properties of pure CS, CS/HA, CS/HA/magnetite, and CS/magnetite were evaluated by the measurements of bending strength, elastic modulus, compressive strength and hardness values. Moreover, the morphology of the bending fracture surfaces were characterized using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an image analyzer. Studies were also conducted to examine the biological response of the human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs) on different composites. We conclude that, although all of these composites possess in-vitro biocompatibility, adding hydroxyapatite and magnetite to the chitosan matrix can noticeably enhance the mechanical properties of the pure chitosan.

  18. Synthesis of stabilized myrrh-capped hydrocolloidal magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2014-01-01

    Herein we report a new method for synthesizing stabilized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) colloids. A new class of monodisperse water-soluble magnetite nano-particles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The ferrous and ferric ions were hydrolyzed at low temperature at pH 9 in the presence of iodine to produce iron oxide nanoparticles. The natural product myrrh gum was used as capping agent to produce highly dispersed coated magnetite nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogel was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to examine the crystal structure of the produced magnetite nanoparticles. PMID:25090117

  19. Synthesis of stabilized myrrh-capped hydrocolloidal magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2014-07-31

    Herein we report a new method for synthesizing stabilized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) colloids. A new class of monodisperse water-soluble magnetite nano-particles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The ferrous and ferric ions were hydrolyzed at low temperature at pH 9 in the presence of iodine to produce iron oxide nanoparticles. The natural product myrrh gum was used as capping agent to produce highly dispersed coated magnetite nanoparticles. The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogel was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to examine the crystal structure of the produced magnetite nanoparticles.

  20. Microwave absorption by magnetite: a possible mechanism for coupling nonthermal levels of radiation to biological systems.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L

    1996-01-01

    The presence of trace amounts of biogenic magnetite (Fe3O4) in animal and human tissues and the observation that ferromagnetic particles are ubiquitous in laboratory materials (including tissue culture media) provide a physical mechanism through which microwave radiation might produce or appear to produce biological effects. Magnetite is an excellent absorber of microwave radiation at frequencies between 0.5 and 10.0 GHz through the process of ferromagnetic resonance, where the magnetic vector of the incident field causes precession of Bohr magnetons around the internal demagnetizing field of the crystal. Energy absorbed by this process is first transduced into acoustic vibrations at the microwave carrier frequency within the crystal lattice via the magnetoacoustic effect; then, the energy should be dissipated in cellular structures in close proximity to the magnetite crystals. Several possible methods for testing this hypothesis experimentally are discussed. Studies of microwave dosimetry at the cellular level should consider effects of biogenic magnetite.

  1. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D; Kopp, Robert E; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V; Sears, S Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-11-18

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 microm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 microm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability--a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming--drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes.

  2. Gigantism in unique biogenic magnetite at the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Dirk; Raub, Timothy D.; Kopp, Robert E.; Guerquin-Kern, Jean-Luc; Wu, Ting-Di; Rouiller, Isabelle; Smirnov, Aleksey V.; Sears, S. Kelly; Lücken, Uwe; Tikoo, Sonia M.; Hesse, Reinhard; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2008-01-01

    We report the discovery of exceptionally large biogenic magnetite crystals in clay-rich sediments spanning the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) in a borehole at Ancora, NJ. Aside from previously described abundant bacterial magnetofossils, electron microscopy reveals novel spearhead-like and spindle-like magnetite up to 4 μm long and hexaoctahedral prisms up to 1.4 μm long. Similar to magnetite produced by magnetotactic bacteria, these single-crystal particles exhibit chemical composition, lattice perfection, and oxygen isotopes consistent with an aquatic origin. Electron holography indicates single-domain magnetization despite their large crystal size. We suggest that the development of a thick suboxic zone with high iron bioavailability—a product of dramatic changes in weathering and sedimentation patterns driven by severe global warming—drove diversification of magnetite-forming organisms, likely including eukaryotes. PMID:18936486

  3. The transformation of magnetite to hematite and its influence on the rheology of iron oxide rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Barbosa, Paola; Goncalves, Fabio; Rodrigues, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    Phase transformation is an important process for strain localization after the initiation of ductile shear zones. In polyphase aggregates one important aspect to consider is likely to be the interconnectivity of weak phase after the transformation of the load-bearing framework grains. However the physical processes involved in that transition is not well understood, partially because the microstructures of the initial weakening are generally obliterated by subsequent deformation. Iron oxide-quartz rocks from paleoproterozoic Iron Formations in southern Brazil preserve microstructures that allow a good insight into the evolution of the deformation mechanisms and fabrics during the transition from a load-bearing framework (magnetite) to an interconnected weak phase (hematite). We conducted microstructural and textural analyses of aggregates of magnetite and hematite combining observations in an optical microscope and measurements in the electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD). The samples were cut parallel to the mineral lineation (the X-axis) and perpendicular to the foliation. Our goal was to understand the evolution of fabric and texture of the iron oxide aggregates caused by the change in deformation behavior resulting from the phase transformation. The studied samples consist mainly of aggregates of magnetite and hematite in a varied proportions. Samples that preserve the early microstructures consist in aggregate of magnetite grains of varied sizes. The grains are partially transformed to hematite along {111} planes but no foliation is observed in the samples. Basically the samples consist of grains of irregular shapes and a weak or absent crystallographic preferred orientation. The newly transformed hematite crystals share the (0001) planes and directions <11-20> with planes {111} and directions <110> of magnetite grains. Other samples present relicts of initial magnetite grains surrounded by a matrix of tabular to platy hematite crystals. The matrix show a

  4. Magnetite compositions and oxygen fugacities of the Khibina magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabchikov, Igor D.; Kogarko, L. N.

    2006-10-01

    Most titanomagnetite in the Khibina alkaline igneous complex, sampled through 500 m of a vertical cross-section, is represented by Ti-rich varieties. The ulvöspinel component is most commonly around 55 mol%, rarely reaching up to 80 mol%. We calculated an fO 2- T diagram for magnetite + ilmenite + titanite + clinopyroxene + nepheline + alkali feldspar and magnetite + titanite+ clinopyroxene + nepheline + alkali feldspar phase assemblages at a hedenbergite activity of 0.2. The diagram shows that magnetites with 55 mol% of ulvöspinel crystallized at oxygen fugacities just slightly below the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer. More Ti-rich varieties crystallized at higher temperatures and slightly lower ΔQMF values, whereas more Ti-poor magnetites crystallized at or below about 650 °C. Under the redox conditions estimated for the apatite-bearing intrusion of the Khibina complex (close to the QFM buffer), substantial quantities of methane may only form during cooling below 400 °C in equilibrium with magma. However, even at higher orthomagmatic temperatures and redox conditions corresponding to ΔQMF = 0, the hydrogen content in the early magmatic stage is not negligible. This hydrogen present in the gas phase at magmatic temperatures may migrate to colder parts of a solidifying magma chamber and trigger Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions there. We propose therefore, that methane in peralkaline systems may form in three distinct stages: orthomagmatic and late-magmatic in equilibrium with a melt and — due to Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions — post-magmatic in equilibrium with a local mineral assemblage.

  5. Incorporation and retention of 99-Tc(IV) in magnetite under high pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Timothy A; Morris, Katherine; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Bots, Pieter; Parry, Stephen A; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-10-21

    Technetium incorporation into magnetite and its behavior during subsequent oxidation has been investigated at high pH to determine the technetium retention mechanism(s) on formation and oxidative perturbation of magnetite in systems relevant to radioactive waste disposal. Ferrihydrite was exposed to Tc(VII)(aq) containing cement leachates (pH 10.5-13.1), and crystallization of magnetite was induced via addition of Fe(II)aq. A combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), chemical extraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques provided direct evidence that Tc(VII) was reduced and incorporated into the magnetite structure. Subsequent air oxidation of the magnetite particles for up to 152 days resulted in only limited remobilization of the incorporated Tc(IV). Analysis of both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data indicated that the Tc(IV) was predominantly incorporated into the magnetite octahedral site in all systems studied. On reoxidation in air, the incorporated Tc(IV) was recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution with less than 40% remobilization to solution despite significant oxidation of the magnetite to maghemite/goethite: All solid associated Tc remained as Tc(IV). The results of this study provide the first direct evidence for significant Tc(IV) incorporation into the magnetite structure and confirm that magnetite incorporated Tc(IV) is recalcitrant to oxidative dissolution. Immobilization of Tc(VII) by reduction and incorporation into magnetite at high pH and with significant stability upon reoxidation has clear and important implications for limiting technetium migration under conditions where magnetite is formed including in geological disposal of radioactive wastes. PMID:25236360

  6. Intermediate magnetite formation during dehydration of goethite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özdemir, Özden; Dunlop, David J.

    2000-04-01

    The dehydration of goethite has been studied by low-temperature induced magnetization (LTIM) and X-ray diffraction on well-characterized acicular crystals. Fresh samples were heated in air to temperatures between 155°C and 610°C. Goethite and hematite were the magnetically dominant phases after all runs except 500°C and 610°C, for which only hematite was found. However, partially dehydrated goethites after the 238-402°C runs had broad peaks or inflections in the LTIM curves around 120 K, suggesting the formation of an intermediate spinel phase. These samples were next given a saturation remanence in a field of 2 T at 10 K and the remanence was measured continuously during zero-field warming to 300 K. There was a decrease in remanence at the Verwey transition (120 K), diagnostic of magnetite. The possible formation of a small amount of magnetite is of serious concern in studies of goethite-bearing sediments and rocks. Chemical remanent magnetization (CRM) of this strongly magnetic spinel phase could significantly modify the direction as well as the intensity of the original goethite CRM. As well, it would be a new source of paleomagnetic noise as far as primary remanence carried by other mineral phases is concerned.

  7. Hydrogen-bond-dynamics-based switching of conductivity and magnetism: a phase transition caused by deuterium and electron transfer in a hydrogen-bonded purely organic conductor crystal.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akira; Yamada, Shota; Isono, Takayuki; Kamo, Hiromichi; Nakao, Akiko; Kumai, Reiji; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Nishio, Yutaka; Mori, Hatsumi

    2014-08-27

    A hydrogen bond (H-bond) is one of the most fundamental and important noncovalent interactions in chemistry, biology, physics, and all other molecular sciences. Especially, the dynamics of a proton or a hydrogen atom in the H-bond has attracted increasing attention, because it plays a crucial role in (bio)chemical reactions and some physical properties, such as dielectricity and proton conductivity. Here we report unprecedented H-bond-dynamics-based switching of electrical conductivity and magnetism in a H-bonded purely organic conductor crystal, κ-D3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-D). This novel crystal κ-D, a deuterated analogue of κ-H3(Cat-EDT-TTF)2 (abbreviated as κ-H), is composed only of a H-bonded molecular unit, in which two crystallographically equivalent catechol-fused ethylenedithiotetrathiafulvalene (Cat-EDT-TTF) skeletons with a +0.5 charge are linked by a symmetric anionic [O···D···O](-1)-type strong H-bond. Although the deuterated and parent hydrogen systems, κ-D and κ-H, are isostructural paramagnetic semiconductors with a dimer-Mott-type electronic structure at room temperature (space group: C2/c), only κ-D undergoes a phase transition at 185 K, to change to a nonmagnetic insulator with a charge-ordered electronic structure (space group: P1). The X-ray crystal structure analysis demonstrates that this dramatic switching of the electronic structure and physical properties originates from deuterium transfer or displacement within the H-bond accompanied by electron transfer between the Cat-EDT-TTF π-systems, proving that the H-bonded deuterium dynamics and the conducting TTF π-electron are cooperatively coupled. Furthermore, the reason why this unique phase transition occurs only in κ-D is qualitatively discussed in terms of the H/D isotope effect on the H-bond geometry and potential energy curve.

  8. Core Amino Acid Residues in the Morphology-Regulating Protein, Mms6, for Intracellular Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Narumiya, Kaori; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms produce finely tuned biomineral architectures with the aid of biomineral-associated proteins. The functional amino acid residues in these proteins have been previously identified using in vitro and in silico experimentation in different biomineralization systems. However, the investigation in living organisms is limited owing to the difficulty in establishing appropriate genetic techniques. Mms6 protein, isolated from the surface of magnetite crystals synthesized in magnetotactic bacteria, was shown to play a key role in the regulation of crystal morphology. In this study, we have demonstrated a defect in the specific region or substituted acidic amino acid residues in the Mms6 protein for observing their effect on magnetite biomineralization in vivo. Analysis of the gene deletion mutants and transformants of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 expressing partially truncated Mms6 protein revealed that deletions in the N-terminal or C-terminal regions disrupted proper protein localization to the magnetite surface, resulting in a change in the crystal morphology. Moreover, single amino acid substitutions at Asp123, Glu124, or Glu125 in the C-terminal region of Mms6 clearly indicated that these amino acid residues had a direct impact on magnetite crystal morphology. Thus, these consecutive acidic amino acid residues were found to be core residues regulating magnetite crystal morphology. PMID:27759096

  9. Structural insight into magnetochrome-mediated magnetite biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siponen, Marina I.; Legrand, Pierre; Widdrat, Marc; Jones, Stephanie R.; Zhang, Wei-Jia; Chang, Michelle C. Y.; Faivre, Damien; Arnoux, Pascal; Pignol, David

    2013-10-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria align along the Earth's magnetic field using an organelle called the magnetosome, a biomineralized magnetite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2O4) or greigite (Fe(II)Fe(III)2S4) crystal embedded in a lipid vesicle. Although the need for both iron(II) and iron(III) is clear, little is known about the biological mechanisms controlling their ratio. Here we present the structure of the magnetosome-associated protein MamP and find that it is built on a unique arrangement of a self-plugged PDZ domain fused to two magnetochrome domains, defining a new class of c-type cytochrome exclusively found in magnetotactic bacteria. Mutational analysis, enzyme kinetics, co-crystallization with iron(II) and an in vitro MamP-assisted magnetite production assay establish MamP as an iron oxidase that contributes to the formation of iron(III) ferrihydrite eventually required for magnetite crystal growth in vivo. These results demonstrate the molecular mechanisms of iron management taking place inside the magnetosome and highlight the role of magnetochrome in iron biomineralization.

  10. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Jiang, Weilin; Qiang, You; Burks, Edward; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; Mccloy, John S.

    2014-11-03

    Iron oxide films were deposited onto Si substrates using ion-beam-assisted deposition. The films were ~300 nm thick polycrystalline magnetite with an average crystallite size of ~6 nm. Additionally, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite. However, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction both indicate that the films are single-phase magnetite. Since no direct evidence of a second phase could be found, exchange bias likely arises due to defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples have such small grains, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field. The high energy deposition process results in an oxygen-rich, argon-containing magnetite film with low temperature exchange bias due to defects at the high concentration of grain boundaries.

  11. Magnetite and Magnetotaxis in Algae

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo, F. F. Torres; Pires, M. A.; Frankel, R. B.; Bicudo, C. E. M.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetotactic algae of the genus Anisonema (Euglenophyceae) have been isolated from a coastal mangrove swamp in northeastern Brazil. The magnetotactic response is based on a permanent magnetic dipole moment per cell ∼7 10-10 emu. Each cell contains many magnetite (Fe3O4) particles organized in chains. ImagesFIGURE 2FIGURE 1FIGURE 3 PMID:19431684

  12. Some Properties of Magnetite Nanoparticles Produced Under Different Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Umar Saeed; Khattak, Nazir Shah; Manan, Abdul; Rahman, Aminur; Khan, Faridullah; Rahim, Abdur

    2015-01-01

    Temperature, stirring rate, stirring time, reaction pH, and concentration of precursors during synthesis were found to be crucial in determining the size of the magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) obtained. The relationship between synthetic conditions and the crystal structure, particle size, and size distribution of the NPs was studied. Surface coating of iron oxide NPs was performed in two steps. Magnetite NPs were prepared by coprecipitation then coated with silica by use of a sol-gel process. Saturation magnetization of the magnetite NPs increased from 47.23 to 49.12 emu/g when their size was increased from 8.89 to 9.39 nm. Magnetite NPs in the size range 11-12 nm, coated with silica, are monodispersed and their corresponding saturation magnetization is 40.67 emu/g (11 nm) and 34.65 emu/g (12 nm). The decrease in the saturation magnetization of the coated samples is attributed to the increase in the amount of tetraethyl orthosilicate.

  13. Polyaniline stabilized magnetite nanoparticle reinforced epoxy nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hongbo; Tadakamalla, Sruthi; Huang, Yudong; Colorado, Henry A; Luo, Zhiping; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2012-10-24

    Magnetic epoxy polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) reinforced with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been prepared at different particle loading levels. The particle surface functionality tuned by conductive polyaniline (PANI) is achieved via a surface initiated polymerization (SIP) approach. The effects of nanoparticle loading, surface functionality, and temperature on both the viscosity and storage/loss modulus of liquid epoxy resin suspensions and the physicochemical properties of the cured solid PNCs are systematically investigated. The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of the cured epoxy filled with the functionalized NPs has shifted to the higher temperature in the dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) compared with that of the cured pure epoxy. Enhanced mechanical properties of the cured epoxy PNCs filled with the functionalized NPs are observed in the tensile test compared with that of the cured pure epoxy and cured epoxy PNCs filled with as-received NPs. The uniform NP distribution in the cured epoxy PNCs filled with functionalized NPs is observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). These magnetic epoxy PNCs show the good magnetic properties and can be attached by a permanent magnet. Enhanced interfacial interaction between NPs and epoxy is revealed in the fracture surface analysis. The PNCs formation mechanism is also interpreted from the comprehensive analysis based on the TGA, DSC, and FTIR in this work.

  14. Magnetism of Al-substituted magnetite reduced from Al-hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Zhao, Xiang; Roberts, Andrew P.; Heslop, David; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2016-06-01

    Aluminum-substituted magnetite (Al-magnetite) reduced from Al-substituted hematite or goethite (Al-hematite or Al-goethite) is an environmentally important constituent of magnetically enhanced soils. In order to characterize the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite, two series of Al-magnetite samples were synthesized through reduction of Al-hematite by a mixed gas (80% CO2 and 20% CO) at 395°C for 72 h in a quartz tube furnace. Al-magnetite samples inherited the morphology of their parent Al-hematite samples, but only those transformed from Al-hematite synthesized at low temperature possessed surficial micropores, which originated from the release of structural water during heating. Surface micropores could thus serve as a practical fingerprint of fire or other high-temperature mineralogical alteration processes in natural environments, e.g., shear friction in seismic zones. In addition, Al substitution greatly affects the magnetic properties of Al-magnetite. For example, coercivity (Bc) increases with increasing Al content and then decreases slightly, while the saturation magnetization (Ms), Curie temperature (Tc), and Verwey transition temperature (Tv) all decrease with increasing Al content due to crystal defect formation and dilution of magnetic ions caused by Al incorporation. Moreover, different trends in the correlation between Tc and Bc can be used to discriminate titanomagnetite from Al-magnetite, which is likely to be important in environmental and paleomagnetic studies, particularly in soil.

  15. A facile approach to enhance the high temperature stability of magnetite nanoparticles with improved magnetic property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, S. S.; Philip, John

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of Zn2+ doping on crystal structure, magnetic properties, blocking and Curie temperatures, and the high temperature phase stability of magnetite nanoparticles under air and vacuum annealing. The Zn2+ doped nanoparticles (ZnxFe3-xO4 with x = 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6) are prepared by simple co-precipitation technique and are characterized by high temperature X-ray powder diffraction (HTXRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, small angle X-ray scattering, thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy. Our HTXRD studies show that the decomposition temperature of pure magnetite (Fe3O4) in vacuum is increased by 300 °C (from 700 to 1000 °C), with 0.2 fraction of Zn2+ doping. The DSC studies under air environment also show that the γ-Fe2O3 to α-Fe2O3 phase transition temperature increases with the zinc fraction. The increase in transition temperature is attributed to the increase in the activation energy of the maghemite to hematite phase transition after the replacement of Fe3+ with larger diameter Zn2+ in the A site. Interestingly, the saturation magnetization increases from 61 to 69 emu/g upon 0.2 fraction of Zn2+, which augments the utility of the doped compound for practical applications. While the Curie temperature is found to increase with doping concentration, the blocking temperature shows an opposite trend. The blocking temperature values were found to be 262, 196, 144, and 153 K for 0, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 fraction of zinc, respectively. The reduction in TB is attributed to weak dipole-dipole interactions and local exchange coupling between nanoparticles. All the Zn2+ doped samples show superparamagnetic nature. These findings are extremely useful in producing superparamagnetic nanoparticles with enhanced magnetic properties for high temperature applications.

  16. Biophysics of Magnetic Orientation: Radical Pairs, Biogenic Magnetite, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joe

    2011-03-01

    Two major biophysical mechanisms for magnetoreception in terrestrial animals, one based on biogenic magnetite and another on radical-pair biochemical reactions, have been the subject of experiment and debate for the past 30 years. The magnetite hypothesis has stood the test of time: biogenic magnetite is synthesized biochemically in Bacteria, Protists, and numerous Animal phyla, as well as in some plants. Chains of single-domain crystals have been detected by clean-lab based SQUID magnetometry in animal tissues in all major phyla, followed by high-resolution TEM in selected model organisms, as well as by electrophysiological studies demonstrating the role of the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve in the magnetoreceptive process. Pulse-remagnetization - configured to uniquely flip the polarity of single-domain ferromagnets - has dramatic effects on the behavior of many birds, honeybees, mole rats, turtles, and bats, to cite a growing list. Magnetite-containing cells in the vicinity of these neurons in fish are now the subject of intense study by our consortium. The existence of a specialized class of magnetite-containing magnetoreceptor cells in animal tissues is no longer controversial. In contrast, less success has been achieved in gaining experimental support across a range of taxa for the radical-pair hypothesis. Although this mechanism was proposed to explain an early observation that birds would not respond to complete inversion of the magnetic vector, many organisms (even some birds) do indeed respond to the field polarity. We also note that few, if any, of these critical experiments have been done using fully double-blind methods. This is joint work with: M. M. Walker (University of Auckland, New Zealand) and M. Winklhofer (LMU Munich, Germany).

  17. Magnetite-Based Magnetoreceptor Cells in the Olfactory Organ of Rainbow Trout and Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Cadiou, H.; Dixson, A. D.; Eder, S.; Kobayashi, A.; McNaughton, P. A.; Muhamad, A. N.; Raub, T. D.; Walker, M. M.; Winklhofer, M.; Yuen, B. B.

    2011-12-01

    Many vertebrate and invertebrate animals have a geomagnetic sensory system, but the biophysics and anatomy of how magnetic stimuli are transduced to the nervous system is a challenging problem. Previous work in our laboratories identified single-domain magnetite chains in olfactory epithelium in cells proximal to the ros V nerve, which, in rainbow trout, responds to magnetic fields. Our objectives are to characterize these magnetite-containing cells and determine whether they form part of the mechanism of magnetic field transduction in teleost fishes, as a model for other Vertebrates. Using a combination of reflection mode confocal microscopy and a Prussian Blue technique modified to stain specifically for magnetite, our Auckland group estimated that both juvenile rainbow trout (ca. 7 cm total length) olfactory rosettes have ~200 magnetite-containing cells. The magnetite present in two types of cells within the olfactory epithelium appears to be arranged in intracellular chains. All of our groups (Munich, Auckland, Cambridge and Caltech) have obtained different types of structural evidence that magnetite chains closely associate with the plasma membrane in the cells, even in disaggregated tissues. In addition, our Cambridge group used Ca2+ imaging to demonstrate a clear response by individual magnetite-containing cells to a step change in the intensity of the external magnetic field and a slow change in Ca2+ activity when the external magnetic field was cancelled. In the teleost, zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small (~4 cm adult length in captivity) genetic and developmental biology model organism, our Caltech group detected ferromagnetic material throughout the body, but concentrated in the rostral trunk, using NRM and IRM scans of whole adults. Our analysis suggests greater than one million, 80-100 nm crystals, with Lowrie-Fuller curves strongly consistent with single-domain magnetite in 100-100,000 magnetocytes. Ferromagentic resonance (FMR) spectra show crystals

  18. Magnetite-apatite mineralization in Khanlogh iron deposit, northwest of Neyshaboor, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafzadeh Tehrani, Parvin; Asghar Calagari, Ali; Velasco Roldan, Francisco; Simmonds, Vartan; Siahcheshm, Kamal

    2016-04-01

    Khanlogh iron deposit lies on Sabzehvar-Ghoochan Cenozoic magmatic belt in northwest of Neyshaboor, NE Iran. The lithologic units in this area include a series of sub-volcanic intrusive rocks like diorite porphyry, quartz-diorite porphyry, and micro-granodiorite of Oligocene age. Mineralization in this area occurred as veins, dissemination, and open space filling in brecciated zones within the host sub-volcanic intrusive bodies. Three distinct types of mineral associations can be distinguished, (1) diopside-magnetite, (2) magnetite-apatite, and (3) apatite-calcite. Microscopic examinations along with SEM and EPMA studies demonstrated that magnetite is the most common ore mineral occurring as solitary crystals. The euhedral magnetite crystals are accompanied by lamellar destabilized ilmenite and granular fluorapatite in magnetite-apatite ores. The results of EPMA revealed that the lamellar ilmenite, relative to host magnetite crystal, is notably enriched in MgO and MnO (average of 3.3 and 2.6 wt%, respectively; n=5), whereas magnetite is slighter enriched in Ti (TiO2 around 1.8 wt%) being average of MgO, MnO and V2O3 of 0.6wt%, 0.2wt%, and 0.6 wt% (respectively; n=20). Minerals such as chlorapatite, calcite, and chalcedony are also present in the magnetite-apatite ores. The samples from apatite-calcite ores contain coarse crystals of apatite and rhomboedral calcite. The plot of the EPMA data of Khanlogh iron ore samples on diagram of TiO2-V2O5 (Hou et al, 2011) illustrated that the data points lies between the well-known Kiruna and El Laco (Chile) iron deposits. The magnetite crystals in the sub-volcanic host rocks were possibly formed by immiscible iron oxide fluids during magmatic stage. However, the magnetite and apatite existing in the veins and breccia zones may have developed by high temperature hydrothermal fluids. Studies done by Purtov and Kotelnikova (1993) proved that the proportion of Ti in magnetite is related to fluoride complex in the hydrothermal

  19. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostka, J. E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis.

  20. Dissolution and reduction of magnetite by bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kostka, J E; Nealson, K H

    1995-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is an iron oxide of mixed oxidation state [Fe(II), Fe(III)] that contributes largely to geomagnetism and plays a significant role in diagenesis in marine and freshwater sediments. Magnetic data are the primary evidence for ocean floor spreading and accurate interpretation of the sedimentary magnetic record depends on an understanding of the conditions under which magnetite is stable. Though chemical reduction of magnetite by dissolved sulfide is well known, biological reduction has not been considered likely based upon thermodynamic considerations. This study shows that marine and freshwater strains of the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens are capable of the rapid dissolution and reduction of magnetite, converting millimolar amounts to soluble Fe(II)in a few days at room temperature. Conditions under which magnetite reduction is optimal (pH 5-6, 22-37 degrees C) are consistent with an enzymatic process and not with simple chemical reduction. Magnetite reduction requires viable cells and cell contact, and it appears to be coupled to electron transport and growth. In a minimal medium with formate or lactate as the electron donor, more than 10 times the amount of magnetite was reduced over no carbon controls. These data suggest that magnetite reduction is coupled to carbon metabolism in S. putrefaciens. Bacterial reduction rates of magnetite are of the same order of magnitude as those estimated for reduction by sulfide. If such remobilization of magnetite occurs in nature, it could have a major impact on sediment magnetism and diagenesis. PMID:11539843

  1. Thermal treatment of magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wykowska, Urszula; Satula, Dariusz; Nordblad, Per

    2015-01-01

    Summary This paper presents the results of a thermal treatment process for magnetite nanoparticles in the temperature range of 50–500 °C. The tested magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized using three different methods that resulted in nanoparticles with different surface characteristics and crystallinity, which in turn, was reflected in their thermal durability. The particles were obtained by coprecipitation from Fe chlorides and decomposition of an Fe(acac)3 complex with and without a core–shell structure. Three types of ferrite nanoparticles were produced and their thermal stability properties were compared. In this study, two sets of unmodified magnetite nanoparticles were used where crystallinity was as determinant of the series. For the third type of particles, a Ag shell was added. By comparing the coated and uncoated particles, the influence of the metallic layer on the thermal stability of the nanoparticles was tested. Before and after heat treatment, the nanoparticles were examined using transmission electron microscopy, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Based on the obtained results, it was observed that the fabrication methods determine, to some extent, the sensitivity of the nanoparticles to external factors. PMID:26199842

  2. Formation of Magnetite Nanoparticles at Low Temperature: From Superparamagnetic to Stable Single Domain Particles

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Jens; Bertinetti, Luca; Widdrat, Marc; Hirt, Ann M.; Faivre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The room temperature co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric iron under alkaline conditions typically yields superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles below a size of 20 nm. We show that at pH  =  9 this method can be tuned to grow larger particles with single stable domain magnetic (> 20–30 nm) or even multi-domain behavior (> 80 nm). The crystal growth kinetics resembles surprisingly observations of magnetite crystal formation in magnetotactic bacteria. The physicochemical parameters required for mineralization in these organisms are unknown, therefore this study provides insight into which conditions could possibly prevail in the biomineralizing vesicle compartments (magnetosomes) of these bacteria. PMID:23520462

  3. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    SciTech Connect

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-10-15

    and recrystallised as goethite. The {gamma}-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure substoichiometric nanosize magnetite particles of about 25 nm in size and with the stoichiometry of Fe{sub 2.83}O{sub 4}.

  4. Sonochemical coating of magnetite nanoparticles with silica.

    PubMed

    Dang, Feng; Enomoto, Naoya; Hojo, Junichi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were coated with silica through the hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under ultrasonic irradiation. The ultrasonic irradiation was used to prevent the agglomeration of the magnetite particles and accelerate the hydrolysis and condensation of TEOS. TEM, DLS, XRF, VSM, TG and sedimentation test were used to characterize the silica-coated magnetite particles. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles in aqueous solution was improved significantly and the agglomerate particle size was decreased to 110 nm. It was found that the agglomerate particle size of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the coating temperature and the pH value in the silica-coating process. The weight ratio of silica in silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the pH value in the silica-coating process. The dispersibility of silica-coated magnetite particles was mainly decided by the agglomerate particle size of the suspension. The oxidation of magnetite particles in air was limited through the coated silica. The magnetism of silica-coated magnetite particles decreased slightly after silica-coating.

  5. Raman study of the Verwey transition in magnetite at high-pressure and low-temperature: Effect of Al doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparov, L.; Shirshikova, Z.; Pekarek, T. M.; Blackburn, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Gavriliuk, A.; Rueckamp, R.; Berger, H.

    2012-08-01

    We employed Raman spectroscopy to investigate how the hydrostatic pressure affects the temperature of the Verwey transition in pure (Fe3O4) and Al-doped (Fe2.8Al0.2O4) magnetite. In both samples, pressure suppresses the transition. The Al-doped sample displays no transition above 8 GPa. We do not observe such discontinuity in a pure magnetite, which suggests that the discontinuity is doping driven. Our Clausius-Clapeyron formula based analysis of the pressure-transition temperature dependence is in excellent agreement with our data in pure magnetite. The Al doping leads to a smaller entropy change and larger volume expansion consistent with partial charge ordering at the transition.

  6. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-10-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid.

  7. Vortex magnetic structure in framboidal magnetite reveals existence of water droplets in an ancient asteroid.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yuki; Sato, Takeshi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Nozawa, Jun; Nakamura, Tomoki; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    The majority of water has vanished from modern meteorites, yet there remain signatures of water on ancient asteroids. How and when water disappeared from the asteroids is important, because the final fluid-concentrated chemical species played critical roles in the early evolution of organics and in the final minerals in meteorites. Here we show evidence of vestigial traces of water based on a nanometre-scale palaeomagnetic method, applying electron holography to the framboids in the Tagish Lake meteorite. The framboids are colloidal crystals composed of three-dimensionally ordered magnetite nanoparticles and therefore are only able to form against the repulsive force induced by the surface charge of the magnetite as a water droplet parches in microgravity. We demonstrate that the magnetites have a flux closure vortex structure, a unique magnetic configuration in nature that permits the formation of colloidal crystals just before exhaustion of water from a local system within a hydrous asteroid. PMID:24149376

  8. Composition of coarse-grained magnetite from pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Overstreet, William C.; Mousa, Hassan; Matzko, John J.

    1985-01-01

    Crystals of magnetite as large as 30 mm long and 7 mm thick are locally present in quartz-rich zones of interior and exterior pegmatite dikes related to plutons of quartz monzonite in the Jabal Lababa area. Niobium, tin, and yttrium are strongly enriched in six specimens of magnetite from interior pegmatite dikes in a small pluton where these elements form geochemical anomalies in nonmagnetic heavy-mineral concentrates from wadi sediment. Less abundant anomalous elements in the magnetite are molybdenum, lead, and zirconium, which also tend to be present in anomalous amounts in the nonmagnetic concentrates from the niobium-bearing pluton. The most anomalous trace element in the magnetite is zinc, which is at least 10 times as abundant as it is in the quartz monzonite plutons or in the nonmagnetic concentrates. The capacity of magnetite to scavenge molybdenum, zinc, niobium, lead, tin, yttrium, and zirconium suggests the possible utility of magnetite as a geochemical sample medium.

  9. Polyhedral magnetite nanocrystals with multiple facets: facile synthesis, structural modelling, magnetic properties and application for high capacity lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Su, Dawei; Horvat, Josip; Munroe, Paul; Ahn, Hyojun; Ranjbartoreh, Ali R; Wang, Guoxiu

    2012-01-01

    Polyhedral magnetite nanocrystals with multiple facets were synthesised by a low temperature hydrothermal method. Atomistic simulation and calculations on surface attachment energy successfully predicted the polyhedral structure of magnetite nanocrystals with multiple facets. X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission microscopy confirmed the crystal structure of magnetite, which is consistent with the theoretical modelling. The magnetic property measurements show the superspin glass state of the polyhedral nanocrystals, which could originate from the nanometer size of individual single crystals. When applied as an anode material in lithium ion cells, magnetite nanocrystals demonstrated an outstanding electrochemical performance with a high lithium storage capacity, a satisfactory cyclability, and an excellent high rate capacity.

  10. Understanding the biological stabilization of ferrihydrite and its transformation to magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyle; Joester, Derk

    2013-03-01

    The biosynthesis of magnetite in the chiton tooth begins with the formation of ferrihydrite, which is transformed into magnetite. This strategy, which employs crystallization of a precursor into the desired polymorph, is generalized across a range of organisms. However, the specific biological factors that control the transformation are not known. Our results employing atom probe tomography of chiton tooth magnetite revealed the presence of acidic proteins binding sodium and magnesium ions associated with chitin nanofibers. Using a model system we are investigating the influence of organic and inorganic additives on the stabilization of ferrihydrite and the transformation to magnetite. I will discuss the influence of a range of organic and inorganic additives on the formation and transformation of ferrihydrite within the gel. We have found that acidic polymers stabilize ferrihydrite and prevent the formation of the crystalline polymorphs. Transformation of the ferrihydrite to magnetite upon addition of ferrous iron is observed as early as 30 minutes. Taken together, the contribution of these factors to magnetite biomineralization in the presence of an organic matrix will help to elucidate biological mechanisms for nucleation, stabilization, and transformation of iron oxides.

  11. Structure-function studies of the magnetite-biomineralizing magnetosome-associated protein MamC.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Valverde-Tercedor, Carmen; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Grimberg, Noam; Levi, Hilla; Nelkenbaum, Or; Davidov, Geula; Faivre, Damien; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are Gram-negative bacteria that navigate along geomagnetic fields using the magnetosome, an organelle that consists of a membrane-enveloped magnetic nanoparticle. Magnetite formation and its properties are controlled by a specific set of proteins. MamC is a small magnetosome-membrane protein that is known to be active in iron biomineralization but its mechanism has yet to be clarified. Here, we studied the relationship between the MamC magnetite-interaction loop (MIL) structure and its magnetite interaction using an inert biomineralization protein-MamC chimera. Our determined structure shows an alpha-helical fold for MamC-MIL with highly charged surfaces. Additionally, the MamC-MIL induces the formation of larger magnetite crystals compared to protein-free and inert biomineralization protein control experiments. We suggest that the connection between the MamC-MIL structure and the protein's charged surfaces is crucial for magnetite binding and thus for the size control of the magnetite nanoparticles. PMID:26970040

  12. Structure-function studies of the magnetite-biomineralizing magnetosome-associated protein MamC.

    PubMed

    Nudelman, Hila; Valverde-Tercedor, Carmen; Kolusheva, Sofiya; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Grimberg, Noam; Levi, Hilla; Nelkenbaum, Or; Davidov, Geula; Faivre, Damien; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Zarivach, Raz

    2016-06-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria are Gram-negative bacteria that navigate along geomagnetic fields using the magnetosome, an organelle that consists of a membrane-enveloped magnetic nanoparticle. Magnetite formation and its properties are controlled by a specific set of proteins. MamC is a small magnetosome-membrane protein that is known to be active in iron biomineralization but its mechanism has yet to be clarified. Here, we studied the relationship between the MamC magnetite-interaction loop (MIL) structure and its magnetite interaction using an inert biomineralization protein-MamC chimera. Our determined structure shows an alpha-helical fold for MamC-MIL with highly charged surfaces. Additionally, the MamC-MIL induces the formation of larger magnetite crystals compared to protein-free and inert biomineralization protein control experiments. We suggest that the connection between the MamC-MIL structure and the protein's charged surfaces is crucial for magnetite binding and thus for the size control of the magnetite nanoparticles.

  13. [Adsorption of methylene blue onto vanadium-doped magnetite].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yuan-Hong; Liang, Xiao-Liang; Zhu, Jian-Xi; He, Hong-Ping; Yuan, Peng

    2010-06-01

    A series of vanadium-doped magnetite (Fe3-x VxO4, x < 0.4) synthesized by an oxidation-precipitation method, were characterized using chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), as well as thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) analyses. The obtained results show that the synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 has spinel structure while vanadium mostly replaces Fe3+ in the octahedral sites. The synthetic Fe3-x VxO4 is magnetic material, with crystal size ranging from 28 to 35 nm. The substitution of vanadium in the magnetite structure increases the amount of surface hydroxyls. The experimental adsorption results indicate that, in neutral pH condition, the maximum adsorption capacities of Fe3-x VxO4 increase obviously with the increase of vanadium concentration in magnetite while the adsorption isotherm complies well with the Langmuir model. The adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on Fe3-x VxO4 can get equilibrium in the first 25 min, supporting a pseudo-second order equation. Moreover, the rise of the solution pH value results in an increase of the adsorption capability of MB on Fe3-x VxO4.

  14. Crystallographic Relationships of Silicate-hosted Magnetite Inclusions Determined with Electron Backscatter Pattern Indexing (EBSP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, J. M.; Wenk, H.; Renne, P. R.; Scott, G. R.

    2002-12-01

    Crystallographically controlled laths of magnetite exsolved in silicates such as clinopyroxene and plagioclase are common features in gabbros and mafic granulite facies rocks. As the inclusions cool below the Curie temperature of magnetite (580°C) they record a component of the direction and intensity of the Earth's ambient magnetic field. The extreme anisotropy of the inclusions' aspect ratio allows them to retain an unusually stable magnetization, as exemplified by their single-domain behavior. In order to transform these magnetite inclusions into a useful paleomagnetic tool it is necessary to clearly describe the epitaxial relationship between the magnetite and its host silicate phases. In the past the crystallographic orientation of magnetite inclusions and their host silicates were determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction or diffraction patterns obtained with a transmission electron microscope. Although both of these techniques are ultimately successful, they are time consuming and cumbersome. The Electron Backscatter Diffraction Pattern (EBSP) technique is an alternative approach that uses diffraction patterns of Kikuchi bands generated in a scanning electron microscope. The geometric relationships between intersecting Kikuchi bands can be used to determine the orientation of a crystal. Generally the EBSP technique is used to determine preferred orientation patterns in aggregates. However, in this application we use it to investigate local crystallographic relationships. First, inclusions in a thin section are visualized on a backscattered electron image and verified chemically with an EDX signal. Then EBSPs are produced for both the host silicate and the magnetite inclusions and the orientation relationship is ascertained. The EBSP technique's straightforward sample preparation and rapid measurement time, combined with the broad accessibility of scanning electron microscopes allow scientists to more efficiently determine crystallographic

  15. A new method for the identification and quantification of magnetite-maghemite mixture using conventional X-ray diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonbaek; Suh, Chang-Yul; Cho, Sung-Wook; Roh, Ki-Min; Kwon, Hanjung; Song, Kyungsun; Shon, In-Jin

    2012-05-30

    The electrical explosion of Fe wire in air produced nanoparticles containing the binary mixture of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) and maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)). The phase identification of magnetite and maghemite by the conventional X-ray diffraction method is not a simple matter because both have the same cubic structure and their lattice parameters are almost identical. Here, we propose a convenient method to assess the presence of magnetite-maghemite mixture and to further quantify its phase composition using the conventional peak deconvolution technique. A careful step scan around the high-angle peaks as (511) and (440) revealed the clear doublets indicative of the mixture phases. The quantitative analysis of the mixture phase was carried out by constructing a calibration curve using the pure magnetite and maghemite powders commercially available. The correlation coefficients, R(2), for magnetite-maghemite mixture was 0.9941. According to the method, the iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by the wire explosion in this study was calculated to contain 55.8 wt.% maghemite and 44.2 wt.% magnetite. We believe that the proposed method would be a convenient tool for the study of the magnetite-maghemite mixture which otherwise requires highly sophisticated equipments and techniques.

  16. Comparison of the inhibitory capacity of two groups of pure natural extract on the crystallization of two types of material compound urinary stones in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beghalia, Mohamed; Ghalem, Said; Allali, Hocine

    2015-10-01

    Urolithiasis is defined as the result of an abnormal precipitation within the urinary tract. This precipitation is most often from the normal constituents of the urine. This is a fairly common condition in the population. She is happy and recurrent etiology is often unknown if hypothetical. In Algeria, as in many countries, a large number of patients use herbal medicines in the treatment of their diseases including urolithiasis. Thus the aim of this study is the most widely used to evaluate the effectiveness of aqueous extracts of medicinal plants, in the treatment of calcium urolithiasis oxalo-and magnesium-amoniaco in vitro. The study also examines the effect of these extracts on the states of crystallization (nucleation, crystal growth, crystal aggregation), followed by photography on polarized light microscope.In this regard, we are devoted to studying the crystallization steps from oxalo-calcium and phospho-calcic prepared as artificial urine and supersaturated aqueous solutions, maintained at 37 °C to remain close to biological conditions. Extracts of the first group of herbs: Ammodaucus leucotrichus, Ajuga iva, Globularia alypum, Atriplex halimus are studied on the crystallization calcium oxalate, we cite the Ammodaucus leucotrichus which acts on the stages of nucleation, growth and the aggregation with a total inhibition. The second group of extracts plants tested on calcium phosphate crystallization : Acacia raddiana, Citrullus colocynthis, Rhus tripartita, Pistacia lentiscu, Warionia saharae, are able to significantly reduce phosphate crystallization in vitro. It is easily proved by FTIR and optical microscope. In conclusion the results of our work allows us to confirm the use of these plants as an aqueous decoction, in the field of urolithiasis. These activities may help to strengthen the body in depressed situations.

  17. Three-Dimensional Morphological Analysis of ALH84001 Magnetite Using Electron Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Shimmin, Joel; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2003-01-01

    We report here the crystal morphologies of MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites as calculated by back-projection using electron tomography. In the present study, we used a 300 keV TEM with a field emission gun (Tecnai F-30 from FEI Inc.), equipped with a 2048 x 2048 pixel CCD camera from Gatan Inc. to image magnetite crystals over tilt ranges of approx. +/- 72 deg in 2 deg tilt intervals. The images were aligned for back-projection, either manually, or through the use of fiducial 5 nm Au spheres affixed to the specimen prior to microscopy. Three-dimensional (3-D) reconstructions were computed using weighted back-projection of the tilted views. The tomograms were viewed and analyzed as a series of slices 1.0 nm thick, taken parallel to the specimen-supporting grid, using the IMOD software package. The shape of each magnetite crystal was determined by defining the external contour of a given magnetite in each slice and assembling a stack of these contours in 3-D. To aid in visualization, the stacked contour array was reduced to an optimal mesh by Delaunay triangulation. The surface normal to each of the triangles in the mesh was calculated and the triangle faces colored according to the orientation of that surface normal relative to the principal crystallographic axis of magnetite. Green surfaces correspond to {111} orientations, blue surfaces to {100} orientations, and red surfaces to {110} orientations. Triangles whose surface normal did not correspond to one of the principal axes were colored gray. Within the experimental and numerical uncertainties of the deconvolution, the tomographic reconstruction of both MV-1 and ALH84001 magnetites are equivalent and correspond to a truncated hexa-octahedral morphology.

