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Sample records for pure ultrasonic communication

  1. Ultrasonic speech translator and communications system

    DOEpatents

    Akerman, M.A.; Ayers, C.W.; Haynes, H.D.

    1996-07-23

    A wireless communication system undetectable by radio frequency methods for converting audio signals, including human voice, to electronic signals in the ultrasonic frequency range, transmitting the ultrasonic signal by way of acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium, including gases, liquids, or solids, and reconverting the ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves back to the original audio signal. The ultrasonic speech translator and communication system includes an ultrasonic transmitting device and an ultrasonic receiving device. The ultrasonic transmitting device accepts as input an audio signal such as human voice input from a microphone or tape deck. The ultrasonic transmitting device frequency modulates an ultrasonic carrier signal with the audio signal producing a frequency modulated ultrasonic carrier signal, which is transmitted via acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium such as gases, liquids or solids. The ultrasonic receiving device converts the frequency modulated ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves to a frequency modulated electronic signal, demodulates the audio signal from the ultrasonic carrier signal, and conditions the demodulated audio signal to reproduce the original audio signal at its output. 7 figs.

  2. Ultrasonic speech translator and communications system

    DOEpatents

    Akerman, M. Alfred; Ayers, Curtis W.; Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-01-01

    A wireless communication system undetectable by radio frequency methods for converting audio signals, including human voice, to electronic signals in the ultrasonic frequency range, transmitting the ultrasonic signal by way of acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium, including gases, liquids, or solids, and reconverting the ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves back to the original audio signal. The ultrasonic speech translator and communication system (20) includes an ultrasonic transmitting device (100) and an ultrasonic receiving device (200). The ultrasonic transmitting device (100) accepts as input (115) an audio signal such as human voice input from a microphone (114) or tape deck. The ultrasonic transmitting device (100) frequency modulates an ultrasonic carrier signal with the audio signal producing a frequency modulated ultrasonic carrier signal, which is transmitted via acoustical pressure waves across a carrier medium such as gases, liquids or solids. The ultrasonic receiving device (200) converts the frequency modulated ultrasonic acoustical pressure waves to a frequency modulated electronic signal, demodulates the audio signal from the ultrasonic carrier signal, and conditions the demodulated audio signal to reproduce the original audio signal at its output (250).

  3. Ultrasonic Communication Project, Phase 1, FY1999

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, H.D.; Akerman, M.A.; Baylor, V.M.

    2000-06-01

    This Phase 1 project has been successful in identifying, exploring, and demonstrating methods for ultrasonic-based communication with an emphasis on the application of digital signal processing techniques. During the project, at the direction of the agency project monitor, particular attention was directed at sending and receiving ultrasonic data through air and through pipes that would be commonly found in buildings. Efforts were also focused on development of a method for transmitting computer files ultrasonically. New methods were identified and evaluated for ultrasonic communication. These methods are based on a technique called DFS. With DFS, individual alphanumeric characters are broken down into a sequence of bits, and each bit is used to generate a discrete ultrasonic frequency. Characters are then transmitted one-bit-at-a-time, and reconstructed by the receiver. This technique was put into practice through the development of LabVIEW{trademark}VIs. These VIs were integrated with specially developed electronic circuits to provide a system for demonstrating the transmission and reception/reconstruction of typed messages and computer files. Tests were performed to determine the envelope for ultrasound transmission through pipes (with and without water) versus through air. The practical aspects of connections, efficient electronics, impedance matching, and the effect of damping mechanisms were all investigated. These tests resulted in a considerable number of reference charts that illustrate the absorption of ultrasound through different pipe materials, both with and without water, as a function of distance. Ultrasound was found to be least attenuated by copper pipe and most attenuated by PVC pipe. Water in the pipe provides additional damping and attenuation of ultrasonic signals. Dramatic improvements are observed, however, in ultrasound signal strength if the transducers are directly coupled to the water, rather than simply attaching them to the outside of

  4. Ultrasonic Transducers for Air and Underwater Communication.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koosha, Abdolrahim

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The performance of a novel radiator capable of producing ultrasonic waves in air and liquids has been investigated. For commercial transducers when operating in air or liquids, impedance matching is the necessary condition for maximum transfer of energy to the medium (thus no standing waves are involved). However, for this radiator the formation of the mechanical standing waves on it is the key condition for directional radiation of energy into the surrounding environment. Under this condition the radiator exhibits a practical conversion of electrical energy into ultrasound. To further improve the performance of the radiator the wavelength coincidence condition must be satisfied. This condition implies that the wavelength of the bending vibration developed on the blade to be the same as that in the medium to which it is coupled. Consequently, an end-fire radiation pattern is obtained. The theory of this when applied to water and also for a double blade configuration are presented. The main component of the radiator consists of a cantilever blade on which a pair of piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic bars are fixed. These the so called excitation gauges, are fixed on both sides of a thin rectangular metal blade near the clamped end. When wavelength coincidence condition is fulfilled, the radiator transmits ultrasonic wave in a highly directional pattern. The direction of propagation of ultrasound is solely steered by frequency of the applied signal. System imperfections such as inter modal coupling when used underwater are considered. An analytical approach is developed to investigate the performance of the radiator for transmission of digital signals in air as well as in water. This method is used to evaluate the efficiency of the device as a suitable means for communication between divers or a diver and an underwater stationary station. Amplitude modulation of speech signals demonstrated the capabilities of a new

  5. Strain localization of commercially pure titanium subjected to ultrasonic impact treatment followed by uniaxial tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, Alexey; Kazachenok, Marina; Kozelskaya, Anna; Perevalova, Olga; Balokhonov, Ruslan; Romanova, Varvara; Pochivalov, Yurii

    2016-11-01

    It was demonstrated that the ultrasonic impact treatment results in the gradient microstructure of the surface layer of commercially pure titanium composed of nanosized nonequiaxial α-Ti grains, underlying course α-grains with banded substructure and deformation twins, and subjacent layer characterized by the presence of a few twins and extinction contours within the course grains. The effect of ultrasonic impact treatment on the mechanical behavior of titanium specimen under tension was revealed theoretically and experimentally Using optical and atomic force microscopes it was shown that the fine-grained surface layer impede dislocation motion causing the initiation and propagation of shear bands oriented along the direction of maximum shear stresses. The fine structure of shear bands was studied by transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Recording Mouse Ultrasonic Vocalizations to Evaluate Social Communication

    PubMed Central

    Ferhat, Allain-Thibeault; Torquet, Nicolas; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Mice emit ultrasonic vocalizations in different contexts throughout development and in adulthood. These vocal signals are now currently used as proxies for modeling the genetic bases of vocal communication deficits. Characterizing the vocal behavior of mouse models carrying mutations in genes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorders will help to understand the mechanisms leading to social communication deficits. We provide here protocols to reliably elicit ultrasonic vocalizations in pups and in adult mice. This standardization will help reduce inter-study variability due to the experimental settings. Pup isolation calls are recorded throughout development from individual pups isolated from dam and littermates. In adulthood, vocalizations are recorded during same-sex interactions (without a sexual component) by exposing socially motivated males or females to an unknown same-sex conspecific. We also provide a protocol to record vocalizations from adult males exposed to an estrus female. In this context, there is a sexual component in the interaction. These protocols are established to elicit a large amount of ultrasonic vocalizations in laboratory mice. However, we point out the important inter-individual variability in the vocal behavior of mice, which should be taken into account by recording a minimal number of individuals (at least 12 in each condition). These recordings of ultrasonic vocalizations are used to evaluate the call rate, the vocal repertoire and the acoustic structure of the calls. Data are combined with the analysis of synchronous video recordings to provide a more complete view on social communication in mice. These protocols are used to characterize the vocal communication deficits in mice lacking ProSAP1/Shank2, a gene associated with autism spectrum disorders. More ultrasonic vocalizations recordings can also be found on the mouseTube database, developed to favor the exchange of such data. PMID:27341321

  7. Recording Mouse Ultrasonic Vocalizations to Evaluate Social Communication.

    PubMed

    Ferhat, Allain-Thibeault; Torquet, Nicolas; Le Sourd, Anne-Marie; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-06-05

    Mice emit ultrasonic vocalizations in different contexts throughout development and in adulthood. These vocal signals are now currently used as proxies for modeling the genetic bases of vocal communication deficits. Characterizing the vocal behavior of mouse models carrying mutations in genes associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as autism spectrum disorders will help to understand the mechanisms leading to social communication deficits. We provide here protocols to reliably elicit ultrasonic vocalizations in pups and in adult mice. This standardization will help reduce inter-study variability due to the experimental settings. Pup isolation calls are recorded throughout development from individual pups isolated from dam and littermates. In adulthood, vocalizations are recorded during same-sex interactions (without a sexual component) by exposing socially motivated males or females to an unknown same-sex conspecific. We also provide a protocol to record vocalizations from adult males exposed to an estrus female. In this context, there is a sexual component in the interaction. These protocols are established to elicit a large amount of ultrasonic vocalizations in laboratory mice. However, we point out the important inter-individual variability in the vocal behavior of mice, which should be taken into account by recording a minimal number of individuals (at least 12 in each condition). These recordings of ultrasonic vocalizations are used to evaluate the call rate, the vocal repertoire and the acoustic structure of the calls. Data are combined with the analysis of synchronous video recordings to provide a more complete view on social communication in mice. These protocols are used to characterize the vocal communication deficits in mice lacking ProSAP1/Shank2, a gene associated with autism spectrum disorders. More ultrasonic vocalizations recordings can also be found on the mouseTube database, developed to favor the exchange of such data.

  8. Initial experience with endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator in purely neuroendoscopic removal of intraventricular tumors.

    PubMed

    Cinalli, Giuseppe; Imperato, Alessia; Mirone, Giuseppe; Di Martino, Giuliana; Nicosia, Giancarlo; Ruggiero, Claudio; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Spennato, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Neuroendoscopic removal of intraventricular tumors is difficult and time consuming because of the lack of an effective decompression system that can be used through the working channel of the endoscope. The authors report on the utilization of an endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator in the resection of intraventricular tumors. METHODS Twelve pediatric patients (10 male, 2 female), ages 1-15 years old, underwent surgery via a purely endoscopic approach using a Gaab rigid endoscope and endoscopic ultrasonic aspirator. Two patients presented with intraventricular metastases from high-grade tumors (medulloblastoma, atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor), 2 with subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (associated with tuberous sclerosis), 2 with low-grade intraparaventricular tumors, 4 with suprasellar tumors (2 craniopharyngiomas and 2 optic pathway gliomas), and 2 with pineal tumors (1 immature teratoma, 1 pineal anlage tumor). Hydrocephalus was present in 5 cases. In all patients, the endoscopic trajectory and ventricular access were guided by electromagnetic neuronavigation. Nine patients underwent surgery via a precoronal bur hole while supine. In 2 cases, surgery was performed through a frontal bur hole at the level of the hairline. One patient underwent surgery via a posterior parietal approach to the trigone while in a lateral position. The endoscopic technique consisted of visualization of the tumor, ventricular washing to dilate the ventricles and to control bleeding, obtaining a tumor specimen with biopsy forceps, and ultrasonic aspiration of the tumor. Bleeding was controlled with irrigation, monopolar coagulation, and a thulium laser. RESULTS In 7 cases, the resection was total or near total (more than 90% of lesion removed). In 5 cases, the resection was partial. Histological evaluation of the collected material (withdrawn using biopsy forceps and aspirated with an ultrasonic aspirator) was diagnostic in all cases. The duration of surgery ranged from 30 to

  9. Evaluation of multiple-channel OFDM based airborne ultrasonic communications.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-09-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) modulation has been extensively used in both wired and wireless communication systems. The use of OFDM technology allows very high spectral efficiency data transmission without using complex equalizers to correct the effect of a frequency-selective channel. This work investigated OFDM methods in an airborne ultrasonic communication system, using commercially available capacitive ultrasonic transducers operating at 50kHz to transmit information through the air. Conventional modulation schemes such as binary phase shift keying (BPSK) and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) were used to modulate sub-carrier signals, and the performances were evaluated in an indoor laboratory environment. Line-of-sight (LOS) transmission range up to 11m with no measurable errors was achieved using BPSK at a data rate of 45kb/s and a spectral efficiency of 1b/s/Hz. By implementing a higher order modulation scheme (16-QAM), the system data transfer rate was increased to 180kb/s with a spectral efficiency of 4b/s/Hz at attainable transmission distances up to 6m. Diffraction effects were incorporated into a model of the ultrasonic channel that also accounted for beam spread and attenuation in air. The simulations were a good match to the measured signals and non-LOS signals could be demodulated successfully. The effects of multipath interference were also studied in this work. By adding cyclic prefix (CP) to the OFDM symbols, the bit error rate (BER) performance was significantly improved in a multipath environment.

  10. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications.

    PubMed

    Cañete, Francisco J; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J; Paris, José F

    2016-02-19

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression.

  11. Measurement and Modeling of Narrowband Channels for Ultrasonic Underwater Communications

    PubMed Central

    Cañete, Francisco J.; López-Fernández, Jesús; García-Corrales, Celia; Sánchez, Antonio; Robles, Encarnación; Rodrigo, Francisco J.; Paris, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks are a promising technology that allow real-time data collection in seas and oceans for a wide variety of applications. Smaller size and weight sensors can be achieved with working frequencies shifted from audio to the ultrasonic band. At these frequencies, the fading phenomena has a significant presence in the channel behavior, and the design of a reliable communication link between the network sensors will require a precise characterization of it. Fading in underwater channels has been previously measured and modeled in the audio band. However, there have been few attempts to study it at ultrasonic frequencies. In this paper, a campaign of measurements of ultrasonic underwater acoustic channels in Mediterranean shallow waters conducted by the authors is presented. These measurements are used to determine the parameters of the so-called κ-μ shadowed distribution, a fading model with a direct connection to the underlying physical mechanisms. The model is then used to evaluate the capacity of the measured channels with a closed-form expression. PMID:26907281

  12. mouseTube – a database to collaboratively unravel mouse ultrasonic communication

    PubMed Central

    Torquet, Nicolas; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Faure, Philippe; Bourgeron, Thomas; Ey, Elodie

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic vocalisation is a broadly used proxy to evaluate social communication in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy and robustness of testing these models suffer from limited knowledge of the structure and functions of these vocalisations as well as of the way to analyse the data. We created mouseTube, an open database with a web interface, to facilitate sharing and comparison of ultrasonic vocalisations data and metadata attached to a recording file. Metadata describe 1) the acquisition procedure, e.g., hardware, software, sampling frequency, bit depth; 2) the biological protocol used to elicit ultrasonic vocalisations; 3) the characteristics of the individual emitting ultrasonic vocalisations ( e.g., strain, sex, age). To promote open science and enable reproducibility, data are made freely available. The website provides searching functions to facilitate the retrieval of recording files of interest. It is designed to enable comparisons of ultrasonic vocalisation emission between strains, protocols or laboratories, as well as to test different analysis algorithms and to search for protocols established to elicit mouse ultrasonic vocalisations. Over the long term, users will be able to download and compare different analysis results for each data file. Such application will boost the knowledge on mouse ultrasonic communication and stimulate sharing and comparison of automatic analysis methods to refine phenotyping techniques in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27830061

  13. Enhanced osteoblast proliferation and corrosion resistance of commercially pure titanium through surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening and stress relieving.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Shitu; Bansal, Rajesh; Singh, Bijay P; Pandey, Rajiv; Narayanan, Shankar; Wani, Mohan R; Singh, Vakil

    2014-07-01

    This investigation was carried out to study the effect of a novel process of surface modification, surface nanostructuring by ultrasonic shot peening, on osteoblast proliferation and corrosion behavior of commercially pure titanium (c p-Ti) in simulated body fluid. A mechanically polished disc of c p-Ti was subjected to ultrasonic shot peening with stainless steel balls to create nanostructure at the surface. A nanostructure (<20 nm) with inhomogeneous distribution was revealed by atomic force and scanning electron microscopy. There was an increase of approximately 10% in cell proliferation, but there was drastic fall in corrosion resistance. Corrosion rate was increased by 327% in the shot peened condition. In order to examine the role of residual stresses associated with the shot peened surface on these aspects, a part of the shot peened specimen was annealed at 400°C for 1 hour. A marked influence of annealing treatment was observed on surface structure, cell proliferation, and corrosion resistance. Surface nanostructure was much more prominent, with increased number density and sharper grain boundaries; cell proliferation was enhanced to approximately 50% and corrosion rate was reduced by 86.2% and 41% as compared with that of the shot peened and the as received conditions, respectively. The highly significant improvement in cell proliferation, resulting from annealing of the shot peened specimen, was attributed to increased volume fraction of stabilized nanostructure, stress recovery, and crystallization of the oxide film. Increase in corrosion resistance from annealing of shot peened material was related to more effective passivation. Thus, the surface of c p-Ti, modified by this novel process, possessed a unique quality of enhancing cell proliferation as well as the corrosion resistance and could be highly effective in reducing treatment time of patients adopting dental and orthopedic implants of titanium and its alloys.

