Science.gov

Sample records for pure titanium welds

  1. Tensile and flexural strength of commercially pure titanium submitted to laser and tungsten inert gas welds.

    PubMed

    Atoui, Juliana Abdallah; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Orsi, Iara Augusta; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile and flexural strength of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds in specimens made of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) compared with laser welds. Sixty cylindrical specimens (2 mm diameter x 55 mm thick) were randomly assigned to 3 groups for each test (n=10): no welding (control), TIG welding (10 V, 36 A, 8 s) and Nd:YAG laser welding (380 V, 8 ms). The specimens were radiographed and subjected to tensile and flexural strength tests at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min using a load cell of 500 kgf applied on the welded interface or at the middle point of the non-welded specimens. Tensile strength data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test, and flexural strength data by the Kruskal-Wallis test (α=0.05). Non-welded specimens presented significantly higher tensile strength (control=605.84 ± 19.83) (p=0.015) and flexural strength (control=1908.75) (p=0.000) than TIG- and laser-welded ones. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the welding types for neither the tensile strength test (TIG=514.90 ± 37.76; laser=515.85 ± 62.07) nor the flexural strength test (TIG=1559.66; laser=1621.64). As far as tensile and flexural strengths are concerned, TIG was similar to laser and could be suitable to replace laser welding in implant-supported rehabilitations.

  2. Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.; Nakata, K.; Zhang, J.X.; Yamamoto, N.; Liao, J.

    2012-03-15

    Microstructural evolution of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium was studied by means of electron backscattering diffraction. The microstructural evolution is strongly affected by the {beta} {yields} {alpha} transformation mechanism dependent on the cooling rate during phase transformation. The long-range diffusional transformation mainly occurs in the fusion zone at the low cooling rate, and the massive transformation dominantly takes place at the high cooling rate. For this reason, the grain morphologies probably change from the granular-like to columnar-like grains with the cooling rate increasing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures of fusion zone in laser beam welds of pure titanium are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing cooling rate changes grain morphology from granular to columnar one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Final microstructures depend on the {beta}{yields}{alpha} transformation mechanisms.

  3. Effect of Heat Input on Microstructural Changes and Corrosion Behavior of Commercially Pure Titanium Welds in Nitric Acid Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Shankar, A.; Gopalakrishnan, G.; Balusamy, V.; Kamachi Mudali, U.

    2009-11-01

    Commercially pure titanium (Ti) has been selected for the fabrication of dissolver for the proposed fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant at Kalpakkam, India. In the present investigation, microstructural changes and corrosion behavior of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welds of Ti grade-1 and grade-2 with different heat inputs were carried out. A wider heat affected zone was observed with higher heat inputs and coarse grains were observed from base metal toward the weld zone with increasing heat input. Fine and more equiaxed prior β grains were observed at lower heat input and the grain size increased toward fusion zone. The results indicated that Ti grade-1 and grade-2 with different heat inputs and different microstructures were insensitive to corrosion in liquid, vapor, and condensate phases of 11.5 M nitric acid tested up to 240 h. The corrosion rate in boiling liquid phase (0.60-0.76 mm/year) was higher than that in vapor (0.012-0.039 mm/year) and condensate phases (0.04-0.12 mm/year) of nitric acid for Ti grade-1 and grade-2, as well as for base metal for all heat inputs. Potentiodynamic polarization experiment carried out at room temperature indicated higher current densities and better passivation in 11.5 M nitric acid. SEM examination of Ti grade-1 welds for all heat inputs exposed to liquid phase after 240 h showed corrosion attack on the surface, exposing Widmanstatten microstructure containing acicular alpha. The continuous dissolution of the liquid-exposed samples was attributed to the heterogeneous microstructure and non-protective passive film formation.

  4. Sorting Titanium Welding Rods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, W. D., Jr.; Brown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of titanium welding wires identified by their resistance to current flow. Welding-wire tester quickly identifies unknown titaniumalloy wire by touching wire with test probe, and comparing meter response with standard response. Before touching wire, tip of test probe dipped into an electrolyte.

  5. In-situ spatially resolved x-ray diffraction mapping of the alpha to beta to alpha transformation in commercially pure titanium arc welds

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J. W., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) is used to map the {alpha}{r_arrow}{beta}{r_arrow}{alpha} phase transformation in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of commercially pure titanium gas tungsten arc welds. In-situ SRXRD experiments were conducted on arc welds using a 200 pm diameter x-ray beam at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). A map was created which identifies six HAZ microstructural regions that exist between the liquid weld pool and the base metal during welding. The first region is single phase {beta}-Ti that forms in a 2- to 3-mm band adjacent to the liquid weld pool. The second region is back transformed {alpha}-Ti that forms behind the portion of the HAZ where {beta}-Ti was once present at higher temperatures. The third region is completely recrystallized {alpha}-Ti that forms in a 2- to 3-mm band surrounding the single phase {beta}-Ti region. Recrystallized {alpha}-Ti was observed by itself and also with varying amounts of {beta}-Ti. The fourth region of the weld is the partially transformed zone where {alpha}-Ti and {beta}-Ti coexist during welding. The fifth region is directly behind the partially transformed zone and consists of a mixture of recrystallized and back transformed {alpha}-Ti The sixth region is farthest from the weld pool and consists of {alpha}-Ti that is undergoing annealing and recrystallization. Annealing of the base metal was observed to some degree in all of the SRXRD patterns, showing that annealing exceeded 13 mm from the centerline of the weld. Although the microstructure consisted predominantly of {alpha}-Ti, both prior to the weld and after the weld, the (002) texture of the starting material was altered during welding to produce a predominantly (101) texture within the resulting HAZ.

  6. Weld-bonded titanium structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Creedon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Structurally stronger titanium articles are produced by a weld-bonding technique comprising fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spotwelding and curing an adhesive interspersed between the spot-weld nuggets. This weld-bonding may be employed to form lap joints or to stiffen titanium metal plates.

  7. An Evaluation of Former Soviet Union Welding Processes on Commercially Pure Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    wire from Reference 8 is given as 40% to 50% CaF2, 18% to 20% LaF3 or CeF3, 5% to 10% BaF 2, and SrF2 (remainder). No information was available about...of under -fill was observed along the fusion line on each side of the weld metal on Plate A; no under -fill was observed on Plates B and C...and Casting Inspection and Repair for Machinery, Piping, and Pressure Vessels," NAVSEA Technical Publication S9074-AR-GIB-010/278, Washington, DC

  8. Thermal Stir Welds in Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonda, Richard W.; Knipling, Keith E.; Pilchak, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Although conventional friction stir welding (FSW) has proven unsuccessful in joining thick sections of alpha and near-alpha titanium alloys, thermal stir welding, a variant of the FSW process in which an external heat source is used to preheat the workpiece, is demonstrated to be able to reliably join 12.3-mm-thick plates of CP titanium. This paper describes the microstructures and textures that develop in these thermal stir welds. The observed microstructure was used to reconstruct the high-temperature microstructure and texture present during the welding process and therefore reveal the genesis of the welding structures.

  9. Welded Permanent Fittings for Titanium Hydraulic Tubing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FITTINGS, *HYDRAULIC EQUIPMENT, RIVETED JOINTS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, PIPES , JET TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT, COLD WORKING, PRESSURE, RUPTURE, ARC WELDING , INERT...GAS WELDING , RADIOGRAPHY, STRESS RELIEVING, SUPERSONIC AIRCRAFT, COMMERCIAL AIRCRAFT.

  10. Temporarily alloying titanium to facilitate friction stir welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri

    2009-05-01

    While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

  11. Weld-brazing of titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spotwelding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and align the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing; it contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vacuum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  12. Customized orbital welding meets the challenge of titanium welding

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    Titanium has emerged as the material of choice for tubing used in surface condensers around the world in both new and retrofit configurations. A major worldwide supplier of steam surface condensers to the electric utility industry, Senior Engineering is finding an increased use of titanium tubes and tube sheets in condenser specifications. When compared to other alloys, titanium`s light weight is efficient in design, handling, transportation and installation activities. Additionally, it maintains a stable price structure. Senior Engineering implements an orbital welding process using fusion gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) for its titanium tube-to-tube sheet welding. Orbital welding involves the use of a welding apparatus placed inside a tube or pipe to automatically and precisely weld a 360-deg joint. When welding manually, a welder stops several times during the weld due to the large amount of time and fatigue involved in achieving 360-deg welds, which results in lack of fusion. An automated orbital welding system, however, can accomplish the task as one continuous weld. This reduces process time and decreases lack of fusion. The orbital welding systems, featuring a microprocessor-based controller, an inverter-based power supply, an expandable mandrel and a customized torch shroud, reduced welding labor by 35%. The improved labor efficiency justified the addition of two more of the systems in January 1996.

  13. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutina, Yu. N. Bataev, A. A. Shevtsova, L. I.; Mali, V. I. Anisimov, A. G.

    2015-10-27

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  14. Yttria Nanoparticle Reinforced Commercially Pure (CP) Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    nanoparticles as well as titanium boride (TiB) reinforcements were produced through gas atomization. After consolidation and extrusion, room temperature...pure FE iron O oxygen Ti titanium TiB titanium boride TYS tensile yield strength UTS ultimate tensile strength wt% weight percent Y2O3

  15. Weld bonding of titanium with polyimide adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Orell, M. K.

    1975-01-01

    A conductive adhesive primer and a capillary flow adhesive were developed for weld bonding titanium alloy joints. Both formulations contained ingredients considered to be non-carcinogenic. Lap-shear joint test specimens and stringer-stiffened panels were weld bonded using a capillary flow process to apply the adhesive. Static property information was generated for weld bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F). The capillary flow process was demonstrated to produce weld bonded joints of equal strength to the weld through weld bonding process developed previously.

  16. Welding of gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smashey, Russell W. (Inventor); Kelly, Thomas J. (Inventor); Snyder, John H. (Inventor); Sheranko, Ronald L. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    An article made of a gamma titanium aluminide alloy is welded, as for example in the weld repair of surface cracks, by removing foreign matter from the area to be welded, first stress relieving the article, cooling the entire article to a welding temperature of from about 1000.degree. F. to about 1400.degree. F., welding a preselected region in an inert atmosphere at the welding temperature, and second stress relieving the article. Welding is preferably accomplished by striking an arc in the preselected region so as to locally melt the alloy in the preselected region, providing a filler metal having the same composition as the gamma titanium aluminide alloy of the article, and feeding the filler metal into the arc so that the filler metal is melted and fused with the article to form a weldment upon solidification.

  17. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  18. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  19. Metallurgy and deformation of electron beam welded similar titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasang, T.; Sabol, J. C.; Misiolek, W. Z.; Mitchell, R.; Short, A. B.; Littlefair, G.

    2012-04-01

    Butt welded joins were produced between commercially pure titanium and various titanium alloys using an electron beam welding technique. The materials used represent commercially pure grade, α-β alloy and β alloy. They were CP Ti, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr (Ti5553), respectively. Grains were largest in the FZs of the different weldments, decreasing in size towards the heat affected zones (HAZs) and base metals. Hardness measurements taken across the traverse cross-sections of the weldments were constant from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal for CP Ti/CP Ti and Ti64/Ti64 welds, while the FZ of Ti5553/Ti5553 had a lower hardness compared with the base metal. During tensile testing the CP Ti/CP Ti weldments fractured at the base metal, whereas both the Ti64/Ti64 and Ti5553/Ti5553 broke at the weld zones. Fracture surface analysis suggested microvoid coalescence as the failure mechanism. The compositional analysis showed a relatively uniform distribution of solute elements from base metal-to-weld-to-base metal. CP Ti has always been known for its excellent weldability, Ti64 has good weldability and, preliminary results indicated that Ti5553 alloy is also weldable.

  20. Formation of vortices during explosion welding (titanium-orthorhombic titanium aluminide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Greenberg, B. A.; Antonova, O. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Patselov, A. M.; Sidorov, I. I.

    2009-10-01

    The possibility of cladding commercially pure titanium by a plate of orthorhombic titanium aluminide has been investigated. The bimetallic joints of orthorhombic titanium aluminide (Ti-30Al-16Nb-1Zr-1Mo) with commercially pure titanium have been obtained by explosion welding. It has been found that the weld joint investigated had a multilayer structure consisting of a zone of continuous deformation observed in both materials, a zone of titanium recrystallization, and a transition zone near the interface. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones have been observed. It has been found that upon explosion welding the bonding of the surfaces is effected via melting and subsequent mixing (in the zone of vortices) and the transfer of particles of one metal into another with the formation of particle tracks (outside the zone of vortices). A possible scenario of the formation of the vortex zone in the melt with a subsequent eutectic decomposition is proposed. The structure of the vortex zones was found to consist of an ultrafine mixture of α and β grains (both phases are disordered) with the grain size changing in the limits of 50-300 nm. The regions of transition from the vortex zone to the region of continuous deformation of the aluminide and to the recrystallized zone of titanium have been investigated.

  1. Laser-TIG Welding of Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turichin, G.; Tsibulsky, I.; Somonov, V.; Kuznetsov, M.; Akhmetov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the results of investigation the technological opportunity of laser-TIG welding of titanium alloys. The experimental stand for implementation of process with the capability to feed a filler wire was made. The research of the nature of transfer the filler wire into the welding pool has been demonstrated. The influence of distance between the electrode and the surface of the welded plates on the stability of the arc was shown. The relationship between welding velocity, the position of focal plane of the laser beam and the stability of penetration of plates was determined.

  2. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: I. Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Antonova, O. V.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2011-10-01

    The structures of the interfaces and transition zones of bimetallic metal-intermetallide joints produced by explosion welding under various conditions have been studied. The welded materials were commercial-purity titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide of two alloying schemes. The specific features of the structure and substructure of the zones under study are discussed. Wave formation and formation of isolated vortex zones, as well as tracks of particles related to the transfer of particles of one metal into the other one, were observed. A possible scenario of formation of interfaces, depending on the composition of titanium aluminide and welding conditions, is proposed.

  3. Electron Beam Welding to Join Gamma Titanium Aluminide Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Thomas Joseph (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method is provided for welding two gamma titanium aluminide articles together. The method includes preheating the two articles to a welding temperature of from about 1700 F to about 2100 F, thereafter electron beam welding the two articles together at the welding temperature and in a welding vacuum to form a welded structure, and thereafter annealing the welded structure at an annealing temperature of from about 1800 F to about 2200 F, to form a joined structure.

  4. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder Metallurgy Produced Titanium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Muth, Thomas R; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Frederick, David Alan; Contescu, Cristian I; Chen, Wei; Lim, Yong Chae; Peter, William H; Feng, Zhili

    2013-01-01

    ORNL undertook an investigation using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate, to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal / minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders, are critical to achieve equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  5. Microstructural characterization and hardness properties of electric resistance welding titanium joints for dental applications.

    PubMed

    Ceschini, Lorella; Boromei, Iuri; Morri, Alessandro; Nardi, Diego; Sighinolfi, Gianluca; Degidi, Marco

    2015-06-01

    The electric resistance welding procedure is used to join a titanium bar with specific implant abutments in order to produce a framework directly in the oral cavity of the patient. This investigation studied the effects of the welding process on microstructure and hardness properties of commercially pure (CP2 and CP4) Ti components. Different welding powers and cooling procedures were applied to bars and abutments, normally used to produce the framework, in order to simulate the clinical intraoral welding procedure. The analyses highlighted that the joining process did not induce appreciable changes in the geometry of the abutments. However, because of unavoidable microstructural modifications in the welded zones, the hardness decreased to values lower than those of the unwelded CP2 and CP4 Ti grades, irrespective of the welding environments and parameters.

  6. Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum and Titanium Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    What is this? Jata/US Air Force Typical FSW Tools W-Re tool in collet- style tool holder. Used for welding steels and Ti alloys 3-piece self...Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum and Titanium alloys NATO Advanced Research Workshop Metallic Materials with High Structural Efficiency Kyiv...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 18 MAR 2004 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum

  7. CO2 laser welding of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nanri, Kenzo; Ootani, Masanori; Seto, Sachio; Arai, Mikiya; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-02-01

    Titanium aluminide intermetallic compound is studied to find out good welding conditions using CO2 laser irradiation. In the experiment, we used the casting titanium aluminide containing iron, vanadium and boron with a thickness of 2 mm. We carried out bead-on-plate laser welding at various initial temperatures of specimens varied from room temperature to 873 [K] in inert gas environment filled with argon. We measured fused depth, bead width and Vickers hardness. As a result of experiments, welding speeds that allow full bead-on- plate welding to be possible were strongly by dependent on the initial temperature, 3000 [mm/min], initial temperature 873 [K], 2600 [mm/mm], initial temperature 673 [K], and 2000 [mm/min] with 300 [K]. Transverse crack-free welding was achieved, when initial temperature was at 873 [K].

  8. Disk Laser Weld Brazing of AW5083 Aluminum Alloy with Titanium Grade 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahul, Miroslav; Sahul, Martin; Vyskoč, Maroš; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Pašák, Matej

    2017-03-01

    Disk laser weld brazing of dissimilar metals was carried out. Aluminum alloy 5083 and commercially pure titanium Grade 2 with the thickness of 2.0 mm were used as experimental materials. Butt weld brazed joints were produced under different welding parameters. The 5087 aluminum alloy filler wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm was used for joining dissimilar metals. The elimination of weld metal cracking was attained by offsetting the laser beam. When the offset was 0 mm, the intermixing of both metals was too high, thus producing higher amount of intermetallic compounds (IMCs). Higher amount of IMCs resulted in poorer mechanical properties of produced joints. Grain refinement in the fusion zone occurred especially due to the high cooling rates during laser beam joining. Reactions at the interface varied in the dependence of its location. Continuous thin IMC layer was observed directly at the titanium-weld metal interface. Microhardness of an IMC island in the weld metal reached up to 452.2 HV0.1. The XRD analysis confirmed the presence of tetragonal Al3Ti intermetallic compound. The highest tensile strength was recorded in the case when the laser beam offset of 300 μm from the joint centerline toward aluminum alloy was utilized.

  9. Causal Factors of Weld Porosity in Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Powder-Metallurgy-Produced Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, T. R.; Yamamoto, Y.; Frederick, D. A.; Contescu, C. I.; Chen, W.; Lim, Y. C.; Peter, W. H.; Feng, Z.

    2013-05-01

    An investigation was undertaken using gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding on consolidated powder metallurgy (PM) titanium (Ti) plate to identify the causal factors behind observed porosity in fusion welding. Tramp element compounds of sodium and magnesium, residual from the metallothermic reduction of titanium chloride used to produce the titanium, were remnant in the starting powder and were identified as gas-forming species. PM-titanium made from revert scrap, where sodium and magnesium were absent, showed fusion weld porosity, although to a lesser degree. We show that porosity was attributable to hydrogen from adsorbed water on the surface of the powders prior to consolidation. The removal and minimization of both adsorbed water on the surface of titanium powder and the residues from the reduction process prior to consolidation of titanium powders are critical for achieving equivalent fusion welding success similar to that seen in wrought titanium produced via the Kroll process.

  10. Structure of the welding zone between titanium and orthorhombic titanium aluminide for explosion welding: II. Local melting zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Antonova, O. V.; Inozemtsev, A. V.

    2011-10-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the local melting zones that form during explosion welding of orthorhombic titanium aluminide with commercial-purity titanium near a wavy interface between them are studied. The Rayleigh number is estimated to propose a possible mechanism for the formation of a concentric structure in these zones. Titanium aluminide fragments are detected near the zone boundaries. It is assumed that the fragmentation in the transition zone is caused by the division of a material into loosely coupled microvolumes under the action of a strong external action in a time comparable with the explosion time. Outside the transition zone, fragmentation occurs via a traditional way beginning from dislocation accumulation. Both processes occur in titanium aluminide and only one process (banded structure formation) takes place in titanium.

  11. Inverse Thermal Analysis of Titanium GTA Welds Using Multiple Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Shabaev, A.; Huang, L.

    2015-06-01

    Inverse thermal analysis of titanium gas-tungsten-arc welds using multiple constraint conditions is presented. This analysis employs a methodology that is in terms of numerical-analytical basis functions for inverse thermal analysis of steady-state energy deposition in plate structures. The results of this type of analysis provide parametric representations of weld temperature histories that can be adopted as input data to various types of computational procedures, such as those for prediction of solid-state phase transformations. In addition, these temperature histories can be used to construct parametric function representations for inverse thermal analysis of welds corresponding to other process parameters or welding processes whose process conditions are within similar regimes. The present study applies an inverse thermal analysis procedure that provides for the inclusion of constraint conditions associated with both solidification and phase transformation boundaries.

  12. Tribological evaluation of diamond coating on pure titanium in comparison with plasma nitrided titanium and uncoated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, B.; Loh, N.L.; Fu, Y.; Sun, C.Q.; Hing, P.

    1999-12-01

    Titanium alloys are characterized by poor tribological properties, and the traditional use of titanium alloys has been restricted to nontribological applications. The deposition of a well adherent diamond coating is a promising way to solve this problem. In this study, the tribological properties of diamond-coated titanium were studied using a pin-on-disk tribometer, and the results were compared with those of pure titanium and plasma nitrided titanium. The tribological behavior of pure titanium was characterized by high coefficient of friction and rapid wear of materials. Plasma nitriding improved the wear resistance only under low normal load; however, this hardened layer was not efficient in improving the wear resistance and the friction properties under high normal load. Diamond coating on pure titanium improved the wear resistance of titanium significantly. Surface profilometry measurement indicated that little or no wear of the diamond coating occurred under the test conditions loads. The roughness of the diamond coating was critical because it controlled the amount of abrasive damage on the counterface. Reducing the surface roughness by polishing led to the reductions in both the friction and wear of the counterface.

  13. Weld-brazing of titanium. [resistance spot welding combined with brazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A joining process, designated weld-brazing, which combines resistance spot-welding and brazing has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center. Resistance spot-welding is employed to position and aline the parts and to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing and contributes to the integrity of the joint. Brazing enhances the properties of the joint and reduces the stress concentrations normally associated with spotwelds. Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints have been fabricated using 3003 aluminum braze both in a vaccum furnace and in a retort containing an inert gas environment.

  14. Laser welding technique for titanium alloy sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbi, S.L.; Zhang, L.; Norris, J.; Zolotovsky, S.; Richter, K.H.

    1994-12-31

    In order to achieve reliable welds with minimal distortion for the fabrication of aerospace industrial components, several techniques were carried out on Ti6Al4V and Ti6Al2Sn4Zr2Mo sheets of 1.6 mm and 2 mm thickness using a CO{sub 2} and a Nd-YAG laser. Test 1: A satisfactory weld can be obtained by using a CO{sub 2} CW laser with a filler wire. Test 2: Before laser welding the edges were shaped with a special relief defined incorporated filler, which allows it to avoid the classical filler wire. Test 3: A cosmetic butt weld without filler, obtained by defocusing the CO{sub 2} CW laser beam, enables it to eliminate the undercut and result in a smooth surface. Test 4: High power pulsed Nd-YAG laser equipped with fiber optics and f5{prime} focus lens was employed, which produces the autogenous butt welds with full penetration and regular bead profile. The undercut and slump could be controlled by pulse energy, pulse duration, frequency, waveform and overlapping rate.

  15. Weld-brazing - a new joining process. [combination resistance spot welding and brazing of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bales, T. T.; Royster, D. M.; Arnold, W. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A joining process designated weld brazing which combines resistance spot welding and brazing has been developed. Resistance spot welding is used to position and align the parts as well as to establish a suitable faying surface gap for brazing. Fabrication is then completed by capillary flow of the braze alloy into the joint. The process has been used successfully to fabricate Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joints using 3003 aluminum braze alloy. Test results obtained on single overlap and hat-stiffened structural specimens show that weld brazed joints are superior in tensile shear, stress rupture, fatigue, and buckling than joint fabricated by spotwelding or brazing. Another attractive feature of the process is that the brazed joints is hermetically sealed by the braze material.

  16. On the Hydrogen Embrittlement of Commercially Pure Alpha Titanium: An Example from the Petrochemical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawancy, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Grade 2 of commercially pure Ti consisting of α-phase has many applications in the petrochemical industry such as floaters of gauges used to indicate liquid levels in tanks and reaction vessels. A floater fabricated by welding of 3.5-mm-thick sheet of grade 2 Ti into a thick-walled cylinder to indicate the level of a liquid mixture of isobutane, neobutane and neopentane in a petrochemical plant has lost its structural integrity by puncturing, cracking and blistering particularly at the section in contact with the liquid. The damage has been most severe in the base metal adjacent to the weld. Detailed microstructural characterization of the damaged floater and unwelded section of the same material has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and the results have been complemented by stress analysis and microhardness measurements. It is shown that the mechanical strength of the floater has been degraded by a combination of excessive absorption of hydrogen during welding and rapid cooling from the β-phase field aided by the stresses generated by the liquid pressure. Absorption of hydrogen and rapid cooling are found to alter the desirable morphology of equiaxed grains of α-phase into a multi-phase structure with fine platelet-type morphology. The base metal adjacent to the weld is found to contain the brittle δ-phase of titanium hydride in a low-ductility matrix of α-Ti with some β-Ti. However, β-Ti is found to be the predominant constituent of the weld.

  17. On the Hydrogen Embrittlement of Commercially Pure Alpha Titanium: An Example from the Petrochemical Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawancy, H. M.

    2017-02-01

    Grade 2 of commercially pure Ti consisting of α-phase has many applications in the petrochemical industry such as floaters of gauges used to indicate liquid levels in tanks and reaction vessels. A floater fabricated by welding of 3.5-mm-thick sheet of grade 2 Ti into a thick-walled cylinder to indicate the level of a liquid mixture of isobutane, neobutane and neopentane in a petrochemical plant has lost its structural integrity by puncturing, cracking and blistering particularly at the section in contact with the liquid. The damage has been most severe in the base metal adjacent to the weld. Detailed microstructural characterization of the damaged floater and unwelded section of the same material has been carried out using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, and the results have been complemented by stress analysis and microhardness measurements. It is shown that the mechanical strength of the floater has been degraded by a combination of excessive absorption of hydrogen during welding and rapid cooling from the β-phase field aided by the stresses generated by the liquid pressure. Absorption of hydrogen and rapid cooling are found to alter the desirable morphology of equiaxed grains of α-phase into a multi-phase structure with fine platelet-type morphology. The base metal adjacent to the weld is found to contain the brittle δ-phase of titanium hydride in a low-ductility matrix of α-Ti with some β-Ti. However, β-Ti is found to be the predominant constituent of the weld.

  18. Effect of casting methods on castability of pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, J; Zhang, J Z; Okazaki, M

    1993-12-01

    Two types of patterns were tested for castability: 1) polyester mesh pattern (20mm x 22mm with 100 open squares) and 2) 20mm x 20mm wax plates 1.0 and 1.5 mm in thickness. These materials were invested using a pre-arranged commercial phosphate-bonded investment for titanium. Three different types of casting machines were selected: 1) a pressure-type casting machine with separate melting and casting chambers, 2) a pressure-type casting machine with one chamber and 3) a centrifugal-type casting machine at 3000 rpm. Pure titanium (> 99.5%) was cast into the molds at a mold temperature of 100 degrees C. The castability of mesh pattern was evaluated in terms of the number of cast segment, and the cast plate was evaluated using X-ray transparent images by a digital imaging technique. The centrifugal casting method showed the best castability among these three casting methods.

  19. FLUXES FOR MECHANIZED ELECTRIC WELDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING FLUXES, WELDING ), (* WELDING , WELDING FLUXES), ARC WELDING , WELDS, STABILITY, POROSITY, WELDING RODS, STEEL, CERAMIC MATERIALS, FLUXES(FUSION), TITANIUM ALLOYS, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COPPER ALLOYS, ELECTRODEPOSITION

  20. Joining characteristics of titanium-based orthodontic wires connected by laser and electrical welding methods.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Junko; Watanabe, Ikuya; Nakao, Noriko; Watanabe, Etsuko; Elshahawy, Waleed; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the possibility of electrical and laser welding to connect titanium-based alloy (beta-titanium and nickel-titanium) wires and stainless-steel or cobalt-chromium alloy wires for fabrication of combination arch-wires. Four kinds of straight orthodontic rectangular wires (0.017 × 0.025 inch) were used: stainless-steel (S-S), cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr), beta-titanium alloy (β-Ti), and nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti). Homogeneous and heterogeneous end-to-end joints (15 mm long each) were made by electrical welding and laser welding. Non-welded wires (30 mm long) were also used as a control. Maximum loads at fracture (N) and elongation (%) were measured by conducting tensile test. The data (n = 10) were statistically analyzed using analysis of variance/Tukey test (P < 0.05).The S-S/S-S and Co-Cr/Co-Cr specimens showed significantly higher values of the maximum load (ML) at fracture and elongation (EL) than those of the Ni-Ti/Ni-Ti and β-Ti/β-Ti specimens for electrical welding and those of the S-S/S-S and Co-Cr/Co-Cr specimens welded by laser. On the other hand, the laser-welded Ni-Ti/Ni-Ti and β-Ti/β-Ti specimens exhibited higher values of the ML and EL compared to those of the corresponding specimens welded by electrical method. In the heterogeneously welded combinations, the electrically welded Ni-Ti/S-S, β-Ti/S-S and β-Ti/Co-Cr specimens showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher ML and EL than those of the corresponding specimens welded by laser. Electrical welding exhibited the higher values of maximum load at fracture and elongation for heterogeneously welded combinations than laser-welding.

  1. Tailoring properties of commercially pure titanium by gradation extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, Markus; Rautenstrauch, Anja; Selbmann, René; de Oliveira, Raoni Barreto; Coelho, Rodrigo Santiago; Landgrebe, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) is of great importance in medical applications due to its attractive properties, such as high biocompatibility, excellent corrosion resistance and relatively low density and suitable stiffness. Compared to the commonly used Ti-6Al-4V alloy, its lower strength has to be increased. The most attractive approach is to subject CP Ti to severe plastic deformation (SPD) processes such as Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP). The resulting decreased grain size in CP Ti yields a significant increase in hardness and strength. Common SPD-processes typically provide a uniform modification of the material. Their material efficiency and productivity are critical and limiting factors. A new approach is to tailor the material properties by using Gradation Extrusion, which produces a distinct gradient in microstructure and strength. The forming process combines a regular impact extrusion process and severe plastic deformation in the lateral area of the material. This efficient process can be integrated easily into forming process chains, for instance for dental implants. This paper presents the forming process and the applied die geometry. The results of numerical simulations are used to illustrate the potential of the process to modify and strengthen the titanium material. Experiments show that the material is successfully processed by gradation extrusion. By characterizing the hardness and its distribution within the formed parts the effects of the process are investigated.

  2. Repairing an implant titanium milled framework using laser welding technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Soni; Monaco, Edward A

    2009-04-01

    The application of laser welding technology allows titanium to be welded predictably and precisely to achieve accurate fit of a milled framework. Laser energy results in localized heat production, thereby reducing thermal expansion. Unlike soldering, laser energy can be directed to a small area, making it possible to laser weld close to acrylic resin or ceramic. This article describes the use of laser welding to repair an implant titanium milled fixed denture. A quick, cost-effective, accurate repair was accomplished, and the repaired framework possessed adequate strength and the same precise fit as the original framework.

  3. Comparative study of two commercially pure titanium casting methods

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Renata Cristina Silveira; FARIA, Adriana Claudia Lapria; ORSI, Iara Augusta; de MATTOS, Maria da Gloria Chiarello; MACEDO, Ana Paula; RIBEIRO, Ricardo Faria

    2010-01-01

    The interest in using titanium to fabricate removable partial denture (RPD) frameworks has increased, but there are few studies evaluating the effects of casting methods on clasp behavior. Objective This study compared the occurrence of porosities and the retentive force of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) and cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) removable partial denture circumferential clasps cast by induction/centrifugation and plasma/vacuum-pressure. Material and Methods 72 frameworks were cast from CP Ti (n=36) and Co-Cr alloy (n=36; control group). For each material, 18 frameworks were casted by electromagnetic induction and injected by centrifugation, whereas the other 18 were casted by plasma and injected by vacuum-pressure. For each casting method, three subgroups (n=6) were formed: 0.25 mm, 0.50 mm, and 0.75 mm undercuts. The specimens were radiographed and subjected to an insertion/removal test simulating 5 years of framework use. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's to compare materials and cast methods (α=0.05). Results Three of 18 specimens of the induction/centrifugation group and 9 of 18 specimens of plasma/vacuum-pressure cast presented porosities, but only 1 and 7 specimens, respectively, were rejected for simulation test. For Co-Cr alloy, no defects were found. Comparing the casting methods, statistically significant differences (p<0.05) were observed only for the Co-Cr alloy with 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm undercuts. Significant differences were found for the 0.25 mm and 0.75 mm undercuts dependent on the material used. For the 0.50 mm undercut, significant differences were found when the materials were induction casted. Conclusion Although both casting methods produced satisfactory CP Ti RPD frameworks, the occurrence of porosities was greater in the plasma/vacuum-pressure than in the induction/centrifugation method, the latter resulting in higher clasp rigidity, generating higher retention force values. PMID:21085805

  4. Latent Cracking of Tantalum-Titanium Welds Due to Hydrogen Embrittlement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossick-Schott, Joachim; Reiterer, Markus; Heffelfinger, Jason; Hintz, Mike; Ringle, Mike; Levina, Iryna; Gaffney, Kevin

    2013-05-01

    Establishing electrical interconnects in implantable electronic medical devices frequently requires joining of dissimilar materials. A weld between a tantalum wire and titanium sheet metal on a contact module is presented as an example for dissimilar joining. Latent, brittle cracking was observed in the proximity of the weld upon pull testing. The weld cracking occurs by the mechanism known as hydrogen stress cracking (HSC) and is due to titanium hydride formation. Diffusion facilitated hydrogen transport into the weld area. Diffusing hydrogen accumulates preferably in regions of high stress, causing latent titanium hydride formation and embrittlement of the weld. A broad array of analytical tools such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, electron backscattered diffraction, dynamic secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and nanoindentation were utilized to identify the root cause for HSC.

  5. Structure of Ti-6Al-4V nanostructured titanium alloy joint obtained by resistance spot welding

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenov, V. A.; Kurgan, K. A.; Chumaevskii, A. V.; Gnyusov, S. F.

    2016-01-15

    The structure of weld joints of the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V in the initial ultrafine-grained state, obtained by resistance spot welding, is studied using the optical and scanning electron microscopy method and the X-ray structure analysis. The carried out studies show the relationship of the metal structure in the weld zone with main joint zones. The structure in the core zone and the heat affected zone is represented by finely dispersed grains of needle-shaped martensite, differently oriented in these zones. The change in the microhardness in the longitudinal section of the weld joint clearly correlates with structural changes during welding.

  6. Evaluation of Superplastic Forming and Weld-brazing for Fabrication of Titanium Compression Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Bales, T. T.; Davis, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The two titanium processing procedures, superplastic forming and weld brazing, are successfully combined to fabricate titanium skin stiffened structural panels. Stiffeners with complex shapes are superplastically formed using simple tooling. These stiffeners are formed to the desired configuration and required no additional sizing or shaping following removal from the mold. The weld brazing process by which the stiffeners are attached to the skins utilize spot welds to maintain alignment and no additional tooling is required for brazing. The superplastic formed/weld brazed panels having complex shaped stiffeners develop up to 60 percent higher buckling strengths than panels with conventional shaped stiffeners. The superplastic forming/weld brazing process is successfully scaled up to fabricate full size panels having multiple stiffeners. The superplastic forming/weld brazing process is also successfully refined to show its potential for fabricating multiple stiffener compression panels employing unique stiffener configurations for improved structural efficiency.

  7. The Effect of Nitrogen and Titanium on the Toughness of High Strength Saw Weld Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-12

    for joining high strength steels . In this endeavor, ten butt-welded HY-100 sample plates were produced using the submerged arc welding process. With...was shown to degrade toughness. In this case, the DBTT increased at a rate of +11C for every 0.01 weight percent increase in titanium. Examination of...to degrade toughness through precipitation and dispersion hardening effects. It is concluded that for the welding of high strength steels , nitrogen

  8. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloying Antibacterial Silver Coating on Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Hang, Ruiqiang; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tang, Bin

    2014-03-01

    In order to endow the commercial pure titanium dental implant material with antibacterial property and aimed at avoiding the invalidation that is caused by bacterial adhesion on the surface, a silver coating was fabricated via double glow plasma surface alloying. The antibacterial property of the silver coating was assessed via in vitro estimation. The results showed that a continuous and compact coating was formed. The silver coating had absolute superiority in antibacterial property to raw commercial pure titanium. Double glow plasma surface alloying with silver on commercial pure titanium dental implant material could be considered as a potentially effective method for preventing bacterial adhesion.

  9. Double Glow Plasma Surface Alloying Antibacterial Silver Coating on Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Hang, Ruiqiang; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tang, Bin

    2014-12-01

    In order to endow the commercial pure titanium dental implant material with antibacterial property and aimed at avoiding the invalidation that is caused by bacterial adhesion on the surface, a silver coating was fabricated via double glow plasma surface alloying. The antibacterial property of the silver coating was assessed via in vitro estimation. The results showed that a continuous and compact coating was formed. The silver coating had absolute superiority in antibacterial property to raw commercial pure titanium. Double glow plasma surface alloying with silver on commercial pure titanium dental implant material could be considered as a potentially effective method for preventing bacterial adhesion.

  10. Corrosion behavior of pure titanium and titanium alloys in fluoride-containing solutions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Matsuya, S; Udoh, K

    2001-12-01

    The effects of fluoride concentrations and pH on the corrosion behavior of pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys and a new Ti alloy adding palladium, which is expected to promote a repassivation of Ti were examined by anodic polarization and corrosion potential measurements. The amount of dissolved Ti was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The surface of the specimen was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy before and after the measurement. Pure Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys were easily corroded even in a low fluoride concentration in an acidic environment. The corrosion resistance of Ti-0.2Pd alloy was greater than those of pure Ti, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys in the wide range of pH and fluoride concentrations. The high corrosion resistance of Ti-0.2Pd alloy was caused by the surface enrichment of Pd promoting a repassivation of Ti. The Ti-0.2Pd alloy is expected to be useful as a new Ti alloy with high corrosion resistance in dental use.

  11. Effect of minor chemistry elements on GTA weld fusion zone characteristics of a commercial grade titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Marya, S.K.

    1996-06-01

    Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is the most common technique employed in the fabrication of rolled thin tubes. One of the major manufacturing problems concerns the stability of weld fusion zone on materials from different casts, notwithstanding stringent monitoring of the process parameters -- current, voltage and travel speed. These parameters determine the theoretical weld heat and are expected to control the instantaneous mass of melt. According to the data compiled by Sahoo et al., oxygen is known to reduce the surface tension of most of the metals. However, investigations on the role of minor changes in concentrations of elements like sulphur, oxygen, selenium, bismuth, aluminium, and titanium in steels have very often attributed the cast to cast variations to different temperature gradients of surface tension over the weldpool. To the author`s knowledge, no reported work so far has revealed changing weld profiles in autogeneous mechanized GTA welds on titanium due to minor composition changes.

  12. Microstructure Refinement After the Addition of Titanium Particles in AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Resistance Spot Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L.; Liu, L.; Esmaeili, S.; Zhou, Y.

    2012-02-01

    Microstructural evolution of AZ31 magnesium alloy welds without and with the addition of titanium powders during resistance spot welding was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fusion zone of AZ31 magnesium alloy welds could be divided into columnar dendritic zone (CDZ) and equiaxed dendritic zone (EDZ). The well-developed CDZ in the vicinity of the fusion boundary was clearly restricted and the coarse EDZ in the central region was efficiently refined by adding titanium powders into the molten pool, compared with the as-received alloy welds. A microstructural analysis showed that these titanium particles of approximately 8 µm diameter acted as inoculants and promoted the nucleation of α-Mg grains and the formation of equiaxed dendritic grains during resistance spot welding. Tensile-shear testing was applied to evaluate the effect of titanium addition on the mechanical properties of welds. It was found that both strength and ductility of magnesium alloy welds were increased after the titanium addition. A TEM examination showed the existence of an orientation matching relationship between the added Ti particles and Mg matrix, i.e., [ {0 1bar{1}0} ]_{{Mg}} // [ { 1bar{2} 1bar{3}} ]_{{Ti}} {{and}} ( {000 2} )_{{Mg}} // ( 10bar{1}0)_{{Ti}} in some grains of Ti polycrystal particles. This local crystallographic matching could promote heterogeneous nucleation of the Mg matrix during welding. The diameter of the added Ti inoculant should be larger than 1.8 µm to make it a potent inoculant.

  13. [The role of fetus decalcified bone matrix (FDBM) in inducing pure titanium-bone implant integration].

    PubMed

    Zou, L; Zhang, D; Wang, W

    1998-05-01

    Because of its high biological compatibility, titanium has been a good biomaterial. The implanted artificial bone made from titanium can contact with the vital and mature osseous tissue directly within 3-6 months, the so-called osteointergration. In order to promote the process of osteointergration, FDBM of rabbit was prepared and was combined with pure titanium so as to speed up osteointergration. The study focused on bone density, bone intergration rate, new bone growth rate around the pure titanium, and the Ca2+ and PO(4)3- density of titanium-bone interface. A control group of pure titanium inplant without FDBM was set up. The results showed FDBM had no antigenicity. It could induce and speed up the new bone formation at titanium-bone interface. The titanium-bone intergration time was within 2 months. It was suggested that there were more bone morphogenesis protein (BMP) or other bone induction and bone formation factors in brephobone than that in child and adult bone. As a kind of bone induction material, FDBM was easy prepared, cheap in price, easy to storage, no antigenicity and obvious bone-inductive function.

  14. Nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in an explosion-welded laminate composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Mali, V. I.; Pavlyukova, D. V.; Yartsev, P. S.; Golovin, E. D.

    2012-10-01

    Processes of nucleation and growth of titanium aluminide in a 23-layer aluminum-titanium composite produced by explosion welding have been studied. In the vortex zones of seven upper welds, microvolumes of melted metal whose microhardness is ˜5500 MPa have been revealed, which corresponds to the microhardness of the intermetallic compound Al3Ti. No formation of titanium aluminide in welded junctions that were not subjected to additional heat treatment has been revealed by X-ray diffraction. The holding of the composites at 630°C is accompanied by the formation of interlayers of intermetallic compounds of the Al3Ti type. Intermetallic compounds of two morphological types are formed in the welds. In the regions of vortex zones, compact precipitates of Al3Ti are formed; in the other regions of the welds, intermetallic compounds in the form of a film are precipitated. The intermetallic compounds of the first type grow more rapidly and in final account absorb the precipitates of the film type. The activation of diffusion in the upper junctions that occurs upon heating of the welded composites is favored by the nonequilibrium state of the material caused by the strain hardening of the initial samples. In the welds located deeper than the 13th layer, no signs of the formation of compact intermetallic compounds have been revealed upon the annealing for 5 h and less.

  15. Achieving High Strength Joint of Pure Copper Via Laser-Cold Metal Transfer Arc Hybrid Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yulong; Chen, Cong; Gao, Ming; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2016-06-01

    Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding of pure copper was studied. Weld porosity was tested by X-ray nondestructive testing. Microstructure and fracture features were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical properties were evaluated by cross weld tensile test. Full penetrated and continuous welds were obtained by hybrid welding once the laser power reached 2 kW, while they could not be obtained by laser welding alone, even though the laser power reached 5 kW. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the yield strength (YS), and the elongation of the best hybrid weld material were up to 227, 201 MPa, and 21.5 pct, respectively. The joint efficiencies in UTS and YS of hybrid weld were up to 84 and 80 pct of the BM, respectively. The fracture location changes from the fusion zone to the heat-affected zone with the increase of laser power. Besides, the mechanisms of process stability and porosity suppression were clarified by laser-arc interaction and pool behavior. The strengthening mechanism was discussed by microstructure characteristics.