  18. Magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles with diluted magnet-like behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Garza-Navarro, Marco; Gonzalez, Virgilio; Ortiz, Ubaldo; De la Rosa, Elder

    2010-01-15

    In the present work is reported the use of the biopolymer chitosan as template for the preparation of magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems, following a two step procedure of magnetite nanoparticles in situ precipitation and subsequent silver ions reduction. The crystalline and morphological characteristics of both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems were analyzed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nanobeam diffraction patterns (NBD). The results of these studies corroborate the core/shell morphology and the crystalline structure of the magnetite core and the silver shell. Moreover, magnetization temperature dependent, M(T), measurements show an unusual diluted magnetic behavior attributed to the dilution of the magnetic ordering in the magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles systems. - Graphical abstract: Biopolymer chitosan was used as stabilization media to synthesize both magnetite and magnetite/silver core/shell nanoparticles. Results of HRTEM and NBD patterns confirm core/shell morphology of the obtained nanoparticles. It was found that the composites show diluted magnet-like behavior.

  19. High Efficiency DNA Extraction by Graphite Oxide/Cellulose/Magnetite Composites Under Na+ Free System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2016-04-01

    DNA extraction is the key step at various research areas like biotechnology, diagnostic development, paternity determination, and forensic science . Solid support extraction is the most common method for DNA purification. In this method, Na+ ions have often been applied as binding buffers in order to obtain high extraction efficiency and high quality of DNA; however, the presence of Na+ ions might be interfering with the downstream DNA applications. In this study, we proposed graphite oxide (GO)/magnetite composite/cellulose as an innovative material for Na+-free DNA extraction. The total wt.% of GO was fixed at 4.15% in the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite . The concentration of magnetite within the composites were controlled at 0-3.98 wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of magnetite. The highest yield was achieved at 3.98 wt.% magnetite, where the extraction efficiency was reported to be 338.5 ng/µl. The absorbance ratios between 260 nm and 280 nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution volume was demonstrated as 1.81, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The mechanism of adsorption of DNA was provided by (1) π-π interaction between the aromatic ring in GO and nucleobases of DNA molecule, and (2) surface charge interaction between the positive charge magnetite and anions such as phosphates within the DNA molecules. The results proved that the GO/cellulose/magnetite composite provides a Na+-free method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA.

  20. Raman study of the Verwey transition in Magnetite at high-pressure and low-temperature; effect of Al doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparov, Lev; Shirshikova, Z.; Pekarek, T. M.; Blackburn, J.; Struzhkin, V.; Gavriliuk, A.; Rueckamp, R.; Berger, H.

    2012-02-01

    We report high-pressure low-temperature Raman measurements of the Verwey transition in pure and Al --doped magnetite (Fe3O4) Al-doped magnetite Fe2.8Al0.2O4 (TV=116.5K) displays a nearly linear decrease of the transition temperature with an increase of pressure yielding dP/dTV=-0.096±0.013 GPa/K. In contrast pure magnetite displays a significantly steeper slope of the PT equilibrium line with dP/dTV = -0.18±0.013 GPa/K. Contrary to earlier high pressure resistivity reports we do not observe quantum critical point behavior at 8 GPa in the pure magnetite. Our data indicates that Al doping leads to a smaller entropy change and larger volume expansion at the transition. The trends displayed by the data are consistent with the mean field model of the transition that assumes charge ordering in magnetite.

  1. Microstructures Resulting from Uniaxial Deformation of Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, A. K.; Feinberg, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Researchers rely on the magnetic record preserved in magnetite when investigating magnetic field reversals, reconstructing past tectonic plate locations, and studying changes in the strength of the earth's magnetic field. Despite the extensive use of magnetite in scientific studies, the effects of dislocations on magnetite's remanence and magnetic stability are poorly understood, yet are crucial to understanding how magnetite records and maintains past magnetic field directions and intensities. To begin to address this need, we have studied the dislocation and defect structures in magnetite that form after controlled deformation. We have also measured major hysteresis loops to investigate the changes in remanence and coercivity that result from each of these deformation events. A single magnetite octahedron was cut into roughly equal bar-shaped pieces, and each was deformed uniaxially along a <121> direction at one atmosphere using a variety of temperature and pressure conditions, each selected to fall within the dislocation glide regime. Slices were cut from each deformed bar after deformation and investigated using a transmission electron microscope to characterize the types of deformation structures resulting from each of the temperature-pressure combinations. A variety of deformation structures were observed, especially dislocations and deformation bands. Dislocations were more common in samples deformed below 875°C. Hysteresis loops were measured for each sample with a field direction perpendicular to the deformation axis. Surprisingly, there is no significant difference in the bulk coercivity of a deformed and undeformed piece of magnetite.

  2. Influence of cobalt doping on the hyperthermic efficiency of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantechi, Elvira; Innocenti, Claudia; Albino, Martin; Lottini, Elisabetta; Sangregorio, Claudio

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) are extensively investigated for biomedical applications, particularly as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and as heat mediators in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia. For the latter, one of the goal of the research is to obtain materials with improved hyperthermic properties. A valuable strategy is the increase of the magnetic anisotropy of commonly employed magnetite through the total or partial substitution of Fe2+ ions with Co2+ ions. Here we present a study on a family of 8 nm Co-doped magnetite NPs (CoxFe3-xO4), with composition ranging from pure magnetite (x=0) to stoichiometric cobalt ferrite (x=1), aimed to investigate the evolution of the hyperthermic properties with the increase of Co content. We found that the addition of a small amount of Co is enough to sharply increase the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). The SAR further increases with x but it reaches a maximum for an intermediate value (x=0.6). Such anomalous behavior is ascribed to the intrinsic magnetic properties of the material, and, in particular, to the magnetic anisotropy, which displays the same peculiar trend. The Co-doping thus may represent an effective strategy to improve the poor hyperthermic efficiency of very small magnetite NPs (<10 nm).

  3. Intercalation crystallization of phase-pure α-HC(NH2)2PbI3 upon microstructurally engineered PbI2 thin films for planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yang, Mengjin; Kwun, Joonsuh; Game, Onkar S.; Zhao, Yixin; Pang, Shuping; Padture, Nitin P.; Zhu, Kai

    2016-03-01

    The microstructure of the solid-PbI2 precursor thin film plays an important role in the intercalation crystallization of the formamidinium lead triiodide perovskite (α-HC(NH2)2PbI3). It is shown that microstructurally engineered PbI2 thin films with porosity and low crystallinity are the most favorable for conversion into uniform-coverage, phase-pure α-HC(NH2)2PbI3 perovskite thin films. Planar perovskite solar cells fabricated using these thin films deliver power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 13.8%.The microstructure of the solid-PbI2 precursor thin film plays an important role in the intercalation crystallization of the formamidinium lead triiodide perovskite (α-HC(NH2)2PbI3). It is shown that microstructurally engineered PbI2 thin films with porosity and low crystallinity are the most favorable for conversion into uniform-coverage, phase-pure α-HC(NH2)2PbI3 perovskite thin films. Planar perovskite solar cells fabricated using these thin films deliver power conversion efficiency (PCE) up to 13.8%. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06189j

  4. Complete sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of pure and MgO-doped lithium niobate crystals at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchak, A. S.; Laba, H. P.; Yurkevych, O. V.; Mytsyk, B. G.; Solskii, I. M.; Kityk, A. V.; Sahraoui, B.

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the results of ultrasonic measurements of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO crystals. The tensors of piezoelectric coefficients, elastic stiffness constants, and elastic compliances are determined for both crystals at room temperature. Combining these data with the results of piezo-optical measurements, a complete set of photoelastic tensor coefficients is also calculated. Doping of LiNbO{sub 3} crystals by MgO does not lead to a considerable modification of their elastic and photoelastic properties. However, LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO is characterized by a considerably higher resistance with respect to powerful light radiation, making it promising for future application in acousto-optic devices that deal with superpowerful laser radiation. Presented here are the complete tensor sets of elastic constants and photoelastic coefficients of LiNbO{sub 3} and LiNbO{sub 3}:MgO crystals that may be used for a geometry optimization of acousto-optical interaction providing the best diffraction efficiency of acousto-optical cells made of these materials.

  5. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-02-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments. PMID:21776027

  6. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-01-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments. PMID:21776027

  7. Novel magnetite-producing magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Christopher T; Viloria, Nathan; Schmidt, Marian L; Pósfai, Mihály; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2012-02-01

    Two novel magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from sediment and water collected from the Badwater Basin, Death Valley National Park and southeastern shore of the Salton Sea, respectively, and were designated as strains BW-2 and SS-5, respectively. Both organisms are rod-shaped, biomineralize magnetite, and are motile by means of flagella. The strains grow chemolithoautotrophically oxidizing thiosulfate and sulfide microaerobically as electron donors, with thiosulfate oxidized stoichiometrically to sulfate. They appear to utilize the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle for autotrophy based on ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) activity and the presence of partial sequences of RubisCO genes. Strains BW-2 and SS-5 biomineralize chains of octahedral magnetite crystals, although the crystals of SS-5 are elongated. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, both strains are phylogenetically affiliated with the Gammaproteobacteria class. Strain SS-5 belongs to the order Chromatiales; the cultured bacterium with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to SS-5 is Thiohalocapsa marina (93.0%). Strain BW-2 clearly belongs to the Thiotrichales; interestingly, the organism with the highest 16S rRNA gene sequence identity to this strain is Thiohalospira alkaliphila (90.2%), which belongs to the Chromatiales. Each strain represents a new genus. This is the first report of magnetite-producing MTB phylogenetically associated with the Gammaproteobacteria. This finding is important in that it significantly expands the phylogenetic diversity of the MTB. Physiology of these strains is similar to other MTB and continues to demonstrate their potential in nitrogen, iron, carbon and sulfur cycling in natural environments.

  8. Preparation of magnetite-fullerene nanocomposite with enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kalska-Szostko, B; Rogowska, M

    2012-09-01

    This study presents modification of magnetite nanoparticles and fullerene for biocompatibility. It show also specific fabrication of magnetite-carbon nanocomposite with immobilized biomolecule. The composites were created by joining individual components step-by-step manner (fullerene to magnetite and glucose oxidase or glucose oxidase to magnetite and fullerene). The resulting nanocomposites were characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  9. Crystallization of Enantiomerically Pure Proteins from Quasi-Racemic Mixtures: Structure Determination by X-Ray Diffraction of Isotope-Labeled Ester Insulin and Human Insulin.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Dhayalan, Balamurugan; Avital-Shmilovici, Michal; Tokmakoff, Andrei; Kent, Stephen B H

    2016-03-01

    As a part of a program aimed towards the study of the dynamics of human insulin-protein dimer formation using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we used total chemical synthesis to prepare stable isotope labeled [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] human insulin, via [(1-(13) C=(18) O)Phe(B24) )] ester insulin as a key intermediate product that facilitates folding of the synthetic protein molecule (see preceding article). Here, we describe the crystal structure of the synthetic isotope-labeled ester insulin intermediate and the product synthetic human insulin. Additionally, we present our observations on hexamer formation with these two proteins in the absence of phenol derivatives and/or Zn metal ions. We also describe and discuss the fractional crystallization of quasi-racemic protein mixtures containing each of these two synthetic proteins.

  10. CIRCUMSTELLAR MAGNETITE FROM THE LAP 031117 CO3.0 CHONDRITE

    SciTech Connect

    Zega, Thomas J.; Haenecour, Pierre; Floss, Christine; Stroud, Rhonda M.

    2015-07-20

    We report the first microstructural confirmation of circumstellar magnetite, identified in a petrographic thin section of the LaPaz Icefield 031117 CO3.0 chondrite. The O-isotopic composition of the grain indicates an origin in a low-mass (∼2.2 M{sub ⊙}), approximately solar metallicity red/asymptotic giant branch (RGB/AGB) star undergoing first dredge-up. The magnetite is a single crystal measuring 750 × 670 nm, is free of defects, and is stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. We hypothesize that the magnetite formed via oxidation of previously condensed Fe dust within the circumstellar envelope of its progenitor star. Using an empirically derived rate constant for this reaction, we calculate that such oxidation could have occurred over timescales ranging from approximately ∼9000–500,000 years. This timescale is within the lifetime of estimates for dust condensation within RGB/AGB stars.

  11. Smart hollow microspheres of chondroitin sulfate conjugates and magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic vector.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Marcos R; Reis, Adriano V; Alves, Bruno R V; Kunita, Marcos H; Rubira, Adley F; Tambourgi, Elias B

    2010-12-01

    Smart hollow microspheres composed of vinyled-chondroitin sulfate conjugates (CSπ) and magnetite nanoparticles were obtained by the intermediate of a multiple emulsion in absence of a surfactant, attributable to stabilizing properties of the CS. It was formed an oil-water multiple emulsion in which the CS played a role as an anionic stabilizer for magnetite nanoparticles via complexation. Iron oxides were bonded to the microspheres by the formation of a complex of Fe(3+) ions on the crystalline phase with oxygen atoms at the carboxyl groups without their magnetic properties being affected. The average crystal size of embedded magnetite nanoparticles was approximately 16.5nm, indicative of a good dispersion in microspheres. Furthermore, the introduction of iron oxides resulted in microspheres with a higher diameter and a narrower particle size distribution.

  12. Smart hollow microspheres of chondroitin sulfate conjugates and magnetite nanoparticles for magnetic vector.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Marcos R; Reis, Adriano V; Alves, Bruno R V; Kunita, Marcos H; Rubira, Adley F; Tambourgi, Elias B

    2010-12-01

    Smart hollow microspheres composed of vinyled-chondroitin sulfate conjugates (CSπ) and magnetite nanoparticles were obtained by the intermediate of a multiple emulsion in absence of a surfactant, attributable to stabilizing properties of the CS. It was formed an oil-water multiple emulsion in which the CS played a role as an anionic stabilizer for magnetite nanoparticles via complexation. Iron oxides were bonded to the microspheres by the formation of a complex of Fe(3+) ions on the crystalline phase with oxygen atoms at the carboxyl groups without their magnetic properties being affected. The average crystal size of embedded magnetite nanoparticles was approximately 16.5nm, indicative of a good dispersion in microspheres. Furthermore, the introduction of iron oxides resulted in microspheres with a higher diameter and a narrower particle size distribution. PMID:20832809

  13. Is magnetite a universal memory molecule?

    PubMed

    Størmer, Fredrik C

    2014-11-01

    Human stem cells possess memory, and consequently all living human cells must have a memory system. How memory is stored in cells and organisms is an open question. Magnetite is perhaps the best candidate to be a universal memory molecule. Magnetite may give us a clue, because it is the Earth's most distributed and important magnetic material. It is found in living organisms with no known functions except for involvement in navigation in some organisms. In humans magnetite is found in the brain, heart, liver and spleen. Humans suffer from memory dysfunctions in many cases when iron is out of balance. Anomalous concentrations of magnetite is known to be associated with a neurodegenerative disorder like Alzheimer's disease. Due to the rapid speed and accuracy of our brain, memory and its functions must be governed by quantum mechanics.

  14. Using the chemical analysis of magnetite to constrain various stages in the formation and genesis of the Kiruna-type chadormalu magnetite-apatite deposit, Bafq district, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarian, Hassan; Lentz, David; Alirezaei, Saeed; Peighambari, Sima; Hall, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Textural and compositional data are presented for different types of magnetite in the Chadormalu iron deposit to discern the genesis of various styles of mineralization. Samples were chosen according to their paragenetic relations to apatite and their host setting: magnetite-apatite veins in the altered host rocks, disseminated magnetite-apatite assemblages in the marginal parts of the main ore body, and massive magnetite associated with irregular apatite veinlets from internal part of the main ore body. Scanning electron microscopy - back scatter electron (SEM-BSE) images reveal that there are three main generations of magnetite in each of the different magnetite-apatite assemblages. Primary magnetite (Mag1) features abundant porosity and a dark appearance. A second generation of magnetite (Mag2) replacing Mag1 shows a lighter appearance with both sharp and gradational contacts with the primary magnetite crystals. The two magnetite types are related to dissolution-precipitation processes due to changing physico-chemical parameters of the ore fluids. A third type of magnetite (Mag3) with a recrystallized appearance and foam-like triple junctions was mostly observed in magnetite-apatite veins in the main ore body and in veins hosted by altered rocks. Electron probe microanalyses (EPMA) were utilized to discriminate the various magnetite generations in the different magnetite-apatite assemblages. Applying published elemental discrimination diagrams shows that most primary magnetites fall into the hydrothermal- and Kiruna-type fields. Primary magnetite contains lower FeO (88.77-93.65 wt.%; average 91.5 wt.%), and higher SiO2 (0.21-2.26 wt.%; ave. 0.32 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.001-0.45 wt.%; ave. 0.053 wt.%), and CaO (0.002-0.48 wt.%; ave. 0.078 wt.%) contents, which might be related to magmatically derived fluids. Secondary magnetites have higher FeO (89.23-93.49 wt.%; ave. 92.11 wt.%), lower SiO2 (0.037-0.189 wt.%; ave. 0.072 wt.%), Al2O3 (0.004-0.072 wt.%; ave. 0.019 wt

  15. Thermal Analysis of Acicular Shaped Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Ming, D. W.; Golden, D. C.

    2003-01-01

    We are in the process of developing a database on the thermal properties of well-characterized Martian analog materials in support of future Mars surface missions. The database contains the thermal behaviors of these analog materials under reduced and Earth ambient pressures. Magnetite in planetary materials has received considerable attention in recent years since the identification of fine grain single-domain magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 and their possible link to past life on Mars (i.e., possible biominerals of magnetotactic bacteria). Because of its possible importance to Mars science, we report here the thermal properties of magnetite particles with acicular morphology, i.e., needle-shaped magnetite. Acicular shaped magnetite can be commercially produced from goethite (FeOOH) as the starting material via a H2 reduction process. However, instead of using this process or procedure, we report here on the thermal characterization of acicular magnetite formed under reducing conditions from well-characterized needle-shaped goethite at low temperature in controlled CO-CO2 1-bar atmosphere gas mixing furnaces.

  16. Formation of single domain magnetite by green rust oxidation promoted by microbial anaerobic nitrate-dependent iron oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Li, Jinhua; Benzerara, Karim; Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Bernard, Sylvain; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Guyot, François

    2014-08-01

    Biomineralization of magnetite is a central geomicrobiological process that might have played a primordial role over Earth’s history, possibly leaving traces of life in the geological record or controlling trace metal(loid)s and organic pollutants mobility in modern environments. Magnetite biomineralization has been attributed to two main microbial pathways to date (namely magnetotactic bacteria and dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria). Here, we uncover a new route of magnetite biomineralization involving the anaerobic nitrate-reducing iron(II) oxidizing bacterium Acidovorax sp. strain BoFeN1. Using transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy and rock magnetic analyses, this strain is shown to promote the transformation of hydroxychloride green rust in equilibrium with dissolved Fe(II) to (1) periplasmic lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) and (2) extracellular magnetite, thus leading to strong redox heterogeneities at the nanometer scale. On the one hand, lepidocrocite was associated with protein moieties and exhibited an anisotropic texture, with the elongated axis parallel to the cell wall. On the other hand, magnetite crystals exhibited grain sizes and magnetic properties consistent with stable single domain particles. By comparison, abiotic controls led to a very slow (4 months vs. 2 days in BoFeN1 cultures) and incomplete oxidation of hydroxychloride green rust towards magnetite. As this abiotic magnetite exhibited the same size and magnetic properties (stable single domain particles) as magnetite produced in BoFeN1 cultures, only the co-occurrence of textured Fe(III)-oxides and magnetite, associated with the persistence of organic carbon molecules, might constitute valuable biosignatures to be looked for in the geological record. Our results furthermore contribute to a more complex picture of Fe redox cycling in the environment, providing an additional process of Fe(II)-bearing phase

  17. Mineralogical and microfabric characteristics of magnetite in the Wuyang Precambrian BIFs, southern North China Craton: Implications for genesis and depositional processes of the associated BIFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongzhong; Zhai, Mingguo; Zhang, Lianchang; Yang, Zhijun; Kapsiotis, Argyrios; Zhou, Yongzhang; He, Junguo; Wang, Changle; Liang, Jin

    2014-11-01

    Precambrian Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are widely distributed in the North China Craton (NCC). Among them, the Wuyang BIFs located in the southern margin of NCC occur in the Late Archaean Tieshanmiao Formation and can be subdivided in two different sub-types: (i) quartz-magnetite BIFs (QMB), consisting of magnetite, fine-microcrystalline quartz and minor calcite and (ii) pyroxene-magnetite BIFs (PMB), composed of pyroxene, fine-microcrystalline quartz and subordinate feldspars. Both sub-types display apparent discrepancies in terms of petrography and mineral composition. As shown in Electron BackScattered Diffraction (EBSD) images and micrographs, magnetite grains from the QMB range in size from tens up to hundreds of μm, whereas magnetite crystals from the PMB can be up to a few tens of μm across. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) structural data indicate that magnetite from both BIF sub-types is equiaxed (cubic) and was generated by sedimentary metamorphic processes. The cell parameters of magnetite in the QMB are a = b = c = 8.396 Å and Z = 8, which deviate slightly from these of magnetite in the PMB: a = b = c = 8.394 Å and Z = 8. The analytical results of Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed micro-structural signatures of both magnetite (Raman shifts near 552 cm-1 and 673 cm-1) and hematite (Raman shifts near 227 cm-1, 295 cm-1 and 413 cm-1). In magnetite from both QMB and PMB, the crystallinity degree is similar for magnetite micro-structures but varies significantly for hematite micro-structures. Oxygen fugacity (fO2) conditions fluctuated during the recrystallization of magnetite in the QMB, whereas no evident variation of fO2 occurred during the formation of magnetite in the PMB. Analytical results of laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) show that the Si, Al and Mg abundances are higher in magnetite from the QMB, whereas the Ti and Mn contents are more elevated in magnetite from the PMB. Magnetite composition also

  18. The effect of humic acid adsorption on pH-dependent surface charging and aggregation of magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Illes, E.; Tombacz, E.

    2006-03-01

    The pH-dependent adsorption of humic acid (HA) on magnetite and its effect on the surface charging and the aggregation of oxide particles were investigated. HA was extracted from brown coal. Synthetic magnetite was prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of iron(II) and iron(III) salts. The pH-dependent particle charge and aggregation, and coagulation kinetics at pH around to 4 were measured by laser Doppler electrophoresis and dynamic light scattering. The charge of pure magnetite reverses from positive to negative at pH around 8, which may consider as isoelectric point (IEP). Near this pH, large aggregates form, while stable sols exist further from it. In the presence of increasing HA loading, the IEP shifts to lower pH, then at higher loading, magnetite becomes negatively charged even at low pHs, which indicate the neutralization and gradual recharging positive charges on surface. In acidic region, the trace HA amounts are adsorbed on magnetite surface as oppositely charged patches, systems become highly unstable due to heterocoagulation. Above the adsorption saturation, however, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The HA coated magnetite particles form stable colloidal dispersion, particle aggregation does not occur in a wide range of pH and salt tolerance is enhanced.

  19. Magnetic Dinner Salads: The Role of Biogenic Magnetite in Cryopreservation for Common Food Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaffee, T. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    Biogenically-precipitated magnetite has been found in organisms ranging from Bacteria, single-celled protists, and many of the animal phyla, where its major function is navigation and magnetoreception. To date there is but a single report of biogenic magnetite in plants (essentially, magnetoferritin), and that is in common grass (Festuca species, from Gajdardziska-Josifovska et. al. doi:10.1127/0935-1221/2001/0013/0863). Recent developments in cryopreservation suggest that ~ 1 mT, ~ 10 Hz oscillating magnetic fields can drastically reduce ice nucleation during freezing, promote supercooling, and minimize cellular damage in living tissues (e.g., Kaku et al., doi: 10.1016/j.cryobiol.2012.02.001). Kobayashi & Kirschvink (2014, doi:10.1016/j.cryobiol.2013.12.002) suggest that biogenic magnetite crystals could be the nucleating site for damaging ice crystals, and that they would be driven magneto-mechanically to rotate in those oscillating fields which could inhibit the ice crystal nucleation process. This prompted our investigation into the magnetite content of ordinary fruit and vegetable food products, as knowledge of the natural levels of biogenic magnetite in the human food supply could guide the selection of which foods might work for this type of cryopreservation. Our study involved a range of common foods including avocados, bananas, garlic, and apples. Samples were prepared in a clean lab environment kept free of contaminant particles, and subjected to a variety of standard rock-magnetic tests including IRM and ARM acquisition, and the corresponding Af demagnetization, on a standard 2G™ SRM. Results are consistent with moderately interacting single-domain magnetite (see figure), with moderate inter-particle interaction effects. Typical magnetite concentrations in these samples are in the range of .1 to 1 ng/g for room temperature samples, increasing to the range of 1-10 ng/g when measured frozen (to inhibit thermal rotation of small particles and clumps). If

  20. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United

  1. Geochemistry of magnetite from Proterozoic Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian metallogenic province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei Terry; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Gao, Jian-Feng; Hu, Ruizhong

    2015-10-01

    -sulfide stage have slightly higher Cu, Zn, and Mn and are thought to have crystallized from relatively low-temperature and Cu-Zn-Mn-rich fluids evolved from the fluids of the early Fe-oxide stage. Our results show that magnetite from the Fe-Cu deposits in the Kangdian Province, banded iron formation, Fe skarn deposits, diabase-hosted hydrothermal Fe deposits, and magmatic deposits has significantly different compositions. We propose that covariations of Co-Ni, Zn-Sn, and Co/Ni-Mn can be used to effectively discriminate different deposit types.

  2. Pond sediment magnetite grains show a distinctive microbial community.

    PubMed

    Song, H-K; Sonkaria, S; Khare, V; Dong, K; Lee, H-T; Ahn, S-H; Kim, H-K; Kang, H-J; Lee, S-H; Jung, S P; Adams, J M

    2015-07-01

    Formation of magnetite in anaerobic sediments is thought to be enhanced by the activities of iron-reducing bacteria. Geobacter has been implicated as playing a major role, as in culture its cells are often associated with extracellular magnetite grains. We studied the bacterial community associated with magnetite grains in sediment of a freshwater pond in South Korea. Magnetite was isolated from the sediment using a magnet. The magnetite-depleted fraction of sediment was also taken for comparison. DNA was extracted from each set of samples, followed by PCR for 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and HiSeq sequencing. The bacterial communities of the magnetite-enriched and magnetite-depleted fractions were significantly different. The enrichment of three abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) suggests that they may either be dependent upon the magnetite grain environment or may be playing a role in magnetite formation. The most abundant OTU in magnetite-enriched fractions was Geobacter, bolstering the case that this genus is important in magnetite formation in natural systems. Other major OTUs strongly associated with the magnetite-enriched fraction, rather than the magnetite-depleted fraction, include a Sulfuricella and a novel member of the Betaproteobacteria. The existence of distinct bacterial communities associated with particular mineral grain types may also be an example of niche separation and coexistence in sediments and soils, which cannot usually be detected due to difficulties in separating and concentrating minerals. PMID:25592636

  3. Pond sediment magnetite grains show a distinctive microbial community.

    PubMed

    Song, H-K; Sonkaria, S; Khare, V; Dong, K; Lee, H-T; Ahn, S-H; Kim, H-K; Kang, H-J; Lee, S-H; Jung, S P; Adams, J M

    2015-07-01

    Formation of magnetite in anaerobic sediments is thought to be enhanced by the activities of iron-reducing bacteria. Geobacter has been implicated as playing a major role, as in culture its cells are often associated with extracellular magnetite grains. We studied the bacterial community associated with magnetite grains in sediment of a freshwater pond in South Korea. Magnetite was isolated from the sediment using a magnet. The magnetite-depleted fraction of sediment was also taken for comparison. DNA was extracted from each set of samples, followed by PCR for 16S bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and HiSeq sequencing. The bacterial communities of the magnetite-enriched and magnetite-depleted fractions were significantly different. The enrichment of three abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) suggests that they may either be dependent upon the magnetite grain environment or may be playing a role in magnetite formation. The most abundant OTU in magnetite-enriched fractions was Geobacter, bolstering the case that this genus is important in magnetite formation in natural systems. Other major OTUs strongly associated with the magnetite-enriched fraction, rather than the magnetite-depleted fraction, include a Sulfuricella and a novel member of the Betaproteobacteria. The existence of distinct bacterial communities associated with particular mineral grain types may also be an example of niche separation and coexistence in sediments and soils, which cannot usually be detected due to difficulties in separating and concentrating minerals.

  4. Oxidation of pyrite in coal to magnetite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Alexander, C.C.; Dulong, F.T.

    1984-01-01

    When bituminous coal is heated in an inert atmosphere (He) containing small amounts of oxygen at 393-455 ??C, pyrite (FeS2) in coal is partially converted to magnetite (Fe304). The maximum amount of Fe304 formed during the time of heating corresponds to 5-20% of the total pyrite present, depending on the coal sample. The magnetite forms as an outer crust on the pyrite grains. The fact that the magnetic properties of the pyrite grains are substantially increased by the magnetite crust suggests that pyrite can be separated from coal by use of a low magnetic field. In a laboratory test, 75% removal is obtained by means of a 500 Oe magnet on three samples, and 60% on a fourth sample. ?? 1984.

  5. Magnetite whiskers and platelets in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite: evidence of vapor phase growth.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-sized magnetite crystals associated with carbonates in fracture zones within Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been examined using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Some of the crystals exhibit distinctive morphologies: filamentary rods and ribbon, and platelets. The rods and ribbons are elongated along the crystallographic [100] and [111] directions. Some of the rods contain microstructural defects indicating that they grew by spiral growth about screw dislocations. Platelets are flattened along the [100] and [110] directions. These unique morphologies and microstructures constrain the growth conditions of magnetite. The whiskers and platelets most likely formed in the temperature range 500-800 degrees C by direct condensation from a vapor or precipitation from a supercritical fluid, and their properties are inconsistent with a biogenic origin. PMID:11541129

  6. Magnetite whiskers and platelets in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite: evidence of vapor phase growth.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J P; Harvey, R P; McSween, H Y

    1996-01-01

    Nanometer-sized magnetite crystals associated with carbonates in fracture zones within Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been examined using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Some of the crystals exhibit distinctive morphologies: filamentary rods and ribbon, and platelets. The rods and ribbons are elongated along the crystallographic [100] and [111] directions. Some of the rods contain microstructural defects indicating that they grew by spiral growth about screw dislocations. Platelets are flattened along the [100] and [110] directions. These unique morphologies and microstructures constrain the growth conditions of magnetite. The whiskers and platelets most likely formed in the temperature range 500-800 degrees C by direct condensation from a vapor or precipitation from a supercritical fluid, and their properties are inconsistent with a biogenic origin.

  7. Rock magnetism linked to human brain magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Magnetite has a long and distinguished career as one of the most important minerals in geophysics, as it is responsible for most of the remanent magnetization in marine sediments and the oceanic crust. It may come as a surprise to discover that it also ranks as the third or fourth most diverse mineral product formed biochemically by living organisms, and forms naturally in a variety of human tissues [Kirschvink et al., 1992].Magnetite was discovered in teeth of the Polyplacophora mollusks over 30 years ago, in magnetotactic bacteria nearly 20 years ago, in honey bees and homing pigeons nearly 15 years ago, but only recently in human tissue.

  8. Biomimetic Magnetite Formation: From Biocombinatorial Approaches to Mineralization Effects

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Biological materials typically display complex morphologies and hierarchical architectures, properties that are hardly matched by synthetic materials. Understanding the biological control of mineral properties will enable the development of new synthetic approaches toward biomimetic functional materials. Here, we combine biocombinatorial approaches with a proteome homology search and in vitro mineralization assays to assess the role of biological determinants in biomimetic magnetite mineralization. Our results suggest that the identified proteins and biomimetic polypeptides influence nucleation in vitro. Even though the in vivo role cannot be directly determined from our experiments, we can rationalize the following design principles: proteins, larger complexes, or membrane components that promote nucleation in vivo are likely to expose positively charged residues to a negatively charged crystal surface. In turn, components with acidic (negatively charged) functionality are nucleation inhibitors, which stabilize an amorphous structure through the coordination of iron. PMID:24499323

  9. Banded sulfide-magnetite ores of Mauk copper massive sulfide deposit, Central Urals: Composition and genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safina, N. P.; Maslennikov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Kotlyarov, V. A.; Danyushevsky, L. V.; Large, R. R.; Blinov, I. A.

    2015-05-01

    The results of investigation of metamorphosed sulfide-magnetite ores from the Mauk deposit located within the Main Ural Fault at the junction of Tagil and Magnitogorsk massive sulfide zones are discussed. The ore-hosting sequence comprises metamorphic rocks formed from basalt, carbonaceous and carbonaceous-cherty siltstone, and lenticular serpentinized ultramafic bodies. The ores of the deposit are represented by banded varieties and less frequent breccia. The clastic origin of the banded ore is indicated by load casts at the bottom of sulfide beds, alternation of sulfide and barren beds, and the truncation of the growth zones of pyrite crystals. Pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and magnetite are the major minerals of the banded ores. The internal structure of the listed minerals testifies to the deep metamorphic recrystallization of primary hydrothermal-sedimentary ores accompanied with deformation. Cubanite, pyrrhotite, mackinawite, greigite, and gold are enclosed in metacrysts of pyrite, magnetite, and chalcopyrite. The accessory minerals of the Pb-Bi-Te, Bi-Te, and Ag-Te systems as well as uraninite have been found at the Mauk deposit for the first time. Magnetite predominantly replaces pyrite and less frequently chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and gangue minerals. It was established that the major carriers of As and Co are crystals of metamorphic pyrite. Chalcopyrite is the major carrier of Zn, Sn, Te, Pb, Bi, and Ag. Admixture of Fe and Cu is typical of sphalerite, and Se and Ni are characteristic of pyrrhotite. Ti, V, Mn, Sb, As, Ba, and U are concentrated in magnetite. The banded ores of the Mauk deposit are suggested as having been transformed in several stages: diagenesis, anadiagenesis, epidiagenesis ( t < 300°C), and amphibolite facies metamorphism ( t > 500°C).

  10. Biogenic Magnetite Formation through Anaerobic Biooxidation of Fe(II)

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Swades K.; Lack, Joseph G.; Coates, John D.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of isotopically light carbonates in association with fine-grained magnetite is considered to be primarily due to the reduction of Fe(III) by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the environment. Here, we report on magnetite formation by biooxidation of Fe(II) coupled to denitrification. This metabolism offers an alternative environmental source of biogenic magnetite. PMID:11375205

  11. Magnetite Biomineralization: Fifty years of progress, from beach-combing to the SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Dixson, A. D.; Raub, T.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetite biomineralization was first discovered 50 years ago as a hardening agent in the teeth of the Polyplacophoran molluscs (chitons) by the late Prof. Heinz A. Lowenstam of Caltech, when he noticed unusual erosional effects produced by their grazing in the intertidal zones of Palau (Lowenstam, 1962). Since then, biogenic magnetite has been detected in a broad range of organisms, including magnetotactic bacteria, protists, insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals including humans. In many species, the role of ferromagnetic material as a neurophysiological transducer is demonstrated clearly through the effects of pulse-remagnetization on behavior. A brief (1 uS), properly configured magnetic discharge from a rectified LC circuit, tailored to exceed the coercivity of the magnetite, will often abolish a magnetic behavioral response, or in some cases make the organism go the wrong way. This is a unique ferromagnetic effect. The genes controlling magnetite biomineralization are well characterized in several species of bacteria, and the ability of some of these bacterial genes to initiate magnetite precipitation in mammalian cell lines argues for a common descent, probably via a magnetotactic mitochondrial ancestor. Previous studies in fish reported the presence of single-domain magnetite crystals in cells near projections of the trigeminal nerve, co-located in the olfactory epithelium. Although the cells are rare, the recent development of a spinning magnetic field technique allows easy identification and isolation of these cells for individual study (Eder et al., 2012). The cells are surprisingly magnetic, with moments hundreds of times larger than typical magnetotactic bacteria. Subsequent efforts to identify the anatomical seat of magnetoreceptors have focused on the same locations in new organisms, excluding other areas. Using SQUID moment magnetometry and SQUID scanning microscopy, we report here the unexpected presence of biogenic magnetite in

  12. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Schwartz, Cindy; Morphew, Mary; McIntosh, J. Richard; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Vali, Hojatollah

    2004-01-01

    Dated at approximately 3.9 billion years of age, carbonate disks, found within fractures of the host rock of Martian meteorite ALH84001, have been interpreted as secondary minerals that formed at low temperature in an aqueous medium. Heterogeneously distributed within these disks are magnetite nanocrystals that are of Martian origin. Approximately one quarter of these magnetites have morphological and chemical similarities to magnetite particles produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, which are ubiquitous in aquatic habitats on Earth. Moreover, these types of magnetite particles are not known or expected to be produced by abiotic means either through geological processes or synthetically in the laboratory. The remaining three quarters of the ALH84001 magnetites are likely products of multiple processes including, but not limited to, precipitation from a hydrothermal fluid, thermal decomposition of the carbonate matrix in which they are embedded, and extracellular formation by dissimilatory Fe-reducing bacteria. We have proposed that the origins of magnetites in ALH84001 can be best explained as the products of multiple processes, one of which is biological. Recently the three-dimensional (3-D) external morphology of the purported biogenic fraction of the ALH84001 magnetites has been the subject of considerable debate. We report here the 3-D geometry of biogenic magnetite crystals extracted from MV-1 and of those extracted from ALH84001 carbonate disks using a combination of high resolution classical and tomographic transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We focus on answering the following questions: (1) which technique provides adequate information to deduce the 3-D external crystal morphology?; and, (2) what is the precise 3-D geometry of the ALH84001 and MV-1 magnetites?

  13. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  14. Magnetite in Black Sea Turtles (Chelonia agassizi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuentes, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Garduño, V.; Sanchez, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2004-12-01

    Previous studies have reported experimental evidence for magnetoreception in marine turtles. In order to increase our knowledge about magnetoreception and biogenic mineralization, we have isolated magnetite particles from the brain of specimens of black sea turtles Chelonia agassizi. Our samples come from natural deceased organisms collected the reserve area of Colola Maruata in southern Mexico. The occurrence of magnetite particles in brain tissue of black sea turtles offers the opportunity for further studies to investigate possible function of ferrimagnetic material, its mineralogical composition, grain size, texture and its location and structural arrangement within the host tissue. After sample preparation and microscopic examination, we localized and identified the ultrafine unidimensional particles of magnetite by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Particles present grain sizes between 10.0 to 40.0Mm. Our study provides, for the first time, evidence for biogenic formation of this material in the black sea turtles. The ultrafine particles are apparently superparamagnetic. Preliminary results from rock magnetic measurements are also reported and correlated to the SEM observations. The black turtle story on the Michoacan coast is an example of formerly abundant resource which was utilized as a subsistence level by Nahuatl indigenous group for centuries, but which is collapsing because of intensive illegal commercial exploitation. The most important nesting and breeding grounds for the black sea turtle on any mainland shore are the eastern Pacific coastal areas of Maruata and Colola, in Michoacan. These beaches are characterized by important amounts of magnetic mineral (magnetites and titanomagnetites) mixed in their sediments.

  15. Magnetite biomineralization and ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R B; Buseck, P R

    2000-04-01

    Certain chemical and mineral features of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were reported in 1996 to be probable evidence of ancient life on Mars. In spite of new observations and interpretations, the question of ancient life on Mars remains unresolved. Putative biogenic, nanometer magnetite has now become a leading focus in the debate. PMID:10742183

  16. Originof magnetite in martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E.; Fuller, M.

    2003-04-01

    The magnetization of ALH84001 is predominantly carried by single domain magnetite, which is found in association with carbonate. The magnetite is found in topotactic relationship with the carbonate in regions of iron rich carbonate, whereas in magnesium richer areas periclase is found. The magnetite formed from the carbonate by thermal decomposition of siderite at elevated temperature in a major impact event at about 4.0 Gyr. Chromite is also present in large amounts, but it is predominantly paramagnetic at room temperature with a Neel point close to 100^oK. Carbonate with associated magnetite is also found in the martian meteorite Nakhla. Experiments and theory show that siderite is a major product of percolation and evaporation of brines generated under pressures of more than 0.1bar of carbon dioxide. This is the preferred explanation for the carbonate in nakhla, as well as in ALH84001. Thermal decomposition of siderite may result from deep burial, magmatic heat sources, or as in the case of ALH84001, impact heating.

  17. Magnetite biomineralization and ancient life on Mars.

    PubMed

    Frankel, R B; Buseck, P R

    2000-04-01

    Certain chemical and mineral features of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 were reported in 1996 to be probable evidence of ancient life on Mars. In spite of new observations and interpretations, the question of ancient life on Mars remains unresolved. Putative biogenic, nanometer magnetite has now become a leading focus in the debate.

  18. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres.

  19. Bisphosphonate release profiles from magnetite microspheres.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Inoue, Tatsuya; Shirosaki, Yuki; Kawashita, Masakazu; Matsubara, Takao; Matsumine, Akihiko

    2014-10-01

    Hyperthermia has been suggested as a novel, minimally invasive cancer treatment method. After implantation of magnetic nano- or microparticles around a tumour through blood vessels, irradiation with alternating magnetic fields facilitates the efficient in situ hyperthermia even for deep-seated tumours. On the basis of this idea, if the microspheres are capable of delivering drugs, they could be promising multifunctional biomaterials effective for chemotherapy as well as hyperthermia. In the present study, magnetite microspheres were prepared by aggregation of the iron oxide colloid in water-in-oil (W/O) emulsion. The release behaviour of alendronate, a typical bisphosphonate, from the microspheres was examined in vitro as a model of the bone tumour prevention and treatment system. The alendronate was successfully incorporated onto the porous magnetite microspheres in vacuum conditions. The drug-loaded microspheres maintained their original spherical shapes even after shaking in ultrapure water for 3 days, suggesting that they have sufficient mechanical integrity for clinical use. It was attributed to high aggregation capability of the magnetite nanoparticles through van der Waals and weak magnetic attractions. The microspheres showed slow release of the alendronate in vitro, resulting from tight covalent or ionic interaction between the magnetite and the alendronate. The release rate was diffusion-controlled type and well controlled by the alendronate concentration in drug incorporation to the microspheres. PMID:24854985

  20. Adsorption of zinc on magnetite pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Cargnel, D.A.; Cole, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Zinc is a common contaminant in wastewater electroplating, metal finishing, and many other industrial processes. This paper presents the results of work which is intended to be the first step in an evaluation of the use of concentrated and pelletized magnetite for the adsorption of metals from industrial wastewater. The magnetite used is a cold carbon bonded material which is formulated for the steel industry as a complete product ready for feed to the furnaces. The specific objective of this work was to determine the zinc adsorption capacity of the prepared magnetite pellets through batch tests that were designed to allow the development of an adsorption isotherm. Future work would explore the potential for use of the spent adsorbent in the steel making process, thereby allowing the recovered metals to be recycled into steel products, while avoiding spent adsorbent disposal costs. Although not evaluated in this study, an additional advantage of the use of magnetite as an adsorbent is that it can be magnetically separated from the wastewater.