  14. Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. E.; Gardner, C. G.

    1973-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing is discussed as a primary means of nondestructive evaluation of subsurface flaws. The advantages and disadvantages are listed. The elementary principles, basic components of test units, scan modes, resonance testing, detection of fatigue cracks, monitoring fatigue crack growth, and determination of residual stress are discussed.

  15. P.U.R.E. Communication: A Strategy to Improve Care-Coordination for High Risk Birth.

    PubMed

    Gephart, Sheila M; Cholette, Meghan

    2012-06-01

    High-risk birth can be an emotionally-charged and sometimes emergent event that requires a cohesive multidisciplinary team. Communication breakdowns in perinatal emergencies are known to contribute to errors and adverse patient outcomes. One approach to breaching these barriers is the Purposeful, Unambiguous, Respectful, and Effective, P.U.R.E. process. P.U.R.E. is a method of communication that emphasizes coordination and recognizes the contributions of each member of the team. The purpose of this article is to describe how the P.U.R.E. process works and how teamwork strategies, group skills training, and structured communication techniques complement it.

  16. Entangled Pure State Transformations via Local Operations Assisted by Finitely Many Rounds of Classical Communication.

    PubMed

    Spee, C; de Vicente, J I; Sauerwein, D; Kraus, B

    2017-01-27

    We consider generic pure n-qubit states and a general class of pure states of arbitrary dimensions and arbitrarily many subsystems. We characterize those states which can be reached from some other state via local operations assisted by finitely many rounds of classical communication (LOCC_{N}). For n qubits with n>3, we show that this set of states is of measure zero, which implies that the maximally entangled set is generically of full measure if restricted to the practical scenario of LOCC_{N}. Moreover, we identify a class of states for which any LOCC_{N} protocol can be realized via a concatenation of deterministic steps. We show, however, that in general there exist state transformations which require a probabilistic step within the protocol, which highlights the difference between bipartite and multipartite LOCC.

  17. Rodent ultrasonic communication: Male prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations elicit social approach behavior in female rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    PubMed

    Willadsen, Maria; Seffer, Dominik; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2014-02-01

    Rats emit distinct types of ultrasonic vocalizations (USV), which serve as situation-dependent affective signals with important communicative functions. Low-frequency 22-kHz USV typically occur in aversive situations, such as social defeat, whereas high-frequency 50-kHz USV can be observed in appetitive situations, like rough-and-tumble-play in juveniles or mating in adults. The 2 main USV types serve distinct communicative functions and induce call-specific behavioral responses in the receiver. While 22-kHz USV probably serve as alarm calls, 50-kHz USV appear to serve a prosocial communicative function in the sexual and the nonsexual context. In the sexual context, however, this view has recently been challenged by playback studies where only very limited behavioral changes were observed in response to prosocial 50-kHz USV. The aim of the present study was therefore to test whether female rats display social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV by means of our established playback paradigm. To this aim, we exposed female rats to playback of the following 2 acoustic stimuli: (a) natural male 50-kHz USV and (b) time- and amplitude-matched white noise, with the latter serving as acoustic control for novelty-induced changes in behavior not linked to the communicative function of male prosocial 50-kHz USV. Our present findings show that female rats display high levels of social approach behavior in response to male prosocial 50-kHz USV, but not time- and amplitude-matched white noise, supporting the conclusion that male prosocial 50-kHz USV are likely to play an important role in establishing social proximity and possibly regulate mating behavior.

  18. Affective communication in rodents: ultrasonic vocalizations as a tool for research on emotion and motivation.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, Markus; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2013-10-01

    Mice and rats emit and perceive calls in the ultrasonic range, i.e., above the human hearing threshold of about 20 kHz: so-called ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). Juvenile and adult rats emit 22-kHz USV in aversive situations, such as predator exposure and fighting or during drug withdrawal, whereas 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations, such as rough-and-tumble play and mating or in response to drugs of abuse, e.g., amphetamine. Aversive 22-kHz USV and appetitive 50-kHz USV serve distinct communicative functions. Whereas 22-kHz USV induce freezing behavior in the receiver, 50-kHz USV lead to social approach behavior. These opposite behavioral responses are paralleled by distinct patterns of brain activation. Freezing behavior in response to 22-kHz USV is paralleled by increased neuronal activity in brain areas regulating fear and anxiety, such as the amygdala and periaqueductal gray, whereas social approach behavior elicited by 50-kHz USV is accompanied by reduced activity levels in the amygdala but enhanced activity in the nucleus accumbens, a brain area implicated in reward processing. These opposing behavioral responses, together with distinct patterns of brain activation, particularly the bidirectional tonic activation or deactivation of the amygdala elicited by 22-kHz and 50-kHz USV, respectively, concur with a wealth of behavioral and neuroimaging studies in humans involving emotionally salient stimuli, such as fearful and happy facial expressions. Affective ultrasonic communication therefore offers a translational tool for studying the neurobiology underlying socio-affective communication. This is particularly relevant for rodent models of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by social and communication deficits, such as autism and schizophrenia.

  19. Ultrasonic Digital Communication System for a Steel Wall Multipath Channel: Methods and Results

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Timothy L.

    2005-12-01

    As of the development of this thesis, no commercially available products have been identified for the digital communication of instrumented data across a thick ({approx} 6 n.) steel wall using ultrasound. The specific goal of the current research is to investigate the application of methods for digital communication of instrumented data (i.e., temperature, voltage, etc.) across the wall of a steel pressure vessel. The acoustic transmission of data using ultrasonic transducers prevents the need to breach the wall of such a pressure vessel which could ultimately affect its safety or lifespan, or void the homogeneity of an experiment under test. Actual digital communication paradigms are introduced and implemented for the successful dissemination of data across such a wall utilizing solely an acoustic ultrasonic link. The first, dubbed the ''single-hop'' configuration, can communicate bursts of digital data one-way across the wall using the Differential Binary Phase-Shift Keying (DBPSK) modulation technique as fast as 500 bps. The second, dubbed the ''double-hop'' configuration, transmits a carrier into the vessel, modulates it, and retransmits it externally. Using a pulsed carrier with Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM), this technique can communicate digital data as fast as 500 bps. Using a CW carrier, Least Mean-Squared (LMS) adaptive interference suppression, and DBPSK, this method can communicate data as fast as 5 kbps. A third technique, dubbed the ''reflected-power'' configuration, communicates digital data by modulating a pulsed carrier by varying the acoustic impedance at the internal transducer-wall interface. The paradigms of the latter two configurations are believed to be unique. All modulation methods are based on the premise that the wall cannot be breached in any way and can therefore be viably implemented with power delivered wirelessly through the acoustic channel using ultrasound. Methods, results, and considerations for future research are discussed

  20. Effects of amphetamine on pro-social ultrasonic communication in juvenile rats: Implications for mania models.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, K-Alexander; Fuchs, Eberhard; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Communication is the act of information transfer between sender and receiver. In rats, vocal communication can be studied through ultrasonic vocalizations (USV). 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations, most notably juvenile play, likely expressing the sender׳s positive affective state. Such appetitive 50-kHz USV serve important pro-social communicative functions and elicit social exploratory and approach behavior in the receiver. Emission of 50-kHz USV can be induced pharmacologically by the administration of psychostimulant drugs, such as amphetamine. However, it is unknown whether amphetamine affects the pro-social communicative function of 50-kHz USV in the receiver. We therefore assessed dose-response effects of amphetamine (0.0mg/kg, 0.5mg/kg, 1.0mg/kg, 2.5mg/kg, 5.0mg/kg) on pro-social ultrasonic communication on both, sender and receiver, in juvenile rats. We found an inverted U-shaped effect of amphetamine on 50-kHz USV emission, with 50-kHz USV levels being strongly enhanced by moderate doses, yet less prominent effects were seen following the highest dose. Likewise, amphetamine exerted inverted U-shaped effects on social exploratory and approach behavior induced by playback of appetitive 50-kHz USV. Social approach was enhanced by moderate amphetamine doses, but completely abolished following the highest dose. Amphetamine further dose-dependently promoted the emission of 50-kHz USV following playback of appetitive 50-kHz USV, indicating more vigorous attempts to establish social proximity. Our results support an important role of dopamine in closing a perception-and-action-loop through linking mechanisms relevant for detection and production of social vocalizations. Moreover, our approach possibly provides a new means to study mania-like aberrant social interaction and communication in animal models for bipolar disorder.

  1. Entanglement manipulation of multipartite pure states with finite rounds of classical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vicente, J. I.; Spee, C.; Sauerwein, D.; Kraus, B.

    2017-01-01

    We studied pure state transformations using local operations assisted by finitely many rounds of classical communication (LOCCIN) [C. Spee, J. I. de Vicente, D. Sauerwein, and B. Kraus [Phys. Rev. Lett. (to be published)], arXiv:1606.04418]. Here, we present the details of some of the proofs and generalize the construction of examples of state transformations via LOCCIN which require a probabilistic step. However, we also present explicit examples of SLOCC classes where any separable transformation can be realized by a protocol in which each step is deterministic (all-det-LOCCIN). Such transformations can be considered as natural generalizations of bipartite transformations. Furthermore, we provide examples of pure state transformations which are possible via separable transformations, but not via LOCCIN. We also analyze an interesting genuinely multipartite effect which we call locking or unlocking the power of other parties. This means that one party can prevent or enable the implementation of LOCC transformations by other parties. Moreover, we investigate the maximally entangled set restricted to LOCCIN and show how easily computable bounds on some entanglement measures can be derived by restricting to LOCCIN.

  2. The communication of "pure" group-based anger reduces tendencies toward intergroup conflict because it increases out-group empathy.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Bart; van Zomeren, Martijn; Gordijn, Ernestine H; Postmes, Tom

    2013-08-01

    The communication of group-based anger in intergroup conflict is often associated with destructive conflict behavior. However, we show that communicating group-based anger toward the out-group can evoke empathy and thus reduce intergroup conflict. This is because it stresses the value of maintaining a positive long-term intergroup relationship, thereby increasing understanding for the situation (in contrast to the communication of the closely related emotion of contempt). Three experiments demonstrate that the communication of group-based anger indeed reduces destructive conflict intentions compared with (a) a control condition (Experiments 1-2), (b) the communication of group-based contempt (Experiment 2), and (c) the communication of a combination of group-based anger and contempt (Experiments 2-3). Moreover, results from all three experiments reveal that empathy mediated the positive effect of communicating "pure" group-based anger. We discuss the implications of these findings for the theory and practice of communicating emotions in intergroup conflicts.

  3. Full-Duplex Airborne Ultrasonic Data Communication Using a Pilot-Aided QAM-OFDM Modulation Scheme.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-08-01

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has been extensively used in a variety of broadband digital wireless communications applications because of its high bandwidth utilization efficiency and effective immunity to multipath distortion. This paper has investigated quadrature amplitude modulation and OFDM methods in air-coupled ultrasonic communication, using broadband capacitive ultrasonic transducers with high- k dielectric layers. OFDM phase noise was discussed and corrected using a pilot-aided estimation algorithm. The overall system data rate achieved was up to 400 kb/s with a spectral efficiency of 2 b/s/Hz. An ultrasonic propagation model for signal prediction considered atmospheric absorption of sound in air, beam divergence, and transducer frequency response. The simulations were compared with the experimental results, and good agreement was found between the two. Two-way communication through air was also implemented successfully by applying three-way handshaking initialization and an adaptive modulation scheme with variable data rates depending on the transmission distance, estimated using received signal strength indication measurement. It was shown that the error-free transmission range could be extended up to 2.5 m using different system transfer rates from 400 kb/s down to 100 kb/s. In full-duplex transmission mode, the overall error-free system data rate achieved was 0.8 Mb/s up to 1.5 m.

  4. Full-duplex airborne ultrasonic data communication using a pilot-aided QAM-OFDM modulation scheme.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wentao; Wright, William M D

    2016-05-18

    Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has been extensively used in a variety of broadband digital wireless communications applications because of its high bandwidth utilization efficiency and effective immunity to multipath distortion. This work has investigated quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) and OFDM methods in aircoupled ultrasonic communication, using broadband capacitive ultrasonic transducers with high-k dielectric layers. OFDM phase noise was discussed and corrected using a pilot-aided estimation algorithm. The overall system data rate achieved was up to 400 kb/s with a spectral efficiency of 2 b/s/Hz. An ultrasonic propagation model for signal prediction considered atmospheric absorption of sound in air, beam divergence and transducer frequency response. The simulations were compared with experimental results, and good agreement was found between the two. Two-way communication through air was also implemented successfully by applying 3-way handshaking initialisation and an adaptive modulation scheme with variable data rates depending on the transmission distance, estimated using received signal strength indication (RSSI) measurement. It was shown that the error-free transmission range could be extended up to 2.5 m using different system transfer rates from 400 kb/s down to 100 kb/s. In full-deplex transmission mode, the overall error-free system data rate achieved was 0.8 Mb/s up to 1.5 m.

  5. A role for ultrasonic vocalisation in social communication and divergence of natural populations of the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus).

    PubMed

    von Merten, Sophie; Hoier, Svenja; Pfeifle, Christine; Tautz, Diethard

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that rodents emit signals in the ultrasonic range, but their role in social communication and mating is still under active exploration. While inbred strains of house mice have emerged as a favourite model to study ultrasonic vocalisation (USV) patterns, studies in wild animals and natural situations are still rare. We focus here on two wild derived mouse populations. We recorded them in dyadic encounters for extended periods of time to assess possible roles of USVs and their divergence between allopatric populations. We have analysed song frequency and duration, as well as spectral features of songs and syllables. We show that the populations have indeed diverged in several of these aspects and that USV patterns emitted in a mating context differ from those emitted in same sex encounters. We find that females vocalize not less, in encounters with another female even more than males. This implies that the current focus of USVs being emitted mainly by males within the mating context needs to be reconsidered. Using a statistical syntax analysis we find complex temporal sequencing patterns that could suggest that the syntax conveys meaningful information to the receivers. We conclude that wild mice use USV for complex social interactions and that USV patterns can diverge fast between populations.

  6. Ultrasonic communication in rats: effects of morphine and naloxone on vocal and behavioral responses to playback of 50-kHz vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, Markus; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2009-12-01

    Rats emit ultrasonic vocalizations and it was hypothesized that these vocalizations have an important role in intra-specific communication. Recently, we demonstrated that playback of 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations can induce social approach, indicating that 50-kHz calls can serve to (re)establish or to maintain social contact. It is known that endogenous opioids are implicated in the regulation of social behavior, particularly in rough and tumble play. Here, we tested whether administration of opioid ligands can affect social approach in response to playback of 50-kHz calls in juvenile and adult rats. Rats were either treated with 1mg/kg naloxone, 1mg/kg morphine, or with saline vehicle. Administration of opioid ligands affected social approach at both ages. Specifically, in juvenile and adult rats, social approach displayed in response to playback of 50-kHz calls was reduced in case of naloxone treatment, but enhanced with morphine. Furthermore, juvenile rats treated with saline or morphine emitted a substantial amount of ultrasonic vocalizations in response to the playback of 50-kHz calls. Such ultrasonic calling was not seen in naloxone treated rats. Importantly, these drug-dependent differences were stimulus-specific, i.e. seen only in response to playback of 50-kHz calls and not in response to playback of background noise. The present finding that opioid ligands can affect social approach and ultrasonic vocalizations induced by playback of 50-kHz calls, indicates that an important feature of social interaction in rats, namely ultrasonic communication, is at least partially regulated by endogenous opioids.