  16. Revival of pure titanium for dynamically loaded porous implants using additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Wauthle, Ruben; Ahmadi, Seyed Mohammad; Amin Yavari, Saber; Mulier, Michiel; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are getting more and more established as reliable methods for producing porous metal implants thanks to the almost full geometrical and mechanical control of the designed porous biomaterial. Today, Ti6Al4V ELI is still the most widely used material for porous implants, and none or little interest goes to pure titanium for use in orthopedic or load-bearing implants. Given the special mechanical behavior of cellular structures and the material properties inherent to the additive manufacturing of metals, the aim of this study is to investigate the properties of selective laser melted pure unalloyed titanium porous structures. Therefore, the static and dynamic compressive properties of pure titanium structures are determined and compared to previously reported results for identical structures made from Ti6Al4V ELI and tantalum. The results show that porous Ti6Al4V ELI still remains the strongest material for statically loaded applications, whereas pure titanium has a mechanical behavior similar to tantalum and is the material of choice for cyclically loaded porous implants. These findings are considered to be important for future implant developments since it announces a potential revival of the use of pure titanium for additively manufactured porous implants.

  17. Effect of silica coating on the bond strength of milled pure titanium to dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiantao; Ye, Xiuhua; Chang, Shaohai; Liu, Lang; Zhang, Yiping; Lin, Shiyao

    2016-10-01

    The creation of a high bond strength between machined computer-manufactured pure titanium and porcelain remains problematic, and the effects of a silica coating on the bond strength of milled pure titanium bonded to dental porcelain require further investigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of machined pure titanium, with an intermediate coating of silica, to dental porcelain. In this work, 24 specimens of milled pure titanium were prepared and randomly divided into test and control groups, in which the test group was coated with silica using the sol-gel dipping technique. The metal-ceramic bond strength was evaluated, according to ISO 9693 standards, using the three-point bending test, and scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the microstructure and elemental composition of the specimens. The bonding strength of the silica-coated group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and more residual porcelain on the metal surface could be observed in the silica-coated group. Therefore, the application of a silica intermediate coating produced using the sol-gel method could significantly improve the bond strength between machined pure titanium and porcelain.

  18. Microstructural Evolution During Friction Stir Welding of Near-Alpha Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    focused on aluminum alloys. However, there is also substantial interest in developing FSW for higher strength alloys such as titanium and steels . Such...higher loads needed for some of these alloys. Although FSW of these high strength alloys has seen much less development than FSW of aluminum alloys... FSW of many high strength alloys in titanium and steel has been demonstrated and research on the welding of these alloys is increasing [e.g., 2– 14

  19. The Effect of Titanium Inclusions on HY-80 GMA Weld Deposits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    Titanium Inclusions, HY-80 GMA Weld Deposits. 19 Abstract (continue on reverse if necessary and identiffy by block number) HY-80 steels are used in...submarine and ship construction and it has been found that small additions of titanium to this steel during manufacture markedly improve the fracture...toughness of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of Gas-MetaI-Arc-NWeldin) IGNMAW) deposits made from this steel . This has been ascribed to prior austenite grain

  20. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth’s crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  1. Characteristics of multi-layer coating formed on commercially pure titanium for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Teker, Dilek; Muhaffel, Faiz; Menekse, Meryem; Karaguler, Nevin Gul; Baydogan, Murat; Cimenoglu, Huseyin

    2015-03-01

    An innovative multi-layer coating comprising a bioactive compound layer (consisting of hydroxyapatite and calcium titanate) with an underlying titanium oxide layer (in the form of anatase and rutile) has been developed on Grade 4 quality commercially pure titanium via a single step micro-arc oxidation process. Deposition of a multi-layer coating on titanium enhanced the bioactivity, while providing antibacterial characteristics as compared its untreated state. Furthermore, introduction of silver (4.6wt.%) into the multi-layer coating during micro-arc oxidation process imposed superior antibacterial efficiency without sacrificing the bioactivity.

  2. Ultrasonic Spot and Torsion Welding of Aluminum to Titanium Alloys: Process, Properties and Interfacial Microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balle, Frank; Magin, Jens

    Hybrid lightweight structures shape the development of future vehicles in traffic engineering and the aerospace industry. For multi-material concepts made out of aluminum and titanium alloys, the ultrasonic welding technique is an alternative effective joining technology. The overlapped structures can be welded in the solid state, even without gas shielding. In this paper the conventional ultrasonic spot welding with longitudinal oscillation mode is compared to the recent ultrasonic torsion welding with a torsional mode at 20 kHz working frequency. For each technique the process parameters welding force, welding energy and oscillation amplitude were optimized for the hybrid joints using design of experiments. Relationships between the process parameters, mechanical properties and related welding zone should be understood. Central aspects of the research project are microscopic studies of the joining zone in cross section and extensive fracture surface analysis. Detailed electron microscopy and spectroscopy of the hybrid interface help to understand the interfacial formation during ultrasonic welding as well as to transfer the gained knowledge for further multi-metal joints.

  3. New mechanism for the alpha to omega martensitic transformation in pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Trinkle, D R; Hennig, R G; Srinivasan, S G; Hatch, D M; Jones, M D; Stokes, H T; Albers, R C; Wilkins, J W

    2003-07-11

    We propose a new direct mechanism for the pressure driven alpha-->omega martensitic transformation in pure titanium. A systematic algorithm enumerates all possible pathways whose energy barriers are evaluated. A new, homogeneous pathway emerges with a barrier at least 4 times lower than other pathways. The pathway is shown to be favorable in any nucleation model.

  4. [Effects on microstructure and mechanical property of pure titanium (TA1) treated by anodic oxidation].

    PubMed

    Pan, Liuguo; Sun, Liqun

    2008-12-01

    Effects on surface microstructure and mechanical property of pure titanium (TA1) for implant treated by anodic oxidation were investigated. We found that the oxide film with a certain uniform and compact color could be achieved by anodic oxidation method. However, with the increasing of oxidizing voltage and time, the oxide film will be dissolved at local area. The oxygen content of oxide film and the hydrogen content of matrix titanium will be raised, and will also be increased. In fact, hydrogen could be diffused into matrix titanium. With the increase of hydrogen content of matrix titanium and sigmas/sigmab, there appear the possible results of plastic deformation and the fracture of implant.

  5. Susceptibility of Welded and Non-Welded Titanium Alloys to Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Simulated Concentrated Ground Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Fix, D V; Estill, J C; Wong, L L; Rebak, R B

    2003-10-14

    The engineering barriers for the nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain include a double walled container and a detached drip shield. The material selected to construct the drip shield will be Titanium Grade 7 (Ti Gr 7 or R52400). Ti Gr 7 is highly resistant to corrosion and consequently it is widely used to handle aggressive industrial environments. The model for the degradation of the engineering barriers includes three modes of corrosion, namely general corrosion, localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC). The objective of the current research was to characterize the susceptibility of three titanium alloys to EAC in several environmental conditions with varying solution composition, pH and temperature. The susceptibility to EAC was evaluated using constant deformation (deflection) U-bend specimens in both the non-welded and welded conditions. Results show that after more than five years exposure in the vapor and liquid phases of alkaline (pH {approx} 10) and acidic (pH {approx} 3) multi-ionic environments at 60 C and 90 C, most of the specimens were free from EAC. The only specimens that suffered EAC were welded Ti Gr 12 (R53400) exposed to liquid simulated concentrated water (SCW) at 90 C.

  6. Joining characteristics of beta-titanium wires with electrical resistance welding.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Masahiro; Brantley, William A; Yuasa, Toshihiro; Kawashima, Isao; Mizoguchi, Itaru

    2008-05-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate the effects of different conditions for electrical resistance welding of beta-titanium orthodontic wires. Three electrode types were used with a range of power settings on an electrical resistance welding machine to join beta-titanium wires (Resolve, GAC International). Forces that caused bond failures for joined specimens were obtained with tensile loading, and the values were compared using one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). Metallurgical phases in the joint region were determined by micro-X-ray diffraction. Mean tensile forces for bond failure ranged from 5 to 20 kgf for the eight specimen groups and were dependent on electrode type and power setting. All X-ray diffraction peaks in the joint region were indexed to beta-titanium. Superior bond strength was achieved with the use of wide electrodes. The absence of phases other than beta-titanium in the joint area suggests that the electrical resistance welding may not adversely affect clinically important mechanical properties. Scanning microscope observations indicated that the localized permanent deformation and the formation of an undesirable equiaxed grain structure occurred with the use of narrow electrodes.

  7. Influence of Duplex Treatment on Structural and Tribological Properties of Commercially Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ilhan

    2017-01-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in many fields, including aerospace and the chemical and biomedical industries. This is due to their mechanical properties, excellent corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility although they do have poor wear resistance. In this study, a duplex layer was successfully formed on the commercially pure titanium surface by duplex treatments (plasma nitriding and physical vapor deposition (PVD)). In the initial treatment, plasma nitriding was performed on the pure titanium samples and in the second treatment, the nitrided samples were coated with CrN by PVD. The friction and wear properties of the duplex-treated samples were investigated for tribological applications. Surface morphology and microstructure of the duplex-treated samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In addition, the tribological properties were investigated using pin-on-disc tribometer. A compound layer composed of ɛ-Ti2N and δ-TiN phases and a diffusion layer formed under the compound layer were obtained on the surface of pure titanium after the nitriding treatments. CrN coated on the nitrided surface provided an increase in the surface hardness and in the wear resistance.

  8. Effect of heat treatment in atmosphere on mechanical properties of pure titanium at liquid helium temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Konosu, S.; Nakaniwa, T.; Ivano, O.

    1998-05-12

    Due to their extreme friability, nuclear fusion superconductivity coil materials (NbTi, Nb{sub 3}Sn, Nb{sub 3}Al) are placed in pure titanium rectangular parallelepiped sleeves called conduits, of about 1 mm in wall thickness, and subjected to sintering heat treatment (50 to 200 hours at 923 to 1,023K) to produce superconductive materials. In use, the superconductive coil is immersed in liquid helium (4.2K) and as immense currents flow through the coil, the conduit is subjected to very large electromagnetic forces. As pure titanium is a highly active material, oxided scale forms on the surface when it is heated to high temperatures under atmospheric conditions, together with the formation, beneath the oxided scale, of an oxygen-rich layer possessing intense oxygen solubility. While oxided scale, because of its ability to reduce hydrogen absorption, is being actively used as a means to prevent the hydrogen embrittlement of titanium, it is believed that this leads to a deterioration of the mechanical properties because the oxygen-rich layer is deficient in ductility. The current research is intended to clarify the effect on the tensile test properties at liquid helium temperature (4.2K) of pure titanium and the oxygen-rich layer which forms thereon as a result of the heat treatment under atmospheric conditions.

  9. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  10. Biocompatibility of pure titanium modified by human endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jin; Zhu, Ying; Tu, Qiufen; Huang, Nan

    2010-04-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) used to modify biomaterial surface is a promising method for improving cardiovascular material hemocompatibility. In the present work, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) are cultured and native ECM is obtained on pure titanium surface. Fourier infrared spectrum (FTIR) test proves the existence of amide I and amide II band on the modified titanium surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) further confirms the chemical composition and binding types of the ECM proteins on the titanium substrate. The results of light microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) exhibit the morphology of HUVEC derived ECM. There are higher water contact angles on the ECM modified samples. Furthermore, some ECM components, including fibronectin (FN), laminin (LN) and type IV collagen (IV-COL) are presented on ECM-covered titanium surface by immunofluorescence staining. The biological behavior of cultured HUVECs and adherent platelets on different samples are investigated by in vitro HUVECs culture and platelet adhesion. Cells exhibit better morphology and their proliferation ability greatly improve on the ECM-covered titanium. At the same time, the platelet adhesion and spreading are inhibited on ECM-covered titanium surface. These investigations demonstrate that ECM produced by HUVECs cannot only improve adhesion and proliferation ability of endothelial cell but also inhibit adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, the approach described here may provide a basis for preparation of modified surface in cardiovascular implants application.

  11. Fundamental study about CO2 laser welding of titanium aluminide intermetallic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Gaku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Nanri, Kenzo; Ootani, Masanori; Tetsuka, Masato; Seto, Sachio; Arai, Mikiya; Fujioka, Tomoo

    2000-11-01

    Titanium aluminide intermetallic compound is attracting attentions as heat-resistant and high-specific strength material in the next generation, especially, it is promising material in the field of aerospace components. Conventional machining process including welding, however, can be hardly applied due to its very low ductility. The objective of this study, as a first stage, is to find out paying attention to crack and hardness the fundamental good conditions of the bead-on-plate welding of TiAl intermetallic compound using CO2 laser irradiation. In the experiment, we used the casting gamma titanium aluminide contained iron, vanadium and boron with a thickness of 2mm. We carried out bead-on-plate laser welding in the titanium aluminide material in inert gas environment filled with argon. We measured fused depth, Vickers hardness, transverse crack numbers and so on as major parameters of welding speed from 1000 to 4600 mm/min and initial temperature of specimen from R.T. to 873 K with a beam spot size of 0.5 mm and an output power of 1.5 kW. In addition, the specimens were analyzed by Electron Probe X-ray Micro Analyzer, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffractometry. As a result of experiments, transverse crack-free welding was achieved, when initial temperature was at 873 K. In every condition, the value of Vickers hardness of fused zone increased compared with base. We think the reason of it is an increase of (alpha) 2(Ti3Al) phase, which is caused by rapid cooling, taking in Oxygen, fine structure and so on.

  12. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    The high strength-to-weight ratio of titanium alloys suggests their use for solid-propellant rocket-motor cases for high-performance orbiting or space-probe vehicles. The paper describes the fabrication of a 6-in.-diam., 0.025-in.-wall rocket-motor from the 6A1-4V titanium alloy. The rocket-motor case, used in the fourth stage of a successful JPL-NASA lunar-probe flight, was constructed using a design previously proven satisfactory for Type 410 stainless steel. The nature and scope of the problems peculiar to the use of the titanium alloy, which effected an average weight saving of 34%, are described.

  13. Partially degradable friction-welded pure iron-stainless steel 316L bone pin.

    PubMed

    Nasution, A K; Murni, N S; Sing, N B; Idris, M H; Hermawan, H

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of a partially degradable metal bone pin, proposed to minimize the occurrence of bone refracture by avoiding the creation of holes in the bone after pin removal procedure. The pin was made by friction welding and composed of two parts: the degradable part that remains in the bone and the nondegradable part that will be removed as usual. Rods of stainless steel 316L (nondegradable) and pure iron (degradable) were friction welded at the optimum parameters: forging pressure = 33.2 kPa, friction time = 25 s, burn-off length = 15 mm, and heat input = 4.58 J/s. The optimum tensile strength and elongation was registered at 666 MPa and 13%, respectively. A spiral defect formation was identified as the cause for the ductile fracture of the weld joint. A 40-µm wide intermetallic zone was identified along the fusion line having a distinct composition of Cr, Ni, and Mo. The corrosion rate of the pin gradually decreased from the undeformed zone of pure iron to the undeformed zone of stainless steel 316L. All metallurgical zones of the pin showed no toxic effect toward normal human osteoblast cells, confirming the ppb level of released Cr and Ni detected in the cell media were tolerable.

  14. Estimation of Dislocation Density in Cold-Rolled Commercially Pure Titanium by Using Synchrotron Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALkhazraji, Hasan; Salih, Mohammed Z.; Zhong, Zhengye; Mhaede, Mansour; Brokmeier, Hans-Günter; Wagner, Lothar; Schell, N.

    2014-08-01

    Cold rolling (CR) leads to a heavy changes in the crystallographic texture and microstructure, especially crystal defects, such as dislocations, and stacking faults increase. The microstructure evolution in commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) deformed by CR at the room temperature was determined by using the synchrotron peak profile analysis of full width at half maximum (FWHM). The computer program ANIZC has been used for the calculation of diffraction contrast factors of dislocations in elastically anisotropic hexagonal crystals. The dislocation density has a minimum value at 40 pct reduction. The increase of the dislocation density at higher deformation levels is caused by the nucleation of new generation of dislocations from the crystallite grain boundaries. The high-cycle fatigue strength (HCF) has a maximum value at 80 pct reduction and it has a minimum value at 40 pct reduction in the commercially pure titanium.

  15. Laser surface alloying of commercially pure titanium with boron and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, N.; Kulka, M.; Dziarski, P.; Przestacki, D.

    2014-06-01

    Laser surface alloying with boron and carbon was applied to produce the composite layers, reinforced by the hard ceramic phases (titanium borides and titanium carbides), on commercially pure titanium. The external cylindrical surface of substrate material was coated by paste containing boron, boron and graphite, or graphite. Then, the laser re-melting was carried out with using the continuous-wave CO2 laser. This enabled the formation of laser-borided, laser-borocarburized, and laser-carburized layers. The microstructure or the re-melted zone consisted of the hard ceramic phases (TiB+TiB2, TiB+TiB2+TiC, or TiC) located in the eutectic mixture of Tiα'-phase with borides, borides and carbides, or carbides, respectively. All the composite layers were characterized by the sufficient cohesion. The significant increase in microhardness and in wear resistance of all the laser-alloyed layers was observed in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The percentage of hard ceramic phases in more plastic eutectic mixture influenced the measured microhardness values. The dominant wear mechanism (abrasive or adhesive) depended on the method of laser alloying, and the type of test used. The wear tests for longer duration, without the change in the counter specimen, created the favourable conditions for adhesive wear, while during the shorter tests the abrasive wear dominated, as a rule.

  16. The deformation behavior of commercially pure titanium subjected to electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kazachenok, Marina Kozelskaya, Anna; Panin, Alexey; Ivanov, Yurii

    2015-10-27

    The effect of low-energy high-current pulsed electron beam treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of commercially pure titanium specimens is studied. Plastic deformation mechanisms of the specimens subjected to the electron beam treatment followed by uniaxial tension are demonstrated. The role of the interface between the hardened surface layer and the relatively soft parent metal in the slip band formation in the loaded specimens is revealed.

  17. Welding of a corrosion-resistant composite material based on VT14 titanium alloy obtained using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkovski, M. G.; Samoylenko, V. V.; Polyakov, I. A.; Lenivtseva, O. G.; Chakin, I. K.; Komarov, P. N.; Ruktuev, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigates the possibility of inert gas arc welding of a double layer composite material on a titanium base with an anti-corrosive layer obtained by fused deposition of a powder mix containing tantalum and niobium over a titanium base using an electron beam emitted into the atmosphere. Butt welding and fillet welding options were tested with two types of edge preparation. Welds were subjected to a metallographic examination including a structural study and an analysis of the chemical and phase composition of the welds. A conclusion was made regarding the possibility of using welding for manufacturing of items from the investigated composite material.

  18. Spectral diagnostics of a vapor-plasma plume produced during welding titanium with a high-power ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uspenskiy, S. A.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Bykovskiy, D. P.; Mironov, V. D.; Prokopova, N. M.; Tret'yakov, E. V.

    2015-03-01

    This work is devoted to the research of welding plume during high power ytterbium fiber laser welding of a titanium alloy in the Ar shielding gas environment. High speed video observation of a vapor-plasma plume for visualization of processes occurring at laser welding was carried out. The coefficient of the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is calculated for a plasma welding plume by results of spectrometer researches. The conclusion deals with the impact of plasma on a high-power fiber laser radiation.

  19. Explosive Welding of Aluminum, Titanium and Zirconium to Copper Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegazy, A. A.; Mote, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    The main material properties affecting the explosive weldability of a certain metal combination are the yield strength, the ductility, the density and the sonic velocity of the two metals. Successful welding of the metal combination depends mainly on the correct choice of the explosive welding parameters; i.e., the stand off distance, the weight of the explosive charge relative to the weight of the flyer plate and the detonation velocity of the explosive. Based on the measured and the handbook values of the properties of interest, the explosive welding parameters were calculated and the arrangements for the explosive welding of the Al alloy 6061-T6, titanium and zirconium to OFHC copper were determined. The relatively small sheet metal thickness (1/8") and the fact that the thickness of the explosive layer must exceed a certain minimum value were considered during the determination of the explosive welding conditions. The results of the metallographic investigations and the measurements of the shear strength at the interface demonstrate the usefulness of these calculations to minimize the number of experimental trials.

  20. Corrosion Analysis of an Experimental Noble Alloy on Commercially Pure Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bortagaray, Manuel Alberto; Ibañez, Claudio Arturo Antonio; Ibañez, Maria Constanza; Ibañez, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the Noble Bond® Argen® alloy was electrochemically suitable for the manufacturing of prosthetic superstructures over commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) implants. Also, the electrolytic corrosion effects over three types of materials used on prosthetic suprastructures that were coupled with titanium implants were analysed: Noble Bond® (Argen®), Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®), and commercially pure titanium. Materials and Methods: 15 samples were studied, consisting in 1 abutment and one c.p. titanium implant each. They were divided into three groups, namely: Control group: five c.p Titanium abutments (B&W®), Test group 1: five Noble Bond® (Argen®) cast abutments and, Test group 2: five Argelite 76sf +® (Argen®) abutments. In order to observe the corrosion effects, the surface topography was imaged using a confocal microscope. Thus, three metric parameters (Sa: Arithmetical mean height of the surface. Sp: Maximum height of peaks. Sv: Maximum height of valleys.), were measured at three different areas: abutment neck, implant neck and implant body. The samples were immersed in artificial saliva for 3 months, after which the procedure was repeated. The metric parameters were compared by statistical analysis. Results: The analysis of the Sa at the level of the implant neck, abutment neck and implant body, showed no statistically significant differences on combining c.p. Ti implants with the three studied alloys. The Sp showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. The Sv showed no statistically significant differences between the three alloys. Conclusion: The effects of electrogalvanic corrosion on each of the materials used when they were in contact with c.p. Ti showed no statistically significant differences. PMID:27733875

  1. Welded Titanium Case for Space-Probe Rocket Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brothers, A. J.; Boundy, R. A.; Martens, H. E.; Jaffe, L. D.

    1959-01-01

    Early in 1958, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology was requested to participate in a lunar-probe mission code-named Juno II which would place a 15-lb Instrumented payload (Pioneer IV) in the vicinity of the moon. The vehicle was to use the same high-speed upper-stage assembly as flown on the successful Jupiter-C configuration; however, the first-stage booster was to be a Jupiter rather than a Redstone. An analysis of the intended flight and payload configuration Indicated that the feasibility of accomplishing the mission was questionable and that additional performance would have to be obtained if the mission was to be feasible. Since the most efficient way of Increasing the performance of a staged vehicle is to increase the performance of the last stage, a study of possible ways of doing this was made.. Because of the time schedule placed on this effort It was decided to reduce the weight of the fourth-stage rocket-motor case by substituting the annealed 6Al--4V titanium alloy for the Type 410 stainless steel. Although this introduced an unfamiliar material, It reduced the changes in design and fabrication techniques. This particular titanium alloy was chosen on the basis of previous tests which proved the suitability of the alloy as a pressure-vessel material when used at an annealed yield strength of about 120, 000 psi. The titanium-case fourth stage of Juno U is shown with the payload and on the missile in Fig. 1; the stainless-steel motor cases used in the Jupiter-C vehicle are shown in Fig. 2. The fourth-stage motor case has a diameter of 6 in., a length of approximately 38 in. center dot and a nominal cylindrical wall thickness of 0.025 in. As shown in Fig. 1, the case serves as the structural support of the payload and is aligned to the upper stage assembly through an alignment ring. The nozzle is threaded into the end of the motor case, and is of the ceramic-coated steel design. Figure 3 shows a comparison of the

  2. Bactericidal and antimicrobial effects of pure titanium and titanium alloy treated with short-term, low-energy UV irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Narita, K.; Ono, A.; Wada, K.; Tanaka, T.; Kumagai, G.; Yamauchi, R.; Nakane, A.; Ishibashi, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The surface of pure titanium (Ti) shows decreased histocompatibility over time; this phenomenon is known as biological ageing. UV irradiation enables the reversal of biological ageing through photofunctionalisation, a physicochemical alteration of the titanium surface. Ti implants are sterilised by UV irradiation in dental surgery. However, orthopaedic biomaterials are usually composed of the alloy Ti6Al4V, for which the antibacterial effects of UV irradiation are unconfirmed. Here we evaluated the bactericidal and antimicrobial effects of treating Ti and Ti6Al4V with UV irradiation of a lower and briefer dose than previously reported, for applications in implant surgery. Materials and Methods Ti and Ti6Al4V disks were prepared. To evaluate the bactericidal effect of UV irradiation, Staphylococcus aureus 834 suspension was seeded onto the disks, which were then exposed to UV light for 15 minutes at a dose of 9 J/cm2. To evaluate the antimicrobial activity of UV irradiation, bacterial suspensions were seeded onto the disks 0, 0.5, one, six, 24 and 48 hours, and three and seven days after UV irradiation as described above. In both experiments, the bacteria were then harvested, cultured, and the number of colonies were counted. Results No colonies were observed when UV irradiation was performed after the bacteria were added to the disks. When the bacteria were seeded after UV irradiation, the amount of surviving bacteria on the Ti and Ti6Al4V disks decreased at 0 hours and then gradually increased. However, the antimicrobial activity was maintained for seven days after UV irradiation. Conclusion Antimicrobial activity was induced for seven days after UV irradiation on both types of disk. Irradiated Ti6Al4V and Ti had similar antimicrobial properties. Cite this article: T. Itabashi, K. Narita, A. Ono, K. Wada, T. Tanaka, G. Kumagai, R. Yamauchi, A. Nakane, Y. Ishibashi. Bactericidal and antimicrobial effects of pure titanium and titanium alloy treated with

  3. Titanium integration with bone, welding, and screw head destruction complicating hardware removal of the distal radius: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Van Nortwick, Sara S; Yao, Jeffrey; Ladd, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    Increasingly, surgeons treat distal radius fractures with locking plate systems. Recent case reports have focused on technical insertion errors resulting in removal difficulties: poor drilling orientation or cross-threading, destruction of the screw head, and filling of the screw recess with tissue. We report 2 complications of titanium locked plate removal secondary to in vivo reactions including titanium integration with bone and mechanical binding between the titanium screw and plate. We clarify and discuss terminology relevant to implant removal, including cold-welding, galling, fretting, and anodization. Even with optimal technique, in situ reactions can complicate titanium implant removal.

  4. Effects of fluoride and dissolved oxygen concentrations on the corrosion behavior of pure titanium and titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaharu; Matsuya, Shigeki; Udoh, Koichi

    2002-06-01

    The effects of dissolved-oxygen concentration and fluoride concentration on the corrosion behaviors of commercial pure titanium, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys and experimentally produced Ti-0.2Pd and Ti-0.5Pt alloys were examined using the corrosion potential measurements. The amount of dissolved Ti was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. A decrease in the dissolved-oxygen concentration tended to reduce the corrosion resistance of Ti and Ti alloys. If there was no fluoride, however, corrosion did not occur. Under low dissolved-oxygen conditions, the corrosion of pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys might easily take place in the presence of small amounts of fluoride. They were corroded by half or less of the fluoride concentrations in commercial dentifrices. The Ti-0.2Pd and Ti-0.5Pt alloys did not corrode more, even under the low dissolved-oxygen conditions and a fluoride-containing environment, than pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-7Nb alloys. These alloys are expected to be useful as new Ti alloys with high corrosion resistance in dental use.

  5. Fiber laser welding of austenitic steel and commercially pure copper butt joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuryntsev, S. V.; Morushkin, A. E.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-03-01

    The fiber laser welding of austenitic stainless steel and commercially pure copper in butt joint configuration without filler or intermediate material is presented. In order to melt stainless steel directly and melt copper via heat conduction a defocused laser beam was used with an offset to stainless steel. During mechanical tests the weld seam was more durable than heat affected zone of copper so samples without defects could be obtained. Three process variants of offset of the laser beam were applied. The following tests were conducted: tensile test of weldment, intermediate layer microhardness, optical metallography, study of the chemical composition of the intermediate layer, fractography. Measurements of electrical resistivity coefficients of stainless steel, copper and copper-stainless steel weldment were made, which can be interpreted or recalculated as the thermal conductivity coefficient. It shows that electrical resistivity coefficient of cooper-stainless steel weldment higher than that of stainless steel. The width of intermediate layer between stainless steel and commercially pure copper was 41-53 μm, microhardness was 128-170 HV0.01.

  6. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Yanni; Li, Jinglong; Xiong, Jiangtao; Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid

    2012-09-15

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  7. Corrosion-fatigue of laser-repaired commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy under different test environments.

    PubMed

    Zavanelli, R A; Guilherme, A S; Pessanha-Henriques, G E; de Arruda Nóbilo, M Antônio; Mesquita, M F

    2004-10-01

    This study evaluated the corrosion-fatigue life of laser-repaired specimens fabricated from commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V alloy, tested under different storage conditions. For each metal, 30 dumbbell rods with a central 2.3 mm diameter were prepared by lost-wax casting with the Rematitan System. Simulating the failure after service, corrosion-fatigue life in different media at room temperature (air, synthetic saliva and fluoride synthetic saliva) was determined at a testing frequency of 10 Hz for intact specimens and after laser repairing, using a square waveform with equal maximum tensile and compressive stress that was 30% lower than the 0.2% offset yield strength. For laser welding, the fractured specimens were rejoined using a jig to align the sections invested in type-IV dental stone. The adjacent areas of the gap was air-abraded with 100 microm aluminum oxide, laser welded and retested under the same conditions as the initial intact specimens. The number of cycles at failure was recorded, and the fracture surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The number of cycles for failure of the welded and intact specimens was compared by anova and the Tukey test at a 5% probability level. Within the limitations of this study, the number of cycles required for fracture decreased in wet environments and the laser repairing process adversely affected the life of both metals under the corrosion-fatigue conditions.

  8. Optimization of Oxidation Temperature for Commercially Pure Titanium to Achieve Improved Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, J. K.; Singh, Vakil; Singh, D. D. N.; Das, Parimal

    2017-03-01

    Thermal oxidation of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) was carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 200 to 900 °C to achieve optimum corrosion resistance of the thermally treated surface in simulated body fluid. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the oxides and assess their protective properties exposed in the test electrolyte. Maximum resistance toward corrosion was observed for samples oxidized at 500 °C. This was attributed to the formation of a composite layer of oxides at this temperature comprising Ti2O3 (titanium sesquioxide), anatase and rutile phases of TiO2 on the surface of cp-Ti. Formation of an intact and pore-free oxide-substrate interface also improved its corrosion resistance.

  9. Strain localization of commercially pure titanium subjected to ultrasonic impact treatment followed by uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina; Kozelskaya, Anna; Perevalova, Olga; Balokhonov, Ruslan; Romanova, Varvara; Pochivalov, Yurii

    2016-11-01

    It was demonstrated that the ultrasonic impact treatment results in the gradient microstructure of the surface layer of commercially pure titanium composed of nanosized nonequiaxial α-Ti grains, underlying course α-grains with banded substructure and deformation twins, and subjacent layer characterized by the presence of a few twins and extinction contours within the course grains. The effect of ultrasonic impact treatment on the mechanical behavior of titanium specimen under tension was revealed theoretically and experimentally Using optical and atomic force microscopes it was shown that the fine-grained surface layer impede dislocation motion causing the initiation and propagation of shear bands oriented along the direction of maximum shear stresses. The fine structure of shear bands was studied by transmission electron microscopy.

  10. Optimization of Oxidation Temperature for Commercially Pure Titanium to Achieve Improved Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, J. K.; Singh, Vakil; Singh, D. D. N.; Das, Parimal

    2017-02-01

    Thermal oxidation of commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) was carried out at different temperatures, ranging from 200 to 900 °C to achieve optimum corrosion resistance of the thermally treated surface in simulated body fluid. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques were used to characterize the oxides and assess their protective properties exposed in the test electrolyte. Maximum resistance toward corrosion was observed for samples oxidized at 500 °C. This was attributed to the formation of a composite layer of oxides at this temperature comprising Ti2O3 (titanium sesquioxide), anatase and rutile phases of TiO2 on the surface of cp-Ti. Formation of an intact and pore-free oxide-substrate interface also improved its corrosion resistance.

  11. Biocompatibility of surface treated pure titanium and titanium alloy by in vivo and in vitro test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min-Ho; Yoon, Dong-Joo; Won, Dae-Hee; Bae, Tae-Sung; Watari, Fumio

    2003-02-01

    In the present study, commercial pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens with and without alkali and heat treatments were implanted in the abdominal connective tissue of mice. Conventional stainless steel 316L was also implanted for comparison. After three months, their biocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Surface structural changes of specimens due to the alkali treatment and soaking in Hank's solution were analyzed by XRD, SEM, XPS and AES. An apatite layer, which accelerates the connection with bone, was formed more easily on the alkali treated specimens than the non-treated specimens. The number of macrophages, which is known to increase as the inflammatory reaction proceeds, was much lower for the alkali and heat treated specimens than for the others. The average thickness of the fibrous capsule formed around the implant was much thinner for the alkali and heat treated specimens than for the others.

  12. Work-hardening behavior of commercially pure titanium JIS grade 1 sheet upon reverse loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Takayuki; Yi, Ning; Kobuki, Akihiro; Uchida, Sohei; Fujimoto, Hitoshi; Takuda, Hirohiko

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, work-hardening behavior under various loading paths of a commercially pure titanium JIS Grade 1 sheet was investigated. The following tension-compression asymmetry was presented. The yield stress was smaller under compression than under tension, whereas the subsequent work-hardening was larger under compression than under tension. When the sheet was subjected to reverse loading from compression to tension, strong Bauschinger effect was exhibited. Thereafter, a concave curve followed by a small stress peak appeared, which was not presented under monotonic tension. Microstructure observations suggested that this characteristic behavior would be owing to the the activities of twinning and detwinning respectively during compression and following tension.

  13. Spherical nanoindentation stress-strain curves of commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Priddy, Matthew W.; McDowell, David L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2016-07-27

    Spherical nanoindentation combined with electron back-scattered diffraction was employed to characterize the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of single crystal alpha-Ti for commercially pure (CP-Ti) and alloyed (Ti-64) titanium. In addition, alpha-beta Ti (single colony) grains were characterized. The data set includes the nanoindentation force, displacement, and contact stiffness, the nanoindentation stress-strain analysis, and the alpha-Ti crystal orientations. Details of the samples and experimental protocols can be found in Weaver et al. (2016) Acta Materialia doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.06.053.

  14. Investigation of plasma arc welding as a method for the additive manufacturing of titanium-(6)aluminum-(4)vanadium alloy components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinoha, Joe N.

    The process of producing near net-shape components by material deposition is known as additive manufacturing. All additive manufacturing processes are based on the addition of material with the main driving forces being cost reduction and flexibility in both manufacturing and product design. With wire metal deposition, metal is deposited as beads side-by-side and layer-by-layer in a desired pattern to build a complete component or add features on a part. There are minimal waste products, low consumables, and an efficient use of energy and feedstock associated with additive manufacturing processes. Titanium and titanium alloys are useful engineering materials that possess an extraordinary combination of properties. Some of the properties that make titanium advantageous for structural applications are its high strength-to-weight ratio, low density, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and good corrosion resistance. The most commonly used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, is typically used in aerospace applications, pressure vessels, aircraft gas turbine disks, cases and compressor blades, and surgical implants. Because of the high material prices associated with titanium alloys, the production of near net-shape components by additive manufacturing is an attractive option for the manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy components. In this thesis, the manufacturing of cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens by wire metal deposition utilizing the plasma arc welding process was demonstrated. Plasma arc welding is a cost effective additive manufacturing technique when compared to other current additive manufacturing methods such as laser beam welding and electron beam welding. Plasma arc welding is considered a high-energy-density welding processes which is desirable for the successful welding of titanium. Metal deposition was performed using a constant current plasma arc welding power supply, flow-purged welding chamber, argon shielding and orifice gas, ERTi-5 filler metal, and Ti-6Al

  15. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bykovskiy, D P; Petrovskii, V N; Uspenskiy, S A

    2015-03-31

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  16. Microstructure and properties of laser-borided composite layers formed on commercially pure titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulka, M.; Makuch, N.; Dziarski, P.; Piasecki, A.; Miklaszewski, A.

    2014-03-01

    Laser-boriding was proposed in order to produce composite boride layers on commercially pure titanium. Three zones were observed in the microstructure: laser-borided re-melted zone (TiB, TiB2 and Tiα'-phase), heat affected zone (Tiα'-phase) and the substrate without heat treatment (Tiα-phase). The stick-like titanium borides occurred in the re-melted zone. In some areas, the tubular nature of titanium borides was visible. Among the sticks of titanium borides the needles of Tiα'-phase appeared. The high overlapping of multiple laser tracks (86%) caused the formation of uniform laser-alloyed layer in respect of the thickness. The microcracks and pores were not detected in the laser-borided composite layer. The high hardness of the re-melted zone (1250-1650 HV) was obtained. The hardness gradually decreased up to 250-300 HV in heat affected zone and up to about 200 HV in the substrate. In case of higher laser beam power used (1.95 kW), the re-melted zone was thicker and more homogeneous in respect of the microstructure and hardness. The craters obtained at the surface after the Rockwell C indentation test evidently revealed ideal cohesion of the laser-borided layer (HF1 standard). The significant increase in wear resistance of laser-borided composite layers was observed in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The lower mass wear intensity factors were obtained for laser-alloyed layers. The measurements of relative mass loss were also used in order to evaluate wear behavior of the investigated materials. The tests of laser-borided layers showed the catastrophic wear of the counter-specimens. The separated particles of counter-sample caused the accelerated wear of the laser-alloyed specimen. The longer duration of the tests, carried out without the change in a counter-specimen, caused the adhesion of counter-sample particles on the laser-borided specimen. The increased contact surface was the reason for the higher temperature and created the favourable

  17. Effects of sandblasting and electrical discharge machining on porcelain adherence to cast and machined commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Inan, Ozgür; Acar, Asli; Halkaci, Selçuk

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sandblasting and electrical discharge machining (EDM) on cast and machined titanium surfaces and titanium-porcelain adhesion. Twenty machined titanium specimens were prepared by manufacturer (groups 1 and 2). Thirty specimens were prepared with autopolymerizing acrylic resin. Twenty of these specimens (groups 3 and 4) were cast with commercially pure titanium and the alpha-case layer was removed. For control group (group 5), 10 specimens were cast by using NiCr alloy. Groups 2 and 4 were subjected to EDM while groups 1, 3, and 5 were subjected to sandblasting. Surface examinations were made by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). A low-fusing porcelain was fused on the titanium surfaces, whereas NiCr specimens were covered using a conventional porcelain. Titanium-porcelain adhesion was characterized by a 3-point bending test. Results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Metal-porcelain interfaces were characterized by SEM. The bond strength of control group was higher than that of the titanium-porcelain system. There was no significant difference between cast and machined titanium groups (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference between EDM and sandblasting processes (p > 0.05). The use of EDM as surface treatment did not improve titanium-porcelain adhesion compared with sandblasting.

  18. DC electrical conductivity measurements for pure and titanium oxide doped KDP Crystals grown by gel medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareeswaran, S.; Asaithambi, T.

    2016-10-01

    Now a day's crystals are the pillars of current technology. Crystals are applied in various fields like fiber optic communications, electronic industry, photonic industry, etc. Crystal growth is an interesting and innovative field in the subject of physics, chemistry, material science, metallurgy, chemical engineering, mineralogy and crystallography. In recent decades optically good quality of pure and metal doped KDP crystals have been grown by gel growth method in room temperature and its characterizations were studied. Gel method is a very simple and one of the easiest methods among the various crystal growth methods. Potassium dihydrogen phosphate KH2PO4 (KDP) continues to be an interesting material both academically and technologically. KDP is a delegate of hydrogen bonded materials which possess very good electrical and nonlinear optical properties in addition to interesting electro-optic properties. We made an attempt to grow pure and titanium oxide doped KDP crystals with various doping concentrations (0.002, 0.004, 0.006, 0.008 and 0.010) using gel method. The grown crystals were collected after 20 days. We get crystals with good quality and shaped crystals. The dc electrical conductivity (resistance, capacitance and dielectric constant) values of the above grown crystals were measured at two different frequencies (1KHz and 100 Hz) with a temperature range of 500C to 1200C using simple two probe setup with Q band digital LCR meter present in our lab. The electrical conductivity increases with the increase of temperature. Dielectric constants value of titanium oxide doped KDP crystal was slightly decreased compared with pure KDP crystals. Results were discussed in details.

  19. Tensile properties of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and the weld joints after neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shiba, K.; Ioka, I.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hamada, A.; Hishinuma, A.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile specimens of a titanium modified austenitic stainless steel and its weldments fabricated with Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) and Electron Beam (EB) welding techniques were irradiated to a peak dose of 19 dpa and a peak helium level of 250 appm in the temperature range between 200 and 400{degrees}C in spectrally tailored capsules in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The He/dpa ratio of about 13 appm/dpa is similar to the typical helium/dpa ratio of a fusion reactor environment. The tensile tests were carried out at the irradiation temperature in vacuum. The irradiation caused an increase in yield stress to levels between 670 and 800 MPa depending on the irradiation temperature. Total elongation was reduced to less than 10%, however the specimens failed in a ductile manner. The results were compared with those of the specimens irradiated using irradiation capsules producing larger amount of He. Although the He/dpa ratio affected the microstructural change, the impact on the post irradiation tensile behavior was rather small for not only base metal specimens but also for the weld joint and the weld metal specimens.

  20. Laser-Arc Hybrid Welding of Dissimilar Titanium Alloy and Stainless Steel Using Copper Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Chen, Cong; Wang, Lei; Wang, Zemin; Zeng, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Laser-arc hybrid welding with Cu3Si filler wire was employed to join dissimilar Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and AISI316 stainless steel (316SS). The effects of welding parameters on bead shape, microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture behavior were investigated in detail. The results show that cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 212 MPa. In the joint, obvious nonuniformity of the microstructure is found in the fusion zone (FZ) and at the interfaces from the top to the bottom, which could be improved by increasing heat input. For the homogeneous joint, the FZ is characterized by Fe67- x Si x Ti33 dendrites spreading on α-Cu matrix, and the two interfaces of 316SS/FZ and FZ/Ti6Al4V are characterized by a bamboo-like 316SS layer and a CuTi2 layer, respectively. All the tensile samples fractured in the hardest CuTi2 layer at Ti6Al4V side of the joints. The fracture surface is characterized by river pattern revealing brittle cleavage fracture. The bead formation mechanisms were discussed according to the melt flow and the thermodynamic calculation.

  1. ARc Welding (Industrial Processing Series).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARC WELDING , *BIBLIOGRAPHIES), (*ARC WELDS, BIBLIOGRAPHIES), ALUMINUM ALLOYS, TITANIUM ALLOYS, CHROMIUM ALLOYS, METAL PLATES, SPOT WELDING , STEEL...INERT GAS WELDING , MARAGING STEELS, MICROSTRUCTURE, HEAT RESISTANT ALLOYS, HEAT RESISTANT METALS, WELDABILITY, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, RESISTANCE WELDING

  2. The process development of laser surface modification of commercially pure titanium (Grade 2) with rhenium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobiela, K.; Smolina, I.; Dziedzic, R.; Szymczyk, P.; Kurzynowski, T.; Chlebus, E.

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the results of the process development of laser surface modification of commercially pure titanium with rhenium. The criterion of the successful/optimal process is the repetitive geometry of the surface, characterized by predictable and repetitive chemical composition over its entire surface as well as special mechanical properties (hardness and wear resistance). The analysis of surface geometry concluded measurements of laser penetration depth and heat affected zone (HAZ), the width of a single track as well as width of a clad. The diode laser installed on the industrial robot carried out the laser treatment. This solution made possible the continuous supply of powder to the substrate during the process. The aim of an investigation is find out the possibility of improving the tribological characteristics of the surface due to the rhenium alloying. The verification of the surface properties (tribological) concluded geometry measurements, microstructure observation, hardness tests and evaluation of wear resistance.