  1. Ferromagnetic resonance and low-temperature magnetic tests for biogenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Benjamin P.; Sam Kim, Soon; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Kopp, Robert E.; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-07-01

    Magnetite is both a common inorganic rock-forming mineral and a biogenic product formed by a diversity of organisms. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetites of high purity and crystallinity (magnetosomes) arranged in linear chains of crystals. Magnetosomes and their fossils (magnetofossils) have been identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in sediments dating back to ˜510-570 Ma, and possibly in 4 Ga carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. We present the results from two rock magnetic analyses—the low-temperature Moskowitz test and ferromagnetic resonance (FMR)—applied to dozens of samples of magnetite and other materials. The magnetites in these samples are of diverse composition, size, shape, and origin: biologically induced (extracellular), biologically controlled (magnetosomes and chiton teeth), magnetofossil, synthetic, and natural inorganic. We confirm that the Moskowitz test is a distinctive indicator for magnetotactic bacteria and provide the first direct experimental evidence that this is accomplished via sensitivity to the magnetosome chain structure. We also demonstrate that the FMR spectra of four different strains of magnetotactic bacteria and a magnetofossil-bearing carbonate have a form distinct from all other samples measured in this study. We suggest that this signature also results from the magnetosomes' unique arrangement in chains. Because FMR can rapidly identify samples with large fractions of intact, isolated magnetosome chains, it could be a powerful tool for identifying magnetofossils in sediments.

  2. Lanthanide-Substituted Magnetite Nanoparticles Using a New Mixed Precursor Method by Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, J.; Roh, Y.; Yeary, L. W.; Lauf, R. J.; Phelps, T. J.

    2006-12-01

    A metal reducing bacterium, Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus successfully converted the precursor of L (lanthanide)-mixed akaganeite (LxFe1-xOOH) phase to L-substituted magnetite (LyFe3-yO4) while avoiding the potentially toxic effects of soluble L-ions. Antibiotic elements, lanthanide (Nd, Gd, Tb, Ho, and Er)-substituted magnetites were produced by microbial fermentation using LxFe1-xOOH, where x was up to 0.02 which is equivalent to 0.72 mM. Combining lanthanides into the akaganeite precursor phase mitigated some of the toxicity when compared to the traditional method by using pure akaganeite and the dissolved L-salt form. This new technique showed that an upper limit of L-concentrations between 0.02 and 0.1 mM might suppress bacterial activity. At the equivalent L-cation mole fraction, the traditional method increased the concentration of soluble toxic L ions in the final media. The precursor method enabled production of microbially synthesized L- substituted magnetite with an L-concentration 36-fold greater than could be obtained when the lanthanides were added as soluble salts. These results were confirmed by protein assay. The increase of L-concentration in the magnetite evidently manipulates its physical properties such as decreasing Curie temperature and decreasing saturation magnetism of L-substituted magnetite. This mixed precursor method can therefore be used to extend the application for nanofermentation and other bacterial synthesis fields where there is a need for economically low-energy consumable microbial production of nanoscale materials that should involve toxic or inhibitory elements to bacterial growth.

  3. Exchange bias in polycrystalline magnetite films made by ion-beam assisted deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Maninder; Qiang, You; Jiang, Weilin; Burks, Edward C.; Liu, Kai; Namavar, Fereydoon; McCloy, John S.

    2014-11-07

    Iron oxide films were produced using ion-beam-assisted deposition, and Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction indicate single-phase magnetite. However, incorporation of significant fractions of argon in the films from ion bombardment is evident from chemical analysis, and Fe/O ratios are lower than expected from pure magnetite, suggesting greater than normal disorder. Low temperature magnetometry and first-order reversal curve measurements show strong exchange bias, which likely arises from defects at grain boundaries, possibly amorphous, creating frustrated spins. Since these samples contain grains ∼6 nm, a large fraction of the material consists of grain boundaries, where spins are highly disordered and reverse independently with external field.

  4. One step facile synthesis of ferromagnetic magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suppiah, Durga Devi; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2016-09-01

    The ferromagnetic properties of magnetite (Fe3O4) were influenced by the nanoparticle size, hence importance were given to the synthesis method. This paper clearly shows that magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by employing one step controlled precipitation method using a single salt (Iron(II) sulfate) iron precursor. The acquired titration curve from this method provides vital information on the possible reaction mechanism leading to the magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles formation. Goethite (α-FeOOH) was obtained at pH 4, while the continuous addition of hydroxyl ions (OH-) forms iron hydroxides (Fe(OH)2). This subsequently reacts with the goethite, producing magnetite (Fe3O4) at pH 10. Spectroscopy studies validate the magnetite phase existence while structural and morphology analysis illustrates cubic shaped magnetite with an average size of 35 nm was obtained. The synthesized magnetite might be superparamagnetic though lower saturation magnetization (67.5 emu/g) measured at room temperature as compared to bulk magnetite. However the nanoparticles surface anisotropy leads to higher remanence (12 emu/g) and coercivity (117.7 G) making the synthesized magnetite an excellent candidate to be utilized in recording devices. The understanding of the magnetite synthesis mechanism can not only be used to achieve even smaller magnetite nanoparticles but also to prepare different types of iron oxides hydroxides using different iron precursor source.

  5. The contribution of vanadium and titanium on improving methylene blue decolorization through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction catalyzed by their co-doped magnetite.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Zhong, Yuanhong; Zhu, Sanyuan; Ma, Lingya; Yuan, Peng; Zhu, Jianxi; He, Hongping; Jiang, Zheng

    2012-01-15

    This study investigated the methylene blue (MB) decolorization through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction catalyzed by V-Ti co-doped magnetites, with emphasis on comparing the contribution of V and Ti cations on improving the adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite. In the well crystallized spinel structure, both Ti(4+) and V(3+) occupied the octahedral sites. Ti(4+) showed a more obvious effect on increasing specific surface area and superficial hydroxyl amount than V(3+) did, resulting in a significant improvement of the adsorption ability of magnetite to MB. The UV introduction greatly accelerated MB degradation. And magnetite with more Ti and less V displayed better catalytic activity in MB degradation through heterogeneous UV-Fenton reaction. The transformation of degradation products and individual contribution from vanadium and titanium on improving adsorption and catalytic activity of magnetite were also investigated. These new insights are of high importance for well understanding the interface interaction between contaminants and metal doped magnetites, and the environmental application of natural and synthetic magnetites.

  6. The magnetosome membrane protein, MmsF, is a major regulator of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1

    PubMed Central

    Murat, Dorothée; Falahati, Veesta; Bertinetti, Luca; Csencsits, Roseann; Körnig, André; Downing, Kenneth; Faivre, Damien; Komeili, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) use magnetosomes, membrane bound crystals of magnetite or greigite, for navigation along geomagnetic fields. In Magnetospirillum magneticum sp. AMB-1, and other MTB, a magnetosome gene island (MAI) is essential for every step of magnetosome formation. An 8-gene region of the MAI encodes several factors implicated in control of crystal size and morphology in previous genetic and proteomic studies. We show that these factors play a minor role in magnetite biomineralization in vivo. In contrast, MmsF, a previously uncharacterized magnetosome membrane protein encoded within the same region plays a dominant role in defining crystal size and morphology and is sufficient for restoring magnetite synthesis in the absence of the other major biomineralization candidates. In addition, we show that the 18 genes of the mamAB gene cluster of the MAI are sufficient for the formation of an immature magnetosome organelle. Addition of MmsF to these 18 genes leads to a significant enhancement of magnetite biomineralization and an increase in the cellular magnetic response. These results define a new biomineralization protein and lay down the foundation for the design of autonomous gene cassettes for the transfer of the magnetic phenotype in other bacteria. PMID:22716969

  7. Production of substantially pure fructose

    SciTech Connect

    Hatcher, H.J.; Gallian, J.J.; Leeper, S.A.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a process for the production of a substantially pure product containing greater than 60% fructose. It comprises: combining a sucrose-containing substrate with effective amounts of a levansucrase enzyme preparation to form levan and glucose; purifying the levan by at least one of the following purification methods: ultrafiltration, diafiltration, hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, liquid--liquid partition, solvent extraction, chromatography, and precipitation; hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose substantially free of glucose and sucrose; and recovering the fructose by at least one of the following recovery methods: hyperfiltration, reverse osmosis, evaporation, drying, crystallization, and chromatography.

  8. Origin of carbonate-magnetite-sulfide assemblages in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Scott, E R

    1999-02-25

    A review of the mineralogical, isotopic, and chemical properties of the carbonates and associated submicrometer iron oxides and sulfides in Martian meteorite ALH84001 provides minimal evidence for microbial activity. Some magnetites resemble those formed by magnetotactic microorganisms but cubic crystals <50 nm in size and elongated grains <25 nm long are too small to be single-domain magnets and are probably abiogenic. Magnetites with shapes that are clearly unique to magnetotactic bacteria appear to be absent in ALH84001. Magnetosomes have not been reported in plutonic rocks and are unlikely to have been transported in fluids through fractures and uniformly deposited where abiogenic magnetite was forming epitaxially on carbonate. Submicrometer sulfides and magnetites probably formed during shock heating. Carbonates have correlated variations in Ca, Mg, and 18O/16O, magnetite-rich rims, and they appear to be embedded in pyroxene and plagiociase glass. Carbonates with these features have not been identified in carbonaceous chondrites and terrestrial rocks, suggesting that the ALH84001 carbonates have a unique origin. Carbonates and hydrated minerals in ALH84001, like secondary phases in other Martian meteorites, have O and H isotopic ratios favoring formation from fluids that exchanged with the Martian atmosphere. I propose that carbonates originally formed in ALH84001 from aqueous fluids and were subsequently shock heated and vaporized. The original carbonates were probably dolomite-magnesite-siderite assemblages that formed in pores at interstitial sites with minor sulfate, chloride, and phyllosilicates. These phases, like many other volatile-rich phases in Martian meteorites, may have formed as evaporate deposits from intermittent floods. PMID:11542931

  9. [Interaction of fibrinogen with magnetite nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Bychkova, A V; Sorokina, O N; Kovarskiĭ, A L; Shapiro, A B; Leonova, V B; Rozenfel'd, M A

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between fibrinogen and magnetite nanoparticles in solution has been studied by the methods of spin labeling, ferromagnetic resonance, dynamic and Rayleigh light scattering. It was shown that protein molecules adsorb on the surface of nanoparticles to form multilayer protein covers. The number of molecules adsorbed on one nanoparticle amounts to approximately 65 and the thickness of the adsorption layer amounts to approximately 27 nm. Separate nanoparticles with fibrinogen covers (clusters) form aggregates due to interactions of the end D-domains of fibrinogen. Under the influence of direct magnetic field, nanoparticles with adsorbed proteins form linear aggregates parallel to force lines. It was shown that the rate of protein coagulation during the formation of fibrin gel under the action of thrombin on fibrinogen decreases approximately 2 times in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles, and the magnitude of the average fiber mass-length ratio grows.

  10. EBSD analysis of electroplated magnetite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Teng, C. L.; Ryan, M. P.; Hartmann, U.; Mücklich, F.

    2010-05-01

    By means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), we analyse the crystallographic orientation of electroplated magnetite thin films on Si/copper substrates. Varying the voltage during the electroplating procedure, the resulting surface properties are differing considerably. While a high voltage produces larger but individual grains on the surface, the surfaces become smoother on decreasing voltage. Good quality Kikuchi patterns could be obtained from all samples; even on individual grains, where the surface and the edges could be measured. The spatial resolution of the EBSD measurement could be increased to about 10 nm; thus enabling a detailed analysis of single magnetite grains. The thin film samples are polycrystalline and do not exhibit a preferred orientation. EBSD reveals that the grain size changes depending on the processing conditions, while the detected misorientation angles stay similar.

  11. Initial Test Determination of Cosmogenic Nuclides in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, H.; Caffee, M. W.; Nagao, K.; Nishiizumi, K.

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived radionuclides, such as 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl, are produced by cosmic rays in surficial materials on Earth, and used for determinations of cosmic-ray exposure ages and erosion rates. Quartz and limestone are routinely used as the target minerals for these geomorphological studies. Magnetite also contains target elements that produce abundant cosmogenic nuclides when exposed to the cosmic rays. Magnetite has several notable merits that enable the measurement of cosmogenic nuclides: (1) the target elements for production of cosmogenic nuclides in magnetite comprise the dominant mineral form of magnetite, Fe3O4; (2) magnetite can be easily isolated, using a magnet, after rock milling; (3) multiple cosmogenic nuclides are produced by exposure of magnetite to cosmic-ray secondaries; and (4) cosmogenic nuclides produced in the rock containing the magnetite, but not within the magnetite itself, can be separated using nitric acid and sodium hydroxide leaches. As part of this initial study, magnetite was separated from a basaltic sample collected from the Atacama Desert in Chili (2,995 m). Then Be, Al, Cl, Ca, and Mn were separated from ~2 g of the purified magnetite. We measured cosmogenic 10Be, 26Al, and 36Cl concentrations in the magnetite by accelerator mass spectrometry at PRIME Lab, Purdue University. Cosmogenic 3He and 21Ne concentrations of aliquot of the magnetite were measured by mass spectrometry at the University of Tokyo. We also measured the nuclide concentrations from magnetite collected from a mine at Ishpeming, Michigan as a blank. The 10Be and 36Cl concentrations as well as 3He concentration produce concordant cosmic ray exposure ages of ~0.4 Myr for the Atacama basalt. However, observed high 26Al and 21Ne concentrations attribute to those nuclides incorporation from silicate impurity.

  12. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  13. Galvanostatic interruption of lithium insertion into magnetite: Evidence of surface layer formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, Nicholas W.; Knehr, K. W.; Cama, Christina A.; Lininger, Christianna N.; Lin, Zhou; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; West, Alan C.

    2016-07-01

    Magnetite is a known lithium intercalation material, and the loss of active, nanocrystalline magnetite can be inferred from the open-circuit potential relaxation. Specifically, for current interruption after relatively small amounts of lithium insertion, the potential first increases and then decreases, and the decrease is hypothesized to be due to a formation of a surface layer, which increases the solid-state lithium concentration in the remaining active material. Comparisons of simulation to experiment suggest that the reactions with the electrolyte result in the formation of a thin layer of electrochemically inactive material, which is best described by a nucleation and growth mechanism. Simulations are consistent with experimental results observed for 6, 8 and 32-nm crystals. Furthermore, simulations capture the experimental differences in lithiation behavior between the first and second cycles.

  14. Galvanostatic interruption of lithium insertion into magnetite: Evidence of surface layer formation

    DOE PAGES

    Nicholas W. Brady; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Knehr, K. W.; Cama, Christina A.; Lininger, Christianna N.; Lin, Zhou; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; West, Alan C.

    2016-05-05

    Magnetite is a known lithium intercalation material, and the loss of active, nanocrystalline magnetite can be inferred from the open-circuit potential relaxation. Specifically, for current interruption after relatively small amounts of lithium insertion, the potential first increases and then decreases, and the decrease is hypothesized to be due to a formation of a surface layer, which increases the solid-state lithium concentration in the remaining active material. Comparisons of simulation to experiment suggest that the reactions with the electrolyte result in the formation of a thin layer of electrochemically inactive material, which is best described by a nucleation and growth mechanism.more » Simulations are consistent with experimental results observed for 6, 8 and 32-nm crystals. As a result, simulations capture the experimental differences in lithiation behavior between the first and second cycles.« less

  15. Hybrid DFT calculation of Fe57 NMR resonances and orbital order in magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, C. H.

    2014-08-01

    The crystal structure and charge and orbital order of magnetite below the Verwey temperature are calculated using a first-principles hybrid density functional theory (DFT) method. The initial atomic positions in the crystal-structure calculation are those recently refined from x-ray diffraction data for the Cc space-group unit cell [Senn, Wright, and Attfield, Nature (London) 481, 173 (2012), 10.1038/nature10704]. Fermi contact and magnetic dipolar contributions to hyperfine fields at Fe57 nuclei obtained from hybrid DFT calculations are used to obtain NMR resonance frequencies for magnetite for a range of external magnetic field directions in a relatively weak field. NMR frequencies from hybrid density functional theory calculations are compared to NMR data [M. Mizoguchi, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 70, 2333 (2001), 10.1143/JPSJ.70.2333] for a range of applied magnetic field directions. NMR resonance frequencies of B-site Fe ions show large relative variations with applied field direction owing to anisotropic hyperfine fields from charge and orbital ordered Fe 3d minority-spin electrons at those sites. Good agreement between computed and measured NMR resonance frequencies confirms the pattern of charge and orbital order obtained from calculations. The charge and orbital order of magne-tite in its low-temperature phase obtained from hybrid DFT calculations is analyzed in terms of one-electron bonds between Fe ions. The Verwey transition in magnetite therefore resembles Mott-Peierls transitions in vanadium oxides which undergo symmetry-breaking transitions owing to electron-pair bond formation.

  16. Preparation and characterization of MR fluid consisting of magnetite particle coated with PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, M. K.; Park, B. J.; Choi, H. J.

    2009-02-01

    To improve physical characteristics of MR fluid, we synthesize magnetite nanoparticles (MNP) in shape of magnetic core- poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) polymeric shell by atomic transfer radical polymerization. Prepared MNPs-PMMA which possesses a density lower than that of pure MNPs were characterized by FT-IR, XPS and TEM. Synthesized MNP-PMMA based MR fluid which was dispersed in non-magnetic medium lubricant oil (Yu-base 8) with 10 vol% was prepared. Rheological properties such as shear viscosity, shear stress and storage modulus were measured by both static and dynamic tests using a rotational rheometer with various external magnetic field strength applied.

  17. Silicon dioxide nanoporous structure with liquid crystal for optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushynskyi, Orest; Vistak, Maria; Gotra, Zenon; Fechan, Andriy; Mikityuk, Zinoviy

    2013-05-01

    It has been studied the spectral characteristics of the porous silicon dioxide and cholesteric liquid crystal. It has been shown that doping of the EE1 cholesteric liquid crystal with Fe3O4 magnetite nanoparticles doesn't shift significantly the position of the transmittance minimum of the material. It has been found that the deformation of chiral pitch of cholesteric liquid crystal with magnetite is observed in case of doping of porous nanocomposite host with following shifting of minimum of transmittance into short wavelength direction. It has been shown that influence of carbon monoxide on optical characteristics of the cholesteric liquid crystal with magnetite can be explained by the interaction of CARBON MONOXIDE molecules with magnetite nanodopants.

  18. Magnetite/poly(alkylcyanoacrylate) (core/shell) nanoparticles as 5-Fluorouracil delivery systems for active targeting.

    PubMed

    Arias, José L; Gallardo, Visitación; Ruiz, M A Adolfina; Delgado, Angel V

    2008-05-01

    In this article, a reproducible emulsion polymerization process is described to prepare core/shell colloidal nanospheres, loaded with 5-Fluorouracil, and consisting of a magnetic core (magnetite) and a biodegradable polymeric shell [poly(ethyl-2-cyanoacrylate), poly(butylcyanoacrylate), poly(hexylcyanoacrylate), or poly(octylcyanoacrylate)]. The heterogeneous structure of these carriers can confer them both the possibility of being used as drug delivery systems and the responsiveness to external magnetic fields, allowing an active drug targeting without a concurrent systemic distribution. Zeta potential determinations as a function of ionic strength showed that the surface behaviour of the core/shell particles is similar to that of pure cyanoacrylate particles. The first magnetization curve of both magnetite and magnetite/polymer particles demonstrated that the polymer shell reduces the magnetic responsiveness of the particles, but keeps unchanged their ferrimagnetic character. Two drug loading mechanisms were studied: absorption or entrapment in the polymeric network, and surface adsorption. We found that the acidity of the medium had significant effects on the drug absorption per unit mass of polymer, and needs to be controlled to avoid formation of macroaggregates and to reach significant 5-Fluorouracil absorption. The type of polymer and the drug concentration are also main factors determining the drug incorporation to the core/shell particles. 5-Fluorouracil release evaluations showed a biphasic profile affected by the type of polymeric shell, the type of drug incorporation and the amount of drug loaded.

  19. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M. S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20-30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications.

  20. Production of magnetite by electrolytic reduction of ferric oxyhydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique-Julio, J.; Machuca-Martinez, F.; Marriaga-Cabrales, N.; Pinzon-Cardenas, M.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) particles were prepared by electrolytic synthesis without the use of a surfactant. Various techniques were used to evaluate the effect of two parameters, the current density and the separation between electrodes, in the formation process of ferrimagnetic magnetite particles. The crystallite sizes can be controlled by adjusting the current density. Particle formation was favored below a critical separation distance between the electrodes. Finally, a formation mechanism for magnetite was proposed based on the partial reduction of lepidocrocite.

  1. Functional Analysis of the Magnetosome Island in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense: The mamAB Operon Is Sufficient for Magnetite Biomineralization

    PubMed Central

    Lohße, Anna; Ullrich, Susanne; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah; Wanner, Gerd; Richter, Michael; Voigt, Birgit; Schweder, Thomas; Schüler, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial magnetosomes are membrane-enveloped, nanometer-sized crystals of magnetite, which serve for magnetotactic navigation. All genes implicated in the synthesis of these organelles are located in a conserved genomic magnetosome island (MAI). We performed a comprehensive bioinformatic, proteomic and genetic analysis of the MAI in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. By the construction of large deletion mutants we demonstrate that the entire region is dispensable for growth, and the majority of MAI genes have no detectable function in magnetosome formation and could be eliminated without any effect. Only <25% of the region comprising four major operons could be associated with magnetite biomineralization, which correlated with high expression of these genes and their conservation among magnetotactic bacteria. Whereas only deletion of the mamAB operon resulted in the complete loss of magnetic particles, deletion of the conserved mms6, mamGFDC, and mamXY operons led to severe defects in morphology, size and organization of magnetite crystals. However, strains in which these operons were eliminated together retained the ability to synthesize small irregular crystallites, and weakly aligned in magnetic fields. This demonstrates that whereas the mamGFDC, mms6 and mamXY operons have crucial and partially overlapping functions for the formation of functional magnetosomes, the mamAB operon is the only region of the MAI, which is necessary and sufficient for magnetite biomineralization. Our data further reduce the known minimal gene set required for magnetosome formation and will be useful for future genome engineering approaches. PMID:22043287

  2. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We

  3. Purely lytic osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    De Santos, L.A.; Eideken, B.

    1982-11-01

    The radiographic features of 42 purely lytic osteosarcomas are presented. Purely lytic osteosarcoma is identified as a lytic lesion of bone with no demonstrable osteoid matrix by conventional radiographic modalities. Purely lytic osteosarcoma represented 13.7% of a group of 305 osteosarcomas. The most common presentation was that of a lytic illdefined lesion with a moderate to large extraosseous mass component. Nine lesions presented with benign radiographic features. The differential diagnosis is outlined. The need for awareness of this type of presentation of osteosarcoma is stressed.

  4. Study of the surface chemistry and morphology of single walled carbon nanotube-magnetite composites

    SciTech Connect

    Marquez-Linares, F.; Uwakweh, O.N.C.; Lopez, N.; Chavez, E.; Polanco, R.; Morant, C.; Sanz, J.M.; Elizalde, E.; Neira, C.; Nieto, S.; Roque-Malherbe, R.

    2011-03-15

    The study of the morphologies of the single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), magnetite nanoparticles (MNP), and the composite based on them was carried with combined X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). These techniques together with thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) and diffuse reflectance infrared transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) confirmed the production of pure single phases, and that the composite material consisted of MNP attached to the outer surface of the SWCNT. The Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) research showed the presence of a large quantity of Lewis acid sites in the highly dispersed magnetite particles supported on the SWCNT outer surface. The DRIFTS carbon dioxide adsorption study of the composites revealed significant adsorption of carbon dioxide, fundamentally in the Lewis acid sites. Then, the Lewis acid sites were observed to be catalytically active. Further, the electron exchange between the Lewis acid sites and the basic or amphoteric adsorbed molecules could influence the magnetic properties of the magnetite. Consequently, together with this first ever use of MS in the study of Lewis acid sites, this investigation revealed the potential of the composites for catalytic and sensors applications. -- Graphical abstract: A large amount of Lewis acid sites were found in the highly dispersed magnetite which is supported on the SWCNT outer surface. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The obtained materials were completely characterized with XRD, Raman and SEM-TEM. {yields} DRIFT, TGA and adsorption of the composites allowed understand the material formation. {yields} This is the first report of a study of Lewis sites by Moessbauer spectroscopy.

  5. Magnetite in Desert Varnish and Applications to Rock Varnish on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.; Bishop, J. L.; de, S.

    2002-03-01

    Magnetite in desert varnish is characterized here using DTA, IR and SEM. The presence of magnetite in desert varnish is significant because of the oxidizing environment. This situation is similar to that of Mars where magnetite may also be present.

  6. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  7. Pure-quartic solitons.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; de Sterke, C Martijn; Martijn, de Sterke C; Sipe, J E; Krauss, Thomas F; Eggleton, Benjamin J; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  8. Viscosity studies of water based magnetite nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anu, K.; Hemalatha, J.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been synthesized through co-precipitation method. The structural and topographical studies made with the X-Ray Diffractometer and Atomic Force Microscope are presented in this paper. The density and viscosity studies for the ferrofluids of various concentrations have been made at room temperature. The experimental viscosities are compared with theoretical values obtained from Einstein, Batchelor and Wang models. An attempt to modify the Rosensweig model is made and the modified Rosensweig equation is reported. In addition, new empirical correlation is also proposed for predicting viscosity of ferrofluid at various concentrations.

  9. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  10. Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe2+ and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Handler, Robert M; Beard, Brian L; Pasakarnis, Timothy; Johnson, Clark M; Scherer, Michelle M

    2012-11-20

    The reaction between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) has been extensively studied due to its role in contaminant reduction, trace-metal sequestration, and microbial respiration. Previous work has demonstrated that the reaction of Fe(2+) with magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) results in the structural incorporation of Fe(2+) and an increase in the bulk Fe(2+) content of magnetite. It is unclear, however, whether significant Fe atom exchange occurs between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+), as has been observed for other Fe oxides. Here, we measured the extent of Fe atom exchange between aqueous Fe(2+) and magnetite by reacting isotopically "normal" magnetite with (57)Fe-enriched aqueous Fe(2+). The extent of Fe atom exchange between magnetite and aqueous Fe(2+) was significant (54-71%), and went well beyond the amount of Fe atoms found at the near surface. Mössbauer spectroscopy of magnetite reacted with (56)Fe(2+) indicate that no preferential exchange of octahedral or tetrahedral sites occurred. Exchange experiments conducted with Co-ferrite (Co(2+)Fe(2)(3+)O(4)) showed little impact of Co substitution on the rate or extent of atom exchange. Bulk electron conduction, as previously invoked to explain Fe atom exchange in goethite, is a possible mechanism, but if it is occurring, conduction does not appear to be the rate-limiting step. The lack of significant impact of Co substitution on the kinetics of Fe atom exchange, and the relatively high diffusion coefficients reported for magnetite suggest that for magnetite, unlike goethite, Fe atom diffusion is a plausible mechanism to explain the rapid rates of Fe atom exchange in magnetite.

  11. [Role of mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate) in the obtaining of stabilized magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical application].

    PubMed

    Vazhnichaya, Ye M; Mokliak, Ye V; Kurapov, Yu A; Zabozlaev, A A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) are studied as agents for magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia of malignant tumors, targeted drug delivery as well as anti-anemic action. One of the main problems of such NPs is their aggregation that requires creation of methods for magnetite NPs stabilization during preparation of liquid medicinal forms on their basis. The present work is devoted to the possibility of mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate) use for solubilization of magnetite NPs in hydrophilic medium. For this purpose, the condensate produced by electron-beam evaporation and condensation, with magnetite particles of size 5-8 nm deposited into the crystals of sodium chloride were used in conjunction with substance of mexidol (2-ethyl-6-methyl-3-hydroxypyridine succinate), and low molecular weight polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The NP condensate was dispersed in distilled water or PVP or mexidol solutions. NPs size distribution in the liquid phase of the systems was determined by photon correlation spectroscopy, iron (Fe) concentration was evaluated by atomic emission spectrometry. It is shown that in the dispersion prepared in distilled water, the major amount of NPs was of 13-120 nm in size, in mexidol solution - 270-1700 nm, in PVP solution - 30-900 nm. In the fluid containing magnetite NPs together with mexidol and PVP, the main fraction (99.9%) was characterized by the NPs size of 14-75 nm with maximum of 25 nm. This system had the highest iron concentration: it was similar to that in the sample with mexidol solution and 6.6-7.3 times higher than the concentration in the samples with distilled water or PVP. Thus, in the preparation of aqueous dispersions based on magnetite NPs condensate, mexidol provides a transition of Fe to the liquid phase in amount necessary to achieve its biological activity, and PVP stabilizes such modified NPs. PMID:26215417

  12. Magnetite as Possible Template for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    a perfect chance to attest this argument. In order to understand the distribution of spiral magnetites among different meteorite classes, as well as to investigate their spiral configurations and correlation to molecular asymmetry, we observed polished thin sections of CCs using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging. Individual magnetite grains were picked, embedded in epoxy, thin-sectioned using an ultra-microtome, and studied with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to reconstruct the crystal orientation along the stack of magnetite disks.

  13. Synthesis, characterisation and application of silica-magnetite nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Ian J.; Taylor, James; Todd, Michael; Davies, Martin J.; Borioni, Enrico; Sangregorio, Claudio; Sen, Tapas

    2004-12-01

    Silica-magnetite composites were prepared for eventual applications in biomolecular separations (nucleic acids). Their production on large scale has been optimised and they have been extensively characterised in a physical and chemical context. They perform at least as well, if not better than a commercially available equivalent at adsorbing and eluting DNA. Several methods for the preparation of magnetite were compared in order to select one, which produced particles, possessing high magnetic susceptibility, low rate of sedimentation and good chemical stability. Of the main methods studied: (i) oxidative hydrolysis of iron(II) sulphate in alkaline media, (ii) alkaline hydrolysis of iron(II) and iron(III) chloride solutions, and (iii) precipitation from iron(II) and iron(III) chloride solutions by hydrolysis of urea, method (i) produced the 'best' magnetite particles. Silica-magnetite composites were prepared using the 'best' magnetite, and, for comparison, two methods for depositing silica were used to coat the silica onto magnetite nanoparticles, from silicic acid at pH 10 and by acid hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) at 90 °C. The best method for yielding silica-magnetite composites that worked well in DNA adsorption and elution proved to be that involving silicic acid and this material could be made in 20 g batch sizes. Silica-magnetite composites from the two methods proved to have distinct and different physical and chemical properties. All magnetite and silica-magnetite samples were fully characterised for their relative chemical composition using Fourier-transform infrared, XRF and thermo-gravimetric analysis. Their physical characteristics were determined using scanning electron microscopy and N2 adsorption and Mossbauer spectroscopy was used to confirm the identity of the iron oxides produced. Selected samples were comparatively tested for their ability to adsorb, and subsequently elute, 2-deoxyguanosine-5-monophosphate (GMP) and its non

  14. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2006-12-26

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  15. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.; Padilla, Dennis D.; Wingo, Robert M.; Worl, Laura A.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2003-07-22

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  16. Biogeochemical role of magnetite in urban soils (Review of publications)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.

    2013-03-01

    The surface horizons of urban soils are enriched in technogenic magnetite Fe3O4 accumulated from emissions. Its content there reaches 3-4% and more, whereas it does not exceed 0.1% in the back-ground soils. In urban soils, large spherical magnetite particles of pseudo-single-domain and multidomain fabric predominate; the cavities in magnetic spherules decrease their chemical stability and increase their reactivity. Magnetite is most often destroyed in urban soils due to complexing; its destruction may be initiated by mineral salts entering the soil with deicing mixtures and by organic acids excreted by roots (e.g., by oxalic acid). The high solubility of magnetite with ammonium oxalate should be taken into account when using Tamm's reagent for the analysis of urban soils. Magnetite is a mineral carrier of some heavy metals. Therefore, its content (as determined from the magnetic susceptibility) serves as an indirect index of soil pollution. In addition, magnetite may affect many soil properties as a reducer and sorbent. It adsorbs phosphorus thus preventing the penetration of this nutrient into rivers and lakes. Magnetite also oxidizes Cl-containing aliphatic hydrocarbons and purifies the soil. Although magnetite enters urban soils as a pollutant, its influence on the soil properties cannot be unambiguously judged as only negative.

  17. Effects of oxidation on the magnetization of nanoparticulate magnetite.

    PubMed

    Rebodos, Robert L; Vikesland, Peter J

    2010-11-16

    Synthetic nanomagnetite has been suggested as a potential reactant for the in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater. Although the application of magnetite nanoparticles for environmental remediation is promising, a full understanding of particle reactivity has been deterred by the propensity of the nanoparticles to aggregate and become colloidally unstable. Attractive magnetic interactions between particles are partially responsible for their aggregation. In this study, we characterized the magnetic behavior of magnetite by determining the saturation magnetization, coercivity, remanent magnetization, susceptibility, and blocking temperature of synthetic magnetite using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We show how these properties vary in the presence of surface-associated solutes such as tetramethylammonium (TMA(+)) and ferrous (Fe(II)) cations. More importantly, because magnetite readily reacts with O(2) to produce maghemite, we analyzed the effect of oxidation on the magnetic properties of the particles. Because maghemite has a reported magnetic saturation that is less than that of magnetite, we hypothesized that oxidation would decrease the magnitude of the magnetic attractive force between adjacent particles. The presence of TMA(+) and Fe(II) caused a change in the magnetic properties of magnetite potentially because of alterations in its crystalline order. Magnetite oxidation caused a decrease in saturation magnetization, resulting in less significant magnetic interactions between particles. Oxidation, therefore, could lead to the decreased aggregation of magnetite nanoparticles and a potential enhancement of their colloidal stability.

  18. Habits of Magnetosome Crystals in Coccoid Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Ulysses; McCartney, Martha R.; Farina, Marcos; Frankel, Richard B.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron holography were used to study the habits of exceptionally large magnetite crystals in coccoid magnetotactic bacteria. In addition to the crystal habits, the crystallographic positioning of successive crystals in the magnetosome chain appears to be under strict biological control. PMID:16085893

  19. Electrochemical capacitor of magnetite in aqueous electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nae-Lih; Wang, Shi-Yu; Han, Chih-Yu; Wu, Dien-Shi; Shiue, Lih-Ren

    The capacitive behaviours of magnetite nanocrystallites, along with conductive carbon black additive, in aqueous electrolytes, including sodium sulphite, sulphate, chloride, and phosphate, and potassium hydroxide, have been characterised by means of cyclic voltammetry and chrono-potentiometry. The behaviour can be categorised into three groups. Sodium sulphate and chloride electrolytes give capacitances (˜5 F/g-Fe 3O 4) close to the space-charge capacitance of the oxide. Potassium hydroxide and sodium phosphate gave rise to a higher capacitance (˜7 F/g) which can in part be attributed to a surface redox reaction which involves hydroxide ions. Sodium sulphite results in the highest capacitances, which depend heavily on the dispersion of magnetite crystallites on the conductive matrix and range from ˜30 to 510 F/g-Fe 3O 4 with an operation voltage range of 1.2 V. Correlation between rest potential and anion-concentration gives strong indication of potential-determining process which involve either OH under extremely alkaline conditions (pOH<3) or SO 32- in the sulphite electrolyte.

  20. Curcumin associated magnetite nanoparticles inhibit in vitro melanoma cell growth.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Fernanda França; dos Santos, Michelly Christine; dos Passos, Debora Cristina Silva; Lima, Emilia Celma de Oliveira; Guillo, Lidia Andreu

    2011-09-01

    Curcumin is a natural product possessing therapeutic properties but the low water solubility of this compound limits its use. We have successfully incorporated curcumin into a bilayer of dodecanoic acid attached to magnetite nanoparticles in an effort to maximize solubility and delivery efficiency. Curcumin/magnetite nanoparticles were characterized using diffused reflectance infra-red fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Moreover curcumin associated magnetite nanoparticles inhibited in vitro melanoma cell growth. An inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 66.0 +/- 3.0 microM (48 +/- 2.2 microg-iron/mL) was observed for the curcumin/magnetite nanoparticles. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that curcumin associated magnetite nanoparticles were internalized by the melanoma cells and remained in the cytoplasm. The curcumin/magnetic nanoparticles synthesized in this study possess magnetic and water solubility properties making this a novel curcumin formulation with therapeutic potential.

  1. No evidence for intracellular magnetite in putative vertebrate magnetoreceptors identified by magnetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Nathaniel B.; Fritz, Tanja; Nimpf, Simon; Pichler, Paul; Lauwers, Mattias; Hickman, Robert W.; Papadaki-Anastasopoulou, Artemis; Ushakova, Lyubov; Heuser, Thomas; Resch, Guenter P.; Saunders, Martin; Shaw, Jeremy A.; Keays, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular basis of the magnetic sense remains an unsolved scientific mystery. One theory that aims to explain how animals detect the magnetic field is the magnetite hypothesis. It argues that intracellular crystals of the iron oxide magnetite (Fe3O4) are coupled to mechanosensitive channels that elicit neuronal activity in specialized sensory cells. Attempts to find these primary sensors have largely relied on the Prussian Blue stain that labels cells rich in ferric iron. This method has proved problematic as it has led investigators to conflate iron-rich macrophages with magnetoreceptors. An alternative approach developed by Eder et al. [Eder SH, et al. (2012) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109(30):12022–12027] is to identify candidate magnetoreceptive cells based on their magnetic moment. Here, we explore the utility of this method by undertaking a screen for magnetic cells in the pigeon. We report the identification of a small number of cells (1 in 476,000) with large magnetic moments (8–106 fAm2) from various tissues. The development of single-cell correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) permitted subcellular analysis of magnetic cells. This revealed the presence of extracellular structures composed of iron, titanium, and chromium accounting for the magnetic properties of these cells. Application of single-cell CLEM to magnetic cells from the trout failed to identify any intracellular structures consistent with biogenically derived magnetite. Our work illustrates the need for new methods to test the magnetite hypothesis of magnetosensation. PMID:25535350

  2. Hexagonal Platelet-like Magnetite as a Biosignature of Thermophilic Iron-Reducing Bacteria and Its Applications to the Exploration of the Modern Deep, Hot Biosphere and the Emergence of Iron-Reducing Bacteria in Early Precambrian Oceans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine magnetite crystals characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic magnetite. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into magnetite with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like magnetite of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic magnetite with such large crystal sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these crystals allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic magnetite in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life. Key Words: Biosignatures—Magnetite—Iron-reducing bacteria—Deep subsurface biosphere—Banded iron formation. Astrobiology 12, 1100–1108. PMID:23145573

  3. Hexagonal platelet-like magnetite as a biosignature of thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria and its applications to the exploration of the modern deep, hot biosphere and the emergence of iron-reducing bacteria in early precambrian oceans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Liang

    2012-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine magnetite crystals characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic magnetite. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into magnetite with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like magnetite of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic magnetite with such large crystal sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these crystals allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic magnetite in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life. PMID:23145573

  4. Hexagonal platelet-like magnetite as a biosignature of thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria and its applications to the exploration of the modern deep, hot biosphere and the emergence of iron-reducing bacteria in early precambrian oceans.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi-Liang

    2012-12-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria are able to enzymatically reduce ferric iron and couple to the oxidation of organic carbon. This mechanism induces the mineralization of fine magnetite crystals characterized by a wide distribution in size and irregular morphologies that are indistinguishable from authigenic magnetite. Thermoanaerobacter are thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria that predominantly inhabit terrestrial hot springs or deep crusts and have the capacity to transform amorphous ferric iron into magnetite with a size up to 120 nm. In this study, I first characterize the formation of hexagonal platelet-like magnetite of a few hundred nanometers in cultures of Thermoanaerobacter spp. strain TOR39. Biogenic magnetite with such large crystal sizes and unique morphology has never been observed in abiotic or biotic processes and thus can be considered as a potential biosignature for thermophilic iron-reducing bacteria. The unique crystallographic features and strong ferrimagnetic properties of these crystals allow easy and rapid screening for the previous presence of iron-reducing bacteria in deep terrestrial crustal samples that are unsuitable for biological detection methods and, also, the search for biogenic magnetite in banded iron formations that deposited only in the first 2 billion years of Earth with evidence of life.

  5. Origin of magnetite in oxidized CV chondrites: in situ measurement of oxygen isotope compositions of Allende magnetite and olivine.

    PubMed

    Choi, B G; McKeegan, K D; Leshin, L A; Wasson, J T

    1997-01-01

    Magnetite in the oxidized CV chondrite Allende mainly occurs as spherical nodules in porphyritic-olivine (PO) chondrules, where it is associated with Ni-rich metal and/or sulfides. To help constrain the origin of the magnetite, we measured oxygen isotopic compositions of magnetite and coexisting olivine grains in PO chondrules of Allende by an in situ ion microprobe technique. Five magnetite nodules form a relatively tight cluster in oxygen isotopic composition with delta 18O values from -4.8 to -7.1% and delta 17O values from -2.9 to -6.3%. Seven coexisting olivine grains have oxygen isotopic compositions from -0.9 to -6.3% in delta 18O and from -4.6 to -7.9% in delta 17O. The delta 17O values of the magnetite and coexisting olivine do not overlap; they range from -0.4 to -2.6%, and from -4.0 to -5.7%, respectively. Thus, the magnetite is not in isotopic equilibrium with the olivine in PO chondrules, implying that it formed after the chondrule formation. The delta 17O of the magnetite is somewhat more negative than estimates for the ambient solar nebula gas. We infer that the magnetite formed on the parent asteroid by oxidation of metal by H2O which had previously experienced minor O isotope exchange with fine-grained silicates.

  6. Origin of magnetite in oxidized CV chondrites: in situ measurement of oxygen isotope compositions of Allende magnetite and olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, B. G.; McKeegan, K. D.; Leshin, L. A.; Wasson, J. T.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetite in the oxidized CV chondrite Allende mainly occurs as spherical nodules in porphyritic-olivine (PO) chondrules, where it is associated with Ni-rich metal and/or sulfides. To help constrain the origin of the magnetite, we measured oxygen isotopic compositions of magnetite and coexisting olivine grains in PO chondrules of Allende by an in situ ion microprobe technique. Five magnetite nodules form a relatively tight cluster in oxygen isotopic composition with delta 18O values from -4.8 to -7.1% and delta 17O values from -2.9 to -6.3%. Seven coexisting olivine grains have oxygen isotopic compositions from -0.9 to -6.3% in delta 18O and from -4.6 to -7.9% in delta 17O. The delta 17O values of the magnetite and coexisting olivine do not overlap; they range from -0.4 to -2.6%, and from -4.0 to -5.7%, respectively. Thus, the magnetite is not in isotopic equilibrium with the olivine in PO chondrules, implying that it formed after the chondrule formation. The delta 17O of the magnetite is somewhat more negative than estimates for the ambient solar nebula gas. We infer that the magnetite formed on the parent asteroid by oxidation of metal by H2O which had previously experienced minor O isotope exchange with fine-grained silicates.

  7. Pure shift NMR.

    PubMed

    Zangger, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Although scalar-coupling provides important structural information, the resulting signal splittings significantly reduce the resolution of NMR spectra. Limited resolution is a particular problem in proton NMR experiments, resulting in part from the limited proton chemical shift range (∼10 ppm) but even more from the splittings due to scalar coupling to nearby protons. "Pure shift" NMR spectroscopy (also known as broadband homonuclear decoupling) has been developed for disentangling overlapped proton NMR spectra. The resulting spectra are considerably simplified as they consist of single lines, reminiscent of proton-decoupled C-13 spectra at natural abundance, with no multiplet structure. The different approaches to obtaining pure shift spectra are reviewed here and several applications presented. Pure shift spectra are especially useful for highly overlapped proton spectra, as found for example in reaction mixtures, natural products and biomacromolecules.