  7. Differential effects of social and physical environmental enrichment on brain plasticity, cognition, and ultrasonic communication in rats.

    PubMed

    Brenes, Juan C; Lackinger, Martin; Höglinger, Günter U; Schratt, Gerhard; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) exerts beneficial effects on brain plasticity, cognition, and anxiety/depression, leading to a brain that can counteract deficits underlying various brain disorders. Because the complexity of the EE commonly used makes it difficult to identify causal aspects, we examined possible factors using a 2 × 2 design with social EE (two vs. six rats) and physical EE (physically enriched vs. nonenriched). For the first time, we demonstrate that social and physical EE have differential effects on brain plasticity, cognition, and ultrasonic communication. Expectedly, physical EE promoted neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation, but not in the subventricular zone, and, as a novel finding, affected microRNA expression levels, with the activity-dependent miR-124 and miR-132 being upregulated. Concomitant improvements in cognition were observed, yet social deficits were seen in the emission of prosocial 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) paralleled by a lack of social approach in response to them, consistent with the intense world syndrome/theory of autism. In contrast, social EE had only minor effects on brain plasticity and cognition, but led to increased prosocial 50-kHz USV emission rates and enhanced social approach behavior. Importantly, social deficits following physical EE were prevented by additional social EE. The finding that social EE has positive whereas physical EE has negative effects on social behavior indicates that preclinical studies focusing on EE as a potential treatment in models for neuropsychiatric disorders characterized by social deficits, such as autism, should include social EE in addition to physical EE, because its lack might worsen social deficits.

  8. HIGHER FREQUENCY ULTRASONIC LIGHT MODULATORS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LIGHT ), (*MODULATORS, (*ULTRASONIC RADIATION, MODULATORS), OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS, BANDWIDTH, TRANSDUCERS, HIGH FREQUENCY, VERY HIGH FREQUENCY, ATTENUATION, DATA PROCESSING, OPTICAL EQUIPMENT, ANALOG COMPUTERS, THEORY.

  9. Affiliative Behavior, Ultrasonic Communication and Social Reward Are Influenced by Genetic Variation in Adolescent Mice

    PubMed Central

    Panksepp, Jules B.; Jochman, Kimberly A.; Kim, Joseph U.; Koy, Jamie J.; Wilson, Ellie D.; Chen, QiLiang; Wilson, Clarinda R.; Lahvis, Garet P.

    2007-01-01

    Social approach is crucial for establishing relationships among individuals. In rodents, social approach has been studied primarily within the context of behavioral phenomena related to sexual reproduction, such as mating, territory defense and parental care. However, many forms of social interaction occur before the onset of reproductive maturity, which suggests that some processes underlying social approach among juvenile animals are probably distinct from those in adults. We conducted a longitudinal study of social investigation (SI) in mice from two inbred strains to assess the extent to which genetic factors influence the motivation for young mice to approach one another. Early-adolescent C57BL/6J (B6) mice, tested 4–6 days after weaning, investigated former cage mates to a greater degree than BALB/cJ (BALB) mice, irrespective of the sex composition within an interacting pair. This strain difference was not due to variation in maternal care, the phenotypic characteristics of stimulus mice or sensitivity to the length of isolation prior to testing, nor was it attributable to a general difference in appetitive motivation. Ultrasonic vocalization (USV) production was positively correlated with the SI responses of mice from both strains. Interestingly, several USV characteristics segregated with the genetic background of young mice, including a higher average frequency and shorter duration for the USVs emitted by B6 mice. An assessment of conditioned place preference responses indicated that there was a strain-dependent difference in the rewarding nature of social contact. As adolescent mice aged, SI responses gradually became less sensitive to genetic background and more responsive to the particular sex of individuals within an interacting pair. We have thus identified a specific, genetic influence on the motivation of early-adolescent mice to approach one another. Consistent with classical theories of motivation, which propose a functional relationship between

  10. Embedded Ultrasonic Transducer Design and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Monitoring of Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, G.; Benny, G.; Gachagan, A.; Farlow, R.; Hailu, B.; McNab, A.; Girma, D.

    2003-03-01

    This paper describes a wireless demonstrator system designed for generation and detection of fundamental symmetrical Lamb waves (S0) characterized by high velocity and low attenuation. The demonstrator comprises two piezoceramic transducers embedded within an epoxy plate, drive and pre-amplification electronics, a microcontroller and a communications interface. This arrangement can be configured to operate in an active pitch-catch or pulse-echo interrogation mode or as a passive acoustic emission (AE) sensor. The history of AE incidents, for example, may then be transmitted by wireless link.

  11. Communication: spectroscopic characterization of an alkyl substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH(3)CHOO through pure rotational transitions.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki

    2014-01-07

    An alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH3CHOO was detected in the gas phase through Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. Observed pure rotational transitions show a small splitting corresponding to the A∕E components due to the threefold methyl internal rotation. The rotational constants and the barrier height of the hindered methyl rotation were determined to be A = 17 586.5295(15) MHz, B = 7133.4799(41) MHz, C = 5229.1704(40) MHz, and V3 = 837.1(17) cm(-1). High-level ab initio calculations which reproduce the experimentally determined values well indicate that the in-plane C-H bond in the methyl moiety is trans to the C-O bond, and other two protons are directed to the terminal oxygen atom for the most stable structure of syn-CH3CHOO. The torsional barrier of the methyl top is fairly large in syn-CH3CHOO, implying a significant interaction between the terminal oxygen and the protons of the methyl moiety, which may be responsible for the high production yields of the OH radical from energized alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates.

  12. Communication: Spectroscopic characterization of an alkyl substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO through pure rotational transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Endo, Yasuki

    2014-01-07

    An alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediate syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO was detected in the gas phase through Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy. Observed pure rotational transitions show a small splitting corresponding to the A/E components due to the threefold methyl internal rotation. The rotational constants and the barrier height of the hindered methyl rotation were determined to be A = 17 586.5295(15) MHz, B = 7133.4799(41) MHz, C = 5229.1704(40) MHz, and V{sub 3} = 837.1(17) cm{sup −1}. High-level ab initio calculations which reproduce the experimentally determined values well indicate that the in-plane C–H bond in the methyl moiety is trans to the C–O bond, and other two protons are directed to the terminal oxygen atom for the most stable structure of syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO. The torsional barrier of the methyl top is fairly large in syn-CH{sub 3}CHOO, implying a significant interaction between the terminal oxygen and the protons of the methyl moiety, which may be responsible for the high production yields of the OH radical from energized alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates.

  13. Pure-quartic solitons

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Redondo, Andrea; Martijn, de Sterke C.; Sipe, J.E.; Krauss, Thomas F.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Husko, Chad

    2016-01-01

    Temporal optical solitons have been the subject of intense research due to their intriguing physics and applications in ultrafast optics and supercontinuum generation. Conventional bright optical solitons result from the interaction of anomalous group-velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. Here we experimentally demonstrate a class of bright soliton arising purely from the interaction of negative fourth-order dispersion and self-phase modulation, which can occur even for normal group-velocity dispersion. We provide experimental and numerical evidence of shape-preserving propagation and flat temporal phase for the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and periodically modulated propagation for the higher-order pure-quartic solitons. We derive the approximate shape of the fundamental pure-quartic soliton and discover that is surprisingly Gaussian, exhibiting excellent agreement with our experimental observations. Our discovery, enabled by precise dispersion engineering, could find applications in communications, frequency combs and ultrafast lasers. PMID:26822758

  14. Ultrasonic evaluation of high voltage circuit boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Riley, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary observations indicate that an ultrasonic scanning technique may be useful as a quick, low cost, nondestructive method for judging the quality of circuit board materials for high voltage applications. Corona inception voltage tests were conducted on fiberglass-epoxy and fiberglass-polyimide high pressure laminates from 20 to 140 C. The same materials were scanned ultrasonically by utilizing the single transducer, through-transmission technique with reflector plate, and recording variations in ultrasonic energy transmitted through the board thickness. A direct relationship was observed between ultrasonic transmission level and corona inception voltage. The ultrasonic technique was subsequently used to aid selection of high quality circuit boards for the Communications Technology Satellite.

  15. Short communication: Jersey × Holstein crossbreds compared with pure Holsteins for body weight, body condition score, fertility, and survival during the first three lactations.

    PubMed

    Heins, B J; Hansen, L B; Hazel, A R; Seykora, A J; Johnson, D G; Linn, J G

    2012-07-01

    Crossbred cows (n=80) resulting from the use of Jersey (JE) semen on their pure Holstein (HO) dams were compared with pure HO cows (n=77) for body weight, body condition score, fertility, and survival during their first 3 lactations. Cows were in 2 research herds of the University of Minnesota and calved from September 2003 to June 2008. The JE × HO crossbred cows had significantly less body weight during the first (-56 kg), second (-67 kg), and third (-82 kg) lactations than pure HO cows. However, JE × HO cows had significantly greater body condition score during the first (2.94 vs. 2.84), second (2.97 vs. 2.84), and third (2.99 vs. 2.87) lactations than pure HO cows. For fertility, JE × HO cows had fewer days to first breeding during the first (-10.6d), second (-8.4d), and third (-12.3d) lactations than pure HO cows. Crossbred cows were not significantly different from pure HO cows for number of services during first lactation; however, JE × HO cows had significantly fewer services (2.2) than pure HO cows (2.7) during the second lactation. Also, JE × HO cows had significantly fewer days open than pure HO cows in the first (-24 d), second (-42 d), and third (-42 d) lactations. For survival, JE × HO cows were not significantly different from pure HO cows for percentage of cows calving a second time; however, a tendency existed for a higher percentage of JE × HO cows (63.8%) than pure HO cows (49.4%) to calve a third time, and a higher percentage of JE × HO cows calved a third time within 28, 34, and 40 mo of first calving than pure HO cows.

  16. Ultrasonic Maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Ultraprobe 2000, manufactured by UE Systems, Inc., Elmsford, NY, is a hand-held ultrasonic system that detects indications of bearing failure by analyzing changes in amplitude. It employs the technology of a prototype ultrasonic bearing-failure monitoring system developed by Mechanical Technology, Inc., Latham, New York and Marshall Space Flight Center (which was based on research into Skylab's gyroscope bearings). Bearings on the verge of failure send ultrasonic signals indicating their deterioration; the Ultraprobe changes these to audible signals. The operator hears the signals and gages their intensity with a meter in the unit.

  17. Ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Brashear, Hugh R.; Blair, Michael S.; Phelps, James E.; Bauer, Martin L.; Nowlin, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasonic ranging and data telemetry system determines a surveyor's position and automatically links it with other simultaneously taken survey data. An ultrasonic and radio frequency (rf) transmitter are carried by the surveyor in a backpack. The surveyor's position is determined by calculations that use the measured transmission times of an airborne ultrasonic pulse transmitted from the backpack to two or more prepositioned ultrasonic transceivers. Once a second, rf communications are used both to synchronize the ultrasonic pulse transmission-time measurements and to transmit other simultaneously taken survey data. The rf communications are interpreted by a portable receiver and microcomputer which are brought to the property site. A video display attached to the computer provides real-time visual monitoring of the survey progress and site coverage.

  18. Graphene electrostatic microphone and ultrasonic radio

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinglin; Onishi, Seita; Crommie, M. F.; Zettl, Alex K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication. It is shown that graphene-based acoustic transmitters and receivers have a wide bandwidth, from the audible region (20∼20 kHz) to the ultrasonic region (20 kHz to at least 0.5 MHz). Using the graphene-based components, we demonstrate efficient high-fidelity information transmission using an ultrasonic band centered at 0.3 MHz. The graphene-based microphone is also shown to be capable of directly receiving ultrasound signals generated by bats in the field, and the ultrasonic radio, coupled to electromagnetic (EM) radio, is shown to function as a high-accuracy rangefinder. The ultrasonic radio could serve as a useful addition to wireless communication technology where the propagation of EM waves is difficult. PMID:26150483

  19. Graphene electrostatic microphone and ultrasonic radio.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zheng, Jinglin; Onishi, Seita; Crommie, M F; Zettl, Alex K

    2015-07-21

    We present a graphene-based wideband microphone and a related ultrasonic radio that can be used for wireless communication. It is shown that graphene-based acoustic transmitters and receivers have a wide bandwidth, from the audible region (20∼20 kHz) to the ultrasonic region (20 kHz to at least 0.5 MHz). Using the graphene-based components, we demonstrate efficient high-fidelity information transmission using an ultrasonic band centered at 0.3 MHz. The graphene-based microphone is also shown to be capable of directly receiving ultrasound signals generated by bats in the field, and the ultrasonic radio, coupled to electromagnetic (EM) radio, is shown to function as a high-accuracy rangefinder. The ultrasonic radio could serve as a useful addition to wireless communication technology where the propagation of EM waves is difficult.

  20. Ultrasonic Polishing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmore, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic polishing process makes use of the high-frequency (ultrasonic) vibrations of an abradable tool which automatically conforms to the work piece and an abrasive slurry to finish surfaces and edges on complex, highly detailed, close tolerance cavities in materials from beryllium copper to carbide. Applications range from critical deburring of guidance system components to removing EDM recast layers from aircraft engine components to polishing molds for forming carbide cutting tool inserts or injection molding plastics. A variety of materials including tool steels, carbides, and even ceramics can be successfully processed. Since the abradable tool automatically conforms to the work piece geometry, the ultrasonic finishing method described offers a number of important benefits in finishing components with complex geometries.

  1. Ultrasonic neuromodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naor, Omer; Krupa, Steve; Shoham, Shy

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves can be non-invasively steered and focused into mm-scale regions across the human body and brain, and their application in generating controlled artificial modulation of neuronal activity could therefore potentially have profound implications for neural science and engineering. Ultrasonic neuro-modulation phenomena were experimentally observed and studied for nearly a century, with recent discoveries on direct neural excitation and suppression sparking a new wave of investigations in models ranging from rodents to humans. In this paper we review the physics, engineering and scientific aspects of ultrasonic fields, their control in both space and time, and their effect on neuronal activity, including a survey of both the field’s foundational history and of recent findings. We describe key constraints encountered in this field, as well as key engineering systems developed to surmount them. In closing, the state of the art is discussed, with an emphasis on emerging research and clinical directions.

  2. Ultrasonic Vocalizations Emitted by Flying Squirrels

    PubMed Central

    Murrant, Meghan N.; Bowman, Jeff; Garroway, Colin J.; Prinzen, Brian; Mayberry, Heather; Faure, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Anecdotal reports of ultrasound use by flying squirrels have existed for decades, yet there has been little detailed analysis of their vocalizations. Here we demonstrate that two species of flying squirrel emit ultrasonic vocalizations. We recorded vocalizations from northern (Glaucomys sabrinus) and southern (G. volans) flying squirrels calling in both the laboratory and at a field site in central Ontario, Canada. We demonstrate that flying squirrels produce ultrasonic emissions through recorded bursts of broadband noise and time-frequency structured frequency modulated (FM) vocalizations, some of which were purely ultrasonic. Squirrels emitted three types of ultrasonic calls in laboratory recordings and one type in the field. The variety of signals that were recorded suggest that flying squirrels may use ultrasonic vocalizations to transfer information. Thus, vocalizations may be an important, although still poorly understood, aspect of flying squirrel social biology. PMID:24009728

  3. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stouffer, Donald D.

    1990-01-01

    Communication in its many forms is a critical component for an effective Space Grant Program. Good communication is needed within individual Space Grant College/Consortia, for example between consortium affiliates and the consortium program office. Effective communication between the several programs, NASA Headquarters, and NASA field centers also is required. Further, communication among the above program elements, industry, local and state government, and the public also are necessary for meeting program objectives.