  3. Influence of oxidation treatment on fatigue and fatigue-induced damage of commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Leinenbach, C; Eifler, D

    2009-09-01

    In this investigation, the cyclic deformation behaviour of commercially pure titanium was characterized in axial stress controlled constant amplitude and load increase tests, as well as in rotating bending tests. The influence of different clinically relevant surface treatments (polishing, thermal and anodic oxidizing) on the fatigue behaviour was investigated. All tests were realized in oxygen-saturated Ringer's solution. The cyclic deformation behaviour was characterized by mechanical hysteresis measurements. In addition, the change of the free corrosion potential and the corrosion current during the fatigue tests in simulated physiological media indicated such types of surface damage as slip bands, microcracks and oxide film ablation. Microstructural changes on the specimen surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy.

  4. Preparation and properties of plasma electrolytic oxidation coating on sandblasted pure titanium by a combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Zhao, Xing-Chuan; He, Kun; Yuan, Y F; Li, Ying; Ma, Xiao-Ni

    2014-09-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is one of the most applicable methods to produce bioceramic coating on a dental implant and sandblasting is a primary technique to modify metal surface properties. This study aims to deposit bioceramic Ca- and P-containing coatings on sandblasted commercially pure titanium by PEO technique to improve its bioactive performance. The time-dependent modified surfaces are characterized in terms of their microstructure, phase, chemical composition, mechanical properties and bioactivities. The results show that the combination-treated coating exhibits better properties than the PEO-treated one, especially in bioactivities, as evidenced by the HA formation after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 5 days and the cell viability after seeding for 1 or 3 days. The enhancement of the modified surface is attributed to a combination of the mechanical sandblasting and the microplasma oxidation.

  5. Effect of Thermal Oxidation on Corrosion Resistance of Commercially Pure Titanium in Acid Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamesh, M.; Kumar, Satendra; Sankara Narayanan, T. S. N.

    2012-06-01

    This article addresses the characteristics of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) subjected to thermal oxidation in air at 650 °C for 48 h and its corrosion behavior in 0.1 and 4 M HCl and HNO3 mediums. Thermal oxidation of CP-Ti leads to the formation of thick oxide scales (~20 μm) throughout its surface without any spallation. The oxide layer consists of rutile- and oxygen-diffused titanium as predominant phases with a hardness of 679 ± 43 HV1.96. Electrochemical studies reveal that the thermally oxidized CP-Ti offers a better corrosion resistance than its untreated counterpart in both HCl and HNO3 mediums. The uniform surface coverage and compactness of the oxide layer provide an effective barrier toward corrosion of CP-Ti. The study concludes that thermal oxidation is an effective approach to engineer the surface of CP-Ti so as to increase its corrosion resistance in HCl and HNO3 mediums.

  6. Amorphization effects on pure titanium using C{sup +}, O{sup +} and Cr{sup +} ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Athanasiou, N.S.; Lanza, F.; Paracchini, L.; Brossa, F.

    1998-01-20

    In this work, the influence of the amorphization effect of C{sup +}, O{sup +} and Cr{sup +} implantation on the friction and wettability properties of pure titanium (grade 2) has been studied. Doses from 1 {times} 10{sup 17} to 5 {times} 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup {minus}2} at multiple energies of 50 to 190 keV have been used. Additionally, pin-on-disk tribological tests using Ultra-High-Molecular-Weight-Polyethylene (UHMWPE) pins under lubricated conditions and wettability measurements of implanted and unimplanted titanium samples were carried out. The authors found, that the more suitable material for the wettability and hence wear resistance is C{sup +} implanted titanium, because of its higher surface energy than the unimplanted titanium corresponding energy. Friction tests on monoenergetic 180 keV C{sup +} and O{sup +} modified titanium with 1 {times} 10{sup 17} ions cm{sup {minus}2} have showed an essentially reduced friction compared to samples implanted with the same dose but at multiple energies. A reduction of the wettability by about 7% and the friction coefficient by about 18% was observed for carbon implanted titanium with a dose of 1 {times} 10{sup 17} C{sup +} cm{sup {minus}2}; this effect corresponds to a good correlation between wettability and friction coefficient after C{sup +} implantation in titanium. It was concluded that the reduction of the friction coefficient with monoenergetic C{sup +} implanted titanium is 3.7 times lower compared with those of pure titanium.

  7. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    SciTech Connect

    Tattoli, F.; Casavola, C.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Pappalettere, C.

    2011-01-17

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto--plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  8. Full-Field Strain Measurement On Titanium Welds And Local Elasto-Plastic Identification With The Virtual Fields Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattoli, F.; Pierron, F.; Rotinat, R.; Casavola, C.; Pappalettere, C.

    2011-01-01

    One of the main problems in welding is the microstructural transformation within the area affected by the thermal history. The resulting heterogeneous microstructure within the weld nugget and the heat affected zones is often associated with changes in local material properties. The present work deals with the identification of material parameters governing the elasto—plastic behaviour of the fused and heat affected zones as well as the base material for titanium hybrid welded joints (Ti6Al4V alloy). The material parameters are identified from heterogeneous strain fields with the Virtual Fields Method. This method is based on a relevant use of the principle of virtual work and it has been shown to be useful and much less time consuming than classical finite element model updating approaches applied to similar problems. The paper will present results and discuss the problem of selection of the weld zones for the identification.

  9. Surface modification of pure titanium by hydroxyapatite-containing composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Quan-Ming; Cheng, Li; Yang, Hui-Lin; Liu, Zhong-Tang; Feng, De-Hong

    2014-12-01

    Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) is commonly applied to modify the surface of titanium (Ti)-based medical implants with a bioactive and porous Ti oxide (TiO2) coating. The study reports a new method of incorporating hydroxyapatite (HA) within the TiO2 coating by MAO and alkali heat treatment (AHT) in the solution containing Ca ion and P ion. The morphology, composition and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer and X-ray diffraction. Surface topography and roughness of the coatings were investigated by atomic force microscopy operated in the tapping mode. The results showed that TiO2-based coatings were obtained on pure Ti by MAO with an electrolyte containing Ca ion and P ion; the prepared MAO coatings were mainly composed of Ca, P, O and Ti. AHT transformed Ca and P to HA crystals. In conclusion, the TiO2/HA composite coatings can be obtained on the surface of pure Ti by MAO and AHT, and the addition of Ca ion and P ion to the AHT solution contributed to the formation of HA.

  10. Evaluation of shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to laser welded titanium surface and determination of mode of bond failure.

    PubMed

    Patil, Narendra P; Dandekar, Minal; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Guttal, Satyabodh S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain to laser welded titanium surface and to determine the mode of bond failure through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS). Forty five cast rectangular titanium specimens with the dimension of 10 mm x 8 mm x 1 mm were tested. Thirty specimens had a perforation of 2 mm diameter in the centre. These were randomly divided into Group A and B. The perforations in the Group B specimens were repaired by laser welding using Cp Grade II titanium wire. The remaining 15 specimens were taken as control group. All the test specimens were layered with low fusing porcelain and tested for shear bond strength. The debonded specimens were subjected to SEM and EDS. Data were analysed with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test for comparison among the different groups. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values at a 5% level of confidence. The mean shear bond strength values for control group, Group A and B was 8.4 +/- 0.5 Mpa, 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpa and 8.3 +/- 0.3 Mpa respectively. SEM/EDS analysis of the specimens showed mixed and cohesive type of bond failure. Within the limitations of the study laser welding did not have any effect on the shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to titanium.

  11. Laser Powder Welding of a Ti52Al46.8Cr1Si0.2Titanium Aluminide Alloy at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smal, C. A.; Meacock, C. G.; Rossouw, H. J.

    2011-04-01

    A method for the joining of a Ti52Al46.8Cr1Si0.2Titanium Aluminide alloy by laser powder welding is presented. The technique acts to join materials by consolidating powder with focused laser beam to form weld beads that fill a V joint. In order to avoid the occurrence of residual thermal stresses and hence cracking of the brittle material, the weld plates were heated to a temperature of 1173 K (= 900 °C) by an ohmic heating device, welded and then slowly cooled to produce pore and crack free welds.

  12. Characterization of disk-laser dissimilar welding of titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V to aluminum alloy 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiazzo, Fabrizia; Alfieri, Vittorio; Cardaropoli, Francesco; Corrado, Gaetano; Sergi, Vincenzo

    2013-02-01

    Both technical and economic reasons suggest to join dissimilar metals, benefiting from the specific properties of each material in order to perform flexible design. Adhesive bonding and mechanical joining have been traditionally used although adhesives fail to be effective in high-temperature environments and mechanical joining are not adequate for leak-tight joints. Friction stir welding is a valid alternative, even being difficult to perform for specific joint geometries and thin plates. The attention has therefore been shifted to laser welding. Interest has been shown in welding titanium to aluminum, especially in the aviation industry, in order to benefit from both corrosive resistance and strength properties of the former, and low weight and cost of the latter. Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V and aluminum alloy 2024 are considered in this work, being them among the most common ones in aerospace and automotive industries. Laser welding is thought to be particularly useful in reducing the heat affected zones and providing deep penetrative beads. Nevertheless, many challenges arise in welding dissimilar metals and the aim is further complicated considering the specific features of the alloys in exam, being them susceptible to oxidation on the upper surface and porosity formation in the fused zone. As many variables are involved, a systematic approach is used to perform the process and to characterize the beads referring to their shape and mechanical features, since a mixture of phases and structures is formed in the fused zone after recrystallization.

  13. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use by South Carolina vocational education teachers as a continuing set of lesson plans for a two-year course on welding. Covered in the individual sections of the guide are the following topics: an orientation to welding, oxyacetylene welding, advanced oxyacetylene welding, shielded metal arc welding, TIG…

  14. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  15. Microstructure and Microtexture Evolution of Pure Titanium during Single Direction Torsion and Alternating Cyclic Torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Han; Li, Fuguo; Liu, Jie; Li, Jinghui; Ma, Xinkai; Wan, Qiong

    2017-03-01

    Systematic experimental studies of microstructure and crystallographic texture of pure titanium during the Single Direction Torsion (SDT) and Alternating Cyclic Torsion (ACT) are carried out at room temperature. The microstructure evolution indicates that the grain size can be refined during SDT, while the grain morphology can be controlled during ACT. Also, lots of {10-12} and few {11-22} twins are observed and their area percentages increase with increasing torsion angles during SDT. The microtexture evolution states that the deformation texture first approaches to the B fiber (0, 90, 0 to 60 deg), and then stays away from B fiber (0, 90, 0 to 60 deg) with increasing plastic strain during SDT. The change of deformation texture is mainly attributed to the appearance of {10-12} twin. However, the deformation texture is always close to B fiber (0, 90, 0 to 60 deg) during ACT. Finally, the effects of different dislocation movements caused by SDT and ACT are discussed. Quantities of subgrains with high density dislocation are observed during SDT while the {10-12} and {11-22} twins intersect with each other, and high density dislocations distribute the twin during ACT.

  16. HISTOMORPHOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF PURE TITANIUM IMPLANTS WITH POROUS SURFACE VERSUS ROUGH SURFACE

    PubMed Central

    Brentel, Aline Scalone; de Vasconcellos, Luana Marotta Reis; Oliveira, Marize Varella; Graça, Mário Lima de Alencastro; de Vasconcellos, Luis Gustavo Oliveira; Cairo, Carlos Alberto Alves; Carvalho, Yasmin Rodarte

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the bone repair around commercially pure titanium implants with rough and porous surface, fabricated using powder metallurgy technique, after their insertion in tibiae of rabbits. Seven male rabbits were used. Each animal received 3 porous-surface implants in the left tibia and 3 rough-surface implants in the right tibia. The rabbits were sacrificed 4 weeks after surgery and fragments of the tibiae containing the implants were submitted to histological and histomorphometric analyses to evaluate new bone formation at the implant-bone interface. Means (%) of bone neoformation obtained in the histomorphometric analysis were compared by Student's t-test for paired samples at 5% significance level.. The results of the histological analysis showed that osseointegration occurred for both types of implants with similar quality of bone tissue. The histomorphometric analysis revealed means of new bone formation at implant-bone interface of 79.69 ± 1.00% and 65.05 ± 1.23% for the porous- and rough-surface implants, respectively. Statistically significant difference was observed between the two types of implants with respect to the amount new bone formation (p<0.05). In conclusion, the porous-surface implants contributed to the osseointegration because they provide a larger contact area at implant-bone interface. PMID:19089076

  17. Grain Size Effect of Commercial Pure Titanium Foils on Mechanical Properties, Fracture Behaviors and Constitutive Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daming, Nie; Zhen, Lu; Kaifeng, Zhang

    2017-02-01

    The constitutive models based on grain size effect are crucial for analyzing the deformation of metal foils. Previous investigations on the constitutive models concentrate on the foils whose thickness/average grain diameter (T/D) ratios are more than 3. In this study, the commercial pure titanium foils with thickness of 0.1 and 0.2 mm were employed as the experimental materials. The mechanical properties of foils with dimensions of nine different T/D ratios categorized into three ranges (T/D < 1, 1 ≤ T/D < 3, T/D ≥ 3)were tested. Meanwhile, the fracture behaviors and fracture mechanisms of the samples with different T/D ratios were compared and analyzed. Besides, three constitutive models incorporating the surface layer effect and grain boundary strengthening effect were established for the three T/D ratio ranges correspondingly. In these models, the thickness of the surface layers is set T for T/D < 1 foils, D for T/D > 3, and increases with D linearly in 1 ≤ T/D < 3. The results calculated by the three models were compared. The experiments indicate that those models are all in good agreement.

  18. Fabrication of the Ti5Si3/Ti composite inoculants and its refining mechanism on pure titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nuo; Cui, Chunxiang; Liu, Shaungjin; Zhao, Long; Liu, Shuiqing

    2017-03-01

    The in situ Ti5Si3/Ti inoculants were successfully prepared by vacuum arc-melting and melt-spinning method. An efficient route by adding a small quantity of Ti5Si3/Ti inoculants to Ti melt has been first proposed to modify the coarse grains of as cast microstructure of pure titanium in this paper. It was found that the microstructure of ribbon inoculants was cellular structure that composed of Ti5Si3 and α-Ti phases. The grain refining effect of the inoculants was significantly improved with the adding ratio range from 0.2% to 0.5% in weight. With the increase of addition amount of inoculants on Ti melt, the tensile strength, yield strength and microhardness of pure titanium are significantly improved except elongation. The excellent grain refining effect can be attributed to the heterogeneous nucleation of the titanium grain on the precipitated Ti5Si3 phases in the Si-rich regions and the constitutional supercooling of Si in the Si-poverty regions. It is suggested that the in situ Ti5Si3/Ti inoculants is a promising inoculants for titanium alloys.

  19. Effects of Peracetic Acid on the Corrosion Resistance of Commercially Pure Titanium (grade 4).

    PubMed

    Raimundo, Lariça B; Orsi, Iara A; Kuri, Sebastião E; Rovere, Carlos Alberto D; Busquim, Thaís P; Borie, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the corrosion resistance of pure titanium grade 4 (cp-Ti-4), subjected to disinfection with 0.2% and 2% peracetic acid during different immersion periods using anodic potentiodynamic polarization test in acid and neutral artificial saliva. Cylindrical samples of cp-Ti-4 (5 mm x 5 mm) were used to fabricate 24 working electrodes, which were mechanically polished and divided into eight groups (n=3) for disinfection in 2% and 0.2% peracetic acid for 30 and 120 min. After disinfection, anodic polarization was performed in artificial saliva with pH 4.8 and 6.8 to assess the electrochemical behavior of the electrodes. A conventional electrochemical cell, constituting a reference electrode, a platinum counter electrode, and the working electrode (cp-Ti specimens) were used with a scanning rate of 1 mV/s. Three curves were obtained for each working electrode, and corrosion was characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS). Data of corrosion potential (Ecorr) and passive current (Ipass) obtained by the polarization curves were analyzed statistically by Student's t-test (a=0.05). The statistical analysis showed no significant differences (p>0.05) between artificial saliva types at different concentrations and periods of disinfection, as well as between control and experimental groups. No surface changes were observed in all groups evaluated. In conclusion, disinfection with 0.2% and 2% peracetic acid concentrations did not cause corrosion in samples manufactured with cp-Ti-4.

  20. High Power Laser Welding. [of stainless steel and titanium alloy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banas, C. M.

    1972-01-01

    A review of recent developments in high power, carbon dixoide laser welding is presented. Deep penetration welding in stainless steel to 0.5-in. thick, high speed welding in thin gage rimmed steel and gas shielded welding in Ti-6Al-4V alloy are described. The effects of laser power, power density, focusing optics, gas-shielding techniques, material properties and weld speed on weld quality and penetration are discussed. It is shown that laser welding performance in thin materials is comparable to that of electron beams. It is further shown that high quality welds, as evidenced by NDT, mechanical and metal-lographic tests, can be achieved. The potential of the laser for industrial welding applications is indicated.

  1. Effect of Prior and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Electron Beam Weldments of (α + β) Titanium alloy Ti-5Al-3Mo-1.5V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil Kumar, V.; Gupta, R. K.; Manwatkar, Sushant K.; Ramkumar, P.; Venkitakrishnan, P. V.

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloy Ti5Al3Mo1.5V is used in the fabrication of critical engine components for space applications. Double vacuum arc re-melted and (α + β) forged blocks were sliced into 10-mm-thick plates and subjected to electron beam welding (EBW) with five different variants of prior and post-weld heat treatment conditions. Effects of various heat treatment conditions on the mechanical properties of the weldments have been studied. The welded coupons were characterized for microstructure, mechanical properties, and fracture analysis. An optimized heat treatment and welding sequence has been suggested. Weld efficiency of 90% could be achieved. Weldment has shown optimum properties in solution treated and aged condition. Heat-affected zone adjacent to weld fusion line is found to have lowest hardness in all conditions.

  2. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Pulsed Laser Beam Welded Ti-2Al-1.5Mn Titanium Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiuyang; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties in the pulsed laser beam welded joints of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy thin sheet were investigated in this study. The results show that the original α + β-phases and the transformed α + α'-phases are found in the partially transformed heat-affected zone (HAZ) together with the remaining β-phase, and the microhardness gradually enhances in the region as the result of the increase of α'-phase. The martensitic α'-phase and the remaining β-phase are detected in the fully transformed HAZ and the fusion zone (FZ), and the highest microhardness is found in these regions in virtue of the dominant α'-phase structure. The fine α'-phase appeared in the FZ results in higher average microhardness at high welding speed. Moreover, similar to the results of microhardness test, the tensile test results mean that the HAZ and FZ are stronger than the base metal (BM). Therefore, pulsed laser beam welding is feasible for joining thin sheet of Ti-2Al-1.5Mn titanium alloy.

  3. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Area Vocational-Technical School, Schnecksville, PA.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a 12-unit secondary course in welding. Purpose stated for the flexible entry and exit course is to help students master manipulative skills to develop successful welding techniques and to gain an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in the welding field. Units cover oxyacetylene…

  4. A comparative evaluation of laser and GTA welds in a high-strength titanium alloy -- Ti-6-22-22S

    SciTech Connect

    Baeslack, W.A. III; Hurley, J.; Paskell, T.

    1994-12-31

    Titanium alloy Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-2Mo-2Cr-025Si (hereafter designated Ti-6-22-22S)is an alpha-beta titanium alloy developed for deep hardenability, high strength, intermediate temperature creep resistance, and moderate toughness. As a potential structural material for next-generation aircraft and aerospace systems, the weldability of Ti-6-22-22S has recently become a subject of increasing importance and concern. In the welding of titanium sheet, achieving satisfactory ductility is the principal limitation to alloy weldability, with poor ductility promoted by a coarse beta grain structure in the weld fusion and near-heat-affected zones. Square-butt welds were produced in 1.6 mm thick Ti-6-22-22S sheet using automatic GTA and CO{sub 2} laser welding systems. Microstructure analysis and DPH hardness traverses were performed on mounted. polished and etched specimens. Three-point bend and tensile tests were performed on transverse-weld and longitudinal-weld oriented specimens. Microstructure analysis of the laser welds revealed a fine, columnar fusion zone beta grain macrostructure and a fully-martensitic transformed-beta microstructure. Consistent with the microstructural similarities, fusion zone hardnesses of the laser welds were comparable (385 and 390 DPG, respectively) and greater than that of the base metal (330 DPH). In general, laser welds did not exhibit markedly superior ductilities relative to the GTAW, which was attributed to differences in the nature of the intragranular transformed-beta microstructures, being coarser and softer for the GTAW, the response of these as-welded microstructures to heat treatment, and interactions between the transformed-beta microstructure and the beta grain macrostructure.

  5. Vacuum brazing of alumina ceramic to titanium for biomedical implants using pure gold as the filler metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Mohammad S.

    One of the many promising applications of metal/ceramic joining is in biomedical implantable devices. This work is focused on vacuum brazing of C.P titanium to 96% alumina ceramic using pure gold as the filler metal. A novel method of brazing is developed where resistance heating of C.P titanium is done inside a thermal evaporator using a Ta heating electrode. The design of electrode is optimized using Ansys resistive heating simulations. The materials chosen in this study are biocompatible and have prior history in implantable devices approved by FDA. This research is part of Boston Retinal implant project to make a biocompatible implantable device (www.bostonretina.org). Pure gold braze has been used in the construction of single terminal feedthrough in low density hermetic packages utilizing a single platinum pin brazed to an alumina or sapphire ceramic donut (brazed to a titanium case or ferrule for many years in implantable pacemakers. Pure gold (99.99%) brazing of 96% alumina ceramic with CP titanium has been performed and evaluated in this dissertation. Brazing has been done by using electrical resistance heating. The 96% alumina ceramic disk was manufactured by high temperature cofired ceramic (HTCC) processing while the Ti ferrule and gold performs were purchased from outside. Hermetic joints having leak rate of the order of 1.6 x 10-8 atm-cc/ sec on a helium leak detector were measured. Alumina ceramics made by HTCC processing were centreless grounded utilizing 800 grit diamond wheel to provide a smooth surface for sputtering of a thin film of Nb. Since pure alumina demonstrates no adhesion or wetting to gold, an adhesion layer must be used on the alumina surface. Niobium (Nb), Tantalum (Ta) and Tungsten (W) were chosen for evaluation since all are refractory (less dissolution into molten gold), all form stable oxides (necessary for adhesion to alumina) and all are readily thin film deposited as metals. Wetting studies are also performed to determine the

  6. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Properties of Explosively Welded Titanium-Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachowski, Marcin; Gloc, Michał; Ślęzak, Tomasz; Płociński, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2017-02-01

    This paper describes a study of explosively welded titanium-carbon steel S355J2+N plates. Following the welding, plates underwent heat treatment at temperature of 600 °C for 90 min with cooling in furnace to 300 °C and in air to room temperature. The structure of the bonding was examined by using light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties before and after heat treatment were examined applying three-point bending tests with cyclic loads and hardness measurements. Fracture surfaces were investigated using computer tomography and SEM. It has been found that the bonding areas are characterized by a specific chemical composition, microstructure and microhardness. Between the steel and the Ti cladding, a strongly defected transition zone was formed and melted areas with altered chemical composition were observed. It was also demonstrated that the heat treatment commonly applied to welded steel-Ti plates had a significant and negative impact on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded plates due to formation of brittle intermetallic phases.

  7. The Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Properties of Explosively Welded Titanium-Steel Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wachowski, Marcin; Gloc, Michał; Ślęzak, Tomasz; Płociński, Tomasz; Kurzydłowski, Krzysztof Jan

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes a study of explosively welded titanium-carbon steel S355J2+N plates. Following the welding, plates underwent heat treatment at temperature of 600 °C for 90 min with cooling in furnace to 300 °C and in air to room temperature. The structure of the bonding was examined by using light, scanning electron (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy. The mechanical properties before and after heat treatment were examined applying three-point bending tests with cyclic loads and hardness measurements. Fracture surfaces were investigated using computer tomography and SEM. It has been found that the bonding areas are characterized by a specific chemical composition, microstructure and microhardness. Between the steel and the Ti cladding, a strongly defected transition zone was formed and melted areas with altered chemical composition were observed. It was also demonstrated that the heat treatment commonly applied to welded steel-Ti plates had a significant and negative impact on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded plates due to formation of brittle intermetallic phases.

  8. Understanding the effects of process parameters on the properties of cold gas dynamic sprayed pure titanium coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wilson

    The cold gas dynamic spraying of commercially pure titanium coatings was investigated. Specifically, the relationship between several key cold spray parameters on the quality of the resulting coatings was studied in order to gain a more thorough understanding of the cold spray process. To achieve this goal, three distinct investigations were performed. The first part of the investigation focussed on the effect of propelling gas, particularly helium and nitrogen, during the cold spraying of titanium coatings. Coatings were characterised by SEM and were evaluated for their deposition efficiency (DE), microhardness, and porosity. In selected conditions, three particle velocities were investigated such that for each condition, the propelling gasses temperature and pressure were attuned to attain similar particle velocities for each gas. In addition, a thick and fully dense cold sprayed titanium coating was achieved with optimised spray parameters and nozzle using helium. The corresponding average particle velocity was 1173 m/s. The second part of the investigation studied the effect of particle morphology (spherical, sponge, and irregular) and size distributions (mean particle sizes of 20, 29, and 36 mum) of commercially pure titanium on the mechanical properties of the resulting cold sprayed coatings. Numerous powder and coating characterisations were performed. From these data, semi-empirical flow (stress-strain) curves were generated based on the Johnson-Cook plasticity model which could be used as a measure of cold sprayability. Cold sprayability can be defined as the ease with which a powder can be cold sprayed. It was found that the sponge and irregular commercially pure titanium powders had higher oxygen content, poorer powder flowability, higher compression ratio, lower powder packing factor, and higher average particle impact velocities compared to the spherical powders. XRD results showed no new phases present when comparing the various feedstock powders to

  9. Simulation of the elastic deformation of laser-welded joints of an austenitic corrosion-resistant steel and a titanium alloy with an intermediate copper insert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugacheva, N. B.; Myasnikova, M. V.; Michurov, N. S.

    2016-02-01

    The macro- and microstructures and the distribution of elements and of the values of the microhardness and contact modulus of elasticity along the height and width of the weld metal and heat-affected zone of austenitic corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T steel (Russian analog of AISI 321) and titanium alloy VT1-0 (Grade 2) with an intermediate copper insert have been studied after laser welding under different conditions. The structural inhomogeneity of the joint obtained according to one of the regimes selected has been shown: the material of the welded joint represents a supersaturated solid solution of Fe, Ni, Cr, and Ti in the crystal lattice of copper with a uniformly distributed particles of intermetallic compounds Ti(Fe,Cr) and TiCu3. At the boundaries with steel and with the titanium alloy, diffusion zones with thicknesses of 0.1-0.2 mm are formed that represent supersaturated solid solutions based on iron and titanium. The strength of such a joint was 474 MPa, which corresponds to the level of strength of the titanium alloy. A numerical simulation of the mechanical behavior of welded joints upon the elastic tension-compression has been performed taking into account their structural state, which makes it possible to determine the amplitude values of the deformations of the material of the weld.

  10. Solid Particle Erosion Behaviors of Carbon-Fiber Epoxy Composite and Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Feng; Gao, Feng; Pant, Shashank; Huang, Xiao; Yang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Rotor blades of Bell CH-146 Griffon helicopter experience excessive solid particle erosion at low altitudes in desert environment. The rotor blade is made of an advanced light-weight composite which, however, has a low resistance to solid particle erosion. Coatings have been developed and applied to protect the composite blade. However, due to the influence of coating process on composite material, the compatibility between coating and composite base, and the challenges of repairing damaged coatings as well as the inconsistency between the old and new coatings, replaceable thin metal shielding is an alternative approach; and titanium, due to its high-specific strength and better formability, is an ideal candidate. This work investigates solid particle erosion behaviors of carbon-fiber epoxy composite and titanium in order to assess the feasibility of titanium as a viable candidate for erosion shielding. Experiment results showed that carbon-fiber epoxy composite showed a brittle erosion behavior, whereas titanium showed a ductile erosion mode. The erosion rate on composite was 1.5 times of that on titanium at impingement angle 15° and increased to 5 times at impact angle 90°.

  11. Effects of Long Term Thermal Exposure on Chemically Pure (CP) Titanium Grade 2 Room Temperature Tensile Properties and Microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Room temperature tensile testing of Chemically Pure (CP) Titanium Grade 2 was conducted for as-received commercially produced sheet and following thermal exposure at 550 and 650 K for times up to 5,000 h. No significant changes in microstructure or failure mechanism were observed. A statistical analysis of the data was performed. Small statistical differences were found, but all properties were well above minimum values for CP Ti Grade 2 as defined by ASTM standards and likely would fall within normal variation of the material.

  12. Evaluation of the Pressing Characteristics of Commercially Pure Titanium Using an Instrumented Double Acting Die

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, K. Scott

    2008-06-19

    With recent advances in synthesizing titanium powder by low-cost routes, there has been growing interest in identifying process/material conditions that overcome the powder compaction problems typically found with this reactive metal. The use of instrumented dies in studying the cold pressing process for commercial iron and steel powders has provided greater insight into the complex phenomena that occur and may be used to evaluate constitutive relations that describe the compaction process. Nevertheless, little work has been conducted on the special, more problematic case of reactive metal powders such as titanium. An instrumented die was developed that allows die wall friction to be characterized and the radial stress distribution along the die wall and throughout the compact to be monitored. As will be presented, this tool has been used to investigate titanium compaction and to draw comparisons with results obtained on a baseline commercial iron powder. Both sets of data were systematically collected using various powder/die lubrication combinations.

  13. The influence of surface roughness and high pressure torsion on the growth of anodic titania nanotubes on pure titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Nan; Gao, Nong; Starink, Marco J.

    2016-11-01

    Anodic titanium dioxide nanotube (TNT) arrays have wide applications in photocatalytic, catalysis, electronics, solar cells and biomedical implants. When TNT coatings are combined with severe plastic deformation (SPD), metal processing techniques which efficiently improve the strength of metals, a new generation of biomedical implant is made possible with both improved bulk and surface properties. This work investigated the effect of processing by high pressure torsion (HPT) and different mechanical preparations on the substrate and subsequently on the morphology of TNT layers. HPT processing was applied to refine the grain size of commercially pure titanium samples and substantially improved their strength and hardness. Subsequent anodization at 30 V in 0.25 wt.% NH4F for 2 h to form TNT layers on sample surfaces prepared with different mechanical preparation methods was carried out. It appeared that the local roughness of the titanium surface on a microscopic level affected the TNT morphology more than the macroscopic surface roughness. For HPT-processed sample, the substrate has to be pre-treated by a mechanical preparation finer than 4000 grit for HPT to have a significant influence on TNTs. During the formation of TNT layers the oxide dissolution rate was increased for the ultrafine-grained microstructure formed due to HPT processing.

  14. Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy Ti-6Al-4V: Microstructure, Mechanical and Fracture Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, D. G.; Edwards, P.; Cantrell, A. M.; Gangwar, K.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-05-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has been refined to create butt welds from two sheets of Ti-6Al-4V alloy to have an ultra-fine grain size. Weld specimen testing was completed for three different FSW process conditions: As welded, stress relieved, stress relieved and machined, and for the un-welded base material. The investigation includes macrostructure, microstructure, microhardness, tensile property testing, notched bar impact testing, and fracture toughness evaluations. All experiments were conducted in accordance with industry standard testing specifications. The microstructure in the weld nugget was found to consist of refined and distorted grains of alpha in a matrix of transformed beta containing acicular alpha. The enhanced fracture toughness of the welds is a result of increased hardness, which is attributed to an increase in alpha phase, increase in transformed beta in acicular alpha, and grain refinement during the weld process. The noted general trend in mechanical properties from as welded, to stress relieved, to stress relieved and machined conditions exhibited a decrease in ultimate tensile strength, and yield strength with a small increase in ductility and a significant increase in fracture toughness.

  15. Influence of oxidative nanopatterning and anodization on the fatigue resistance of commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V.

    PubMed

    Ketabchi, Amirhossein; Weck, Arnaud; Variola, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    With an increasingly aging population, a significant challenge in implantology is the creation of biomaterials that actively promote tissue integration and offer excellent mechanical properties. Engineered surfaces with micro- and nanoscale topographies have shown great potential to control and direct biomaterial-host tissue interactions. Two simple yet efficient chemical treatments, oxidative nanopatterning and anodization, have demonstrated the ability to confer exciting new bioactive capacities to commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. However, the resulting nanoporous and nanotubular surfaces require careful assessment in regard to potential adverse effects on the fatigue resistance, a factor which may ultimately cause premature failure of biomedical implants. In this work, we have investigated the impact of oxidative nanopatterning and anodization on the fatigue resistance of commercially pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V. Quantitative (e.g., S-N curves) and qualitative analyses were carried out to precisely characterize the fatigue response of treated metals and compare it to that of polished controls. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging revealed the effects of cyclic loading on the fracture surface and on the structural integrity of chemically grown nanostructured oxides. Results from this study reinforce the importance of mechanical considerations in the development and optimization of micro- and nanoscale surface treatments for metallic biomedical implants.

  16. Commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) versus titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) materials as bone anchored implants - Is one truly better than the other?

    PubMed

    Shah, Furqan A; Trobos, Margarita; Thomsen, Peter; Palmquist, Anders

    2016-05-01

    Commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) and titanium alloys (typically Ti6Al4V) display excellent corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Although the chemical composition and topography are considered important, the mechanical properties of the material and the loading conditions in the host have, conventionally, influenced material selection for different clinical applications: predominantly Ti6Al4V in orthopaedics while cp-Ti in dentistry. This paper attempts to address three important questions: (i) To what extent do the surface properties differ when cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V materials are manufactured with the same processing technique?, (ii) Does bone tissue respond differently to the two materials, and (iii) Do bacteria responsible for causing biomaterial-associated infections respond differently to the two materials? It is concluded that: (i) Machined cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V exhibit similar surface morphology, topography, phase composition and chemistry, (ii) Under experimental conditions, cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V demonstrate similar osseointegration and biomechanical anchorage, and (iii) Experiments in vitro fail to disclose differences between cp-Ti and Ti6Al4V to harbour Staphylococcus epidermidis growth. No clinical comparative studies exist which could determine if long-term, clinical differences exist between the two types of bulk materials. It is debatable whether cp-Ti or Ti6Al4V exhibit superiority over the other, and further comparative studies, particularly in a clinical setting, are required.

  17. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  18. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Budovskikh, Evgenii A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.; Soskova, Nina A.

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB2, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO2) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  19. Formation of mixed and patterned self-assembled films of alkylphosphonates on commercially pure titanium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzka, Katarzyna; Sanchez Treviño, Alda Y.; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel A.; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel A.

    2016-12-01

    Titanium is extensively employed in biomedical devices, in particular as implant. The self-assembly of alkylphosphonates on titanium surfaces enable the specific adsorption of biomolecules to adapt the implant response against external stimuli. In this work, chemically-tailored cpTi surfaces were prepared by self-assembly of alkylphosphonate molecules. By bringing together attributes of two grafting molecules, aqueous mixtures of two alkylphosphonates were used to obtain mixed self-assembled films. Single self-assembled films were also altered by laser abrasion to produce chemically patterned cpTi surfaces. Both mixed and patterned self-assembled films were confirmed by AFM, ESEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Water contact angle measurements also revealed the composition of the self-assembly films. Chemical functionalization with two grafting phosphonate molecules and laser surface engineering may be combined to guide the bone-like formation on cpTi, and the future biological response in the host.

  20. Hardening of the surface layers of commercial pure titanium VT1-0 under combined treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Bashchenko, Lyudmila P. Gromov, Viktor E. Budovskikh, Evgenii A. Soskova, Nina A.; Ivanov, Yurii F.

    2015-10-27

    The treatment of VT1-0 titanium samples was carried out by concentrated energy fluxes. The combined treatment included surface carburizing with the joint use of powder samples of compounds with high physical and mechanical properties (namely, titanium diboride TiB{sub 2}, silicon carbide SiC and zirconium oxide ZrO{sub 2}) and subsequent electron beam treatment of surface layers formed in electroexplosive treatment. The combined treatment of surface layers resulted in the multifold increase in microhardness, which reduces depending on the depth of hardening zone. After electron-beam treatment, the depth of hardening zone is increased. During electron-beam treatment, the two-layer hardening zone forms.

  1. Electrochemical Behavior Assessment of Micro- and Nano-Grained Commercial Pure Titanium in H2SO4 Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-alhosseini, Arash; Ansari, Ali Reza; Mazaheri, Yousef; Karimi, Mohsen

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the electrochemical behavior of commercial pure titanium with both coarse-grained (annealed sample with the average grain size of about 45 µm) and nano-grained microstructure was compared by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and Mott-Schottky analysis. Nano-grained Ti, which typically has a grain size of about 90 nm, is successfully made by six-cycle accumulative roll-bonding process at room temperature. Potentiodynamic polarization plots and impedance measurements revealed that as a result of grain refinement, the passive behavior of the nano-grained sample was improved compared to that of annealed pure Ti in H2SO4 solutions. Mott-Schottky analysis indicated that the passive films behaved as n-type semiconductors in H2SO4 solutions and grain refinement did not change the semiconductor type of passive films. Also, Mott-Schottky analysis showed that the donor densities decreased as the grain size of the samples reduced. Finally, all electrochemical tests showed that the electrochemical behavior of the nano-grained sample was improved compared to that of annealed pure Ti, mainly due to the formation of thicker and less defective oxide film.

  2. Experimental study on the behavior of primary human osteoblasts on laser-cused pure titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Markwardt, Jutta; Friedrichs, Jens; Werner, Carsten; Davids, Andreas; Weise, Hartmut; Lesche, Raoul; Weber, Anke; Range, Ursula; Meißner, Heike; Lauer, Günther; Reitemeier, Bernd

    2014-05-01

    Mandibular tumor resection can lead to a mandibular segmental defect. LaserCUSING® is used to produce a mandibular implant, designed to be identical to the shape of the mandibular defect. Novel microrough surfaces result from this generative technology. In the current study, the behavior of human osteoblasts on untreated laser-cused titanium specimens or on specimens conditioned with different blasting agents was analyzed. The conditioning of these specimens resulted in surfaces with graded roughness. White light confocal microscopy and single-cell force spectroscopy were used to characterize the surface of the specimens and to quantify the initial adhesion of primary human osteoblasts to the specimens, respectively. Furthermore, cell growth, viability, apoptosis as well as mineralization of the specimens were analyzed over a time-period of 2 months. Compared to specimens that were treated with blasting agents, untreated specimens had the highest surface roughness. Quantitative SCFS measurements demonstrated that the adhesion of human primary osteoblasts was the highest on these specimens. Additionally, the untreated specimens allowed the highest number of osteoblasts to colonize. Mineralization studies showed increasing calcium and phosphor elemental composition for all specimen series. It can be concluded that untreated laser-cused titanium specimens are superior to promote the initial adhesion and subsequent colonization by osteoblast cells.

  3. Effects of Long-Term Thermal Exposure on Commercially Pure Titanium Grade 2 Elevated-Temperature Tensile Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated-temperature tensile testing of commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) Grade 2 was conducted for as-received commercially produced sheet and following thermal exposure at 550 and 650 K (531 and 711 F) for times up to 5000 h. The tensile testing revealed some statistical differences between the 11 thermal treatments, but most thermal treatments were statistically equivalent. Previous data from room temperature tensile testing was combined with the new data to allow regression and development of mathematical models relating tensile properties to temperature and thermal exposure. The results indicate that thermal exposure temperature has a very small effect, whereas the thermal exposure duration has no statistically significant effects on the tensile properties. These results indicate that CP Ti Grade 2 will be thermally stable and suitable for long-duration space missions.

  4. Imaging of Compressed Pure-CH Shells and CH Shells with Titanium-Doped Layers on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Delettrez, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    The compressed shell integrity of spherical targets has been studied using the 60-beam, 30-kJ UV, OMEGA laser system. The emission from the hot core has been imaged through the cold shell at two narrow, x-ray energy bands, absorbing and nonabsorbing by the shell, allowing nonuniformities in the core emission and the cold shell areal density to be measured. Images of the target have been obtained using a pinhole-array with K-edge filters. The x-ray energies used are around 2.8 and 4.5 keV for pure-CH shells, and around 4.5 and 6 keV for titanium-doped layers. Additional images of the shell are obtained with a framed monochromatic x-ray microscope and a time-integrated crystal-spectrometer/pinhole-array combination. We will present measurements of the compressed shell integrity at the stagnation stage of spherical implosions by varying the position of the titanium-doped layer within the shell, by varying the thickness of the CH shell, and by using two different laser pulse shapes. The experimental results will be compared with 2-D (ORCHID) hydrodynamic simulations. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  5. Diffusion bonding of commercially pure titanium to low carbon steel using a silver interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Atasoy, Evren; Kahraman, Nizamettin

    2008-10-15

    Titanium and low carbon steel plates were joined through diffusion bonding using a silver interlayer at various temperatures for various diffusion times. In order to determine the strength of the resulting joints, tensile-shear tests and hardness tests were applied. Additionally, optical, scanning electron microscopy examinations and energy dispersive spectrometry elemental analyses were carried out to determine the interface properties of the joint. The work showed that the highest interface strength was obtained for the specimens joined at 850 deg. C for 90 min. It was seen from the hardness results that the highest hardness value was obtained for the interlayer material and the hardness values on the both sides of the interlayer decreased gradually as the distance from the joint increased. In energy dispersive spectrometry analyses, it was seen that the amount of silver in the interlayer decreased markedly depending on the temperature rise. In addition, increasing diffusion time also caused some slight decrease in the amount of silver.

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser-Welded Joints of Ti-22Al-25Nb/TA15 Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dalong; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi; Zhang, Hao; Bu, Xianzheng

    2016-05-01

    Laser beam welding (LBW) was applied to join 1-mm-thick dissimilar titanium alloys, Ti-22Al-25Nb (at.%) and TA15, and the microstructure and mechanical properties of the welded joints were systematically analyzed. Defect-free joints were obtained, and the fusion zone mainly consisted of B2 and martensitic α' phases because of the uneven distribution of the β phase stabilizer and rapid cooling rate of LBW. The phase compositions of the heat-affected zone varied with the different thermal cycles during the welding process. The different microstructures of the dissimilar titanium alloys led to an unsymmetrical hardness profile, with the welded seam exhibiting the lowest value of 271 HV. In room-temperature tensile tests, the fractures all occurred preferentially in the fusion zone. The strengths of the joints were close to those of the base metal but with prominently decreasing ductility. In tensile tests performed at 550 °C, all the joints fractured in the TA15 base metal, and the strength and plasticity of the welds were equivalent to those of the TA15 base metal.

  7. Effects of the laser beam superficial heat treatment on the gas Tungsten arc Ti-6al-4v welded metal microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voiculescu, I.; Dontu, Octavian; Geanta, V.; Ganatsios, S.

    2008-03-01

    The microstructure of the weld and the extent to which it is different from the thermo-mechanically processed base material is strongly influenced by the thermal cycle of welding. The mechanical properties of composite weld structures in titanium alloys depend on structural characteristics of each region (weld, base material and heat affected area), influenced by the specific thermal cycle imposed during welding and the subsequent post-weld heat treatment. In order to improve the as-welded metal toughness and ductility, the welded metal was subjected to various post weld laser heat treatments, above and below beta transus temperature in a shielding atmosphere of pure argon. Standard micro-hardness measurements and tensile strength techniques showed higher mechanical properties of the heat treated samples in different conditions with respect to the base metal. Metallographic investigations attribute this to the formation of α'phases in heat treated material, especially in the weld metal.