  8. Did the massive magnetite "lava flows" of El Laco (Chile) form by magmatic or hydrothermal processes? New constraints from magnetite composition by LA-ICP-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-06-01

    The El Laco magnetite deposits consist of more than 98 % magnetite but show field textures remarkably similar to mafic lava flows. Therefore, it has long been suggested that they represent a rare example of an effusive Fe oxide liquid. Field and petrographic evidence, however, suggest that the magnetite deposits represent replacement of andesite flows and that the textures are pseudomorphs. We determined the trace element content of magnetite by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) from various settings at El Laco and compared them with magnetite from both igneous and hydrothermal environments. This new technique allows us to place constraints on the conditions under which magnetite in these supposed magnetite "lava flows" formed. The trace element content of magnetite from the massive magnetite samples is different to any known magmatic magnetite, including primary magnetite phenocrysts from the unaltered andesite host rocks at El Laco. Instead, the El Laco magnetite is most similar in composition to hydrothermal magnetite from high-temperature environments (>500 °C), such as iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) and porphyry-Cu deposits. The magnetite trace elements from massive magnetite are characterised by (1) depletion in elements considered relatively immobile in hydrothermal fluids (e.g. Ti, Al, Cr, Zr, Hf and Sc); (2) enrichment in elements that are highly incompatible with magmatic magnetite (rare earth elements (REE), Si, Ca, Na and P) and normally present in very low abundance in magmatic magnetite; (3) high Ni/Cr ratios which are typical of magnetite from hydrothermal environments; and (4) oscillatory zoning of Si, Ca, Mg, REE and most high field strength elements, and zoning truncations indicating dissolution, similar to that formed in hydrothermal Fe skarn deposits. In addition, secondary magnetite in altered, brecciated host rock, forming disseminations and veins, has the same composition as magnetite from the massive

  9. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  10. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  11. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanocrystals-graphene oxide nanocomposites: facile synthesis and their enhanced electric double-layer capacitor performance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qihua; Wang, Dewei; Li, Yuqi; Wang, Tingmei

    2012-06-01

    Superparamagnetic magnetite nanocrystals-graphene oxide (FGO) nanocomposites were successfully synthesized through a simple yet versatile one-step solution-processed approach at ambient conditions. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals (NCs) with a size of 10-50 nm were uniformly deposited on the surfaces of graphene oxide (GO) sheets, which were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission election microscopy (HAADF-STEM) studies. FGO with different Fe3O4 loadings could be controlled by simply manipulating the initial weight ratio of the precursors. The M-H measurements suggested that the as-prepared FGO nanocomposites have a large saturation magnetizations that made them can move regularly under an external magnetic field. Significantly, FGO nanocomposites also exhibit enhanced electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) activity compared with pure Fe3O4 NCs and GO in terms of specific capacitance and high-rate charge-discharge. PMID:22905504

  12. Controlled cobalt doping in biogenic magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, J. M.; Coker, V. S.; Moise, S.; Wincott, P. L.; Vaughan, D. J.; Tuna, F.; Arenholz, E.; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R. A. D.; Lloyd, J. R.; Telling, N. D.

    2013-01-01

    Cobalt-doped magnetite (CoxFe3 −xO4) nanoparticles have been produced through the microbial reduction of cobalt–iron oxyhydroxide by the bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens. The materials produced, as measured by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, X-ray magnetic circular dichroism, Mössbauer spectroscopy, etc., show dramatic increases in coercivity with increasing cobalt content without a major decrease in overall saturation magnetization. Structural and magnetization analyses reveal a reduction in particle size to less than 4 nm at the highest Co content, combined with an increase in the effective anisotropy of the magnetic nanoparticles. The potential use of these biogenic nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions for magnetic hyperthermia applications is demonstrated. Further analysis of the distribution of cations within the ferrite spinel indicates that the cobalt is predominantly incorporated in octahedral coordination, achieved by the substitution of Fe2+ site with Co2+, with up to 17 per cent Co substituted into tetrahedral sites. PMID:23594814

  13. Refractory Behaviors of Magnetite-Kaolin Bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeosun, S. O.; Akpan, E. I.; Gbenebor, O. P.; Taiwo, O. O.; Eke, I. J.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the suitability of using kaolin-magnetite-plastic clay to produce refractory bricks has been experimentally explored. Thirty bricks of different compositions were produced and fired at 1200°C. The density, shrinkage moisture content, loss on ignition, porosity and permeability of the bricks were examined. Results show that the bricks remained stable during firing and thus possess good insulating characteristics. The highest (2.23 g/cm3) and lowest (2.00 g/cm3) bulk densities obtained in this study are higher than the highest bulk density reported for Al dross-filled refractories (1.23 g/cm3). The bricks also possessed very low effective moisture content (10-23%) and very high compression modulus (16-100 MPa) desirable in insulating refractory bricks with high resistance to abrasion.

  14. Verwey transition in single magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q.; Mottaghizadeh, A.; Wang, H.; Ulysse, C.; Zimmers, A.; Rebuttini, V.; Pinna, N.; Aubin, H.

    2014-08-01

    We present a tunnel spectroscopy study of the electronic spectrum of single magnetite Fe3O4 nanoparticles trapped between nanometer-spaced electrodes. The Verwey transition is clearly identified in the current-voltage characteristics where we find that the transition temperature is electric field dependent. The data show the presence of localized states at high energy, ɛ ˜0.6 eV, which can be attributed to polaron states. At low energy, the density of states (DOS) is suppressed at the approach of the Verwey transition. Below the Verwey transition, a gap, Δ ˜300 meV, is observed in the spectrum. In contrast, no gap is observed in the high temperature phase, implying that electronic transport in this phase is possibly due to polaron hopping with activated mobility.

  15. Sonochemical synthesis of versatile hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marchegiani, G; Imperatori, P; Mari, A; Pilloni, L; Chiolerio, A; Allia, P; Tiberto, P; Suber, L

    2012-07-01

    Hydrophilic magnetite nanoparticles in the size range 30-10nm are easily and rapidly prepared under ultrasonic irradiation of Fe(OH)(2) in di- and tri-ethylene glycol/water solution with volume ratio varying between 7:3 and 3:7. Structural (XRD) and morphological (SEM) characterization reveal good crystalline and homogeneous particles whereas, when solvothermally prepared, the particles are inhomogeneous and aggregated. The sonochemically prepared particles are versatile, i.e. well suited to covalently bind molecules because of the free glycol hydroxylic groups on their surface or exchange the diethylene or triethylene glycol ligand. They can be easily transferred in hydrophobic solvents too. Room-temperature magnetic hysteresis properties measured by means of Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) display a nearly superparamagnetic character. The sonochemical preparation is easily scalable to meet industrial demand.

  16. LA-ICP-MS of magnetite: Methods and reference materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, P.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a common accessory mineral in many geologic settings. Its variable geochemistry makes it a powerful petrogenetic indicator. Electron microprobe (EMPA) analyses are commonly used to examine major and minor element contents in magnetite. Laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is applicable to trace element analyses of magnetite but has not been widely employed to examine compositional variations. We tested the applicability of the NIST SRM 610, the USGS GSE-1G, and the NIST SRM 2782 reference materials (RMs) as external standards and developed a reliable method for LA-ICP-MS analysis of magnetite. LA-ICP-MS analyses were carried out on well characterized magnetite samples with a 193 nm, Excimer, ArF LA system. Although matrix-matched RMs are sometimes important for calibration and normalization of LA-ICP-MS data, we demonstrate that glass RMs can produce accurate results for LA-ICP-MS analyses of magnetite. Cross-comparison between the NIST SRM 610 and USGS GSE-1G indicates good agreement for magnetite minor and trace element data calibrated with either of these RMs. Many elements show a sufficiently good match between the LA-ICP-MS and the EMPA data; for example, Ti and V show a close to linear relationship with correlation coefficients, R2 of 0.79 and 0.85 respectively. ?? 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) by magnetite.

    PubMed

    Wiatrowski, Heather A; Das, Soumya; Kukkadapu, Ravi; Ilton, Eugene S; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

    2009-07-15

    Mercury (Hg) is a highly toxic element, and its contamination of groundwater presents a significant threat to terrestrial ecosystems. Understanding the geochemical processes that mediate mercury transformations in the subsurface is necessary to predict its fate and transport. In this study, we investigated the redox transformation of mercuric Hg (Hg[II]) in the presence of the Fe(II)/Fe(III) mixed valence iron oxide mineral magnetite. Kinetic and spectroscopic experiments were performed to elucidate reaction rates and mechanisms. The experimental data demonstrated that reaction of Hg(II) with magnetite resulted in the loss of Hg(II) and the formation of volatile elemental Hg (Hg[0]). Kinetic experiments showed that Hg(II) reduction occurred within minutes, with reaction rates increasing with increasing magnetite surface area (0.5 to 2 m2/L) and solution pH (4.8 to 6.7), and decreasing with increasing chloride concentration (10(-6) to 10(-2) mol/L). Mössbauer spectroscopic analysis of reacted magnetite samples revealed a decrease in Fe(II) content, corresponding to the oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the magnetite structure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy detected the presence of Hg(II) on magnetite surfaces, implying that adsorption is involved in the electron transfer process. These results suggest that Hg(II) reaction with solid-phase Fe(II) is a kinetically favorable pathway for Hg(II) reduction in magnetite-hearing environmental systems.

  18. Porphyrin-magnetite nanoconjugates for biological imaging

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of silica coated magnetic nanoparticles as contrast agents has resulted in the production of highly stable, non-toxic solutions that can be manipulated via an external magnetic field. As a result, the interaction of these nanocomposites with cells is of vital importance in understanding their behaviour and biocompatibility. Here we report the preparation, characterisation and potential application of new "two-in-one" magnetic fluorescent nanocomposites composed of silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles covalently linked to a porphyrin moiety. Method The experiments were performed by administering porphyrin functionalised silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles to THP-1 cells, a human acute monocytic leukaemia cell line. Cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium with 25 mM HEPES supplemented with heat-inactivated foetal bovine serum (FBS). Results We have synthesised, characterised and analysed in vitro, a new multimodal (magnetic and fluorescent) porphyrin magnetic nanoparticle composite (PMNC). Initial co-incubation experiments performed with THP-1 macrophage cells were promising; however the PMNC photobleached under confocal microscopy study. β-mercaptoethanol (β-ME) was employed to counteract this problem and resulted not only in enhanced fluorescence emission, but also allowed for elongated imaging and increased exposure times of the PMNC in a cellular environment. Conclusion Our experiments have demonstrated that β-ME visibly enhances the emission intensity. No deleterious effects to the cells were witnessed upon co-incubation with β-ME alone and no increases in background fluorescence were recorded. These results should present an interest for further development of in vitro biological imaging techniques. PMID:21477294

  19. Purely Cortical Anaplastic Ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma. PMID:23119204

  20. Purely cortical anaplastic ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Romero, Flávio Ramalho; Zanini, Marco Antônio; Ducati, Luis Gustavo; Vital, Roberto Bezerra; de Lima Neto, Newton Moreira; Gabarra, Roberto Colichio

    2012-01-01

    Ependymomas are glial tumors derived from ependymal cells lining the ventricles and the central canal of the spinal cord. It may occur outside the ventricular structures, representing the extraventicular form, or without any relationship of ventricular system, called ectopic ependymona. Less than fifteen cases of ectopic ependymomas were reported and less than five were anaplastic. We report a rare case of pure cortical ectopic anaplastic ependymoma.

  1. Microfabrication and characterization of magnetite-based magnetic tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chando

    Magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) consisting of two magnetic layers separated by a thin insulating barrier have emerged as the major candidate for magnetic based information storage systems because of their relatively high tunneling magnetoresistance (MR). The magnitude of the MR is determined by the spin polarization of the magnetic layers. One of the most promising materials for MTJs is magnetite (Fe3O4), which has 100% spin polarization. In theory, the MR of Fe3O4-based MTJ should be large and inverse. However, to date most experimental results have shown a small, positive MR, especially when using an aluminum oxide barrier (AlOx). However, the origin of the sign and low magnitude of the MR for these tunnel junctions remains unclear. In this thesis, single phase Fe3O4 films and Fe 3O4-based MTJs (junction size: 2 x 2mum 2 ˜ 18 x 12mum) were fabricated with standard photolithography and characterized in terms of electrical, magnetic and microstructual properties. A reactive sputtering can produce high quality Fe3O4 films having smooth surface, which is confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and atomic force microscope (AFM). When a reactive sputtered Fe3O4 film was used as a top or bottom electrode for MTJs, the phase at the interface was not single phase Fe3O4. This is because the interface reaction, which can be written as: Fe3O4 + Al => Fe + AlOx (amorphous) , occurs. This causes the junctions to have poor transport. By using in situ oxidation of a thin Fe layer, it was possible to achieve a pure polycrystalline Fe3O4 interface with the AlOx barrier, resulting in an inverse MR. The results showed that the phases and quality of the interface adjacent to the AlOx barrier determine the sign and magnitude of the MR. To obtain inverse and large MR for an MTJ, pure and defect free Fe3O4 should exist at the interface adjacent to the AlOx barrier.

  2. Pure Lovelock Kasner metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camanho, Xián O.; Dadhich, Naresh; Molina, Alfred

    2015-09-01

    We study pure Lovelock vacuum and perfect fluid equations for Kasner-type metrics. These equations correspond to a single Nth order Lovelock term in the action in d=2N+1,2N+2 dimensions, and they capture the relevant gravitational dynamics when aproaching the big-bang singularity within the Lovelock family of theories. Pure Lovelock gravity also bears out the general feature that vacuum in the critical odd dimension, d=2N+1, is kinematic, i.e. we may define an analogue Lovelock-Riemann tensor that vanishes in vacuum for d=2N+1, yet the Riemann curvature is non-zero. We completely classify isotropic and vacuum Kasner metrics for this class of theories in several isotropy types. The different families can be characterized by means of certain higher order 4th rank tensors. We also analyze in detail the space of vacuum solutions for five- and six dimensional pure Gauss-Bonnet theory. It possesses an interesting and illuminating geometric structure and symmetries that carry over to the general case. We also comment on a closely related family of exponential solutions and on the possibility of solutions with complex Kasner exponents. We show that the latter imply the existence of closed timelike curves in the geometry.

  3. Hexagonal plate-like magnetite nanocrystals produced in komatiite-H2O-CO2 reaction system at 450°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xi-Luo; Li, Yi-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Batch experiments of komatiite-H2O-CO2 system with temperatures from 200 to 450°C were performed to simulate the interactions between the newly formed ultramafic crust and the proto-atmosphere on Earth before the formation of its earliest ocean. Particularly, magnetite nanocrystals were observed in the experiment carried out at 450°C that are characterized by their hexagonal platelet-like morphology and porous structure. Exactly the same set of lattice fringes on the two opposite sides of one pore suggests post-crystallization erosion. The results demonstrate that magnetite could be produced by the direct interactions between the ultramafic rocky crust and the atmosphere before the formation of the ocean on the Hadean Earth. These magnetite nanoparticles could serve as a catalyst in the synthesis of simple organic molecules during the organochemical evolution towards life.

  4. Evidence for a relationship between hydrocarbons and authigenic magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, R. D.; Engel, M. H.; Crawford, L.; Nick, K.; Imbus, S.; Sofer, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Establishing a relationship between hydrocarbon migration and the precipitation of authigenic magnetite in sedimentary rocks is of significant interest with respect to (1) elucidating mechanisms for remagnetization and establishing the origin of secondary magnetizations residing in magnetite, (2) developing a method to date hydrocarbon migration events by determining the time of remanence acquisition by palaeomagnetic methods, and (3) evaluating whether searching for anomalous concentrations of diagenetic magnetic minerals and/or aeromagnetic anomalies is justified as a relatively inexpensive exploration tool. The direct association of hydrocarbon migration and the precipitation of authigenic magnetite has, however, not been established. In this paper we report palaeomagnetic, rock magnetic, petrographic and geochemical results of a study of samples from Permian spelebthems and gilsonite found in the Ordovician Arbuckle Group in southern Oklahoma. The results indicate that there is a genetic relationship between hydrocarbon migration and the precipitation of authigenic magnetite.

  5. Magnetite Plaquettes Provide an Extraterrestrial Source of Asymmetric Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Martinez, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular selectivity is a crucial criterion for life. A possible abiotic mechanism that can produce chiral asymmetry in meteoritic amino acids is their formation with the presence of asymmetric catalysts. Magnetite (Fe3O4), a common mineral in some carbonaceous chondrites (CCs), has been shown to be an effective catalyst for the formation of amino acids that are commonly found in these meteorites. Magnetite sometimes takes the form of plaquettes that consist of barrel-shaped stacks of magnetite disks that resemble a spiral. However, a widely accepted description of the internal morphology of this particular magnetite form is still lacking, which is necessary in order to confirm or disprove the spiral configuration.

  6. The Search for 60Fe in Secondary Magnetite and Fayalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, P. H.; Huss, G. R.; Nagashima, K.; Telus, M.

    2016-08-01

    Secondary phases produced by aqueous alteration may record fossil iron-60 signatures and also avoid issues with redistribution of Fe and Ni. We investigated fayalite and magnetite from Semarkona and Kaba and will report our results.

  7. Origins of magnetite nanocrystals in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2009-11-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe 3O 4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterization of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the carbonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  8. Electrophoretic mobility of magnetite particles in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Vidojkovic, Sonja; Rodriguez-Santiago, V; Fedkin, Mark V.; Wesolowski, David J; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetite(Fe3O4) isoneofthemostcommonoxidesformingdepositsandparticulatephasesin industrialhightemperaturewatercircuits.Itscolloidalcharacteristicsplayaprincipalroleinthe mechanismofdepositformationandcanbeusedascontrollingfactorstopreventorminimizedeposit formationanddamageofindustrialpipelinesduetounder-depositcorrosion.Inthisstudy,ahigh temperatureparticleelectrophoresistechniquewasemployedtomeasurethezetapotentialatthe magnetite/waterinterface the parameterthatcontrolscolloidalstabilityofparticles,theiraggrega- tion, anddeposition.Themeasurementsweremadeattemperaturesupto200 1C overawiderangeofpH. The isoelectricpointsofmagnetite,atwhichthedepositionofparticlesisincreased,weredeterminedatpH 6.35, 6.00,5.25,and5.05fortemperatures25,100,150,and200 1C, respectively.Theobserved temperaturedependenceofzetapotentialandtheisoelectricpHpointofmagnetitecanhelptoexplain the extentofinteractionsbetweenthecolloidalparticlesandthesteelwallsurfacesunderhydro- thermalconditions,andindicatemethodsforcontrollingandmitigatingoxidedepositioninhigh temperaturewatercycles.

  9. The Periplasmic Nitrate Reductase Nap Is Required for Anaerobic Growth and Involved in Redox Control of Magnetite Biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingjie; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The magnetosomes of many magnetotactic bacteria consist of membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals, whose synthesis is favored by a low redox potential. However, the cellular redox processes governing the biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide have remained unknown. Here, we show that in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, magnetite biomineralization is linked to dissimilatory nitrate reduction. A complete denitrification pathway, including gene functions for nitrate (nap), nitrite (nir), nitric oxide (nor), and nitrous oxide reduction (nos), was identified. Transcriptional gusA fusions as reporters revealed that except for nap, the highest expression of the denitrification genes coincided with conditions permitting maximum magnetite synthesis. Whereas microaerobic denitrification overlapped with oxygen respiration, nitrate was the only electron acceptor supporting growth in the entire absence of oxygen, and only the deletion of nap genes, encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase, and not deletion of nor or nos genes, abolished anaerobic growth and also delayed aerobic growth in both nitrate and ammonium media. While loss of nosZ or norCB had no or relatively weak effects on magnetosome synthesis, deletion of nap severely impaired magnetite biomineralization and resulted in fewer, smaller, and irregular crystals during denitrification and also microaerobic respiration, probably by disturbing the proper redox balance required for magnetite synthesis. In contrast to the case for the wild type, biomineralization in Δnap cells was independent of the oxidation state of carbon substrates. Altogether, our data demonstrate that in addition to its essential role in anaerobic respiration, the periplasmic nitrate reductase Nap has a further key function by participating in redox reactions required for magnetite biomineralization. PMID:22730130

  10. The periplasmic nitrate reductase nap is required for anaerobic growth and involved in redox control of magnetite biomineralization in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Katzmann, Emanuel; Borg, Sarah; Schüler, Dirk

    2012-09-01

    The magnetosomes of many magnetotactic bacteria consist of membrane-enveloped magnetite crystals, whose synthesis is favored by a low redox potential. However, the cellular redox processes governing the biomineralization of the mixed-valence iron oxide have remained unknown. Here, we show that in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense, magnetite biomineralization is linked to dissimilatory nitrate reduction. A complete denitrification pathway, including gene functions for nitrate (nap), nitrite (nir), nitric oxide (nor), and nitrous oxide reduction (nos), was identified. Transcriptional gusA fusions as reporters revealed that except for nap, the highest expression of the denitrification genes coincided with conditions permitting maximum magnetite synthesis. Whereas microaerobic denitrification overlapped with oxygen respiration, nitrate was the only electron acceptor supporting growth in the entire absence of oxygen, and only the deletion of nap genes, encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase, and not deletion of nor or nos genes, abolished anaerobic growth and also delayed aerobic growth in both nitrate and ammonium media. While loss of nosZ or norCB had no or relatively weak effects on magnetosome synthesis, deletion of nap severely impaired magnetite biomineralization and resulted in fewer, smaller, and irregular crystals during denitrification and also microaerobic respiration, probably by disturbing the proper redox balance required for magnetite synthesis. In contrast to the case for the wild type, biomineralization in Δnap cells was independent of the oxidation state of carbon substrates. Altogether, our data demonstrate that in addition to its essential role in anaerobic respiration, the periplasmic nitrate reductase Nap has a further key function by participating in redox reactions required for magnetite biomineralization.

  11. Effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} nucleating agents on crystallization behavior and magnetic properties of ferromagnetic glass-ceramic in the system Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaO{center_dot}ZnO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Hameed, Salwa A.M.; Elwan, Rawhia L.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallization of magnetic glass ceramic with different nucleating agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} as nucleating agents was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XRD for as prepared samples revealed crystallization of pure magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heat treatment revealed minor calcium silicate, hematite and cristobalite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TEM revealed crystallization of crystallite size in the range 50-100 nm. -- Abstract: Preparation and characterization of ferromagnetic glass ceramic in the system Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}{center_dot}CaO{center_dot}ZnO{center_dot}SiO{sub 2} with different nucleating agents was studied. The effect of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoO, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoO{sub 3} as nucleating agents was investigated. Differential thermal analysis; X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope were used to investigate thermal behavior, sequence of crystallization and microstructure of the samples. XRD analysis for as prepared samples revealed the crystallization of single magnetite phase. Heat treatment at 900 Degree-Sign C/2 h revealed the appearance of minor amounts of calcium silicate, hematite and cristobalite beside magnetite. TEM revealed crystallization of crystallite size in the range 50-100 nm. Lattice parameters, cell volume and crystallite size were stimulated from XRD data. Magnetic properties of quenched samples were measured under 20 kG.

  12. In Situ Mineralization of Magnetite Nanoparticles in Chitosan Hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yongliang; Li, Baoqiang; Zhou, Yu; Jia, Dechang

    2009-09-01

    Based on chelation effect between iron ions and amino groups of chitosan, in situ mineralization of magnetite nanoparticles in chitosan hydrogel under ambient conditions was proposed. The chelation effect between iron ions and amino groups in CS-Fe complex, which led to that chitosan hydrogel exerted a crucial control on the magnetite mineralization, was proved by X-ray photoelectron spectrum. The composition, morphology and size of the mineralized magnetite nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and thermal gravity. The mineralized nanoparticles were nonstoichiometric magnetite with a unit formula of Fe2.85O4 and coated by a thin layer of chitosan. The mineralized magnetite nanoparticles with mean diameter of 13 nm dispersed in chitosan hydrogel uniformly. Magnetization measurement indicated that superparamagnetism behavior was exhibited. These magnetite nanoparticles mineralized in chitosan hydrogel have potential applications in the field of biotechnology. Moreover, this method can also be used to synthesize other kinds of inorganic nanoparticles, such as ZnO, Fe2O3 and hydroxyapatite.

  13. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  14. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FRESH PEARS AND PEACHES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches,...

  15. Influence of different magnetites on properties of magnetic Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilizates used for biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Heyd, M; Weigold, P; Franzreb, M; Berensmeier, S

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades, whole-cell immobilization has been used successfully in many bioprocesses. In particular, it is aimed at implementing continuous production processes, reaching higher production rates, and reusing the biocatalyst. In some cases, effective retention of immobilizates in the bioprocess is not feasible by membranes or sieves due to pore plugging or undesired losses of immobilizates. In the present publication, it is reported about the investigation of magnetic immobilizates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for application in continuous biosurfactant production of rhamnolipids by foam fractionation and retention of entrained immobilizates by high-gradient magnetic separation from foam. Different materials and methods were tested with respect to important parameters, such as stability, diffusion properties or magnetic separation. Good magnetic separation of immobilizates was achieved at 5% (w/w) magnetite loading. Best results in terms of homogeneous embedding, good diffusion properties, and stability enhancement vis-à-vis pure alginate beads was achieved with alginate beads with embedded Bayoxide magnetite or MagPrep silica particles. Although polyurethane immobilizates showed higher stabilities compared with alginate beads, rhamnolipid diffusion in immobilizates was superior in magnetic alginate beads. Regarding bead production, smaller immobilizates were achieved with suspension polymerization compared to droplet extrusion by the JetCutting technology. In total, magnetic immobilizates are a promising tool for an easier handling of biocatalysts in a continuous biological production process, but they have to be adapted to the current production task.

  16. Influence of different magnetites on properties of magnetic Pseudomonas aeruginosa immobilizates used for biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Heyd, M; Weigold, P; Franzreb, M; Berensmeier, S

    2009-01-01

    During the last decades, whole-cell immobilization has been used successfully in many bioprocesses. In particular, it is aimed at implementing continuous production processes, reaching higher production rates, and reusing the biocatalyst. In some cases, effective retention of immobilizates in the bioprocess is not feasible by membranes or sieves due to pore plugging or undesired losses of immobilizates. In the present publication, it is reported about the investigation of magnetic immobilizates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for application in continuous biosurfactant production of rhamnolipids by foam fractionation and retention of entrained immobilizates by high-gradient magnetic separation from foam. Different materials and methods were tested with respect to important parameters, such as stability, diffusion properties or magnetic separation. Good magnetic separation of immobilizates was achieved at 5% (w/w) magnetite loading. Best results in terms of homogeneous embedding, good diffusion properties, and stability enhancement vis-à-vis pure alginate beads was achieved with alginate beads with embedded Bayoxide magnetite or MagPrep silica particles. Although polyurethane immobilizates showed higher stabilities compared with alginate beads, rhamnolipid diffusion in immobilizates was superior in magnetic alginate beads. Regarding bead production, smaller immobilizates were achieved with suspension polymerization compared to droplet extrusion by the JetCutting technology. In total, magnetic immobilizates are a promising tool for an easier handling of biocatalysts in a continuous biological production process, but they have to be adapted to the current production task. PMID:19691121

  17. Structure of the magnetite-oleic acid-decalin magnetic fluid from small-angle neutron scattering data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornyi, A. V.; Petrenko, V. I.; Bulavin, L. A.; Avdeev, M. V.; Almásy, L.; Rosta, L.; Aksenov, V. L.

    2014-01-01

    Structural parameters of the magnetite-oleic acid-decalin magnetic fluid at various excesses of oleic acid (up to 25 vol %) have been determined using small-angle neutron scattering. Based on the comparison of the behavior of oleic acid in the magnetic fluid and in the pure solvent (decalin), it has been concluded that the interaction between the molecules of free (unadsorbed) surfactant changes in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles. However, the system remains stable and does not form aggregates of magnetic particles or free oleic acid. These results are compared with the previously presented data for similar benzene-based magnetic fluids.

  18. An experimental study of the mechanism of the replacement of magnetite by pyrite up to 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Gujie; Brugger, Joël; Skinner, William M.; Chen, Guorong; Pring, Allan

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of an experimental study into the sulfidation of magnetite to form pyrite/marcasite under hydrothermal conditions (90-300 °C, vapor saturated pressures), a process associated with gold deposition in a number of ore deposits. The formation of pyrite/marcasite was studied as a function of reaction time, temperature, pH, sulfide concentration, solid-weight-to-fluid-volume ratio, and geometric surface area of magnetite in polytetrafluoroethylene-lined autoclaves (PTFE) and a titanium and stainless steel flow-through cell. Marcasite was formed only at pH 21°C <4 and was the dominant Fe disulfide at pH 21°C 1.11, while pyrite predominated at pH 21°C >2 and formed even under basic conditions (up to pH 21°C 12-13). Marcasite formation was favored at higher temperatures. Fine-grained pyrrhotite formed in the initial stage of the reaction together with pyrite in some experiments with large surface area of magnetite (grain size <125 μm). This pyrrhotite eventually gave way to pyrite. The transformation rate of magnetite to Fe disulfide increased with decreasing pH (at 120 °C; pH 120°C 0.96-4.42), and that rate of the transformation increased from 120 to 190 °C. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging revealed that micro-pores (0.1-5 μm scale) existed at the reaction front between the parent magnetite and the product pyrite, and that the pyrite and/or marcasite were euhedral at pH 21°C <4 and anhedral at higher pH. The newly formed pyrite was micro-porous (0.1-5 μm); this micro-porosity facilitates fluid transport to the reaction interface between magnetite and pyrite, thus promoting the replacement reaction. The pyrite precipitated onto the parent magnetite was polycrystalline and did not preserve the crystallographic orientation of the magnetite. The pyrite precipitation was also observed on the PTFE liner, which is consistent with pyrite crystallizing from solution. The mechanism of the reaction is that of a dissolution

  19. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Lewandowski, Mikołaj; Peplińska, Barbara; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Wiesner, Maciej; Załęski, Karol; Babutina, Tetyana; Warowicka, Alicja; Jurga, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The article is devoted to preparation and characterization of magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites for targeted antimicrobial therapy. Magnetite nanopowder was produced by thermochemical technique; silver was deposited on the magnetite nanoparticles in the form of silver clusters. Magnetite/silver nanocomposite was investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, AFM, XPS, EDX techniques. Adsorptivity of magnetite/silver nanocomposite towards seven antibiotics from five different groups was investigated. It was shown that rifampicin, doxycycline, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime and doxycycline may be attached by physical adsorption to magnetite/silver nanocomposite. Electrostatic surfaces of antibiotics were modeled and possible mechanism of antibiotic attachment is considered in this article. Raman spectra of magnetite, magnetite/silver and magnetite/silver/antibiotic were collected. It was found that it is difficult to detect the bands related to antibiotics in the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposite spectra due to their overlap by the broad carbon bands of magnetite nanopowder. Magnetic measurements revealed that magnetic saturation of the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites decreased on 6-19 % in comparison with initial magnetite nanopowder. Pilot study of antimicrobial properties of the magnetite/silver/antibiotic nanocomposites were performed towards Bacillus pumilus.

  20. TEA controllable preparation of magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) with excellent magnetic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Chengliang; Zhu, Dejie; Wu, Hanzhao; Li, Yao; Cheng, Lu; Hu, Kunhong

    2016-06-01

    A fast and controllable synthesis method for superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) was developed in Fe(III)-triethanolamine (TEA) solution. The phase structure, morphology and particle size of the as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the magnetic particles were pure Fe3O4 with mean sizes of approximately 10 nm. The used TEA has key effects on the formation of well dispersing Fe3O4 NPs. Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) result indicated that the as-obtained Fe3O4 NPs exhibited superparamagnetic behavior and the saturation magnetization (Ms) was about 70 emu/g, which had potential applications in magnetic science and technology.

  1. Variations of trace element concentration of magnetite and ilmenite from the Taihe layered intrusion, Emeishan large igneous province, SW China: Implications for magmatic fractionation and origin of Fe-Ti-V oxide ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Yu-Wei; Song, Xie-Yan; Yu, Song-Yue; He, Hai-Long

    2015-12-01

    In situ LA-ICP-MS trace elemental analysis has been applied to magnetite and ilmenite of the Taihe layered intrusion, Emeishan large igneous province, SW China, in order to understand better fractionation processes of magma and origin of Fe-Ti-V oxide ore deposits. The periodic reversals in Mg, Ti, Mn in magnetite and Mg, Sc in ilmenite are found in the Middle Zone of the intrusion and agree with fractionation trends as recorded by olivine (Fo), plagioclase (An) and clinopyroxene (Mg#) compositions. These suggest the Taihe intrusion formed from open magma chamber processes in a magma conduit with multiple replenishments of more primitive magmas. The V and Cr of magnetite are well correlated with V and Cr of clinopyroxene indicating that they became liquidus phases almost simultaneously at an early stage of magma evolution. Ilmenite from the Middle and Upper Zones shows variable Cr, Ni, V, Mg, Nb, Ta and Sc contents indicating that ilmenite at some stratigraphic levels crystallized slightly earlier than magnetite and clinopyroxene. The early crystallization of magnetite and ilmenite is the result of the high FeOt and TiO2 contents in the parental magma. The ilmenite crystallization before magnetite in the Middle and Upper Zones can be attributed to higher TiO2 content of the magma due to the remelting of pre-existing ilmenite in a middle-level magma chamber. Compared to the coeval high-Ti basalts, the relatively low Zr, Hf, Nb and Ta contents in both magnetite and ilmenite throughout the Taihe intrusion indicate that they crystallized from Fe-Ti-(P)-rich silicate magmas. Positive correlations of Ti with Mg, Mn, Sc and Zr of magnetite, and Zr with Sc, Hf and Nb of ilmenite also suggest that magnetite and ilmenite crystallized continuously from the homogeneous silicate magma rather than an immiscible Fe-rich melt. Therefore, frequent replenishments of Fe-Ti-(P)-rich silicate magma and gravitational sorting and settling are crucial for the formation the massive and

  2. Origins of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of mag- netite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compo- sitional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the car- bonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  3. Viscosity of pure hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Knapstad, B.; Skjolsvik, P.A.; Oye, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Accurate viscosity measurements have been performed on eight pure hydrocarbons at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 20-150/sup 0/C, or up to approximately 20/sup 0/C below the boiling point of the hydrocarbon, by use of an absolute oscillating viscometer. The hydrocarbons are cyclohexane and benzene and the n-alkanes of hexane, heptane, octane, decane, dodecane, and tetradecane. The viscosities are described with a modified Arrhenius equation, and the deviation in fit is 0.12% or less. The accuracy is estimated to be 0.33-0.56%. The lowest viscosities are assumed to have the highest deviation. Literature data reported by Dymond and Young normally fit our viscosities within our estimated accuracy. Other literature viscosities tend to be higher than our results, especially for the n-alkanes.

  4. Isolation and pure culture of a freshwater magnetic spirillum in chemically defined medium.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, R P; Maratea, D; Wolfe, R S

    1979-11-01

    A bipolarly flagellated magnetotactic spirillum containing intracellular chains of single domain-sized magnetite crystals was isolated by applying a magnetic field to sediments from a freshwater swamp. The organism was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing ferric quinate and succinate as sources of iron and carbon, respectively. Nonmagnetic variants of this isolate were maintained in chemically defined medium lacking ferric quinate. In contrast to magnetic cells, these had less iron and lacked measurable magnetic remanence and the intracytoplasmic crystals. In other respects, including moles percent guanine plus cytosine content, growth characteristics, nutrition, and physiology, the two types were similar. The isolate reduced nitrate without accumulating nitrite and produced ammonia during growth. Nitrate or ammonium ions served as a nitrogen source. The organism was microaerophilic and did not grow anaerobically with nitrate in the medium. In chemically defined medium, cells synthesized magnetite only if the initial O2 concentration in the atmosphere of sealed cultures was 6% (vol/vol) or less.

  5. Electrochemistry and dissolution kinetics of magnetite and ilmenite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.; Hochella, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    Natural samples of magnetite and ilmenite were experimentally weathered in pH 1-7 anoxic solutions at temperatures of 2-65 ??C. Reaction of magnetite is described as [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 2H+ ??? ??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + H2O. Dynamic polarization experiments using magnetite electrodes confirmed that this reaction is controlled by two electrochemical half cells, 3[Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) ??? 4??[Fe23+]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2e- and [Fe2+Fe23+]O4(magnetite) + 8 H+ + 2e- ??? 3Fe2+ + 4H2O, which result in solid state Fe3+ reduction, formation of an oxidized layer and release of Fe(II) to solution. XPS data revealed that iron is present in the ferric state in the surfaces of reacted magnetite and ilmenite and that the Ti Fe ratio increased with reaction pH for ilmenite. Short-term (<36 h) release rates of Fe(II) were linear with time. Between pH 1 and 7, rates varied between 0.3 and 13 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for magnetite and 0.05 and 12.3 ?? 10-14 mol ?? cm-2 ?? s-1 for ilmenite. These rates are two orders of magnitude slower than electrochemical rates determined by Tafel and polarization resistance measurements. Discrepancies are due to both differences in geometric and BET surface area estimates and in the oxidation state of the mineral surface. In long-term closed-system experiments (<120 days), Fe(II) release slowed with time due to the passivation of the surfaces by increasing thicknesses of oxide surface layers. A shrinking core model, coupling surface reaction and diffusion transport, predicted that at neutral pH, the mean residence time for sand-size grains of magnetite and ilmenite will exceed 107 years. This agrees with long-term stability of these oxides in the geologic record. ?? 1994.

  6. Production Rate of Cosmogenic 10Be in Magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granger, D. E.; Rogers, H. E.; Riebe, C. S.; Lifton, N. A.

    2013-12-01

    Cosmogenic 10Be is widely used for determining exposure ages, soil production rates, and catchment-wide erosion rates. To date, measurements have been almost exclusively in the mineral quartz (SiO2), which is resistant to weathering and easily cleaned of meteoric 10Be contamination. However, this limits the method to quartz-bearing rocks and requires specialized laboratories due to the need for large quantities of hydrofluoric acid (HF). Here, we present initial results for 10Be production in the mineral magnetite (Fe3O4). Magnetite offers several advantages over quartz; it is (1) present in mafic rocks, (2) easily collected in the field, (3) quickly and easily separated in the lab, and (4) digested without HF. In addition, 10Be can be measured in both detrital quartz and magnetite from the same catchment to yield information about the intensity of chemical weathering (Rogers et al., this conference). The 10Be production rate in magnetite relative to quartz was determined for a granitic boulder from Mt. Evans, Colorado, USA. The boulder was crushed and homogenized to facilitate production rate comparisons among various minerals. We separated magnetite using a combination of hand magnets, froth flotation, and a variety of selective chemical dissolutions in dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate solution, 5% nitric acid (HNO3) and 1% HF/HNO3. Six aliquots of magnetite were analyzed for 10Be and compared to quartz. Three aliquots that were not exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 were contaminated with meteoric 10Be, probably associated with residual mica. Three aliquots that were exposed to 1% HF/HNO3 treatments agreed to within 2% measurement uncertainty. Our preliminary results indicate that the relative production rate by mass of 10Be in magnetite and quartz is 0.462 × 0.012. Our results are similar to theoretically predicted values. Recently updated excitation functions for neutron and proton spallation reactions allow us to partition 10Be production in quartz and magnetite among

  7. Abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite at high pressures.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H; Leu, Bogdan M; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of magnetite at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric magnetite using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe(2+)-Fe(3+)-Fe(2+) ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of magnetite in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916

  8. Abnormal Elastic and Vibrational Behaviors of Magnetite at High Pressures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jung-Fu; Wu, Junjie; Zhu, Jie; Mao, Zhu; Said, Ayman H.; Leu, Bogdan M.; Cheng, Jinguang; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Jin, Changqing; Zhou, Jianshi

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite exhibits unique electronic, magnetic, and structural properties in extreme conditions that are of great research interest. Previous studies have suggested a number of transitional models, although the nature of magnetite at high pressure remains elusive. We have studied a highly stoichiometric magnetite using inelastic X-ray scattering, X-ray diffraction and emission, and Raman spectroscopies in diamond anvil cells up to ~20 GPa, while complementary electrical conductivity measurements were conducted in a cubic anvil cell up to 8.5 GPa. We have observed an elastic softening in the diagonal elastic constants (C11 and C44) and a hardening in the off-diagonal constant (C12) at ~8 GPa where significant elastic anisotropies in longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves occur, especially along the [110] direction. An additional vibrational Raman band between the A1g and T2g modes was also detected at the transition pressure. These abnormal elastic and vibrational behaviors of magnetite are attributed to the occurrence of the octahedrally-coordinated Fe2+-Fe3+-Fe2+ ions charge-ordering along the [110] direction in the inverse spinel structure. We propose a new phase diagram of magnetite in which the temperature for the metal-insulator and distorted structural transitions decreases with increasing pressure while the charge-ordering transition occurs at ~8 GPa and room temperature. PMID:25186916

  9. Magnetic Separations with Magnetite: Theory, Operation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect

    G. B. Cotten

    2000-08-01

    This dissertation documents the theory development and experimental plan followed to describe how a magnetite-based column under the influence of an external magnetic field functions as a magnetic separator. Theoretical simulations predict that weekly paramagnetic particles in the sub-micron range can be magnetically separated while diamagnetic particles as large as 2 microns in diameter may pass. Magnetite-based columns were evaluated as magnetically-controllable enhanced filtration devices. There was no evidence of enhanced filtration for diamagnetic particles by the magnetite-based bed. Magnetite-based magnetic separators have proven to be effective in specific laboratory experiments, indicating a potential feasibility for scale-up operations. Column media-filter type filtration effects indicate a magnetite-based column would not be suitable for treatment of a waste stream with a high diamagnetic solids content or high volume throughput requirements. Specific applications requiring removal of sub-micron para- or ferromagnetic particles under batch or Stokes flow conditions would be most applicable.

  10. Biogeochemical Conditions Favoring Magnetite Formation during Anaerobic Iron Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bell, P. E.; Mills, A. L.; Herman, J. S.

    1987-01-01

    Several anaerobic bacteria isolated from the sediments of Contrary Creek, an iron-rich environment, produced magnetite when cultured in combinations but not when cultured alone in synthetic iron oxyhydroxide medium. When glucose was added as a carbon source, the pH of the medium decreased (to 5.5) and no magnetite was formed. When the same growth medium without glucose was used, the pH increased (to 8.5) and magnetite was formed. In both cases, Fe2+ was released into the growth medium. Geochemical equilibrium equations with Eh and pH as master variables were solved for the concentrations of iron and inorganic carbon that were observed in the system. Magnetite was predicted to be the dominant iron oxide formed at high pHs, while free Fe2+ or siderite were the dominant forms of iron expected at low pHs. Thus, magnetite formation occurs because of microbial alteration of the local Eh and pH conditions, along with concurrent reduction of ferric iron (direct biological reduction or abiological oxidation-reduction reactions). PMID:16347480

  11. Functionalization of Magnetite Nanoparticles as Oil Spill Collector

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Ayman M.; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A.; Al-Hussain, Sami A.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on magnetite can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for magnetite nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of magnetite capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared magnetite nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:25822876

  12. Functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles as oil spill collector.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2015-03-26

    In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on magnetite can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for magnetite nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of magnetite capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared magnetite nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup.

  13. Fabrication of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip for chromium removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sureshkumar, Vaishnavi; Kiruba Daniel, S. C. G.; Ruckmani, K.; Sivakumar, M.

    2016-02-01

    Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals is a serious threat. In the present work, removal of chromium was carried out using chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip. Magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4) were synthesized using chemical co-precipitation method at 80 °C. The nanoparticles were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, atomic force microscope, dynamic light scattering and vibrating sample magnetometer, which confirm the size, shape, crystalline nature and magnetic behaviour of nanoparticles. Atomic force microscope revealed that the particle size was 15-30 nm and spherical in shape. The magnetite nanoparticles were mixed with chitosan solution to form hybrid nanocomposite. Chitosan strip was casted with and without nanoparticle. The affinity of hybrid nanocomposite for chromium was studied using K2Cr2O7 (potassium dichromate) solution as the heavy metal solution containing Cr(VI) ions. Adsorption tests were carried out using chitosan strip and hybrid nanocomposite strip at different time intervals. Amount of chromium adsorbed by chitosan strip and chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip from aqueous solution was evaluated using UV-visible spectroscopy. The results confirm that the heavy metal removal efficiency of chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite strip is 92.33 %, which is higher when compared to chitosan strip, which is 29.39 %.