  4. Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Alan

    An informal introduction to the study of communication deals with the major topics in the field. It presents basic theories of communication and language, reviews how language takes on meaning, explains the stimulus-response and Piaget theories of learning, and presents major theories dealing with communications and society. These theories include…

  5. Ultrasonic test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Anthony; Goff, Dan; Kruchowy, Roman; Rhoads, Carl

    1994-08-01

    An ultrasonic system for determining the quality of concrete under water without inaccuracies caused by electromagnetic interference from the ultrasonic generator. An ultrasonic generator applies pulses to the concrete. An ultrasonic detector detects the ultrasonic pulses and produces corresponding signals that are indicative of ultrasonic pulses that have passed through the material. Signal processing circuitry processes the signals to determine the transit time of the ultrasonic pulses through the material. The signal processing circuitry is disabled for a predetermined time after application of each ultrasonic pulse to the material to prevent noise produced by the means for applying ultrasonic pulses to the material from entering the signal processing circuitry and causing spurious measurements.

  6. Communicate!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Stuart

    This ten chapter book is designed to provide high school students with an understanding of basic communication processes. The first five chapters include discussions of language development, function, and acquisition in relation to both human and non-human communication. The sixth chapter contains specimen linguistic analyses of speech and…

  7. Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James

    2010-01-01

    NASA s communication work for the UAS Command and Control area will build upon work currently being conducted under NASA Recovery Act funds. Communication portions of UAS NextGen ConOps, Stateof- the-Art assessment, and Gap Analysis. Preliminary simulations for UAS CNPC link scalability assessment. Surrogate UAS aircraft upgrades. This work will also leverage FY10 in-guide funding for communication link model development. UAS are currently managed through exceptions and are operating using DoD frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Instrument/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for Safety and Regularity of Flight. No radio-frequency (RF) spectrum has been allocated by the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) specifically for UAS command and control links, for either LOS or Beyond LOS (BLOS) communication.

  8. Ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Steven C.; Kraft, Nancy C.

    2007-03-13

    An ultrasonic transducer having an effective center frequency of about 42 MHz; a bandwidth of greater than 85% at 6 dB; a spherical focus of at least 0.5 inches in water; an F4 lens; a resolution sufficient to be able to detect and separate a 0.005 inch flat-bottomed hole at 0.005 inches below surface; and a beam size of approximately 0.006–0.008 inches measured off a 11/2 mm ball in water at the transducer's focal point.

  9. Ultrasonic pipe assessment

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Graham H.; Morrow, Valerie L.; Levie, Harold; Kane, Ronald J.; Brown, Albert E.

    2003-12-23

    An ultrasonic pipe or other structure assessment system includes an ultrasonic transducer positioned proximate the pipe or other structure. A fluid connection between the ultrasonic transducer and the pipe or other structure is produced. The ultrasonic transducer is moved relative to the pipe or other structure.

  10. Ultrasonic Interferometers Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    I have been tinkering with ultrasonic transducers once more. In earlier notes I reported on optics-like experiments performed with ultrasonics, described a number of ultrasonic interferometers, and showed how ultrasonic transducers can be used for Fourier analysis. This time I became interested in trying the technique of using two detectors in…

  11. Ultrasonic hydrometer

    DOEpatents

    Swoboda, Carl A.

    1984-01-01

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time "t" between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance "d" between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time "t", the sonic velocity "V" is calculated with the equation "V=2d/t". The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0.degree. and 40.degree. C. and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation. The disclosed modified battery has a hollow spacer nub on the battery side wall, the sonic surfaces being on the inside of the nub and the electrolyte filling between the surfaces to the exclusion of intervening structure. An accessible pad exposed on the nub wall opposite one sonic surface allows the reliable placement thereagainst of the transducer.

  12. Ultrasonic hydrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Swoboda, C.A.

    1984-04-17

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time ''t'' between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance ''d'' between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time ''t'', the sonic velocity ''V'' is calculated with the equation ''V=2d/t''. The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0/sup 0/ and 40/sup 0/ C. and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation. The disclosed modified battery has a hollow spacer nub on the battery side wall, the sonic surfaces being on the inside of the nub and the electrolyte filling between the surfaces to the exclusion of intervening structure. An accessible pad exposed on the nub wall opposite one sonic surface allows the reliable placement thereagainst of the transducer.

  13. Twisted partially pure spinors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Rafael; Tellez, Ivan

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the relationship between orthogonal complex structures and pure spinors, we define twisted partially pure spinors in order to characterize spinorially subspaces of Euclidean space endowed with a complex structure.

  14. Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailenson, Jeremy; Buzzanell, Patrice; Deetz, Stanley; Tewksbury, David; Thompson, Robert J.; Turow, Joseph; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Bishop, M. J.; Gayeski, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of communications were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Jeremy Bailenson, Patrice Buzzanell, Stanley Deetz, David Tewksbury, Robert J. Thompson, and…

  15. Ultrasonic pulser-receiver

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Steven C.

    2006-09-12

    Ultrasonic pulser-receiver circuitry, for use with an ultrasonic transducer, the circuitry comprising a circuit board; ultrasonic pulser circuitry supported by the circuit board and configured to be coupled to an ultrasonic transducer and to cause the ultrasonic transducer to emit an ultrasonic output pulse; receiver circuitry supported by the circuit board, coupled to the pulser circuitry, including protection circuitry configured to protect against the ultrasonic pulse and including amplifier circuitry configured to amplify an echo, received back by the transducer, of the output pulse; and a connector configured to couple the ultrasonic transducer directly to the circuit board, to the pulser circuitry and receiver circuitry, wherein impedance mismatches that would result if the transducer was coupled to the circuit board via a cable can be avoided.

  16. ULTRASONIC NEUTRON DOSIMETER

    DOEpatents

    Truell, R.; de Klerk, J.; Levy, P.W.

    1960-02-23

    A neutron dosimeter is described which utilizes ultrasonic waves in the megacycle region for determination of the extent of neutron damage in a borosilicate glass through ultrasonic wave velocity and attenuation measurements before and after damage.

  17. Ultrasonic Device for Assessing the Quality of a Wire Crimp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Perey, Daniel F. (Inventor); Cramer, Karl E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A system for determining the quality of an electrical wire crimp between a wire and ferrule includes an ultrasonically equipped crimp tool (UECT) configured to transmit an ultrasonic acoustic wave through a wire and ferrule, and a signal processor in communication with the UECT. The signal processor includes a signal transmitting module configured to transmit the ultrasonic acoustic wave via an ultrasonic transducer, signal receiving module configured to receive the ultrasonic acoustic wave after it passes through the wire and ferrule, and a signal analysis module configured to identify signal differences between the ultrasonic waves. The signal analysis module is then configured to compare the signal differences attributable to the wire crimp to a baseline, and to provide an output signal if the signal differences deviate from the baseline.

  18. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  19. Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallaschek, J.

    1994-12-31

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are a new type of actuator. They are characterized by high torque at low rotational speed, simple mechanical design and good controllability. They also provide a high holding torque even if no power is applied. Compared to electromagnetic actuators the torque per volume ratio of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors can be higher by an order of magnitude. Recently various types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors have been developed for industrial applications. This paper describes several types of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors.

  20. Ultrasonic Determination Of Recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    1988-01-01

    State of recrystallization identified. Measurement of ultrasonic attenuation shows promise as means of detecting recrystallization in metal. Technique applicable to real-time acoustic monitoring of thermomechanical treatments. Starting with work-hardened material, one ultrasonically determines effect of annealing, using correlation between ultrasonic attenuation and temperature.

  1. Ultrasonic search wheel probe

    DOEpatents

    Mikesell, Charles R.

    1978-01-01

    A device is provided for reducing internal reflections from the tire of an ultrasonic search wheel probe or from within the material being examined. The device includes a liner with an anechoic chamber within which is an ultrasonic transducer. The liner is positioned within the wheel and includes an aperture through which the ultrasonic sound from the transducer is directed.

  2. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  3. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  4. 7 CFR 916.16 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 916.16 Section 916.16... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.16 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) Pure grower means any...); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure grower can pack...

  5. 7 CFR 917.8 - Pure grower or pure producer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure grower or pure producer. 917.8 Section 917.8... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.8 Pure grower or pure producer. (a) For peaches, pure... packing business); or (2) Who produces and handles his or her own product; Provided, That a pure...

  6. Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonelle, G. J.

    1984-01-01

    Communications in any system is one of the last technologies to be considered, and sometimes it is considered too late to impact the system. This was somewhat the impression on reviewing the NASA budget for two mission scenarios for the space station. However, that budget fortunately was well spent, and the money was spent to get the most benefit per dollar. Another thing that is very often forgotten is that technology is not produced in a vacuum. In fact, in conducting independent research and development (IR&D), the first phase is to define the requirements which must be time phased, becuase very often the conditions will change during the life of the system. From the requirements, a set of architectures that are at least representative of that era are produced. If the exact requirements were not established, at least boundaries are set on the requirements for that architecture. When this is completed, then the technology that is really needed is defined. The major criticism of the work that was presented to the panel is the lack of a firm set of requirements.

  7. Ultrasonic Microtransport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroney, Richard Morgan, III

    We have observed numerous kinetic effects using ultrasonic flexural plate waves (FPWs) in 4mu -thick composite plates of low-stress silicon nitride, piezoelectric zinc oxide and aluminum. The wavelength is typically 100 mum, and the area 3 x 8 mm^2. A successful new surface micromachining fabrication process is presented here for the first time. FPWs have been used to move liquids and gasses with motion typically indicated by polysilicon blocks in air and polystyrene spheres in water; the velocity in air is 4.5 mm/s (with a zero-to-peak input of 3 V), and in water it is 100 mum/s (with an input of 7.8 V). Other observations include pumping of a liquid dye, and mixing near the FPW surface. All quantitative observations demonstrate that the kinetic effects of FPWs are proportional to the square of the wave amplitude. The amplitude for a typical device is 250 A at 9 V input; the power in a typical FPW is about 2 mW. The amplitude can be accurately measured using a laser diffraction technique. Experimental error is about +/-10%, and many of the results agree well with a simple theory to predict the FPW amplitude; extensions of the theory model the fluid loading of FPW devices, but experiment and theory disagree by about 15%. Pumping by flexural plate waves is an example of the phenomenon known as acoustic streaming. A common solution approach is the method of successive approximations, where the nonlinear equations are first linearized and solved. This "first-order" solution is then used to determine the inhomogeneous source terms in the linearized, "second -order" equations of motion. Theoretical predictions of streaming theory are in excellent agreement with experiment in the case where the FPW device contacts a half-space of fluid; predictions for flow in small channels encourage the development of integrated micropumps. Applications for microflow include thermal redistribution in integrated circuits and liquid movement in analytical instruments--particularly where

  8. Geomorphology: Pure and applied

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    The book summarizes the history of intellectual debate in geomorphology and describes modern developments both ''pure'' and ''applied.'' The history begins well before W.M. Davis and follows through to such debates as those concerned with the Pleistocene. Modern developments in pure geomorphology are cast in terms of chapters on form, process, materials, and methods analysis. The applied chapters concentrate on environmental hazards and resources, and their management.

  9. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  10. Ultrasonic Bolt Gage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleman, Stuart M. (Inventor); Rowe, Geoffrey K. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An ultrasonic bolt gage is described which uses a crosscorrelation algorithm to determine a tension applied to a fastener, such as a bolt. The cross-correlation analysis is preferably performed using a processor operating on a series of captured ultrasonic echo waveforms. The ultrasonic bolt gage is further described as using the captured ultrasonic echo waveforms to perform additional modes of analysis, such as feature recognition. Multiple tension data outputs, therefore, can be obtained from a single data acquisition for increased measurement reliability. In addition, one embodiment of the gage has been described as multi-channel, having a multiplexer for performing a tension analysis on one of a plurality of bolts.

  11. Private ultrasonic whispering in moths

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Ryo; Ishikawa, Yukio; Tatsuki, Sadahiro; Skals, Niels; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2009-01-01

    Sound-producing moths have evolved a range of mechanisms to emit loud conspicuous ultrasounds directed toward mates, competitors and predators. We recently discovered a novel mechanism of sound production, i.e., stridulation of specialized scales on the wing and thorax, in the Asian corn borer moth, Ostrinia furnacalis, the male of which produces ultrasonic courtship songs in close proximity to a female (<2 cm). The signal is very quiet, being exclusively adapted for private communication. A quiet signal is advantageous in that it prevents eavesdropping by competitors and/or predators. We argue that communication via quiet ultrasound, which has not been reported previously, is probably common in moths and other insects. PMID:20835290

  12. Pro-social 50-kHz ultrasonic communication in rats: post-weaning but not post-adolescent social isolation leads to social impairments—phenotypic rescue by re-socialization

    PubMed Central

    Seffer, Dominik; Rippberger, Henrike; Schwarting, Rainer K. W.; Wöhr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Rats are highly social animals and social play during adolescence has an important role for social development, hence post-weaning social isolation is widely used to study the adverse effects of juvenile social deprivation and to induce behavioral phenotypes relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders, like schizophrenia. Communication is an important component of the rat's social behavior repertoire, with ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) serving as situation-dependent affective signals. High-frequency 50-kHz USV occur in appetitive situations and induce approach behavior, supporting the notion that they serve as social contact calls; however, post-weaning isolation effects on the behavioral changes displayed by the receiver in response to USV have yet to be studied. We therefore investigated the impact of post-weaning isolation on socio-affective information processing as assessed by means of our established 50-kHz USV radial maze playback paradigm. We showed that post-weaning social isolation specifically affected the behavioral response to playback of pro-social 50-kHz but not alarm 22-kHz USV. While group-housed rats showed the expected preference, i.e., approach, toward 50-kHz USV, the response was even stronger in short-term isolated rats (i.e., 1 day), possibly due to a higher level of social motivation. In contrast, no approach was observed in long-term isolated rats (i.e., 4 weeks). Importantly, deficits in approach were reversed by peer-mediated re-socialization and could not be observed after post-adolescent social isolation, indicating a critical period for social development during adolescence. Together, these results highlight the importance of social experience for affiliative behavior, suggesting a critical involvement of play behavior on socio-affective information processing in rats. PMID:25983681

  13. Production of pure metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process for depositing elements by irradiating liquids is reported. Ultra pure elements are precipitated from aqueous solutions or suspensions of compounds. A solution of a salt of a metal to be prepared is irradiated, and the insoluble reaction product settles out. Some chemical compounds may also be prepared in this manner.

  14. Dahlbeck and Pure Ontology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Jim

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to Johan Dahlbeck's "Towards a pure ontology: Children's bodies and morality" ["Educational Philosophy and Theory," vol. 46 (1), 2014, pp. 8-23 (EJ1026561)]. His arguments from Nietzsche and Spinoza do not carry the weight he supposes, and the conclusions he draws from them about pedagogy would be…

  15. Language as Pure Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Joseph Sung-Yul

    2016-01-01

    Language occupies a crucial position in neoliberalism, due to the reimagination of language as commodified skill. This paper studies the role of language ideology in this transformation by identifying a particular ideology that facilitates this process, namely the ideology which views language as pure potential. Neoliberalism treats language as a…

  16. Ultrasonic/Sonic Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2009-01-01

    The ultrasonic/sonic anchor (U/S anchor) is an anchoring device that drills a hole for itself in rock, concrete, or other similar material. The U/S anchor is a recent addition to a series of related devices, the first of which were reported in "Ultrasonic/Sonic Drill/Corers With Integrated Sensors"

  17. Experiments in Pulsed Ultrasonics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, S. B.; Forster, G. A.

    1970-01-01

    Describes and apparatus designed to generate and detect pulsed ultrasonics in solids and liquids over the frequency range 1-20 MHz. Experiments are suggested for velocity of sound, elastic constant and ultrasonic attenuation measurements on various materials over a wide temperature range. The equipment should be useful for demonstration purposes.…

  18. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  19. Dynamic system model for ultrasonic lubrication in perpendicular configuration.

    PubMed

    Dong, Sheng; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasonic lubrication can be achieved by superimposing ultrasonic vibrations onto the relative sliding velocity between two surfaces. Ultrasonic vibrations are typically generated by a piezoelectric actuator. Relative to the macroscopic velocity, the vibrations can be longitudinal, transverse, or perpendicular. Often considered as a purely interfacial effect, ultrasonic lubrication is in fact a system phenomenon incorporating the dynamics of the actuator, sliding surfaces, and surrounding structure. This article presents a dynamic system model for ultrasonic lubrication configured in perpendicular mode, as experimentally measured with a modified pin-on-disc tribometer. The framework includes a lumped-parameter, dynamic model for the tribometer, an electromechanical model for the piezoelectric transducer used to generated the ultrasonic vibrations in the tribometer, and a "cube" model for the contact mechanics between asperities. Electrical impedance, system vibrations, and friction reduction are examined. Results show a strong match between experiments and simulations with errors lower than 10%. A parametric study is conducted to investigate the influence of driving voltage, macroscopic velocity, driving frequency, and signal waveform on ultrasonic friction reduction.