  8. Full-Field Strain Behavior of Friction Stir-Welded Titanium Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    microstructural uniformity and mechanical properties [2]. Typical FSW tools for aluminum are made from tool steel and can have fairly elaborate geometries...2]. Much has been accomplished in characterizing FSW joints in 2XXX and 7XXX series aluminum alloys for aerospace use, but little published...roughly two thirds higher than aluminum . The tensile stiffness of titanium sheet is between that of steel and aluminum , but titanium’s strength

  9. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  10. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Harold; Whitney, Gregory

    This curriculum guide is intended to assist vocational instructors in preparing students for entry-level employment as welders and preparing them for advanced training in the workplace. The package contains an overview of new and emerging welding technologies, a competency/skill and task list, an instructor's guide, and an annotated bibliography.…

  11. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and corrosion resistance of commercially pure titanium through surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening and stress relieving.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Shitu; Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, Bijay P; Pandey, Rajiv; Narayanan, Shankar; Wani, Mohan R; Singh, Vakil

    2014-07-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of a novel process of surface modification, surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening, on osteoblast proliferation and corrosion behavior of commercially pure titanium (c p-Ti) in simulated body fluid. A mechanically polished disc of c p-Ti was subjected to ultrasonic shot peening with stainless steel balls to create nanostructure at the surface. A nanostructure (<20 nm) with inhomogeneous distribution was revealed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. There was an increase of approximately 10% in cell proliferation, but there was drastic fall in corrosion resistance. Corrosion rate was increased by 327% in the shot peened condition. In order to examine the role of residual stresses associated with the shot peened surface on these aspects, a part of the shot peened specimen was annealed at 400°C for 1 hour. A marked influence of annealing treatment was observed on surface structure, cell proliferation, and corrosion resistance. Surface nanostructure was much more prominent, with increased number density and sharper grain boundaries; cell proliferation was enhanced to approximately 50% and corrosion rate was reduced by 86.2% and 41% as compared with that of the shot peened and the as received conditions, respectively. The highly significant improvement in cell proliferation, resulting from annealing of the shot peened specimen, was attributed to increased volume fraction of stabilized nanostructure, stress recovery, and crystallization of the oxide film. Increase in corrosion resistance from annealing of shot peened material was related to more effective passivation. Thus, the surface of c p-Ti, modified by this novel process, possessed a unique quality of enhancing cell proliferation as well as the corrosion resistance and could be highly effective in reducing treatment time of patients adopting dental and orthopedic implants of titanium and its alloys.

  12. Strain measurement of pure titanium covered with soft tissue using X-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Tadano, Shigeru

    2010-03-01

    Measurement of the stress and strain applied to implants and bone tissue in the human body are important for fracture prediction and evaluations of implant adaptation. The strain of titanium (Ti) materials can be measuring by X-ray diffraction techniques. This study applied X-ray diffraction to the skin tissue-covered Ti. Characteristic X-rays of Mo Kalpha were used and the X-rays diffracted from the Ti were detected through the covering skin tissue. The X-ray absorption by skin tissue is large under the diffracted X-rays detected in low angles because the length of penetration depends on the angle of inclination, equal to the Bragg angle. The effects of skin tissue to detect the diffracted X-rays were investigated in the experiments. And the strain measurements were conducted under bending loads applied to the Ti specimen. The effect of skin tissue was absorption of X-rays as well as the X-rays scattered from the physiological saline contained in the tissue. The X-rays scattered by the physiological saline creates a specific background pattern near the peaks from the (002) and (011) lattice planes of Ti in the X-ray diffraction profile. Diffracted X-rays from the Ti were detected after being transmitted through 1 mm thick skin tissue by Mo Kalpha. Individual peaks such as (010), (002), (011), and (110) were clearly established by using a parallel beam arrangement. The strains of (110) lattice planes were measured with or without the tissue cover were very similar. The strain of the (110) lattice planes of Ti could be measured by Mo Kalpha when the Ti specimen was located under the skin tissue.

  13. Corrosion and in vitro biocompatibility properties of cryomilled-spark plasma sintered commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Shehreen S; Kim, Yoon Kyung; Melnyk, Christopher; Liu, Wendy; Mohamed, Farghalli A

    2013-05-01

    Ti alloys, such as Ti6Al4V, are currently used in biomedical and dental implant applications. Ti alloys are used because they are stronger than commercially pure (CP) Ti due to the presence of alloying elements. However, toxicity of alloying elements during long-term use of implants is of concern. Another means of increasing the strength of materials is grain size refinement. In this study, ultrafine-grained (UFG, ~250 nm to 1 μm) CP Ti was produced by cryomilling followed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cell culture experiments were performed to compare the corrosion and biocompatibility properties of coarse grained (CG) Ti and UFG Ti. It was found that UFG Ti exhibited corrosion resistance comparable to CG Ti in Ringers solution. In addition, UFG Ti exhibited a reduced inflammatory response and enhanced cell adhesion compared to CG Ti. Investigation of surface roughness provided an explanation for enhanced cell adhesion.

  14. The Effect of Grain Size on Fatigue Crack Propagation in Commercial Pure Titanium Investigated by Acoustic Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lifei; Zhang, Zheng; Shen, Gongtian

    2015-07-01

    The effect of grain size on fatigue crack propagation and the corresponding acoustic emission (AE) characteristics of commercial pure titanium (CP-Ti) were investigated at room temperature. After a four-point bending fatigue testing, the fatigue features and AE source mechanisms were discussed, combined with microstructural and fractographic observations. The results showed that the increased grain size had little effect on the stable propagation rate of fatigue crack; however, a significant increase in the AE counts rate was observed. During crack stable propagation, the relationship between the AE counts rate and the fatigue stress intensity factor range was generally in accordance with the Pairs law, with the exception of some local fluctuations due to regional twin paling. While lenticular twins appeared dispersively along the crack, twin palings were observed occasionally at the edge of the crack. Twin paling occurrence was more frequent in the specimens with larger grains than in those with smaller grains. This suggests that twin discontinuously played a role in the fatigue process in this CP-Ti, and that the AE technique is sensitive to crack propagation and twinning events during fatigue.

  15. Combined Laser Beam Welding and Brazing Process for Aluminium Titanium Hybrid Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, F.; Grden, M.; Thomy, C.; Vollertsen, F.

    The current state of the art in light-weight construction is - for the case of aircraft structures - the use of either aluminium or titanium. Whereas aluminium is light-weight and less expensive, titanium offers superior corrosion properties at higher cost. In order to combine the advantages of both materials, a hybrid Ti-Al structure is proposed for e.g. seat-track application. In this paper, an overview of the results from this research work and the accompanying thermo-mechanical simulations will be reported and discussed. On the basis of the development of an appropriate system technology, the process development will be described, focusing on the main influencing parameters of the process on joint properties.

  16. Capillary flow weld-bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Jones, R. J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    The invention of a weld-bonding technique for titanium plates was described. This involves fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spot-welding and applying a bead of adhesive along the edge of the resistance spot-welded joint which upon heating, flows and fills the separation between the joint components.

  17. Filler wire for aluminum alloys and method of welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Jr., Gerald W. O. (Inventor); Cho, Alex (Inventor); Russell, Carolyn K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A weld filler wire chemistry has been developed for fusion welding 2195 aluminum-lithium. The weld filler wire chemistry is an aluminum-copper based alloy containing high additions of titanium and zirconium. The additions of titanium and zirconium reduce the crack susceptibility of aluminum alloy welds while producing good weld mechanical properties. The addition of silver further improves the weld properties of the weld filler wire. The reduced weld crack susceptibility enhances the repair weldability, including when planishing is required.

  18. Structure and properties of commercially pure titanium nitrided in the plasma of a low-pressure gas discharge produced by a PINK plasma generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Yu F.; Akhmadeev, Yu H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, V.; Koval, N. N.

    2015-11-01

    The paper analyzes the surface structure and properties of commercially pure VT1-0 titanium nitrided in the plasma of a low-pressure gas discharge produced by a PINK plasma generator. The analysis demonstrates that the friction coefficient of the nitrided material decreases more than four times and its wear resistance and microhardness increases more than eight and three times, respectively. The physical mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of strength and tribological properties of the material are discussed.

  19. Laser-Modified Surface Enhances Osseointegration and Biomechanical Anchorage of Commercially Pure Titanium Implants for Bone-Anchored Hearing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Omar; Simonsson, Hanna; Palmquist, Anders; Thomsen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Osseointegrated implants inserted in the temporal bone are a vital component of bone-anchored hearing systems (BAHS). Despite low implant failure levels, early loading protocols and simplified procedures necessitate the application of implants which promote bone formation, bone bonding and biomechanical stability. Here, screw-shaped, commercially pure titanium implants were selectively laser ablated within the thread valley using an Nd:YAG laser to produce a microtopography with a superimposed nanotexture and a thickened surface oxide layer. State-of-the-art machined implants served as controls. After eight weeks’ implantation in rabbit tibiae, resonance frequency analysis (RFA) values increased from insertion to retrieval for both implant types, while removal torque (RTQ) measurements showed 153% higher biomechanical anchorage of the laser-modified implants. Comparably high bone area (BA) and bone-implant contact (BIC) were recorded for both implant types but with distinctly different failure patterns following biomechanical testing. Fracture lines appeared within the bone ~30–50 μm from the laser-modified surface, while separation occurred at the bone-implant interface for the machined surface. Strong correlations were found between RTQ and BIC and between RFA at retrieval and BA. In the endosteal threads, where all the bone had formed de novo, the extracellular matrix composition, the mineralised bone area and osteocyte densities were comparable for the two types of implant. Using resin cast etching, osteocyte canaliculi were observed directly approaching the laser-modified implant surface. Transmission electron microscopy showed canaliculi in close proximity to the laser-modified surface, in addition to a highly ordered arrangement of collagen fibrils aligned parallel to the implant surface contour. It is concluded that the physico-chemical surface properties of laser-modified surfaces (thicker oxide, micro- and nanoscale texture) promote bone bonding

  20. The effect of static applied potential on the 24-hour impedance behavior of commercially pure titanium in simulated biological conditions.

    PubMed

    Ehrensberger, Mark T; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2010-04-01

    Potential step impedance analysis was utilized to evaluate the electrochemical impedance of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) samples that were polarized to static potentials (range from -1000 mV to +1000 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) and immersed in physiologically relevant electrolytes [phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and cell culture medium with 10% fetal bovine serum (AMEM + FBS)] for 24 hrs. The cpTi impedance outcomes were a complex function of voltage, solution constituents, and immersion time. In the 0 mV to +1000 mV range, oxide growth was observed over 24 hr immersion in both solutions based on decreasing current density (approximately 10(-6) A/cm(2) to approximately 10(-8) A/cm(2)) and increasing R(p) (200 kOmega cm(2) to approximately 10 MOmega cm(2)). Below 0 mV, the 24 hr R(p) decreased with negative potential to approximately 15 kOmega cm(2). After 24 hr immersion, oxide dissolution and/or adsorption of organic species caused the capacitance to increase at -1000 mV (AMEM + FBS & PBS) and at -600 mV (AMEM + FBS only). Twenty-four hours of immersion in AMEM + FBS at -1000 mV and -600 mV produced a surface coloration that is likely due to alteration of oxide valance state and/or doping level. This work shows that Ti surface oxide and its electrochemical behavior can be altered dramatically under sustained cathodic potentials.

  1. The effect of fretting associated periodic cathodic potential shifts on the electrochemistry and in vitro biocompatibility of commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    Ciolko, Alexandra A; Tobias, Menachem; Ehrensberger, Mark T

    2016-11-01

    This study explored how periodic cathodic polarization of commercially pure titanium (cpTi) alters its electrochemical properties and biocompatibility. MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells were cultured directly on cpTi samples and maintained at open circuit potential (OCP) for 24 h followed by an additional 24-h sequence of periodic cathodic polarization to -1000 or -750 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) for 1 s followed by a 5-s recovery at OCP. Control experiments were performed where the samples were maintained at OCP throughout the entire test. Subsequent electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed both of the periodic cathodic polarization conditions significantly reduced the polarization resistance (Rp ), while only the -1000 mV condition significantly increased the capacitance (C) as compared to the controls. Scanning electron micrographs showed that the cells were fragmented and balled up on the samples periodically shifted to -1000 mV as compared to the cells that were well spread on the controls and samples periodically shifted to -750 mV. Additionally, live/dead fluorescence microscopy revealed that periodic polarizations to -1000 mV reduced cell viability to around 12% as compared to the greater than 95% cell viability observed on the controls and samples periodically polarized to -750 mV. This work showed that periodic cathodic potential shifts can notably alter the electrochemical behavior of cpTi and the viability and morphology of cells seeded directly onto its surface. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1591-1601, 2016.

  2. SCC INITIATION AND GROWTH RATE STUDIES ON TITANIUM GRADE 7 AND BASE METAL, WELDED, AND AGED ALLOY 22 IN CONCENTRATED GROUNDWATER

    SciTech Connect

    J.H. Payer

    2005-08-01

    The stress corrosion crack initiation and growth rate response was evaluated on as-received, as-welded, cold worked and aged Alloy 22 (UNS N06022) and titanium Grades 7 (UNS R52400), 28 (UNS R55323) and 29 (UNS R56404) at 105-165 C in various aerated, concentrated groundwater environments. Time-to-failure experiments on actively-loaded tensile specimens at 105 C evaluated the effects of applied stress, welding, surface finish, shot peening, cold work, crevicing, and aging treatments in Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), and found these materials to be highly resistant to SCC (none observed). Long-term U-bend data at 165 C corroborated these findings. Titanium Grade 7 and stainless steels were also included in the 105 C test matrix. Long term crack growth rate data showed stable crack growth in titanium Grade 7. Recent creep tests in air confirm literature data that these alloys are quite susceptible to creep failure, even below the yield stress, and it is unclear whether cracking in SCC tests is only accelerated by the creep response, or whether creep is responsible for cracking. Alloy 22 exhibited stable growth rates under ''gentle'' cyclic loading, but was prone to crack arrest at fully static loading. No effect of Pb additions was observed.

  3. Effect of Heat Input on the Tensile Damage Evolution in Pulsed Laser Welded Ti6Al4V Titanium Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Gao, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianxun

    2016-11-01

    The present paper is focused on studying the effect of heat input on the tensile damage evolution of pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of Ti6Al4V alloy under monotonic loading. To analyze the reasons that the tensile fracture site of the pulsed-laser-welded Ti6Al4V sheet joints changes with the heat input under monotonic loading, the microstructure of the sample with different nominal strain values was investigated by in situ observation. Experiment results show that the tensile ductility and fatigue life of welded joints with low heat input are higher than that of welded joints with high heat input. Under tensile loads, the critical engineering strain for crack initiation is much lower in the welded joint with high heat input than in the welded joints with low and medium heat input. And the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the fusion zone than in the base metal for the welded joints with high input, whereas the microstructural damage accumulation is much faster in the base metal than in the fusion zone for the welded joints with low input. Consequently, the welded joints fractured in the fusion zone for the welds with high heat input, whereas the welded joints ruptured in the base metal for the welds with low heat input. It is proved that the fine grain microstructure produced by low heat input can improve the critical nominal strain for crack initiation and the resistance ability of microstructural damage.

  4. Combined effect of grain refinement and surface modification of pure titanium on the attachment of mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, A E; Neumann, A; Ng, H P; Lapovok, R; Kasper, C; Lowe, T C; Anumalasetty, V N; Estrin, Y

    2017-02-01

    Surface modification is an important step in production of medical implants. Surface roughening creates additional surface area to enhance the bonding between the implant and the bone. Recent research provided a means to alter the microstructure of titanium by severe plastic deformation (SPD) in order to increase its strength, and thereby reduce the size of the implants (specifically, their diameter). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of bulk microstructure of commercially pure titanium with coarse-grained (CG) and ultrafine-grained (UFG) bulk structure on the surface state of these materials after surface modification by sand blasting and acid etching (SLA). It was shown that SLA-modified surface characteristics, in particular, roughness, chemistry, and wettability, were affected by prior SPD processing. Additionally, biocompatibility of UFG titanium was examined using osteosarcoma cell line SaOS-2 and primary human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (adMSC) cultures. Enhanced cell viability as well as increased matrix mineralization during osteogenic differentiation of MSCs on the surface of ultrafine-grained titanium was shown.

  5. Effects of sandblasting, H2SO4/HCl etching, and phosphate primer application on bond strength of veneering resin composite to commercially pure titanium grade 4.

    PubMed

    Egoshi, Takafumi; Taira, Yohsuke; Soeno, Kohyoh; Sawase, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength of a resin composite to a commercially pure titanium. The bonding surfaces of all titanium specimens were ground with 1,000-grit silicon carbide paper and then subjected to one or more of these surface treatments: sandblasting with alumina (sand), etching with 45wt% H2SO4 and 15wt% HCl (SH-etchant) at 70°C for 10 min, and/or phosphate primer (MDP-primer) application. Specimens not subjected to any surface treatment were used as controls. After resin composite veneer placement and 24-h water immersion, the shear bond strengths of the specimens in descending order were: sand/SH-etchant/MDP-primer, sand/SH-etchant/no primer, no sand/SH-etchant/MDP-primer, sand/no etch/MDP-primer, no sand/SH-etchant/no primer, sand/no etch/no primer, no sand/no etch/MDP-primer, no sand/no etch/no primer. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that sandblasting and SH-etchant created many micro- and nanoscale cavities on the titanium surface. Results showed that a combined use of sandblasting, SH-etchant, and MDP-primer application had a cooperative effect on titanium bonding.

  6. Physicochemical state of the nanotopographic surface of commercially pure titanium following anodization-hydrothermal treatment reveals significantly improved hydrophilicity and surface energy profiles.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Jun; Ito, Shigeki; Miura, Shingo; Miyata, Kyohei; Ishibashi, Kanji

    2012-01-01

    A method of coating commercially pure titanium (cpTi) implants with a highly crystalline, thin hydroxyapatite (HA) layer using discharge anodic oxidation followed by hydrothermal treatment (Spark discharged Anodic oxidation treatment ; SA-treated cpTi) has been reported for use in clinical dentistry. We hypothesized that a thin HA layer with high crystallinity and nanostructured anodic titanium oxide film on such SA-treated cpTi implant surfaces might be a crucial function of their surface-specific potential energy. To test this, we analyzed anodic oxide (AO) cpTi and SA-treated cpTi disks by SEM and AFM. Contact angles and surface free energy of each disk surface was measured using FAMAS software. High-magnification SEM and AFM revealed the nanotopographic structure of the anodic titanium oxide film on SA-treated cpTi; however, this was not observed on the AO cpTi surface. The contact angle and surface free energy measurements were also significantly different between AO cpTi and SA-treated cpTi surfaces (Tukey's, P<0.05). These data indicated that the change of physicochemical properties of an anodic titanium oxide film with HA crystals on an SA-treated cpTi surface may play a key role in the phenomenon of osteoconduction during the process of osseointegration.

  7. Submerged-arc welding slags: characterization and leaching strategies for the removal of aluminum and titanium.

    PubMed

    Annoni, Raquel; Souza, Poliana Santos; Petrániková, Martina; Miskufova, Andrea; Havlík, Tomáš; Mansur, Marcelo Borges

    2013-01-15

    In the present study, submerged-arc welding slags were characterized by applying a variety of methods, including X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, particle size, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The content of Al proved to be quite similar within neutral and acid slags (10-14%), while that of Ti proved to be much higher in acid slags (approximately 10%) than in neutral slags (<1%). The presence of spinel structures associated with Al species could also be identified in the analyzed samples. This characterization study was accompanied by leaching tests performed under changing operating conditions in an attempt to evaluate to what extent the Al and Ti bearing components could be removed from the slags. The leaching work involved three distinct strategies: (i) NaOH leaching followed by H(2)SO(4) leaching, (ii) acid leaching (HCl and H(2)SO(4)) using oxidizing/reducing agents, and (iii) slag calcination followed by H(2)SO(4) leaching. In the best result, 80% of Al was extracted in one single leaching stage after calcination of the acid slag with NaCl+C at 900 °C. By contrast, the removal of Ti proved to be unsatisfactory.

  8. Preparation and characterization of porous bioceramic layers on pure titanium surfaces obtained by micro-arc oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Chi-Sheng; Hung, Yu-Chien; Hong, Ting-Fu; Wu, Chung-Chun; Kuo, Tsung-Yuan; Lee, Tzer-Min; Liao, Tze-Yuan; Lin, Huan-Chang; Chuang, Cheng-Hsin

    2017-03-01

    Fluorapatite (FA) has better chemical and thermal stability than hydroxyapatite (HA), and has thus attracted significant interest for biomaterial applications in recent years. In this study, porous bioceramic layers were prepared on pure titanium surfaces using a micro-arc oxidation (MAO) technique with an applied voltage of 450 V and an oxidation time of 5 min. The MAO process was performed using three different electrolyte solutions containing calcium fluoride (CaF2), calcium acetate monohydrate (Ca(CH3COO)2·H2O), and sodium phosphate monobasic dihydrate (NaH2PO4·2H2O) mixed in ratios of 0:2:1, 1:1:1, and 2:0:1, respectively. The surface morphology, composition, micro-hardness, porosity, and biological properties of the various MAO coatings were examined and compared. The results showed that as the CaF2/Ca(CH3COO)2·H2O ratio increased, the elemental composition of the MAO coating transformed from HA, A-TiO2 (Anatase) and R-TiO2 (Rutile); to A-TiO2, R-TiO2, and a small amount of HA; and finally A-TiO2, R-TiO2, CaF2, TiP2O5, and FA. The change in elemental composition was accompanied by a higher micro-hardness and a lower porosity. The coatings exhibited a similar in vitro bioactivity performance during immersion in simulated body fluid for 7-28 days. Furthermore, for in initial in vitro biocompatibility tests performed for 24 h using Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) supplement containing 10%Fetal bovine serum, the attachment and spreading of osteoblast-like osteosarcoma MG63 cells were found to increase slightly with an increasing CaF2/Ca(CH3COO)2·H2O ratio. In general, the results presented in this study show that all three MAO coatings possess a certain degree of in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility.

  9. Fabrication of nanotube arrays on commercially pure titanium and their apatite-forming ability in a simulated body fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsueh-Chuan; Wu, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Shih-Kuang; Chang, Yu-Chen; Ho, Wen-Fu

    2015-02-15

    In this study, we investigated self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotubes that were grown using anodization of commercially pure titanium at 5 V or 10 V in NH{sub 4}F/NaCl electrolyte. The nanotube arrays were annealed at 450 °C for 3 h to convert the amorphous nanotubes to anatase and then they were immersed in simulated body fluid at 37 °C for 0.5, 1, and 14 days. The purpose of this experiment was to evaluate the apatite-formation abilities of anodized Ti nanotubes with different tube diameters and lengths. The nanotubes that formed on the surfaces of Ti were examined using a field emission scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscope. When the anodizing potential was increased from 5 V to 10 V, the pore diameter of the nanotube increased from approximately 24–30 nm to 35–53 nm, and the tube length increased from approximately 590 nm to 730 nm. In vitro testing of the heat-treated nanotube arrays indicated that Ca-P formation occurred after only 1 day of immersion in simulated body fluid. This result was particularly apparent in the samples that were anodized at 10 V. It was also found that the thickness of the Ca-P layer increases as the applied potential for anodized c.p. Ti increases. The average thickness of the Ca-P layer on Ti that was anodized at 5 V and 10 V was approximately 170 nm and 190 nm, respectively, after immersion in simulated body fluid for 14 days. - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanotube on Ti surface was formed by anodic oxidation in a NaCl/NH{sub 4}F solution. • TiO{sub 2} layers show a tube length of 590 nm and 730 nm at 5 V and 10 V, respectively. • After soaking in SBF, Ca-P layer completely covered the entire nanotubular surfaces. • The Ca-P layer was thicker on the Ti surface anodized at 10 V.

  10. Microstructural Evolution of the Interface Between Pure Titanium and Low Melting Point Zr-Ti-Ni(Cu) Filler Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongmyoung; Sun, Juhyun; Kang, Donghan; Shin, Seungyoung; Hong, Juhwa

    2014-12-01

    Low melting point Zr-based filler metals with melting point depressants (MPDs) such as Cu and Ni elements are used for titanium brazing. However, the phase transition of the filler metals in the titanium joint needs to be explained, since the main element of Zr in the filler metals differs from that of the parent titanium alloys. In addition, since the MPDs easily form brittle intermetallics, that deteriorate joint properties, the phase evolution they cause needs to be studied. Zr-based filler metals having Cu content from 0 to 12 at. pct and Ni content from 12 to 24 at. pct with a melting temperature range of 1062 K to 1082 K (789 °C to 809 °C) were wetting-tested on a titanium plate to investigate the phase transformation and evolution at the interface between the titanium plate and the filler metals. In the interface, the alloys system with Zr, Zr2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases was easily changed to a Ti-based alloy system with Ti, Ti2Ni, and (Ti,Zr)2Ni phases, by the local melting of parent titanium. The dissolution depths of the parent metal were increased with increasing Ni content in the filler metals because Ni has a faster diffusion rate than Cu. Instead, slow diffusion of Cu into titanium substrate leads to the accumulation of Cu at the molten zone of the interface, which could form undesirable Ti x Cu y intermetallics. This study confirmed that Zr-based filler metals are compatible with the parent titanium metal with the minimum content of MPDs.

  11. Study of weld offset in longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. S.; Brunair, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of rocket engine structures such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet X-rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered in this report. Using the FEM and beamlike plate approximations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thicknesses on both sides of the joint. Following the study, some conclusions are derived for the weld offsets.

  12. Titanium 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that the metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  13. Characterization of solid-phase welds between Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0. 01Si and Ti-13. 5A1-21. 5Nb titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Baeslack, W.A. III; Juhas, M.; Fraser, H.L. ); Broderick, T.F. . Materials Directorate)

    1994-12-01

    Dissimilar-alloy welds have been produced between Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si (wt.%) and Ti-13.5Al-21.5Nb (wt.%) titanium aluminide using three different solid-phase welding processes that create significantly different thermo-mechanical conditions at the weld interface. Exposure to supertransus temperatures, appreciable deformation and rapid cooling of the weld interface region during linear-friction welding promote dynamic recrystallization of beta grains and beta decomposition to fine martensitic products. In contrast, diffusion welding at temperatures below the base metal beta transus temperatures and at relatively low pressures minimizes deformation and microstructural variations in the weld interface region relative to the unaffected base metal. During capacitor-discharge resistance spot welding, extremely rapid heating of the weld interface region to near-solidus temperatures, and subsequent rapid cooling, result in the formation of a metastable, ordered-beta microstructure in the Ti-13.5ASl-21.5Nb and fine alpha-prime martensite in the Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.1Si.

  14. Nanopore formation on the surface oxide of commercially pure titanium grade 4 using a pulsed anodization method in sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R S; Disegi, J; Griggs, J A; Roach, M D

    2013-10-01

    Titanium and its alloys form a thin amorphous protective surface oxide when exposed to an oxygen environment. The properties of this oxide layer are thought to be responsible for titanium and its alloys biocompatibility, chemical inertness, and corrosion resistance. Surface oxide crystallinity and pore size are regarded to be two of the more important properties in establishing successful osseointegration. Anodization is an electrochemical method of surface modification used for colorization marking and improved bioactivity on orthopedic and dental titanium implants. Research on titanium anodization using sulphuric acid has been reported in the literature as being primarily conducted in molarity levels 3 M and less using either galvanostatic or potentiostatic methods. A wide range of pore diameters ranging from a few nanometers up to 10 μm have been shown to form in sulfuric acid electrolytes using the potentiostatic and galvanostatic methods. Nano sized pores have been shown to be beneficial for bone cell attachment and proliferation. The purpose of the present research was to investigate oxide crystallinity and pore formation during titanium anodization using a pulsed DC waveform in a series of sulfuric acid electrolytes ranging from 0.5 to 12 M. Anodizing titanium in increasing sulfuric acid molarities showed a trend of increasing transformations of the amorphous natural forming oxide to the crystalline phases of anatase and rutile. The pulsed DC waveform was shown to produce pores with a size range from ≤0.01 to 1 μm(2). The pore size distributions produced may be beneficial for bone cell attachment and proliferation.

  15. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  16. Effects of concentration of Ag nanoparticles on surface structure and in vitro biological responses of oxide layer on pure titanium via plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ki Ryong; Kim, Yeon Sung; Kim, Gye Won; Yang, Hae Woong; Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2015-08-01

    This study was to investigate how Ag nanoparticles with various concentrations affect the surface structure and in vitro biological properties of oxide layers on the pure titanium produced by a plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) process. For this aim, PEO processes were carried out at an AC current density of 100 mA/cm2 for 300 s in potassium pyrophosphate (K4P2O7) electrolytes containing 0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 g/l Ag nanoparticles. Structural investigations using scanning electron microscopy evidenced that the oxide layers showed the successful incorporation of Ag nanoparticles, and the topographical deformation of the porous surface was found when the concentration of Ag nanoparticles was more than 0.1 g/l. Based on the anti-bacterial activity of all oxide layers, the Ag nanoparticles uniformly spread were of considerable importance in triggering the disinfection of E. coli bacteria. The bone forming abilities and cell (MC3T3-E1) proliferation rates of oxide layers produced in electrolytes containing 0 and 0.1 g/l Ag nanoparticles were higher than those containing 0.3 and 0.5 g/l Ag nanoparticles. Consequently, the oxide layer on pure titanium via PEO process in the electrolyte with 0.1 g/l Ag nanoparticles exhibited better the bioactivity accompanying the anti-bacterial activity.

  17. Cracks growth behaviors of commercial pure titanium under nanosecond laser irradiation for formation of nanostructure-covered microstructures (with sub-5-μm)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, A. F.; Wang, W. J.; Mei, X. S.; Zheng, B. X.; Yan, Z. X.

    2016-11-01

    This study reported on the formation of sub-5-μm microstructures covered on titanium by cracks growth under 10-ns laser radiation at the wavelength of 532 nm and its induced light modification for production of nanostructures. The electric field intensity and laser power density absorbed by commercial pure titanium were computed to investigate the self-trapping introduced by cracks and the effect of surface morphology on laser propagation characteristics. It is found that nanostructures can form at the surface with the curvature radius below 20 μm. Meanwhile, variable laser fluences were applied to explore the evolution of cracks on commercial pure titanium with or without melt as spot overlap number increased. Experimental study was first performed at the peak laser fluence of 1.063 J/cm2 to investigate the microstructures induced only by cracks growth. The results demonstrated that angular microstructures with size between 1.68 μm and 4.74 μm was obtained and no nanostructure covered. Then, at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, there were some nanostructures covered on the melt-induced curved microstructured surface. However, surface molten material submerged in the most of cracks at the spot overlap number of 744, where the old cracks disappeared. The results indicated that there was too much molten material and melting time at the peak laser fluence of 2.126 J/cm2, which was not suitable for obtainment of perfect micro-nano structures. On this basis, peak laser fluence was reduced down to 1.595 J/cm2 and the sharp sub-5 μm microstructures with nanostructures covered was obtained at spot overlap number of 3720.

  18. Influence of Helium and Nitrogen Gases on the Properties of Cold Gas Dynamic Sprayed Pure Titanium Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Wilson; Irissou, Eric; Ryabinin, Anatoly N.; Legoux, Jean-Gabriel; Yue, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of propellant gas, helium, and nitrogen during cold spraying of titanium coatings. Coatings were characterized by SEM and were evaluated for their deposition efficiency (DE), microhardness, and porosity. In selected conditions, three particle velocities were investigated in which for each condition, the propelling gases' temperature and pressure were attuned to attain similar particle velocities for each gas. Observations show that loosely bonded particles can be detached by high-pressure supersonic gas stream. Selected coatings were characterized by XPS to analyze the occurrence of oxidation and nitridation. Although generally accepted that coating characteristics can be affected by particle temperature, results show that for the same particle velocity, DE and coating density are also a function of substrate temperature. In addition, a thick and fully dense cold sprayed titanium coating was achieved with optimized spray parameters and nozzle using helium. The corresponding average particle velocity was 1173 m/s.

  19. In vitro biological response to the oxide layer in pure titanium formed at different current densities by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ki Ryong; Kim, Yeon Sung; Yang, Hae Woong; Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the influence of the current density on the surface characteristics and biological response of titanium oxide layers produced by a plasma electrolytic oxidation process. For this purpose, the present processes were carried out under alternating current conditions in a phosphate electrolyte for 300 s at current densities of 100, 150, 200, and 250 mA/cm2. The pore size decreased with decreasing the current density, whereas the mean surface roughness and amount of anatase phase increased. This tendency is considered suitable for the formation of biomimetic apatite and the proliferation of osteoblast cells. The in vitro examinations showed that the formation of biomimetic apatite and the proliferation of osteoblasts on the titanium oxide layer produced at 100 mA/cm2 were highest among the samples evaluated.

  20. Size-mediated cytotoxicity of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide, pure and zinc-doped hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in human hepatoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanand Venkatasubbu, G.; Ramasamy, S.; Avadhani, G. S.; Palanikumar, L.; Kumar, J.

    2012-03-01

    Nanoparticles are highly used in biological applications including nanomedicine. In this present study, the interaction of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCC) with hydroxyapatite (HAp), zinc-doped hydroxyapatite, and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were investigated. Hydroxyapatite, zinc-doped hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles were prepared by wet precipitation method. They were subjected to isochronal annealing at different temperatures. Particle morphology and size distribution were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The nanoparticles were co-cultured with HepG2 cells. MTT assay was employed to evaluate the proliferation of tumor cells. The DNA damaging effect of HAp, Zn-doped HAp, and TiO2 nanoparticles in human hepatoma cells (HepG2) were evaluated using DNA fragmentation studies. The results showed that in HepG2 cells, the anti-tumor activity strongly depend on the size of nanoparticles in HCC cells. Cell cycle arrest analysis for HAp, zinc-doped HAp, and TiO2 nanoparticles revealed the influence of HAp, zinc-doped HAp, and titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. The results imply that the novel nano nature effect plays an important role in the biomedicinal application of nanoparticles.

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Gas-Tungsten-Arc-Welded Ti-15-3 Beta Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, K.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Pant, Bhanu; Phanikumar, G.

    2009-11-01

    Microstructure and mechanical properties of gas-tungsten-arc (GTA)-welded Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al alloy in direct current electrode negative mode are characterized. The thermal profile was measured during welding with continuous current (CC) and pulsed current (PC) at different frequencies. A single-step postweld aging of the welded samples at subtransus temperature was attempted to study precipitation of alpha phase. Two different morphologies of alpha phase are observed along with a partitioning of alloying elements into the two phases. Processing conditions for higher strength are identified and correlated with the thermal profile. Microstructure changes due to postweld heat treatment were characterized.

  2. Feasibility of correlating V-Cr-Ti alloy weld strength with weld chemistry. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grossbeck, M.L.; Odom, R.W.

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of refractory metals such as vanadium are determined to a large extent by the interstitial impurities in the alloy. In the case of welding, interstitial impurities are introduced in the welding process from the atmosphere and by dissolution of existing precipitates in the alloy itself. Because of the necessity of having an ultra-pure atmosphere, a vacuum chamber or a glove box is necessary. In the V-Cr-Ti system, the titanium serves as a getter to control the concentration of oxygen and nitrogen in solid solution in the alloy. In this project the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) technique was used to detect, measure, and map the spacial distribution of impurity elements in welds in the alloy V-4Cr-4Ti. An attempt was then made to correlate the concentrations and distributions of the impurities with mechanical properties of the welds. Mechanical integrity of the welds was determined by Charpy V-notch testing. Welds were prepared by the gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) method. Charpy testing established a correlation between weld impurity concentration and the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Higher concentrations of oxygen resulted in a higher DBTT. An exception was noted in the case of a low-oxygen weld which had a high hydrogen concentration resulting in a brittle weld. The concentrations and distributions of the impurities determined by SIMS could not be correlated with the mechanical properties of the welds. This research supports efforts to develop fusion reactor first wall and blanket structural materials.

  3. Proliferation of mouse fibroblast-like and osteoblast-like cells on pure titanium films manufactured by electron beam melting.

    PubMed

    Kawase, Mayu; Hayashi, Tatsuhide; Asakura, Masaki; Tomino, Masafumi; Mieki, Akimichi; Kawai, Tatsushi

    2016-10-01

    The physical characteristics and biological compatibility of surfaces produced by electron beam melting (EBM) are not well known. In particular, there are not many reports on biocompatibility qualities. In this study, pure Ti films were manufactured using EBM. While it is reported that moderately hydrophilic biomaterial surfaces display improved cell growth and biocompatibility, contact angle measurements on the EBM-produced pure Ti films showed slight hydrophobicity. Nonetheless, we found the cell count of both fibroblast-like cells (L929) and osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) increased on pure Ti films, especially the MC3T3-E1, which increased more than that of the control. In addition, the morphology of L929 and MC3T3-E1 was polygonal and spindle-shaped and the cytoskeleton was well developed in the pure Ti surface groups. Upon staining with Alizarin red S, a slight calcium deposition was observed and this level gradually rose to a remarkable level. These results indicate that pure Ti films manufactured by EBM have good biocompatibility and could be widely applied as biomedical materials in the near future.

  4. Interaction of human plasma fibrinogen with commercially pure titanium as studied with atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keere, Isabel Van De; Willaert, Ronnie; Hubin, Annick; Vereecken, Jean

    2008-03-04

    The surface of a biomaterial interacts with the body fluid upon implantation in the human body. The biocompatibility of a material is strongly influenced by the adsorption of proteins onto the surface. Titanium is frequently used as a biomaterial for implants in orthopedics and cardiovascular devices. Understanding the biocompatibility is very important to improve implants. The surface chemistry of an implant material and its influence on the interaction with body fluid is crucial in that perspective. The main goal of this study was to investigate the conformation of human plasma fibrinogen (HPF) adsorbed on commercially pure titanium (CP Ti) on a molecular level by means of ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). With X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with argon ion beam depth profiling, it was shown that the oxide layer present at the surface was mainly composed of TiO2, with a small percentage of Ti2O3. Ex situ AFM imaging showed the conformation of HPF on CP Ti. Single molecules and aggregates of fibrinogen were observed. The trinodular structure of single HPF molecules (two spherical D domains at the distal ends of the extended molecule and the central spherical E domain) adsorbed onto CP Ti was visualized. Aggregate formation through the connection of the D domains of the HPF molecules was observed on CP Ti. The alphaC domains of HPF were not visible on CP Ti. The ex situ AFM images indicated conformational changes of HPF upon adsorption onto CP Ti. The conformation of the adsorbed HPF molecules was different on mica and titanium. The difference in wettability between both substrates caused a larger spread of the protein on the CP Ti surface and thus resulted in a larger perturbation to the native structure of HPF as compared to mica.

  5. Synthesis by anodic-spark deposition of Ca- and P-containing films on pure titanium and their biological response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banakh, Oksana; Journot, Tony; Gay, Pierre-Antoine; Matthey, Joël; Csefalvay, Catherine; Kalinichenko, Oleg; Sereda, Olha; Moussa, Mira; Durual, Stéphane; Snizhko, Lyubov

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize the anodized layers formed on titanium by anodic-spark deposition in an electrolyte containing Ca and P ions, Ca3(PO4)2, studied for the first time. The oxidation experiments were performed at different periods of time and using different concentrations of electrolyte. The influence of the process parameters (time of electrolysis and electrolyte concentration) on the surface morphology and chemical composition of the anodized layers was studied. It has been found that it is possible to incorporate Ca and P into the growing layer. A response of the anodized layers in a biological medium was evaluated by their immersion in a simulated body fluid. An enrichment of titanium and a simultaneous loss of calcium and phosphorus in the layer after immersion tests indicate that these coatings should be bioresorbable in a biological medium. Preliminary biological assays were performed on some anodized layers in order to assess their biocompatibility with osteoblast cells. The cell proliferation on one selected anodized sample was assessed up to 21 days after seeding. The preliminary results suggest excellent biocompatibility properties of anodized coatings.

  6. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  7. Effect of Multi-pass Friction Stir Processing on the Electrochemical and Corrosion Behavior of Pure Titanium in Strongly Acidic Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattah-Alhosseini, Arash; Attarzadeh, Farid Reza; Vakili-Azghandi, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of multi-pass friction stir processed (FSP) pure titanium was studied in 0.5 M H2SO4 solutions. Microstructures of treated and untreated samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the grain size decreased with increasing the number of applied passes of FSP. Electrochemical tests including potentiodynamic polarization measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that three passes of FSP treatments resulted in a Ti sample which exhibited the best passive behavior and had the highest corrosion resistance among all samples in strongly acidic solutions of 0.5 M H2SO4. These improvements can be attributed to the emergence of diverse structural defects and grain refinement induced by FSP treatments. Moreover, Mott-Schottky analysis was performed to investigate the semiconducting properties of passive films. It was found that the semiconducting behavior remained the same after FSP treatments but it reduced donor densities and surprisingly introduced an additional donor level.

  8. Role of surface roughness on corrosion and fretting corrosion behaviour of commercially pure titanium in Ringer's solution for bio-implant application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, Bose; Pathak, Lokesh Chandra; Singh, Raghuvir

    2017-04-01

    Influence of roughness (ra) from 43 to 474 nm on corrosion and fretting corrosion of commercially pure titanium (CpTi) was studied in the Ringer's solution. The anodic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) revealed the highest corrosion resistance of CpTi with ra 43 nm and correlated well with the surface energy (SE). The highest potential drop associated with the fretting corrosion is observed for CpTi with ra 43 nm followed by 474 nm; this is found to correspond with the worn out area. The fretting current density (ifretting) is several order higher than obtained during the potentiodynamic polarization (without fretting) study. Fretting corrosion manifested by the drop in electrochemical potential is simulated with high accuracy using fretting current density and an initial contact area. Fretting corrosion at an applied potential (+250 mV(SCE)) is produced much larger fretting corrosion current density than during the open circuit potential (OCP).

  9. Structures and properties of layered bioceramic coatings on pure titanium using a hybrid technique of sandblasting and micro-arc oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Li, Ying

    2013-10-01

    Sandblasting is the most ordinary approach not only to leave the treated regions in compressive residual stress states but also to alter the surface topography of an implant, and micro-arc oxidation (MAO) provides a novelly effective way to produce porous, adhesive and bioactive implant coatings. In this study, ceramic coatings containing Ca and P elements were deposited on the sandblasted pure titanium substrates through the MAO process, and the bioactive performance of the coatings was improved. In addition, the variation of morphology and microstructure, phase and element composition of the coatings according to treating time and related properties were characterized and analyzed, respectively. It was indicated that the hybrid-treated coatings exhibited better properties than that by MAO method, especially in hydroxyapatite (HA) inducing ability, as evidenced by characterization test and HA formation after simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion for days. The enhancement of modified surface was attributed to the combination of the physical and electrochemical treatments.

  10. Effect of sandblasting intensity on microstructures and properties of pure titanium micro-arc oxidation coatings in an optimized composite technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-Yuan; Zhu, Rui-Fu; Lu, Yu-Peng; Xiao, Gui-Yong; He, Kun; Yuan, Y. F.; Ma, Xiao-Ni; Li, Ying

    2014-02-01

    Sandblasting is one of the most effective methods to modify a metal surface and improve its properties for application. Micro-arc oxidation (MAO) could produce a ceramic coating on a dental implant, facilitating cellular differentiation and osseocomposite on it. This study aims to deposit bioceramic Ca- and P-containing coatings on sandblasted commercially pure titanium by an optimum composite technique to improve the bioactive performance. The effect of sandblasting intensity on microstructures and properties of the implant coatings is examined, and the modified surfaces are characterized in terms of their topography, phase, chemical composition, mechanical properties and hydroxyapatite (HA)-inducing ability. The results show that a moderate sandblasting micromachines the substrate in favorable combination of rough and residual stresses; its MAO coating deposits nano-hydroxyapatite after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 5 days exhibiting better bioactivity. The further improvement of the implant surface performance is attributed to an optimized composite technique.

  11. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments - conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Vignesh; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan; Mahadevan; Santhosh, S

    2015-04-01

    The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm) Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial.

  12. Comparative evaluation of the three different surface treatments – conventional, laser and Nano technology methods in enhancing the surface characteristics of commercially pure titanium discs and their effects on cell adhesion: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Vignesh; Nayar, Sanjna; Bhuminathan; Mahadevan; Santhosh, S.