  14. Functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles as oil spill collector.

    PubMed

    Atta, Ayman M; Al-Lohedan, Hamad A; Al-Hussain, Sami A

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a new magnetic powder based on magnetite can be used as a petroleum crude oil collector. Amidoximes based on rosin as a natural product can be prepared from a reaction between hydroxylamine and rosin/acrylonitrile adducts. The produced rosin amidoximes were used as capping agents for magnetite nanoparticles to prepare hydrophobic coated magnetic powders. A new class of monodisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles was prepared by a simple and inexpensive co-precipitation method. Iron ions and iodine were prepared by the reaction between ferric chloride and potassium iodide. The structure and morphology of magnetite capped with rosin amidoxime were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), zeta potential, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic properties were determined from vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) analyses. These prepared magnetite nanoparticles were tested as bioactive nanosystems and their antimicrobial effects were investigated. The prepared nanomaterials were examined as a crude oil collector using magnetic fields. The results show promising data for the separation of the petroleum crude oil from aqueous solution in environmental pollution cleanup. PMID:25822876

  15. Observations of magnetite dissolution in poorly drained soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimley, D.A.; Arruda, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Dissolution of strongly magnetic minerals is a common and relatively rapid phenomenon in poorly drained soils of the central United States, resulting in low magnetic susceptibility (MS). Low Eh reducing conditions are primarily responsible for magnetic mineral dissolution; a process likely mediated by iron-reducing bacteria in the presence of soil organic matter. Based on transects across drainage sequences from nine sites, natural magnetic minerals (>5 ??m) extracted from surface soil consist of 54% ?? 18% magnetite, 21% ?? 11% titanomagnetite, and 17% ?? 14% ilmenite. Magnetite and titanomagnetite dissolution, assessed by scanning electron microscopy on a 0-to-3 scale, inversely correlates with surface soil MS (r = 0.53), a proxy for soil drainage at studied transects. Altered magnetite typically displays etch pits 5 ??m) include 26% ?? 18% anthropogenic fly ash that also exhibits greater dissolution in low MS soils (r = 0.38), indicating detectable alteration can occur within 150 years in low Eh soils. Laboratory induced reduction of magnetite, titanomagnetite, and magnetic fly ash, with a citrate-bicarbonate- dithionite solution, resulted in dissolution textures similar to those of in situ soil particles. Although experiments indicate that reductive dissolution of magnetite can occur abiotically under extreme conditions, bacteria likely play an important role in the natural environment. ?? 2007 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  16. Magnetite biomineralization and geomagnetic sensitivity in higher animals: an update and recommendations for future study.

    PubMed

    Kirschvink, J L

    1989-01-01

    Magnetite, the only known biogenic material with ferromagnetic properties, has been identified as a biochemical precipitate in three of the five kingdoms of living organisms, with a fossil record that now extends back nearly 2 billion years. In the magnetotactic bacteria, protoctists, and fish, single-domain crystals of magnetite are arranged in membrane-bound linear structures called magnetosomes, which function as biological bar magnets. Magnetosomes in all three of these groups bear an overall structural similarity to each other, which includes alignment of the individual crystallographic [111] directions parallel to the long axis. Although the magnetosomes represent only a small volume fraction in higher organisms, enough of these highly energetic structures are present to provide sensitivity to extremely small fluctuations and gradients in the background geomagnetic field. Previous experiments with elasmobranch fish are reexamined to test the hypothesis that gradients played a role in their successful geomagnetic conditioning, and a variety of four-turn coil designs are considered that could be used to test the various hypotheses proposed for them. PMID:2665750

  17. Functionalized magnetite particles for adsorption of colloidal noble metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana L; Marques, Karine L; Girão, Ana V; Pereira, Eduarda; Trindade, Tito

    2016-08-01

    Magnetite (inverse spinel type) particles have been surface-modified with siliceous shells enriched in dithiocarbamate groups. The deposition of colloidal noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, Pt, Pd) onto the modified magnetites can be performed by treating the respective hydrosols with the magnetic sorbents, thus allowing their uptake from water under a magnetic gradient. In particular, for Au colloids, these magnetic particles are very efficient sorbents that we ascribe to the strong affinity of sulfur-containing groups at the magnetite surfaces for this metal. Considering the extensive use of Au colloids in laboratorial and industrial contexts, the approach described here might have an impact on the development of nanotechnologies to recover this precious metal. En route to these findings, we varied several operational parameters in order to investigate this strategy as a new bottom-up assembly method for producing plasmonic-magnetic nanoassemblies. PMID:27156089

  18. Functionalized magnetite particles for adsorption of colloidal noble metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana L; Marques, Karine L; Girão, Ana V; Pereira, Eduarda; Trindade, Tito

    2016-08-01

    Magnetite (inverse spinel type) particles have been surface-modified with siliceous shells enriched in dithiocarbamate groups. The deposition of colloidal noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Ag, Pt, Pd) onto the modified magnetites can be performed by treating the respective hydrosols with the magnetic sorbents, thus allowing their uptake from water under a magnetic gradient. In particular, for Au colloids, these magnetic particles are very efficient sorbents that we ascribe to the strong affinity of sulfur-containing groups at the magnetite surfaces for this metal. Considering the extensive use of Au colloids in laboratorial and industrial contexts, the approach described here might have an impact on the development of nanotechnologies to recover this precious metal. En route to these findings, we varied several operational parameters in order to investigate this strategy as a new bottom-up assembly method for producing plasmonic-magnetic nanoassemblies.

  19. The Verwey transition in nanostructured magnetite produced by a combination of chimie douce and spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudisson, T.; Vázquez-Victorio, G.; Bañobre-López, M.; Nowak, S.; Rivas, J.; Ammar, S.; Mazaleyrat, F.; Valenzuela, R.

    2014-05-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 10 nm sized were synthesized by the polyol method. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC)-FC measurements showed a blocking temperature ˜170 K and the absence of the Verwey transition. They were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering at 750 °C for 15 min, leading to a high density (92% of the theoretical density), solid body, with grains in the 150 nm range. X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a spinel single phase with cell parameters corresponding to the magnetite structure. Magnetic measurements showed a decrease of coercivity from 685 Oe (54.5 kA/m) at 118 K to 90 Oe (7.2 kA/m) at 139 K. ZFC measurements at 25 Oe presented a three-fold magnetization increase as temperature increased; a small transition between 116 and 117.5 K, followed by a larger one from 117.6 to 124 K. The first transition can be associated with a complex crystallographic transition and delocalization of Fe2+-Fe3+, while the second one can be attributed to spin reorientation due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K1) change of sign as previously observed only in magnetite single crystals.

  20. The Verwey transition in nanostructured magnetite produced by a combination of chimie douce and spark plasma sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudisson, T.; Nowak, S.; Ammar, S.; Vázquez-Victorio, G.; Valenzuela, R.; Bañobre-López, M.; Rivas, J.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2014-05-07

    Magnetite nanoparticles about 10 nm sized were synthesized by the polyol method. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC)-FC measurements showed a blocking temperature ∼170 K and the absence of the Verwey transition. They were subsequently consolidated by spark plasma sintering at 750 °C for 15 min, leading to a high density (92% of the theoretical density), solid body, with grains in the 150 nm range. X-ray diffraction patterns exhibited a spinel single phase with cell parameters corresponding to the magnetite structure. Magnetic measurements showed a decrease of coercivity from 685 Oe (54.5 kA/m) at 118 K to 90 Oe (7.2 kA/m) at 139 K. ZFC measurements at 25 Oe presented a three-fold magnetization increase as temperature increased; a small transition between 116 and 117.5 K, followed by a larger one from 117.6 to 124 K. The first transition can be associated with a complex crystallographic transition and delocalization of Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 3+}, while the second one can be attributed to spin reorientation due to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant (K{sub 1}) change of sign as previously observed only in magnetite single crystals.

  1. Magnetic fabric development in a highly anisotropic magnetite-bearing ductile shear zone (Seve Nappe Complex, Scandinavian Caledonides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, A.; Engelmann, R.; Grimmer, J. C.; Greiling, R. O.; Hirt, A.

    2012-04-01

    Magnetite-bearing mylonitic garnet-micaschists close to the major suture between the Baltica and Iapetus terranes (Seve Nappe Complex, Scandinavian Caledonides) show very high anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) with corrected degree of anisotropy ( P') up to 4.8. Three different magnetic fabric types can be distinguished. They correspond to protomylonite (type I, P' < 2), mylonite (type II, 2 < P' < 3), and ultramylonite (type III, P' > 3), respectively. The orientation of the ellipsoid axes from all applied magnetic fabric methods in this study is similar with shallow dips of the metamorphic foliation toward WSW and subhorizontal, mostly NW-SE trending mineral lineation. Differences between subfabrics were minimized under high shear strain as all markers tend to align parallel with the shear plane. The very high anisotropies and mostly oblate ellipsoid shapes of type III correlate with high magnetic susceptibility ( k mean up to 55 × 10-3 SI units) and are related to the concentration of magnetite aggregates with shape-preferred orientation. They show a distinct field dependence of magnetic susceptibility of up to 10% in the k max-direction. We attribute this field dependence to a "memory" of high strains in the domain walls of the crystals acquired during synkinematic magnetite growth during shear zone fabric development at temperatures of 550-570°C.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibarra, Jaime; Melendres, Julio; Almada, Mario; Burboa, María G.; Taboada, Pablo; Juárez, Josué; Valdez, Miguel A.

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis and characterization of a new hybrid nanoparticles system performed by magnetite nanoparticles, loaded in a PLGA matrix, and stabilized by different concentrations of chitosan. Magnetite nanoparticles were hydrophobized with oleic acid and entrapped in a PLGA matrix by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, after that, magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by adding dropwise magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles in chitosan solutions. Magnetite/PLGA nanoparticles produced with different molar ratios did not show significant differences in size and the 3:1 molar ratio showed best spherical shapes as well as uniform particle size. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies demonstrated that the first stage of PLGA-chitosan interaction is mostly regulated by electrostatic forces. Based on a single set of identical sites model, we obtained for the average number of binding sites a value of 3.4, which can be considered as the number of chitosan chains per nanoparticle. This value was confirmed by using a model based on the DLVO theory and fitting zeta potential measurements of magnetite/PLGA/chitosan nanoparticles. From the adjusted parameters, we found that an average number of chitosan molecules of 3.6 per nanoparticle are attached onto the surface of the PLGA matrix. Finally, we evaluated the effect of surface charge of nanoparticles on a membrane model of endothelial cells performed by a mixture of three phospholipids at the air-water interface. Different isotherms and adsorption curves show that cationic surface of charged nanoparticles strongly interact with the phospholipids mixture and these results can be the basis of future experiments to understand the nanoparticles- cell membrane interaction.

  3. Simple and Rapid Synthesis of Magnetite/Hydroxyapatite Composites for Hyperthermia Treatments via a Mechanochemical Route

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Tomohiro; Nakatsuka, Ryo; Murase, Kenya; Takata, Hiroshige; Nakamura, Hideya; Watano, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for the rapid synthesis of magnetite/hydroxyapatite composite particles. In this method, superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles are first synthesized by coprecipitation using ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. Immediately following the synthesis, carbonate-substituted (B-type) hydroxyapatite particles are mechanochemically synthesized by wet milling dicalcium phosphate dihydrate and calcium carbonate in a dispersed suspension of magnetite nanoparticles, during which the magnetite nanoparticles are incorporated into the hydroxyapatite matrix. We observed that the resultant magnetite/hydroxyapatite composites possessed a homogeneous dispersion of magnetite nanoparticles, characterized by an absence of large aggregates. When this material was subjected to an alternating magnetic field, the heat generated increased with increasing magnetite concentration. For a magnetite concentration of 30 mass%, a temperature increase greater than 20 K was achieved in less than 50 s. These results suggest that our composites exhibit good hyperthermia properties and are promising candidates for hyperthermia treatments. PMID:23629669

  4. Study of magnetite nanoparticle suspensions by photometry and NMR relaxometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Yu. V.; Gareev, K. G.; Matyushkin, L. B.; Moshnikov, V. A.; Naumova, A. N.

    2013-12-01

    A method has been described for preparation of suspensions of magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by porous silicon dioxide. The process of sedimentation of nanoparticles in suspensions of different compositions and concentrations has been analyzed by transmission coefficient measurements. Spectra of the transmission coefficient have been obtained for suspensions containing composite nanoparticles, the initial silicon dioxide, and macroscopic magnetite particles. The average effective radius of nanoparticles has been calculated from the time dependences of the transmission coefficient. It has been demonstrated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess magnetic-resonance contrast properties.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of magnetite/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tingting; Huang, Chenchen; Yan, Shan; Li, Xiu-Juan; Pan, Si-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Three kinds of magnetite/reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) nanocomposites were prepared by solvothermal, hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized and compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential. The results showed that MRGO made by different methods differed in surface functional groups, crystal structure, particle sizes, surface morphology and surface charge. Due to their unlike features, these nanocomposites displayed dissimilar performances when they were used to adsorb drugs, dyes and metal ions. The MRGO prepared by the co-precipitation method showed special adsorption ability to negative ions, but those synthesized by the solvothermal method obtained the best extraction ability and reusability to the others and showed a good prospective in magnetic solid-phase extraction. Therefore, it is highly recommended to use the right preparation method before application in order to attain the best extraction performance. PMID:26452936

  6. Synthesis, characterization and adsorption properties of magnetite/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Qi, Tingting; Huang, Chenchen; Yan, Shan; Li, Xiu-Juan; Pan, Si-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Three kinds of magnetite/reduced graphene oxide (MRGO) nanocomposites were prepared by solvothermal, hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods. The as-prepared nanocomposites were characterized and compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and zeta potential. The results showed that MRGO made by different methods differed in surface functional groups, crystal structure, particle sizes, surface morphology and surface charge. Due to their unlike features, these nanocomposites displayed dissimilar performances when they were used to adsorb drugs, dyes and metal ions. The MRGO prepared by the co-precipitation method showed special adsorption ability to negative ions, but those synthesized by the solvothermal method obtained the best extraction ability and reusability to the others and showed a good prospective in magnetic solid-phase extraction. Therefore, it is highly recommended to use the right preparation method before application in order to attain the best extraction performance.

  7. SEPARATION OF TECHNETIUM FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS BY COPRECIPITATION WITH MAGNETITE

    DOEpatents

    Rimshaw, S.J.

    1961-10-24

    A method of separating technetium in the 4+ oxidation state from an aqueous basic solution containing products of uranium fission is described. The method consists of contacting the solution with finely divided magnetite and recovering a technetium-bearing precipitate. (AEC)

  8. Benefaction studies on the Hasan Celebi magnetite deposit, Turkey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pressler, Jean W.; Akar, Ali

    1972-01-01

    Bench-scale and semicontinuous tests were performed on surface, trench, and diamond drill core samples from the Hasan Celebi low-grade magnetite deposit to determine the optimum benefication procedures utilizing wet magnetic separation techniques. Composite core samples typically contain about 27 percent recoverable magnetite and require crushing and grinding through 1 mm in size to insure satisfactory separation of the gangue from the magnetite. Regrinding and cleaning the magnetite concentrate to 80 percent minus 150-mesh is necessary to obtain an optimum of 66 percent iron. Semicontinuous pilot-plant testing with the wet magnetic drum using the recycled middling technique indicates that as much as 83 percent of the acid-soluble iron can be recovered into a concentrate containing 66 percent iron, with minimum deleterious elements. This represents 27 weight percent of the original ore. Further tests will continue when the Maden Tetkik ve Arama Enstitusu (MTA) receives 24 tons of bulk sample from an exploratory drift and cross-cut now being driven through a section of the major reserve area.

  9. Enhancing of Fe removal in pyrophyllite using magnetite ore susceptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack Lim, Dae; Myung, Eun Ji; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choul Choi, Nag; Cho, Kang Hee; Park, Cheon Young

    2016-04-01

    Pyrite and hematite are an impurity that reduces the grade of pyrophyllite in the final products. Because the impurity in pyrophyllite which was associated with hydrothermally altered rocks. Microwave has been extensively explored in various fields of materials processing. This technology exhibits unique characteristics including volumetric and selective heating, which eventually lead to many exceptional advantages over conventional processing methods including both energy and cost savings, improved product quality and faster processing. The aim of this study was to investigate the application possibility of microwave process for Fe removal in pyrophyllite. The pyrite and quartz of the pyrophyllite was determined by reflected light microscopy and XRD. The result of Fe removal experiment in pyrophyllite using microwave susceptor(magnetite ore included ilmenite and magnetite) showed to decrease of Fe content in pyrophyllite. The Fe removal of 93.62% and parameters were obtained under the following conditions by magnetite ore was 20.0 g, the pyrophyllite was 10.0 g, and the microwave heating time was 10.0 min. By means of microwave, Fe removal in pyrophyllite can be rapidly and efficiently pyrolyze. if some of the magnetite ore, which acts as a microwave susceptor, is mixed with the raw material. Acknowledgment : This subject is supported by Korea Ministry of Environment as "Advanced Technology Program for Environmental Industry"

  10. Raman spectroscopy investigation of magnetite nanoparticles in ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavov, L.; Abrashev, M. V.; Merodiiska, T.; Gelev, Ch.; Vandenberghe, R. E.; Markova-Deneva, I.; Nedkov, I.

    2010-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy is used to investigate magnetite nanoparticles dispersed in two types of β-cyclodextrin suspensions. An approach is presented for characterization of the magnetic core in liquid surrounding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The effect of elevating laser power on the structural stability and chemical composition of magnetite in the ferrofluids is discussed. The data are compared with data from dry by-products from the fluids. Powder samples undergo total phase transition from magnetite to hematite at laser power of 1.95 mW. The same nanoparticles in the fluid undergo transformation at 9 mW, but no hematite positions appear throughout that investigation. The Raman spectra revealed that the main phase of the magnetic core in the fluids is magnetite. That is indicated by a strong and non-diminishing in intensity peak at 670 cm -1. A second phase is present at the nanoparticle's surface with Raman spectroscopy unveiling maghemite-like and small fractions of goethite-like structures. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy investigations confirm deviations in the surface structure and also point to the fact that the oxidation process starts at an early stage after formation of the nanoparticles. The analyses of the infrared data also show that β-cyclodextrin molecules retain their cyclic character and the coating does not affect the oxidation process once the particles are evicted from the fluids. A Mössbauer spectroscopy measurement on a ferrofluidic sample is also presented.

  11. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in het...

  12. Magnetite and Carbonate Textures in ALH84001: Experimental Insights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2001-01-01

    Synthetic siderite and synthetic siderite-magnesite carbonates were equilibrated with hematite, magnetite, and CO2 at elevated pressure and temperature. Comparisons are made to textures seen in the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Advancing Sustainable Catalysis with Magnetite Surface Modification and Synthetic Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article surveys the recent developments in the synthesis, surface modification, and synthetic applications of magnetitenanoparticles. The emergence of iron(II,III) oxide (triiron tetraoxide or magnetite; Fe3O4, or FeO•Fe2O3) nanoparticles as a sustainable support in heteroge...

  14. Intensified magneto-resistance by rapid thermal annealing in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film on SiO2 glass substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobori, H.; Morii, K.; Yamasaki, A.; Sugimura, A.; Taniguchi, T.; Horie, T.; Naitoh, Y.; Shimizu, T.

    2012-12-01

    We have observed large magneto-resistance (MR) intensified by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) in magnetite (Fe3O4) thin film (MTF) on SiO2 glass (a-SiO2) substrate. The MTF was produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method by using a magnetite target. The electrical resistivity (ER) of as-grown MTF (AG-MTF) showed the Mott's variable range hopping behavior, which implies that the AG-MTF is amorphous-like. Although the magneto-resistance (MR) ratio of bulk single crystal is very small except around the Verwey transition temperature (VTT), that of the AG-MTF showed moderately large below room temperature. Due to RTA of the AG-MTF by use of an IR image furnace, the MR ratio of MTFs was intensified, and especially by the annealing around the Curie temperature (585°C) of magnetite. Furthermore the ER of the rapid thermally annealed MTF (RTA-MTF) showed a slight kink at around the VTT, which indicates that the crystallinity of the RTA-MTF is higher than that of the AG-MTF The MTF produced by the RF magnetron sputtering method are composed of magnetite fine particles (MFPs). We consider that the directions of magnetic moments of MFPs in the MTF were spatially randomized by the RTA and the strong spin scattering of itinerant electrons transferring between adjacent MFPs caused the intensification of the MR ratio.

  15. Electrokinetic characterization of magnetite nanoparticles functionalized with amino acids.

    PubMed

    Viota, J L; Arroyo, F J; Delgado, A V; Horno, J

    2010-04-01

    The synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a magnetite core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (L-arginine, L-lysine, glycine, and L-glutamine) is described in this paper. For all the amino acids it is found that adsorption increases with concentration in solution in the range 0.5-10 mg/mL. The adsorption, however, differs substantially from one amino acid to another, depending on the length of the hydrocarbon chain and the polarity and charge of the side group. Thus, for given concentration and pH, adsorption is found to increase in the order L-arginine < L-lysine < L-glutamine < glycine. This order corresponds roughly to amino acids with decreasing chain length; in addition, the presence of the less polarizable guanidine group in the arginine molecule may explain why this amino acid is slightly less adsorbed than lysine. The pH dependence of the adsorption of each amino acid is reasonably explained considering the surface charge of magnetite and the charge of the amino acid molecules for different pHs, indicating a significant role of electrostatics in adsorption. This is further checked by means of determinations of the electrophoretic mobility of amino acid-coated magnetite as a function of pH: the results indicate a shift of the isoelectric point of the raw magnetite toward more basic pHs, an indication of adsorption of positive species, as confirmed by the tendency of the mobility of amino acid-coated magnetite toward more positive values below neutral pH. The electrophoretic mobility of coated particles was also measured as a function of the concentration of amino acid, and it was found that for low concentrations the four amino acids provoke charge inversion and overcharging of the magnetite surface at pH 6. Finally, the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility on the ionic strength indicated that from an electrophoretic point of view, the functionalized magnetite-amino acid particles do not behave as soft particles, and that the amino acid

  16. Influence of magnetite stoichiometry on Fe(II) uptake and nitrobenzene reduction.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Christopher A; Scherer, Michelle M

    2009-05-15

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a common biomineralization product of microbial iron respiration and is often found in subsurface anoxic environments, such as groundwater aquifers where aqueous Fe(II) is present We investigated the reaction between aqueous Fe(II) and magnetite using the isotopic selectivity of 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and revisited the reduction of nitrobenzene by magnetite. Similar to our previous findings with Fe3+ oxides, we did not observe the formation of a stable sorbed Fe(II) species; instead, we observed oxidation of the Fe(II) to a partially oxidized magnetite phase. Oxidation of Fe(II) was accompanied by reduction of the octahedral Fe3+ atoms in the underlying magnetite to octahedral Fe2+ atoms. The lack of a stable, sorbed Fe(II) species on magnetite prompted us to reevaluate what is controlling the extent of Fe(II) uptake on magnetite, as well as contaminant reduction in the presence of magnetite and Fe(II). Uptake of Fe(II) by magnetite appears to be limited by the stoichiometry of the magnetite particles, rather than the surface area of the particles. More oxidized (or less stoichiometric) magnetite particles take up more Fe(II), with the formation of stoichiometric magnetite (Fe2+/Fe3+ = 0.5) limiting the extent of Fe(II) uptake. We also showthat stoichiometric magnetite, in the absence of aqueous Fe(II), can rapidly reduce nitrobenzene. Based on these results, we speculate that contaminant reduction that was previously attributed to Fe(II) sorbed on magnetite is due to a process similar to negative (n) doping of a solid, which increases the stoichiometry of the magnetite and alters the bulk redox properties of the particle to make reduction more favorable. PMID:19544872

  17. Magnetite Nanoparticles Stabilized Under Physiological Conditions for Biomedical Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdãº, A.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bica, D.; Vékás, L.

    The biomedical application of water based magnetic fluids (MFs) is of great practical importance. Their colloidal stability under physiological conditions (blood pH ˜ 7.2-7.4 and salt concentration ˜0.15 M) and more in high magnetic field gradient is crucial. Magnetite or maghemite nanoparticles are used in general. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles were stabilized with different compounds (citric acid (CA) and phosphate) and sodium oleate (NaO) as the most used surfactant in the stabilization of MFs. The adsorption and overcharging effect were quantified, and the enhancement in salt tolerance of stabilized systems was studied. Adsorption, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements were performed. The electrolyte tolerance was tested in coagulation kinetic measurements. Above the adsorption saturation, the nanoparticles are stabilized in a way of combined steric and electrostatic effects. The aim was to research these two important effects and demonstrate that none of them alone is enough. The phosphate was not able to stabilize the ferrofluid in spite of our expectation, but the other two additives proved to be effective stabilizing agents. The magnetite was well stabilized by the surface complexation of CA above pH ˜ 5, however, the salt tolerance of citrate stabilized MFs remained much below the concentration of physiological salt solution, and more the dissolution of magnetite nanocrystals was enhanced due to Fe-CA complexation in aqueous medium, which may cause problems in vivo. The oleate double layers were able to stabilize magnetite nanoparticles perfectly at pH ˜ 6 preventing particle aggregation effectively even in physiological salt solution.

  18. Surface reactions kinetics between nanocrystalline magnetite and uranyl.

    PubMed

    Missana, Tiziana; Maffiotte, César; García-Gutiérrez, Miguel

    2003-05-01

    Magnetite is the most important end member of iron corrosion products under reducing environment, which is the condition expected in a deep geological high level radioactive waste disposal. Nanocrystalline magnetite was synthesized in the laboratory and its physicochemical properties were analyzed in detail. The kinetics of the adsorption of U(VI) and the kinetics of the actinide reduction to a lower oxidation state, in presence of the oxide, were studied by means of batch sorption techniques and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The results showed that the uranium sorption and reduction processes on the magnetite surface have very fast kinetics (hours), the reduction process being triggered by sorption. XPS measurements showed that the speciation of uranium at the surface does not show significant changes with time (from 1 day to 3 months), as well as the quantity of uranium detected at the surface. The surface speciation depended on the initial pH of the contact solution. Considering that the Eh of equilibrium between magnetite and the solution, under our experimental conditions, is slightly positive (50-100 mV), the uranium reduction would also be thermodynamically possible within the liquid phase. However, the kinetics of reduction in the liquid occur at a much slower rate which, in turn, has to depend on the attainment of the magnetite/solution equilibrium. The decrease of uranium in solution, observed after the uranyl adsorption stage, and particularly at acidic pH, is most probably due to the precipitation of U(IV) formed in the solution.

  19. Controlled aggregates of magnetite nanoparticles for highly sensitive MR contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bong-Sik; Cho, Eun-Jin; Yang, Hee-Man; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Kim, Jong-Duk

    2009-12-01

    We have prepared a magnetite encapsulated polymer nanocomposite (MEPN) by an emulsification-diffusion technique and found that the encapsulation efficiency could be precisely controlled according to the portion of magnetite and the capping ligand that covers the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles. The field-dependence and temperature dependence on magnetization, measured by a superconducting quantum interference device, demonstrate that there was no size effect of the magnetite nanoparticles on the encapsulation behavior. The size distribution and T2 relaxivity of prepared MEPNs were measured using magnetic resonance imaging for analysis of the effect of aggregation and it was verified that aggregates of the magnetite nanoparticles provide enhanced relaxation ability.

  20. Cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Pallab; Giri, Jyotsnendu; Banerjee, Rinti; Bellare, Jayesh; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2007-04-01

    In vitro cytocompatibility and cellular interactions of lauric acid and dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles were evaluated with two different cell lines (mouse fibroblast and human cervical carcinoma). Lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles were less cytocompatible than dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles and cellular uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles was more than that of dextran-coated magnetite nanoparticles. Lesser cytocompatibility and higher uptake of lauric acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles as compared to dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles may be due to different cellular interactions by coating material. Thus, coating plays an important role in modulation of biocompatibility and cellular interaction of magnetic nanoparticles.

  1. Magnetite Formation from Thermal Decomposition of Siderite: Implications for Inorganic Magnetite Formation in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, RIchard V.

    2002-01-01

    A biogenic mechanism for formation of a subpopulation magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been suggested [McKay et al., 1996; Thomas-Keprta, et al., 2000]. We are developing experimental evidence for an alternating working hypothesis, that the subpopulation was produced inorganically by the thermal decomposition of siderite [Golden et al., 2000].

  2. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U(IV) nanoprecipitates on the magnetite (111) surface.

    PubMed

    Singer, David M; Chatman, Shawn M; Ilton, Eugene S; Rosso, Kevin M; Banfield, Jillian F; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2012-04-01

    Sequestration of uranium (U) by magnetite is a potentially important sink for U in natural and contaminated environments. However, molecular-scale controls that favor U(VI) uptake including both adsorption of U(VI) and reduction to U(IV) by magnetite remain poorly understood, in particular, the role of U(VI)-CO(3)-Ca complexes in inhibiting U(VI) reduction. To investigate U uptake pathways on magnetite as a function of U(VI) aqueous speciation, we performed batch sorption experiments on (111) surfaces of natural single crystals under a range of solution conditions (pH 5 and 10; 0.1 mM U(VI); 1 mM NaNO(3); and with or without 0.5 mM CO(3) and 0.1 mM Ca) and characterized surface-associated U using grazing incidence extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (GI-EXAFS), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the absence of both carbonate ([CO(3)](T), denoted here as CO(3)) and calcium (Ca), or in the presence of CO(3) only, coexisting adsorption of U(VI) surface species and reduction to U(IV) occurs at both pH 5 and 10. In the presence of both Ca and CO(3), only U(VI) adsorption (VI) occurs. When U reduction occurs, nanoparticulate UO(2) forms only within and adjacent to surface microtopographic features such as crystal boundaries and cracks. This result suggests that U reduction is limited to defect-rich surface regions. Further, at both pH 5 and 10 in the presence of both CO(3) and Ca, U(VI)-CO(3)-Ca ternary surface species develop and U reduction is inhibited. These findings extend the range of conditions under which U(VI)-CO(3)-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction.

  3. Dissolution behaviour of magnetite film formed over carbon steel in dilute organic acid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, A. A. M.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S. V.; Ramesh, C.; Murugesan, N.; Raghavan, P. S.; Gopalan, R.

    2001-03-01

    Magnetite is the major corrosion product formed over the carbon steel in the primary heat transport system of the pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR). This magnetite usually accumulates radioactivity during reactor operation. The dissolution of the host magnetite is achieved by chemical formulations in order to get rid of the radioactivity trapped in the oxide; the underlying base metal also participates in the process by contributing electron to reduce the ferric ion or by undergoing corrosion. In the present study, the role of base metal in the dissolution of magnetite in various chelating agents has been investigated. The liberated hydrogen was measured by using an amperometric hydrogen sensor. The magnetite dissolution rate and the corrosion rate of carbon steel in the formulations were calculated. The effect of temperature, pH and concentration of the chelating agents on the magnetite film dissolution was studied in detail. The mechanism of base metal aided magnetite dissolution is discussed.

  4. Magnetite-based Magnetoreception in Animals: 25+ Years of Theory & Experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Walker, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Living organisms ranging from bacteria through higher vertebrates rely on orientation, navigation, and homing to survive. Any sensory cue that enhances these behaviors will be subject to intense natural selection over geological time. Reproducible behavioral responses to earth-strength magnetic fields(1) have been documented in Bacteria, Protoctists, and in nearly every major group of animals, and are possibly also present in the Archaea. Several groups of animals, including birds and cetaceans, respond behaviorally to magnetic anomalies below 100 nT in magnitude, implying that their magnetoreception ability approaches the thermal noise limit. This approach to thermal noise is commonly observed in other sensory systems, including hearing, olfaction, and electroreception. The hypothesis of magnetite-based magnetoreception(2) is the only theory proposed so far that is capable of explaining all of the magnetic behavioral data. Tiny crystals of single-domain magnetite (or in some bacteria, greigite) rotate the cells of microorganisms passively like a simple compass needle. The initial detection of biogenic magnetite with rock magnetic techniques in birds and bees over 25 years ago has led progressively to the identification of a group of specialized cells in fish and birds which contain organized magnetite-containing structures. In these animals (and presumably all vertebrates) magnetic signals are transmitted to the brain via the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve(3, 4). Experiments with pulse-remagnetization, like those that convert North-seeking bacteria into South-seekers, have dramatic effects on animal behavior, confirming the role of magnetite in the sensory system. This is therefore a general mechanism for a highly sensitive magnetic sense, the origin of which probably dates to the ancestral metazoan, and perhaps earlier. The largest debate presently occurring in the field concerns the interpretation of magnetic compass responses that vary with intensity

  5. Quartz crystal microbalance biosensor study of endothelial cells and their extracellular matrix following cell removal: Evidence for transient cellular stress and viscoelastic changes during detachment and the elastic behavior of the pure matrix.

    PubMed

    Marx, Kenneth A; Zhou, Tiean; Montrone, Anne; McIntosh, Donna; Braunhut, Susan J

    2005-08-01

    A quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) cell biosensor utilizing living endothelial cells (ECs) or human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) adhering to the gold QCM surface was used to study the relative contributions of the cells and their underlying extracellular matrix (ECM) to the measured QCM Deltaf and DeltaR shifts. The ECM represents a natural biomaterial that is synthesized by the cells to enable their attachment to surfaces. We followed the detachment of the ECs or MCF-7 cells from their ECM using a nonproteolytic method and were able to apportion the total frequency, Deltaf, decrease of the biosensor into contributions from cell attachment and from the intact underlying ECM. We also demonstrated that the Deltaf shift remaining after EC removal corresponds to ECM as determined by light microscopic visualization of the stained protein. During the process of cell detachment, we observed a novel transient increase in viscoelastic behavior expressed as a transient increase in the motional resistance, DeltaR, parameter. Then we showed via a simulation experiment using ECs stained with fluorescent rhodamine-labeled phalloidin, an actin stain, that the transient viscoelastic increase correlated with cellular stress exhibited by the cells during removal with ethylene glycol bis(2-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'- tetraacetic acid. Prior to cells lifting from their ECM, the attached ECs rearrange their actin microfilaments first into peripheral stress fibers and second into internal aggregates, to maintain cell-cell connectivity, retain their spread morphology, and attempt to adhere more tightly to their underlying ECM. The decrease in DeltaR following its transient rise corresponds to cells finally losing their attachment focal points and lifting from the ECM. We also characterized the normalized f shifts, -Delta(Deltaf)(ECM)/attached cell and -Delta(Deltaf)(cells)/attached cell, as a function of varying the number of adherent cells. Finally, we demonstrate that the underlying

  6. Geochemistry of magnetite from porphyry Cu and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nadoll, Patrick; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; LeVeille, Richard A.; Koenig, Alan E.

    2015-01-01

    A combination of petrographic observations, laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), and statistical data exploration was used in this study to determine compositional variations in hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from five porphyry Cu–Mo and skarn deposits in the southwestern United States, and igneous magnetite from the unmineralized, granodioritic Inner Zone Batholith, Japan. The most important overall discriminators for the minor and trace element chemistry of magnetite from the investigated porphyry and skarn deposits are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and Ga—of these the elements with the highest variance for (I) igneous magnetite are Mg, Al, Ti, V, Mn, Zn, for (II) hydrothermal porphyry magnetite are Mg, Ti, V, Mn, Co, Zn, and for (III) hydrothermal skarn magnetite are Mg, Ti, Mn, Zn, and Ga. Nickel could only be detected at levels above the limit of reporting (LOR) in two igneous magnetites. Equally, Cr could only be detected in one igneous occurrence. Copper, As, Mo, Ag, Au, and Pb have been reported in magnetite by other authors but could not be detected at levels greater than their respective LORs in our samples. Comparison with the chemical signature of igneous magnetite from the barren Inner Zone Batholith, Japan, suggests that V, Mn, Co, and Ga concentrations are relatively depleted in magnetite from the porphyry and skarn deposits. Higher formation conditions in combination with distinct differences between melt and hydrothermal fluid compositions are reflected in Al, Ti, V, and Ga concentrations that are, on average, higher in igneous magnetite than in hydrothermal magnetite (including porphyry and skarn magnetite). Low Ti and V concentrations in combination with high Mn concentrations are characteristic features of magnetite from skarn deposits. High Mg concentrations (<1,000 ppm) are characteristic for magnetite from magnesian skarn and likely reflect extensive fluid/rock interaction. In porphyry deposits

  7. Preparation of magnetite aqueous dispersion for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Teppei; Kasuya, Ryo; Endo, Shota; Nakamura, Akira; Takai, Toshiyuki; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Tohji, Kazuyuki; Balachandran, Jeyadevan

    2011-05-01

    An aqueous magnetic suspension was prepared by dispersing amphiphilic co-polymer-coated monodispersed magnetite nanoparticles synthesized through thermal decomposition of iron acetylacetonate (Fe(acac) 3) in a mixture of oleic acid and oleylamine. The average diameter of narrow-size-distributed magnetite nanoparticles varied between 5 and 12 nm depending on the experimental parameters such as reaction temperature, metal salt concentration and oleic acid/oleylamine ratio. Though the as-synthesized particles were coated with oleate and were dispersible in organic solvent, their surfaces were modified using amphiphilic co-polymers composed of poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) and polyethylene glycol-methyl ether and made dispersible in water. Infrared spectra of the sample indicated the existence of -COOH groups on the surface for further conjugation with biomolecules for targeted cancer therapy.

  8. Relaxometry imaging of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkler, Amit; Schmid-Lorch, Dominik; Häberle, Thomas; Reinhard, Friedemann; Zappe, Andrea; Slota, Michael; Bogani, Lapo; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    We present a novel technique to image superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles via their fluctuating magnetic fields. The detection is based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond, which allows optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) measurements on its electron spin structure. In combination with an atomic-force-microscope, this atomic-sized color center maps ambient magnetic fields in a wide frequency range from DC up to several GHz, while retaining a high spatial resolution in the sub-nanometer range. We demonstrate imaging of single 10 nm sized magnetite nanoparticles using this spin noise detection technique. By fitting simulations (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process) to the data, we are able to infer additional information on such a particle and its dynamics, like the attempt frequency and the anisotropy constant. This is of high interest to the proposed application of magnetite nanoparticles as an alternative MRI contrast agent or to the field of particle-aided tumor hyperthermia.

  9. Carboxymethyldextran/magnetite hybrid microspheres designed for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Anan, Shota; Ishida, Eiichi; Kawashita, Masakazu

    2013-05-01

    Recently, organic-inorganic hybrids composed of derivatives of dextran, a polysaccharide, and magnetite nanoparticles have attracted much attention as novel thermoseeds. If they can be fabricated into microspheres of size 20-30 μm, they are expected to show not only hyperthermia effects but also embolization effects in human liver and kidney cancers. In this study, we examined the fabrication of carboxymethyldextran/magnetite microspheres using a water/oil emulsion as the reaction medium. Improvement of the chemical stability of the microcapsules by coating with silica using a sol-gel process was also investigated. The obtained hollow microspheres contained particles of size 20-30 μm. Silica coating using an appropriate catalyst for hydrolysis and polycondensation of alkoxysilanes was found to be effective for preventing dissolution and collapse in simulated body environments.

  10. Carboxymethyldextran/magnetite hybrid microspheres designed for hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Toshiki; Anan, Shota; Ishida, Eiichi; Kawashita, Masakazu

    2013-05-01

    Recently, organic-inorganic hybrids composed of derivatives of dextran, a polysaccharide, and magnetite nanoparticles have attracted much attention as novel thermoseeds. If they can be fabricated into microspheres of size 20-30 μm, they are expected to show not only hyperthermia effects but also embolization effects in human liver and kidney cancers. In this study, we examined the fabrication of carboxymethyldextran/magnetite microspheres using a water/oil emulsion as the reaction medium. Improvement of the chemical stability of the microcapsules by coating with silica using a sol-gel process was also investigated. The obtained hollow microspheres contained particles of size 20-30 μm. Silica coating using an appropriate catalyst for hydrolysis and polycondensation of alkoxysilanes was found to be effective for preventing dissolution and collapse in simulated body environments. PMID:23371771

  11. Rapid Discrimination of Biogenic and Detrital Magnetite Through a Double Verwey Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Heslop, D.; Roberts, A. P.; Rey, D.; Mohamed, K.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetite occurs widely in natural environments in both inorganic and biogenic forms. Discrimination of the origin of magnetite in natural environments has important implications, from searching for past microbial activity to interpreting paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic records in a wide range of settings. In this study, we present detailed rock magnetic and electron microscopic results from marine sediment samples from the continental margin of Oman. Low-temperature magnetic measurements reveal two distinct Verwey transition temperatures (Tv) that are associated with the presence of biogenic and inorganic magnetite. This interpretation is consistent with room temperature magnetic properties and is confirmed by electron microscopic analyses. Our study justifies the use of two distinct Tv temperatures as a diagnostic magnetic signature for discriminating inorganic and biogenic magnetite. Simple low-temperature magnetic measurement (i.e., low-temperature warming of a saturation remanence after field cooling) provides a tool to recognize rapidly the origin of magnetite particles within natural samples. In addition, our analyses reveal progressive down-core dissolution of detrital and biogenic magnetite. We also observe preservation of significant amounts of fine-grained magnetite within sediments that have been subjected to severe diagenetic alteration, despite the expectation that small magnetite grains are prone to dissolution in anoxic marine environments. Preservation of magnetite in such environments is most likely due to protection of fine-grained magnetite inclusions by coarse-grained silicate host minerals.

  12. Hematite Versus Magnetite as the Signature for Planetary Magnetic Anomalies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kletetshka, Gunther; Taylor, Patrick T.; Wasilewski, Peter J.

    1999-01-01

    Crustal magnetic anomalies are the result of adjacent geologic units having contrasting magnetization. This magnetization arises from induction and/or remanence. In a planetary context we now know that Mars has significant crustal magnetic anomalies due to remanent magnetization, while the Earth has some anomalies where remanence can be shown to be important. This picture, however, is less clear because of the nature and the magnitude of the geomagnetic field which is responsible for superimposed induced magnetization. Induced magnetization assumes a magnetite source, because of its much greater magnetic susceptibility when compared with other magnetic minerals. We investigated the TRM (thermoremanent magnetization) acquisition of hematite, in weak magnetic fields up to 1 mT, to determine if the remanent and induced magnetization of hematite could compete with magnetite. TRM acquisition curves of magnetite and hematite show that multi-domain hematite reaches TRM saturation (0.3 - 0.4 A sq m/kg) in fields as low as 100 microT. However, multi-domain magnetite reaches only a few percent of its TRM saturation in a field of 100 microT (0.02 - 0.06 A sq m/kg). These results suggest that a mineral such as hematite and, perhaps, other minerals with significant remanence and minor induced magnetization may play an important role in providing requisite magnetization contrast. Perhaps, and especially for the Mars case, we should reevaluate where hematite and other minerals, with efficient remanence acquisition, exist in significant concentration, allowing a more comprehensive explanation of Martian anomalies and better insight into the role of remanent magnetization in terrestrial crustal magnetic anomalies.

  13. Supercritical fluid synthesis of magnetic hexagonal nanoplatelets of magnetite.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonglai; Godsell, Jeffrey F; O'Byrne, Justin P; Petkov, Nikolay; Morris, Michael A; Roy, Saibal; Holmes, Justin D

    2010-09-15

    A supercritical fluid technique was used to prepare hexagonal nanoplatelets of magnetite. Ferrocene was used as the Fe source, and sc-CO(2) acted as both a solvent and oxygen source in the process. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and magnetic measurements were used to characterize the products. It was found that the morphology and structure of the product strongly depended on the reaction conditions.

  14. Biologically controlled synthesis and assembly of magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Mathieu; Bertinetti, Luca; Neely, Robert K; Schertel, Andreas; Körnig, André; Flors, Cristina; Müller, Frank D; Schüler, Dirk; Klumpp, Stefan; Faivre, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles have size- and shape-dependent magnetic properties. In addition, assemblies of magnetite nanoparticles forming one-dimensional nanostructures have magnetic properties distinct from zero-dimensional or non-organized materials due to strong uniaxial shape anisotropy. However, assemblies of free-standing magnetic nanoparticles tend to collapse and form closed-ring structures rather than chains in order to minimize their energy. Magnetotactic bacteria, ubiquitous microorganisms, have the capability to mineralize magnetite nanoparticles, the so-called magnetosomes, and to direct their assembly in stable chains via biological macromolecules. In this contribution, the synthesis and assembly of biological magnetite to obtain functional magnetic dipoles in magnetotactic bacteria are presented, with a focus on the assembly. We present tomographic reconstructions based on cryo-FIB sectioning and SEM imaging of a magnetotactic bacterium to exemplify that the magnetosome chain is indeed a paradigm of a 1D magnetic nanostructure, based on the assembly of several individual particles. We show that the biological forces are a major player in the formation of the magnetosome chain. Finally, we demonstrate by super resolution fluorescence microscopy that MamK, a protein of the actin family necessary to form the chain backbone in the bacteria, forms a bundle of filaments that are not only found in the vicinity of the magnetosome chain but are widespread within the cytoplasm, illustrating the dynamic localization of the protein within the cells. These very simple microorganisms have thus much to teach us with regards to controlling the design of functional 1D magnetic nanoassembly.