  20. Ultrasonic displacement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, N. D.

    1975-01-01

    An acoustic instrument system is described as a feasible tool for remote measurement of structural velocities. The system involves measurement of the Doppler shift of ultrasonic sound as it is reflected from an oscillating plate. Measurements were performed in air with an ultrasonic frequency source of 42.5 kilohertz. The surface under investigation was a plexiglass plate oscillating sinusoidally at 10, 13, and 15 Hz. Data are presented to show that, in such a system, the measurement of the Doppler shift is dependent upon the acoustic pathlength between the sensing device and the oscillating surface, with the distance between maximum shifts being half the wavelength of the ultrasonic source.

  1. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.; Lundin, Ralph L.

    1989-01-01

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation.

  2. Ultrasonic liquid level detector

    DOEpatents

    Kotz, Dennis M.; Hinz, William R.

    2010-09-28

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use within a shielded container, the detector being tubular in shape with a chamber at its lower end into which liquid from in the container may enter and exit, the chamber having an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver in its top wall and a reflector plate or target as its bottom wall whereby when liquid fills the chamber a complete medium is then present through which an ultrasonic wave may be transmitted and reflected from the target thus signaling that the liquid is at chamber level.

  3. Ultrasonic determination of recrystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation was measured for cold worked Nickel 200 samples annealed at increasing temperatures. Localized dislocation density variations, crystalline order and colume percent of recrystallized phase were determined over the anneal temperature range using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and metallurgy. The exponent of the frequency dependence of the attenuation was found to be a key variable relating ultrasonic attenuation to the thermal kinetics of the recrystallization process. Identification of this key variable allows for the ultrasonic determination of onset, degree, and completion of recrystallization.

  4. Ultrasonic washing of textiles.

    PubMed

    Choi, Junhee; Kim, Tae-Hong; Kim, Ho-Young; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-03-01

    We present the results of experimental investigation of ultrasonic washing of textiles. The results demonstrate that cavitation bubbles oscillating in acoustic fields are capable of removing soils from textiles. Since the washing performance is mitigated in a large washing bath when using an ultrasonic transducer, we propose a novel washing scheme by combining the ultrasonic vibration with a conventional washing method utilizing kinetic energy of textiles. It is shown that the hybrid washing scheme achieves a markedly enhanced performance up to 15% in comparison with the conventional washing machine. This work can contribute to developing a novel laundry machine with reduced washing time and waste water.

  5. Ultrasonic drilling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.; Lundin, R.L.

    1988-06-20

    Apparatus attachable to an ultrasonic drilling machine for drilling deep holes in very hard materials, such as boron carbide, is provided. The apparatus utilizes a hollow spindle attached to the output horn of the ultrasonic drilling machine. The spindle has a hollow drill bit attached at the opposite end. A housing surrounds the spindle, forming a cavity for holding slurry. In operation, slurry is provided into the housing, and into the spindle through inlets while the spindle is rotating and ultrasonically reciprocating. Slurry flows through the spindle and through the hollow drill bit to cleanse the cutting edge of the bit during a drilling operation. 3 figs.

  6. Ultrasonic Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, Steven (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An imaging system is described which can be used to either passively search for sources of ultrasonics or as an active phase imaging system. which can image fires. gas leaks, or air temperature gradients. This system uses an array of ultrasonic receivers coupled to an ultrasound collector or lens to provide an electronic image of the ultrasound intensity in a selected angular region of space. A system is described which includes a video camera to provide a visual reference to a region being examined for ultrasonic signals.

  7. Ultrasonic material property determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serabian, S.

    1986-01-01

    The use and potential offered by ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to determine and/or monitor material properties is explored. The basis for such unique measurements along with examples of materials from a variety of industries are presented.

  8. Ultrasonic bone densitometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoop, J. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A device, for measuring the density of a bone structure so as to monitor the calcium content, is described. A pair of opposed spaced ultrasonic transducers are held within a clamping apparatus closely adjacent the bone being analyzed. These ultrasonic transducers incude piezoelectric crystals shaped to direct signals through the bone encompassed in the heel and finger of the subject being tested. A pulse generator is coupled to one of the transducers and generates an electric pulse for causing the transducers to generate an ultrasonic sound wave which is directed through the bone structure to the other transducer. An electric circuit, including an amplifier and a bandpass filter couples the signals from the receiver transducer back to the pulse generator for retriggering the pulse generator at a frequency proportional to the duration that the ultrasonic wave takes to travel through the bone structure being examined.

  9. Generation of extreme ultrasonics in rainforest katydids.

    PubMed

    Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Morris, Glenn K; Mason, Andrew C

    2006-12-01

    The calling song of an undescribed Meconematinae katydid (Tettigoniidae) from South America consists of trains of short, separated pure-tone sound pulses at 129 kHz (the highest calling note produced by an Arthropod). Paradoxically, these extremely high-frequency sound waves are produced by a low-velocity movement of the stridulatory forewings. Sound production during a wing stroke is pulsed, but the wings do not pause in their closing, requiring that the scraper, in its travel along the file, must do so to create the pulses. We hypothesize that during scraper pauses, the cuticle behind the scraper is bent by the ongoing relative displacement of the wings, storing deformation energy. When the scraper slips free it unbends while being carried along the file and its deformation energy contributes to a more powerful, higher-rate, one-tooth one-wave sound pulse, lasting no more than a few waves at 129 000 Hz. Some other katydid species make pure-tone ultrasonic pulses. Wing velocities and carriers among these pure-tone species fall into two groups: (1) species with ultrasonic carriers below 40 kHz that have higher calling frequencies correlated with higher wing-closing velocities and higher tooth densities: for these katydids the relationship between average tooth strike rate and song frequency approaches 1:1, as in cricket escapement mechanisms; (2) a group of species with ultrasonic carriers above 40 kHz (that includes the Meconematinae): for these katydids closing wing velocities are dramatically lower and they make short trains of pulses, with intervening periods of silence greater than the duration of the pulses they separate. This signal form may be the signature of scraper-stored elastic energy.

  10. Metalworking with ultrasonic energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonea, I.; Minca, M.

    1974-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic radiation for metal working of steel is discussed. It is stated that the productivity of the ultrasonic working is affected by the hardness of the material to be worked, the oscillation amplitude, the abrasive temperature, and the grain size. The factors that contribute to an increase in the dislocation speed are analyzed. Experimental data are provided to substantiate the theoretical parameters.

  11. Dispersion Method Using Focused Ultrasonic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungsoon Kim,; Moojoon Kim,; Kanglyel Ha,; Minchul Chu,

    2010-07-01

    The dispersion of powders into liquids has become one of the most important techniques in high-tech industries and it is a common process in the formulation of various products, such as paint, ink, shampoo, beverages, and polishing media. In this study, an ultrasonic system with a cylindrical transducer is newly introduced for pure nanoparticle dispersion. The acoustics pressure field and the characteristics of the shock pulse caused by cavitation are investigated. The frequency spectrum of the pulse from the collapse of air bubbles in the cavitation is analyzed theoretically. It was confirmed that a TiO2 water suspension can be dispersed effectively using the suggested system.

  12. Design of a Slender Tuned Ultrasonic Needle for Bone Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Rebecca; Mathieson, Andrew; Wallace, Robert; Simpson, Hamish; Lucas, Margaret

    This paper reports on an ultrasonic bone biopsy needle, particularly focusing on design guidelines applicable for any slender tuned ultrasonic device component. Ultrasonic surgical devices are routinely used to cut a range of biological tissues, such as bone. However the realisation of an ultrasonic bone biopsy needle is particularly challenging. This is due to the requirement to generate sufficient vibrational amplitude capable of penetrating mineralised tissue, while avoiding flexural vibrational responses, which are known to reduce the performance and reliability of slender ultrasonic devices. This investigation uses finite element analysis (FEA) to predict the vibrational behaviour of a resonant needle which has dimensions that match closely to an 8Gx4inch bone marrow biopsy needle. Features of the needle, including changes in material and repeated changes in diameter, have been included and systematically altered to demonstrate that the location of and geometry of these features can significantly affect the resonant frequency of bending and torsional modes of vibration while having a limited effect on the frequency and shape of the tuned longitudinal mode. Experimental modal analysis was used to identify the modal parameters of the selected needle design, validating the FEA model predictions of the longitudinal mode and the close flexural modes. This verifies that modal coupling can be avoided by judicious small geometry modifications. Finally, the tuned needle assembly was driven under typical operational excitation conditions to demonstrate that an ultrasonic biopsy needle can be designed to operate in a purely longitudinal motion.

  13. Effect of ultrasonic vibration on freezing of supercooled water

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Takaaki; Zhang, Xu; Yabe, Akira; Tanaka, Makoto; Kozawa, Yoshiyuki

    1999-07-01

    A method to actively control the supercooling of water is one of the critical issues for cold-energy storage systems utilizing ice slurry. The authors experimentally studied the use of ultrasonic water to ice. Figure A-1 shows a schematic of the experimental apparatus. A heat transfer plate made of copper was immersed in water and cooled by coolant from its upper side. The authors measured the maximum degree of supercooling in the absence of ultrasonic vibration (Exp. 1), and they examined the tendency for the supercooled water to freeze on the heat transfer surface when ultrasonic vibration was applied to the water (Exp. 2). Figure A-2 shows the probability of the freezing for pure water as a function of the degree of supercooling. A{sub e} represents the rate of surface erosion on an aluminum film attached to the heat transfer surface, which is an index of the cavitation intensity. Comparing the results of Exp. 1 and Exp. 2 shows that ultrasonic vibration is effective for promoting freezing. The results of Exp. 2 indicate that the probability of freezing on the heat transfer surface exposed to ultrasonic vibration increased as the surface erosion increased. Furthermore, the authors found that ultrasonic vibration is effective not only for controlling the freezing temperature but also for making ice slurry.

  14. Porous silicon nanoparticles as sensitizers for ultrasonic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Sviridov, A. P. Andreev, V. G.; Ivanova, E. M.; Osminkina, L. A.; Tamarov, K. P.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2013-11-04

    Aqueous suspensions of porous silicon nanoparticles (NPs) with average size ∼100 nm and concentration ∼1 g/L undergo significant heating as compared with pure water under therapeutic ultrasonic (US) irradiation with frequencies of 1–2.5 MHz and intensities of 1–20 W/cm{sup 2}. This effect is explained by taking into account the efficient absorption of US energy by NPs. The observed US-induced heating of biodegradable NPs is promising for applications in ultrasonic hyperthermia of tumors.

  15. Old World frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narins, Peter M.; Feng, Albert S.; Lin, Wenyu; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich; Denzinger, Annette; Suthers, Roderick A.; Xu, Chunhe

    2004-02-01

    Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication. In contrast, frogs and birds produce sounds during night- and day-time hours that are audible to humans; their sounds are so pervasive that together with those of insects, they are considered the primary sounds of nature. Here we show that an Old World frog (Amolops tormotus) and an oscine songbird (Abroscopus albogularis) living near noisy streams reliably produce acoustic signals that contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics. Our findings provide the first evidence that anurans and passerines are capable of generating tonal ultrasonic call components and should stimulate the quest for additional ultrasonic species.

  16. Pure right ventricular infarction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Katsuji; Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Hideo; Koyama, Yasushi; Nishimura, Kazuhisa; Ito, Taketoshi

    2002-02-01

    A 76-year-old man with chest pain was admitted to hospital where electrocardiography (ECG) showed ST-segment elevation in leads V1-4, indicative of acute anterior myocardial infarction. ST-segment elevation was also present in the right precordial leads V4R-6R. Emergency coronary angiography revealed that the left coronary artery was dominant and did not have significant stenosis. Aortography showed ostial occlusion of the right coronary artery (RCA). Left ventriculography showed normal function and right ventriculography showed a dilated right ventricle and severe hypokinesis of the right ventricular free wall. Conservative treatment was selected because the patient's symptoms soon ameliorated and his hemodynamics was stable. 99mTc-pyrophosphate and 201Tl dual single-photon emission computed tomography showed uptake of 99mTc-pyrophosphate in only the right ventricular free wall, but no uptake of 99mTc-pyrophosphate and no perfusion defect of 201Tl in the left ventricle. The peak creatine kinase (CK) and CK-MB were 1,381 IU/L and 127 IU/L, respectively. His natural course was favorable and the chest pain disappeared under medication. Two months after the onset, the ECG showed poor R progression in leads V1-4 indicating an old anterior infarction. Coronary angiography confirmed the ostial stenosis of the hypoplastic RCA. This was a case of pure right ventricular free wall infarction because of the occlusion of the ostium of the hypoplastic RCA, but not of the right ventricular branch. Because the electrocardiographic findings resemble those of an acute anterior infarction, it is important to consider pure right ventricular infarction in the differential diagnosis.

  17. Ultrasonic Inspection Of Thick Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friant, C. L.; Djordjevic, B. B.; O'Keefe, C. V.; Ferrell, W.; Klutz, T.

    1993-01-01

    Ultrasonics used to inspect large, relatively thick vessels for hidden defects. Report based on experiments in through-the-thickness transmission of ultrasonic waves in both steel and filament-wound composite cases of solid-fuel rocket motors.

  18. Ultrasonics in Dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walmsley, A. D.

    Ultrasonic instruments have been used in dentistry since the 1950's. Initially they were used to cut teeth but very quickly they became established as an ultrasonic scaler which was used to remove deposits from the hard tissues of the tooth. This enabled the soft tissues around the tooth to return to health. The ultrasonic vibrations are generated in a thin metal probe and it is the working tip that is the active component of the instrument. Scanning laser vibrometry has shown that there is much variability in their movement which is related to the shape and cross sectional shape of the probe. The working instrument will also generate cavitation and microstreaming in the associated cooling water. This can be mapped out along the length of the instrument indicating which are the active areas. Ultrasonics has also found use for cleaning often inaccessible or different surfaces including root canal treatment and dental titanium implants. The use of ultrasonics to cut bone during different surgical techniques shows considerable promise. More research is indicated to determine how to maximize the efficiency of such instruments so that they are more clinically effective.

  19. Schlieren visualization of ultrasonic standing waves in mm-sized chambers for ultrasonic particle manipulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background For the design and characterization of ultrasonic particle manipulation devices the pressure field in the fluid cavity is of great interest. The schlieren method provides an optical tool for the visualization of such pressure fields. Due to its purely optical nature this experimental method has got some unique advantages compared to methods like particle tracking. Results A vertical schlieren setup and an investigation with the same of a mm-sized chamber used to agglomerate particles are presented here. The schlieren images show a two-dimensional representation of the whole pressure distribution recorded simultaneously with a good resolution in time. The gained description of the pressure field is shown to be in agreement with a numerical simulation. Thermal effects as well as streaming effects are shown. Conclusions The results show the great potential of schlieren visualization to investigate ultrasonic particle manipulation devices. Visualized are pressure fields, acoustic streaming, temperature effects and effects caused by fluid volumes of different density. PMID:23842114

  20. Torsional ultrasonic wave based level measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Holcomb, David E [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN

    2012-07-10

    A level measurement system suitable for use in a high temperature and pressure environment to measure the level of coolant fluid within the environment, the system including a volume of coolant fluid located in a coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment and having a level therein; an ultrasonic waveguide blade that is positioned within the desired coolant region of the high temperature and pressure environment; a magnetostrictive electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment and configured to operate in the environment and cooperate with the waveguide blade to launch and receive ultrasonic waves; and an external signal processing system located outside of the high temperature and pressure environment and configured for communicating with the electrical assembly located within the high temperature and pressure environment.

  1. Artificial Intelligence Assists Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Lloyd A.; Willenberg, James D.

    1992-01-01

    Subtle indications of flaws extracted from ultrasonic waveforms. Ultrasonic-inspection system uses artificial intelligence to help in identification of hidden flaws in electron-beam-welded castings. System involves application of flaw-classification logic to analysis of ultrasonic waveforms.