    2015-01-01

    The surface area of the titanium dental implant materials can be increased by surface treatments without altering their shape and form, thereby increasing the biologic properties of the biomaterial. A good biomaterial helps in early cell adhesion and cell signaling. In this study, the commercially pure titanium surfaces were prepared to enable machined surfaces to form a control material and to be compared with sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces, laser treated surfaces and titanium dioxide (20 nm) Nano-particle coated surfaces. The surface elements were characterized. The biocompatibility was evaluated by cell culture in vitro using L929 fibroblasts. The results suggested that the titanium dioxide Nano-particle coated surfaces had good osteoconductivity and can be used as a potential method for coating the biomaterial. PMID:26015762

  13. Pure titanium particle loaded nanocomposites: study on the polymer/filler interface and hMSC biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Avolio, Roberto; D'Albore, Marietta; Guarino, Vincenzo; Gentile, Gennaro; Cocca, Maria Cristina; Zeppetelli, Stefania; Errico, Maria Emanuela; Avella, Maurizio; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2016-10-01

    The integration of inorganic nanoparticles into polymer matrices allows for the modification of physical properties as well as the implementation of new features for unexplored application fields. Here, we propose the study of a new metal/polymer nanocomposite fabricated by dispersing pure Ti nanoparticles into a poly(methylmetacrilate) matrix via solvent casting process, to investigate its potential use as new biomaterial for biomedical applications. We demonstrated that Ti nanoparticles embedded in the poly(methylmetacrilate) matrix can act as reinforcing agent, not negatively influencing the biological response of human mesenchymal stem cell in terms of cytotoxicity and cell viability. As a function of relative amount and surface treatment, Ti nanoparticles may enhance mechanical strength of the composite-ranging from 31.1 ± 2.5 to 43.7 ± 0.7 MPa-also contributing to biological response in terms of adhesion and proliferation mechanisms. In particular, for 1 wt% Ti, treated Ti nanoparticles improve cell materials recognition, as confirmed by higher cell spreading-quantified in terms of cell area via image analysis-locally promoting stronger interactions at cell matrix interface. At this stage, these preliminary results suggest a promising use of pure Ti nanoparticles as filler in polymer composites for biomedical applications.

  14. Pure Titanium Membrane (Ultra – Ti®) in the Treatment of Periodontal Osseous Defects: A Split-Mouth Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Rajeev; Pardhe, Nilesh Dinesh; Srivastava, Nancy; Bajpai, Manas; Gupta, Shailendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although many different types of Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) membranes (resorbable/non-resorbable, including titanium mesh) have been used in the field of Periodontics till now, but this is the first and only clinical study testing the effectiveness of an ultra thin pure Titanium Membrane (Ultra Ti) as a GTR membrane in infra-bony periodontal defects. Aim To compare the efficacy of GTR in intra-bony defects with newly introduced non-resorbable barrier membrane, made of titanium called “Ultra-Ti ® GTR Membrane” versus open flap debridement. Materials and Methods A prospective, randomized, controlled, clinical split mouth study was designed wherein each patient received both the control and test treatment. Two similar defects were selected in each of the 12 patients and were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments. Both the surgeries consisted of identical procedures except for the omission of the barrier membrane in the control sites. Full mouth Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI), Pocket Probing Depth (PPD) and Relative Attachment Level (RAL) were recorded before surgery and after 6 months and 9 months along with hard tissue measurements at the time of surgery and then at re-entry after 9 months. Radiographs were also taken before surgery and 9 months post operatively. Student’s paired t-test and unpaired t-test (SPSS software version 9) were used to analyze the results. Results Nine months after treatment, the test defects gained 4.375 ± 1.189mm of RAL, while the control defects yielded a significantly lower RAL gain of 3.417 ± 0.996mm. Pocket reduction was also significantly higher in the test group (4.917 ± 0.996mm) when compared with the controls (3.83 ± 0.718mm). There was a significant bone fill (54.69% of defect fill) obtained in the test site, unlike the control site (8.91%). Conclusion The present study demonstrated that GTR with “Ultra-Ti® GTR Membrane” resulted in a significant added benefit in comparison with

  15. Microstructural Evolution in Friction Stir Welding of Ti-5111

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    industry for aluminum alloys. FSW of steels is under continued development. 1.1.3.1 Friction Stir Welding of Metals Since the development of...or friction welding [Titanium handbook]. A potential welding technique for titanium that has shown promise for joining aluminum and steel is...combatants, this research examines an alternative joining technology, friction stir welding ( FSW ). Friction stir welding uses a non-consumable tool to

  16. Hot press and roll welding of titanium-6-percent-aluminum-4-percent-vanadium bar and sheet with auto-vacuum cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holko, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    Hot press butt welds were made in 0.5 in. diameter bar, and roll lap welds were made in 0.060 in. thick sheet of Ti-6A1-4V. For hot press welds made after auto-vacuum cleaning at 1800 F for 2 hours, weld strength and ductility equaled the parent metal properties. Only 5 minutes of pressing time were needed at 1800 F and 200 psi to make the hot press welds. Roll welds were made in sheet at 1750 F with only 10 percent deformation. The welds in the bar and sheet were metallurgically indistinguishable from the parent material.

  17. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  18. Nanostructure of vortex during explosion welding.

    PubMed

    Rybin, V V; Greenberg, B A; Ivanov, M A; Patselov, A M; Antonova, O V; Elkina, O A; Inozemtsev, A V; Salishchev, G A

    2011-10-01

    The microstructure of a bimetallic joint made by explosion welding of orthorhombic titanium aluminide (Ti-30Al-16Nb-1Zr-1Mo) with commercially pure titanium is studied. It is found that the welded joint has a multilayered structure including a severely deformed zone observed in both materials, a recrystallized zone of titanium, and a transition zone near the interface. Typical elements of the transition zone-a wavy interface, macrorotations of the lattice, vortices and tracks of fragments of the initial materials-are determined. It is shown that the observed vortices are formed most probably due to local melting of the material near the contact surface. Evidence for this assumption is deduced from the presence of dipoles, which consist of two vortices of different helicity and an ultrafine duplex structure of the vortex. Also, high mixing of the material near the vortex is only possible by the turbulent transport whose coefficient is several orders of magnitude larger than the coefficient of atomic diffusion in liquids. The role played by fragmentation in both the formation of lattice macrorotations and the passage of coarse particles of one material through the bulk of the other is determined.

  19. Bonding titanium to Rene 41 alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Pair of intermediate materials joined by electron beam welding method welds titanium to Rene 41 alloy. Bond is necessary for combining into one structure high strength-to-density ratio titanium fan blades and temperature resistant nickel-base alloy turbine-buckets in VTOL aircraft lift-fan rotor.

  20. Technique development for field inspection of cracking in seam welded ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Shell, Eric B.; Benson, Craig; Liljestrom, Greg C.; Shanahan, Stephen

    2014-02-18

    The resistance seam weld interfaces between alloyed and pure titanium are an in service concern due to precipitation of titanium hydride and resulting embrittlement and cracking. Several inspection techniques were developed and evaluated for field use to characterize the damage in the fleet. Electromagnetic, ultrasonic, florescent penetrant, thermographic, and radiographic techniques were considered. The ultrasonic and electromagnetic approaches were both found suitable. However, the electromagnetic approach is more desirable for field inspections, due to consistency and ease of use. The electromagnetic inspection procedure is able to discriminate between precursor damage and through cracking with sufficient sensitivity to small cracks.

  1. Parametric study in weld mismatch of longitudinally welded SSME HPFTP inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Spanyer, K. L.; Brunair, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Welded joints are an essential part of pressure vessels such as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turbopumps. Defects produced in the welding process can be detrimental to weld performance. Recently, review of the SSME high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) titanium inlet x rays revealed several weld discrepancies such as penetrameter density issues, film processing discrepancies, weld width discrepancies, porosity, lack of fusion, and weld offsets. Currently, the sensitivity of welded structures to defects is of concern. From a fatigue standpoint, weld offset may have a serious effect since local yielding, in general, aggravates cyclic stress effects. Therefore, the weld offset issue is considered. Using the finite element method and mathematical formulations, parametric studies were conducted to determine the influence of weld offsets and a variation of weld widths in longitudinally welded cylindrical structures with equal wall thickness on both sides of the joint. From the study, the finite element results and theoretical solutions are presented.

  2. New explosive seam welding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Recently developed techniques provide totally-confined linear explosive seam welding and produce scarf joint with linear explosive seam welding. Linear ribbon explosives are utilized in making narrow, continuous, airtight joints in variety of aluminum alloys, titanium, copper, brass, and stainless steel.

  3. Failure behavior of plasma-sprayed HAp coating on commercially pure titanium substrate in simulated body fluid (SBF) under bending load.

    PubMed

    Laonapakul, Teerawat; Rakngarm Nimkerdphol, Achariya; Otsuka, Yuichi; Mutoh, Yoshiharu

    2012-11-01

    Four point bending tests with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring were conducted for evaluating failure behavior of the plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HAp) top coat on commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) plate with and without mixed HAp/Ti bond coat. Effect of immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) on failure behavior of the coated specimen was also investigated by immersing the specimen in SBF. The AE patterns obtained from the bending test of the HAp coating specimens after a week immersion in SBF clearly showed the earlier stage of delamination and spallation of the coating layer compared to those without immersion in SBF. It was also found that the bond coating improved failure resistance of the HAp coating specimen compared to that without the bond coat. Four point bend fatigue tests under ambient and SBF environments were also conducted with AE monitoring during the entire fatigue test for investigating the influence of SBF environment on fatigue failure behavior of the HAp coating specimen with the mixed HAp/Ti bond coat. The specimens tested at a stress amplitude of 120 MPa under both ambient and SBF environments could survive up to 10⁷ cycles without spallation of HAp coating layer. The specimens tested under SBF environment and those tested under ambient environment after immersion in SBF showed shorter fatigue life compared to those tested under ambient environment without SBF immersion. Micro-cracks nucleated in the coating layer in the early stage of fatigue life and then propagated into the cp-Ti substrate in the intermediate stage, which unstably propagated to failure in the final stage. It was found from the XRD analysis that the dissolution of the co-existing phases and the precipitation of the HAp phase were taken place during immersion in SBF. During this process, the co-existing phases disappeared from the coating layer and the HAp phase fully occupied the coating layer. The degradation of bending strength and fatigue life of the HAp coating

  4. Behavior of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI titanium alloy sheet parent and weld metal in the presence of cracks at 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.

    1971-01-01

    Through- and surface-cracked specimens of two thicknesses were tested in uniaxial tension. Surface-cracked specimens were generally found to be stronger than through-cracked specimens with the same crack length. Apparent surface-crack fracture toughness calculated using the Anderson modified Irwin equation remained relatively constant for cracks as deep as 90 percent of the sheet thickness. Subcritical growth of surface cracks was investigated. Comparison of chamber and open air welds showed chamber welds to be slightly tougher. Both methods produced welds with toughness that compared favorably with that of the parent metal. Weld efficiencies were above 94 percent.

  5. Performance of a scanning mobility particle sizer in measuring diverse types of airborne nanoparticles: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes, welding fumes, and titanium dioxide spray.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Friend, Sherri; Stone, Samuel; Keane, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Direct-reading instruments have been widely used for characterizing airborne nanoparticles in inhalation toxicology and industrial hygiene studies for exposure/risk assessments. Instruments using electrical mobility sizing followed by optical counting, e.g., scanning or sequential mobility particle spectrometers (SMPS), have been considered as the "gold standard" for characterizing nanoparticles. An SMPS has the advantage of rapid response and has been widely used, but there is little information on its performance in assessing the full spectrum of nanoparticles encountered in the workplace. In this study, an SMPS was evaluated for its effectiveness in producing "monodisperse" aerosol and its adequacy in characterizing overall particle size distribution using three test aerosols, each mimicking a unique class of real-life nanoparticles: singlets of nearly spherical titanium dioxide (TiO2), agglomerates of fiber-like multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and aggregates that constitutes welding fume (WF). These aerosols were analyzed by SMPS, cascade impactor, and by counting and sizing of discrete particles by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effectiveness of the SMPS to produce classified particles (fixed voltage mode) was assessed by examination of the resulting geometric standard deviation (GSD) from the impactor measurement. Results indicated that SMPS performed reasonably well for TiO2 (GSD = 1.3), but not for MWCNT and WF as evidenced by the large GSD values of 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. For overall characterization, results from SMPS (scanning voltage mode) exhibited particle-dependent discrepancies in the size distribution and total number concentration compared to those from microscopic analysis. Further investigation showed that use of a single-stage impactor at the SMPS inlet could distort the size distribution and underestimate the concentration as shown by the SMPS, whereas the presence of vapor molecules or atom clusters in some test

  6. Performance of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer in Measuring Diverse Types of Airborne Nanoparticles: Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Welding Fumes, and Titanium Dioxide Spray

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Friend, Sherri; Stone, Samuel; Keane, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Direct-reading instruments have been widely used for characterizing airborne nanoparticles in inhalation toxicology and industrial hygiene studies for exposure/risk assessments. Instruments using electrical mobility sizing followed by optical counting, e.g., scanning or sequential mobility particle spectrometers (SMPS), have been considered as the “gold standard” for characterizing nanoparticles. An SMPS has the advantage of rapid response and has been widely used, but there is little information on its performance in assessing the full spectrum of nanoparticles encountered in the workplace. In this study, an SMPS was evaluated for its effectiveness in producing “monodisperse” aerosol and its adequacy in characterizing overall particle size distribution using three test aerosols, each mimicking a unique class of real-life nanoparticles: singlets of nearly spherical titanium dioxide (TiO2), agglomerates of fiber-like multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and aggregates that constitutes welding fume (WF). These aerosols were analyzed by SMPS, cascade impactor, and by counting and sizing of discrete particles by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effectiveness of the SMPS to produce classified particles (fixed voltage mode) was assessed by examination of the resulting geometric standard deviation (GSD) from the impactor measurement. Results indicated that SMPS performed reasonably well for TiO2 (GSD = 1.3), but not for MWCNT and WF as evidenced by the large GSD values of 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. For overall characterization, results from SMPS (scanning voltage mode) exhibited particle-dependent discrepancies in the size distribution and total number concentration compared to those from microscopic analysis. Further investigation showed that use of a single-stage impactor at the SMPS inlet could distort the size distribution and underestimate the concentration as shown by the SMPS, whereas the presence of vapor molecules or atom clusters in

  7. Morphology of the surface of technically pure titanium VT1-0 after electroexplosive carbonization with a weighed zirconium oxide powder sample and electron beam treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sosnin, Kirill V.; Raykov, Sergey V.; Vaschuk, Ekaterina S.; Budovskikh, Evgenie A. Gromov, Victor E.; Ivanov, Yuri F.

    2014-11-14

    Titanium is carbonized by the electroexplosive method. Formation of a surface alloyed layer and a coating on the treated surface is established by the methods of transmission electron microscopy. The morphology and elemental composition of the alloyed layer are analyzed. A dependence of the structure of the modified layer subjected to electron gun treatment on the absorbed power density is revealed.

  8. Cytotoxic effects of four types of welding fumes on macrophages in vitro: a comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Pasanen, J.T.; Gustafsson, T.E.; Kalliomaeki, P.L.T.; Tossavainen, A.; Jaervisalo, J.O.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of fume particles given off by the manual metal arc (MMA) and metal inert gas (MIG) welding of stainless steel (SS) and mild steel (MS) were studied on rat alveolar macrophage cultures in vitro. The fumes were generated by welding, and particulate material obtained was collected on membrane filters. The macrophage cultures were exposed to the total dust and to its water-insoluble fractions. Cell variability and the release of both lactate dehydrogenase and one lysosomal enzyme from the cells to the medium were measured after an exposure period of 24 h. The cytotoxic control dust was DQ 12 quartz, and the inert control dust was pure titanium dioxide. According to the parameters studied, SS/MMA and MS/MMA welding fumes were cytotoxic to rat alveolar macrophages. The cytotoxic effect of SS/MMA welding fumes decreased after the samples had been washed with phosphate-buffered salt solution. The MIG welding fumes of SS and MS had markedly smaller effects on the cells. Diluted solutions of potassium chromate were also tested in order to investigate its role in the cytotoxicity of SS/MMA welding fumes. The results suggest that hexavalent chromium may be responsible for the cytotoxicity of SS/MMA.

  9. A comparison of the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of commercially pure titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and in distilled water: a fracture mechanics approach.

    PubMed

    Roach, Michael D; Williamson, R Scott; Thomas, Joseph A; Griggs, Jason A; Zardiackas, Lyle D

    2014-01-01

    From the results of laboratory investigations reported in the literature, it has been suggested that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms may contribute to early failures in titanium alloys that have elevated oxygen concentrations. However, the susceptibility of titanium alloys to SCC in physiological environments remains unclear. In this study, a fracture mechanics approach was used to examine the SCC susceptibility of CP titanium grade 4 in Ringer's solution and distilled de-ionized (DI) water, at 37°C. The study duration was 26 weeks, simulating the non-union declaration of a plated fracture. Four wedge loads were used corresponding to 86-95% of the alloy's ligament yield load. The longest cracks were measured to be 0.18 mm and 0.10 mm in Ringer's solution and DI water, respectively. SEM analysis revealed no evidence of extensive fluting and quasi-cleavage fracture features which, in literature reports, were attributed to SCC. We thus postulate that the Ringer's solution accelerated the wedge-loaded crack growth without producing the critical stresses needed to change the fracture mechanism. Regression analysis of the crack length results led to a significant best-fit relationship between crack growth velocity (independent variable) and test electrolyte, initial wedge load, and time of immersion of specimen in electrolyte (dependent variables).

  10. Underwater wet welding consumables for offshore applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Osio, A.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1993-12-31

    The use of underwater wet welding for offshore repairs has been limited mainly because of porosity in the resulting welds. With appropriate consumable design, however, it is possible to enhance weld metal toughness through microstructural refinement and to reduce porosity. New titanium and boron based consumables have been developed with which high toughness acicular ferrite can be produced in underwater wet welds. Titanium, by means of oxide formation, promoted an increase in weld metal acicular ferrite, while boron additions decreased the amount of grain boundary ferrite, further improving the microstructure. Porosity reduction was possible through the addition of calcium carbonate at approximately 13 wt. % in the coating. However, weld metal decarburization also resulted with the addition.

  11. Submerged Arc Welding of Titanium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-30

    slag control. 7) Further developmental work was necessary. Following Petsch’s work, Union Carbide Corporation, under contract to the Office of Naval...crucibles under argon. However, subsequent X—ray analysis indicated that this fusion technique resulted in 1 to 37. CaO impurity formation from adsorbed...this source would probably not produce a large quantity of nitrogen; however, all flux was fused under argon in order to prevent any such

  12. The effect of mucine, IgA, urea, and lysozyme on the corrosion behavior of various non-precious dental alloys and pure titanium in artificial saliva.

    PubMed

    Bilhan, H; Bilgin, T; Cakir, A F; Yuksel, B; Von Fraunhofer, J A

    2007-11-01

    The corrosion of dental alloys has biological, functional, and aesthetic consequences. Various studies have shown that protein solutions can inhibit the corrosion of alloys. This study is planned to determine the relationship of organic constituents of saliva and the corrosion of dental alloys. The organic constituents are IgA, mucine, urea, and lysozyme which are encountered in the highest amounts in saliva and the dental materials are titanium (Ti), Co-Cr-Mo and Ni-Cr-Mo alloys, and dental amalgam, the most often used metallic components in dentistry. In particular, the interactions between the commonest salivary proteins, IgA, mucine, urea and lysozyme, and Ti, Co-Cr-Mo, Ni-Cr-Mo and dental amalgam were investigated. Each alloy was evaluated by cyclic polarization in each medium. The general anodic and cathodic behavior during forward and reverse cycles, the corrosion and passivation current densities (muA/cm2 ), and the corrosion and the pitting potentials (mV) were determined. The results have shown that Ni-Cr-Mo and dental amalgam alloys are highly susceptible to corrosion in all the investigated media. The Co-Cr-Mo alloy has shown high passive current densities in the solution of mucine and lysozyme in artificial saliva. Titanium instead, has shown a high resistance to corrosion and a stable passive behavior in all media, especially in a solution of mucine and IgA in synthetic saliva. Mucine and IgA, as well as urea and lysozyme, appeared to enhance the formation of a passive film layer on the Ti metal surface, thus inhibiting the corrosion. Based on the study findings, and especially considering the problem of nickel allergy and toxicity of mercury released from dental amalgam, the use of Co-Cr-Mo alloys and Ti to Ni-Cr-Mo alloys is recommended and alternatives to dental amalgam should be sought for patients with impaired salivary flow.

  13. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  14. Investigation of Torsional Strength of the VT6 Weld Joint Produced by Linear Friction Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleimanova, G. R.; Kabirov, R. R.; Karavaeva, M. V.; Ershova, Yu. A.; Zhilyaev, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Results of measurement of torsional strength of the weld joint of the VT6 titanium alloy produced by linear friction welding are presented. For a comparison, the same method was used to test monolithic specimens of the VT6 alloy. Torsional strength values of the weld joint (τUS = 861 MPa and φ = 110°) correspond to the strength of the monolithic material. In this case, the specimens fail along the base metal.

  15. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  16. Welding IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding IV, a competency-based course in advanced arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with proficiency in: (1) single vee groove welding using code specifications established by the American Welding Society…

  17. Automatic orbital GTAW welding: Highest quality welds for tomorrow's high-performance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henon, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG welding is certain to play an increasingly prominent role in tomorrow's technology. The welds are of the highest quality and the repeatability of automatic weldings is vastly superior to that of manual welding. Since less heat is applied to the weld during automatic welding than manual welding, there is less change in the metallurgical properties of the parent material. The possibility of accurate control and the cleanliness of the automatic GTAW welding process make it highly suitable to the welding of the more exotic and expensive materials which are now widely used in the aerospace and hydrospace industries. Titanium, stainless steel, Inconel, and Incoloy, as well as, aluminum can all be welded to the highest quality specifications automatically. Automatic orbital GTAW equipment is available for the fusion butt welding of tube-to-tube, as well as, tube to autobuttweld fittings. The same equipment can also be used for the fusion butt welding of up to 6 inch pipe with a wall thickness of up to 0.154 inches.

  18. Advanced Welding Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  19. Advanced Welding Science for DoD Application. The Genesis of the Army Welding Microfactory, Workshop held in Golden, Colorado on March 20+-22, 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    2000). 39 5.3.7 Welding and Joinint Consumables Presen 1995 22005 (a) Aluminum-Lithium and Composite Fillers (b) Hardfacing (c) Lov Cost Titanium...filler alloys need to be investigated for unique weld metal properties (1991). HARDFACING (22) Welded overlay band process for artillery rotating

  20. More About Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oelgoetz, Peter A.; Davis, William M.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes modification and testing of proposed tool discussed in "Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld Beads" (MFS-30056). Modified version of commercial pneumatically driven rotary cutting tool removes such hard metals as nickel alloys, titanium, and stainless steels.

  1. Welding Technician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  2. Influence of Solute Content and Solidification Parameters on Grain Refinement of Aluminum Weld Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schempp, Philipp; Cross, Carl Edward; Pittner, Andreas; Rethmeier, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Grain refinement provides an important possibility to enhance the mechanical properties ( e.g., strength and ductility) and the weldability (susceptibility to solidification cracking) of aluminum weld metal. In the current study, a filler metal consisting of aluminum base metal and different amounts of commercial grain refiner Al Ti5B1 was produced. The filler metal was then deposited in the base metal and fused in a GTA welding process. Additions of titanium and boron reduced the weld metal mean grain size considerably and resulted in a transition from columnar to equiaxed grain shape ( CET). In commercial pure aluminum (Alloy 1050A), the grain-refining efficiency was higher than that in the Al alloys 6082 and 5083. Different welding and solidification parameters influenced the grain size response only slightly. Furthermore, the observed grain-size reduction was analyzed by means of the undercooling parameter P and the growth restriction parameter Q, which revealed the influence of solute elements and nucleant particles on grain size.

  3. Reduction of titanium dioxide to metallic titanium conducted under the autogenic pressure of the reactants.

    PubMed

    Eshed, Michal; Irzh, Alexander; Gedanken, Aharon

    2009-08-03

    We report on a reaction to convert titanium dioxide to titanium. The reduction reaction was done under the autogenic pressure of the reactants at 750 degrees C for 5 h. The MgO, a by-product, was removed by acids to obtain pure metallic titanium.

  4. A superior process for forming titanium hydrogen isotopic films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W.

    1975-01-01

    Process forms stoichiometric, continuous, strongly bonded titanium hydrogen isotopic films. Films have thermal and electrical conductivities approximately the same as bulk pure titanium, ten times greater than those of usual thin films.

  5. Fatigue Crack Growth in Friction Stir Welded Ti-5111

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    base plate [3-9]. The FSW weld nugget region in aluminum alloys, steels , and titanium alloys typically consists of very fine equiaxed grains...Unlike FSW aluminum alloys and FSW steels where the transition from base plate microstructure to weld nugget microstructure is gradual and is comprised...through the FSW weld nugget regions also have been reported for FSW HSLA-65 steel and FSW aluminum alloys [3,7,8]. To verify the presence of residual

  6. Elements of arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This paper looks at the following arc welding techniques: (1) shielded metal-arc welding; (2) submerged-arc welding; (3) gas metal-arc welding; (4) flux-cored arc welding; (5) electrogas welding; (6) gas tungsten-arc welding; and (7) plasma-arc welding.

  7. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  8. Effect of Pre- and Post-weld Heat Treatments on Linear Friction Welded Ti-5553

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanjara, Priti; Dalgaard, Elvi; Gholipour, Javad; Cao, Xinjin; Cuddy, Jonathan; Jonas, John J.

    2014-10-01

    Linear friction welding allows solid-state joining of near-beta ( β) titanium alloy Ti-5553 (Ti-5Al-5V-5Mo-3Cr). In the as-welded condition, the weld zone (WZ) exhibits β grain refinement and marked softening as compared with Ti-5553 in the solution heat treated and aged condition. The softening of the weldment is attributed to the depletion of the strengthening alpha ( α) phase in the WZ and the adjacent thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ). Specifically, in near- β titanium alloys, the strength of the material mainly depends on the shape, size, distribution, and fraction of the primary α and other decomposition products of the β phase. Hence, a combination of pre- and post-weld heat treatments were applied to determine the conditions that allow mitigating the α phase depletion in the WZ and TMAZ of the welds. The mechanical response of the welded samples to the heat treatments was determined by performing microhardness measurements and tensile testing at room temperature with an automated 3D deformation measurement system. It was found that though the joint efficiency in the as-welded condition was high (96 pct), strain localization and failure occurred in the TMAZ. The application of post-weld solution heat treatment with aging was effective in restoring α, increasing the joint efficiency (97 to 99 pct) and inducing strain localization and failure in the parent material region.

  9. WELDING TORCH

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  10. Hydrogen content in titanium and a titanium-zirconium alloy after acid etching.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias J; Walter, Martin S; Lyngstadaas, S Petter; Wintermantel, Erich; Haugen, Håvard J

    2013-04-01

    Dental implant alloys made from titanium and zirconium are known for their high mechanical strength, fracture toughness and corrosion resistance in comparison with commercially pure titanium. The aim of the study was to investigate possible differences in the surface chemistry and/or surface topography of titanium and titanium-zirconium surfaces after sand blasting and acid etching. The two surfaces were compared by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and profilometry. The 1.9 times greater surface hydrogen concentration of titanium zirconium compared to titanium was found to be the major difference between the two materials. Zirconium appeared to enhance hydride formation on titanium alloys when etched in acid. Surface topography revealed significant differences on the micro and nanoscale. Surface roughness was increased significantly (p<0.01) on the titanium-zirconium alloy. High-resolution images showed nanostructures only present on titanium zirconium.

  11. Effects of titanium and zirconium on iron aluminide weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, R.P.; Edwards, G.R.; David, S.A.

    1996-08-01

    Iron aluminides form a coarse fusion zone microstructure when gas-tungsten arc welded. This microstructure is susceptible to hydrogen cracking when water vapor is present in the welding environment. Because fusion zone microstructural refinement can reduce the hydrogen cracking susceptibility, titanium was used to inoculate the weld pool in iron aluminide alloy FA-129. Although the fusion zone microstructure was significantly refined by this method, the fracture stress was found to decrease with titanium additions. This decrease is attributed to an increase in inclusions at the grain boundaries.

  12. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  13. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  14. Plasma arc welding weld imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor); Mcgee, William F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A welding torch for plasma arc welding apparatus has a transparent shield cup disposed about the constricting nozzle, the cup including a small outwardly extending polished lip. A guide tube extends externally of the torch and has a free end adjacent to the lip. First and second optical fiber bundle assemblies are supported within the guide tube. Light from a strobe light is transmitted along one of the assemblies to the free end and through the lip onto the weld site. A lens is positioned in the guide tube adjacent to the second assembly and focuses images of the weld site onto the end of the fiber bundle of the second assembly and these images are transmitted along the second assembly to a video camera so that the weld site may be viewed continuously for monitoring the welding process.

  15. A comparison of two types of neural network for weld quality prediction in small scale resistance spot welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xiaodong; Wang, Yuanxun; Zhao, Dawei; Huang, YongAn

    2017-09-01

    Our study aims at developing an effective quality monitoring system in small scale resistance spot welding of titanium alloy. The measured electrical signals were interpreted in combination with the nugget development. Features were extracted from the dynamic resistance and electrode voltage curve. A higher welding current generally indicated a lower overall dynamic resistance level. A larger electrode voltage peak and higher change rate of electrode voltage could be detected under a smaller electrode force or higher welding current condition. Variation of the extracted features and weld quality was found more sensitive to the change of welding current than electrode force. Different neural network model were proposed for weld quality prediction. The back propagation neural network was more proper in failure load estimation. The probabilistic neural network model was more appropriate to be applied in quality level classification. A real-time and on-line weld quality monitoring system may be developed by taking advantages of both methods.

  16. Robotic Vision for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Vision system for robotic welder looks at weld along axis of welding electrode. Gives robot view of most of weld area, including yet-unwelded joint, weld pool, and completed weld bead. Protected within welding-torch body, lens and fiber bundle give robot closeup view of weld in progress. Relayed to video camera on robot manipulator frame, weld image provides data for automatic control of robot motion and welding parameters.

  17. Cutting Tool For Shaving Weld Beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, David S.; Mcferrin, David C.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.; Coby, John B., Jr.; Dawson, Sidney G.

    1995-01-01

    Cutting tool proposed for use in shaving weld beads flush with adjacent surfaces of weldments. Modified version of commercial pneumatically driven rotary cutting tool, cutting wheel of which turns at speeds sufficient for machining nickel alloys, titanium, and stainless steels. Equipped with forward-mounted handle and rear-mounted skid plate to maximize control and reduce dependence on skill of technician.

  18. Porcelain veneering of titanium--clinical and technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Haag, Per

    2011-01-01

    Gold and other alloys have long been used for the production of crowns and bridges as replacements for damaged or lost teeth. However, doubts have arisen on the suitability of using these materials for dental restorations, as gold has also shown a capacity to cause side-effects such as allergic reactions. This is especially valid for alloys, which during the last decades have been used as porcelain-fused-to metal restorations. This fact has led to an interest in using titanium instead of these alloys. Trials to use titanium for this purpose were initiated in Japan in the early 1980s. Titanium as an unalloyed metal differs in two aspects from the above named alloys: it has a phase transformation at 882 degrees C, which changes its outer and inner properties, and it has an expansion that lies between that of the porcelain types available on the market at the time. In Japan a technique for casting titanium was developed, where the after-treatment of the casting was elaborate, to re-establish the original properties of titanium. The porcelain developed for veneering had shortcomings as the rendering produced a rough surface and non satisfactory esthetics. In Sweden a new concept was introduced in 1989. Here the processing of titanium was performed by industrial methods such as milling, spark erosion and laser welding. The idea behind this was to avoid phase transformation. During the 1990s a number of porcelain products were launched and a vast number of both laboratory and clinical studies were performed and published, with varying results. In the first study of this thesis a prospective clinical trial was performed at a public dental health clinic in Sweden. Twenty-five patients were provided with 40 copings of pure titanium, which were veneered with porcelain. After 2 years 36 of these crowns were evaluated and the patients were also interviewed regarding problems such as shooting pains or difficulties in cleaning around the teeth that were crowned. This evaluation

  19. Fracture Mechanical Measurements with Commercial Stainless Steels at 4 K and with Cp-Titanium at 173 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyilas, A.; Mitterbacher, H.

    2010-04-01

    Using the JETT (J-Evaluation on Tensile Test) technique, measurements have been performed with commercial stainless steels in forged and cast condition for the reason of an assessment for low temperature service down to 4 K. These steels frequently used for industrial applications are designated by German Werkstoff (WNr) 1.4308 and 1.4408 cast stainless steels and a forged material with the number 1.4307. The fracture toughness tests at 4 K with forged material 1.4307 comprised apart from the base metal also the weld zone and additionally the 5% and 8% pre-strained conditions of the base metal. Fracture toughness reduced slightly for cold worked condition gradually as well as for the weld joint. The Reliability of the JETT measurements has been also checked using the ASTM E 1820—99a standard. In addition, to these measurements, commercial pure ASTM grade 2 titanium (WNr 3.7035) has been also examined using the same JETT method for the reason of industrial application and the requirement of minimum fracture toughness of 100 MPa√m was fulfilled at 173 K. Furthermore, test results performed at 7 K of pure titanium plate material (ASTM grade 1) with respect to fracture mechanical JETT method are presented.

  20. Welding III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allegheny County Community Coll., Pittsburgh, PA.

    Instructional objectives and performance requirements are outlined in this course guide for Welding III, an advanced course in arc welding offered at the Community College of Allegheny County to provide students with the proficiency necessary for industrial certification. The course objectives, which are outlined first, specify that students will…

  1. Welding Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EASTCONN Regional Educational Services Center, North Windham, CT.

    The purpose of this welding program is to provide students with skills and techniques to become employed as advanced apprentice welders. The welding program manual includes the following sections: (1) course description; (2) general objectives; (3) competencies; (4) curriculum outline for 13 areas; (5) 13 references; and (6) student progress…

  2. WELDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  3. In vitro toxicity evaluation of silver soldering, electrical resistance, and laser welding of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Sestini, Silvia; Notarantonio, Laura; Cerboni, Barbara; Alessandrini, Carlo; Fimiani, Michele; Nannelli, Pietro; Pelagalli, Antonio; Giorgetti, Roberto

    2006-12-01

    The long-term effects of orthodontic appliances in the oral environment and the subsequent leaching of metals are relatively unknown. A method for determining the effects of various types of soldering and welding, both of which in turn could lead to leaching of metal ions, on the growth of osteoblasts, fibroblasts, and oral keratinocytes in vitro, is proposed. The effects of cell behaviour of metal wires on osteoblast differentiation, expressed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity; on fibroblast proliferation, assayed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulphophenil)-2H-tetrazolium-phenazine ethosulphate method; and on keratinocyte viability and migration on the wires, observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), were tested. Two types of commercially available wires normally used for orthodontic appliances, with a similar chemical composition (iron, carbon, silicon, chromium, molybdenum, phosphorus, sulphur, vanadium, and nitrogen) but differing in nickel and manganese content, were examined, as well as the joints obtained by electrical resistance welding, traditional soldering, and laser welding. Nickel and chromium, known as possible toxic metals, were also examined using pure nickel- and chromium-plated titanium wires. Segments of each wire, cut into different lengths, were added to each well in which the cells were grown to confluence. The high nickel and chromium content of orthodontic wires damaged both osteoblasts and fibroblasts, but did not affect keratinocytes. Chromium strongly affected fibroblast growth. The joint produced by electrical resistance welding was well tolerated by both osteoblasts and fibroblasts, whereas traditional soldering caused a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in both osteoblast ALP activity and fibroblast viability, and prevented the growth of keratinocytes in vitro. Laser welding was the only joining process well tolerated by all tested cells.

  4. Composite thin-foil bandpass filter for EUV astronomy Titanium-antimony-titanium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinsky, P.; Martin, C.; Kimble, R.; Bowyer, S.; Steele, G.

    1983-01-01

    Thin metallic foils of antimony and titanium have been investigated in an attempt to develop an EUV filter with a bandpass from 350 to 550 A. A composite filter has been developed composed of antimony sandwiched between two titanium foils. The transmissions of sample composite foils and of pure titanium foils from 130 to 1216 A are presented. The absorption coefficients of anatimony and titanium and the effect of titanium oxide on the transmission are derived. The composite filter has been found to be quite stable and mechanically rugged. Among other uses, the filter shows substantial promise for EUV astronomy.

  5. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  6. ELECTRIC WELDING EQUIPMENT AND AUTOMATION OF WELDING IN CONSTRUCTION,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    WELDING , *ARC WELDING , AUTOMATION, CONSTRUCTION, INDUSTRIES, POWER EQUIPMENT, GENERATORS, POWER TRANSFORMERS, RESISTANCE WELDING , SPOT WELDING , MACHINES, AUTOMATIC, STRUCTURES, WIRING DIAGRAMS, USSR.

  7. Solid State Joining of Dissimilar Titanium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Todd W.

    Solid state joining of titanium via friction stir welding and diffusion bonding have emerged as enablers of efficient monolithic structural designs by the eliminations fasteners for the aerospace industry. As design complexity and service demands increase, the need for joints of dissimilar alloys has emerged. Complex thermomechanical conditions in friction stir weld joints and high temperature deformation behavior differences between alloys used in dissimilar joints gives rise to a highly variable flow pattern within a stir zone. Experiments performed welding Ti-6Al-4V to beta21S show that mechanical intermixing of the two alloys is the primary mechanism for the generation of the localized chemistry and microstructure, the magnitude of which can be directly related to pin rotation and travel speed weld parameters. Mechanical mixing of the two alloys is heavily influenced by strain rate softening phenomena, and can be used to manipulate weld nugget structure by switching which alloy is subjected to the advancing side of the pin. Turbulent mixing of a weld nugget and a significant reduction in defects and weld forces are observed when the beta21S is put on the advancing side of the weld where higher strain rates are present. Chemical diffusion driven by the heat of weld parameters is characterized using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and is shown to be a secondary process responsible for generating short-range chemical gradients that lead to a gradient of alpha particle structures. Diffusion calculations are inconsistent with an assumption of steady-state diffusion and show that material interfaces in the weld nugget evolve through the break-down of turbulent interface features generated by material flows. A high degree of recrystallization is seen throughout the welds, with unique, hybrid chemistry grains that are generated at material interfaces in the weld nugget that help to unify the crystal structure of dissimilar alloys. The degree of

  8. Laser Welded versus Resistance Spot Welded Bone Implants: Analysis of the Thermal Increase and Strength

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Meleti, Marco; Bonanini, Mauro; Lagori, Giuseppe; Vescovi, Paolo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Nammour, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The first aim of this “ex vivo split mouth” study was to compare the thermal elevation during the welding process of titanium bars to titanium implants inserted in pig jaws by a thermal camera and two thermocouples. The second aim was to compare the strength of the joints by a traction test with a dynamometer. Materials and Methods. Six pigs' jaws were used and three implants were placed on each side of them for a total of 36 fixtures. Twelve bars were connected to the abutments (each bar on three implants) by using, on one side, laser welding and, on the other, resistance spot welding. Temperature variations were recorded by thermocouples and by thermal camera while the strength of the welded joint was analyzed by a traction test. Results. For increasing temperature, means were 36.83 and 37.06, standard deviations 1.234 and 1.187, and P value 0.5763 (not significant). For traction test, means were 195.5 and 159.4, standard deviations 2.00 and 2.254, and P value 0.0001 (very significant). Conclusion. Laser welding was demonstrated to be able to connect titanium implant abutments without the risk of thermal increase into the bone and with good results in terms of mechanical strength. PMID:25110731

  9. Workshop Report Advanced Welding Science for DoD Application: The Genesis of the Army Welding Microfactory Held in Golden, Colorado on 20-22 March 1991.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Hardfacing (c) Low Cost Titanium Consumables (d) Flux and Electrode Coating Systems (e) High Performance Aluminum Consumables (f) Aluminum Filler...investigation. Aluminum metal matrix composite filler alloys need to be investigated for unique weld metal properties (1991). HARDFACING (22) Welded overlay

  10. Welded Kimberlite?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Straaten, B. I.; Kopylova, M. G.; Russell, J. K.; Scott Smith, B. H.

    2009-05-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits generally involves the sintering of hot glassy vesicular particles and requires the presence of a load and/or high temperatures. Welding can occur on various scales as observed in large welded pyroclastic flows, in small-volume agglutinated spatter rims, or as in coalesced clastogenic lava flows. In all these examples welding occurs mainly by reduction or elimination of porosity within the vesicular clasts and/or inter-clast pore space. The end result of welding in pyroclastic deposits is to produce dense, massive, coherent deposits. Here, we present a possible new end-member of the welding process: welding of non- vesicular pyroclasts in intra-crater kimberlite deposits. Kimberlite melt is a low-viscosity liquid carrying abundant crystals. Because of this, kimberlite eruptions generally produce non-vesicular pyroclasts. During welding, these pyroclast cannot deform by volume reduction to form typical fiamme. As a result, welding and compaction in kimberlites proceeds via the reduction of inter-clast pore space alone. The lack of porous pyroclasts limits the maximum amount of volumetric strain within pyroclastic kimberlite deposits to about 30%. This value is substantially lower than the limiting values for welding of more common felsic pyroclastic flows. The lower limit for volumetric strain in welded kimberlite deposits severely restricts the development of a fabric. In addition, pyroclastic kimberlite deposits commonly feature equant-shaped pyroclasts, and equant-shaped crystals. This, in turn, limits the visibility of the results of compaction and pore space reduction, as there are few deformable markers and elongate rigid markers that are able to record the strain during compaction. These features, together with the low viscosity of kimberlite magma and the stratigraphic position of these kimberlite deposits within the upper reaches of the volcanic conduit, call for careful interpretation of coherent-looking rocks in these

  11. Solar cell welded interconnection development program. [parallel gap and ultrasonic metal-metal bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Parallel gap welding and ultrasonic bonding techniques were developed for joining selected interconnect materials (silver, aluminum, copper, silver plated molybdenum and Kovar) to silver-titanium and aluminum contact cells. All process variables have been evaluated leading to establishment of optimum solar cell, interconnect, electrodes and equipment criteria for obtainment of consistent high quality welds. Applicability of nondestructive testing of solar cell welds has been studied. A pre-weld monitoring system is being built and will be utilized in the numerically controlled parallel gap weld station.

  12. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  13. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  14. Designing shielded metal arc consumables for underwater wet welding in offshore applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Osio, A.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.; Ibarra, S.

    1995-08-01

    The use of underwater wet welding for offshore repairs has been limited mainly because of porosity and low toughness in the resulting welds. With appropriate consumable design, however, it is possible to reduce porosity and to enhance weld metal toughness through microstructural refinement. New titanium and boron-based consumables have been developed with which high toughness acicular ferrite (AF) can be produced in underwater wet welds. Titanium, by means of oxide formation, promoted an increase in the amount of acicular ferrite in the weld metal, while boron additions decreased the amount of grain boundary ferrite (GBF), further improving the microstructure. Porosity reduction was possible through the addition of calcium carbonate at approximately 13 wt percent in the electrode coating. However, weld metal decarbonization also resulted with the addition of carbonate.

  15. Particulate and gaseous emissions when welding aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Cole, Homer; Epstein, Seymour; Peace, Jon

    2007-09-01

    Fabrication and repair of aluminum components and structures commonly involves the use of electric arc welding. The interaction of the arc and the metal being welded generates ultraviolet radiation, metallic oxides, fumes, and gases. Aluminum is seldom used as the pure metal but is often alloyed with other metals to improve strength and other physical properties. Therefore, the exact composition of any emissions will depend on the welding process and the particular aluminum alloy being welded. To quantify such emissions, The Aluminum Association sponsored several studies to characterize arc welding emissions by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) processes for various combinations of base and filler alloys. In all cases, the tests were conducted under conditions that could be found in a production weld shop without forced ventilation. The concentrations of each analyte that a welder could be exposed to were greatly affected by the welding process, the composition of the base and filler alloys, the position of the welder, and the welding helmet. The results obtained can be used by employers to identify and control potential hazards associated with the welding of aluminum alloys and can provide the basis for hazard communication to employees involved in the welding of these alloys.