  15. Field Evidence for Magnetite Formation by a Methanogenic Microbial Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossbach, S.; Beaver, C. L.; Williams, A.; Atekwana, E. A.; Slater, L. D.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Lund, A.

    2015-12-01

    The aged, subsurface petroleum spill in Bemidji, Minnesota, has been surveyed with magnetic susceptibility (MS) measurements. High MS values were found in the free-product phase around the fluctuating water table. Although we had hypothesized that high MS values are related to the occurrence of the mineral magnetite resulting from the activity of iron-reducing bacteria, our microbial analysis pointed to the presence of a methanogenic microbial community at the locations and depths of the highest MS values. Here, we report on a more detailed microbial analysis based on high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of sediment samples from four consecutive years. In addition, we provide geochemical data (FeII/FeIII concentrations) to refine our conceptual model of methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation at aged petroleum spills and demonstrate that the microbial induced changes of sediment properties can be monitored with MS. The methanogenic microbial community at the Bemidji site consisted mainly of the syntrophic, hydrocarbon-degrading Smithella and the hydrogenotrophic, methane-generating Methanoregula. There is growing evidence in the literature that not only Bacteria, but also some methanogenic Archaea are able to reduce iron. In fact, a recent study reported that the methanogen Methanosarcina thermophila produced magnetite during the reduction of ferrihydrite in a laboratory experiment when hydrogen was present. Therefore, our finding of high MS values and the presence of magnetite in the methanogenic zone of an aged, subsurface petroleum spill could very well be the first field evidence for magnetite formation during methanogenic hydrocarbon degradation.

  16. Stable ferrofluids of magnetite nanoparticles in hydrophobic ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestrom, Luuk; Lenders, Jos J. M.; de Groot, Rick; Hooghoudt, Tonnis; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Vilaplana Artigas, Marcel

    2015-07-01

    Ferrofluids (FFs) of metal oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquids (ILs) are a potentially useful class of magnetic materials for many applications because of their properties related to temperature/pressure stability, hydrophobicity, viscosity and recyclability. In this work, the screening of several designer surfactants for their stabilizing capabilities has resulted in the synthesis of stable FFs of superparamagnetic 7 ± 2 nm magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the hydrophobic IL 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([CRMIM][NTf2]). The designed and synthesized 1-butyl-3-(10-carboxydecyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide (ILC10-COOH) surfactant that combines the same imidazole moiety as the IL with a long alkyl chain ensured compatibility with the IL and increased the steric repulsion between the magnetite nanoparticles sufficiently such that stable dispersions of up to 50 wt% magnetite were obtained according to stability tests in the presence of a magnetic field (0.5-1 Tesla). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of the IL-based FFs allowed direct visualization of the surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles in the ILs and the native, hardly aggregated state of their dispersion.

  17. "Clickable", trifunctional magnetite nanoparticles and their chemoselective biofunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Das, Manasmita; Bandyopadhyay, Debarati; Mishra, Debasish; Datir, Satyajit; Dhak, Prasanta; Jain, Sanyog; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Basak, Amit; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-06-15

    A multifunctional iron oxide based nanoformulation for combined cancer-targeted therapy and multimodal imaging has been meticulously designed and synthesized using a chemoselective ligation approach. Novel superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles simultaneously functionalized with amine, carboxyl, and azide groups were fabricated through a sequence of stoichiometrically controllable partial succinylation and Cu (II) catalyzed diazo transfer on the reactive amine termini of 2-aminoethylphosphonate grafted magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs). Functional moieties associated with MNP surface were chemoselectively conjugated with rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RITC), propargyl folate (FA), and paclitaxel (PTX) via tandem nucleophic addition of amine to isothithiocyanates, Cu (I) catalyzed azide--alkyne click chemistry and carbodiimide-promoted esterification. An extensive in vitro study established that the bioactives chemoselectively appended to the magnetite core bequeathed multifunctionality to the nanoparticles without any loss of activity of the functional molecules. Multifunctional nanoparticles, developed in the course of the study, could selectively target and induce apoptosis to folate-receptor (FR) overexpressing cancer cells with enhanced efficacy as compared to the free drug. In addition, the dual optical and magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles aided in the real-time tracking of their intracellular pathways also as apoptotic events through dual fluorescence and MR-based imaging.

  18. Stable ferrofluids of magnetite nanoparticles in hydrophobic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mestrom, Luuk; Lenders, Jos J M; de Groot, Rick; Hooghoudt, Tonnis; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M; Artigas, Marcel Vilaplana

    2015-07-17

    Ferrofluids (FFs) of metal oxide nanoparticles in ionic liquids (ILs) are a potentially useful class of magnetic materials for many applications because of their properties related to temperature/pressure stability, hydrophobicity, viscosity and recyclability. In this work, the screening of several designer surfactants for their stabilizing capabilities has resulted in the synthesis of stable FFs of superparamagnetic 7 ± 2 nm magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the hydrophobic IL 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([C(R)MIM][NTf2]). The designed and synthesized 1-butyl-3-(10-carboxydecyl)-1H-imidazol-3-ium bromide (ILC10-COOH) surfactant that combines the same imidazole moiety as the IL with a long alkyl chain ensured compatibility with the IL and increased the steric repulsion between the magnetite nanoparticles sufficiently such that stable dispersions of up to 50 wt% magnetite were obtained according to stability tests in the presence of a magnetic field (0.5-1 Tesla). Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) of the IL-based FFs allowed direct visualization of the surfactant-stabilized nanoparticles in the ILs and the native, hardly aggregated state of their dispersion. PMID:26118409

  19. Bioinspired synthesis and characterization of gadolinium-labeled magnetite nanoparticles for dual contrast t1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Bae, Ki Hyun; Kim, Young Beom; Lee, Yuhan; Hwang, Jinyoung; Park, Hyunwook; Park, Tae Gwan

    2010-03-17

    Gadolinium-labeled magnetite nanoparticles (GMNPs) were synthesized via a bioinspired manner to use as dual contrast agents for T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. A mussel-derived adhesive moiety, 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), was utilized as a robust anchor to form a mixed layer of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and dopamine molecules on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. Gadolinium ions were subsequently complexed at the distal end of the dopamine molecules that were prefunctionalized with a chelating ligand for gadolinium. The resultant GMNPs exhibited high dispersion stability in aqueous solution. Crystal structure and superparamagnetic properties of magnetite nanocrystals were also maintained after the complexation of gadolinium. The potential of GMNPs as dual contrast agents for T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was demonstrated by conducting in vitro and in vivo imaging and relaxivity measurements.

  20. Production of nano zinc, zinc sulphide and nanocomplex of magnetite zinc oxide by Brevundimonas diminuta and Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed

    Mirhendi, Mansoureh; Emtiazi, Giti; Roghanian, Rasoul

    2013-12-01

    ZnO (Zincite) nanoparticle has many industrial applications and is mostly produced by chemical reactions, usually prepared by decomposition of zinc acetate or hot-injection and heating-up method. Synthesis of semi-conductor nanoparticles such as ZnS (Sphalerite) by ultrasonic was previously reported. In this work, high-zinc tolerant bacteria were isolated and used for nano zinc production. Among all isolated microorganisms, a gram negative bacterium which was identified as Brevundimonas diminuta could construct nano magnetite zinc oxide on bacterial surface with 22 nm in size and nano zinc with 48.29 nm in size. A piece of zinc metal was immersed in medium containing of pure culture of B. diminuta. Subsequently, a yellow-white biofilm was formed which was collected from the surface of zinc. It was dried at room temperature. The isolated biofilm was analysed by X-ray diffractometer. Interestingly, the yield of these particles was higher in the light, with pH 7 at 23°C. To the best of the authors knowledge, this is the first report about the production of nano zinc metal and nano zinc oxide that are stable and have anti-bacterial activities with magnetite property. Also ZnS (sized 12 nm) produced by Pseudomonas stutzeri, was studied by photoluminescence and fluorescent microscope.

  1. Evidence For Weak Ferromagnetic Moment Within The Basal Plane Of Hematite Natural Crystals At Low-Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, F. M.; Hirt, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Hematite is an iron oxide (α-Fe2O3) that represents the most oxidized state in the wüstite-magnetite-hematite system. Hematite is antiferromagnetic (AFM) at room temperature with a small canted moment lying within the crystal symmetry plane or basal plane (weak ferromagnetism, WFM). Al low temperatures hematite undergoes a magnetic phase transition from WFM to a pure antiferromagnetic configuration (AF), which is known as the Morin transition. Low-temperature magnetization of hematite within the basal has been studied in a collection of natural crystals by means of torque magnetometry. Comparison between the torque curves at room temperature and at 77 K allows identification of a weak ferromagnetic moment constrained within the basal plane at temperatures well below the Morin transition. Annealing the samples produces the expected reduction of the weak ferromagnetic moment, but there is also a relationship between the ferromagnetic moment before and after annealing. Low temperature measurements after the annealing experiment reveal the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that survives the annealing. This observation suggests the magnetic structure of natural hematite crystals below the Morin transition can still be a carrier of magnetization.

  2. Bench-Scale Testing of the Micronized Magnetite Process

    SciTech Connect

    Edward R. Torak; Peter J. Suardini

    1997-11-01

    A recent emphasis of the Department of Energy's (DOE's), Coal Preparation Program has been the development of high-efficiency technologies that offer near-term, low-cost improvements in the ability of coal preparation plants to address problems associated with coal fines. In 1992, three cost-shared contracts were awarded to industry, under the first High-Efficiency Preparation (HEP I) solicitation. All three projects involved bench-scale testing of various emerging technologies, at the Federal Energy Technology Center*s (FETC*s), Process Research Facility (PRF). The first HEP I project, completed in mid-1993, was conducted by Process Technology, Inc., with the objective of developing a computerized, on-line system for monitoring and controlling the operation of a column flotation circuit. The second HEP I project, completed in mid-1994, was conducted by a team led by Virginia Polytechnic Institute to test the Mozely Multi-Gravity Separator in combination with the Microcel Flotation Column, for improved removal of mineral matter and pyritic sulfur from fine coal. The last HEP I project, of which the findings are contained in this report, was conducted by Custom Coals Corporation to evaluate and advance a micronized-magnetite-based, fine-coal cycloning technology. The micronized-magnetite coal cleaning technology, also know as the Micro-Mag process, is based on widely used conventional dense-medium cyclone applications, in that it utilizes a finely ground magnetite/water suspension as a separating medium for cleaning fine coal, by density, in a cyclone. However, the micronized-magnetite cleaning technology differs from conventional systems in several ways: ! It utilizes significantly finer magnetite (about 5 to 10 micron mean particle size), as compared to normal mean particle sizes of 20 microns. ! It can effectively beneficiate coal particles down to 500M in size, as compared to the most advanced, existing conventional systems that are limited to a particle bottom

  3. Growth mechanism and magnetic properties of magnetite nanoparticles during solution process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Kinoshita, Toshiya; Takahashi, Kazuma

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the growth mechanism of magnetite nanoparticles during chemical synthesis by analyzing their physicochemical properties. The transformation from metallic precursor to particles and the growth of the particle occurred during chemical synthesis. During the transformation process, Fe(acac)3, which was used as a metallic precursor, was decomposed, fabricating an Fe oleate. The Fe oleates then agglomerated to each other to form Fe oleate clusters. Finally, the Fe oleate cluster was reduced, and a magnetite nanoparticle was fabricated. During the growth process of the magnetite nanoparticle, the diameter of the magnetite nanoparticles increased as the reaction temperature increased. Then, the Fe oleates on the surface of the magnetite nanoparticle were reduced at a constant rate, and as a result, the magnetite nanoparticle grew significantly.

  4. Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy studies on magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, Olena; Jurga-Stopa, Justyna; Coy, Emerson; Peplinska, Barbara; Pietralik, Zuzanna; Jurga, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    This article presents a study on the detection of antibiotics in magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Antibiotics with different spectra of antimicrobial activities, including rifampicin, doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone, were studied. Mechanical mixtures of antibiotics and magnetite/Ag nanocomposites, as well as antibiotics and magnetite nanopowder, were investigated in order to identify the origin of FTIR bands. FTIR spectroscopy was found to be an appropriate technique for this task. The spectra of the magnetite/Ag/antibiotic nanocomposites exhibited very weak (for doxycycline, cefotaxime, and ceftriaxone) or even no (for rifampicin) antibiotic bands. This FTIR "invisibility" of antibiotics is ascribed to their adsorbed state. FTIR and Raman measurements show altered Csbnd O, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd S bonds, indicating adsorption of the antibiotic molecules on the magnetite/Ag nanocomposite structure. In addition, a potential mechanism through which antibiotic molecules interact with magnetite/Ag nanoparticle surfaces is proposed.

  5. "Pure" cutaneous histiocytosis-X.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, S L; Botero, F; Hurwitz, S; Pearson, H A

    1981-11-15

    The case histories of two young children who experienced skin rashes involving various areas of the body are reported. The diagnosis of pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X was established after extensive studies revealed no other organ involvement. The patients were treated with oral corticosteroids. Currently, both children are in good health, show no evidence of disease, and have been followed over a four-to-five-year period. Therapy with corticosteroids may not be indicated with pure cutaneous histiocytosis-X unless there is evidence of extracutaneous dissemination or rapid progression of the disease.

  6. Force interactions between magnetite, silica, and bentonite studied with atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobryden, I.; Potapova, E.; Holmgren, A.; Weber, H.; Hedlund, J.; Almqvist, N.

    2015-04-01

    Iron ore pellets consist of variety of mineral particles and are an important refined product used in steel manufacturing. Production of high-quality pellets requires good understanding of interactions between different constituents, such as magnetite, gangue residues, bentonite, and additives. Much research has been reported on magnetite, silica, and bentonite surface properties and their effect on pellet strength but more scant with a focus on a fundamental particle-particle interaction. To probe such particle interaction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) using colloidal probe technique has proven to be a suitable tool. In this work, the measurements were performed between magnetite-magnetite, bentonite-magnetite, silica-bentonite, and silica-magnetite particles in 1 mM CaCl2 solution at various pH values. The interaction character, i.e., repulsion or attraction, was determined by measuring and analyzing AFM force curves. The observed quantitative changes in interaction forces were in good agreement with the measured zeta-potentials for the particles at the same experimental conditions. Particle aggregation was studied by measuring the adhesion force. Absolute values of adhesion forces for different systems could not be compared due to the difference in particle size and contact geometry. Therefore, the relative change of adhesion force between pH 6 and 10 was used for comparison. The adhesion force decreased for the magnetite-magnetite and bentonite-silica systems and slightly increased for the magnetite-bentonite system at pH 10 as compared to pH 6, whereas a pronounced decrease in adhesion force was observed in the magnetite-silica system. Thus, the presence of silica particles on the magnetite surface could have a negative impact on the interaction between magnetite and bentonite in balling due to the reduction of the adhesion force.

  7. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite and the Origin of Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2007-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments to determine whether magnetite could be produced by the decomposition of iron-carbonate were initiated. Naturally occurring siderite was first characterized by electron microprobe (EMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements to be sure that the starting material did not contain detectable magnetite. Samples were shocked in tungsten-alloy holders (W=90%, Ni=6%, Cu=4%) to further insure that any iron phases in the shock products were contributed by the siderite rather than the sample holder. Each sample was shocked to a specific pressure between 30 to 49 GPa. Previously reported results of TEM analyses on 49 GPa experiments indicated the presence of nano-phase spinel-structured iron oxide. Transformation of siderite to magnetite as characterized by TEM was found in the 49 GPa shock experiment. Compositions of most magnetites are greater than 50% Fe sup(+2) in the octahedral site of the inverse spinel structure. Magnetites produced in shock experiments display the same range of single-domain, superparamagnetic sizes (approx. 50 100 nm), compositions (100% magnetite to 80% magnetite-20% magnesioferrite), and morphologies (equant, elongated, euhedral to subhedral) as magnetites synthesized by Golden et al. (2001) or magnetites grown naturally by MV1 magnetotactic bacteria, and as the magnetites in Martian meteorite ALH84001. Fritz et al. (2005) previously concluded that ALH84001 experienced approx. 32 GPa pressure and a resultant thermal pulse of approx. 100 - 110 C. However, ALH84001 contains evidence of local temperature excursions high enough to 1 melt feldspar, pyroxene, and a silica-rich phase. This 49 GPa experiment demonstrates that magnetite can be produced by the shock decomposition of siderite as a result of local heating to greater than 470 C. Therefore, magnetite in the rims of carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could be a product of shock devolatilization of

  8. Rotating Flow of Magnetite-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, M.; Mushtaq, A.; Hayat, T.; Alsaedi, A.

    2016-01-01

    Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with magnetite-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4–water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the pure fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690

  9. Rotating Flow of Magnetite-Water Nanofluid over a Stretching Surface Inspired by Non-Linear Thermal Radiation.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, M; Mushtaq, A; Hayat, T; Alsaedi, A

    2016-01-01

    Present study explores the MHD three-dimensional rotating flow and heat transfer of ferrofluid induced by a radiative surface. The base fluid is considered as water with magnetite-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Novel concept of non-linear radiative heat flux is considered which produces a non-linear energy equation in temperature field. Conventional transformations are employed to obtain the self-similar form of the governing differential system. The arising system involves an interesting temperature ratio parameter which is an indicator of small/large temperature differences in the flow. Numerical simulations with high precision are determined by well-known shooting approach. Both uniform stretching and rotation have significant impact on the solutions. The variation in velocity components with the nanoparticle volume fraction is non-monotonic. Local Nusselt number in Fe3O4-water ferrofluid is larger in comparison to the pure fluid even at low particle concentration. PMID:26894690

  10. Soft X-ray Spectroscopy Study of the Electronic Structure of Oxidized and Partially Oxidized Magnetite Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Benjamin; Katz, Jordan E.; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Yin, Yadong; Falcone, Roger; Waychunas, Glenn A.

    2010-10-24

    The crystal structure of magnetite nanoparticles may be transformed to maghemite by complete oxidation, but under many relevant conditions the oxidation is partial, creating a mixed-valence material with structural and electronic properties that are poorly characterized. We used X-ray diffraction, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy to characterize the products of oxidizing uncoated and oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles in air. The oxidization of uncoated magnetite nanoparticles creates a material that is structurally and electronically indistinguishable from maghemite. By contrast, while oxidized oleic acid-coated nanoparticles are also structurally indistinguishable from maghemite, Fe L-edge spectroscopy revealed the presence of interior reduced iron sites even after a 2-year period. We used X-ray emission spectroscopy at the O K-edge to study the valence bands (VB) of the iron oxide nanoparticles, using resonant excitation to remove the contributions from oxygen atoms in the ligands and from low-energy excitations that obscured the VB edge. The bonding in all nanoparticles was typical of maghemite, with no detectable VB states introduced by the long-lived, reduced-iron sites in the oleic acid-coated sample. However, O K-edge absorption spectroscopy observed a 0.2 eV shift in the position of the lowest unoccupied states in the coated sample, indicating an increase in the semiconductor band gap relative to bulk stoichiometric maghemite that was also observed by optical absorption spectroscopy. The results show that the ferrous iron sites within ferric iron oxide nanoparticles coated by an organic ligand can persist under ambient conditions with no evidence of a distinct interior phase and can exert an effect on the global electronic and optical properties of the material. This phenomenon resembles the band gap enlargement caused by electron accumulation in the

  11. Surface characterization of carbon-bearing magnetite (CBM) and carbon-bearing Ni(II)-ferrite (CBNF)

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Akanuma, K.; Tsuji, M.; Tamaura, Y.

    1994-12-31

    Oxygen-deficient magnetite (ODM; Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4{minus}{delta}}, {delta} > 0) synthesized by reduction of magnetite with H{sub 2} at 300 C decomposed CO{sub 2} to carbon with an efficiency of nearly 100% at 300 C. In this reaction, two oxygen ions of the CO{sub 2} were incorporated into the spinel structure of ODM and carbon was deposited on the surface of ODM with zero valence to form visible particles. The particles of carbon separated from ODM were studied by Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray and wave-dispersive X-ray spectroscopies. The carbon which had been deposited on the ODM was found to be a mixture of graphite and amorphous carbon in at least two levels of crystallization. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction patterns of the carbon-bearing magnetite (CBM) showed no indication of carbide (Fe{sub 3}C) or metallic iron ({alpha}-Fe) phase formation. In the C 1s XPS spectra of the CBM, no peaks were observed which could be assigned to CO{sub 2} or CO. X-ray diffractometry, chemical analysis and TG-MS measurement showed that the carbon-bearing Ni(II)-ferrite (CBNF) (Ni(II)/Fe{sub total} = 0.15) synthesized by the carbon deposition reaction from CO{sub 2} with the H{sub 2}-reduced Ni(II)-ferrite was represented by (Ni{sub 0.28}Fe{sub 2.72}O{sub 4.00}){sub 1{minus}{delta}} (Ni{sub 0.69}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2.31}{sup 2+}O{sub 3.00}){sub {delta}}C{sub {tau}} ({delta} = 0.27, {tau} = 0.17). The carbon of the CBNF gave the CIOlayer-like oxide containing some Ni{sup 2+} ions.

  12. Discrimination of biogenic and detrital magnetite through a double Verwey transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liao; Heslop, David; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rey, Daniel; Mohamed, Kais J.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite occurs widely in natural environments in both inorganic and biogenic forms. Discrimination of the origin of magnetite has important implications, from searching for past microbial activity to interpreting paleomagnetic and environmental magnetic records in a wide range of settings. In this study, we present rock magnetic and electron microscopic analyses of marine sediments from the continental margin of Oman. Low-temperature magnetic data reveal two distinct Verwey transition (Tv) temperatures that are associated with the presence of biogenic and inorganic magnetite. This interpretation is consistent with room temperature magnetic properties and is confirmed by electron microscopic analyses. Our study justifies the use of two distinct Tv temperatures as a diagnostic signature for discriminating inorganic and biogenic magnetite. Simple low-temperature magnetic measurements, therefore, provide a tool to recognize rapidly the origin of magnetite within natural samples. In addition, our analyses reveal progressive down-core dissolution of detrital and biogenic magnetite, but with preservation of significant amounts of fine-grained magnetite within sediments that have been subjected to severe diagenetic alteration. We demonstrate that preservation of magnetite in such environments is due to protection of fine-grained magnetite inclusions within silicate hosts. Our results, therefore, also provide new insights into diagenetic processes in marine sediments.

  13. Modeling Magnetite Reflectance Spectra Using Hapke Theory and Existing Optical Constants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, T. L.; Blewett, D. T.; Cahill, J. T. S.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite is an accessory mineral found in terrestrial environments, some meteorites, and the lunar surface. The reflectance of magnetite powers is relatively low [1], and this property makes it an analog for other dark Fe- or Ti-bearing components, particularly ilmenite on the lunar surface. The real and imaginary indices of refraction (optical constants) for magnetite are available in the literature [2-3], and online [4]. Here we use these values to calculate the reflectance of particulates and compare these model spectra to reflectance measurements of magnetite available on-line [5].

  14. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite particles covered with α-trietoxysilil-polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durdureanu-Angheluta, Anamaria; Pricop, Lucia; Stoica, Iuliana; Peptu, Catalina-Anisoara; Dascalu, Andrei; Marangoci, Narcisa; Doroftei, Florica; Chiriac, Horia; Pinteala, Mariana; Simionescu, Bogdan C.

    2010-10-01

    New silicon magnetite ferrofluids were prepared by dispersing siloxane-coated magnetite particles in polydimethylsiloxane with low or high molecular weights. Ferrofluids are stable colloidal dispersions of ultra fine covered magnetite particles, which may be selected for a specific application. We demonstrated new methods of stabilizing the magnetic particles by reacting the hydroxyl groups on the surface of magnetite particles with terminal ethoxy groups of polydimethylsiloxane, followed by their dispersion in silicon fluids. The new silicon ferrofluids were tested from the morphology, magnetic properties/losses, and rheological properties point of view.

  15. Production of substantially pure fructose

    DOEpatents

    Hatcher, Herbert J.; Gallian, John J.; Leeper, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of substantially pure fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.

  16. Magnetorheological behavior of magnetite covered clay particles in aqueous suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Gonzalez, C.; Lopez-Lopez, M. T.; Duran, J. D. G.

    2012-08-01

    Montmorillonite clay particles coated with magnetite nanoparticles suspended in aqueous media behave as magnetorheological fluids with enhanced stability as compared to conventional ones. In this work, the study of the magnetorheological behavior of these suspensions of magnetite-clay composite particles has been carried out. For this purpose, both steady and dynamic rheological measurements were carried out in the absence and in the presence of external magnetic fields. In the first kind of experiments, the rheograms of the suspensions (shear stress versus shear rate plot) are analyzed as a function of the strength of the magnetic field applied. In the second one, oscillatory stresses are applied to the system, and the storage modulus is studied as a function of the external magnetic field. In the absence of magnetic field, the suspensions develop a weak yield stress due to the aggregation of the magnetite covered clay particles. In the presence of magnetic field, the yield stress is strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength inside the samples, demonstrating that the suspensions experience a magnetorheological effect, moderate when the magnetic field strength is weak and stronger for values of magnetic field higher than 150-200 kA/m. Actually, the most intriguing result is the change of the trend in the dependence of the yield stress with the field. This dependence is approximately linear with the field for strength values smaller than 150-200 kA/m. On the other hand, for higher values, the yield stress increases with magnetic field following a power law with exponent 4.5.The results are interpreted by means of a model that relates the structure of the particles in the suspensions to the magnetic field applied and using the interaction energy between particles calculated by the extended DLVO theory to include magnetic interaction.

  17. The effect of cobalt substitution on magnetic hardening of magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozaffari, M.; Hadadian, Y.; Aftabi, A.; Oveisy Moakhar, M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe1-xFe2O4, x=0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction was carried out and the results show that all of the samples have single phase spinel structure. Microstructure of the samples was studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope and the results show that particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were uniform and in the 50-55 nm range. Room temperature magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were measured by an alternating gradient force magnetometer and the results revealed that substituting cobalt for iron in magnetite structure, changes the magnetite from a soft magnetic material to a hard one. So that coercivity changes from 0 (a superparamagnetic state) to 337 Oe (a hard magnetic material), which is a remarkable change. Curie temperatures of the samples were determined by recording their susceptibility-temperature (χ-T) curves and the results show that by increasing cobalt content, Curie temperature of the samples also increases. Also χ-T curves of the samples were recorded from above Curie temperature to room temperature (first cooling), while the curves in the second heating and second cooling have the same behaviour as the first cooling curve. The results depict that all samples have different behaviour in the first cooling and in the first heating processes. This shows remarkable changes of the cation distribution in the course of first heating.

  18. Sticking polydisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Brenner, Thorsten; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Struth, Bernd; Tolan, Metin; Rehage, Heinz

    2010-10-19

    The formation of a layer of hydrophobic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid is analyzed by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The data analysis shows that the nanoparticles partially disperse their hydrophobic coating. Consequently, a Langmuir layer was formed by lauric acid molecules that can be compressed into an untilted condensed phase. A majority of the nanoparticles are attached to the Langmuir film integrating lauric acid residue on their surface into the Langmuir film. Hence, the particles at the liquid-gas interface can be identified as so-called Janus beads, which are amphiphilic solids having two sides with different functionality.

  19. Sticking polydisperse hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles to lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Michael; Degen, Patrick; Brenner, Thorsten; Tiemeyer, Sebastian; Struth, Bernd; Tolan, Metin; Rehage, Heinz

    2010-10-19

    The formation of a layer of hydrophobic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles stabilized by lauric acid is analyzed by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The data analysis shows that the nanoparticles partially disperse their hydrophobic coating. Consequently, a Langmuir layer was formed by lauric acid molecules that can be compressed into an untilted condensed phase. A majority of the nanoparticles are attached to the Langmuir film integrating lauric acid residue on their surface into the Langmuir film. Hence, the particles at the liquid-gas interface can be identified as so-called Janus beads, which are amphiphilic solids having two sides with different functionality. PMID:20873726

  20. Rheological Study of Dextran-Modified Magnetite Nanoparticle Water Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Józefczak, A.; Hornowski, T.; Rozynek, Z.; Skumiel, A.; Fossum, J. O.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of surface modification of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (sterically stabilized by sodium oleate) by the dextran biocompatible layer on the rheological behavior of water-based magnetic fluids. The flow curves were measured as a function of the magnetic field strength by means of rheometry. The measured viscosity is generally dependent on both the particle concentration and the geometrical factors such as the particle shape and thickness of the adsorbed layers. The rheological properties of the magnetic fluids studied show the effect of the magnetic field strength and the presence of the surfactant second layer (dextran) on their viscosity.

  1. Superexchange coupling on oleylsarcosine-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakuzis, A. F.; Pereira, A. R.; Santos, J. G.; Morais, P. C.

    2006-04-01

    Room temperature ferromagnetic resonance was used to investigate particle-particle interaction in magnetic fluid samples containing magnetite nanoparticles surface coated with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) or oleylsarcosine (OLEL). The DMSA sample showed a decrease of the magnetic resonance field (MRF) increasing the nanoparticle concentration (phi), whereas the OLEL sample showed the opposite behavior. The DMSA MRF concentration dependence was explained using a dipolar interaction model beyond the point dipole approximation. In addition, the magnetic resonance spectra of the OLEL sample showed an optical mode suggesting an antiferromagnetic superexchange coupling between magnetic nanoparticles forming dimers.

  2. Canonical Thermal Pure Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Sho; Shimizu, Akira

    2013-07-01

    A thermal equilibrium state of a quantum many-body system can be represented by a typical pure state, which we call a thermal pure quantum (TPQ) state. We construct the canonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the canonical ensemble of the conventional statistical mechanics. It is related to the microcanonical TPQ state, which corresponds to the microcanonical ensemble, by simple analytic transformations. Both TPQ states give identical thermodynamic results, if both ensembles do, in the thermodynamic limit. The TPQ states corresponding to other ensembles can also be constructed. We have thus established the TPQ formulation of statistical mechanics, according to which all quantities of statistical-mechanical interest are obtained from a single realization of any TPQ state. We also show that it has great advantages in practical applications. As an illustration, we study the spin-1/2 kagome Heisenberg antiferromagnet.

  3. Ferrous Iron Binding Key to Mms6 Magnetite Biomineralisation: A Mechanistic Study to Understand Magnetite Formation Using pH Titration and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Andrea E; Bramble, Jonathan P; Hounslow, Andrea M; Williamson, Michael P; Monnington, Amy E; Cooke, David J; Staniland, Sarah S

    2016-06-01

    Formation of magnetite nanocrystals by magnetotactic bacteria is controlled by specific proteins which regulate the particles' nucleation and growth. One such protein is Mms6. This small, amphiphilic protein can self-assemble and bind ferric ions to aid in magnetite formation. To understand the role of Mms6 during in vitro iron oxide precipitation we have performed in situ pH titrations. We find Mms6 has little effect during ferric salt precipitation, but exerts greatest influence during the incorporation of ferrous ions and conversion of this salt to mixed-valence iron minerals, suggesting Mms6 has a hitherto unrecorded ferrous iron interacting property which promotes the formation of magnetite in ferrous-rich solutions. We show ferrous binding to the DEEVE motif within the C-terminal region of Mms6 by NMR spectroscopy, and model these binding events using molecular simulations. We conclude that Mms6 functions as a magnetite nucleating protein under conditions where ferrous ions predominate.

  4. Accessible and green manufacturing of magnetite (ferrous ferric oxide) nanocrystals and their use in magnetic separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavuz, Cafer Tayyar

    This work describes the first size dependent magnetic separation in nanoscale. Magnetite (Fe3O4) nanocrystals of high quality and uniform size were synthesized with monodispersity below 10%. Magnetite nanocrystals of 4 nm to 33 nm (average diameter) were produced. Batch synthesis was shown to go up to 20 grams which is more than 10 times of a standard nanocrystal synthesis, without loosing the quality and monodispersity. Reactor design for mass (1 gram per hour) production of magnetite nanocrystals is reported for the first time. The cost of a kg of lab purity magnetite nanocrystals was shown to be 2600. A green synthesis that utilizes rust and edible oils was developed. The cost of a kg was brought down to 22. Size dependency of magnetism was shown in nanoscale for the first time. Reversible aggregation theory was developed to explain the low field magnetic separation and solution behavior of magnetite nanocrystals. Arsenic was removed from drinking water with magnetite nanocrystals 200 times better than commercial adsorbents. Silica coating was successfully applied to enable the known silica related biotechnologies. Magnetite-silica nanoshells were functionalized with amino groups. For the first time, silver was coated on the magnetite-silica nanoshells to produce triple multishells. Anti-microbial activity of multishells is anticipated.

  5. Surface site density, silicic acid retention and transport properties of compacted magnetite powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayant, C.; Grambow, B.; Abdelouas, A.; Ribet, S.; Leclercq, S.

    In France, within the framework of investigations of the feasibility of deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste, studies on corrosion products of steel over packs are ongoing. Such studies concern silica and radionuclide retention. The objective of the present work is to study sorption of silicic acid on compacted magnetite in percolation cells to attempt to simulate confined site conditions. Potentiometric titration of commercial magnetite was carried out with both dispersed and compacted magnetite. The titration of the magnetite suspension has been made with two different methods: a batch method (several suspensions) and a direct fast method (one suspension). The Gran’s function gave 1.7 (±0.4) and 2.4 (±0.5) sorption sites nm -2 with these respective methods but site densities as high as 20/nm 2 could be obtained by modelling. The titration of magnetite compacted at 120 bars showed that the evolution of charge density on magnetite surfaces is similar for compacted and dispersed magnetite. Silicic acid sorption onto dispersed and compacted magnetite was similar with sorption site densities ranging between 2.2 and 4.4/nm 2.

  6. Physicochemical characterization of surfactant incorporating vesicles that incorporate colloidal magnetite.

    PubMed

    de Melo Barbosa, Raquel; Luna Finkler, Christine L; Bentley, Maria Vitória L B; Santana, Maria Helena A

    2013-03-01

    Drug administration through the transdermal route has optimized for the comfort of patients and easy application. However, the main limitation of transdermal drug delivery is the impermeability of the human skin. Recent advances on improvement of drug transport through the skin include elastic liposomes as a penetration enhancer. Entrapment of ferrofluids in the core of liposomes produces magnetoliposomes, which can be driven by a high-gradient magnetic field. The association of both strategies could enhance the penetration of elastic liposomes. This work relies on the preparation and characterization of elastic-magnetic liposomes designed to permeate through the skin. The incorporation of colloidal magnetite and the elastic component, octaethylene glycol laurate (PEG-8-L), in the structure of liposomes were evaluated. The capability of the elastic magnetoliposomes for permeation through nanopores of two stacked polycarbonate membranes was compared to conventional and elastic liposomes. Magnetite incorporation was dependent on vesicle diameter and size distribution as well as PEG-8-L incorporation into liposomes, demonstrating the capability of the fluid bilayer to accommodate the surfactant without disruption. On the contrary, PEG-8-L incorporation into magnetoliposomes promoted a decrease of average diameter and a lower PEG-8-L incorporation percentage as a result of reduction on the fluidity of the bilayer imparted by iron incorporation into the lipid structure. Elastic liposomes demonstrated an enhancement of the deformation capability, as compared with conventional liposomes. Conventional and elastic magnetoliposomes presented a reduced capability for deformation and permeation. PMID:23363304

  7. Monodisperse magnetite nanofluids: Synthesis, aggregation, and thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei; Wang, Liqiu

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic nanofluids possess some unique properties that can significantly affect their thermal conductivity. We synthesize monodispersed magnetite (Fe3O4) nanofluids in toluene with the particle size from 4 to 12 nm and obtain aqueous nanofluids by a simple "one-step" phase transfer. Even without the effect of external field, the magnetic-interaction-induced self-assembled aggregation can still be significant in magnetite nanofluids. Investigation of the microstructures of self-assembled aggregation is carried out by the dynamic light scattering, which unveils the variation of aggregated configurations with particle concentration and time. Based on the calculation from the existing models, the aggregates decrease the thermal conductivity of both themselves and the entire system, mainly due to the less solid contents and weaker mobility compared with the single particles as well as the increase in interfacial thermal resistance. As the manifestation of the aggregation-structure variation, the measured thermal conductivity is of a wavelike shape as a function of particle concentration. The particle coating layers are also of importance in cluster formation so that nanofluid thermal conductivity can be manipulated for some nanofluids by changing the stabilizer used and thus controlling the particle aggregated structures. Due to the effects of temperature, viscosity and coating layers, the thermal conductivity for aqueous system varies in a different way as that for the toluene system.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles coated with lauric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Mamani, J.B.; Costa-Filho, A.J.; Cornejo, D.R.; Vieira, E.D.; Gamarra, L.F.

    2013-07-15

    Understanding the process of synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is important for its implementation in in vitro and in vivo studies. In this work we report the synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles made from ferrous oxide through coprecipitation chemical process. The nanostructured material was coated with lauric acid and dispersed in aqueous medium containing surfactant that yielded a stable colloidal suspension. The characterization of magnetic nanoparticles with distinct physico-chemical configurations is fundamental for biomedical applications. Therefore magnetic nanoparticles were characterized in terms of their morphology by means of TEM and DLS, which showed a polydispersed set of spherical nanoparticles (average diameter of ca. 9 nm) as a result of the protocol. The structural properties were characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD pattern showed the presence of peaks corresponding to the spinel phase of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The relaxivities r{sub 2} and r{sub 2}* values were determined from the transverse relaxation times T{sub 2} and T{sub 2}* at 3 T. Magnetic characterization was performed using SQUID and FMR, which evidenced the superparamagnetic properties of the nanoparticles. Thermal characterization using DSC showed exothermic events associated with the oxidation of magnetite to maghemite. - Highlights: • Synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles coated with lauric acid • Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles • Morphological, structural, magnetic, calorimetric and relaxometric characterization.

  9. Aqueous ferrofluid of magnetite nanoparticles: Fluorescence labeling and magnetophoretic control.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Yudhisthira; Goodarzi, Alireza; Swihart, Mark T; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Kaur, Navjot; Furlani, Edward P; Prasad, Paras N

    2005-03-10

    A method is presented for the preparation of a biocompatible ferrofluid containing dye-functionalized magnetite nanoparticles that can serve as fluorescent markers. This method entails the surface functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles using citric acid to produce a stable aqueous dispersion and the subsequent binding of fluorescent dyes to the surface of the particles. Several ferrofluid samples were prepared and characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and SQUID magnetometry. In addition, confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study the response of the fluorescent nanoparticles to an applied magnetic field and their uptake by cells in vitro. Results are presented on the distribution of particle sizes, the fluorescent and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles, and the nature of their surface bonds. Biocompatible ferrofluids with fluorescent nanoparticles enable optical tracking of basic processes at the cellular level combined with magnetophoretic manipulation and should be of substantial value to researchers engaged in both fundamental and applied biomedical research. PMID:16851439

  10. Magnetite nanoparticles for biosensor model based on bacteria fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poita, A.; Creanga, D.-E.; Airinei, A.; Tupu, P.; Goiceanu, C.; Avadanei, O.

    2009-06-01

    Fluorescence emission of pyoverdine - the siderophore synthesized by iron scavenger bacteria - was studied using in vitro cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the aim to design a biosensor system for liquid sample iron loading. Diluted suspensions of colloidal magnetite nanoparticles were supplied in the culture medium (10 microl/l and 100 microl/l) to simulate magnetic loading with iron oxides of either environmental waters or human body fluids. The electromagnetic exposure to radiofrequency waves of bacterial samples grown in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles was also carried out. Cell density diminution but fluorescence stimulation following 10 microl/l ferrofluid addition and simultaneous exposure to radiofrequency waves was evidenced. The inhibitory influence of 100 microl/l ferrofluid combined with RF exposure was evidenced by fluorescence data. Mathematical model was proposed to approach quantitatively the dynamics of cell density and fluorescence emission in relation with the consumption of magnetite nanoparticle supplied medium. The biosensor scheme was shaped based on the response to iron loading of bacterial sample fluorescence.

  11. Moessbauer Characterization of Magnetite/Polyaniline Magnetic Nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Anselmo F. R.; Faria, Fernando S. E. D. V.; Lopez, Jorge L.; Mesquita, Antonio G. G.; Coaquira, Jose A. H.; Oliveira, Aderbal C.; Morais, Paulo C.; Azevedo, Ricardo B.; Araujo, Ana C. V. de; Alves, Severino Jr.; Azevedo, Walter M. de

    2010-12-02

    Aniline surface coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by UV irradiation varying the time and the acid media (HCl, HNO{sub 3}, or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}). The synthesized material represents a promising platform for application in nerve regeneration. XRD patterns are consistent with the crystalline structure of magnetite. Nevertheless, for UV irradiation times longer than 2 h, extra XRD lines reveal the presence of goethite. The mean crystallite size of uncoated particles is estimated to be 25.4 nm, meanwhile that size is reduced to 19.9 nm for the UV irradiated sample in HCl medium for 4 h. Moessbauer spectra of uncoated nanoparticles reveal the occurrence of thermal relaxation at room temperature, while the 77 K-Moessbauer spectrum suggests the occurrence of electron localization effects similar to that expected in bulk magnetite. The Mossbauer spectra of UV irradiated sample in HCl medium during 4 h, confirms the presence of the goethite phase. For this sample, the thermal relaxation is more evident, since the room temperature spectrum shows larger spectral area for the nonmagnetic component due to the smaller crystallite size. Meanwhile, the 77 K-Moessbauer spectrum suggests the absence of the electron localization effect above 77 K.

  12. Controlled Biomineralization of Magnetite (Fe(inf3)O(inf4)) and Greigite (Fe(inf3)S(inf4)) in a Magnetotactic Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Bazylinski, D. A.; Frankel, R. B.; Heywood, B. R.; Mann, S.; King, J. W.; Donaghay, P. L.; Hanson, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    A slowly moving, rod-shaped magnetotactic bacterium was found in relatively large numbers at and below the oxic-anoxic transition zone of a semianaerobic estuarine basin. Unlike all magnetotactic bacteria described to date, cells of this organism produce single-magnetic-domain particles of an iron oxide, magnetite (Fe(inf3)O(inf4)), and an iron sulfide, greigite (Fe(inf3)S(inf4)), within their magnetosomes. The crystals had different morphologies, being arrowhead or tooth shaped for the magnetite particles and roughly rectangular for the greigite particles, and were coorganized within the same chain(s) in the same cell with their long axes along the chain direction. Because the two crystal types have different crystallochemical characteristics, the findings presented here suggest that the formation of the crystal types is controlled by separate biomineralization processes and that the assembly of the magnetosome chain is controlled by a third ultrastructural process. In addition, our results show that in some magnetotactic bacteria, external environmental conditions such as redox and/or oxygen or hydrogen sulfide concentrations may affect the composition of the nonmetal part of the magnetosome mineral phase. PMID:16535116

  13. Optimization of Long-Term Stability of Magnetic Fluids from Magnetite and Synthetic Polyelectrolytes

    PubMed

    Mendenhall; Geng; Hwang

    1996-12-25

    Nanometer-sized suspensions of magnetite (Fe3O4) stabilized with polymeric surfactants, principally poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), were prepared by precipitation or sonication and studied by a variety of techniques. The long-term stability of the ferrofluids made with PMAA was optimal at pH 7 (close to the measured isoelectric point of the magnetite, 5.9) and improved at all pH values with increasing surfactant concentration. With extended times of sonication the molecular weight and polydispersity of the PMAA decreased, although magnetite in the ferrofluid was not oxidized (X-ray). Particle diameters of 9-38 nm were measured by saturation magnetization, electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. Centrifugation at 8,000 rpm removed the magnetite from the suspensions together with roughly one molecule of PMAA for each magnetite particle in the fluid, with the average number increasing with higher concentrations and average molecular weights of the polymer. PMID:8978555

  14. Sonochemical synthesis of monodispersed magnetite nanoparticles by using an ethanol-water mixed solvent.

    PubMed

    Dang, Feng; Enomoto, Naoya; Hojo, Junichi; Enpuku, Keiji

    2009-06-01

    The magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized in an ethanol-water solution under ultrasonic irradiation from a Fe(OH)(2) precipitate. XRD, TEM, TG, IR, VSM and UV/vis absorption spectrum were used to characterize the magnetite nanoparticles. It was found that the formation of magnetite was accelerated in ethanol-water solution in the presence of ultrasonic irradiation, whereas, it was limited in ethanol-water solution under mechanical stirring. The monodispersibility of magnetite particles was improved significantly through the sonochemical synthesis in ethanol-water solution. The magnetic properties were improved for the samples synthesized under ultrasonic irradiation. This would be attributed to high Fe(2+) concentration in the magnetite cubic structure.