  2. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    DOEpatents

    Poindexter, Allan M.; Ricks, Herbert E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and or wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities.

  3. Controlled ultrasonic micro-dissection of thin tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Ru, Changhai; Liu, Jun; Pang, Ming; Sun, Yu

    2014-08-01

    In order to obtain sufficient quantities of pure populations of cells or a single cell from surrounding tissue for analytical investigation, we have developed an ultrasonic microdissection system. The system utilizes a vision-based method for detecting the contact between the microdissection needle tip and a target surface. A multilayer stack piezoelectric actuator is employed to generate ultrasonic vibrations for histological isolation. Automated micro-dissection is also realized using visual feedback and vision-based control. Experimental results on tumor tissue sections show that the system has a high dissection accuracy and efficiency and is able to realize dissecting arbitrary shapes in specified locations on a tissue sample. Furthermore, effects in variations of vibration amplitude and frequency of ultrasonic micro-dissection as well as needle insertion depths on micro-dissection accuracy and speed were evaluated.

  4. Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Doug; Leggett, Jim

    2013-07-29

    The Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager project has a goal to develop a wireline ultrasonic imager that is capable of operating in temperatures up to 300°C (572°F) and depths up to 10 km (32,808 ft). This will address one of the critical needs in any EGS development of understanding the hydraulic flow paths in the reservoir. The ultrasonic imaging is well known in the oil and gas industry as one of the best methods for fracture evaluation; providing both high resolution and complete azimuthal coverage of the borehole. This enables fracture detection and characterization, both natural and induced, providing information as to their location, dip direction and dip magnitude. All of these factors are critical to fully understand the fracture system to enable the optimization of the thermal drainage through injectors and producers in a geothermal resource.

  5. Ultrasonic nondestructive materials characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of ultrasonic wave propagation in solid materials is presented with consideration of the altered behavior in anisotropic and nonlinear elastic materials in comparison with isotropic and linear elastic materials. Some experimental results are described in which ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements give insight into materials microstructure and associated mechanical properties. Recent developments with laser beam non-contact generation and detection of ultrasound are presented. The results of several years of experimental measurements using high-power ultrasound are discussed, which provide substantial evidence of the inability of presently accepted theories to fully explain the interaction of ultrasound with solid materials. Finally, a special synchrotron X-ray topographic system is described which affords the possibility of observing direct interaction of ultrasonic waves with the microstructural features of real crystalline solid materials for the first time.

  6. Ultrasonic vehicle rangefinder

    SciTech Connect

    Obayashi, H.; Kobayashi, H.; Takeuchi, K.

    1987-06-30

    An ultrasonic rangefinder is described comprising: an oscillator for intermittently generating high frequency signals; a transmitter microphone for emitting an ultrasonic pulse toward a target object when the high frequency signals are received from the oscillator; a receiver microphone for receiving an ultrasonic pulse reflected from the target object; means for measuring the time difference between transmitted and received pulses; means for detecting attenuation vibrations generated in the transmitter microphone after the high frequency signals have been input into the transmitter microphone; means for distinguishing between a malfunction in the rangefinder on a transmission side or a reception side based on the output from the detecting means; the detecting means comprising a switching means for disconnecting the oscillator from the distinguishing means when high frequency signals from the oscillator are input into transmitter microphone.

  7. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  8. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  9. Acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1990-01-01

    The theoretical development, methodology, and potential applications of acousto-ultrasonic nondestructive testing are set forth in an overview to assess the effectiveness of the technique. Stochastic wave propagation is utilized to isolate and describe defects in fiber-reinforced composites, particularly emphasizing the integrated effects of diffuse populations of subcritical flaws. The generation and nature of acousto-ultrasonic signals are described in detail, and stress-wave factor analysis of the signals is discussed. Applications of acousto-ultrasonics are listed including the prediction of failure sites, assessing fatique and impact damage, calculating ultimate tensile strength, and determining interlaminar bond strength. The method can identify subtle but important variations in fiber-reinforced composites, and development of the related instrumentation technology is emphasized.

  10. Ultrasonic/Sonic Jackhammer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Sherrit, Stewart (Inventor); Herz, Jack L. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides a novel jackhammer that utilizes ultrasonic and/or sonic vibrations as source of power. It is easy to operate and does not require extensive training, requiring substantially less physical capabilities from the user and thereby increasing the pool of potential operators. An important safety benefit is that it does not fracture resilient or compliant materials such as cable channels and conduits, tubing, plumbing, cabling and other embedded fixtures that may be encountered along the impact path. While the ultrasonic/sonic jackhammer of the invention is able to cut concrete and asphalt, it generates little back-propagated shocks or vibrations onto the mounting fixture, and can be operated from an automatic platform or robotic system. PNEUMATICS; ULTRASONICS; IMPACTORS; DRILLING; HAMMERS BRITTLE MATERIALS; DRILL BITS; PROTOTYPES; VIBRATION

  11. Laser Communication--An Ideal Student Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, W. P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a project on the application of the laser which aims to stimulate the interest of undergraduate students in applied physics and to demonstrate the interaction between light and ultrasonic waves by building a simple laser communication system. (SK)

  12. Ultrasonic encapsulation - A review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Thomas S H; Martin, Gregory J O; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2017-03-01

    Encapsulation of materials in particles dispersed in water has many applications in nutritional foods, imaging, energy production and therapeutic/diagnostic medicine. Ultrasonic technology has been proven effective at creating encapsulating particles and droplets with specific physical and functional properties. Examples include highly stable emulsions, functional polymeric particles with environmental sensitivity, and microspheres for encapsulating drugs for targeted delivery. This article provides an overview of the primary mechanisms arising from ultrasonics responsible for the formation of these materials, highlighting examples that show promise particularly in the development of foods and bioproducts.

  13. Ultrasonic shear wave couplant

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Lanham, Ronald N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultrasonically testing of an article at high temperatures is accomplished by the use of a compact layer of a dry ceramic powder as a couplant in a method which involves providing an ultrasonic transducer as a probe capable of transmitting shear waves, coupling the probe to the article through a thin compact layer of a dry ceramic powder, propagating a shear wave from the probe through the ceramic powder and into the article to develop echo signals, and analyzing the echo signals to determine at least one physical characteristic of the article.

  14. Ultrasonic/Sonic Jackhammer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart; Herz, Jack

    2005-01-01

    An ultrasonic/sonic jackhammer (USJ) is the latest in a series of related devices. Each of these devices cuts into a brittle material by means of hammering and chiseling actions of a tool bit excited with a combination of ultrasonic and sonic vibrations. A small-scale prototype of the USJ has been demonstrated. A fully developed, full-scale version of the USJ would be used for cutting through concrete, rocks, hard asphalt, and other materials to which conventional pneumatic jackhammers are applied, but the USJ would offer several advantages over conventional pneumatic jackhammers.

  15. Ultrasonic Processing of Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, Thomas T.; Han, Qingyou; Jian, Xiaogang; Xu, Hanbing

    2005-06-30

    The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of a new breakthrough technology, ultrasonic processing, on various industries, including steel, aluminum, metal casting, and forging. The specific goals of the project were to evaluate core principles and establish quantitative bases for the ultrasonc processing of materials, and to demonstrate key applications in the areas of grain refinement of alloys during solidification and degassing of alloy melts. This study focussed on two classes of materials - aluminum alloys and steels - and demonstrated the application of ultrasonic processing during ingot casting.

  16. Nonlinear explanation for bone-conducted ultrasonic hearing.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Kiyoshi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Tonoike, Mitsuo

    2005-06-01

    Human listeners can perceive speech from a voice-modulated ultrasonic carrier presented via a bone-conduction stimulator. This study explored the psychoacoustic characteristics and underlying mechanisms of ultrasonic hearing by measuring difference limens for frequency (DLF) for pure tones modulated onto ultrasonic carriers. Human subjects were presented with two pulsed tones and asked to judge whether the first or the second had the higher pitch. When amplitude modulation was based on a double side-band transmitted carrier, the DLFs were as small as those from the air-conducted pure tones at 0.25-4 kHz. Ultrasounds yielded larger DLFs for tones with low (0.125 kHz) and high (6-8 kHz) frequencies. Results were essentially identical between the two types of carriers, sine wave (30 kHz) and bandpass noise (30+/-4 kHz), despite the different bandwidths in the ultrasonic range. When amplitude modulation was based on a double side-band suppressed carrier, DLFs corresponded to those from tones with double frequencies. These results suggest nonlinear conduction that demodulates audible signals from ultrasounds and provides inputs to the cochlea.

  17. Keeping consumers safe: food providers' perspectives on pureed food.

    PubMed

    Keller, Heather H; Duizer, Lisa M

    2014-01-01

    Twelve focus groups were conducted in five sites with 80 allied health providers to identify their perspectives on providing pureed food to consumers. Thematic care analysis was completed to summarize and interpret these data. Providers' greatest concern was keeping consumers safe, and the right texture was prioritized over sensory appeal and acceptance. Providers recognized that these foods impacted the quality of life of consumers and worked to rationalize these diets with residents/patients and their families. In addition, offering foods they knew to be poorly accepted affected their self-concept as providers. As a result of these challenges, they did whatever they could in the kitchen and tableside to promote intake of pureed foods. Those in the "food chain" of pureed food provision suggested several ways to further improve these products. Greater communication between those who assist consumers with eating and those who produce the pureed food they consume is needed to promote acceptable pureed products.

  18. Evolutionary robotics: emergence of communication.

    PubMed

    Lipson, Hod

    2007-05-01

    The emergence of communication is considered one of the major transitions in evolution. Recent work using robot-based simulation shows that communication arises spontaneously. While deceptive communication arises in a purely competitive setting, cooperative communication arises only subject to group or kin selection.

  19. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  20. Scanning ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Reimann, Karl J.

    1982-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic testing device for rapid and complete examination of the test specimen, and is particularly well suited for evaluation of tubular test geometries. A variety of defect categories may be detected and analyzed at one time and their positions accurately located in a single pass down the test specimen.

  1. Broadband Ultrasonic Transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    New geometry spreads out resonance region of piezoelectric crystal. In new transducer, crystal surfaces made nonparallel. One surface planar; other, concave. Geometry designed to produce nearly uniform response over a predetermined band of frequencies and to attenuate strongly frequencies outside band. Greater bandwidth improves accuracy of sonar and ultrasonic imaging equipment.

  2. Experiments with Ultrasonic Transducers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas R., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the use of 40 kHz ultrasonic transducers to study wave phenomena. Determines that the resulting wavelength of 9 mm allows acoustic experiments to be performed on a tabletop. Includes transducer characteristics and activities on speed of sound, reflection, double- and single-slit diffraction, standing waves, acoustical zone plate, and…

  3. Ultrasonic cleaning: Fundamental theory and application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, F. John

    1995-01-01

    This presentation describes: the theory of ultrasonics, cavitation and implosion; the importance and application of ultrasonics in precision cleaning; explanations of ultrasonic cleaning equipment options and their application; process parameters for ultrasonic cleaning; and proper operation of ultrasonic cleaning equipment to achieve maximum results.

  4. Large pure intracranial vagal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Costanzo, De Bonis; Carotenuto, Vincenzo; D'Angelo, Vincenzo

    2009-04-01

    We report a patient with a large, pure intracranial vagal schwannoma, compressing the medulla who presented with essential hypertension. Based on this and on previous cases, we suggest that a differentiation of pure intracranial schwannomas (subtype A1) from intracranial schwannomas with some extension in the jugular foramen (type A) should be used.

  5. Defense Mechanisms in "Pure" Anxiety and "Pure" Depressive Disorders.

    PubMed

    Colovic, Olga; Lecic Tosevski, Dusica; Perunicic Mladenovic, Ivana; Milosavljevic, Maja; Munjiza, Ana

    2016-10-01

    Our study was intended to test whether there are any differences in the way defense mechanisms are used by patients suffering from pure anxiety and those with pure depressive disorders. The sample size was as follows: depressive disorders without psychotic symptoms 30, anxiety disorders 30, and the healthy control group 30. The assessment of defense mechanisms was made using the DSQ-40 questionnaire. Our findings show that "pure" anxiety disorders differ from "pure" depressive disorders only in the use of immature defense mechanisms. The group with depressive disorders was significantly more prone to use immature defense mechanisms than the group with anxiety disorders (p = 0.005), primarily projection (p = 0.001) and devaluation (p = 0.003). These defense mechanisms may therefore be used both to differentiate between anxiety and depressive disorders and also to determine which symptoms (anxiety or depressive disorders) are dominant at any given stage of treatment.

  6. Introduction to ultrasonic motors

    SciTech Connect

    Sashida, Toshiiku; Kenjo, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    The ultrasonic motor, invented in 1980, utilizes the piezoelectric effect in the ultrasonic frequency range to provide the motive force. (In conventional electric motors the motive force is electromagnetic.) The result is a motor with unusually good low-speed high-torque and power-to-weight characteristics. It has already found applications in camera autofocus mechanisms, medical equipment subject to high magnetic fields, and motorized car accessories. Its applications will increase as designers become more familiar with its unique characteristics. This book is the result of a collaboration between the inventor and an expert in conventional electric motors: the result is an introduction to the general theory presented in a way that links it to conventional motor theory. It will be invaluable both to motor designers and to those who design with and use electric motors as an introduction to this important new invention.

  7. Ultrasonic thermometer isolation standoffs

    DOEpatents

    Arave, Alvin E.

    1977-01-01

    A method is provided for minimizing sticking of the transmission line to the protective sheath and preventing noise echoes from interfering with signal echoes in an improved high temperature ultrasonic thermometer which includes an ultrasonic transmission line surrounded by a protective sheath. Small isolation standoffs are mounted on the transmission line to minimize points of contact between the transmission line and the protective sheath, the isolation standoffs serving as discontinuities mounted on the transmission line at locations where a signal echo is desired or where an echo can be tolerated. Consequently any noise echo generated by the sticking of the standoff to the protective sheath only adds to the amplitude of the echo generated at the standoff and does not interfere with the other signal echoes.

  8. Fresnel lenses for ultrasonic inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammerer, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    Ultrasonic Fresnel lenses are effective focusing elements with potential applications in ultrasonic "contact" testing for defects in materials. Ultrasonic beams focused on concave lenses are used successfully with immersion transducers, for which test object is immersed in water bath. However, for large objects, objects that are already installed, objects on production lines, and objects that can be damaged by water, contact testing is more practical than immersion.

  9. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding system includes a welding head assembly having a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. During a welding operation, ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod as it rotates about its longitudinal axis. The ultrasonic pulses are applied in such a way that they propagate parallel to the longitudinal axis of the rod.

  10. Ultrasonic techniques for process monitoring and control.

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, H.-T.

    1999-03-24

    Ultrasonic techniques have been applied successfully to process monitoring and control for many industries, such as energy, medical, textile, oil, and material. It helps those industries in quality control, energy efficiency improving, waste reducing, and cost saving. This paper presents four ultrasonic systems, ultrasonic viscometer, on-loom, real-time ultrasonic imaging system, ultrasonic leak detection system, and ultrasonic solid concentration monitoring system, developed at Argonne National Laboratory in the past five years for various applications.

  11. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-05-09

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  12. Ultrasonic Clothes Drying Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Patel, Viral; Momen, Ayyoub

    2016-07-12

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers Ayyoub Momen and Viral Patel demonstrate a direct contact ultrasonic clothes dryer under development by ORNL in collaboration with General Electric (GE) Appliances. This novel approach uses high-frequency mechanical vibrations instead of heat to extract moisture as cold mist, dramatically reducing drying time and energy use. Funding for this project was competitively awarded by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in 2014.

  13. Ultrasonic differential measurement

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, George W.; Migliori, Albert

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for ultrasonic resonance testing of an object is shown and described. Acoustic vibrations are applied to an object at a plurality of frequencies. Measurements of the object's vibrational response are made simultaneously at different locations on said object. The input frequency is stepped by using small frequency changes over a predetermined range. There is a pause interval or ring delay which permits the object to reach a steady state resonance before a measurement is taken.