  16. Welding of Vanadium, Tantalum, 304L and 21-6-9 Stainless Steels, and Titanium Alloys at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a Fiber Delivered 2.2 kW Diode Pumped CW Nd:YAG Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Pong, R; Gauthier, M

    2006-06-16

    This report summarizes the results of a series of laser welds made between 2003 and 2005 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The results are a compilation of several, previously unpublished, internal LLNL reports covering the laser welding of vanadium, tantalum, 304L stainless steel, 21-6-9 (Nitronic 40) steel, and Ti-6Al-4V. All the welds were made using a Rofin Sinar DY-022 diode pumped continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. Welds are made at sharp focus on each material at various power levels and travel speeds in order to provide a baseline characterization of the performance of the laser welder. These power levels are based on measurements of the output power of the laser system, as measured by a power meter placed at the end of the optics train. Based on these measurements, it appears that the system displays a loss of approximately 10% as the beam passes through the fiber optic cable and laser optics. Since the beam is delivered to the fixed laser optics through a fiber optic cable, the effects of fiber diameter are also briefly investigated. Because the system utilizes 1:1 focusing optics, the laser spot size at sharp focus generally corresponds to the diameter of the fiber with which the laser is delivered. Differences in the resulting weld penetration in the different materials system are prevalent, with the welds produced on the Nitronic 40 material displaying the highest depths (> 5 mm) and minimal porosity. A Primes focusing diagnostic has also been installed on this laser system and used to characterize the size and power density distribution of the beams as a function of both power and focus position. Further work is planned in which this focusing diagnostic will be used to better understand the effects of changes in beam properties on the resulting weld dimensions in these and other materials systems.

  17. Fusion welding studies using laser on Ti-SS dissimilar combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugarajan, B.; Padmanabham, G.

    2012-11-01

    Laser welding investigations were carried out on dissimilar Ti-SS combination. The study is aimed to improve the weld strength and ductility by minimizing harmful intermetallics and taking advantage of high cooling rates in laser welding. Results of continuous wave 3.5 kW CO2 laser welding of totally dissimilar combination of Titanium and stainless steel (304) have been discussed. Bead on plate welding experiments were conducted to identify the laser welding parameters using depth of penetration as criteria. The welding of dissimilar combination has been attempted both autogenously and with interlayers such as Vanadium (V) and Tantalum (Ta) in the form of laser cladding as well as strip. Autogenous welds were carried out by varying the laser power, welding speed and position of the laser beam with respect to the joint centre. The resultant welds are characterized by macrostructure analysis, SEM/EDAX and XRD and as welded tensile test in UTM. The autogenous welds have exhibited extensive cracking even when welded at high speeds or by manipulating the beam position with respect to the joint. Similarly Vandaium as interlayer could not achieve crack free joint. A joint with 40 MPa strength could be made with Ta as interlayer. Results and analysis of these variants of laser welded joints are reported and discussed.

  18. Welding Curtains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-01-01

    Concept of transparent welding curtains made of heavy duty vinyl originated with David F. Wilson, President of Wilson Sales Company. In 1968, Wilson's curtains reduced glare of welding arc and blocked ultraviolet radiation. When later research uncovered blue light hazards, Wilson sought improvement of his products. He contracted Dr. Charles G. Miller and James B. Stephens, both of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and they agreed to undertake development of a curtain capable of filtering out harmful irradiance, including ultraviolet and blue light and provide protection over a broad range of welding operation. Working on their own time, the JPL pair spent 3 years developing a patented formula that includes light filtering dyes and small particles of zinc oxide. The result was the Wilson Spectra Curtain.

  19. Truss Assembly and Welding by Intelligent Precision Jigging Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komendera, Erik; Dorsey, John T.; Doggett, William R.; Correll, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes an Intelligent Precision Jigging Robot (IPJR) prototype that enables the precise alignment and welding of titanium space telescope optical benches. The IPJR, equipped with micron accuracy sensors and actuators, worked in tandem with a lower precision remote controlled manipulator. The combined system assembled and welded a 2 m truss from stock titanium components. The calibration of the IPJR, and the difference between the predicted and the truss dimensions as-built, identified additional sources of error that should be addressed in the next generation of IPJRs in 2D and 3D.

  20. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.O.; Sklar, E.

    1998-06-02

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables. 34 figs.

  1. Narrow gap laser welding

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John O.; Sklar, Edward

    1998-01-01

    A laser welding process including: (a) using optical ray tracing to make a model of a laser beam and the geometry of a joint to be welded; (b) adjusting variables in the model to choose variables for use in making a laser weld; and (c) laser welding the joint to be welded using the chosen variables.

  2. Weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Aendenroomer, A.J.R.; Ouden, G. den

    1996-12-31

    This paper deals with weld pool oscillation during pulsed GTA welding and with the possibility to use this oscillation for in-process control of weld penetration. Welding experiments were carried out under different welding conditions. During welding the weld pool was triggered into oscillation by the normal welding pulses or by extra current pulses. The oscillation frequency was measured both during the pulse time and during the base time by analyzing the arc voltage variation using a Fast Fourier Transformation program. Optimal results are obtained when full penetration occurs during the pulse time and partial penetration during the base time. Under these conditions elliptical overlapping spot welds are formed. In the case of full penetration the weld pool oscillates in a low frequency mode (membrane oscillation), whereas in the case of partial penetration the weld pool oscillates in a high frequency mode (surface oscillation). Deviation from the optimal welding conditions occurs when high frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (underpenetration) or when low frequency oscillation is observed during both pulse time and base time (overpenetration). In line with these results a penetration sensing system with feedback control was designed, based on the criterion that optimal weld penetration is achieved when two peaks are observed in the frequency distribution. The feasibility of this sensing system for orbital tube welding was confirmed by the results of experiments carried out under various welding conditions.

  3. Titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint prosthesis: historical background and a six-year clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bütow, K W; Blackbeard, G A; van der Merwe, A E

    2001-08-01

    The titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint (TTN-TMJ) prosthesis, for the combined replacement of both the joint and the glenoid fossa, was developed in 1992 and introduced clinically in 1994. This joint prosthesis is manufactured from pure titanium and the condylar surfaces, as well as the fossa, are coated with titanium nitride for hardening of the contact surfaces. In two different research projects, the joint were first placed in experimental animals, before they were successfully placed in human subjects. Twenty seven joint prostheses used in human subjects have been analysed for this review.

  4. Electroslag and electrogas welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    These two new joining methods perform welding in the vertical position, and therein lies the secret of their impressive advantages in material handling, in weld preparation, in welding speed, in freedom from distortion, and in weld soundness. Once the work has been set in the proper vertical position for welding, no further plate handling is required. The molten filler metal is held in place by copper shoes or dams, and the weld is completed in one pass.

  5. The influence of consumable composition and solidification on inclusion formation and growth in low carbon steel underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Osio, A.; Liu, S.

    1995-02-01

    The use of underwater wet welding for offshore repairs has been limited mainly because of porosity in the resulting welds. With appropriate consumable design, however, it is possible to enhance weld metal toughness and reduce porosity. Surface and underwater wet welds, obtained with E6013 grade electrodes modified with systematic titanium and boron additions, were prepared and analyzed to explain, in terms of the fundamentals of inclusion formation during weld solidification, any increase in acicular ferrite. It was demonstrated that in underwater wet welding, over 60% vol. acicular ferrite can be obtained, through titanium and boron additions to the electrode covering. The presence of titanium resulted in the formation of inclusions which assisted the formation of acicular ferrite in the underwater welds and countered the rapid quenching effect of the underwater environment. Boron additions decreased the amount of grain boundary ferrite, further improving the microstructure. It was shown that the weld metal titanium and boron compositional ranges for acicular ferrite maximization varied with the heat input and the cooling rate. Porosity reduction was possible through the addition of calcium carbonate at approximately 13% wt. in the flux covering. However, weld metal decarburization also occurred with the addition. The Zener diameter approach was used to relate the inclusion size and austenite grain size, and to explain the resulting microstructure.

  6. Friction plug welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeshita, Riki (Inventor); Hibbard, Terry L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Friction plug welding (FPW) usage is advantageous for friction stir welding (FSW) hole close-outs and weld repairs in 2195 Al--Cu--Li fusion or friction stir welds. Current fusion welding methods of Al--Cu--Li have produced welds containing varied defects. These areas are found by non-destructive examination both after welding and after proof testing. Current techniques for repairing typically small (<0.25) defects weaken the weldment, rely heavily on welders' skill, and are costly. Friction plug welding repairs increase strength, ductility and resistance to cracking over initial weld quality, without requiring much time or operator skill. Friction plug welding while pulling the plug is advantageous because all hardware for performing the weld can be placed on one side of the workpiece.

  7. Weld pool phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.; Zacharia, T.; DebRoy, T.

    1994-09-01

    During welding, the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure are affected by the interaction of the heat source with the metal. The interaction affects the fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer in the weld pool, and the solidification behavior of the weld metal. In recent years, there has been a growing recognition of the importance of the weld pool transport processes and the solid state transformation reactions in determining the composition, structure and properties of the welded structure. The relation between the weld pool transport processes and the composition and structure is reviewed. Recent applications of various solidification theories to welding are examined to understand the special problems of weld metal solidification. The discussion is focussed on the important problems and issues related to weld pool transport phenomena and solidification. Resolution of these problems would be an important step towards a science based control of composition, structure and properties of the weld metal.

  8. WELDING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.; DeWitt, D.E.; Nelson, I.V.

    1963-04-23

    This patent covers an arrangement for replacing air in a welding chamber with an inert gas. This operation usually is time-consuming because of the tendency of the inert gas to mix with the air being removed from the welding chamber. The chamber is open at the bottom and has at its top a cover and a porous plate a little below the cover. The inert gas is admitted to the chamber through two screened openings in the cover. On passing through the porous plate, the gas acts as a piston extending across the chamber and moving downwardly to expel the air through the lower open end of the chamber, with a minimum of mixing with the air being expelled. (AEC)

  9. WELDING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Zambrow, J.; Hausner, H.

    1957-09-24

    A method of joining metal parts for the preparation of relatively long, thin fuel element cores of uranium or alloys thereof for nuclear reactors is described. The process includes the steps of cleaning the surfaces to be jointed, placing the sunfaces together, and providing between and in contact with them, a layer of a compound in finely divided form that is decomposable to metal by heat. The fuel element members are then heated at the contact zone and maintained under pressure during the heating to decompose the compound to metal and sinter the members and reduced metal together producing a weld. The preferred class of decomposable compounds are the metal hydrides such as uranium hydride, which release hydrogen thus providing a reducing atmosphere in the vicinity of the welding operation.

  10. Characterization of In-Situ Alloyed and Additively Manufactured Titanium Aluminides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yan; Cuiuri, Dominic; Hoye, Nicholas; Li, Huijun; Pan, Zengxi

    2014-12-01

    Titanium aluminide components were fabricated using in-situ alloying and layer additive manufacturing based on the gas tungsten arc welding process combined with separate wire feeding of titanium and aluminum elements. The new fabrication process promises significant time and cost saving in comparison to traditional methods. In the present study, issues such as processing parameters, microstructure, and properties are discussed. The results presented here demonstrate the potential to produce full density titanium aluminide components directly using the new technique.

  11. Investigation of Conditions of Titanium Carbonization - IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meerson, G. A.; Lipkes, Y. M.

    1949-01-01

    In a previous paper, results are presented of accurate investigations of the processes of titanium carbonization and the succeeding titanium carbide decarbonization as related to the phenomenon of the graphitization of soot by heating at a constant temperature in atmospheres of pure hydrogen and carbon monoxide. These tests showed that the processes of titanium carbonization-decarbonization in an atmosphere of pure gases without nitrogen proceed in the same direction as the analogous processes under the conditions of the production furnace. In this case, however, the presence of admixtures of nitrogen changes the quantitative results of the decarbonization process. Thermodynamic computations confirming the results of previous tests conducted at atmospheric pressure and additional tests of titanium carbonization at lowered pressures are presented herein.

  12. Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process invented in 1991 at The Welding Institute in the United Kingdom. A weld is made in the FSW process by translating a rotating pin along a weld seam so as to stir the sides of the seam together. FSW avoids deleterious effects inherent in melting and promises to be an important welding process for any industries where welds of optimal quality are demanded. This article provides an introduction to the FSW process. The chief concern is the physical effect of the tool on the weld metal: how weld seam bonding takes place, what kind of weld structure is generated, potential problems, possible defects for example, and implications for process parameters and tool design. Weld properties are determined by structure, and the structure of friction stir welds is determined by the weld metal flow field in the vicinity of the weld tool. Metal flow in the vicinity of the weld tool is explained through a simple kinematic flow model that decomposes the flow field into three basic component flows: a uniform translation, a rotating solid cylinder, and a ring vortex encircling the tool. The flow components, superposed to construct the flow model, can be related to particular aspects of weld process parameters and tool design; they provide a bridge to an understanding of a complex-at-first-glance weld structure. Torques and forces are also discussed. Some simple mathematical models of structural aspects, torques, and forces are included.

  13. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  14. Small-scale explosive seam welding. [using ribbon explosive encased in lead sheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J.

    1972-01-01

    A unique small scale explosive seam welding technique is reported that has successfully joined a variety of aluminum alloys and alloy combinations in thicknesses to 0.125 inch, as well as titanium in thicknesses to 0.056 inch. The explosively welded joints are less than one-half inch in width and apparently have no long length limitation. The ribbon explosive developed in this study contains very small quantities of explosive encased in a flexible thin lead sheath. The evaluation and demonstration of this welding technique was accomplished in three phases: evaluation and optimization of ten major explosive welding variables, the development of four weld joints, and an applicational analysis which included photomicrographs, pressure integrity tests, vacuum effects, and fabrication of some potentially useful structures in aluminum and titanium.

  15. Application of titanium materials to vacuum chambers and components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, H.; Ishizawa, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Hesaka, M.; Saito, Y.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the outgassing properties of titanium materials, and development of vacuum chambers and components for practical UHV/XHV systems. The mechano-chemically polished and the chemically polished titanium materials have a smooth surface and a thin (<= 10 nm) oxide surface layer, which showed extremely low outgassing rate below 10-12 Pams-1 after baking process. In order to fabricate practical vacuum systems welding, metallizing and brazing processes were optimized, and complex shaped vacuum chambers and various vacuum components such as a bellows, valve, electric feedthrough and ceramic duct with titanium sleeve were fabricated. Sufficient mechanical properties and durability were obtained for practical use.

  16. Weld-Bead Shaver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guirguis, Kamal; Price, Daniel S.

    1990-01-01

    Hand-held power tool shaves excess metal from inside circumference of welded duct. Removes excess metal deposited by penetration of tungsten/inert-gas weld or by spatter from electron-beam weld. Produces smooth transition across joint. Easier to use and not prone to overshaving. Also cuts faster, removing 35 in. (89 cm) of weld bead per hour.

  17. Introduction to Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortney, Clarence; Gregory, Mike

    This curriculum guide provides six units of instruction on basic welding. Addressed in the individual units of instruction are the following topics: employment opportunities for welders, welding safety and first aid, welding tools and equipment, basic metals and metallurgy, basic math and measuring, and procedures for applying for a welding job.…

  18. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, G. R.; Spretnak, J. W.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the properties of metals, including titanium and its alloys, was investigated. The basic theories of stress corrosion of titanium alloys are reviewed along with the literature concerned with the effect of absorbed hydrogen on the mechanical properties of metals. Finally, the basic modes of metal fracture and their importance to this study is considered. The experimental work was designed to determine the effects of hydrogen concentration on the critical strain at which plastic instability along pure shear directions occurs. The materials used were titanium alloys Ti-8Al-lMo-lV and Ti-5Al-2.5Sn.

  19. Decreasing biotoxicity of fume particles produced in welding process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kuei-Min; Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Tseng, Yiider; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Cho, Kuk

    2011-01-30

    Welding fumes contain heavy metals, such as chromium, manganese, and nickel, which cause respiratory diseases and cancer. In this study, a SiO(2) precursor was evaluated as an additive to the shielding gas in an arc welding process to reduce the biotoxicity caused by welding fume particles. Transmission electron micrographic images show that SiO(2) coats on the surface of welding fume particles and promotes particle agglomeration. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy further shows that the relative amount of silicon in these SiO(2)-coated agglomerates is higher than in baseline agglomerates. In addition, Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to different concentrations of pure SiO(2) particles generated from the arc welding process exhibits similar responses, suggesting that SiO(2) does not contribute to welding fume particle toxicity. The trend of E. coli growth in different concentrations of baseline welding fume particle shows the most significant inhibition occurs in higher exposure concentrations. The 50% lethal logarithmic concentrations for E. coli in arc welding particles of baseline, 2%, and 4.2% SiO(2) precursor additives were 823, 1605, and 1800 mg/L, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that using SiO(2) precursors as an additive to arc welding shielding gas can effectively reduce the biotoxicity of welding fume.

  20. Assessment of weld quality of aerospace grade metals by using ultrasonic matrix phased array technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Jeong K.; Gleeson, Sean T.

    2014-03-01

    Advantages of two dimensional electronic ultrasonic beam focusing, steering and scanning with the matrix phased array (MPA) technology has been used to visualize the conditions of resistance spot welds in auto vehicle grade advanced high strength steel carbon steels nondestructively. Two of the commonly used joining techniques, resistance spot welding and resistance seam welding, for thin aerospace grade plates made of aluminum, titanium, and stainless steels have also been inspected with the same MPA NDE system. In this study, a detailed discussions of the current MPA based ultrasonic real time imaging methodology has been made followed by some of the NDT results obtained with various welded test coupons.

  1. Titanium Cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, D. S.; Blair, G. A. S.

    1974-01-01

    The technique of repairing defects of the skull with titanium is described. The skull contour can be accurately reproduced. The technique is simpler than wiring or suturing methods. The material is inert, radiolucent, and rigid. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7 PMID:4834099

  2. Advanced Welding Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  3. The Kinetics of Phase Transformation in Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Wong, J; Palmer, T

    2002-02-06

    The fundamentals of welding-induced phase transformations in metals and alloys are being investigated using a combination of advanced synchrotron based experimental methods and modem computational science tools. In-situ experimental methods have been developed using a spatially resolved x-ray probe to enable direct observations of phase transformations under the real non- isothermal conditions experienced during welding. These experimental techniques represent a major step forward in the understanding of phase transformations that occur during welding, and are now being used to aid in the development of models to predict microstructural evolution under the severe temperature gradients, high peak temperatures and rapid thermal fluctuations characteristic of welds. Titanium alloys, stainless steels and plain carbon steels are currently under investigation, and the phase transformation data being obtained here cannot be predicted or measured using conventional metallurgical approaches. Two principal synchrotron-based techniques have been developed and refined for in-situ investigations of phase transformation dynamics in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and fusion zone (FZ) of welds: Spatially Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (SRXRD) and Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD). Both techniques provide real-time observations of phases that exist during welding, and both have been developed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using a high flux wiggler beam line. The SRXRD technique enables direct observations of the phases existing in the HAZ of quasi-stationary moving arc welds, and is used to map the HAZ phases by sequentially jogging the weld with respect to the x-ray beam while taking x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns at each new location. These spatially resolved XRD patterns are collected in linear traverses perpendicular to the direction of weld travel. The XRD data contained in multiple traverses is later compiled to produce an areal map of the phases

  4. Characterisation of fume from hyperbaric welding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, John A. S.; Semple, Sean; Duffin, Rodger; Kelly, Frank; Seldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea

    2009-02-01

    We report preliminary work characterising dust from hyperbaric welding trials carried out at increased pressure in a helium and oxygen atmosphere. Particle size and concentration were measured during welding. Samples for quartz and metal analysis and toxicity assessment were taken from a filter in the local fume extraction system. The residue of dust after metal extraction by nitric acid in hydrogen peroxide predominantly a non-metallic white powder assumed to be dust from welding rod coatings and thermal insulation material. Metallic analysis showed predominantly calcium, from the welding rod coating, and period 4 transition metals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and titanium (inductively coupled mass spectrometry, Agilent 7500c). The presence of zirconium indicated a contribution from grinding. The fume was nanoparticulate in nature with a mean particle diameter of 20-30 nm (MSI Inc WPS 1000XP). It showed an intermediate level of oxidative potential regarding the low-molecular weight respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and caused release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 in a human lung A 549 epithelial cell culture with no indication of cytotoxicity. The study findings have strong implications for the measurement techniques needed to assess fume exposure in hyperbaric welding and the provision of respiratory protection.

  5. Television Monitoring System for Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallow, K.; Gordon, S.

    1986-01-01

    Welding process in visually inaccessible spots viewed and recorded. Television system enables monitoring of welding in visually inaccessible locations. System assists welding operations and provide video record, used for weld analysis and welder training.

  6. Welded solar cell interconnection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  7. Laser weld jig

    DOEpatents

    Van Blarigan, Peter; Haupt, David L.

    1982-01-01

    A system is provided for welding a workpiece (10, FIG. 1) along a predetermined weld line (12) that may be of irregular shape, which includes the step of forming a lip (32) on the workpiece to extend parallel to the weld line, and moving the workpiece by engaging the lip between a pair of rotatable members (34, 36). Rotation of one of the members at a constant speed, causes the workpiece to move so that all points on the weld line sequentially pass a fixed point in space (17) at a constant speed, so that a laser welding beam can be directed at that fixed point to form a weld along the weld line. The workpiece can include a reuseable jig (24) forming the lip, and with the jig constructed to detachably hold parts (22, 20) to be welded at a position wherein the weld line of the parts extends parallel to the lip on the jig.

  8. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  9. Metal Bonded Titanium Diboride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-03-01

    of specimens made from titanium diboride plus 10 percent titanium and 30 percent zirconium . X 100. 22 6. Microstructures of specimens made from...chromium. X 1000 26 10. Microstructures of specimens made from titanium diboride plus 10 percent titanium and 30 percent zirconium . X 1200 27 11. Gain in...shock resistance and oxidation resistance of titanium diboride but zirconium diboride which is isomorphous with titanium diboride has been reported6

  10. Intelligent Welding Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, George E.; Kumar, Ramaswamy; Prasad, Tanuji; Andersen, Kristinn; Barnett, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Control system adapts to changing design requirements and operating conditions. Proposed control system for gas/tungsten arc welding requires only that operator specifies such direct parameters of welds as widths and depths of penetration. In control system for robotic welder, components and functions intimately connected with welding process assigned to controller domain. More general functions assigned to supervisor domain. Initial estimate of indirect parameters of welding process applied to system only at beginning of weld (t=0); after start of welding, outputs from multivariable controller takes place of estimate.

  11. Fusion welding process

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Kenneth C.; Jones, Eric D.; McBride, Marvin A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for the fusion welding of nickel alloy steel members wherein a ferrite containing pellet is inserted into a cavity in one member and melted by a welding torch. The resulting weld nugget, a fusion of the nickel containing alloy from the members to be welded and the pellet, has a composition which is sufficiently low in nickel content such that ferrite phases occur within the weld nugget, resulting in improved weld properties. The steel alloys encompassed also include alloys containing carbon and manganese, considered nickel equivalents.

  12. Al-to-Cu Friction Stir Lap Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firouzdor, Vahid; Kou, Sindo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, friction stir welding (FSW) has been used frequently to join dissimilar metals, for instance, Al to Mg, Cu, and steel. The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds often severely limits the strength and ductility of the resultant welds. In the present study, Al-to-Cu lap FSW was studied by welding 6061 Al to commercially pure Cu. Conventional lap FSW was modified by butt welding a small piece of Al to the top of Cu, with a slight pin penetration into the bottom of Al. At travel speeds up to 127 mm/min (5 ipm), the modified welds were about twice the joint strength and five to nine times the ductility of the conventional lap welds. In the conventional lap welds, voids were present along the Al-Cu interface, and fracture occurred along the interface in tensile testing. No such voids were observed in the modified lap welds, and fracture occurred through Cu. Thus, as in the case of Al-to-Mg lap FSW recently studied by the authors, modified lap FSW significantly improved the weld quality in Al-to-Cu lap FSW. At the relatively high travel speed of 203 mm/min (8 ipm), however, modified lap FSW was no longer superior because of channel formation.

  13. Gentamicin-Eluting Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Grown on the Ultrafine-Grained Titanium.

    PubMed

    Nemati, Sima Hashemi; Hadjizadeh, Afra

    2017-01-06

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials is the most appropriate choices for the applications as orthopedic and dental implants. In this regard, ultrafine-grained (UFG) titanium with an enhanced mechanical properties and surface energy has attracted more attention. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes grown on the titanium could enhance bone bonding, cellular response and are good reservoirs for loading drugs and antibacterial agents. This article investigates gentamicin loading into and release from the TiO2 nanotubes, grown on the UFG compared to coarse-grained (CG) titanium substrate surfaces. Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) was employed to produce the UFG structure titanium. TiO2 nanotubes were grown by the anodizing technique on both UFG and CG titanium substrate surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging confirmed TiO2 nanotube growth on the surface. The UV-vis spectroscopy analysis results show that the amount of gentamicin load-release in the anodized UFG titanium sample is higher than that of CG one which can be explained in terms of thicker TiO2 nanotube arrays layer formed on UFG sample. Moreover, the anodized UFG titanium samples released the drug in a longer time than CG (1 day for the UFG titanium vs. 3 h for the CG one). Regarding wettability analysis, anodized UFG titanium sample showed more enhanced hydrophilicity than CG counterpart. Therefore, the significantly smaller grain size of pure titanium provided by the ECAP technique coupled with appropriate subsequent anodization treatment not only offers a good combination of biocompatibility and adequate mechanical properties but also it provides a delayed release condition for gentamicin.

  14. Initial cytotoxicity of novel titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Koike, M; Lockwood, P E; Wataha, J C; Okabe, T

    2007-11-01

    We assessed the biological response to several novel titanium alloys that have promising physical properties for biomedical applications. Four commercial titanium alloys [Super-TIX(R) 800, Super-TIX(R) 51AF, TIMETAL(R) 21SRx, and Ti-6Al-4V (ASTM grade 5)] and three experimental titanium alloys [Ti-13Cr-3Cu, Ti-1.5Si and Ti-1.5Si-5Cu] were tested. Specimens (n = 6; 5.0 x 5.0 x 3.0 mm(3)) were cast in a centrifugal casting machine using a MgO-based investment and polished to 600 grit, removing 250 mum from each surface. Commercially pure titanium (CP Ti: ASTM grade 2) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) were used as positive controls. The specimens were cleaned and disinfected, and then each cleaned specimen was placed in direct contact with Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts for 72 h. The cytotoxicity [succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity] of the extracts was assessed using the MTT method. Cytotoxicity of the metals tested was not statistically different compared to the CP Ti and Teflon controls (p > 0.05). These novel titanium alloys pose cytotoxic risks no greater than many other commonly used alloys, including commercially pure titanium. The promising short-term biocompatibility of these Ti alloys is probably due to their excellent corrosion resistance under static conditions, even in biological environments.

  15. Applying NASA's explosive seam welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1991-01-01

    The status of an explosive seam welding process, which was developed and evaluated for a wide range of metal joining opportunities, is summarized. The process employs very small quantities of explosive in a ribbon configuration to accelerate a long-length, narrow area of sheet stock into a high-velocity, angular impact against a second sheet. At impact, the oxide films of both surface are broken up and ejected by the closing angle to allow atoms to bond through the sharing of valence electrons. This cold-working process produces joints having parent metal properties, allowing a variety of joints to be fabricated that achieve full strength of the metals employed. Successful joining was accomplished in all aluminum alloys, a wide variety of iron and steel alloys, copper, brass, titanium, tantalum, zirconium, niobium, telerium, and columbium. Safety issues were addressed and are as manageable as many currently accepted joining processes.

  16. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  17. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  18. Welding in airplane construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rechtlich, A; Schrenk, M

    1928-01-01

    The present article attempts to explain the principles for the production of a perfect weld and to throw light on the unexplained problems. Moreover, it is intended to elucidate the possibilities of testing the strength and reliability of welded parts.

  19. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; ...

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  20. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  1. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  2. Low Gravity Improves Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.; Plaster, Teresa C.

    1993-01-01

    Hardnesses and tensile strengths greater. Welds made under right conditions in low gravity appear superior to those made under high gravity. Conclusion drawn from results of welding experiments conducted during low- and high-gravity-simulating maneuvers of KC-135 airplane. Results have implications not only for welding in outer space but also for repeated rapid welding on Earth or in airplanes under simulated low gravity to obtain unusually strong joints.

  3. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  4. Active weld control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Bradley W.; Burroughs, Ivan A.

    1994-01-01

    Through the two phases of this contract, sensors for welding applications and parameter extraction algorithms have been developed. These sensors form the foundation of a weld control system which can provide action weld control through the monitoring of the weld pool and keyhole in a VPPA welding process. Systems of this type offer the potential of quality enhancement and cost reduction (minimization of rework on faulty welds) for high-integrity welding applications. Sensors for preweld and postweld inspection, weld pool monitoring, keyhole/weld wire entry monitoring, and seam tracking were developed. Algorithms for signal extraction were also developed and analyzed to determine their application to an adaptive weld control system. The following sections discuss findings for each of the three sensors developed under this contract: (1) weld profiling sensor; (2) weld pool sensor; and (3) stereo seam tracker/keyhole imaging sensor. Hardened versions of these sensors were designed and built under this contract. A control system, described later, was developed on a multiprocessing/multitasking operating system for maximum power and flexibility. Documentation for sensor mechanical and electrical design is also included as appendices in this report.

  5. Portable Weld Tester.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Douglas

    This training manual, which was developed for employees of an automotive plant, is designed to teach trainees to operate a portable weld tester (Miyachi MM-315). In chapter 1, the weld tester's components are illustrated and described, and the procedure for charging its batteries is explained. Chapter 2 illustrates the weld tester's parts,…

  6. Coil Welding Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesenbach, W. T.; Clark, M. C.

    1983-01-01

    Positioner holds coil inside cylinder during tack welding. Welding aid spaces turns of coil inside cylinder and applies contact pressure while coil is tack-welded to cylinder. Device facilitates fabrication of heat exchangers and other structures by eliminating hand-positioning and clamping of individual coil turns.

  7. Variable polarity arc welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E. O., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Technological advances generate within themselves dissatisfactions that lead to further advances in a process. A series of advances in welding technology which culminated in the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process and an advance instituted to overcome the latest dissatisfactions with the process: automated VPPA welding are described briefly.

  8. Welding Course Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Genits, Joseph C.

    This guide is intended for use in helping students gain a fundamental background on the major aspects of the welding trade. The course emphasis is on mastery of the manipulative skills necessary to develop successful welding techniques and on acquisition of an understanding of the specialized tools and equipment used in welding. The first part…

  9. Instructional Guidelines. Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fordyce, H. L.; Doshier, Dale

    Using the standards of the American Welding Society and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, this welding instructional guidelines manual presents a course of study in accordance with the current practices in industry. Intended for use in welding programs now practiced within the Federal Prison System, the phases of the program are…

  10. Penetration in GTA welding

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1990-01-01

    The size and shape of the weld bead produced in GTA welding depends on the magnitude and distribution of the energy incident on the workpiece surfaces as well as the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece. The input energy is largely controllable through the welding parameters selected, however the dissipation of that energy in the workpiece is less subject to control. Changes in energy dissipation can produce large changes in weld shape or penetration. Heat transport away from the weld pool is almost entirely by conduction, but heat transport in the weld pool is more complicated. Heat conduction through the liquid is an important component, but heat transport by convection (mass transport) is often the dominant mechanism. Convective heat transport is directional and changes the weld pool shape from that produced by conduction alone. Surface tension gradients are often the dominant forces driving fluid flow in GTA weld pools. These gradients are sensitive functions of weld pool chemistry and the energy input distribution to the weld. Experimental and theoretical work conducted primarily in the past decade has greatly enhanced our understanding of weld pool fluid flow, the forces which drive it, and its effects on weld pool shape. This work is reviewed here. While less common, changes in energy dissipation through the unmelted portion of the workpiece can also affect fusion zone shape or penetration. These effects are also described. 41 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Advances in Joining Techniques Used in Development of SPF/DB Titanium Sandwich Reinforced with Metal Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischler, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    Three and four-sheet expanded titanium sandwich sheets have been developed at Douglas Aircraft Company, a division of McDonnell Douglas Corporation, under contract to NASA Langley Research Center. In these contracts, spot welding and roll seam welding are used to join the core sheets. These core sheets are expanded to the face sheets and diffusion bonded to form various type cells. The advantages of various cell shapes and the design parameters for optimizing the wing and fuselage concepts are discussed versus the complexity of the spot weld pattern. In addition, metal matrix composites of fibers in an aluminum matrix encapsulated in a titanium sheath are aluminum brazed successfully to the titanium sandwich face sheets. The strength and crack growth rate of the superplastic-formed/diffusion bonded (SPF/DB) titanium sandwich with and without the metal matrix composites are described.

  12. Forge Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Aluminum Alloy Using a Cu, Ni, or Ti Interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Hideki; Sumioka, Junji; Kakiuchi, Shigeki; Tomida, Shogo; Takeda, Kouichi; Shimazaki, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    The forge-welding process was examined to develop a high-strength bonding application of magnesium (Mg) alloy to aluminum (Al) alloy under high-productivity conditions. The effect of the insert material on the tensile strength of the joints, under various preheat temperatures and pressures, was investigated by analyzing the reaction layers of the bonded interface. The tensile strengths resulting from direct bonding, using pure copper (Cu), pure nickel (Ni), and pure titanium (Ti) inserts were 56, 100, 119, and 151 MPa, respectively. The maximum joint strength reached 93 pct with respect to the Mg cast billet. During high-pressure bonding, a microscopic plastic flow occurred that contributed to an anchor effect and the generation of a newly formed surface at the interface, particularly prominent with the Ti insert in the form of an oxide layer. The bonded interfaces of the maximum-strength inserts were investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis. The diffusion reaction layer at the bonded interface consisted of brittle Al-Mg intermetallics having a thickness of approximately 30 μm. In contrast, for the three inserts, the thicknesses of the diffusion reaction layer were infinitely thin. For the pure Ti insert, exhibiting the maximum tensile strength value among the inserts tested, focused ion beam-transmission electron microscopy-EDS analysis revealed a 60-nm-thick Al-Ti reaction layer, which had formed at the bonded interface on the Mg alloy side. Thus, a high-strength Al-Mg bonding method in air was demonstrated, suitable for mass production.

  13. Advanced Techniques for In-Situ Monitoring of Phase Transformations During Welding Using Synchrotron-Based X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Zhang, W; DebRoy, T

    2005-06-05

    Understanding the evolution of microstructure in welds is an important goal of welding research because of the strong correlation between weld microstructure and weld properties. To achieve this goal it is important to develop a quantitative measure of phase transformations encountered during welding in order to ultimately develop methods for predicting weld microstructures from the characteristics of the welding process. To aid in this effort, synchrotron radiation methods have been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for direct observation of microstructure evolution during welding. Using intense, highly collimated synchrotron radiation, the atomic structure of the weld heat affected and fusion zones can be probed in real time. Two synchrotron-based techniques, known as spatially resolved (SRXRD) and time resolved (TRXRD) x-ray diffraction, have been developed for these investigations. These techniques have now been used to investigate welding induced phase transformations in titanium alloys, low alloy steels, and stainless steel alloys. This paper will provide a brief overview of these methods and will discuss microstructural evolution during the welding of low carbon (AISI 1005) and medium carbon (AISI 1045) steels where the different levels of carbon influence the evolution of microstructures during welding.

  14. Microstructure characterization of laser welded Ti-6Al-4V fusion zones

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Pei-quan; Li, Leijun Zhang, Chunbo

    2014-01-15

    The as-welded microstructure of laser-welded Ti-6Al-4V is characterized as a function of CO2 key-hole mode laser welding speed. Martensitic α′ is the predominant phase, with some α and retained β. Phase transformation is affected by the cooling rate through laser welding speed. A higher welding speed of 1.6 to 2.0 m/min produced more martensite α′ and less retained β in the welds. 1.4 m/min welding speed produced small amounts of α, besides the martensite α′. A trace of δ titanium hydride phase seems to have formed in the weld fusion zone. Moiré fringes are a common feature in the TEM microstructure, due to abundance of multi-phase interfaces. Tensile twins and clusters of dislocations indicate that plastic deformation has happened in the as-welded microstructure, indicating the local stress levels to be approaching the yield stress on-cooling during laser welding.

  15. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  16. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, Raymond D.; Smith, Frank M.; O'Leary, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon.

  17. Hydriding of Titanium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    hole. The metals used to make these couples with titanium included HY80 steel , 316 stainless steel , five-nines aluminum, 6061 aluminum, and zinc. All...the other surfaces. Titanium Coupled With Other Metals The corrosion potentials of grade 2 titanium galvanically coupled with naval brass, HY80 steel ...2 titanium; naval brass caused titanium to become an anode. At room temperature, HY80 steel and 316 stainless steel couples exhibited corrosion

  18. Metallographic Preparation of Space Shuttle Reaction Control System Thruster Electron Beam Welds for Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, James

    2011-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster failed during a firing test at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The firing test was being conducted to investigate a previous electrical malfunction. A number of cracks were found associated with the fuel closure plate/injector assembly (Fig 1). The firing test failure generated a flight constraint to the launch of STS-133. A team comprised of several NASA centers and other research institutes was assembled to investigate and determine the root cause of the failure. The JSC Materials Evaluation Laboratory was asked to compare and characterize the outboard circumferential electron beam (EB) weld between the fuel closure plate (Titanium 6Al-4V) and the injector (Niobium C-103 alloy) of four different RCS thrusters, including the failed RCS thruster. Several metallographic challenges in grinding/polishing, and particularly in etching were encountered because of the differences in hardness, ductility, and chemical resistance between the two alloys and the bimetallic weld. Segments from each thruster were sectioned from the outboard weld. The segments were hot-compression mounted using a conductive, carbon-filled epoxy. A grinding/polishing procedure for titanium alloys was used [1]. This procedure worked well on the titanium; but a thin, disturbed layer was visible on the niobium surface by means of polarized light. Once polished, each sample was micrographed using bright field, differential interference contrast optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a backscatter electron (BSE) detector. No typical weld anomalies were observed in any of the cross sections. However, areas of large atomic contrast were clearly visible in the weld nugget, particularly along fusion line interfaces between the titanium and the niobium. This prompted the need to better understand the chemistry and microstructure of the weld (Fig 2). Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS

  19. (Welding under extreme conditions)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S.A.

    1989-09-29

    The traveler was an invited member of the United States delegation and representative of the Basic Energy Science Welding Science program at the 42nd Annual International Institute of Welding (IIW) Assembly and Conference held in Helsinki, Finland. The conference and the assembly was attended by about 600 delegates representing 40 countries. The theme of the conference was welding under extreme conditions. The conference program contained several topics related to welding in nuclear, arctic petrochemical, underwater, hyperbaric and space environments. At the annual assembly the traveler was a delegate (US) to two working groups of the IIW, namely Commission IX and welding research study group 212. Following the conference the traveler visited the Danish Welding Institute in Copenhagen and the Risoe National Laboratory in Roskilde. Prior to the conference the traveler visited Lappeenranta University of Technology and presented an invited seminar entitled Recent Advances in Welding Science and Technology.''

  20. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system wherein a welding torch having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features include an actively cooled electrode holder which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm, and a weld pool contour detector comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom, being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  1. Optically controlled welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled welding system (10) wherein a welding torch (12) having through-the-torch viewing capabilities is provided with an optical beam splitter (56) to create a transmitted view and a reflective view of a welding operation. These views are converted to digital signals which are then processed and utilized by a computerized robotic welder (15) to make the welding torch responsive thereto. Other features includes an actively cooled electrode holder (26) which minimizes a blocked portion of the view by virtue of being constructed of a single spoke or arm (28) and a weld pool contour detector (14) comprising a laser beam directed onto the weld pool with the position of specular radiation reflected therefrom being characteristic of a penetrated or unpenetrated condition of the weld pool.

  2. Robotic Welding Of Injector Manifold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Shelley, D. Mark

    1992-01-01

    Brief report presents history, up through October 1990, of continuing efforts to convert from manual to robotic gas/tungsten arc welding in fabrication of main injector inlet manifold of main engine of Space Shuttle. Includes photographs of welding machinery, welds, and weld preparations. Of interest to engineers considering establishment of robotic-welding facilities.

  3. The morphological evolution of the axial structure and the curved columnar grain in the weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Rihong; Lu, Shanping; Dong, Wenchao; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    2015-12-01

    The competitive growth of microstructures in the entire weld pool for both the Al-Cu alloy and the pure aluminum was simulated by the cellular automata method to comparatively investigate the micro-mechanisms for the morphological evolution of the axial structure and the curved columnar grain in the weld. The competitive mechanism of grains during the epitaxial growth and the morphological evolution of the grain structure in the weld with various welding speeds were studied. The results indicate that both the thermal conditions and the solidification characteristic of the weld metal exert an important influence on the grain competition and the resulting structure in the weld. For the Al-Cu alloy, the dendritic structure with a large S/L interface curvature appears during the epitaxial growth. The preferential orientation affects the competition result obviously. Owing to the anisotropic growth kinetics, the straight axial structure forms at low welding speeds. With the increase of the welding speed, the width of the axial region decreases and eventually disappears. For the pure aluminum, the S/L interface during the epitaxial growth is planar, and the grain competition is controlled by the thermal conditions completely. The columnar grains curve gradually to follow the highest temperature gradient direction at low welding speeds and become straight at high welding speeds.

  4. A Comparison Between Mechanical And Electrochemical Tests on Ti6Al4V Welded By LBW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serroni, G.; Bitondo, C.; Astarita, A.; Scala, A.; Gloria, A.; Prisco, U.; Squillace, A.; Bellucci, F.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium and its alloys are nowadays widely used in many sectors: in the medical field (orthopedic and dental ones), in the architectural field, in the chemical plants field and in aeronautic. In this last field it is more and more used both for its contribution to make lightweight and time durable structures and for its compatibility with new materials, first of all Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP). To this aim, lots of researches are now focusing on new and emerging technologies capable to make titanium objects and, at the same time, reducing the scrap, since titanium alloys for aeronautic application are very expensive. This paper examines Grade 5 Titanium Alloy (Ti6Al4V) welded by Laser Beam (LBW) in butt-joint configuration. The source was Nd:YAG laser, moreover two inert gases were used, in order to provide a shield both on the top and on the bottom of the weld bead. The joints were studied by varying two process parameters: welding speed and power of the laser beam. It was not possible to realize a full experimental plan, due to technological limits in making titanium laser beam welds. The joints were tested to measure their mechanical properties and the corrosion resistance. The process parameters do not significantly affect the maximum static strength of the joints. Microscopic analysis showed that welds made with high power and low welding speed have a uniform weld bead, and no macroscopic defect occurs. Fatigue test results, instead, show a marked influence of the morphology of the weld bead: the occurrence of some defects, such as the undercut, both on the top and on the bottom of the weld bead, dramatically reduced fatigue resistance of the joints. Corrosion resistance was studied using the electrochemical micro cell technique, which allows to distinguish electrochemical properties of each zone of the weld bead, even when, as in this case, they are very narrow. By a general point of view, it has been demonstrated that the joints showing the best

  5. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  6. Virtual Welding — Applying Science to Welding Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhishang; Cao, Zhenning; Chen, X. L.; Ludewig, Howard W.