  15. Microbial production and characterization of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles by Shewanella sp. HN-41.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Roh, Yul; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2008-09-01

    A facultative dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, was used to produce magnetite nanoparticles from a precursor, poorly crystalline ironoxyhydroxide akaganeite (beta-FeOOH), by reducing Fe(III). The diameter of the biogenic magnetite nanoparticles ranged from 26 nm to 38 nm, characterized by dynamic light scattering spectrophotometry. The magnetite nanoparticles consisted of mostly uniformly shaped spheres, which were identified by electron microscopy. The magnetometry revealed the superparamagnetic property of the magnetic nanoparticles. The atomic structure of the biogenic magnetite, which was determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis, showed similar atomic structural parameters, such as atomic distances and coordinations, to typical magnetite mineral.

  16. Synthesis of magnetite particles by pulsed alexandrite laser processing of metallic glass precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sorescu, M.; Schafer, S.A.; Knobbe, E.T.

    1996-12-31

    Samples of Fe{sub 78}B{sub 13}Si{sub 9} and Fe{sub 81}B{sub 13.5}Si{sub 3.5}C{sub 2} metallic glasses were irradiated with a pulsed alexandrite laser ({lambda} = 750 nm, {tau} = 60 {micro}s) using different laser fluences. Kinetics of laser-induced phase transformations and fluence dependence of magnetic properties were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Low laser fluences were found to induce changes in magnetic texture and onset of crystallization. High laser fluences, however, correlated with additional oxidation effects and the formation of stoichiometric Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles in the irradiated alloy system. An activation energy of 11.9 eV was estimated for the laser-driven synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. Pulsed alexandrite laser processing is an intriguing alternative technique for the controlled synthesis of iron oxide phases from ferromagnetic glass precursors.

  17. Synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles for bio- and nanotechnology: genetic engineering and biomimetics of bacterial magnetosomes.

    PubMed

    Lang, Claus; Schüler, Dirk; Faivre, Damien

    2007-02-12

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) have the ability to navigate along the Earth's magnetic field. This so-called magnetotaxis is a result of the presence of magnetosomes, organelles which comprise nanometer-sized intracellular crystals of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) enveloped by a membrane. Because of their unique characteristics, magnetosomes have a high potential for nano- and biotechnological applications, which require a specifically designed particle surface. The functionalization of magnetosomes is possible either by chemical modification of purified particles or by genetic engineering of magnetosome membrane proteins. The second approach is potentially superior to chemical approaches as a large variety of biological functions such as protein tags, fluorophores, and enzymes may be directly incorporated in a site-specific manner during magnetosome biomineralization. An alternative to the bacterial production of magnetosomes are biomimetic approaches, which aim to mimic the bacterial biomineralization pathway in vitro. In MTB a number of magnetosome proteins with putative functions in the biomineralization of the nanoparticles have been identified by genetic and biochemical approaches. The initial results obtained by several groups indicate that some of these proteins have an impact on nanomagnetite properties in vitro. In this article the key features of magnetosomes are discussed, an overview of their potential applications are given, and different strategies are proposed for the functionalization of magnetosome particles and for the biomimetism of their biomineralization pathway.

  18. Synthesis and investigating the magnetic properties of magnetite nanocrystallites for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansar, Muhammad Zaka; Atiq, Shahid; Riaz, Saira; Naseem, Shahzad; Ramay, Shahid M.; Mahmood, Asif

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, use of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications has increased tremendously. In particular, magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles being highly biocompatible are rated very high due to their potential applications in biomedicines, for instance in anticancer drug delivery. In this work, the Fe3O4 nanoparticles have been synthesized using a novel sol-gel based autocombustion technique. The crystal structure of the Fe3O4 phase was confirmed by the data obtained from X-ray diffraction. Scherrer’s formula was employed to estimate the crystallite size of the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The structural morphology, investigated by using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM), revealed well-dispersed and uniform sized grains in the sample prepared using enhanced fuel concentration. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was employed to investigate the magnetic characteristics of the samples which confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of the Fe3O4 samples, essentially required for cancer treatment. These nanoparticles could further be modified and functionalized by suitable polymers to achieve better biocompatibility before being injected into the diseased cells.

  19. Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Anthracyclinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara

    The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.

  20. Biophysical Puzzles Concerning Magnetite-Based Magnetoreception in the Common Nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    magnetic field. If correct, the results of Vidal-Gadea et al. make clear predictions for the inheritance of single-domain magnetite crystals through ontogeny, and demand the presence of a gravity receptor. But if they have a gravity receptor, why would they need magnetotaxis? These are puzzles.

  1. Isolation and pure culture of a freshwater magnetic spirillum in chemically defined medium.

    PubMed Central

    Blakemore, R P; Maratea, D; Wolfe, R S

    1979-01-01

    A bipolarly flagellated magnetotactic spirillum containing intracellular chains of single domain-sized magnetite crystals was isolated by applying a magnetic field to sediments from a freshwater swamp. The organism was cultured in a chemically defined medium containing ferric quinate and succinate as sources of iron and carbon, respectively. Nonmagnetic variants of this isolate were maintained in chemically defined medium lacking ferric quinate. In contrast to magnetic cells, these had less iron and lacked measurable magnetic remanence and the intracytoplasmic crystals. In other respects, including moles percent guanine plus cytosine content, growth characteristics, nutrition, and physiology, the two types were similar. The isolate reduced nitrate without accumulating nitrite and produced ammonia during growth. Nitrate or ammonium ions served as a nitrogen source. The organism was microaerophilic and did not grow anaerobically with nitrate in the medium. In chemically defined medium, cells synthesized magnetite only if the initial O2 concentration in the atmosphere of sealed cultures was 6% (vol/vol) or less. Images PMID:500569

  2. Biocompatible hydrodispersible magnetite nanoparticles used as antibiotic drug carriers.

    PubMed

    Bolocan, Alexandra; Mihaiescu, Dan Eduard; Andronescu, Ecaterina; Voicu, Georgeta; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Ficai, Anton; Vasile, Bogdan Ştefan; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Pop, Corina Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Here we report a newly synthesized vectorizing nanosystem, based on hydrodispersible magnetite nanoparticles (HMNPs) with an average size less than 10 nm, obtained by precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) in basic solution of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis coupled with thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TGA) and bioevaluated for cytotoxicity and antibiotic delivery in active forms. The obtained data demonstrate that HMNPs can be used as an efficient drug delivery system, for clinically relevant antimicrobial drugs. HMNPs antimicrobial activity depended on the loaded drug structure and the tested microbial strain, being more efficient against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, comparing with the Escherichia coli strain. The novel HMNPs demonstrated an acceptable biocompatibility level, being thus a very good candidate for biomedical applications, such as drug delivery or targeting.

  3. Biofunctionalized magnetic hydrogel nanospheres of magnetite and κ-carrageenan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel-da-Silva, Ana L.; Fateixa, Sara; Guiomar, António J.; Costa, Benilde F. O.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Trindade, Tito; Goodfellow, Brian J.; Gil, Ana M.

    2009-09-01

    Magnetic hydrogel κ-carrageenan nanospheres were successfully prepared via water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsions combined with thermally induced gelation of the polysaccharide. The size of the nanospheres (an average diameter (∅) of about 50 and 75 nm) was modulated by varying the concentration of surfactant. The nanospheres contained superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (∅8 nm), previously prepared by co-precipitation within the biopolymer. Carboxyl groups, at a concentration of about 4 mmol g-1, were successfully grafted at the surface of these magnetic nanospheres via carboxymethylation of the κ-carrageenan. The carboxylated nanospheres were shown to be thermo-sensitive in the 37-45 °C temperature range, indicating their potential as thermally controlled delivery systems for drugs and/or magnetic particles at physiological temperatures. Finally, preliminary results have been obtained for IgG antibody conjugation of the carboxylated nanospheres and the potential of these systems for bio-applications is discussed.

  4. Magnetite decorated activated carbon composites for water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barala, Sunil Kumar; Arora, Manju; Saini, Parveen

    2013-06-01

    Activated carbon decorated with magnetite (ACMG) nanoparticles composites have been prepared by facile method via impregnation of AC with stable dispersion of superparamagnetic MG nanoparticles followed by drying. These composites exhibit both magnetic and porosity behavior which can be easily optimized by controlling the weight ratio of two phases. The structural, magnetic, thermal and morphological properties of these as synthesized ACMG samples were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR, VSM and SEM techniques. The ACMG powder has been used for water purification having methylene blue (MB) dye as an impurity. The nanoporosity of these composites allow rapid adsorption of MB and their magnetic behavior helps in single step separation of MB adsorbed ACMG particles by the application of external magnetic field.

  5. Influence of Magnetite Nanoparticles on Human Leukocyte Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džarová, Anežka; Dubničková, Martina; Závišová, Vlasta; Koneracká, Martina; Kopčanský, Peter; Gojzewski, Hubert; Timko, Milan

    2010-12-01

    Chemically synthesized magnetite particles coated by sodium oleate and PEG (MNP), and magnetosomes (MS) influence the process of phagocytosis and the metabolic activity (lysozyme and peroxidase activity) in leukocytes. Lysozyme activity is oxygen-independent liquidation mechanisms of engulfed microorganism, peroxidase activity is an oxygen-dependent mechanism. Both tested types of nanoparticles lysed leukocyte cells during incubation. MNP at concentrations of 10 and 20 μg/mL lysed almost all leukocytes and their cell viability was in the 14±0.05% range. On the other hand MS begin to influence leukocytes activity at the concentration of 1 μg/ml and this influence grows with increasing concentration up to 20 μg/ml. MS are more suitable for biological applications than MNP which are more aggressive material than MS. MS should not be used above 10 μg/mL.

  6. Self-assembly of magnetite nanocubes into helical superstructures.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurvinder; Chan, Henry; Baskin, Artem; Gelman, Elijah; Repnin, Nikita; Král, Petr; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-09-01

    Organizing inorganic nanocrystals into complex architectures is challenging and typically relies on preexisting templates, such as properly folded DNA or polypeptide chains. We found that under carefully controlled conditions, cubic nanocrystals of magnetite self-assemble into arrays of helical superstructures in a template-free manner with >99% yield. Computer simulations revealed that the formation of helices is determined by the interplay of van der Waals and magnetic dipole-dipole interactions, Zeeman coupling, and entropic forces and can be attributed to spontaneous formation of chiral nanocube clusters. Neighboring helices within their densely packed ensembles tended to adopt the same handedness in order to maximize packing, thus revealing a novel mechanism of symmetry breaking and chirality amplification. PMID:25061133

  7. Hydrocolloid-stabilized magnetite for efficient removal of radioactive phosphates.

    PubMed

    Vellora Thekkae Padil, Vinod; Rouha, Michael; Cerník, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste is a common by-product when using radioactive isotopes in research and medicine. Efficient remediation of such liquid waste is crucial for increasing safety during the necessary storage of the material. Herein, we present a novel Gum Karaya stabilized magnetite for the efficient removal of radioactive phosphorus (32)P from liquid radioactive waste. This environmentally friendly material is well suited to be used as a nanohydrogel for the removal of liquid waste, which can then be stored in a smaller space and without the risk of the spills inherent to the initial liquid material. The maximum adsorption capacity of the GK/M in this study was found to be 15.68 GBq/g. We present a thorough morphological characterization of the synthesised GK/M, as well as a discussion of the possible phosphorus adsorption mechanisms.

  8. Hydrocolloid-stabilized magnetite for efficient removal of radioactive phosphates.

    PubMed

    Vellora Thekkae Padil, Vinod; Rouha, Michael; Cerník, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste is a common by-product when using radioactive isotopes in research and medicine. Efficient remediation of such liquid waste is crucial for increasing safety during the necessary storage of the material. Herein, we present a novel Gum Karaya stabilized magnetite for the efficient removal of radioactive phosphorus (32)P from liquid radioactive waste. This environmentally friendly material is well suited to be used as a nanohydrogel for the removal of liquid waste, which can then be stored in a smaller space and without the risk of the spills inherent to the initial liquid material. The maximum adsorption capacity of the GK/M in this study was found to be 15.68 GBq/g. We present a thorough morphological characterization of the synthesised GK/M, as well as a discussion of the possible phosphorus adsorption mechanisms. PMID:24696854

  9. Metastable growth of pure wurtzite InGaAs microstructures.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kar Wei; Ko, Wai Son; Lu, Fanglu; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2014-08-13

    III-V compound semiconductors can exist in two major crystal phases, namely, zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ). While ZB is thermodynamically favorable in conventional III-V epitaxy, the pure WZ phase can be stable in nanowires with diameters smaller than certain critical values. However, thin nanowires are more vulnerable to surface recombination, and this can ultimately limit their performances as practical devices. In this work, we study a metastable growth mechanism that can yield purely WZ-phased InGaAs microstructures on silicon. InGaAs nucleates as sharp nanoneedles and expand along both axial and radial directions simultaneously in a core-shell fashion. While the base can scale from tens of nanometers to over a micron, the tip can remain sharp over the entire growth. The sharpness maintains a high local surface-to-volume ratio, favoring hexagonal lattice to grow axially. These unique features lead to the formation of microsized pure WZ InGaAs structures on silicon. To verify that the WZ microstructures are truly metastable, we demonstrate, for the first time, the in situ transformation from WZ to the energy-favorable ZB phase inside a transmission electron microscope. This unconventional core-shell growth mechanism can potentially be applied to other III-V materials systems, enabling the effective utilization of the extraordinary properties of the metastable wurtzite crystals.

  10. Magnetite (Fe3O4) microcapsules prepared using a glass membrane and solvent removal.

    PubMed

    Omi, S; Kanetaka, A; Shimamori, Y; Supsakulchai, A; Nagai, M; Ma, G H

    2001-01-01

    Fine magnetite powders dispersed in polymer solution were encapsulated from an oil-in-water emulsion prepared by an emulsification process employing a porous glass membrane and subsequent evaporation of the solvent. Styrene-based copolymers were dissolved in a magnetic fluid, and then continuously pushed through the pores of glass membrane into the aqueous phase, which had dissolved polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as a mixed stabilizer. P(styrene-co-acrylic acid) (PS-AA), P(stryrene-co-butyl acrylate) (PS-BA) and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) were dissolved in the specially ordered magnetite fluid (25 wt% magnetite dispersed in toluene) separately or as a mixture, and uniform droplets suspending the magnetic particles were obtained. After the evaporation of toluene, PS-AA capsules retained a spherical shape and uniformity, whereas PS-AA/PS-BA capsules revealed a creased surface and broader size distribution. The microcapsules entrapped 30-40 wt% of magnetite, and the encapsulation yield of magnetite was 20-40%. Glass membranes with 9.5, 5.25 and 1.42 microm pore size were employed and 5-40 microm microcapsules were obtained depending on the pore size. When magnetite suspended in chloroform was used, magnetite capsules with broader size distributions were obtained because of the sticking of the droplets to the membrane wall. The advantage of the membrane emulsification which provides uniform sized droplets was lost. PMID:11695639

  11. Antimicrobial Properties of Lysosomal Enzymes Immobilized on NH₂Functionalized Silica-Encapsulated Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, So Jeong; Le, Thai-Hoang; Kim, Pil; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization efficiency, antimicrobial activity and recovery of lysosomal enzymes on NH2 functionalized magnetite nanoparticles have been studied under various conditions. The immobi- lization efficiency depends upon the ratio of the amount of enzyme and magnetite and it shows an increase with magnetite concentration which is due to the presence of amine group at the magnetite surface that leads to a strong attraction. The optimized reaction time to immobilize the lysosomal enzymes on magnetite was determined by using a rolling method. The immobilization efficiency increases with reaction time and reached a plateau after 5 minutes and then remained constant for 10 minutes. However, after 30 minutes the immobilization efficiency decreased to 85%, which is due to the weaker electrostatic interactions between magnetite and detached lysosomal enzymes. The recovery and stability of immobilized lysosomal enzymes has also been studied. The antimicrobial activity was almost 100% but it decreased upon reuse and no activity was observed after its reuse for seven times. The storage stability of lysosomal enzymes as an antimicrobial agent was about 88%, which decreased to 53% after one day and all activity of immobilized lysosomal enzymes was maintained after five days. Thus, the lysosomal enzymes immobilized on magnetite nanoparticles could potentially be used as antimicrobial agents to remove bacteria. PMID:27398573

  12. Effect of purification pretreatment on the recovery of magnetite from waste ferrous sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wang; Peng, Ying-lin; Zheng, Ya-jie

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the influence of impurities in waste ferrous sulfate on its recovery of magnetite. Ferrous sulfate solution was purified by the addition of NaOH solution to precipitate impurities, and magnetite was recovered from ferrous sulfate solution without and with purification pretreatment. Calcium hydroxide was added to the solution of ferrous sulfate as a precipitator. A mixed product of magnetite and gypsum was subsequently obtained by air oxidation and heating. Wet-milling was performed prior to magnetic separation to recover magnetite from the mixed products. The results show that with the purification pretreatment, the grade of iron in magnetite concentrate increased from 62.05% to 65.58% and the recovery rate of iron decreased from 85.35% to 80.35%. The purification pretreatment reduced the conglutination between magnetite and gypsum, which favors their subsequent magnetic separation. In summary, a higher-grade magnetite with a better crystallinity and a larger particle size of 2.35 μm was obtained with the purification pretreatment.

  13. In vitro study on the alterations of brain tubulin structure and assembly affected by magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dadras, Ali; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Afrasiabi, Ali; Naghshineh, Ali; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Mokhtari, Farzad

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, considerable efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of memory, cognition, and relevant neurodegenerative diseases in the human brain. Several studies have shown the importance of microtubule proteins in the memory mechanism and memory dysfunction. Microtubules possess dynamicity, which is essential for functions of neuronal networks. Microtubule-associated proteins, i.e., tau, play vital roles in microtubule stability. On the other hand, the ferromagnetic mineral magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) has been detected in the normal human brain, and elevated levels of magnetite are also observed in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. Therefore, we propose that a relationship between microtubule organization in axons and brain magnetite nanoparticles is possible. In this study we found alterations of microtubule polymerization in the presence of increasing concentrations of magnetite through transmission electron microscopy images and a turbidimetry method. Structural changes of microtubule and tau protein, as an essential microtubule-associated protein for tubulin assembly, were detected via circular dichroism spectroscopy, intrinsic fluorescence, and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid fluorometry. We predicted three possible binding sites on tau protein and one possible binding site on tubulin dimer for magnetite nanoparticles. Magnetite also causes the morphology of PC12 cells to change abnormally and cell viability to decrease. Finally, we suggest that magnetite changes microtubule dynamics and polymerization through two paths: (1) changing the secondary and tertiary structure of tubulin and (2) binding to either tubulin dimer or tau protein and preventing tau-tubulin interaction.

  14. [Construction of 3D tissue-like structure using functional magnetite nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Ito, Akira; Honda, Hiroyuki; Kamihira, Masamichi

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Since these nanoparticles have unique magnetic features not present in other materials, they can be applied to special medical techniques. Magnetite cationic liposomes (MCLs), one group of the cationic magnetic particles, can be used as carriers to introduce magnetite nanoparticles into target cells since their positively charged surface interacts with the negatively charged cell surface. Magnetite nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies (antibody-conjugated magnetoliposomes, AMLs) are applicable to introduce magnetite nanoparticles specifically into target cells, even when target cells coexist with other kinds of cells. Since the cells labeled with magnetite nanoparticles could be manipulated using magnets, we applied this technique to tissue engineering and termed it ;magnetic force-based tissue engineering (Mag-TE)'. Both magnetic force and functionalized magnetite nanoparticles were used in a process of tissue engineering: construction of multilayered cell sheet-like structures and tubular structures. Thus, the applications of these functionalized magnetite nanoparticles with their unique features will further improve tissue engineering techniques.

  15. Characterization and cytotoxicity studies on liposome-hydrophobic magnetite hybrid colloids.

    PubMed

    Floris, Alice; Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria; Lai, Francesco; Marongiu, Francesca; Scano, Alessandra; Pilloni, Martina; Angius, Fabrizio; Vázquez-Vázquez, Carlos; Ennas, Guido

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to highlight the main features of magnetoliposomes prepared by TLE, using hydrophobic magnetite, and stabilized with oleic acid, instead of using the usual hydrophilic magnetite surrounded by sodium citrate. These biocompatible magnetoliposomes (MLs) were prepared with the purpose of producing a magnetic carrier capable of loading either hydrophilic or lipophilic drugs. The effect of different liposome/magnetite weight ratios on the stability of magnetoliposomes was evaluated by monitoring the mean diameter of the particles, their polydispersity index, and zeta potential over time. The prepared magnetoliposomes showed a high liposome-magnetite association, with magnetoliposomes containing PEG (polyethylene glycol) showing the best magnetite loading values. To verify the position of magnetite nanoparticles in the vesicular structures, the morphological characteristics of the structures were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM studies showed a strong affinity between hydrophobic magnetite nanoparticles, the surrounding oleic acid molecules, and phospholipids. Furthermore, the concentration above which one would expect to find a cytotoxic effect on cells as well as morphological cell-nanoparticle interactions was studied in situ by using the trypan blue dye exclusion assay, and the Prussian Blue modified staining method.

  16. Arsenic sorption by nanocrystalline magnetite: an example of environmentally promising interface with geosphere.

    PubMed

    Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Zorkovská, A; Sayagués, M J; Kováč, J; Timko, M

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, the sorption of arsenic onto nanocrystalline magnetite mineral Fe3O4 was studied in a model system. Nanocrystalline magnetite was produced by mechanical activation in a planetary ball mill from natural microcrystalline magnetite. As a consequence of milling, the specific surface area increased from 0.1m(2)/g to 11.9 m(2)/g and the surface site concentration enhanced from 2.2 sites/nm(2) to 8.4 sites/nm(2). These changes in surface properties of magnetite lead to the enhancement of arsenic removal from model system. The best sorption ability was achieved with magnetite sample activated for 90 min. In this case the sample was able to absorb around 4 mg/g. The structural changes of magnetite were also observed and the new hematite phase was detected after 120 min of milling. A good correlation between the decreasing particle size, increasing specific surface area and reduction of saturation magnetization was found. In desorption study, KOH and NaOH were found as the best eluents where more than 70% of arsenic was released back into the solution. The principal novelty of the paper is that mineral magnetite, truly one nature's gift can be used after "smart" milling (mechanical activation) as an effective arsenic sorbent.

  17. Antimicrobial Properties of Lysosomal Enzymes Immobilized on NH₂Functionalized Silica-Encapsulated Magnetite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bang, Seung Hyuck; Sekhon, Simranjeet Singh; Cho, Sung-Jin; Kim, So Jeong; Le, Thai-Hoang; Kim, Pil; Ahn, Ji-Young; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2016-01-01

    The immobilization efficiency, antimicrobial activity and recovery of lysosomal enzymes on NH2 functionalized magnetite nanoparticles have been studied under various conditions. The immobi- lization efficiency depends upon the ratio of the amount of enzyme and magnetite and it shows an increase with magnetite concentration which is due to the presence of amine group at the magnetite surface that leads to a strong attraction. The optimized reaction time to immobilize the lysosomal enzymes on magnetite was determined by using a rolling method. The immobilization efficiency increases with reaction time and reached a plateau after 5 minutes and then remained constant for 10 minutes. However, after 30 minutes the immobilization efficiency decreased to 85%, which is due to the weaker electrostatic interactions between magnetite and detached lysosomal enzymes. The recovery and stability of immobilized lysosomal enzymes has also been studied. The antimicrobial activity was almost 100% but it decreased upon reuse and no activity was observed after its reuse for seven times. The storage stability of lysosomal enzymes as an antimicrobial agent was about 88%, which decreased to 53% after one day and all activity of immobilized lysosomal enzymes was maintained after five days. Thus, the lysosomal enzymes immobilized on magnetite nanoparticles could potentially be used as antimicrobial agents to remove bacteria.

  18. Arsenic sorption by nanocrystalline magnetite: an example of environmentally promising interface with geosphere.

    PubMed

    Bujňáková, Z; Baláž, P; Zorkovská, A; Sayagués, M J; Kováč, J; Timko, M

    2013-11-15

    In this paper, the sorption of arsenic onto nanocrystalline magnetite mineral Fe3O4 was studied in a model system. Nanocrystalline magnetite was produced by mechanical activation in a planetary ball mill from natural microcrystalline magnetite. As a consequence of milling, the specific surface area increased from 0.1m(2)/g to 11.9 m(2)/g and the surface site concentration enhanced from 2.2 sites/nm(2) to 8.4 sites/nm(2). These changes in surface properties of magnetite lead to the enhancement of arsenic removal from model system. The best sorption ability was achieved with magnetite sample activated for 90 min. In this case the sample was able to absorb around 4 mg/g. The structural changes of magnetite were also observed and the new hematite phase was detected after 120 min of milling. A good correlation between the decreasing particle size, increasing specific surface area and reduction of saturation magnetization was found. In desorption study, KOH and NaOH were found as the best eluents where more than 70% of arsenic was released back into the solution. The principal novelty of the paper is that mineral magnetite, truly one nature's gift can be used after "smart" milling (mechanical activation) as an effective arsenic sorbent. PMID:23531452

  19. Anaerobic production of magnetite by a dissimilatory iron-reducing microorganism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Stolz, J.F.; Nord, G.L.; Phillips, E.J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The potential contribution of microbial metabolism to the magnetization of sediments has only recently been recognized. In the presence of oxygen, magnetotactic bacteria can form intracellular chains of magnetite while using oxygen or nitrate as the terminal electron acceptor for metabolism1. The production of ultrafine-grained magnetite by magnetotactic bacteria in surficial aerobic sediments may contribute significantly to the natural remanent magnetism of sediments2-4. However, recent studies on iron reduction in anaerobic sediments suggested that bacteria can also generate magnetite in the absence of oxygen5. We report here on a sediment organism, designated GS-15, which produces copious quantities of ultrafine-grained magnetite under anaerobic conditions. GS-15 is not magnetotactic, but reduces amorphic ferric oxide to extracellular magnetite during the reduction of ferric iron as the terminal electron acceptor for organic matter oxidation. This novel metabolism may be the mechanism for the formation of ultrafine-grained magnetite in anaerobic sediments, and couldaccount for the accumulation of magnetite in ancient iron formations and hydrocarbon deposits. ?? 1987 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Electrodeposition of Nanostructured Permalloy and Permalloy-Magnetite Composite Coatings and Investigation of Their Magnetic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazli, Sara; Bahrololoom, M. E.

    2016-08-01

    Permalloy and permalloy-magnetite coatings were electrodeposited with the average thickness of 100 µm with certain operating parameters, such as the current density of 100 mA/cm2, pH 3.8, and the temperature of 298 K (25 °C), to fabricate alloy and composite coatings, respectively. The aim was to promote the magnetic properties of permalloy coating in order to extend its magnetic applications. For this purpose, nanocrystalline permalloy and permalloy-magnetite coatings were electrodeposited. The effect of the content of magnetite particles in the bath on magnetic properties of the samples was investigated. Vibrating sample magnetometry was performed to investigate the variation of magnetic properties of the coatings. The optimum amount of magnetite (2 g/L) was determined according to the highest amount of saturated magnetization and a sensible amount of coercivity. The morphology, phase, elemental analyses of the coatings and the chemical composition analysis of the bath were performed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction pattern, quantometry, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The magnetization was increased initially and then decreased (after a limited amount of magnetite) by enhancing the content of magnetite particles in the bath. Also, the coercivity was decreased by increasing the amount of magnetite particles in the coatings, which was due to the reduction of the grain size of the permalloy matrix.

  1. Microreactor and electron spectroscopy studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on magnetite

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, H.J.; Bonzel, H.P.; Schwarting, W.; Gafner, G.

    1981-12-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ (1:3 mixture) at 1 bar total pressure and 570 K has been studied in a differential microreactor system on reduced and unreduced Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/ (magnetite). The catalytic reactivity data were complemented by surface analytical measurements using Auger electron and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, ESCA). XPS measurements showed evidence of carbon deposition, mostly in the form of graphite on all samples. The rate of methanation on reduced magnetite was characterized by a maximum and subsequent decrease. Both features were dependent on the reduction history of the sample. All samples gave rise to the production of higher-molecular-weight species. The selectivity of reduced magnetite tended towards the formation of saturated hydrocarbons while that of the unreduced magnetite favoured the formation of alkenes. It was concluded that the reduction of magnetite led to a considerable increase in surface area and porosity and that secondary reactions of the alkenes caused the primary product spectrum to shift from alkenes to alkanes. Accordingly the polymerisation probability increased from 0.3 for unreduced magnetite (also for clean foil) to greater than or equal to 0.42 for reduced magnetite.

  2. Transformation products of submicron-sized aluminum-substituted magnetite: Color and reductant solubility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetite, when present as fine particles, is soluble in acid ammonium oxalate (pH equals 3). However, the commonly used extractant for free iron oxides (i.e., citrate dithionite-bicarbonate (CDB) is not very effective in dissolving magnetite in soils and geologic materials. Upon oxidation, magnetite transforms to maghemite; at elevated temperatures, maghemite inverts to hematite. This transformation causes a change in color from black to red and may affect the reductant solubility as well. The objectives here were to examine the color and reflectance spectral characteristics of products during the transformation of magnetite to maghemite to hematite and to study the effect of Al-substitution in magnetite on the above process. Reductant solubility of Al-substituted magnetite, maghemite, and hematite was also studied. In summary, the transformation of magnetite to maghemite was accompanied by a change in color from black to red because of the oxidation of Fe2(+) to Fe3(+). The phase change maghemite to hematite had a relatively minor effect on the color and the reflectance spectra.

  3. Spin-resolved electron spectroscopies of epitaxial magnetite (001) (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Kimberly A.; Lochner, Eric; Lind, David M.; DiBari, Rebecca C.; Stoyanov, Plamen; Singer, Brian

    1996-04-01

    We will present the first spin-resolving electron spectroscopic studies of a magnetite (Fe3O4)(001) surface. Magnetite is a semimetal with a high density of states in the minority band, but a large band gap in the majority states at the Fermi energy. The polarization of the secondary emission cascade is measured using spin-resolved secondary electron emission spectroscopy (SRSEES), and reflects the semimetallic spin structure of Fe3O4. The polarization plateau of spin-resolved secondary emission (29.8%) matches the average 3D band polarization of stoichiometric Fe3O4 as determined from spin-resolved band structure calculations (34.2%). An enhancement of the polarization of the secondary electrons at lowest energies will also be discussed. Spin-resolved Auger emission spectroscopy (SRAES) of the Fe3O4 films have been measured and show correlation effects in the valence-valence Auger transitions. Suppressed intensity and polarization of M23M45M45 Auger emission relative to M1M45M45 Auger emission is observed, as well as strong resonant emission with shake-up. Conversely, no spin polarization is detected in the spin-resolved oxygen LMM Auger features, although oxygen Auger emission (in which we can distinguish between adsorbed and bonded oxygen) is used to verify surface cleanliness of the samples. The synthesis of Fe3O4 films grown on magnesium oxide (001) substrates using oxygen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy will be discussed, as will thin-film characterization using SQUID magnetometry and x-ray and electron diffraction. A unique angle-, energy-, and spin-resolved electron spectrometer has been designed and built for the study of magnetic surfaces, and these studies represent its' first use. That spectrometer is based on a tandem configuration of an energy-dispersive energy analyzer and Mott spin polarimeter.

  4. Arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) speciation during transformation of lepidocrocite to magnetite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuheng; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Brown, Gordon E

    2014-12-16

    Bioreduction of As(V) and As-bearing iron oxides is considered to be one of the key processes leading to arsenic pollution in groundwaters in South and Southeast Asia. Recent laboratory studies with simple aqueous media showed that secondary Fe(II)-bearing phases (e.g., magnetite and green rust), which commonly precipitate during bioreduction of iron oxides, captured arsenic species. The aim of the present study was to follow arsenic speciation during the abiotic Fe(II)-induced transformation of As(III)- and As(V)-doped lepidocrocite to magnetite, and to evaluate the influence of arsenic on the transformation kinetics and pathway. We found green rust formation is an intermediate phase in the transformation. Both As(III) and As(V) slowed the transformation, with the effect being greater for As(III) than for As(V). Prior to the formation of magnetite, As(III) adsorbed on both lepidocrocite and green rust, whereas As(V) associated exclusively with green rust, When magnetite precipitated, As(III) formed surface complexes on magnetite nanoparticles and As(V) is thought to have been incorporated into the magnetite structure. These processes dramatically lowered the availability of As in the anoxic systems studied. These results provide insights into the behavior of arsenic during magnetite precipitation in reducing environments. We also found that As(V) removal from solution was higher than As(III) removal following magnetite formation, which suggests that conversion of As(III) to As(V) is preferred when using As-magnetite precipitation to treat As-contaminated groundwaters.

  5. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  6. Discovery of magnetite in the exhausted material from a diesel engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Gautam, M.

    2001-04-01

    Magnetite was detected in the particulate matter collected from diesel engine exhaust using a total exhaust dilution tunnel. This discovery is very important in determining the health effects of exposure to magnetite or its interaction with static magnetic fields or low-frequency electromagnetic fields. Magnetite is the best absorber of microwave radiation of any biological material in the 0.5-10 GHz frequency range through the process of electromagnetic resonance. This includes the frequencies that are normally used in the cellular telephone industry.

  7. Vaterite Crystals Contain Two Interspersed Crystal Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalah-Amitai, Lee; Mayzel, Boaz; Kauffmann, Yaron; Fitch, Andrew N.; Bloch, Leonid; Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.; Pokroy, Boaz

    2013-04-01

    Calcite, aragonite, and vaterite are the three anhydrous polymorphs of calcium carbonate, in order of decreasing thermodynamic stability. Although vaterite is not commonly found in geological settings, it is an important precursor in several carbonate-forming systems and can be found in biological settings. Because of difficulties in obtaining large, pure, single crystals, the crystal structure of vaterite has been elusive for almost a century. Using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we found that vaterite is actually composed of at least two different crystallographic structures that coexist within a pseudo-single crystal. The major structure exhibits hexagonal symmetry; the minor structure, existing as nanodomains within the major matrix, is still unknown.

  8. Mixtures of maximally entangled pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, M. M.; Galapon, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the conditions when mixtures of maximally entangled pure states remain entangled. We found that the resulting mixed state remains entangled when the number of entangled pure states to be mixed is less than or equal to the dimension of the pure states. For the latter case of mixing a number of pure states equal to their dimension, we found that the mixed state is entangled provided that the entangled pure states to be mixed are not equally weighted. We also found that one can restrict the set of pure states that one can mix from in order to ensure that the resulting mixed state is genuinely entangled. Also, we demonstrate how these results could be applied as a way to detect entanglement in mixtures of the entangled pure states with noise.

  9. Water-dispersible magnetite-reduced graphene oxide composites for arsenic removal.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vimlesh; Park, Jaesung; Chun, Young; Lee, Jung Woo; Hwang, In-Chul; Kim, Kwang S

    2010-07-27

    Magnetite-graphene hybrids have been synthesized via a chemical reaction with a magnetite particle size of approximately 10 nm. The composites are superparamagnetic at room temperature and can be separated by an external magnetic field. As compared to bare magnetite particles, the hybrids show a high binding capacity for As(III) and As(V), whose presence in the drinking water in wide areas of South Asia has been a huge problem. Their high binding capacity is due to the increased adsorption sites in the M-RGO composite which occurs by reducing the aggregation of bare magnetite. Since the composites show near complete (over 99.9%) arsenic removal within 1 ppb, they are practically usable for arsenic separation from water.

  10. Redox-freezing and nucleation of diamond via magnetite formation in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Dorrit E; Piazolo, Sandra; Schreiber, Anja; Trimby, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Diamonds and their inclusions are unique probes into the deep Earth, tracking the deep carbon cycle to >800 km. Understanding the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and freezing is a prerequisite for quantifying the fluxes of carbon in the deep Earth. Here we show direct evidence for the formation of diamond by redox reactions involving FeNi sulfides. Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction identifies an arrested redox reaction from pyrrhotite to magnetite included in diamond. The magnetite corona shows coherent epitaxy with relict pyrrhotite and diamond, indicating that diamond nucleated on magnetite. Furthermore, structures inherited from h-Fe3O4 define a phase transformation at depths of 320-330 km, the base of the Kaapvaal lithosphere. The oxidation of pyrrhotite to magnetite is an important trigger of diamond precipitation in the upper mantle, explaining the presence of these phases in diamonds. PMID:27327434

  11. Redox-freezing and nucleation of diamond via magnetite formation in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Dorrit E; Piazolo, Sandra; Schreiber, Anja; Trimby, Patrick

    2016-06-21

    Diamonds and their inclusions are unique probes into the deep Earth, tracking the deep carbon cycle to >800 km. Understanding the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and freezing is a prerequisite for quantifying the fluxes of carbon in the deep Earth. Here we show direct evidence for the formation of diamond by redox reactions involving FeNi sulfides. Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction identifies an arrested redox reaction from pyrrhotite to magnetite included in diamond. The magnetite corona shows coherent epitaxy with relict pyrrhotite and diamond, indicating that diamond nucleated on magnetite. Furthermore, structures inherited from h-Fe3O4 define a phase transformation at depths of 320-330 km, the base of the Kaapvaal lithosphere. The oxidation of pyrrhotite to magnetite is an important trigger of diamond precipitation in the upper mantle, explaining the presence of these phases in diamonds.

  12. Hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetite nanoparticles as lymphatic targeted drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Yang, Feng; Hu, Jianhua; Long, Jiang; Wang, Changchun; Fu, Deliang; Ni, Quanxing

    2009-08-01

    Hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with magnetite nanoparticles were readily taken up into lymph vessels and delivered gemcitabine to lymph nodes with high efficiency under the guidance of a magnetic field.

  13. Magnetite-supported sulfonic acid: a retrievable nanocatalyst for the Ritter reaction and multicomponent reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetite-sulfonic acid (NanocatFe-OSO3H), prepared by wet-impregnation method, serves as a magnetically retrievable sustainable catalyst for the Ritter reaction which can be used in several reaction cycles without any loss of activity.

  14. Characterization of magnetite-organic complex nanoparticles by metal-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yumi; Jang, Heedong; Suh, Yongjae; Roh, Yul

    2011-08-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles exhibit clear technological potential for biomedical applications. The objectives of this study were to synthesize magnetite-organic complex nanoparticles through the use of metal-reducing bacteria and characterize the mineralogical and surface chemical properties of these nanoparticles as well as to test their potential applications in biomedical technology with regards to their protein immobilization capacity. The microbially formed magnetite nanoparticles had a size of around 10 nm with a spherical shape and were coated with organics containing an abundance of reactive carboxyl groups without any chemical process for functionalizing them. These microbial processes may lead to a simple preparation of functional magnetite-organic complex nanoparticles which have benefits for biomedical applications.

  15. Redox-freezing and nucleation of diamond via magnetite formation in the Earth's mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Dorrit E.; Piazolo, Sandra; Schreiber, Anja; Trimby, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Diamonds and their inclusions are unique probes into the deep Earth, tracking the deep carbon cycle to >800 km. Understanding the mechanisms of carbon mobilization and freezing is a prerequisite for quantifying the fluxes of carbon in the deep Earth. Here we show direct evidence for the formation of diamond by redox reactions involving FeNi sulfides. Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction identifies an arrested redox reaction from pyrrhotite to magnetite included in diamond. The magnetite corona shows coherent epitaxy with relict pyrrhotite and diamond, indicating that diamond nucleated on magnetite. Furthermore, structures inherited from h-Fe3O4 define a phase transformation at depths of 320-330 km, the base of the Kaapvaal lithosphere. The oxidation of pyrrhotite to magnetite is an important trigger of diamond precipitation in the upper mantle, explaining the presence of these phases in diamonds.

  16. Magnetic and Structural Properties of Magnetite in Radular Teeth of Chiton Acanthochiton Rubrolinestus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. N.; Liu, C. L.; Yao, L. D.; Wang, Y.; Han, X. F.

    2008-03-01

    The major radular lateral teeth of Polyplacophora Chiton comprise a magnetite biomineral cap.We have investigated the structure and magnetic properties of the biomineralized magnetite crystallites in mature teeth of Chiton Acanthochiton Rubrolinestus. From the measurement of magnetic properties of tooth particles using SQUID magnetometry we find that the saturation magnetization and the Verwey transition temperature (Tv) are 78.4 emu/g and 105 K, respectively. An in situ examination of the structure of magnetite-bearing region within individual tooth using the high resolution TEM, together with electron diffraction (ED) pattern and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses indicates magnetite microcrystal form electron-dense polycrystalline sheets with typical length 800 nm and width 150 nm or so. These polycrystalline sheets are arranged regularly along the longitude direction of the tooth cutting surface. Furthermore, the microcrystallites in polycrystalline sheet take on the generally good crystallinity.

  17. Carbonate and Magnetite Parageneses as Monitors of Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Fugacity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2000-01-01

    The stable coexistence of siderite with other key minerals, such as graphite or magnetite, is only possible under certain restrictive conditions of CO2 and O2 fugacity. Carbonate parageneses in Mars meteorite ALH 84001 are analyzed.

  18. Morphological features of elongated-anisotropic magnetosome crystals in magnetotactic bacteria of the Nitrospirae phylum and the Deltaproteobacteria class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Pósfai, Mihály; Abreu, Fernanda; Lins, Ulysses; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2011-12-01

    High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to study the crystallographic habits of the elongated magnetite crystals, variously described as bullet-, tooth- or arrowhead-shaped, in two recently described, uncultured, magnetotactic bacteria belonging to the Nitrospirae phylum designated Candidatus Magnetoovum mohavensis strain LO-1, and Candidatus Thermomagnetovibrio paiutensis strain HSMV-1; and a cultured sulfate-reducing magnetotactic bacterium of the Deltaproteobacteria class of the Proteobacteria phylum designated strain AV-1. The elongation axes of the magnetosomes do not coincide with the easy magnetization axis (which is [111]) but they are parallel to [100] in LO-1 and AV-1 and parallel to [110] in HSMV-1. In all three strains, magnetosome magnetite crystals appear to elongate at constant width, resulting in asymmetric shapes. Idealized crystal morphologies are proposed. Neither the control mechanism over crystal growth, nor the adaptiveness, if any, of such unusual crystal habits are known at the moment. Since similar elongated and asymmetric morphologies are unknown in inorganically-formed magnetite crystals, these forms of magnetosome magnetite appear to be excellent biomarkers.

  19. Crystallization of hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Drisko, Glenna L; Carretero-Genevrier, Adrian; Perrot, Alexandre; Gich, Martí; Gàzquez, Jaume; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Juan; Favre, Luc; Grosso, David; Boissière, Cédric; Sanchez, Clément

    2015-03-11

    Complex 3D macrostructured nanoparticles are transformed from amorphous silica into pure polycrystalline α-quartz using catalytic quantities of alkaline earth metals as devitrifying agent. Walls as thin as 10 nm could be crystallized without losing the architecture of the particles. The roles of cation size and the mol% of the incorporated devitrifying agent in crystallization behavior are studied, with Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+) and Ba(2+) all producing pure α-quartz under certain conditions.