  14. Magnetic sensing via ultrasonic excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hisato; Takashima, Kazuya; Ikushima, Kenji; Toida, Hiraku; Sato, Michitaka; Ishizawa, Yoshiichi

    2013-04-01

    We present ultrasonic techniques for magnetic measurements. Acoustically modulated magnetization is investigated with sensitive rf detection by narrowband loop antennas. Magnetization on the surface of ferromagnetic metals is temporally modulated with the rf frequency of the irradiated ultrasonic waves, and the near-field components emitted from the focal point of the ultrasonic beam are detected. Based on the principle of the acoustically stimulated electromagnetic (ASEM) response, magnetic sensing and tomography are demonstrated by ultrasonic scanning. We show that ASEM imaging combines good acoustic resolution with magnetic contrast. The sensitivity of this method is estimated to be about 6 G/Hz1/2 in our current setup.

  15. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  16. Piezocomposites improve ultrasonic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    Ultrasonic testing is a nondestructive technique in which beams of high-frequency sound waves are introduced into materials for the detection of surface and subsurface flaws. Ultrasound probes--the devices that generate and receive acoustic energy--have historically been made of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) and similar piezoelectric ceramics. these materials have the capability to convert an electrical signal into acoustic energy (sound waves) to be transmitted into a part. The piezoelectric ceramic then converts the returning echoes into an electrical signal, which is evaluated by an electronic instrument similar to an oscilloscope. Although conventional transducers based on piezoelectric ceramics provide adequate performance, newly undeveloped piezocomposite transducers enable ultrasonic nondestructive testing devices to detect flaws with greater sensitivity than possible before. These are mixtures of conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers such as epoxy, polyurethane, and silicone rubber. A typical piezocomposite consists of an array of ceramic rods in a polymer matrix. This article explains the basics of ultrasonic testing, describes the advantages of the composite detector material, and shows how it is applied to detect flaws.

  17. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Kenneth V.; Cunningham, Jr., Robert A.; Murrin, Horace T.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  18. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Murrin, H.T.

    1981-05-29

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  19. Pure autonomic failure without synucleinopathy.

    PubMed

    Isonaka, Risa; Holmes, Courtney; Cook, Glen A; Sullivan, Patti; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Goldstein, David S

    2017-04-01

    Pure autonomic failure is a rare form of chronic autonomic failure manifesting with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension and evidence of sympathetic noradrenergic denervation unaccompanied by signs of central neurodegeneration. It has been proposed that pure autonomic failure is a Lewy body disease characterized by intra-neuronal deposition of the protein alpha-synuclein in Lewy bodies and neurites. A middle-aged man with previously diagnosed pure autonomic failure experienced a sudden, fatal cardiac arrest. He was autopsied, and tissues were harvested for neurochemical and immunofluorescence studies. Post-mortem microscopic neuropathology showed no Lewy bodies, Lewy neurites, or alpha-synuclein deposition by immunohistochemistry anywhere in the brain. The patient had markedly decreased immunofluorescent tyrosine hydroxylase in sympathetic ganglion tissue without detectable alpha-synuclein even in rare residual nests of tyrosine hydroxylase-containing ganglionic fibers. In pure autonomic failure, sympathetic noradrenergic denervation can occur without concurrent Lewy bodies or alpha-synuclein deposition in the brain or sympathetic ganglion tissue.

  20. Starch nanoparticles formation via high power ultrasonication.

    PubMed

    Bel Haaj, Sihem; Magnin, Albert; Pétrier, Christian; Boufi, Sami

    2013-02-15

    Nano-sized starch particles (NSP) were prepared from starch granules using a purely physical method of high-intensity ultrasonication. Particle size distribution, Field Effect Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Raman spectroscopy, and Wide-Angle X-ray Diffraction (WAXD) were used to characterize the morphology and crystal structure of the ensuing nanoparticles. The results revealed that ultrasound treatment of the starch suspension in water and at low temperature for 75 min results in the formation of starch nanoparticles between 30 and 100 nm in size. An attempt to explain the generation of starch nanoparticles was made on the basis of WAXD, Raman analysis and FE-SEM observation. Compared to acid hydrolysis, which is the most commonly adopted process, the present approach has the advantage of being quite rapid, presenting a higher yield and not requiring any chemical treatment.

  1. Ultrasonic-promoted rapid TLP bonding of fine-grained 7034 high strength aluminum alloys.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weibing; Leng, Xuesong; Luan, Tianmin; Yan, Jiuchun; He, Jingshan

    2017-05-01

    High strength aluminum alloys are extremely sensitive to the thermal cycle of welding. An ultrasonic-promoted rapid TLP bonding with an interlayer of pure Zn was developed to join fine-grained 7034 aluminum alloys at the temperature of lower 400°C. The oxide film could be successfully removed with the ultrasonic vibration, and the Al-Zn eutectic liquid phase generated once Al and Zn contacted with each other. Longer ultrasonic time can promote the diffusion of Zn into the base metal, which would shorten the holding time to complete isothermal solidification. The joints with the full solid solution of α-Al can be realized with the ultrasonic action time of 60s and holding time of only 3min at 400°C, and the shear strength of joints could reach 223MPa. The joint formation mechanism and effects of ultrasounds were discussed in details.

  2. Ultrasonic Bonding to Metalized Plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.; Cruzan, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    New technique makes it possible to bond wires ultrasonically to conductor patterns on such soft substrates as plain or ceramic-filled polytetrafluoroethylene. With ultrasonic bonding, unpackaged chips attached to soft circuit boards. Preferred because chips require substrate area and better matched electrically to circuit board at high frequencies.

  3. Acousto-ultrasonics - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    The application possibilities and limitations of acoustoultrasonics are reviewed. One of the most useful aspects of acousto-ultrasonics is its ability to assess degradation and damage states in composites. The sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic approach for detecting and measuring subtle but significant material property variations in composites has been demonstrated.

  4. Ultrasonic absortion in fatigued materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugan, S.; Arnold, W.

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive detection of fatigue damage, allowing an estimate of the residual life-time of components, could contribute to a safe and reliable operation of components and installations. Ultrasonic absorption, i.e. the internal friction, of a material increases with increasing fatigue or creep damage and there are many theories trying to explain the physics behind this phenomenon. Measurement of ultrasonic absorption directly on components could provide information on the degree of damage. A laser ultrasonic method, using laser-generated pulses and optical detection, was applied to study ultrasonic absorption in fatigue specimens of different metals. A characteristic behavior of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient with increasing levels of fatigue damage was found for the titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V. Another aim of this study was to relate the absorption mechanisms to the behavior of ultrasonic absorption observed in metals with complex microstructure. To achieve this, different ultrasonic absorption mechanisms were analyzed with respect to experimental data. A thermoelastic effect related to the size and elasticity of the microstructure is discussed as the origin of the increased ultrasonic absorption.

  5. Ultrasonic dyeing of cellulose nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Muzamil; Ahmed, Farooq; Jatoi, Abdul Wahab; Mahar, Rasool Bux; Khatri, Zeeshan; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-07-01

    Textile dyeing assisted by ultrasonic energy has attained a greater interest in recent years. We report ultrasonic dyeing of nanofibers for the very first time. We chose cellulose nanofibers and dyed with two reactive dyes, CI reactive black 5 and CI reactive red 195. The cellulose nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning of cellulose acetate (CA) followed by deacetylation. The FTIR results confirmed complete conversion of CA into cellulose nanofibers. Dyeing parameters optimized were dyeing temperature, dyeing time and dye concentrations for each class of the dye used. Results revealed that the ultrasonic dyeing produced higher color yield (K/S values) than the conventional dyeing. The color fastness test results depicted good dye fixation. SEM analysis evidenced that ultrasonic energy during dyeing do not affect surface morphology of nanofibers. The results conclude successful dyeing of cellulose nanofibers using ultrasonic energy with better color yield and color fastness results than conventional dyeing.

  6. Ultrasonic Force Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Oleg; Briggs, Andrew

    Ultrasonic Force Microscopy, or UFM, allows combination of two apparently mutually exclusive requirements for the nanomechanical probe—high stiffness for the efficient indentation and high mechanical compliance that brings force sensitivity. Somewhat inventively, UFM allows to combine these two virtues in the same cantilever by using indention of the sample at high frequency, when cantilever is very rigid, but detecting the result of this indention at much lower frequency. That is made possible due to the extreme nonlinearity of the nanoscale tip-surface junction force-distance dependence, that acts as "mechanical diode" detecting ultrasound in AFM. After introducing UFM principles, we discuss features of experimental UFM implementation, and the theory of contrast in this mode, progressing to quantitative measurements of contact stiffness. A variety of UFM applications ranging from semiconductor quantum nanostructures, graphene, very large scale integrated circuits, and reinforced ceramics to polymer composites and biological materials is presented via comprehensive imaging gallery accompanied by the guidance for the optimal UFM measurements of these materials. We also address effects of adhesion and topography on the elasticity imaging and the approaches for reducing artifacts connected with these effects. This is complemented by another extremely useful feature of UFM—ultrasound induced superlubricity that allows damage free imaging of materials ranging from stiff solid state devices and graphene to biological materials. Finally, we proceed to the exploration of time-resolved nanoscale phenomena using nonlinear mixing of multiple vibration frequencies in ultrasonic AFM—Heterodyne Force Microscopy, or HFM, that also include mixing of ultrasonic vibration with other periodic physical excitations, eg. electrical, photothermal, etc. Significant section of the chapter analyzes the ability of UFM and HFM to detect subsurface mechanical inhomogeneities, as well as

  7. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOEpatents

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  8. Ultrasonic linear measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Scot H. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An ultrasonic linear measurement system uses the travel time of surface waves along the perimeter of a three-dimensional curvilinear body to determine the perimeter of the curvilinear body. The system can also be used piece-wise to measure distances along plane surfaces. The system can be used to measure perimeters where use of laser light, optical means or steel tape would be extremely difficult, time consuming or impossible. It can also be used to determine discontinuities in surfaces of known perimeter or dimension.

  9. Ultrasonics in food processing.

    PubMed

    Chandrapala, Jayani; Oliver, Christine; Kentish, Sandra; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, the physical and chemical effects of ultrasound in liquid and solid media have been extensively used in food processing applications. Harnessing the physical forces generated by ultrasound, in the absence and presence of cavitation, for specific food processing applications such as emulsification, filtration, tenderisation and functionality modification have been highlighted. While some applications, such as filtration and emulsification are "mature" industrial processes, other applications, such as functionality modification, are still in their early stages of development. However, various investigations discussed suggest that ultrasonic processing of food and dairy ingredients is a potential and viable technology that will be used by many food industries in the near future.

  10. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic... calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth....

  11. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4850 Ultrasonic scaler. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic... calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth....

  12. Female mice ultrasonically interact with males during courtship displays

    PubMed Central

    Neunuebel, Joshua P; Taylor, Adam L; Arthur, Ben J; Egnor, SE Roian

    2015-01-01

    During courtship males attract females with elaborate behaviors. In mice, these displays include ultrasonic vocalizations. Ultrasonic courtship vocalizations were previously attributed to the courting male, despite evidence that both sexes produce virtually indistinguishable vocalizations. Because of this similarity, and the difficulty of assigning vocalizations to individuals, the vocal contribution of each individual during courtship is unknown. To address this question, we developed a microphone array system to localize vocalizations from socially interacting, individual adult mice. With this system, we show that female mice vocally interact with males during courtship. Males and females jointly increased their vocalization rates during chases. Furthermore, a female's participation in these vocal interactions may function as a signal that indicates a state of increased receptivity. Our results reveal a novel form of vocal communication during mouse courtship, and lay the groundwork for a mechanistic dissection of communication during social behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06203.001 PMID:26020291

  13. Ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Kevin R.; Malyarenko, Eugene V.; Hinders, Mark K.

    2002-12-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace structures using traditional methods is a complex, time-consuming process critical to maintaining mission readiness and flight safety. Limited access to corrosion-prone structure and the restricted applicability of available NDE techniques for the detection of hidden corrosion or other damage often compound the challenge. In this paper we discuss our recent work using ultrasonic Lamb wave tomography to address this pressing NDE technology need. Lamb waves are ultrasonic guided waves, which allow large sections of aircraft structures to be rapidly inspected for structural flaws such as disbonds, corrosion and delaminations. Because the velocity of Lamb waves depends on thickness, for example, the travel times of the fundamental Lamb modes can be converted into a thickness map of the inspection region. However, extracting quantitative information from Lamb wave data has always involved highly trained personnel with a detailed knowledge of mechanical waveguide physics. Our work focuses on tomographic reconstruction to produce quantitative maps that can be easily interpreted by technicians or fed directly into structural integrity and lifetime prediction codes. Laboratory measurements discussed here demonstrate that Lamb wave tomography using a square perimeter array of transducers with algebraic reconstruction tomography is appropriate for detecting flaws in aircraft materials. The speed and fidelity of the reconstruction algorithms as well as practical considerations for person-portable array-based systems are discussed in this paper.

  14. Studies in Ultrasonic Dosimetry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouni, Abderrachid

    The widespread use of ultrasonic devices in both industry and medicine confirms the great importance of ultrasound as a source of nonionizing radiation. The biological effects of this type of radiation are not completely known up to today, and the need for proper dosimetry is evident. Previous work in the field has been limited to the determination of ultrasonic energy deposition by attenuation measurements of traveling sound waves in homogenized specimens. Alternatively, observed effects were correlated to the output of the source. The objective of this work was to correlate the absorption properties of sound absorbing media to their elastic properties and deduce a correlation between the sonic absorption coefficient and the corresponding Young's modulus. Energy deposition measurements were performed in isotropic rubber samples and in anisotropic meat specimens by the use of the thermocouple probe method which measures the absorbed energy directly. Elasticity measurements were performed for the different types of materials used. The Young's modulus for each type was deduced from defletion measurements on rectangular strips when subjected to successive forces of varying magnitude. The final experimental results showed the existence of a linear relationship between the absorption coefficient of a given elastic material and the inverse square root of its Young's modulus.

  15. Ultrasonic Evaluation and Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Larche, Michael R.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Cinson, Anthony D.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic evaluation of materials for material characterization and flaw detection is as simple as manually moving a single-element probe across a speci-men and looking at an oscilloscope display in real time or as complex as automatically (under computer control) scanning a phased-array probe across a specimen and collecting encoded data for immediate or off-line data analyses. The reliability of the results in the second technique is greatly increased because of a higher density of measurements per scanned area and measurements that can be more precisely related to the specimen geometry. This chapter will briefly discuss applications of the collection of spatially encoded data and focus primarily on the off-line analyses in the form of data imaging. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been involved with as-sessing and advancing the reliability of inservice inspections of nuclear power plant components for over 35 years. Modern ultrasonic imaging techniques such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), phased-array (PA) technolo-gy and sound field mapping have undergone considerable improvements to effec-tively assess and better understand material constraints.

  16. Ultrasonics and space instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The design topic selected was an outgrowth of the experimental design work done in the Fluid Behavior in Space experiment, which relies on the measurement of minute changes of the pressure and temperature to obtain reasonably accurate volume determinations. An alternative method of volume determination is the use of ultrasonic imaging. An ultrasonic wave system is generated by wall mounted transducer arrays. The interior liquid configuration causes reflection and refraction of the pattern so that analysis of the received wave system provides a description of the configuration and hence volume. Both continuous and chirp probe beams were used in a laboratory experiment simulating a surface wetting propellant. The hardware included a simulated tank with gaseous voids, transmitting and receiving transducers, transmitters, receivers, computer interface, and computer. Analysis software was developed for image generation and interpretation of results. Space instrumentation was pursued in support of a number of experiments under development for GAS flights. The program included thirty undergraduate students pursuing major qualifying project work under the guidance of eight faculty supported by a teaching assistant. Both mechanical and electrical engineering students designed and built several microprocessor systems to measure parameters such as temperature, acceleration, pressure, velocity, and circulation in order to determine combustion products, vortex formation, gas entrainment, EMR emissions from thunderstorms, and milli-g-accelerations due to crew motions.

  17. Production of substantially pure fructose

    DOEpatents

    Hatcher, Herbert J.; Gallian, John J.; Leeper, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the production of substantially pure fructose from sucrose-containing substrates. The process comprises converting the sucrose to levan and glucose, purifying the levan by membrane technology, hydrolyzing the levan to form fructose monomers, and recovering the fructose.