    2004-06-01

    Welding practice has traditionally been treated as an art and in most cases experience based trial-and-error experimentation has been the major approach to establish a feasible welding procedure. In recent years, significant progress has been made in understanding welding phenomena based on numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts include simulation of the weld pool formation, weld microstructure evolution, and welding induced residual stress and distortion. The numerical models based on interdisciplinary applied sciences (e.g. heat transfer and fluid flow, materials science, mechanical engineering, and fracture mechanics) have provided detailed insights into welding process and guidance in design of high performance welded-joints and cost effective welding process. The concept of "Virtual Welding," which is a simulation package based on interdisciplinary applied science and multi-scale numerical models, is proposed in this paper. Examples are provided to demonstrate the applications of "Virtual Welding" in industrial practices for high performance welds and reduced manufacturing cost.

  7. Chemical composition and morphology of welding fume particles and grinding dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsen, J.T.; Farrants, G.; Torgrimsen, T.; Reith, A. )

    1992-05-01

    Elemental composition and morphology of pure manual metal arc (MMA) welding fumes, pure grinding dust, and combined fume/dust air samples were collected and determined separately under semilaboratory conditions. The base material was stainless steel. The purpose of the present study was to create a synthetic' work situation under semilaboratory conditions by combining one grinding period and two MMA welding periods and comparing these results with results during welding in a workshop. The duty cycles of pure welding and of pure grinding were also observed. A comparison was also made between metal inert gas (MIG) and MMA welding on stainless steel as well as a nickel-rich alloy under regular conditions. The amount of collected material was determined by weighing the membrane filters before and after exposure, and the element contents were determined by atomic spectroscopy. Other transmission electron microscopy (TEM) filters were used for TEM and computer-image analysis, in which the amount of collected material and its morphological characteristics were observed. The arcing time and the consumption of filler material were estimated for different kinds of electrodes. Chemical analysis showed that the contents of manganese and total chromium were lower in grinding dust than in welding fumes. The contents of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in grinding dust were undetectable. Samples collected in welding shops where concomitant grinding was performed contained about 30% less Cr(VI) than those collected under laboratory conditions during welding only. The sizes and shapes of the particles depend on the welding process and distance of collection from the plume of the fume. To compare laboratory experiments with regular welding situations, the experiment must resemble industrial welding.

  8. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  9. Welding for life

    SciTech Connect

    Stiebler, T.J.; Nugent, R.M.; Wilson, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    State of the Art Welding Techniques are being utilized to extend the life of major steam turbine components, as well as other traditional types of repairs. The development of a temper bead welding technique has allowed Houston Lighting and Power (HL and P) to perform innovative weld repairs. Nozzle vanes are weld repaired without removing the nozzle blocks from the case; repair life has also been doubled. A new two wire Gas Tungsten ARC Welding (GTAW) machine has produced high deposition rates while maintaining excellent mechanical properties. This results in faster turn-around time and with an improved weld repair. Development of a weld wire specification has also been instrumental in achieving additional component life by increasing the resistance to fatigue, especially in the heat affected zone. All these factors work together to enhance the weld repairs. Tensile strengths of 140,000 PSI with good ductility have been achieved. This paper will discuss their experiences with several repairs and recap the results of some studies and tests performed during the technique development stages. Major repairs include; weld repair of cases, nozzle blocks, nozzle boxes, stationary blade repair, forced draft fan shaft buildup, weld repair of turbine shrouds, blades, tennons and journals.

  10. VPPA weld model evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccutcheon, Kimble D.; Gordon, Stephen S.; Thompson, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    NASA uses the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc Welding (VPPAW) process extensively for fabrication of Space Shuttle External Tanks. This welding process has been in use at NASA since the late 1970's but the physics of the process have never been satisfactorily modeled and understood. In an attempt to advance the level of understanding of VPPAW, Dr. Arthur C. Nunes, Jr., (NASA) has developed a mathematical model of the process. The work described in this report evaluated and used two versions (level-0 and level-1) of Dr. Nunes' model, and a model derived by the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) from Dr. Nunes' level-1 model. Two series of VPPAW experiments were done, using over 400 different combinations of welding parameters. Observations were made of VPPAW process behavior as a function of specific welding parameter changes. Data from these weld experiments was used to evaluate and suggest improvements to Dr. Nunes' model. Experimental data and correlations with the model were used to develop a multi-variable control algorithm for use with a future VPPAW controller. This algorithm is designed to control weld widths (both on the crown and root of the weld) based upon the weld parameters, base metal properties, and real-time observation of the crown width. The algorithm exhibited accuracy comparable to that of the weld width measurements for both aluminum and mild steel welds.

  11. Welding arc plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  12. Welding and joining: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of NASA-developed technology in welding and joining. Topics discussed include welding equipment, techniques in welding, general bonding, joining techniques, and clamps and holding fixtures.

  13. Welding skate with computerized controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    New welding skate concept for automatic TIG welding of contoured or double-contoured parts combines lightweight welding apparatus with electrical circuitry which computes the desired torch angle and positions a torch and cold-wire guide angle manipulator.

  14. Treatment of fractures of the condylar head with resorbable pins or titanium screws: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Matthias; Loukota, Richard; Kuchta, Anne; Stadlinger, Bernd; Jung, Roland; Speckl, Katrin; Schmiedekampf, Robert; Eckelt, Uwe

    2013-07-01

    We aimed to compare in vivo the stability of fixation of condylar fractures in sheep using sonic bone welding and standard titanium screws. We assessed stability of the osteosynthesis and maintenance of the height of the mandibular ramus. Height decreased slightly in both groups compared with the opposite side. The volume of the condyle increased considerably in both groups mainly because callus had formed. The results showed no significant disadvantages for pin fixation compared with osteosynthesis using titanium screws.

  15. Establishment of a Continuous Wave Laser Welding Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-01

    water . SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAOEOWiwi Oat« Entered; 11 l .■^.^.Maiaiäkäi — - . .-..^ ^..-^ ■■— ■ —■ ^■^^■..^.■■w...high strength steel and titanium indicated very good toughness. Precracked high strength steel specimens exposed to sea water performed...strength steel always failed in the base metal when exposed to stress near their yield and alternate salt water immersion providing welds were

  16. High cycle fatigue of weld repaired cast Ti-6AI-4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, G. B.; Hodi, F. S.; Eagar, T. W.

    1982-09-01

    In order to determine the effects of weld repair on fatigue life of titanium-6Al-4V castings, a series of specimens was exposed to variations in heat treatment, weld procedure, HIP cycle, cooling rate, and surface finish. The results indicate that weld repair is not detrimental to HCF properties as fatigue cracks were located primarily in the base metal. Fine surface finish and large colony size are the primary variables improving the fatigue life. The fusion zone resisted fatigue crack initiation due to a basketweave morphology and thin grain boundary alpha. Multipass welds were shown not to affect fatigue life when compared with single pass welds. A secondary HIP treatment was not detrimental to fatigue properties, but was found to be unnecessary.

  17. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques.

  18. Microstructure evolution of electron beam welded Ti{sub 3}Al-Nb joint

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Jicai; Wu Huiqiang . E-mail: huiqiang_wu@hit.edu.cn; He Jingshan; Zhang Bingang

    2005-02-15

    The microstructure evolution characterization in high containing Nb, low Al titanium aluminide alloy of electron beam welded joints was investigated by means of OM, SEM, XRD, TEM and microhardness analysis. The results indicated that the microstructure of the weld metal made with electron beam under the welding conditions employed in this work was predominantly metastable, retaining ordered {beta} phase (namely B2 phase), and was independent of the welding parameters but independent of the size and the orientation of the weld solidification structures. As the heat input is decreased, the cellular structure zone is significantly reduced, and then the crystallizing morphology of fusion zone presented dendritically columnar structure. There existed grain growth coarsening in heat affected zone (HAZ) for insufficient polygonization. Both fusion zone (FZ) and the HAZ had higher microhardness than the base metal.

  19. Use of the Plasma Spectrum RMS Signal for Arc-Welding Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Mirapeix, Jesus; Cobo, Adolfo; Fuentes, Jose; Davila, Marta; Etayo, Juan Maria; Lopez-Higuera, Jose-Miguel

    2009-01-01

    A new spectroscopic parameter is used in this paper for on-line arc-welding quality monitoring. Plasma spectroscopy applied to welding diagnostics has typically relied on the estimation of the plasma electronic temperature, as there is a known correlation between this parameter and the quality of the seams. However, the practical use of this parameter gives rise to some uncertainties that could provoke ambiguous results. For an efficient on-line welding monitoring system, it is essential to prevent the appearance of false alarms, as well as to detect all the possible defects. In this regard, we propose the use of the root mean square signal of the welding plasma spectra, as this parameter will be proven to exhibit a good correlation with the quality of the resulting seams. Results corresponding to several arc-welding field tests performed on Inconel and titanium specimens will be discussed and compared to non-destructive evaluation techniques. PMID:22346696

  20. Dual wire welding torch and method

    DOEpatents

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  1. Simulation model of Al-Ti dissimilar laser welding-brazing and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behúlová, M.; Babalová, E.; Nagy, M.

    2017-02-01

    Formation of dissimilar weld joints of light metals and alloys including Al-Ti joints is interesting mainly due to demands on the weight reduction and corrosion resistance of components and structures in automotive, aircraft, aeronautic and other industries. Joining of Al-Ti alloys represents quite difficult problem. Generally, the fusion welding of these materials can lead to the development of different metastable phases and formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. The paper deals with numerical simulation of the laser welding-brazing process of titanium Grade 2 and EN AW 5083 aluminum alloy sheets using the 5087 aluminum filler wire. Simulation model for welding-brazing of testing samples with the dimensions of 50 × 100 × 2 mm was developed in order to perform numerical experiments applying variable welding parameters and to design proper combination of these parameters for formation of sound Al-Ti welded-brazed joints. Thermal properties of welded materials in the dependence on temperature were computed using JMatPro software. The conical model of the heat source was exploited for description of the heat input to the weld due to the moving laser beam source. The sample cooling by convection and radiation to the surrounding air and shielding argon gas was taken into account. Developed simulation model was verified by comparison of obtained results of numerical simulation with the temperatures measured during real experiments of laser welding-brazing by the TruDisk 4002 disk laser.

  2. Antimicrobial titanium/silver PVD coatings on titanium

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Andrea; Glückermann, Susanne K; Thull, Roger; Gbureck, Uwe

    2006-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation and deep infection of endoprostheses is a recurrent complication in implant surgery. Post-operative infections may be overcome by adjusting antimicrobial properties of the implant surface prior to implantation. In this work we described the development of an antimicrobial titanium/silver hard coating via the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. Methods Coatings with a thickness of approximately 2 μm were deposited on titanium surfaces by simultaneous vaporisation of both metals in an inert argon atmosphere with a silver content of approximately 0.7 – 9% as indicated by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. On these surfaces microorganisms and eukaryotic culture cells were grown. Results The coatings released sufficient silver ions (0.5–2.3 ppb) when immersed in PBS and showed significant antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus epidermis and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. At the same time, no cytotoxic effects of the coatings on osteoblast and epithelial cells were found. Conclusion Due to similar mechanical performance when compared to pure titanium, the TiAg coatings should be suitable to provide antimicrobial activity on load-bearing implant surfaces. PMID:16556327

  3. Welding in Space Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.

    1990-01-01

    The potential was discussed for welding in space, its advantages and disadvantages, and what type of programs can benefit from the capability. Review of the various presentations and comments made in the course of the workshop suggests several routes to obtaining a better understanding of how welding processes can be used in NASA's initiatives in space. They are as follows: (1) development of a document identifying well processes and equipment requirements applicable to space and lunar environments; (2) more demonstrations of welding particular hardware which are to be used in the above environments, especially for space repair operations; (3) increased awareness among contractors responsible for building space equipment as to the potential for welding operations in space and on other planetary bodies; and (4) continuation of space welding research projects is important to maintain awareness within NASA that welding in space is viable and beneficial.

  4. Effect of humidity on fretting wear of several pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goto, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Fretting wear experiments with several pure metals were conducted in air at various relative humidity levels. The materials used were iron, aluminum, copper, silver, chromium, titanium, and nickel. Each pure metal had a maximum fretting wear volume at a specific humidity level RH sub max that was not dependent on mechanical factors such as contact load, fretting amplitude, and frequency in the ranges studied. The weight loss due to fretting wear at RH sub max for each pure metal decreased with increasing heat of oxygen adsorption on the metal, indicating that adhesive wear dominated at RH sub max.

  5. Modeling of Bullet Penetration in Explosively Welded Composite Armor Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Carney, Theodore C.

    2006-07-28

    Normal impact of high-speed armor piercing bullet on titanium-steel composite has been investigated using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The objective is to understand the effects of impact during the ballistic testing of explosively welded armor plates. These plates have significant microstructural differences within the weld region, heat-affected zone and the base metal. The variances result in substantial ductility, hardness and strength differences, important criteria in determining the failure mode, specifically whether it occurs at the joint or within the virgin base metal. Several configurations of composite plates with different material combinations were modeled. The results were used to modify the heat treatment process of explosively welded plates, making them more likely to survive impact.

  6. WELDED JACKETED URANIUM BODY

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1958-08-26

    A fuel element is presented for a neutronic reactor and is comprised of a uranium body, a non-fissionable jacket surrounding sald body, thu jacket including a portion sealed by a weld, and an inclusion in said sealed jacket at said weld of a fiux having a low neutron capture cross-section. The flux is provided by combining chlorine gas and hydrogen in the intense heat of-the arc, in a "Heliarc" welding muthod, to form dry hydrochloric acid gas.

  7. Microstructure and properties of a titanium alloy-orthorhombic titanium aluminide layered composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, R. M.; Valiakhmetov, O. R.; Safiullin, R. V.; Imaev, V. M.; Imaev, R. M.

    2009-03-01

    The microstructure and tensile properties of a layered composite material fabricated by solid-state bonding of its components using pressure welding are studied at room and elevated temperatures. The components are made of a high-temperature VT25U titanium alloy and an intermetallic alloy ( O alloy) based on orthorhombic titanium aluminide of the composition Ti-23Al-22.7Nb-1.1V-0.6Zr-0.2Si-0.3C (at %). The study of the microstructure and chemical composition of the composite by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis demonstrates that this method of producing a layered composite provides high-quality poreless bonding of materials of different types. The solid-state bonding zone has an intermediate chemical composition. Mechanical tests demonstrate that the room-temperature strength of the composite is comparable with that of the O alloy and is higher than that of the titanium alloy; as the fraction of the titanium alloy in the composite decreases, this strength increases. The relative elongation of the layered composite is found to be higher than that of the O alloy and lower than that of the titanium alloy. In the temperature range 500-700°C, the strength of the composite material is 25% higher than that of the titanium alloy, and its plasticity is lower than that of the titanium alloy. Our method is shown to be promising for producing layered composite materials that have high mechanical properties over a wide temperature range.

  8. Formation of Intermetallic Compounds During Explosive Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, Bella A.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Pushkin, Mark S.; Inozemtsev, Alexei V.; Patselov, Alexander M.; Tankeyev, Anatoliy P.; Kuzmin, Sergey V.; Lysak, Vladimir I.

    2016-11-01

    Transition states between traditional, i.e., plain and wavy, shapes of the interface during explosive welding were studied. A sequence of the transition states was found for the studied copper-titanium and copper-tantalum joints. Some transition states are common for the joints under study, while others are only typical of the copper-titanium joints, due to sufficiently high solubility of original elements. A transition state has been found, during which cusps, even though they are solid phase, look like splashes on the water. The key role of these splashes is that they evidence the lower boundary of the `weldability window.' The study found certain self-organization processes of the cusps that cause them to turn into a quasi-wavy shape of the interface, and then, as the welding mode is intensified, into a wavy shape. The role of intermetallic compounds was analyzed, due to which a wave only consists of cusps in case mutual solubility of original metals is sufficiently high.

  9. Electric arc welding gun

    DOEpatents

    Luttrell, Edward; Turner, Paul W.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to improved apparatus for arc welding an interior joint formed by intersecting tubular members. As an example, the invention is well suited for applications where many similar small-diameter vertical lines are to be welded to a long horizontal header. The improved apparatus includes an arc welding gun having a specially designed welding head which is not only very compact but also produces welds that are essentially free from rolled-over solidified metal. The welding head consists of the upper end of the barrel and a reversely extending electrode holder, or tip, which defines an acute angle with the barrel. As used in the above-mentioned example, the gun is positioned to extend upwardly through the vertical member and the joint to be welded, with its welding head disposed within the horizontal header. Depending on the design of the welding head, the barrel then is either rotated or revolved about the axis of the vertical member to cause the electrode to track the joint.

  10. Physics of Fusion Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Applicabilities and limitations of three techniques analyzed. NASA technical memorandum discusses physics of electron-beam, gas/ tungsten-arc, and laser-beam welding. From comparison of capabilities and limitations of each technique with regard to various welding conditions and materials, possible to develop criteria for selecting best welding technique in specific application. All three techniques classified as fusion welding; small volume of workpiece melted by intense heat source. Heat source moved along seam, leaving in wake solid metal that joins seam edges together.

  11. Robot welding process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  12. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  13. Explosive Welding of Pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drennov, Oleg; Drennov, Andrey; Burtseva, Olga

    2013-06-01

    For connection by welding it is suggested to use the explosive welding method. This method is rather new. Nevertheless, it has become commonly used among the technological developments. This method can be advantageous (saving material and physical resources) comparing to its statical analogs (electron-beam welding, argon-arc welding, plasma welding, gas welding, etc.), in particular, in hard-to-reach areas due to their geographic and climatic conditions. Explosive welding of cylindrical surfaces is performed by launching of welded layer along longitudinal axis of construction. During this procedure, it is required to provide reliable resistance against radial convergent strains. The traditional method is application of fillers of pipe cavity, which are dense cylindrical objects having special designs. However, when connecting pipes consecutively in pipelines by explosive welding, removal of the fillers becomes difficult and sometimes impossible. The suggestion is to use water as filler. The principle of non-compressibility of liquid under quasi-dynamic loading is used. In one-dimensional gasdynamic and elastic-plastic calculations we determined non-deformed mass of water (perturbations, which are moving in the axial direction with sound velocity, should not reach the layer end boundaries for 5-7 circulations of shock waves in the radial direction). Linear dimension of the water layer from the zone of pipe coupling along axis in each direction is >= 2R, where R is the internal radius of pipe.

  14. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  15. Visible Spectra of Titanium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Nagarajan, R.; Maier, J. P.; Zhuang, X.; Le, A.; Steimle, T. C.

    2011-05-01

    Titanium oxide (TiO) has been extensively studied spectroscopically due to its astrophysical relevance. TiO is the main opacity source in the atmospheres of cool M-type stars in the visible and near infrared. In view of the high cosmic abundance of Ti and O, titanium dioxide (TiO2) is believed to play an important role in dust formation processes from the gas-phase in circumstellar shells of oxygen-rich stars. The electronic spectra of a cold molecular beam of TiO2 have been investigated using mass-resolved resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. TiO2 was produced by laser ablation of a pure titanium rod in the presence of a supersonic expanding mixture of approximately 5% O2 in either helium or argon. The spectra were recorded in the region 17500 cm-1 to 22500 cm-1 and the bands assigned to the A1B2 ← X1A1 transition. The origin and harmonic vibrational constants for the A1B2 state were determined to be: T000 = 17593(5) cm-1, ω1 = 876(3) cm-1, ω2 = 184(1) cm-1, and ω3 = 316(2) cm-1. Further, the dispersed fluorescence of a few bands were recorded to obtain vibrational parameters for the X1A1 state.

  16. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  17. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-07-04

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  18. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  19. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  20. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  1. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  2. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  3. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  4. Process for the fabrication of ceramic fiber reinforced titanium aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Horsfall, I.; Cundy, S.J.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes initial work on a novel process for the production of titanium aluminide matrix composites reinforced with short alumina fibers. The processing route involves an adaption of existing metal matrix composite (MMC) fabrication technology used to produce hybrid particulate/short fiber composites. A preform is produced which contains alumina fibers and titanium metal powder with a fiber content of around 10 percent by volume and approximately 50 percent porosity. This preform is then infiltrated with pure aluminum by a squeeze casting process to produce a fully dense composite of titanium powder and alumina fibers in a metallic aluminum matrix. The composite is then heat treated in a hot isostatic press to react the aluminum and titanium to produce a titanium aluminide matrix. 9 refs.

  5. Effect of chemical polishing in titanium materials for low outgassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizawa, K.; Kurisu, H.; Yamamoto, S.; Nomura, T.; Murashige, N.

    2008-03-01

    A chemical polishing using a nitric acid solution was found to be the most suitable for the titanium materials. 1.8 nm of small surface roughness was observed in a microscopic range in 1 μm square, and 7 nm of a thin oxide layer was shown to exist for the chemically polished titanium. The surface processing for the titanium was developed combining the chemical polishing and the precision cleaning. The chemically polished pure titanium of JIS grade 2 showed extremely low outgassing rate below 10-12 Pams-1 after baking process, which is two orders of magnitude smaller than that for standard vacuum materials under the same baking condition. Outgassing rates of the titanium is about 1/5 of that for a stainless steel without baking process.

  6. The effect of welding parameters on penetration in GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Shirali, A.A. ); Mills, K.C. )

    1993-07-01

    The effect of various welding parameters on the penetration of GTA welds has been investigated. Increases in welding speed were found to reduce penetration; however, increases in welding current were observed to increase the penetration in high sulfur (HS) casts and decrease penetration in low sulfur (LS) steels. Plots of penetration as a function of increasing linear energy (the heat supplied per unit length of weld) revealed a similar trend with increased penetration in HS casts, but the penetration in LS casts was unaffected by increases in linear energy. These results support the Burgardt-Heiple proposition that changes in welding parameters on penetration can be explained in terms of their effect, sequentially, on the temperature gradient and the Marangoni forces operating in the weld pool. Increases in arc length were found to decrease weld penetration regardless of the sulfur concentration of the steel, and the effects of electrode geometry and welding position on weld penetration were also investigated.

  7. Magnesium-titanium alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Ilona

    Magnesium has been identified as a promising biodegradable implant material because it does not cause systemic toxicity and can reduce stress shielding. However, it corrodes too quickly in the body. Titanium, which is already used ubiquitously for implants, was chosen as the alloying element because of its proven biocompatibility and corrosion resistance in physiological environments. Thus, alloying magnesium with titanium is expected to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium. Mg-Ti alloys with a titanium content ranging from 5 to 35 at.-% were successfully synthesized by mechanical alloying. Spark plasma sintering was identified as a processing route to consolidate the alloy powders made by ball-milling into bulk material without destroying the alloy structure. This is an important finding as this metastable Mg-Ti alloy can only be heated up to max. 200C° for a limited time without reaching the stable state of separated magnesium and titanium. The superior corrosion behavior of Mg 80-Ti20 alloy in a simulated physiological environment was shown through hydrogen evolution tests, where the corrosion rate was drastically reduced compared to pure magnesium and electrochemical measurements revealed an increased potential and resistance compared to pure magnesium. Cytotoxicity tests on murine pre-osteoblastic cells in vitro confirmed that supernatants made from Mg-Ti alloy were no more cytotoxic than supernatants prepared with pure magnesium. Mg and Mg-Ti alloys can also be used to make novel polymer-metal composites, e.g., with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) to avoid the polymer's detrimental pH drop during degradation and alter its degradation pattern. Thus, Mg-Ti alloys can be fabricated and consolidated while achieving improved corrosion resistance and maintaining cytocompatibility. This work opens up the possibility of using Mg-Ti alloys for fracture fixation implants and other biomedical applications. KEYWORDS: Magnesium, titanium, corrosion

  8. Welding blades to rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoklo, K. H.; Moore, T. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A process is described to form T-joints between dissimilar thickness parts by magnetic force upset welding. This type of resistance welding is used to join compressor and turbine parts which thereby reduces the weight and cost of jet engines.

  9. NASA welding assessment program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A program was conducted to demonstrate the cycle life capability of welded solar cell modules relative to a soldered solar cell module in a simulated low earth orbit thermal environment. A total of five 18-cell welded (parallel gap resistance welding) modules, three 18-cell soldered modules, and eighteen single cell samples were fabricated using 2 x 4 cm silicon solar cells from ASEC, fused silica cover glass from OCLI, silver plated Invar interconnectors, DC 93-500 adhesive, and Kapton-Kevlar-Kapton flexible substrate material. Zero degree pull strength ranged from 2.4 to 5.7 lbs for front welded contacts (40 samples), and 3.5 to 6.2 lbs for back welded contacts (40 samples). Solar cell cross sections show solid state welding on both front and rear contacts. The 18-cell welded modules have a specific power of 124 W/kg and an area power density of 142 W/sq m (both at 28 C). Three welded and one soldered module were thermal cycle tested in a thermal vacuum chamber simulating a low earth orbit thermal environment.

  10. Friction Stir Welding Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1998-01-01

    The research of this summer was a continuation of work started during the previous summer faculty fellowship period. The Friction Stir Welding process (FSW) patented by The Welding Institute (TWI), in Great Britain, has become a popular topic at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the past year. Last year it was considered a novel approach to welding but few people took it very seriously as a near term solution. However, due to continued problems with cracks in the new aluminum-lithium space shuttle external tank (ET), the friction stir process is being mobilized at full speed in an effort to mature this process for the potential manufacture of flight hardware. It is now the goal of NASA and Lockheed-Martin Corporation (LMC) to demonstrate a full-scale friction stir welding system capable of welding ET size barrel sections. The objectives this summer were: (1) Implementation and validation of the rotating dynamometer on the MSFC FSW system; (2) Collection of data for FSW process modeling efforts; (3) Specification development for FSW implementation on the vertical weld tool; (4) Controls and user interface development for the adjustable pin tool; and (5) Development of an instrumentation system for the planishing process. The projects started this summer will lead to a full scale friction stir welding system that is expected to produce a friction stir welded shuttle external tank type barrel section. The success of this could lead to the implementation of the friction stir process for manufacturing future shuttle external tanks.

  11. Laser Welding in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Kaukler, William F.

    1989-01-01

    Solidification type welding process experiments in conditions of microgravity were performed. The role of convection in such phenomena was examined and convective effects in the small volumes obtained in the laser weld zone were observed. Heat transfer within the weld was affected by acceleration level as indicated by the resulting microstructure changes in low gravity. All experiments were performed such that both high and low gravity welds occurred along the same weld beam, allowing the effects of gravity alone to be examined. Results indicate that laser welding in a space environment is feasible and can be safely performed IVA or EVA. Development of the hardware to perform the experiment in a Hitchhiker-g platform is recomended as the next step. This experiment provides NASA with a capable technology for welding needs in space. The resources required to perform this experiment aboard a Shuttle Hitchhiker-pallet are assessed. Over the four year period 1991 to 1994, it is recommended that the task will require 13.6 manyears and $914,900. In addition to demonstrating the technology and ferreting out the problems encountered, it is suggested that NASA will also have a useful laser materials processing facility for working with both the scientific and the engineering aspects of materials processing in space. Several concepts are also included for long-term optimization of available solar power through solar pumping solid state lasers directly for welding power.

  12. Welding: Scope and Sequence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nashville - Davidson County Metropolitan Public Schools, TN.

    Intended for use by all welding instructors in the Metropolitan Nashville Public Schools, this guide provides a sequential listing of course content and scope. A course description provides a brief overview of the content of the courses offered in the welding program. General course objectives are then listed. Outlines of the course content are…

  13. DC arc weld starter

    DOEpatents

    Campiotti, Richard H.; Hopwood, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A system for starting an arc for welding uses three DC power supplies, a high voltage supply for initiating the arc, an intermediate voltage supply for sustaining the arc, and a low voltage welding supply directly connected across the gap after the high voltage supply is disconnected.

  14. The use of titanium and stainless steel in fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Hayes, J S; Richards, R G

    2010-11-01

    The use of metal in fracture fixation has demonstrated unrivalled success for many years owing to its high stiffness, strength, biological toleration and overall reliable function. The most prominent materials used are electropolished stainless steel and commercially pure titanium, along with the more recent emergence of titanium alloys. Despite the many differences between electropolished stainless steel and titanium, both materials provide a relatively predictable clinical outcome, and offer similar success for fulfilling the main biomechanical and biological requirements of fracture fixation despite distinctive differences in implant properties and biological responses. This article explores these differences by highlighting the limitations and advantages of both materials, and addresses how this translates to clinical success.

  15. Solidification of underwater wet welds

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, A.M.; Medeiros, R.C. de; Liu, S.

    1995-12-31

    It is well known that the shape of a weld pool can influence the microstructure and segregation pattern of the final solidified weld metal. Mechanical properties and susceptibility to defects are consequently affected by the solidification mode of the weld. In this work the solidification behavior of weld beads deposited in air and underwater wet welding using rutile electrodes were compared. The welds were deposited by gravity feed, on low carbon, manganese steel plates using similar welding conditions. Macroscopic observation of the weld craters showed that welds deposited in air presented an elliptical weld pool. The underwater wet welds, on the other hand, solidified with a tear drop shape. Although the welds differed in shape, their lengths were approximately the same. Microscopic examinations carried out on transverse, normal and longitudinal sections revealed a coarser columnar grain structure in the underwater welds. These results suggest that the tear-drop shaped pool induced solidification in a preferred orientation with segregation more likely in welds deposited under wet conditions. This change in weld pool geometry can be explained by the surface heat loss conditions that occur in a wet weld: slower when covered by the steam bubble and faster in the region in contact with water behind the pool.

  16. Argon Welding Inside A Workpiece

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.

    1988-01-01

    Canopies convert large hollow workpiece into inert-gas welding chamber. Large manifold serves welding chamber for attachment of liner parts in argon atmosphere. Every crevice, opening and passageway provided with argon-rich environment. Weld defects and oxidation dramatically reduced; also welding time reduced.

  17. Alternating-Polarity Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Brief reversing polarity of welding current greatly improves quality of welds. NASA technical memorandum recounts progress in art of variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welding, with emphasis on welding of aluminum-alloy tanks. VPPA welders offer important advantages over conventional single-polarity gas/tungsten arc welders.

  18. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  19. Method for welding beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1995-12-31

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. Beryllium parts made using this method can be used as structural components in aircraft, satellites and space applications.

  20. Method for welding beryllium

    DOEpatents

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  1. Rheomorphism of welded tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, J. A.; Wright, J. V.

    1981-05-01

    Peralkaline welded tuffs from the islands of Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, and Pantelleria, Italy, show abundant evidence for post-depositional flow. It is demonstrated that rheomorphism, or secondary mass flowage, can occur in welded tuffs of ignimbrite and air-fall origin. The presence of a linear fabric is taken as the diagnostic criterion for the recognition of the process. Deposition on a slope is an essential condition for the development of rheomorphism after compaction and welding. Internal structures produced during rheomorphic flow can be studied by the methods of structural geology and show similar dispositions to comparable features in sedimentary slump sheets. It is shown that secondary flowage can occur in welded tuffs emplaced on gentle slopes, provided that the apparent viscosity of the magma is sufficiently low. Compositional factors favor the development of rheomorphism in densely welded tuffs of peralkaline type.

  2. Grinding Parts For Automatic Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Hoult, William S.

    1989-01-01

    Rollers guide grinding tool along prospective welding path. Skatelike fixture holds rotary grinder or file for machining large-diameter rings or ring segments in preparation for welding. Operator grasps handles to push rolling fixture along part. Rollers maintain precise dimensional relationship so grinding wheel cuts precise depth. Fixture-mounted grinder machines surface to quality sufficient for automatic welding; manual welding with attendant variations and distortion not necessary. Developed to enable automatic welding of parts, manual welding of which resulted in weld bead permeated with microscopic fissures.

  3. Adaptive weld control for high-integrity welding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Bradley W.

    Adaptive, closed-loop weld control is necessary to maintain high-integrity, zero-defect welds. Conventional weld control techniques using weld parameter feedback control loops are sufficient to maintain set points, but fall short when confronted with unexpected variations in part/tooling temperature and mechanical structure, weldment material, arc skew angle, or calibration in weld parameter feedback measurement. Modern technology allows closed-loop control utilizing input from real-time weld monitoring sensors and inspection devices. Weld puddle parameters, bead profile parameters, and weld seam position are fed back into the weld control loop which adapts for the weld condition variations and drives them back to a desired state, thereby preventing weld defects or perturbations. Parameters such as arc position relative to the weld seam, puddle symmetry, arc length, weld width, and bead shape can be extracted from sensor imagery and used in closed-loop active weld control. All weld bead and puddle measurements are available for real-time display and statistical process control analysis, after which the data is archived to permanent storage or later retrieval and analysis.

  4. Capabilities of infrared weld monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, P.G.; Keske, J.S.; Leong, K.H.; Kornecki, G.

    1997-11-01

    A non-obtrusive pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld penetration, while AC portions of the output can be correlated with surface irregularities and part misalignment or contamination. Changes in DC behavior are also noted for both full and deep penetration welds. Full penetration welds are signified by an abrupt reduction in the weld monitor output. Bead on plate welds were made on steel, aluminum, and magnesium with both a CW CO{sub 2} laser and a pulsed Nd:YAG laser to explore the relationships between the weld characteristics and the weld monitor output.

  5. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  6. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  7. Calibration Fixture For Welding Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holly, Krisztina J.

    1990-01-01

    Compact, lightweight device used in any position or orientation. Calibration fixture designed for use on robotic gas/tungsten-arc welding torch equipped with vision-based seam-tracking system. Through optics in hollow torch cylinder, video camera obtains image of weld, viewing along line of sight coaxial with welding electrode. Attaches to welding-torch cylinder in place of gas cup normally attached in use. By use of longer or shorter extension tube, fixture accommodates welding electrode of unusual length.

  8. Thermoplastic welding apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Matsen, Marc R.; Negley, Mark A.; Geren, William Preston; Miller, Robert James

    2017-03-07

    A thermoplastic welding apparatus includes a thermoplastic welding tool, at least one tooling surface in the thermoplastic welding tool, a magnetic induction coil in the thermoplastic welding tool and generally encircling the at least one tooling surface and at least one smart susceptor in the thermoplastic welding tool at the at least one tooling surface. The magnetic induction coil is adapted to generate a magnetic flux field oriented generally parallel to a plane of the at least one smart susceptor.

  9. Weld analysis and control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Larry Z. (Inventor); Rodgers, Michael H. (Inventor); Powell, Bradley W. (Inventor); Burroughs, Ivan A. (Inventor); Goode, K. Wayne (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a Weld Analysis and Control System developed for active weld system control through real time weld data acquisition. Closed-loop control is based on analysis of weld system parameters and weld geometry. The system is adapted for use with automated welding apparatus having a weld controller which is capable of active electronic control of all aspects of a welding operation. Enhanced graphics and data displays are provided for post-weld analysis. The system provides parameter acquisition, including seam location which is acquired for active torch cross-seam positioning. Torch stand-off is also monitored for control. Weld bead and parent surface geometrical parameters are acquired as an indication of weld quality. These parameters include mismatch, peaking, undercut, underfill, crown height, weld width, puddle diameter, and other measurable information about the weld puddle regions, such as puddle symmetry, etc. These parameters provide a basis for active control as well as post-weld quality analysis and verification. Weld system parameters, such as voltage, current and wire feed rate, are also monitored and archived for correlation with quality parameters.

  10. Oxidation effects on porcelain-titanium interface reactions and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Horng, C J; Okazaki, M; Takahashi, J

    1990-06-01

    Titanium is strong, resists corrosion and has a low density and excellent biocompatibility. Conventional ceramic-metal restorations have been extensively used in dentistry because of their esthetic appearance and good mechanical properties. This study investigates oxidation effects on the porcelain-titanium interface reactions and bond strength. Pure titanium was treated in a porcelain furnace at temperatures of 600 to 1000 degrees C under either vacuum or air. X-ray diffraction analysis of the surface of pure titanium revealed that the relative peak intensity of alpha-Ti decreased and that of TiO2 increased, with increasing firing temperature. The Vickers hardness number of titanium increased with temperature especially over 900 degrees C, and was harder in air than in vacuum. The tension-shear bond strength of the porcelain-titanium system was the highest in the green stage and lowest after 900 degrees C treatment. Metallographic microscopy of the porcelain-titanium interface revealed a thick band-like zone in the sample treated over 900 degrees C. The excess thick layer of TiO2 apparently weakened the bond strength of porcelain-titanium. Unlike the conventional ceramic-gold alloy system the recommended degassing procedure was not suitable for porcelain-pure titanium restoration.

  11. Microstructure and Strength Characteristics of Alloy 617 Welds

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Totemeier; H. Tian; D.E. Clark; J.A. Simpson

    2005-06-01

    Three types of high-temperature joints were created from alloy 617 base metal: fusion welds, braze joints, and diffusion bonds. The microstructures of all joint types and tensile properties of fusion welds and braze joints were characterized. Sound fusion welds were created by the GTAW process with alloy 617 filler wire. Cross-weld tensile strengths were equal to the parent metal at temperatures of 25, 800, and 1000°C; ductilities of the joints were only slightly lower than that of the parent metal. Failure occurred in the weld fusion zone at room temperature and in the parent metal at elevated temperatures. Incomplete wetting occurred in joints produced by vacuum brazing using AWS BNi-1 braze alloy, believed to be due to tenacious Al and Ti oxide formation. Incompletely bonded butt joints showed relatively poor tensile properties. A second set of braze joints has been created with faying surfaces electroplated with pure Ni prior to brazing; characterization of these joints is in progress. Conditions resulting in good diffusion bonds characterized by grain growth across the bondline and no porosity were determined: vacuum bonding at 1150°C for 3 hours with an initial uniaxial stress of 20 MPa (constant ram displacement). A 15 µm thick pure Ni interlayer was needed to achieve grain growth across the bondline. Tensile testing of diffusion bonds is in progress

  12. Influence of nitrogen in the shielding gas on corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatt, R.B.; Kamat, H.S.; Ghosal, S.K.; De, P.K.

    1999-10-01

    The influence of nitrogen in shielding gas on the corrosion resistance of welds of a duplex stainless steel (grade U-50), obtained by gas tungsten arc (GTA) with filler wire, autogenous GTA (bead-on-plate), electron beam welding (EBW), and microplasma techniques, has been evaluated in chloride solutions at 30 C. Pitting attack has been observed in GTA, electron beam welding, and microplasma welds when welding has been carried out using pure argon as the shielding gas. Gas tungsten arc welding with 5 to 10% nitrogen and 90 to 95% argon, as the shielding gas, has been found to result in an improved pitting corrosion resistance of the weldments of this steel. However, the resistance of pitting of autogenous welds (bead-on-plate) obtained in pure argon as the shielding gas has been observed to remain unaffected. Microscopic examination, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), and x-ray diffraction studies have revealed that the presence of nitrogen in the shielding gas in the GTA welds not only modifies the microstructure and the austenite to ferrite ratio but also results in a nearly uniform distribution of the various alloying elements, for example, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum among the constituent phases, which are responsible for improved resistance to pitting corrosion.

  13. Robotics for welding research

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, G.; Jones, J.

    1984-09-01

    The welding metallurgy research and education program at Colorado School of Mines (CSM) is helping industries make the transition toward automation by training students in robotics. Industry's interest is primarily in pick and place operations, although robotics can increase efficiency in areas other than production. Training students to develop fully automated robotic welding systems will usher in new curriculum requirements in the area of computers and microprocessors. The Puma 560 robot is CSM's newest acquisition for welding research 5 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Solar array welding developement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elms, R. V., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The present work describes parallel gap welding as used for joining solar cells to the cell interconnect system. Sample preparation, weldable cell parameter evaluation, bond scheduling, bond strength evaluation, and bonding and thermal shock tests are described. A range of weld schedule parameters - voltage, time, and force - can be identified for various cell/interconnect designs that will provide adequate bond strengths and acceptably small electrical degradation. Automation of solar array welding operations to a significant degree has been achieved in Europe and will be receiving increased attention in the U.S. to reduce solar array fabrication costs.

  15. Thermal stir welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A welding method is provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  16. APPARATUS FOR ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Lingafelter, J.W.

    1960-04-01

    An apparatus is described in which a welding arc created between an annular electrode and a workpiece moves under the influence of an electromagnetic field about the electrode in a closed or annular path. This mode of welding is specially suited to the enclosing of nuclear-fuel slugs in a protective casing. For example, a uranium slug is placed in an aluminum can, and an aluminum closure is welded to the open end of the can along a closed or annular path conforming to the periphery of the end closure.

  17. Thermal stir welding apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A welding method and apparatus are provided for forming a weld joint between first and second elements of a workpiece. The method includes heating the first and second elements to form an interface of material in a plasticized or melted state interface between the elements. The interface material is then allowed to cool to a plasticized state if previously in a melted state. The interface material, while in the plasticized state, is then mixed, for example, using a grinding/extruding process, to remove any dendritic-type weld microstructures introduced into the interface material during the heating process.

  18. Weld Wire Investigation Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, M.A.

    1999-03-22

    After GTA welding reservoir A production/process prove-in assemblies, X-ray examination detected a lack of sidewall fusion. After examining several possible causes, it was determined that the weld wire filler metal was responsible, particularly the wire cleaning process. The final conclusion was that the filler wire must be abrasively cleaned in a particular manner to perform as required. The abrasive process was incorporated into the wire material specification, ensuring consistency for all reservoir GTA welding at AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T).

  19. Specs add confidence in use of wet welding. [Underwater welding

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Underwater wet welding can now be utilized with the same confidence as dry welding, provided certain guidelines are followed. A new electrode is discussed that has been delivering exceptionally high quality welds by a diving firm in Houston. With the issuance of the American Welding Society's specifications (ANS/LAWS D3.6-83) much of the confusion surrounding underwater welding should be eliminated. The new specifications establish the levels of quality for underwater welding and gives everyone in the business a common language.

  20. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  1. Interfacial microstructure and properties of copper clad steel produced using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, Y.; Haghshenas, M.; Nguyen, T.; Galloway, J.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2015-06-15

    A preliminary study compares the feasibility and microstructures of pure copper claddings produced on a pressure vessel A516 Gr. 70 steel plate, using friction stir welding versus gas metal arc welding. A combination of optical and scanning electron microscopy is used to characterize the grain structures in both the copper cladding and heat affected zone in the steel near the fusion line. The friction stir welding technique produces copper cladding with a grain size of around 25 μm, and no evidence of liquid copper penetration into the steel. The gas metal arc welding of copper cladding exhibits grain sizes over 1 mm, and with surface microcracks as well as penetration of liquid copper up to 50 μm into the steel substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that metallurgical bonding is produced in both processes. Increased diffusion of Mn and Si into the copper cladding occurs when using gas metal arc welding, although some nano-pores were detected in the FSW joint interface. - Highlights: • Cladding of steel with pure copper is possible using either FSW or GMAW. • The FSW yielded a finer grain structure in the copper, with no evidence of cracking. • The FSW joint contains some evidence of nano-pores at the interface of the steel/copper. • Copper cladding by GMAW contained surface cracks attributed to high thermal stresses. • The steel adjacent to the fusion line maintained a hardness value below 248 HV.

  2. Titanium Nitride Cermets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-07-01

    7696i ’-Brewer, L., et al. Thermodynamic and Physical Properties of Nitrides. Carbides, Sulfides, i1licides, and Phosphides, Chemistry and Metallurgy of...12 Referen eCs 0 . ...................... • • • 14 WADC TR 52-155 iv LIST OF TABLES I Properties of Titanium Nitride Bodies...15 II Properties of Titanium Nitride-Nickel Bodies............16 III Properties of Titanium Nitride Cermets with Nickel,..... 17 Cobalt, and

  3. Utilization of light scattering in transmission laser welding of medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bülow, Jon Fold; Bager, Kim; Thirstrup, Carsten

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports on optimization of material parameters in transmission laser welding of polymers including light absorption, light scattering and the thermal properties of the polymers. A criterion for making an optimized transmission laser weld between a transparent polymer part and an absorbing and scattering polymer part is formulated as a required thickness of the melt-zone in the transparent part with a corresponding minimum-line-energy-for-welding ( MLEW). Experimental data of MLEW are presented for a medical device application involving joining polyethylene-octene parts for various concentrations of near-infrared absorber and titanium dioxide light scattering particles. Numerical and analytical models yield good agreement to the experimental data and enable optimization of the transmission laser welding process. By utilization of light scattering, the laser line-energy required for joining two polymer parts can be reduced by a factor up to three, enabling a corresponding reduction of the cycle time in the manufacturing process.