  20. Isomerically Pure Tetramethylrhodamine Voltage Reporters.

    PubMed

    Deal, Parker E; Kulkarni, Rishikesh U; Al-Abdullatif, Sarah H; Miller, Evan W

    2016-07-27

    We present the design, synthesis, and application of a new family of fluorescent voltage indicators based on isomerically pure tetramethylrhodamines. These new Rhodamine Voltage Reporters, or RhoVRs, use photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) as a trigger for voltage sensing, display excitation and emission profiles in the green to orange region of the visible spectrum, demonstrate high sensitivity to membrane potential changes (up to 47% ΔF/F per 100 mV), and employ a tertiary amide derived from sarcosine, which aids in membrane localization and simultaneously simplifies the synthetic route to the voltage sensors. The most sensitive of the RhoVR dyes, RhoVR 1, features a methoxy-substituted diethylaniline donor and phenylenevinylene molecular wire at the 5'-position of the rhodamine aryl ring, exhibits the highest voltage sensitivity to date for red-shifted PeT-based voltage sensors, and is compatible with simultaneous imaging alongside green fluorescent protein-based indicators. The discoveries that sarcosine-based tertiary amides in the context of molecular-wire voltage indicators prevent dye internalization and 5'-substituted voltage indicators exhibit improved voltage sensitivity should be broadly applicable to other types of PeT-based voltage-sensitive fluorophores. PMID:27428174

  1. Bringing Planctomycetes into pure culture

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Olga M.; Bondoso, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Planctomycetes have been known since the description of Planctomyces bekefii by Gimesi at the beginning of the twentieth century (1924), although the first axenic cultures were only obtained in the 1970s. Since then, 11 genera with 14 species have been validly named and five candidatus genera belonging to the anaerobic ammonium oxidation, anammox bacteria have also been discovered. However, Planctomycetes diversity is much broader than these numbers indicate, as shown by environmental molecular studies. In recent years, the authors have attempted to isolate and cultivate additional strains of Planctomycetes. This paper provides a summary of the isolation work that was carried out to obtain in pure culture Planctomycetes from several environmental sources. The following strains of planctomycetes have been successfully isolated: two freshwater strains from the sediments of an aquarium, which were described as a new genus and species, Aquisphaera giovannonii; several Rhodopirellula strains from the sediments of a water treatment recycling tank of a marine fish farm; and more than 140 planctomycetes from the biofilm community of macroalgae. This collection comprises several novel taxa that are being characterized and described. Improvements in the isolation methodology were made in order to optimize and enlarge the number of Planctomycetes isolated from the macroalgae. The existence of an intimate and an important relationship between planctomycetes and macroalgae reported before by molecular studies is therefore supported by culture-dependent methods. PMID:23335915

  2. Dependence of microbial magnetite formation on humic substance and ferrihydrite concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piepenbrock, Annette; Dippon, Urs; Porsch, Katharina; Appel, Erwin; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    Iron mineral (trans)formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction is of environmental relevance as it can influence the fate of pollutants such as toxic metal ions or hydrocarbons. Magnetite is an important biomineralization product of microbial iron reduction and influences soil magnetic properties that are used for paleoclimate reconstruction and were suggested to assist in the localization of organic and inorganic pollutants. However, it is not well understood how different concentrations of Fe(III) minerals and humic substances (HS) affect magnetite formation during microbial Fe(III) reduction. We therefore used wet-chemical extractions, magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray diffraction analyses to determine systematically how (i) different initial ferrihydrite (FH) concentrations and (ii) different concentrations of HS (i.e. the presence of either only adsorbed HS or adsorbed and dissolved HS) affect magnetite formation during FH reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In our experiments magnetite formation did not occur at FH concentrations lower than 5 mM, even though rapid iron reduction took place. At higher FH concentrations a minimum fraction of Fe(II) of 25-30% of the total iron present was necessary to initiate magnetite formation. The Fe(II) fraction at which magnetite formation started decreased with increasing FH concentration, which might be due to aggregation of the FH particles reducing the FH surface area at higher FH concentrations. HS concentrations of 215-393 mg HS/g FH slowed down (at partial FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) or even completely inhibited (at complete FH surface coverage with sorbed HS) magnetite formation due to blocking of surface sites by adsorbed HS. These results indicate the requirement of Fe(II) adsorption to, and subsequent interaction with, the FH surface for the transformation of FH into magnetite. Additionally, we found that the microbially formed magnetite was further reduced by strain MR-1 leading to

  3. The study of non-linear kinetics and adsorption isotherm models for Acid Red 18 from aqueous solutions by magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Berizi, Zohre; Hashemi, Seyed Yaser; Hadi, Mahdi; Azari, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in various industries. These substances produce toxic byproducts in aquatic environments in addition to their mutagenic and carcinogenic potential effects. In this study, the effect of magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate in batch systems and nonlinear kinetic and adsorption isotherm models were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and then modified and used as adsorbent to adsorb Acid Red 18. After determining the optimum pH and adsorbent dose, non-equilibrium models for kinetic adsorption were tested with concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and at eight different periods of time (1-15 min) and the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order non-linear models were used to describe the results. For adsorption isotherm, a contact time of 120 min was studied in different concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and the residual concentration of Acid Red 18 was obtained. The results are described by non-linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The optimum amounts of pH for magnetite nanoparticles and for modified ones were 3 and 5, respectively, the efficiencies were 0.75 and 0.2 g/L, respectively. According to the results sodium alginate has a high performance in adsorption of Acid Red 18. Adjusted correlation coefficients and chi-square test showed that Freundlich isotherm and then Langmuir isotherm can well describe the experimental results. In Freundlich, the value of (Kf) was 3.231 (L/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 21.615 (L/g) for modified adsorbent. In Langmuir, the value of (qm) was 16.259 (mg/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 73.464 (mg/g) for modified adsorbent. Comparing the Langmuir maximum calculated adsorption capacity indicated that modified adsorbent can adsorb the pollutants 6.5 times more than the other one.

  4. The study of non-linear kinetics and adsorption isotherm models for Acid Red 18 from aqueous solutions by magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate.

    PubMed

    Berizi, Zohre; Hashemi, Seyed Yaser; Hadi, Mahdi; Azari, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Azo dyes are widely used in various industries. These substances produce toxic byproducts in aquatic environments in addition to their mutagenic and carcinogenic potential effects. In this study, the effect of magnetite nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles modified by sodium alginate in batch systems and nonlinear kinetic and adsorption isotherm models were investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method and then modified and used as adsorbent to adsorb Acid Red 18. After determining the optimum pH and adsorbent dose, non-equilibrium models for kinetic adsorption were tested with concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and at eight different periods of time (1-15 min) and the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order non-linear models were used to describe the results. For adsorption isotherm, a contact time of 120 min was studied in different concentrations (25-100 mg/L) and the residual concentration of Acid Red 18 was obtained. The results are described by non-linear Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models. The optimum amounts of pH for magnetite nanoparticles and for modified ones were 3 and 5, respectively, the efficiencies were 0.75 and 0.2 g/L, respectively. According to the results sodium alginate has a high performance in adsorption of Acid Red 18. Adjusted correlation coefficients and chi-square test showed that Freundlich isotherm and then Langmuir isotherm can well describe the experimental results. In Freundlich, the value of (Kf) was 3.231 (L/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 21.615 (L/g) for modified adsorbent. In Langmuir, the value of (qm) was 16.259 (mg/g) for magnetite nanoparticles and 73.464 (mg/g) for modified adsorbent. Comparing the Langmuir maximum calculated adsorption capacity indicated that modified adsorbent can adsorb the pollutants 6.5 times more than the other one. PMID:27642843

  5. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-11-01

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  6. Introduction of biotin or folic acid into polypyrrole magnetite core-shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Alexandrina; Turcu, Rodica; Liebscher, Jürgen

    2013-11-13

    In order to contribute to the trend in contemporary research to develop magnetic core shell nanoparticles with better properties (reduced toxicity, high colloidal and chemical stability, wide scope of application) in straightforward and reproducible methods new core shell magnetic nanoparticles were developed based on polypyrrole shells functionalized with biotin and folic acid. Magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by sebacic acid were used as magnetic cores. The morphology of magnetite was determined by transmission electron microscopy TEM, while the chemical structure investigated by FT-IR.

  7. Novel one-pot synthesis of magnetite latex nanoparticles by ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Teo, Boon M; Chen, Fei; Hatton, T Alan; Grieser, Franz; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2009-03-01

    A simple and efficacious procedure for the synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles has been achieved via a sonochemical miniemulsion polymerization process. The sonochemically synthesized magnetite encapsulated polymer latex particles exhibit excellent colloidal stability and strong magnetic properties, and are of a size that makes them technologically relevant. This novel method may be readily extended to the preparation of multiple combinations of different polymers and encapsulated materials.

  8. Magnetite polymer nanospheres loaded by Indomethacin for anti-inflammatory therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timko, Milan; Koneracká, Martina; Tomas˘ovičová, Natália; Kopčanský, Peter; Závis˘ová, Vlasta

    2006-05-01

    This contribution is devoted to preparation and characterization of magnetite nanoparticles loaded by Indomethacin (IND) as anti-inflammatory drug suitable for magnetic drug targeting. The poorly water-soluble drug IND was successfully encapsulated in polylactic acid (PLA) magnetic nanospheres (NPs) by nanoprecipitation method. The evidence of successful entrapment of IND was confirmed by FTIR and spectrophotometric measurements. The prepared magnetite-PLA-IND NPs shown the response on external magnetic field and so availability for magnetic drug targeting.

  9. Acceleration of microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion reactions by magnetite beads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2007-03-15

    In this study, we demonstrated that microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion could be greatly accelerated by multifunctional magnetite beads. The acceleration of microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion by the presence of the magnetite beads was attributable to several features of the beads. Their capacity to absorb microwave radiation leads to rapid heating of the beads. Furthermore, their negatively charged functionalities cause adsorption of proteins with opposite charges onto their surfaces by electrostatic interactions, leading to a concentration on the surfaces of the beads of proteins present in trace amounts in the solution. The adsorbed proteins are denatured and hence rendered vulnerable to enzymatic digestion and are digested on the beads. For microwave heating, 30 s was sufficient for carrying out the tryptic digestion of cytochrome c, in the presence of magnetite beads, while 1 min was adequate for tryptic digestion of myoglobin. The digestion products were characterized by MALDI-MS. This rapid enzymatic digestion allowed the entire time for identification of proteins to be greatly reduced. Furthermore, specific proteins present in trace quantities were enriched from the sample on the magnetite beads and could be rapidly isolated from the sample by employing an external magnetic field. These multiple roles of magnetite beads, as the absorber for microwave irradiation, the concentrating probe, and the agent for unfolding proteins, contributed to their capability of accelerating microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion. We also demonstrated that trypsin immobilized magnetite beads were suitable for use in microwave-assisted enzymatic digestion.

  10. Structural and morphological anomalies in magnetosomes: possible biogenic origin for magnetite in ALH84001.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A P; Barry, J C; Webb, R I

    2001-01-01

    We report biogenic magnetite whiskers, with axial ratios of 6 : 1, elongated in the [1 1 1], [1 1 2] and [1 0 0] directions, resembling the magnetite whiskers detected in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 by Bradley et al., and interpreted by those authors as evidence of vapour-phase (abiogenic) growth. Magnetosomal whiskers with extended defects consistent with screw dislocations and magnetosomes resembling flattened twinned platelets, as well as other twinning phenomena and other structural defects, are also reported here. Magnetosomes with teardrop-shaped, cuboidal, irregular and jagged structures similar to those detected in ALH84001 by McKay et al., coprecipitation of magnetite possibly with amorphous calcium carbonate, coprecipitation of magnetite possibly with amorphous silica, the incorporation of titanium in volutin inclusions and disoriented arrays of magnetosomes are also described. These observations demonstrate that the structures of the magnetite particles in ALH84001, their spatial arrangement and coprecipitation with carbonates and proximity to silicates are consistent with being biogenic. Electron-beam-induced flash-melting of magnetosomes produced numerous screw dislocations in the [1 1 1], [1 0 0], and [1 1 0] lattice planes and induced fusion of platelets. From this, the lack of screw dislocations reported in the magnetite particles in ALH84001 (McKay et al., and Bradley et al.) indicates that they have a low-temperature origin. PMID:11136443

  11. Estimation of Sintering Kinetics of Oxidized Magnetite Pellet Using Optical Dilatometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep Kumar, T. K.; Viswanathan, Neelakantan Nurni; Ahmed, Hesham M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Björkman, Bo

    2015-04-01

    The quality of magnetite pellet is primarily determined by the physico-chemical changes the pellet undergoes as it makes excursion through the gaseous and thermal environment in the induration furnace. Among these physico-chemical processes, the oxidation of magnetite phase and the sintering of oxidized magnetite (hematite) and magnetite (non-oxidized) phases are vital. Rates of these processes not only depend on the thermal and gaseous environment the pellet gets exposed in the induration reactor but also interdependent on each other. Therefore, a systematic study should involve understanding these processes in isolation to the extent possible and quantify them seeking the physics. With this motivation, the present paper focusses on investigating the sintering kinetics of oxidized magnetite pellet. For the current investigation, sintering experiments were carried out on pellets containing more than 95 pct magnetite concentrate from LKAB's mine, dried and oxidized to completion at sufficiently low temperature to avoid sintering. The sintering behavior of this oxidized pellet is quantified through shrinkage captured by Optical Dilatometer. The extent of sintering characterized by sintering ratio found to follow a power law with time i.e., Kt n . The rate constant K for sintering was determined for different temperatures from isothermal experiments. The rate constant, K, varies with temperature as and the activation energy ( Q) and reaction rate constant ( K') are estimated. Further, the sintering kinetic equation was also extended to a non-isothermal environment and validated using laboratory experiments.

  12. Magnetic and structural properties of magnetite in radular teeth of chiton Acanthochiton rubrolinestus.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunan; Liu, Chuanlin; Zhou, Dong; Li, Fashen; Wang, Yong; Han, Xiufeng

    2011-04-01

    The teeth of the Polyplacophora Chiton Acanthochiton Rubrolinestus contain biomineralized magnetite crystallites whose biological functions in relation to structure and magnetic properties are not well understood. Here, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, we find that the saturation magnetization (σ(s)) and the Verwey transition temperature (T(v)) of tooth particles are 78.4 emu/g and 105 K, respectively. These values are below those of the stoichiometric magnetite. An in situ examination of the structure of the magnetite-bearing region within an individual tooth using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates magnetite microcrystals form electron dense polycrystalline sheets with typical lengths of about 800 nm and widths of about 150 nm. These polycrystalline sheets are arranged regularly along the longitudinal direction of the tooth cutting surface. In addition, the crystallites in polycrystalline sheets take on generally good crystallinity. The magnetic microstructures of in situ magnetic force microscopy demonstrate that the [111] easy direction of magnetite microcrystals are aligned along the length of the tooth, whereas the [111] direction is parallel to the thickness of the tooth. Both Mössbauer spectra and magnetization versus temperature measurements under field cooled and zero-field cooled conditions do not detect superparamagnetic magnetite crystallites in the mature major lateral tooth particles of this chiton.

  13. Magnetic and structural properties of magnetite in radular teeth of chiton Acanthochiton rubrolinestus.

    PubMed

    Han, Yunan; Liu, Chuanlin; Zhou, Dong; Li, Fashen; Wang, Yong; Han, Xiufeng

    2011-04-01

    The teeth of the Polyplacophora Chiton Acanthochiton Rubrolinestus contain biomineralized magnetite crystallites whose biological functions in relation to structure and magnetic properties are not well understood. Here, using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry, we find that the saturation magnetization (σ(s)) and the Verwey transition temperature (T(v)) of tooth particles are 78.4 emu/g and 105 K, respectively. These values are below those of the stoichiometric magnetite. An in situ examination of the structure of the magnetite-bearing region within an individual tooth using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy indicates magnetite microcrystals form electron dense polycrystalline sheets with typical lengths of about 800 nm and widths of about 150 nm. These polycrystalline sheets are arranged regularly along the longitudinal direction of the tooth cutting surface. In addition, the crystallites in polycrystalline sheets take on generally good crystallinity. The magnetic microstructures of in situ magnetic force microscopy demonstrate that the [111] easy direction of magnetite microcrystals are aligned along the length of the tooth, whereas the [111] direction is parallel to the thickness of the tooth. Both Mössbauer spectra and magnetization versus temperature measurements under field cooled and zero-field cooled conditions do not detect superparamagnetic magnetite crystallites in the mature major lateral tooth particles of this chiton. PMID:21365666

  14. Spectral and other physicochemical properties of submicron powders of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4), goethite (alpha-FeOOH), and lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH).

    PubMed

    Morris, R V; Lauer, H V; Lawson, C A; Gibson, E K; Nace, G A; Stewart, C

    1985-03-10

    Spectral and other physicochemical properties were determined for a suite of submicron powders of hematite (alpha-Fe2O3), maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3), magnetite (Fe3O4), goethite (alpha-FeOOH), and lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH). The spectral reflectivity measurements were made between 0.35 and 2.20 micrograms over the temperature interval between about -110 degrees and 20 degrees C. Other physicochemical properties determined were mean particle diameter, particle shape, chemical composition, crystallographic phase, magnetic properties, and Mossbauer properties. Only the magnetite powders have significant departures from the stoichiometric phase; they are actually cation-deficient magnetites having down to about 18.0 wt % FeO as compared with 31.0 wt % FeO for stoichiometric magnetite. A structured absorption edge due to crystal field transitions and extending from weak absorption in the near-IR to intense absorption in the near-UV is characteristic of the ferric oxides and oxyhydroxides and is responsible for their intense color. Particularly for hematite, the number and position of the spectral features are consistent with significant splitting of the degenerate cubic levels by noncubic components of the crystal field. The position of the crystal-field band at lowest energy, assigned to the envelope of the components of the split cubic 4T1 level, is near 0.86, 0.91, 0.92, and 0.98 microgram at room temperature for hematite, goethite, maghemite, and lepidocrocite, respectively. Comparison with Mossbauer data suggests covalent character increases sequentially through the aforementioned series. The positions of the spectra features are relatively independent of temperature down to about -110 degrees C. The maximum shifts observed were on the order of about 0.02 microgram shortward for the ferric oxyhydroxides. Variations in the magnitude of the reflectivity of the hematite powders as a function of mean particle diameter are consistent with scattering theory. The absorption

  15. The synthesis and characterization of poly(γ-glutamic acid)-coated magnetite nanoparticles and their effects on antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbaraj, B. Stephen; Kao, T. H.; Tsai, T. Y.; Chiu, C. P.; Kumar, R.; Chen, B. H.

    2011-02-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) modified with sodium and calcium salts of poly(γ-glutamic acid) (NaPGA and CaPGA) were synthesized by the coprecipitation method, followed by characterization and evaluation of their antibacterial and cytotoxic effects. Superparamagnetic MNPs are particularly attractive for magnetic driving as well as bacterial biofilm and cell targeting in in vivo applications. Characterization of synthesized MNPs by the Fourier transform infrared spectra and magnetization curves confirmed the PGA coating on MNPs. The mean diameter of NaPGA- and CaPGA-coated MNPs as determined by transmission electron microscopy was 11.8 and 14 nm, respectively, while the x-ray diffraction pattern revealed the as-synthesized MNPs to be pure magnetite. Based on agar dilution assay, both NaPGA- and CaPGA-coated MNPs showed a lower minimum inhibitory concentration in Salmonella enteritidis SE 01 than the commercial antibiotics linezolid and cefaclor, but the former was effective against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 10832, whereas the latter was effective against Escherichia coli O157:H7 TWC 01. An in vitro cytotoxicity study in human skin fibroblast cells as measured by MTT assay implied the as-synthesized MNPs to be nontoxic. This outcome demonstrated that both γ-PGA-modified MNPs are cytocompatible and possess antibacterial activity in vitro, and thereby should be useful in in vivo studies for biomedical applications.

  16. Core-shell magnetite-silica dithiocarbamate-derivatised particles achieve the Water Framework Directive quality criteria for mercury in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C B; Figueira, P; Tavares, D S; Lin, Z; Daniel-da-Silva, A L; Duarte, A C; Rocha, J; Trindade, T; Pereira, E

    2013-09-01

    The sorption capacity of nanoporous titanosilicate Engelhard titanosilicate number 4 (ETS-4) and silica-coated magnetite particles derivatised with dithiocarbamate groups towards Hg(II) was evaluated and compared in spiked ultra-pure and spiked surface-river water, for different batch factors. In the former, and using a batch factor of 100 m(3)/kg and an initial Hg(II) concentrations matching the maximum allowed concentration in an effluent discharge, both materials achieve Hg(II) uptake efficiencies in excess of 99 % and a residual metal concentration lower than the guideline value for drinking water quality. For the surface-river water and the same initial concentration, the Hg(II) uptake efficiency of magnetite particles is outstanding, achieving the quality criteria established by the Water Framework Directive (concerning Hg concentration in surface waters) using a batch factor of 50 m(3)/kg, while the efficiency of ETS-4 is significantly inferior. The dissimilar sorbents' Hg(II) removal efficiency is attributed to different uptake mechanisms. This study also highlights the importance of assessing the effective capacity of the sorbents under realistic conditions in order to achieve trustable results.

  17. Identification of Magnetite in B-type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bin; Jewitt, David

    2010-09-01

    Spectrally blue (B-type) asteroids are rare, with the second discovered asteroid, Pallas, being the largest and most famous example. We conducted a focused, infrared spectroscopic survey of B-type asteroids to search for water-related features in these objects. Our results show that the negative optical spectral slope of some B-type asteroids is due to the presence of a broad absorption band centered near 1.0 μm. The 1 μm band can be matched in position and shape using magnetite (Fe3O4), which is an important indicator of past aqueous alteration in the parent body. Furthermore, our observations of B-type asteroid (335) Roberta in the 3 μm region reveal an absorption feature centered at 2.9 μm, which is consistent with the absorption due to phyllosilicates (another hydration product) observed in CI chondrites. The new observations suggest that at least some B-type asteroids are likely to have incorporated significant amounts of water ice and to have experienced intensive aqueous alteration.

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF MAGNETITE IN B-TYPE ASTEROIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Bin; Jewitt, David E-mail: jewitt@ucla.ed

    2010-09-15

    Spectrally blue (B-type) asteroids are rare, with the second discovered asteroid, Pallas, being the largest and most famous example. We conducted a focused, infrared spectroscopic survey of B-type asteroids to search for water-related features in these objects. Our results show that the negative optical spectral slope of some B-type asteroids is due to the presence of a broad absorption band centered near 1.0 {mu}m. The 1 {mu}m band can be matched in position and shape using magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), which is an important indicator of past aqueous alteration in the parent body. Furthermore, our observations of B-type asteroid (335) Roberta in the 3 {mu}m region reveal an absorption feature centered at 2.9 {mu}m, which is consistent with the absorption due to phyllosilicates (another hydration product) observed in CI chondrites. The new observations suggest that at least some B-type asteroids are likely to have incorporated significant amounts of water ice and to have experienced intensive aqueous alteration.

  19. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  20. Cell-specific cytotoxicity of dextran-stabilized magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jing; Tao, Ke; Li, Jiyu; Song, Sheng; Sun, Kang

    2010-08-01

    Cytotoxicity of dextran-hybridized magnetite nanoparticles which were prepared by a novel polyol method was evaluated by incubation with four different kinds of cells, including rat liver cells BRL 3A, renal cells NRK, astrocyte and periphery blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The study was designed not only to evaluate their cytotoxicity but also to reflect the interaction between nanoparticles and related cells in their circulation processes. By fluorescent-activated cell sorting technique, it was found that the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles is cell-specific. Under the concentrations in our study (0-128 mg/mL), the nanoparticles lead to the apoptosis of PBMC in a concentration-dependant manner, but have almost no influence on the other kinds of cells. TEM images demonstrate that the nanoparticles were endocytosed by BRL 3A, NRK and astrocyte, and result in the apoptosis of PBMC without the observation of the uptaking process. The results suggest that the related cells in nanoparticles cycling process should also be concerned for the cytotoxicity evaluation.

  1. Enhanced thermal stability of phosphate capped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, T.; Philip, John

    2014-06-14

    We have studied the effect of phosphate capping on the high temperature thermal stability and magnetic properties of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles synthesized through a single-step co-precipitation method. The prepared magnetic nanoparticles are characterized using various techniques. When annealed in air, the phosphate capped nanoparticle undergoes a magnetic to non-magnetic phase transition at a temperature of 689 °C as compared to 580 °C in the uncoated nanoparticle of similar size. The observed high temperature phase stability of phosphate capped nanoparticle is attributed to the formation of a phosphocarbonaceous shell over the nanoparticles, which acts as a covalently attached protective layer and improves the thermal stability of the core material by increasing the activation energy. The phosphocarbonaceous shell prevents the intrusion of heat, oxygen, volatiles, and mass into the magnetic core. At higher temperatures, the coalescence of nanoparticles occurs along with the restructuring of the phosphocarbonaceous shell into a vitreous semisolid layer on the nanoparticles, which is confirmed from the small angle X-ray scattering, Fourier transform infra red spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy measurements. The probable mechanism for the enhancement of thermal stability of phosphocarbonaceous capped nanoparticles is discussed.

  2. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E. Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  3. Novel hybrid nanostructured materials of magnetite nanoparticles and pectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Saurabh; Dutta, Raj Kumar

    2011-04-01

    A novel hybrid nanostructured material comprising superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) and pectin was synthesized by crosslinking with Ca2+ ions to form spherical calcium pectinate nanostructures, referred as MCPs, which were typically found to be 100-150 nm in size in dried condition, confirmed from transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The uniform size distribution was revealed from dynamic light scattering measurement. In aqueous medium the MCPs showed swelling behavior with an average size of 400 nm. A mechanism of formation of spherical MCPs is outlined constituting a MNP-pectin interface encapsulated by calcium pectinate at the periphery, by using an array of characterization techniques like zeta potential, thermogravimetry, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The MCPs were stable in simulated gastrointestinal fluid and ensured minimal loss of magnetic material. They exhibited superparamagnetic behavior, confirmed from zero field cooled and field cooled profiles and showed high saturation magnetization (Ms) of 46.21 emu/g at 2.5 T and 300 K. Ms decreased with increasing precursor pectin concentrations, attributed to quenching of magnetic moments by formation of a magnetic dead layer on the MNPs.

  4. Atomic layer deposition of superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic magnetite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yijun; Liu, Ming E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Ren, Wei E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yuepeng; Chen, Xing; Ye, Zuo-Guang E-mail: wren@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

    2015-05-07

    One of the key challenges in realizing superparamagnetism in magnetic thin films lies in finding a low-energy growth way to create sufficiently small grains and magnetic domains which allow the magnetization to randomly and rapidly reverse. In this work, well-defined superparamagnetic and ferrimagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films are successfully prepared using atomic layer deposition technique by finely controlling the growth condition and post-annealing process. As-grown Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} thin films exhibit a conformal surface and poly-crystalline nature with an average grain size of 7 nm, resulting in a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature of 210 K. After post-annealing in H{sub 2}/Ar at 400 °C, the as-grown α−Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample is reduced to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, exhibiting a ferrimagnetic ordering and distinct magnetic shape anisotropy. Atomic layer deposition of magnetite thin films with well-controlled morphology and magnetic properties provides great opportunities for integrating with other order parameters to realize magnetic nano-devices with potential applications in spintronics, electronics, and bio-applications.

  5. Magnetization and susceptibility of ion-irradiated granular magnetite films

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, W.; McCloy, J. S.; Lea, A. S.; Sundararajan, J. A.; Yao, Q.; Qiang, Y.

    2011-04-01

    Porous granular films of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) with grains of {approx}3 nm in size were prepared using a state-of-the-art nanocluster deposition system. The films are initially superparamagnetic but become magnetized following Si{sup 2+} ion irradiation. A significant increase in the grain size and a dramatic change in the microstructure are observed. There are dipolar interactions between the nanoparticles in both the unirradiated and irradiated films. The in-phase alternating current magnetic susceptibility of the unirradiated film shows a blocking temperature of {approx}150 K, depending on frequency. A broadened Verwey transition for the irradiated film occurs at {approx}75 K, above which the susceptibility exhibits unusual behavior: a nearly linear decrease with decreasing temperature. There are irreversible domain rotations in the irradiated film during zero-field cooling and warming cycles between 10 and 300 K. The observed behavior of the irradiated granular films is quite distinct from that of metallic nanostructures after irradiation, and is due to the dramatic change in microstructures.

  6. Improving biohydrogen production using Clostridium beijerinckii immobilized with magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seelert, Trevor; Ghosh, Dipankar; Yargeau, Viviane

    2015-05-01

    In order to supplement the need for alternative energy resources within the near future, enhancing the production of biohydrogen with immobilized Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB8052 was investigated. Magnetite nanoparticles were functionalized, with chitosan and alginic acid polyelectrolytes using a layer-by-layer method, to promote bacterial attachment. Cultivating C. beijerinckii with these nanoparticles resulted in a shorter lag growth phase and increased total biohydrogen production within 100-ml, 250-ml and 3.6-L reactors compared with freely suspended organisms. The greatest hydrogen yield was obtained in the 250-ml reactor with a value of 2.1 ± 0.7 mol H2/mol glucose, corresponding to substrate conversion and energy conversion efficiencies of 52 ± 18 and 10 ± 3 %, respectively. The hydrogen yields obtained using the immobilized bacteria are comparable to values found in literature. However, to make this process viable, further improvements are required to increase the substrate and energy conversion efficiencies.

  7. Water treatment using activated carbon supporting silver and magnetite.

    PubMed

    Valušová, Eva; Vandžurová, Anna; Pristaš, Peter; Antalík, Marián; Javorský, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recent efforts in water purification have led to the development of novel materials whose unique properties can offer effective biocidal capabilities with greater ease of use and at lower cost. In this study, we introduce a novel procedure for the preparation of activated carbon (charcoal) composite in which magnetite and silver are incorporated (MCAG); we also describe the use of this material for the disinfection of surface water. The formation process of magnetic MCAG composite was studied using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The results demonstrated the high sorption efficiency of AgNO₃ to magnetic activated carbon. The antimicrobial capabilities of the prepared MCAG were examined and the results clearly demonstrate their inhibitory effect on total river water bacteria and on Pseudomonas koreensis and Bacillus mycoides cultures isolated from river water. The bacterial counts in river water samples were reduced by five orders of magnitude following 30 min of treatment using 1 g l⁻¹ of MCAG at room temperature. The removal of all bacteria from the surface water samples implies that the MCAG material would be a suitable disinfectant for such waters. In combination with its magnetic character, MCAG would be an excellent candidate for the simple ambulatory disinfection of surface water.

  8. Effects of common groundwater ions on chromate removal by magnetite: Importance of chromate adsorption

    DOE PAGES

    Meena, Amanda H.; Arai, Yuji

    2016-04-29

    Reductive precipitation of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) with magnetite is a well-known Cr(VI) remediation method to improve water quality. The rapid (< a few hr) reduction of soluble Cr(VI) to insoluble Cr(III) species by Fe(II) in magnetite has been the primary focus of the Cr(VI) removal process in the past. However, the contribution of simultaneous Cr(VI) adsorption processes in aged magnetite has been largely ignored, leaving uncertainties in evaluating the application of in situ Cr remediation technologies for aqueous systems. In this study, effects of common groundwater ions (i.e., nitrate and sulfate) on Cr(VI) sorption to magnetite were investigated using batchmore » geochemical experiments in conjunction with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. As a result, in both nitrate and sulfate electrolytes, batch sorption experiments showed that Cr(VI) sorption decreases with increasing pH from 4 to 8. In this pH range, Cr(VI) sorption decreased with increasing ionic strength of sulfate from 0.01 to 0.1 M whereas nitrate concentrations did not alter the Cr(VI) sorption behavior. This indicates the background electrolyte specific Cr(VI) sorption process in magnetite. Under the same ionic strength, Cr(VI) removal in sulfate containing solutions was greater than that in nitrate solutions. This is because the oxidation of Fe(II) by nitrate is more thermodynamically favorable than by sulfate, leaving less reduction capacity of magnetite to reduce Cr(VI) in the nitrate media. X-ray absorption spectroscopy analysis supports the macroscopic evidence that more than 75 % of total Cr on the magnetite surfaces was adsorbed Cr(VI) species after 48 h. In conclusion, this experimental geochemical study showed that the adsorption process of Cr(VI) anions was as important as the reductive precipitation of Cr(III) in describing the removal of Cr(VI) by magnetite, and these interfacial adsorption processes could be impacted by common groundwater ions like sulfate and nitrate. The

  9. Magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules in CK carbonaceous chondrites - Implications for the timing of CK oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubin, Alan E.

    1993-01-01

    CK carbonaceous chondrites contain rare (about 0.1 vol pct) magnetite-sulfide chondrules that range from about 240 to 500 microns in apparent diameter and have ellipsoidal to spheroidal morphologies, granular textures, and concentric layering. They resemble the magnetite-sulfide nodules occurring inside mafic silicate chondrules in CK chondrites. It seems likely that the magnetite-sulfide chondrules constitute the subset of magnetite-sulfide nodules that escaped as immiscible droplets from their molten silicate chondrule hosts during chondrule formation. The intactness of the magnetite-sulfide chondrules and nodules implies that oxidation of CK metal occurred before agglomeration. Hence, the pervasive silicate darkening of CK chondrites was caused by the shock mobilization of magnetite and sulfide, not metallic Fe-Ni and sulfide as in shock-darkened ordinary chondrites.

  10. Ferrous Iron Binding Key to Mms6 Magnetite Biomineralisation: A Mechanistic Study to Understand Magnetite Formation Using pH Titration and NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rawlings, Andrea E; Bramble, Jonathan P; Hounslow, Andrea M; Williamson, Michael P; Monnington, Amy E; Cooke, David J; Staniland, Sarah S

    2016-06-01

    Formation of magnetite nanocrystals by magnetotactic bacteria is controlled by specific proteins which regulate the particles' nucleation and growth. One such protein is Mms6. This small, amphiphilic protein can self-assemble and bind ferric ions to aid in magnetite formation. To understand the role of Mms6 during in vitro iron oxide precipitation we have performed in situ pH titrations. We find Mms6 has little effect during ferric salt precipitation, but exerts greatest influence during the incorporation of ferrous ions and conversion of this salt to mixed-valence iron minerals, suggesting Mms6 has a hitherto unrecorded ferrous iron interacting property which promotes the formation of magnetite in ferrous-rich solutions. We show ferrous binding to the DEEVE motif within the C-terminal region of Mms6 by NMR spectroscopy, and model these binding events using molecular simulations. We conclude that Mms6 functions as a magnetite nucleating protein under conditions where ferrous ions predominate. PMID:27112228

  11. Crystallization Stages of the Bishop Tuff Magma Body Recorded in Crystal Textures in Pumice Clasts

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, Ayla; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.; Anderson, Jr. , Alfred T.

    2012-07-25

    The Bishop Tuff is a giant silicic ignimbrite erupted at 0.76 Ma in eastern California, USA. Five pumice clasts from the late-erupted Bishop Tuff (Aeolian Buttes) were studied in an effort to better understand the pre- and syn-eruptive history of the Bishop magma body and place constraints on the timescales of its existence. This study complements and expands on a previous study that focused on early-erupted Bishop Tuff pumice clasts. Bulk densities of pumice clasts were measured using an immersion method, and phenocryst crystal contents were determined using a sieving and winnowing procedure. X-ray tomography was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative textural information, particularly crystal size distributions (CSDs). We have determined CSDs for crystals ranging in size from {approx}10 to {approx}1000 {micro}m for three groups of mineral phases: magnetite ({+-}ilmenite), pyroxene + biotite, quartz + feldspar. Similar to early-erupted pumice, late-erupted pumice bulk density and crystal contents are positively correlated, and comparison of crystal fraction vs size trends suggests that the proportion of large crystals is the primary control on crystallinity. Porosity is negatively correlated with crystal content, which is difficult to reconcile with closed-system crystallization. Magnetite and pyroxene + biotite size distributions are fractal in nature, often attributed to fragmentation; however, crystals are mostly whole and euhedral, such that an alternative mechanism is necessary to explain these distributions. Quartz + feldspar size distributions are kinked, with a shallow-sloped log-linear section describing large crystals (> 140 {micro}m) and a steep-sloped log-linear section describing small crystals (< 140 {micro}m). We interpret these two crystal populations as resulting from a shift in crystallization regime. We suggest that the shallow-sloped section describes a pre-eruptive quartz + feldspar growth-dominated regime, whereas the steep

  12. Hybrids, pure cultures, and pure lines: from nineteenth-century biology to twentieth-century genetics.

    PubMed

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2007-12-01

    Prompted by recent recognitions of the omnipresence of horizontal gene transfer among microbial species and the associated emphasis on exchange, rather than isolation, as the driving force of evolution, this essay will reflect on hybridization as one of the central concerns of nineteenth-century biology. I will argue that an emphasis on horizontal exchange was already endorsed by 'biology' when it came into being around 1800 and was brought to full fruition with the emergence of genetics in 1900. The true revolution in nineteenth-century life sciences, I maintain, consisted in a fundamental shift in ontology, which eroded the boundaries between individual and species, and allowed biologists to move up and down the scale of organic complexity. Life became a property extending both 'downwards', to the parts that organisms were composed of, as well as 'upwards', to the collective entities constituted by the relations of exchange and interaction that organisms engage in to reproduce. This mode of thinking was crystallized by Gregor Mendel and consolidated in the late nineteenth-century conjunction of biochemistry, microbiology and breeding in agro-industrial settings. This conjunction and its implications are especially exemplified by Wilhelm Johannsen's and Martinus Beijerinck's work on pure lines and cultures. An understanding of the subsequent constraints imposed by the evolutionary synthesis of the twentieth century on models of genetic systems may require us to rethink the history of biology and displace Darwin's theory of natural selection from that history's centre. PMID:18053934

  13. Distinctive arsenic(V) trapping modes by magnetite nanoparticles induced by different sorption processes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuheng; Morin, Guillaume; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Juillot, Farid; Calas, Georges; Brown, Gordon E

    2011-09-01

    Arsenic sorption onto iron oxide spinels such as magnetite may contribute to arsenic immobilization at redox fronts in soils, sediments, and aquifers, as well as in putative remediation and water treatment technologies. We have investigated As(V) speciation resulting from different sorption processes on magnetite nanoparticles, including both adsorption and precipitation, using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XAFS results suggest that AsO(4) tetrahedra form predominantly inner-sphere bidentate corner-sharing ((2)C) complexes and outer-sphere complexes on magnetite in the adsorption experiments. In the precipitation experiments, an increasing fraction of AsO(4) tetrahedra appears to be incorporated in clusters having a magnetite-like local structure with increasing As loading, the remaining fraction of As being adsorbed at the surface of magnetite particles. In the sample with the highest As loading (15.7 μmol/m(2)) XAFS data indicate that As(V) is fully incorporated in such clusters. Such processes help to explain the significantly higher arsenic uptake in precipitation samples compared to those generated in adsorption experiments. In addition, for the precipitation samples, TEM observations indicate the formation of amorphous coatings and small (~3 nm) nanoparticles associated with larger (~20-40 nm) magnetite nanoparticles, which are absent in the adsorption samples. These results suggest that As(V) could form complexes at the surfaces of the small nanoparticles and could be progressively incorporated in their structure with increasing As loading. These results provide some of the fundamental knowledge about As(V)-magnetite interactions that is essential for developing effective water treatment technologies for arsenic.

  14. Trichloroethylene degradation by persulphate with magnetite as a heterogeneous activator in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Xiaoxin; Gu, Xiaogang; Lu, Shuguang; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide-magnetite (Fe3O4) as a heterogeneous activator to activate persulphate anions (S2O8(2-)) for trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation was investigated in this study. The experimental results showed that TCE could be completely oxidized within 5 h by using 5 g L(-1) magnetite and 63 mM S2O8(2-), indicating the effectiveness of the process for TCE removal. Various factors of the process, including. (S2O8(2-) and magnetite dosages, and initial solution pH, were evaluated, and TCE degradation fitted well to the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The calculated kinetic rate constant was increased with increasing S2O8(2-) and magnetite dosages, but it was independent of solution pH. In addition, the changes of magnetite morphology examined by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction, respectively, confirmed the slight corrosion with α-Fe2O3 coated on the magnetite surface. The probe compounds tests clearly identified the generation of the reactive oxygen species in the system. While the free radical quenching studies further demonstrated that •SO4- and •OH were the major radicals responsible for TCE degradation, whereas •O2- contributed less in the system, and therefore the roles of reactive oxygen species on TCE degradation mechanisms were proposed accordingly. To our best knowledge, this is the first time the performance and mechanism of magnetite-activated persulphate oxidation for TCE degradation are reported. The findings of this study provided a new insight into the heterogeneous catalysis mechanism and showed a great potential for the practical application of this technique in in situ TCE-contaminated groundwater remediation.

  15. Method of preparing pure fluorine gas

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, Larned B.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for purifying and storing pure fluorine is described. The method utilizes alkali metal-nickel fluorides to absorb tank fluorine by forming nickel complex salts and leaving the gaseous impurities which are pumped away. The complex nickel fluoride is then heated to evolve back pure gaseous fluorine.

  16. Crystal Creations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whipple, Nona; Whitmore, Sherry

    1989-01-01

    Presents a many-faceted learning approach to the study of crystals. Provides instructions for performing activities including crystal growth and patterns, creating miniature simulations of crystal-containing rock formations, charcoal and sponge gardens, and snowflakes. (RT)

  17. Removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions by the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Liu, Dong; Fan, Mingde; Yang, Dan; Zhu, Runliang; Ge, Fei; Zhu, JianXi; He, Hongping

    2010-01-15

    Diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol methods, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the unsupported and supported magnetite nanoparticles are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the pores of diatom shells, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the unsupported ones. The uptake of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] on the synthesized magnetite nanoparticles was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium [Cr(III)]. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite fit well with the Langmuir isotherm equation. The supported magnetite showed a better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite than unsupported magnetite, and was more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These results indicate that the diatomite-supported/unsupported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  18. Montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles for the removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Peng; Fan, Mingde; Yang, Dan; He, Hongping; Liu, Dong; Yuan, Aihua; Zhu, JianXi; Chen, TianHu

    2009-07-30

    Montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation and hydrosol method. The obtained materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption, elemental analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The average sizes of the magnetite nanoparticles without and with montmorillonite support are around 25 and 15 nm, respectively. The montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles exist on the surface or inside the interparticle pores of clays, with better dispersing and less coaggregation than the ones without montmorillonite support. Batch tests were carried out to investigate the removal mechanism of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] by these synthesized magnetite nanoparticles. The Cr(VI) uptake was mainly governed by a physico-chemical process, which included an electrostatic attraction followed by a redox process in which Cr(VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The adsorption of Cr(VI) was highly pH-dependent and the kinetics of the adsorption followed the Pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption data of unsupported and clay-supported magnetite nanoparticles fit well with the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations. The montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles showed a much better adsorption capacity per unit mass of magnetite (15.3mg/g) than unsupported magnetite (10.6 mg/g), and were more thermally stable than their unsupported counterparts. These fundamental results demonstrate that the montmorillonite-supported magnetite nanoparticles are readily prepared, enabling promising applications for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution.

  19. One-step continuous synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoflowers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, G.; Demoisson, F.; Chassagnon, R.; Popova, E.; Millot, N.

    2016-04-01

    For the first time, functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (Fe3O4 NPs) that form aggregates with a nanoflower morphology were synthesized using a rapid (11 s) one-step continuous hydrothermal process, which was recently modified, and their application as a T 2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent was evaluated. The nanoparticles functionalized with 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (LDOPA) or 3,4-dihydroxyhydrocinnamic acid (DHCA) consisted of small crystallites of approximately 15 nm of diameter that assembled to form flower-shaped aggregate structures. The Fe3O4-LDOPA nanoflowers exhibited a high transverse relaxivity, r 2 of 418 ± 10 l mmolFe -1 s-1 at 3 T owing to magnetic dipolar interactions, which is twice as that of the commercial Feridex®/Endorem®. The prepared nanostructures were compared with bare Fe3O4 NPs and citrated Fe3O4 NPs. DHCA, LDOPA, and citric acid (CA) were found to have an anti-oxidizing effect and to influence the crystallite size and the lattice parameter of the NPs. DHCA and LDOPA increased the crystallite size, whereas CA decreased it. Surface modification increased the colloidal stability of NPs as compared to bare NPs. Nanoflower suspensions of Fe3O4-LDOPA NPs were found to be stable in the phosphate-buffered saline, saline medium, and minimal essential medium and formed aggregates of sizes smaller than 120 nm. All samples were found to be superparamagnetic in nature and the highest saturation magnetization was obtained for the Fe3O4-LDOPA samples. These NPs can bind to polymers such as PEG, and to fluorescent and chelating agents owing to the presence of free -NH2 or -COOH groups on the surface of NPs, allowing their use in dual imaging applications.

  20. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan; Khapli, Sachin D.; Kumar, Sunil

    2015-03-01

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05-0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.