  4. Study on impact toughness of C-Mn multilayer weld metal at [minus]60 degrees

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.H.; Xia, T.D.; Yan, C. )

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study has been carried out on the toughness of specimens of the C-Mn multilayer weld steel and that of the specimens simulated with the various reheating cycles by using the weld thermal-restraint stress and strain cycle simulator. It proved that the region initiating the cleavage crack, i.e., the weakest fractured at [minus]60 C([minus]76 F), is just the region having the lowest toughness among various reheated zones. The toughness of weld metal depends upon the toughness value of this weakest region. Heat input and alloying elements, such as manganese, titanium and boron, affected the toughness of weld metal by changing the toughness of the weakest region in the multilayer weldment.

  5. Effect of cold spray deposition of a titanium coating on fatigue behavior of a titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, T. S.; Shipway, P. H.; McCartney, D. G.

    2006-12-01

    The deposition of titanium on a titanium alloy substrate is being examined for potential use as a surface treatment for medical prostheses. A Ti6Al4V alloy was coated with pure titanium by cold gas dynamic spraying. Coatings were deposited onto samples with two different surface preparation methods (as-received and grit-blasted). The fatigue life of the as-received and grit-blasted materials, both before and after coating, was measured with a rotating-bend fatigue rig. A 15% reduction in fatigue endurance limit was observed after application of the coating to the as-received substrate, but no significant reduction was observed on its application to the grit-blasted substrate. The reduction in fatigue endurance limit has been related to the substrate-coating interface properties, the elastic modulus, and the residual stress states.

  6. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E.; Sutton, Jr., Harry G.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  7. Friction stir welding tool

    DOEpatents

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  8. Neutral polypropylene laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandolfino, Chiara; Lertora, Enrico; Gambaro, Carla

    2016-10-01

    The joining of polymeric materials is a technology used in many industrial applications, from transport to telecommunications and the medical sector. A new technology for the joining of polymers is the laser welding process. In particular, fibre laser welding is a flexible technology which allows high process speed and the realization of good quality joints. Despite its application becoming more widespread in the production of assemblies of high precision, the application of laser technology for the welding of polymers has not been the subject of many studies up to now. This study focused on the welding of neutral polypropylene. The window process parameter was identified, without the use of additives to increase radiation absorption, and a mechanical characterization was conducted in order to evaluate the quality of the joints realized.

  9. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  10. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  11. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  12. Friction Stir Weld Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  13. Friction stir weld tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Robert W. (Inventor); Payton, Lewis N. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A friction stir weld tool sleeve is supported by an underlying support pin. The pin material is preferably selected for toughness and fracture characteristics. The pin sleeve preferably has a geometry which employs the use of an interrupted thread, a plurality of flutes and/or eccentric path to provide greater flow through. Paddles have been found to assist in imparting friction and directing plastic metal during the welding process.

  14. Infrared thermography for monitoring heat generation in a linear friction welding process of Ti6Al4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, L.; Liberini, M.; Campanella, D.; Astarita, A.; Esposito, S.; Boccardi, S.; Meola, C.

    2017-03-01

    The increasing use of titanium alloys in a wider range of applications requires the development of new techniques and processes capable to decrease production costs and manufacturing times. In this regard welding and other joining techniques play an important role. Today, solid state friction joining processes, such as friction stir welding, friction spot welding, inertia friction welding, continuous-drive friction welding and linear friction welding (LFW), represent promising methods for part manufacturing. They allow for joining at temperature essentially below the melting point of the base materials being joined, without the addition of filler metal. However, the knowledge of temperature is essential to understand and model the phenomena involved in metal welding. A global measured value represents only a clue of the heat generation during the process; while, a deep understanding of welding thermal aspects requires temperature field measurement. This paper is focused on the use of infrared thermography applied to the linear friction welding process of Ti6Al4V alloy. The attention is concentrated on thermal field that develops on the outer wall of the two parts to be joined (i.e. heat generated in the friction zone), and on the maximum temperature that characterizes the process before and after the flash formation.

  15. Numerical Study for Gta Weld Shape Variation by Coupling Welding Arc and Weld Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenchao; Lu, Shanping; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Yiyi

    A numerical modeling of the welding arc and weld pool is studied for moving GTA welding to investigate the effect of the surface active element oxygen and the plasma drag force on the weld shape. Based on the 2D axisymmetric numerical modeling of the argon arc, the heat flux, current density and plasma drag force are obtained under different welding currents. Numerical calculations to the weld pool development are carried out for moving GTA welding on SUS304 stainless steel with different oxygen contents 30 ppm and 220 ppm, respectively. The results show that the plasma drag force is another dominating driving force affecting the liquid pool flow pattern, except for the Marangoni force. The different welding currents will change the temperature distribution and plasma drag force on the pool surface, and affect the strength of Marangoni convection and the weld shape. The weld D/W ratio initially increases, followed by a constant value around 0.5 with the increasing welding current under high oxygen content. The weld D/W ratio under the low oxygen content slightly decreases with the increasing welding current. The predicted weld shape by simulation agrees well with experimental results.

  16. Inhomogeneities of the interface produced by explosive welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberg, B. A.; Ivanov, M. A.; Rybin, V. V.; Inozemtsev, A. V.; Antonova, O. V.; Elkina, O. A.; Patselov, A. M.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kozhevnikov, V. E.

    2012-02-01

    Results of studying structure of the transition zone for a number of joints produced by explosive welding are presented. The joints of dissimilar metals (titanium-orthorhombic titanium aluminide, coppertantalum, and others) have been investigated. The welded pairs of metals differ from each other in mutual solubility; moreover, some pairs (copper-tantalum) virtually lack it. The interface was found to be uneven; it contains inhomogeneities, irrespective of whether it is flat or wavy. It is shown that the formation of interfacial protrusions determines the adhesion of materials. A granulating fragmentation has been found near the protrusions. The role of various processes in explosive welding has been discussed. The formation of protrusions does not depend on whether the metals of a pair have mutual solubility or not. However, this factor affects the structure of zones of local melting. The metals that have mutual solubility form true solutions; in the absence of solubility, these zones represent colloidal solutions. It is shown that sometimes the local melting zones do not present a real danger for the strength of the joint. A hypothesis is proposed that the formation of a wavy surface is possible through the self-organization of the previously formed protrusions.

  17. Automatic Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Robotic welding has been of interest to industrial firms because it offers higher productivity at lower cost than manual welding. There are some systems with automated arc guidance available, but they have disadvantages, such as limitations on types of materials or types of seams that can be welded; susceptibility to stray electrical signals; restricted field of view; or tendency to contaminate the weld seam. Wanting to overcome these disadvantages, Marshall Space Flight Center, aided by Hayes International Corporation, developed system that uses closed-circuit TV signals for automatic guidance of the welding torch. NASA granted license to Combined Technologies, Inc. for commercial application of the technology. They developed a refined and improved arc guidance system. CTI in turn, licensed the Merrick Corporation, also of Nashville, for marketing and manufacturing of the new system, called the CT2 Optical Trucker. CT2 is a non-contracting system that offers adaptability to broader range of welding jobs and provides greater reliability in high speed operation. It is extremely accurate and can travel at high speed of up to 150 inches per minute.

  18. Weld radiograph enigmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jemian, Wartan A.

    1986-01-01

    Weld radiograph enigmas are features observed on X-ray radiographs of welds. Some of these features resemble indications of weld defects, although their origin is different. Since they are not understood, they are a source of concern. There is a need to identify their causes and especially to measure their effect on weld mechanical properties. A method is proposed whereby the enigmas can be evaluated and rated, in relation to the full spectrum of weld radiograph indications. Thie method involves a signature and a magnitude that can be used as a quantitive parameter. The signature is generated as the diference between the microdensitometer trace across the radiograph and the computed film intensity derived from a thickness scan along the corresponding region of the sample. The magnitude is the measured difference in intensity between the peak and base line values of the signature. The procedure is demonstated by comparing traces across radiographs of a weld sample before and after the introduction of a hole and by a system based on a MacIntosh mouse used for surface profiling.

  19. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  20. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  1. Language as Pure Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul

    2016-01-01

    Language occupies a crucial position in neoliberalism, due to the reimagination of language as commodified skill. This paper studies the role of language ideology in this transformation by identifying a particular ideology that facilitates this process, namely the ideology which views language as pure potential. Neoliberalism treats language as a…

  2. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  3. Rolling-induced Face Centered Cubic Titanium in Hexagonal Close Packed Titanium at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H. C.; Kumar, A.; Wang, J.; Bi, X. F.; Tomé, C. N.; Zhang, Z.; Mao, S. X.

    2016-01-01

    Combining transmission electron microscopes and density functional theory calculations, we report the nucleation and growth mechanisms of room temperature rolling induced face-centered cubic titanium (fcc-Ti) in polycrystalline hexagonal close packed titanium (hcp-Ti). Fcc-Ti and hcp-Ti take the orientation relation: 〈0001〉hcp||〈001〉fcc and , different from the conventional one. The nucleation of fcc-Ti is accomplished via pure-shuffle mechanism with a minimum stable thickness of three atomic layers, and the growth via shear-shuffle mechanisms through gliding two-layer disconnections or pure-shuffle mechanisms through gliding four-layer disconnections. Such phase transformation offers an additional plastic deformation mode comparable to twinning. PMID:27067515

  4. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  5. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  6. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-07-15

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

  7. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    DOEpatents

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  8. Pre-weld heat treatment improves welds in Rene 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prager, M.

    1968-01-01

    Cooling of Rene 41 prior to welding reduces the incidence of cracking during post-weld heat treatment. The microstructure formed during the slow cooling rate favors elevated temperature ductility. Some vestiges of this microstructure are apparently retained during welding and thus enhance strain-age crack resistance in air.

  9. Weld line detection and process control for welding automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sang-Min; Cho, Man-Ho; Lee, Ho-Young; Cho, Taik-Dong

    2007-03-01

    Welding has been widely used as a process to join metallic parts. But because of hazardous working conditions, workers tend to avoid this task. Techniques to achieve the automation are the recognition of joint line and process control. A CCD (charge coupled device) camera with a laser stripe was applied to enhance the automatic weld seam tracking in GMAW (gas metal arc welding). The adaptive Hough transformation having an on-line processing ability was used to extract laser stripes and to obtain specific weld points. The three-dimensional information obtained from the vision system made it possible to generate the weld torch path and to obtain information such as the width and depth of the weld line. In this study, a neural network based on the generalized delta rule algorithm was adapted to control the process of GMAW, such as welding speed, arc voltage and wire feeding speed. The width and depth of the weld joint have been selected as neurons in the input layer of the neural-network algorithm. The input variables, the width and depth of the weld joint, are determined by image information. The voltage, weld speed and wire feed rate are represented as the neurons in the output layer. The results of the neural-network learning applied to the welding are as follows: learning ratio 0.5, momentum ratio 0.7, the number of hidden layers 2 and the number of hidden units 8. They have significant influence on the weld quality.

  10. Welding structures in gas tungsten arc-welded zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, T.E.; Saggese, M.E.

    1982-02-01

    Microstructures were obtained by welding tubes to end caps in fuel elements. The final joint properties are influenced by different structural elements including microstructure, porosity, and inclusions. The secondary structure found after welding is Widmanstaetten. Welding thermal cycles are inherently inhomogeneous, affecting both plate width and /beta/ primary grain. 4 refs.

  11. Weld pool oscillation during GTA welding of mild steel

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Y.H.; Ouden, G. den . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    In this paper the results are reported of a study dealing with the oscillation behavior of weld pools in the case of GTA bead-on-plate welding of mild steel, Fe 360. During welding, the weld pool was brought into oscillation by applying short current pulses, and the oscillation frequency and amplitude were measured by monitoring the arc voltage. It was found that the oscillation of the partially penetrated weld pool is dominated by one of two different oscillation modes (Mode 1 and Mode 2) depending on the welding conditions, whereas the oscillation of the fully penetrated weld pool is characterized by a third oscillation mode (Mode 3). It is possible to maintain partially penetrated weld pool oscillation in Mode 1 by choosing appropriate welding conditions. Under these conditions, an abrupt decrease in oscillation frequency occurs when the weld pool transfers from partial penetration to full penetration. Thus, weld penetration can be in-process controlled by monitoring the oscillation frequency during welding.

  12. Sprayable titanium composition

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, Chester E.; Kern, Werner; Vibronek, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to an organometallic titanium compound dissolved in a diluent and optionally containing a lower aliphatic alcohol spreading modifier, produces a solution that can be sprayed onto a substrate and cured to form an antireflection titanium oxide coating having a refractive index of from about 2.0 to 2.2.

  13. Laser Welding of Copper Using Multi Mode Fiber Lasers at Near Infrared Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebl, S.; Wiedenmann, R.; Ganser, A.; Schmitz, P.; Zaeh, M. F.

    Due to the increasing electrification of automotive drives and the expansion of decentralized renewable energygeneration, the consumption of copper for the fabrication of electrical components such as electric motors or conducting paths increases. To jointhese components, laser welding is more frequently used since it represents a flexible and fully automatable joining process. Because of the high thermal conductivity, the low absorption coefficient forinfrared wavelength of common laser beam sources and the resulting limited process efficiency, welding of copper alloys represents a major challenge for laser assisted processes. In this paper, experimental investigationsare presented to identify arising process limits during laser welding of pure copper materials with multi-mode fiber lasers at near infrared wavelength depending on the applied laser power and welding velocity. In addition, a potential stabilization of the welding process by shielding gas support was examined. Further investigations were focused on the influence of shielding gas on the molten pool geometry.

  14. High Strength Steel Welding Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    ical A nalysis ............................................................................ 124 4.6.1 Inductively Coupled Plasm a...welding, the heat source is not stationary ................................................................................................ 19 0 Figure 5...primary and secondary phases in weld m etal inclusions ................................................................. 52 Figure 13: HAC in heat

  15. Welding arc length control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iceland, William F. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a welding arc length control system. The system includes, in its broadest aspects, a power source for providing welding current, a power amplification system, a motorized welding torch assembly connected to the power amplification system, a computer, and current pick up means. The computer is connected to the power amplification system for storing and processing arc weld current parameters and non-linear voltage-ampere characteristics. The current pick up means is connected to the power source and to the welding torch assembly for providing weld current data to the computer. Thus, the desired arc length is maintained as the welding current is varied during operation, maintaining consistent weld penetration.

  16. Resistance-Welding Test Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Andrew D.

    1990-01-01

    Realistic welding conditions produce reliable specimens. Simple fixture holds resistance-welding test specimens. Specimen holder includes metallic holder and clamps to provide electrical and thermal paths and plastic parts providing thermal and electrical isolation.

  17. Workmanship standards for fusion welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, M. D.

    1967-01-01

    Workmanship standards manual defines practices, that adhere to rigid codes and specifications, for fusion welding of component piping, assemblies, and systems. With written and pictorial presentations, it is part of the operating procedure for fusion welding.

  18. Inactivation of Escherichia coli by titanium dioxide photocatalytic oxidation.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Titanium dioxide in the anatase crystalline form was used as a photocatalyst to generate hydroxyl radicals in a flowthrough water reactor. Experiments were performed on pure cultures of Escherichia coli in dechlorinated tap water and a surface water sample to evaluate the disinfe...

  19. Surface Modifications and Their Effects on Titanium Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Jemat, A.; Ghazali, M. J.; Razali, M.; Otsuka, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This review covers several basic methodologies of surface treatment and their effects on titanium (Ti) implants. The importance of each treatment and its effects will be discussed in detail in order to compare their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. Published literature for the last 18 years was selected with the use of keywords like titanium dental implant, surface roughness, coating, and osseointegration. Significant surface roughness played an important role in providing effective surface for bone implant contact, cell proliferation, and removal torque, despite having good mechanical properties. Overall, published studies indicated that an acid etched surface-modified and a coating application on commercial pure titanium implant was most preferable in producing the good surface roughness. Thus, a combination of a good surface roughness and mechanical properties of titanium could lead to successful dental implants. PMID:26436097

  20. Discoloration of titanium alloy in acidic saline solutions with peroxide.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare corrosion behavior in several titanium alloys with immersion in acidulated saline solutions containing hydrogen peroxide. Seven types of titanium alloy were immersed in saline solutions with varying levels of pH and hydrogen peroxide content, and resulting differences in color and release of metallic elements determined in each alloy. Some alloys were characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy. Ti-55Ni alloy showed a high level of dissolution and difference in color. With immersion in solution containing hydrogen peroxide at pH 4, the other alloys showed a marked difference in color but a low level of dissolution. The formation of a thick oxide film was observed in commercially pure titanium showing discoloration. The results suggest that discoloration in titanium alloys immersed in hydrogen peroxide-containing acidulated solutions is caused by an increase in the thickness of this oxide film, whereas discoloration of Ti-55Ni is caused by corrosion.

  1. Electrochemical Deoxidation of Titanium and Its Alloy Using Molten Magnesium Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Hamanaka, Yuki; Okabe, Toru H.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygen was directly removed from pure titanium and a Ti-6Al-4V alloy by electrolysis in molten MgCl2 at 1173 K (900 °C), where the metal being refined was the cathode and a graphite rod was used as the anode. By applying a voltage of approximately 3 V between the electrodes, commercially pure titanium, containing 1200 mass ppm oxygen, and the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, containing 1400 mass ppm oxygen, were deoxidized to 500 mass ppm or less. Under certain conditions, extra-low-oxygen titanium (as low as 80 mass ppm oxygen) was obtained using this electrochemical technique. The results obtained in this study indicate that the electrochemical deoxidation of titanium in molten MgCl2 is feasible and applicable not only to the refinement of primary metals, but also for upgrading machined titanium products and recycling metal scraps.

  2. Fabrication and evaluation of superplastically formed/weld-brazed corrugated compression panels with beaded webs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royster, D. M.; Davis, R. C.; Shinn, J. M., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Wiant, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made to investigate the feasibility of superplastically forming corrugated panels with beaded webs and to demonstrate the structural integrity of these panels by testing. The test panels in the study consist of superplastically formed titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V half-hat elements that are joined by weld-brazing to titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V caps to form either single-corrugation compression panels or multiple-corrugation compression panels. Stretching and subsequent thinning of the titanium sheet during superplastic forming is reduced by approximately 35 percent with a shallow half-hat die concept instead of a deep die concept and results in a more uniform thickness across the beaded webs. The complete panels are tested in end compression at room temperature and the results compared with analysis. The heavily loaded panels failed at loads approaching the yield strength of the titanium material. At maximum load, the caps wrinkled locally accompanied with separation of the weld-braze joint in the wrinkle. None of the panels tested, however, failed catastrophically in the weld-braze joint. Experimental test results are in good agreement with structural analysis of the panels.

  3. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  4. Self-Reacting Friction Stir Welding for Aluminum Alloy Circumferential Weld Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Cantrell, Mark; Carter, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Friction stir welding is an innovative weld process that continues to grow in use, in the commercial, defense, and space sectors. It produces high quality and high strength welds in aluminum alloys. The process consists of a rotating weld pin tool that plasticizes material through friction. The plasticized material is welded by applying a high weld forge force through the weld pin tool against the material during pin tool rotation. The high weld forge force is reacted against an anvil and a stout tool structure. A variation of friction stir welding currently being evaluated is self-reacting friction stir welding. Self-reacting friction stir welding incorporates two opposing shoulders on the crown and root sides of the weld joint. In self-reacting friction stir welding, the weld forge force is reacted against the crown shoulder portion of the weld pin tool by the root shoulder. This eliminates the need for a stout tooling structure to react the high weld forge force required in the typical friction stir weld process. Therefore, the self-reacting feature reduces tooling requirements and, therefore, process implementation costs. This makes the process attractive for aluminum alloy circumferential weld applications. To evaluate the application of self-reacting friction stir welding for aluminum alloy circumferential welding, a feasibility study was performed. The study consisted of performing a fourteen-foot diameter aluminum alloy circumferential demonstration weld using typical fusion weld tooling. To accomplish the demonstration weld, weld and tack weld development were performed and fourteen-foot diameter rings were fabricated. Weld development consisted of weld pin tool selection and the generation of a process map and envelope. Tack weld development evaluated gas tungsten arc welding and friction stir welding for tack welding rings together for circumferential welding. As a result of the study, a successful circumferential demonstration weld was produced leading

  5. Laser beam interactions with vapor plumes during Nd:YAG laser welding on aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peebles, H. C.; Russo, A. J.; Hadley, G. R.; Akau, R. L.

    Welds produced on pure aluminum targets using pulsed Nd:YAG lasers can be accurately described using a relatively simple conduction mode heat transfer model provided that the fraction of laser energy absorbed is known and the amount of metal vaporized is smalled however at laser fluences commonly used in many production welding schedules significant aluminum vaporization does occur. The possible mechanisms have been identified which could result in laser beam attenuation by the vapor plume.

  6. Titanium and titanium alloys as dental materials.

    PubMed

    Lautenschlager, E P; Monaghan, P

    1993-06-01

    Because of light weight, high strength to weight ratio, low modulus of elasticity, and excellent corrosion resistance, titanium and some of its alloys have been important materials for the aerospace industry since the 1950s. Now, with the additional advantages of excellent biocompatibility, good local spot weldability, and easy shaping and finishing by a number of mechanical and electrochemical processes, these materials are finding uses in dental applications, such as implants and restorative castings. Although more research is still needed in areas such as development of optimal casting investments, porcelain veneering systems, device designs, and controlled biological responses, the present and future uses of titanium appear bright for dentistry.

  7. Effect of Ti-containing inclusions on the nucleation of acicular ferrite and mechanical properties of multipass weld metals.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, M; Nabhani, N; Hosseini, M; Arabian, N; Rahimi, E

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, the influence of Ti-containing inclusions on the development of acicular ferrite microstructure and mechanical properties in the multipass weld metals has been studied. Shielded metal arc weld deposits were prepared by varying titanium content in the range of 0.003-0.021%. The variation in the titanium content was obtained by the addition of different amounts of titanium oxide nanoparticles to the electrode coating. The dispersion of titanium oxide nanoparticles, composition of inclusions, microstructural analysis, tensile properties and Charpy impact toughness were evaluated. As the amount of Ti-containing inclusions in the weld metal was increased, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed from the grain boundary allotriomorphic ferrite structure to acicular ferrite with the intragranular nucleation of ferrite on the Ti-containing inclusions, and the mechanical properties were improved. This improvement is attributable to the increased percentage of acicular ferrite due to the uniform dispersion of Ti-containing inclusions and the pinning force of oxide nanoparticles against the growth of allotriomorphic ferrite and Widmanstätten ferrite from the austenite grain boundaries.

  8. Improved welding of Rene-41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunez, S.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-tungsten arc welding with a filler of Rene-41 produces strong welded joints. When Rene-41 is used, resistance to strain-age cracking is greatly increased by post-weld solution annealing in an inert atmosphere. Mechanical properties of Rene-41 and Hastelloy-W are compared.

  9. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  10. Welding. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of eight terminal objectives for a basic welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (2 hours daily) course developed to teach the fundamentals of welding shop work, to become familiar with the operation of the welding shop…

  11. Robotic Welding and Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    H. B. Smartt; D. P. Pace; E. D. Larsen; T. R. McJunkin; C. I. Nichol; D. E. Clark; K. L. Skinner; M. L. Clark; T. G. Kaser; C. R. Tolle

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a robotic system for GTA welding of lids on cylindrical vessels. The system consists of an articulated robot arm, a rotating positioner, end effectors for welding, grinding, ultrasonic and eddy current inspection. Features include weld viewing cameras, modular software, and text-based procedural files for process and motion trajectories.

  12. Automatic welding comes of age. [Offshore

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, D.L. Jr.

    1981-07-01

    Automatic pipe welding systems today fall into three main categories: gas metal arc welding, gas-tungsten arc welding, and flash-butt welding. The first automatic welding devices used offshore were the CRC and H.C. Price systems. Both use gas metal arc welding with a consumable steel filler wire. The recently developed McDermott flash-butt welding system is described. (DLC)

  13. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOEpatents

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  14. Numerical simulation of linear fiction welding (LFW) processes

    SciTech Connect

    Fratini, L.; La Spisa, D.

    2011-05-04

    Solid state welding processes are becoming increasingly important due to a large number of advantages related to joining ''unweldable'' materials and in particular light weight alloys. Linear friction welding (LFW) has been used successfully to bond non-axisymmetric components of a range of materials including titanium alloys, steels, aluminum alloys, nickel, copper, and also dissimilar material combinations. The technique is useful in the research of quality of the joints and in reducing costs of components and parts of the aeronautic and automotive industries.LFW involves parts to be welded through the relative reciprocating motion of two components under an axial force. In such process the heat source is given by the frictional forces work decaying into heat determining a local softening of the material and proper bonding conditions due to both the temperature increase and the local pressure of the two edges to be welded. This paper is a comparative test between the numerical model in two dimensions, i.e. in plane strain conditions, and in three dimensions of a LFW process of AISI1045 steel specimens. It must be observed that the 3D model assures a faithful simulation of the actual threedimensional material flow, even if the two-dimensional simulation computational times are very short, a few hours instead of several ones as the 3D model. The obtained results were compared with experimental values found out in the scientific literature.

  15. Numerical simulation of linear fiction welding (LFW) processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, L.; La Spisa, D.

    2011-05-01

    Solid state welding processes are becoming increasingly important due to a large number of advantages related to joining "unweldable" materials and in particular light weight alloys. Linear friction welding (LFW) has been used successfully to bond non-axisymmetric components of a range of materials including titanium alloys, steels, aluminum alloys, nickel, copper, and also dissimilar material combinations. The technique is useful in the research of quality of the joints and in reducing costs of components and parts of the aeronautic and automotive industries. LFW involves parts to be welded through the relative reciprocating motion of two components under an axial force. In such process the heat source is given by the frictional forces work decaying into heat determining a local softening of the material and proper bonding conditions due to both the temperature increase and the local pressure of the two edges to be welded. This paper is a comparative test between the numerical model in two dimensions, i.e. in plane strain conditions, and in three dimensions of a LFW process of AISI1045 steel specimens. It must be observed that the 3D model assures a faithful simulation of the actual threedimensional material flow, even if the two-dimensional simulation computational times are very short, a few hours instead of several ones as the 3D model. The obtained results were compared with experimental values found out in the scientific literature.

  16. Study of inertia welding: the sensitivity of weld configuration and strength to variations in welding parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Mote, M.W.

    1981-12-01

    An experiment is described which is designed to demonstrate the forgiveness of inertia welding, that is, the relative insensitivity of weld strength to variations in energy (rotational speed of parts) and axial force. Although easily observed variations in the welding parameters produced easily observed changes in weldment configuration and changes in dimension (upset), only extremes in parameters produced changes in weld strength. Consequently, process monitoring and product inspection would be sufficient for quality assurance in a production environment.

  17. The science and practice of welding. 8th ed. Vol. 2: The practice of welding

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    This book includes sections on underwater welding and cutting, cold pressure welding, the application of mixed gases to various welding processes, and robot welding. The author uses photographs, tables, figures, and illustrations to explain the text and provides examination questions.

  18. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  19. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  20. Weld Nugget Temperature Control in Thermal Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A control system for a thermal stir welding system is provided. The control system includes a sensor and a controller. The sensor is coupled to the welding system's containment plate assembly and generates signals indicative of temperature of a region adjacent and parallel to the welding system's stir rod. The controller is coupled to the sensor and generates at least one control signal using the sensor signals indicative of temperature. The controller is also coupled to the welding system such that at least one of rotational speed of the stir rod, heat supplied by the welding system's induction heater, and feed speed of the welding system's weld material feeder are controlled based on the control signal(s).

  1. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  2. Reinforcement of titanium by laser metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampedro, Jesús; Pérez, Irene; Cárcel, Bernabé; Amigó, Vicente; Sánchez, José María

    2010-09-01

    Pure commercial titanium is widely used because of its high corrosion resistance and lower cost compared with other titanium alloys, in particular when there is no high wear requirements. Nevertheless, the wear resistance is poor and surface damage occurs in areas under contact loadings. Laser melting deposition using a high power laser is a suitable technique for manufacturing precise and defect free coatings of a dissimilar material with higher wear and corrosion resistance. In this work a good understanding of laser metal deposition mechanisms allowed to obtain defect free coatings of Ti6Al4V and TiC metal matrix composite (MMC) using a flash lamp pumped Nd:YAG laser of 1 kW. A complete investigation of the process parameters is discussed and resultant wear and corrosion properties are shown. The results show the feasibility to apply the process for manufacturing, improving or repairing high added value components for a wide range of industrial sectors.

  3. Controlling conditions for wet welding

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, M.

    1985-11-01

    Wet welding is finding increased use for repairing and maintaining vessel hulls around the world. Users are developing new methods and procedures to expand the technology. A wet welded joint underwater can be made as strong as one welded in a dry habitat, but at a greatly reduced cost. The design of the joint for wet welding and the procedures that need to be followed are outlined. In designing for wet welding, high tensile strength, ease of access, and over-design should be considered.

  4. Extravehicular activity welding experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, J. Kevin

    1989-01-01

    The In-Space Technology Experiments Program (INSTEP) provides an opportunity to explore the many critical questions which can only be answered by experimentation in space. The objective of the Extravehicular Activity Welding Experiment definition project was to define the requirements for a spaceflight experiment to evaluate the feasibility of performing manual welding tasks during EVA. Consideration was given to experiment design, work station design, welding hardware design, payload integration requirements, and human factors (including safety). The results of this effort are presented. Included are the specific objectives of the flight test, details of the tasks which will generate the required data, and a description of the equipment which will be needed to support the tasks. Work station requirements are addressed as are human factors, STS integration procedures and, most importantly, safety considerations. A preliminary estimate of the cost and the schedule for completion of the experiment through flight and postflight analysis are given.

  5. Advanced Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In order to more easily join the huge sections of the Space Shuttle external tank, Marshall Space Flight Center initiated development of the existing concept of Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) welding. VPPA welding employs a variable current waveform that allows the system to operate for preset time increments in either of two polarity modes for effective joining of light alloys. Marshall awarded the torch contract to B & B Precision Machine, which produced a torch for the Shuttle, then automated the system, and eventually delivered a small torch used by companies such as Whirlpool for sheet metal welding of appliance parts and other applications. The dependability of the torch offers cost and time advantages.

  6. Method and apparatus for assessing weld quality

    DOEpatents

    Smartt, Herschel B.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Johnson, John A.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Clark, Denis E.; Taylor, Paul L.; Reutzel, Edward W.

    2001-01-01

    Apparatus for determining a quality of a weld produced by a welding device according to the present invention includes a sensor operatively associated with the welding device. The sensor is responsive to at least one welding process parameter during a welding process and produces a welding process parameter signal that relates to the at least one welding process parameter. A computer connected to the sensor is responsive to the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor. A user interface operatively associated with the computer allows a user to select a desired welding process. The computer processes the welding process parameter signal produced by the sensor in accordance with one of a constant voltage algorithm, a short duration weld algorithm or a pulsed current analysis module depending on the desired welding process selected by the user. The computer produces output data indicative of the quality of the weld.

  7. Pulsed Long Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents a method and an appliance for pulsed arc welding. The method supports dosage of energy required for melting each bead of electrode metal starting from the detachment of a bead. The appliance including a sensor to register bead detachment shows this moment due to the voltage burst in the arc space. Transferred beads of electrode metal are of similar size because of the dosage of energy used for melting each bead, as the consequence, the process is more stable and starting conditions to transfer electrode metal are similar, as the result, a produced weld is improved.

  8. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  9. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  10. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  11. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  12. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  13. 49 CFR 195.228 - Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welds and welding inspection: Standards of... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Construction § 195.228 Welds and welding inspection: Standards of acceptability. (a) Each weld and welding must be inspected to insure compliance...

  14. Joining Uranium to Aluminum using Electron Beam Welding and an Explosively Clad Niobium Interlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, J W; Terrill, P; Brasher, D; Butler, D

    2001-06-12

    A uranium alloy was joined to a high strength aluminum alloy using a commercially pure niobium interlayer. Joining of the Nb interlayer to the aluminum alloy was performed using an explosive welding process, while joining the Nb interlayer to the uranium alloy was performed using an electron beam welding process. Explosive welding was selected to bond the Nb to the aluminum alloy in order to minimize the formation of brittle intermetallic phases. Electron beam welding was selected to join the Nb to the uranium alloy in order to precisely control melting so as to minimize mixing of the two metals. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and tensile testing of the welds were used to characterize the resulting joints. This paper presents the welding techniques and processing parameters that were developed to produce high integrity ductile joints between these materials.

  15. Hydrogen-induced cracking along the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, M.D.; Nelson, T.W.; Lippold, J.C.

    1999-02-01

    Presented here are the results from a series of experiments in which dissimilar metals welds were made using the gas tungsten arc welding process with pure argon or argon-6% hydrogen shielding gas. The objective was to determine if cracking near the fusion boundary of dissimilar metal welds could be caused by hydrogen absorbed during welding and to characterize the microstructures in which cracking occurred. Welds consisted of ER308 and ER309LSi austenitic stainless steel and ERNiCr-3-nickel-based filler metals deposited on A36 steel base metal. Cracking was observed in welds made with all three filler metals. A ferrofluid color metallography technique revealed that cracking was confined to regions in the weld metal containing martensite. Microhardness indentations indicated that martensitic regions in which cracking occurred had hardness values from 400 to 550 HV. Cracks did not extend into bulk weld metal with hardness less than 350 HV. Martensite formed near the fusion boundary in all three filler metals due to regions of locally increased base metal dilution.

  16. Multiphysical Modeling of Transport Phenomena During Laser Welding of Dissimilar Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métais, A.; Matteï, S.; Tomashchuk, I.; Gaied, S.

    The success of new high-strength steels allows attaining equivalent performances with lower thicknesses and significant weight reduction. The welding of new couples of steel grades requires development and control of joining processes. Thanks to high precision and good flexibility, laser welding became one of the most used processes for joining of dissimilar welded blanks. The prediction of the local chemical composition in the weld formed between dissimilar steels in function of the welding parameters is essential because the dilution rate and the distribution of alloying elements in the melted zone determines the final tensile strength of the weld. The goal of the present study is to create and to validate a multiphysical numerical model studying the mixing of dissimilar steels in laser weld pool. A 3D modelling of heat transfer, turbulent flow and transport of species provides a better understanding of diffusion and convective mixing in laser weld pool. The present model allows predicting the weld geometry and element distribution. The model has been developed based on steady keyhole approximation and solved in quasi-stationary form in order to reduce the computation time. Turbulent flow formulation was applied to calculate velocity field. Fick law for diluted species was used to simulate the transport of alloying elements in the weld pool. To validate the model, a number of experiments have been performed: tests using pure 100 μm thick Ni foils like tracer and weld between a rich and poor manganese steels. SEM-EDX analysis of chemical composition has been carried out to obtain quantitative mapping of Ni and Mn distributions in the melted zone. The results of simulations have been found in good agreement with experimental data.

  17. Friction Plug Weld Repair Geometric Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coletta, Edmond R.; Cantrell, Mark A.; McCool, A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation outlines the fundamentals of friction plug welding. A process overview is given for friction push plug welding, including different uses and strengths of push plug welding. Details are given for friction pull plug welding, including welding parameters, details on observed defects, expected benefits, and test results.

  18. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  19. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  20. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  1. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  2. Welding Development: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the basic understanding of the friction stir welding process. It covers process description, pin tool operation and materials, metal flow theory, mechanical properties, and materials welded using the process. It also discusses the thermal stir welding process and the differences between thermal stir and friction stir welding. MSFC weld tools used for development are also presented.

  3. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  4. Tool For Robotic Resistive Roll Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilber, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Roll-welding attachment for robot simple, inexpensive device incorporating modified commercial resistance-welding gun. Modified welding gun easily attaches to end effector of robot. Robot applies welding force and moves electrode wheel along prescribed path. Resistance-welding current starts and stops automatically according to force exerted against workpiece. Used to apply brazing foil to workpiece.

  5. 49 CFR 192.225 - Welding procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Welding procedures. 192.225 Section 192.225... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Welding of Steel in Pipelines § 192.225 Welding procedures. (a) Welding must be performed by a qualified welder in accordance with welding...

  6. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  7. Deconvoluting the Friction Stir Weld Process for Optimizing Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C.

    2008-01-01

    In the friction stir welding process, the rotating surfaces of the pin and shoulder contact the weld metal and force a rotational flow within the weld metal. Heat, generated by the metal deformation as well as frictional slippage with the contact surface, softens the metal and makes it easier to deform. As in any thermo-mechanical processing of metal, the flow conditions are critical to the quality of the weld. For example, extrusion of metal from under the shoulder of an excessively hot weld may relax local pressure and result in wormhole defects. The trace of the weld joint in the wake of the weld may vary geometrically depending upon the flow streamlines around the tool with some geometry more vulnerable to loss of strength from joint contamination than others. The material flow path around the tool cannot be seen in real time during the weld. By using analytical "tools" based upon the principles of mathematics and physics, a weld model can be created to compute features that can be observed. By comparing the computed observations with actual data, the weld model can be validated or adjusted to get better agreement. Inputs to the model to predict weld structures and properties include: hot working properties ofthe metal, pin tool geometry, travel rate, rotation and plunge force. Since metals record their prior hot working history, the hot working conditions imparted during FSW can be quantified by interpreting the final microstructure. Variations in texture and grain size result from variations in the strain accommodated at a given strain rate and temperature. Microstructural data from a variety of FSWs has been correlated with prior marker studies to contribute to our understanding of the FSW process. Once this stage is reached, the weld modeling process can save significant development costs by reducing costly trial-and-error approaches to obtaining quality welds.

  8. Weld seam tracking and lap weld penetration monitoring using the optical spectrum of the weld plume

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.E.; Hopkins, J.A.; Semak, V.V.; McCay, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Joining of dissimilar materials is a long standing problem in manufacturing, with many tricks and special techniques developed to successfully join specific pairs of materials. Often, these special techniques impose stringent requirements on the process such as precise control of process parameters to achieve the desired joint characteristics. Laser welding is one of the techniques which has had some success in welding dissimilar metal alloys, and appears to be a viable process for these materials. Minimal heat input limits differential thermal expansion, and the small weld pool allows precise control of alloy mixing in the fusion zone. Obtaining optimal weld performance requires accurate monitoring and control of absorbed laser power and weld focus position. In order to monitor the laser welding process, the authors have used a small computer controlled optical spectrometer to observe the emission from the weld plume. Absorbed laser power can be related to the temperature of the weld pool surface and the plume above the weld. Focus position relative to the joint can easily be seen by the proportion of elements from each material existing in the plume. This monitor has been used to observe and optimize the performance of butt and lap welds between dissimilar alloys, where each alloy contains at least one element not found in the other alloy. Results will be presented for a copper-steel butt joint and a lap weld between stainless and low alloy steels.

  9. Effect of Postweld Aging Treatment on Fatigue Behavior of Pulsed Current Welded AA7075 Aluminum Alloy Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-04-01

    This article reports the effect of postweld aging treatment on fatigue behavior of pulsed current welded AA 7075 aluminum alloy joints. AA7075 aluminum alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy) has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers, and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of AA7075 aluminum alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 10 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing multipass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt.%)) grade aluminum alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW), and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Rotary bending fatigue testing machine has been used to evaluate fatigue behavior of the welded joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit. Simple postweld aging treatment applied to the joints is found to be beneficial to enhance the fatigue performance of the welded joints.

  10. Effect of oxygen on weld shape and crystallographic orientation of duplex stainless steel weld using advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Ying Ueji, Rintaro; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2014-05-01

    The double-shielded advanced A-TIG (AA-TIG) welding method was adopted in this study for the welding of the SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel with the shielding gases of different oxygen content levels. The oxygen content in the shielding gas was controlled by altering the oxygen content in the outer layer gas, while the inner layer remained pure argon to suppress oxidation on the tungsten electrode. As a result, a deep weld penetration was obtained due to the dissolution of oxygen into the weld metals. Additionally, the microstructure of the weld metal was changed by the dissolution of oxygen. The austenite phase at the ferrite grain boundary followed a Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship with the ferrite matrix phase at any oxide content. On the other hand, the orientation relationship between the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase exhibited different patterns under different oxygen content levels. When there was little oxide in the fusion zone, only a limited part of the intragranular austenite phase and the ferrite matrix phase followed the K–S orientation relationship. With the increase of the oxide, the correspondence of the K–S relationship increased and fit very well in the 2.5% O{sub 2} shielded sample. The investigation of this phenomenon was carried out along with the nucleation mechanisms of the intragranular austenite phases. - Highlights: • Weld penetration increased with the increase of the oxygen content. • Average diameter and number density of oxide were changed by the oxygen content. • K-S relationship of Widmanstätten austenite/ferrite wasn’t varied by oxide. • Orientation relationship of intragranular austenite/ferrite was varied by oxide.

  11. Low-Temperature Forming of Beta Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, R. S.; Woods, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Low cost methods for titanium structural fabrication using advanced cold-formable beta alloys were investigated for application in a Mach 2.7 supersonic cruise vehicle. This work focuses on improving processing and structural efficiencies as compared with standard hot formed and riveted construction of alpha-beta alloy sheet structure. Mechanical property data and manufacturing parameters were developed for cold forming, brazing, welding, and processing Ti-15V-3Cr-3Sn-3Al sheet, and Ti-3Al-8V-6Cr-4Zr on a more limited basis. Cost and structural benefits were assessed through the fabrication and evaluation of large structural panels. The feasibility of increasing structural efficiency of beta titanium structure by selective reinforcement with metal matrix composite was also explored.

  12. Welding Supplementary Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Don; And Others

    This document contains supplemental materials for special needs high school students intended to facilitate their mainstreaming in regular welding classes. Teacher's materials precede the materials for students and include general notes for the instructor, suggestions, eight references, a class progress chart, a questionnaire on the usefulness of…

  13. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  14. Elementary TIG Welding Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierson, John E., III

    The text was prepared to help deaf students develop the skills needed by an employed welder. It uses simplified language and illustrations to present concepts which should be reinforced by practical experience with welding skills. Each of the 12 lessons contains: (1) an information section with many illustrations which presents a concept or…

  15. Welding. Student Learning Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 23 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 23 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in welding. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 1-4 enabling objectives. For each enabling objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps (outline of student…

  16. Welding of Stainless Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, H; Johnson, Lawrence

    1929-01-01

    It would appear that welds in some stainless steels, heat-treated in some practicable way, will probably be found to have all the resistance to corrosion that is required for aircraft. Certainly these structures are not subjected to the severe conditions that are found in chemical plants.

  17. State Skill Standards: Welding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  18. Welding. Competencies for Articulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeast Community Coll., Lincoln, NE.

    Materials contained in this guide present competencies describing welding skills necessary for success in initial employment or applicable to advanced educational placement, and may be used by administrators, students, and secondary and postsecondary vocational teachers. The student outcomes section provides guidelines for planning of and…

  19. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  20. Welding nozzle position manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Gutow, David A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a welding nozzle position manipulator. The manipulator consists of an angle support to which the remaining components of the device are attached either directly or indirectly. A pair of pivotal connections attach a weld nozzle holding link to the angle support and provide a two axis freedom of movement of the holding link with respect to the support angle. The manipulator is actuated by a pair of adjusting screws angularly mounted to the angle support. These screws contact a pair of tapered friction surfaces formed on the upper portion of the welding nozzle holding link. A spring positioned between the upper portions of the support angle and the holding link provides a constant bias engagement between the friction surfaces of the holding link and the adjustment screws, so as to firmly hold the link in position and to eliminate any free play in the adjustment mechanism. The angular relationships between the adjustment screws, the angle support and the tapered friction surfaces of the weld nozzle holding link provide a geometric arrangement which permits precision adjustment of the holding link with respect to the angle support and also provides a solid holding link mount which is resistant to movement from outside forces.