  18. Generation and detection of incoherent phonons in picosecond ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Perrin, B; Péronne, E; Belliard, L

    2006-12-22

    In picosecond ultrasonics experiments the absorption of a femtosecond laser pulse in a thin metallic transducer is used to generate very short acoustic pulses. These pulses are made of coherent longitudinal waves with a frequency spectrum that can reach 100-200 GHz. The laser pulse absorption gives rise to a heating of the film of a few Kelvin within a typical time of 1 ps. Later on, the heat goes in the substrate through an interface thermal resistance and is diffused by thermal conduction. At very low temperature and in pure crystals the thermal phonons emitted by the heated metallic film can propagate ballistically over large distances and produce a so-called heat pulse. We report on the experimental evidence of the coexistence of the coherent acoustic pulse and the incoherent heat pulse generated and detected by laser ultrasonics.

  19. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Palmer, Joe; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Keller, Paul; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hual-Te; Kohse, Gordon; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Rempe, Joy

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  20. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2014-07-30

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  1. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Daw, Joshua; Tittmann, Bernhard; Reinhardt, Brian; Kohse, Gordon E.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert O.; Chien, Hual-Te; Villard, Jean-Francois; Palmer, Joe; Rempe, Joy

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2 (E> 0.1 MeV). The goal of this research is to characterize magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test will be an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers.

  2. Ultrasonic characterization of structural ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klima, S. J.; Baaklini, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements were used to characterize density and microstructure in monolithic silicon nitride and silicon carbide. Research samples of these structural ceramics exhibited a wide range of density and microstructural variations. It was shown that bulk density variations correlate with and can be estimated by velocity measurements. Variations in microstructural features such as grain size or shape and pore morphology had a minor effect on velocity. However, these features had a pronounced effect on ultrasonic attenuation. The ultrasonic results are supplemented by low-energy radiography and scanning laser acoustic microscopy.

  3. Pulsed ultrasonic stir welding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of performing ultrasonic stir welding uses a welding head assembly to include a plate and a rod passing through the plate. The rod is rotatable about a longitudinal axis thereof. In the method, the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis during a welding operation. During the welding operation, a series of on-off ultrasonic pulses are applied to the rod such that they propagate parallel to the rod's longitudinal axis. At least a pulse rate associated with the on-off ultrasonic pulses is controlled.

  4. Analytical ultrasonics for structural materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupperman, D. S.

    1986-01-01

    The application of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements to characterize the microstructure of structural materials is discussed. Velocity measurements in cast stainless steel are correlated with microstructural variations ranging from equiaxed (elastically isotropic) to columnar (elastically anisotropic) grain structure. The effect of the anisotropic grain structure on the deviation of ultrasonic waves in cast stainless steel is also reported. Field-implementable techniques for distinguishing equiaxed from columnar grain structures in cast strainless steel structural members are presented. The application of ultrasonic velocity measurements to characterize structural ceramics in the green state is also discussed.

  5. Computer automation of ultrasonic testing. [inspection of ultrasonic welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, B. G. W.; Kerlin, E. E.; Gardner, A. H.; Dunmyer, D.; Wells, T. G.; Robinson, A. R.; Kunselman, J. S.; Walker, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    Report describes a prototype computer-automated ultrasonic system developed for the inspection of weldments. This system can be operated in three modes: manual, automatic, and computer-controlled. In the computer-controlled mode, the system will automatically acquire, process, analyze, store, and display ultrasonic inspection data in real-time. Flaw size (in cross-section), location (depth), and type (porosity-like or crack-like) can be automatically discerned and displayed. The results and pertinent parameters are recorded.

  6. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yenn Chong, See; Sunuwar, Nitam; Park, Chan Yik

    2013-08-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite.

  7. Experimental determination of the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate by ultrasonic velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürbüz, H.; Özdemir, B.

    2003-05-01

    The metastable zone width of borax decahydrate (disodium tetraborate decahydrate), represented by the maximum undercooling Δ Tmax, both in pure and impure aqueous solutions were determined according to polythermal method by using the ultrasonic technique. It is found that the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate in pure solutions determined by ultrasonic method fulfills well the linear relation between logΔ Tmax and log(-d T/d t). However, the sensitivity of the method using the ultrasonic technique increases with increasing saturation temperature, probably due to the increase of temperature dependence of solubility with increasing saturation temperature. A comparison of the nucleation temperatures from ultrasonic measurements and from visual determination shows that both detection techniques give almost the same results for borax decahydrate. The results obtained from ultrasonic measurements show, that the presence of Ca 2+ as impurity has only a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax decahydrate as long as the impurity concentrations is in the range of 25-200 ppm. Similar to the effect of Ca 2+, Mg 2+ also has a small effect on the metastable zone width of borax up to the impurity concentration of 100 ppm. However, the presence of 200 ppm Mg 2+ results in a reasonable increase of the metastable zone width.

  8. Apparatus for ultrasonic nebulization

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Kenneth W.; Haas, Jr., William J.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1978-08-29

    An improved apparatus for ultrasonic nebulization of liquid samples or suspensions in which the piezoelectric transducer is protected from chemical attack and erosion. The transducer is protected by being bonded to the inner surface of a glass plate which forms one end wall of a first hollow body provided with apparatus for circulating a fluid for cooling and stabilizing the transducer. The glass plate, which is one-half wavelength in thickness to provide an acoustically coupled outer nebulizing surface, seals an opening in a second hollow body which encloses an aerosol mixing chamber. The second body includes apparatus for delivering the sample solution to the nebulizing surface, a gas inlet for providing a flow of carrier gas for transporting the aerosol of the nebulized sample and an aerosol outlet.

  9. High resolution ultrasonic densitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Dress, W.B.

    1983-01-01

    The velocity of torsional stress pulses in an ultrasonic waveguide of non-circular cross section is affected by the temperature and density of the surrounding medium. Measurement of the transit times of acoustic echoes from the ends of a sensor section are interpreted as level, density, and temperature of the fluid environment surrounding that section. This paper examines methods of making these measurements to obtain high resolution, temperature-corrected absolute and relative density and level determinations of the fluid. Possible applications include on-line process monitoring, a hand-held density probe for battery charge state indication, and precise inventory control for such diverse fluids as uranium salt solutions in accountability storage and gasoline in service station storage tanks.

  10. A practical ultrasonic plethysmograph.

    PubMed

    Wu, V C; Nickell, W T; Bhagat, P K

    1982-04-01

    An ultrasonic plethysmograph, which gives improved performance over the standard Whitney Strain Gauge, is described. This instrument monitors dimension changes in human limbs by measuring the transit times of acoustic pulses across two chords of the limb. In the case of a small uniform expansion, the percentage change in limb volume is shown to be proportional to twice the percentage change in either of the measured chords. Measurement of two chords allows correction for possible non-uniform expansion. In addition, measurement of two chords allows an estimate of the absolute cross-sectional area of the limb. The developed instrument incorporates a microprocessor, which performs necessary calculation and control functions. Use of the microprocessor allows the instrument to be self-calibrating. In addition, the device can be easily reprogrammed to incorporate improvements in operating features or computational schemes.

  11. Ultrasonic Frost Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Kazunari; Saiki, Kazushi; Sato, Hiroki; Ito, Takahiro

    2003-02-01

    The authors have observed the accumulation of frost on the surface of a rectangular aluminum alloy (duralumin) plate flexurally vibrating at approximately 37 kHz in an atmosphere of almost 100% relative humidity at 2°C. The plate surface, which had been prepolished with abrasive slurry for maintaining its average surface roughness of about 100 nm, was refrigerated at a temperature of -20°C with cold carbon-dioxide gas as coolant. Experiments have been conducted with and without fine silver oxide powder spread on the plate surface so as to examine the effect of artificial ice crystal nuclei. Ultrasonic vibrations with an amplitude of 3.4 μm (rms) are found to suppress frost accumulation by approximately 60%. The phenomenon cannot be ascribed directly to the heat generation caused by high-amplitude vibration, but may have a complex mechanical and/or acoustical effect on small ice crystals.

  12. [Ultrasonic diagnosis of ureterocele].

    PubMed

    Urenkov, S B; Roslov, A L

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasonic investigation has found many applications in routine urologic practices. The use of ultrasound for the investigation of 19 patients with ureterocele is reported. High diagnostic value, simplicity and noninvasiveness of echographic diagnosis of this congenital malformation of distal ureteral portions and related complications are pointed out. Its advantages over conventional means of ureterocele diagnosis, such as excretory urography and cystoscopy, are demonstrated, while their shortcomings are avoided. Echography is particularly effective in cases of impaired renal activity, doubled upper urinary tract and segmentary ureterohydronephrosis. Ultrasound makes it possible to choose the type of surgical intervention, and exclude angiography from the diagnostic complex in some cases. Follow-up echographic examination after surgery for ureterocele provides adequate information on treatment results.

  13. Ultrasonic Welding of Hybrid Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Guntram; Balle, Frank; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    A central research field of the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Kaiserslautern (WKK), Germany, is the realization of innovative hybrid joints by ultrasonic metal welding. This article gives an overview of suitable ultrasonic welding systems as well as of essential machine and material parameters, which influence the quality of the welds. Besides the ultrasonic welding of dissimilar metals such as Al to Cu or Al to steels, the welds between newly developed materials like aluminum foam sandwiches or flat flexible cables also can be realized. Moreover, the joining of glass and ceramic to sheet metals is a point of interest at the WKK. By using the ultrasonic metal welding process, it is possible to realize metal/glass welds with tensile shear strengths of 50 MPa. For metal/ceramic joints, the shear strengths values up to 150 MPa were measured. Finally, selected results about the occurring bonding mechanisms will be discussed.

  14. Ultrasonic Technology in Duress Alarms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Martha A.

    2000-01-01

    Provides the pros and cons of the most commonly used technologies in personal duress alarm systems in the school environment. Discussed are radio frequency devices, infrared systems, and ultrasonic technology. (GR)

  15. Ultrasonic Atomization Amount for Different Frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Keiji; Honma, Hiroyuki; Xu, Zheng; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2011-07-01

    The mass flow rate of ultrasonic atomization was estimated by measuring the vaporization amount from a bulk liquid with a fountain. The effects of ultrasonic frequency and intensity on the atomization characteristics were investigated when the directivities of the acoustic field from a transducer were almost the same. The sample was distillated water and the ultrasonic frequencies were 0.5, 1.0, and 2.4 MHz. The mass flow rate of ultrasonic atomization increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity and decreasing ultrasonic frequency. The fountain was formed at the liquid surface where the effective value of acoustic pressure was above atmospheric pressure. The fountain height was strongly governed by the acoustic pressure at the liquid surface of the transducer center. At the same ultrasonic intensity, the dependence of ultrasonic frequency on the number of atomized droplets was small. At the same apparent surface area of the fountain, the number of atomized droplets became larger as the ultrasonic frequency increased.

  16. Computer Automated Ultrasonic Inspection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-06

    Microcomputer CRT Cathode Ray Tube SBC Single Board Computer xiii 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 Background Standard ultrasonic inspection techniques used in industry...30 Microcomputer The heart of the bridge control microcomputer is an Intel single board computer using a high-speed 8085 HA-2 microprocessor chip ...subsystems (bridge, bridge drive electronics, bridge control microcomputer , ultrasonic unit, and master computer system), development of bridge control and

  17. Ultrasonic Imaging Of Deep Arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rooney, James A.; Heyser, Richard C.; Lecroissette, Dennis H.

    1990-01-01

    Swept-frequency sound replaces pulsed sound. Ultrasonic medical instrument produces images of peripheral and coronary arteries with resolutions higher and at depths greater than attainable by previous ultrasonic systems. Time-delay-spectrometry imager includes scanning, image-processing, and displaying equipment. It sweeps in frequency from 0 to 10 MHz in 20 ms, pauses for 5 ms, and repeats sweep. Intended for use in noninvasive detection and measurement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  18. The acousto-ultrasonic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1987-01-01

    The nature and underlying rationale of the acousto-ultrasonic approach is reviewed, needed advanced signal analysis and evaluation methods suggested, and application potentials discussed. Acousto-ultrasonics is an NDE technique combining aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. This approach uses analysis of simulated stress waves for detecting and mapping variations of mechanical properties. Unlike most NDE, acousto-ultrasonics is less concerned with flaw detection than with the assessment of the collective effects of various flaws and material anomalies. Acousto-ultrasonics has been applied chiefly to laminated and filament-wound fiber reinforced composites. It has been used to assess the significant strength and toughness reducing effects that can be wrought by combinations of essentially minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations. Acousto-ultrasonics assesses integrated defect states and the resultant variations in properties such as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and fracture resistance. Matrix cure state, porosity, fiber orientation, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix bonding, and interlaminar bond quality are underlying factors.

  19. High resolution ultrasonic spectroscopy system for nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. H.

    1991-01-01

    With increased demand for high resolution ultrasonic evaluation, computer based systems or work stations become essential. The ultrasonic spectroscopy method of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) was used to develop a high resolution ultrasonic inspection system supported by modern signal processing, pattern recognition, and neural network technologies. The basic system which was completed consists of a 386/20 MHz PC (IBM AT compatible), a pulser/receiver, a digital oscilloscope with serial and parallel communications to the computer, an immersion tank with motor control of X-Y axis movement, and the supporting software package, IUNDE, for interactive ultrasonic evaluation. Although the hardware components are commercially available, the software development is entirely original. By integrating signal processing, pattern recognition, maximum entropy spectral analysis, and artificial neural network functions into the system, many NDE tasks can be performed. The high resolution graphics capability provides visualization of complex NDE problems. The phase 3 efforts involve intensive marketing of the software package and collaborative work with industrial sectors.

  20. Synthesis of Enantiomerically Pure Anthracyclinones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achmatowicz, Osman; Szechner, Barbara

    The anthracycline antibiotics are among the most important clinical drugs used in the treatment of human cancer. The search for new agents with improved therapeutic efficacy and reduced cardiotoxicity stimulated considerable efforts in the synthesis of new analogues. Since the biological activity of anthracyclines depends on their natural absolute configuration, various strategies for the synthesis of enantiomerically pure anthracyclinones (aglycones) have been developed. They comprise: resolution of racemic intermediate, incorporation of a chiral fragment derived from natural and non-natural chiral pools, asymmetric synthesis with the use of a chiral auxiliary or a chiral reagent, and enantioselective catalysis. Synthetic advances towards enantiopure anthracyclinones reported over the last 17 years are reviewed.

  1. Toxicological evaluation of pure hydroxytyrosol.

    PubMed

    Auñon-Calles, David; Canut, Lourdes; Visioli, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Of all the phenolic constituents of olives and extra virgin olive oil, hydroxytyrosol is currently being actively exploited as a potential supplement or preservative to be employed in the nutraceutical, cosmeceutical, and food industry. In terms of safety profile, hydroxytyrosol has only been investigated as the predominant part of raw olive mill waste water extracts, due to the previous unavailability of appropriate quantities of the pure compound. We report the toxicological evaluation of hydroxytyrosol and, based on the results, propose a No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL) of 500mg/kg/d.

  2. Ultrasonic attenuation in molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Bernard

    1981-11-01

    It is now well established from an experimental point of view that, concerning the ultrasonic attenuation, molecular crystals exhibit a specific behavior among dielectric crystals. This fact suggests the presence of a relaxation process. Liebermann, who has introduced this field, has proposed a way to analyze this problem and in particular has given an expression for the ultrasonic absorption coefficient in terms of a relaxation time and some thermodynamic quantities. In contrast to Liebermann's approach, a solid-state viewpoint is presented here, and it is shown that this ultrasonic relaxation can be taken into account in the framework of Akhieser's theory. A general expression of the ultrasonic absorption coefficient is calculated in terms of the phonon collision operator using the Boltzmann-equation approach of Woodruff and Ehrenreich. The collision-time approximation widely used in dielectric crystals fails in molecular crystals for which the presence of slow relaxation times in the collision operator prevents the thermalization of the whole set of phonons and gives rise to an ultrasonic relaxation. Thus a more suitable approximation is suggested here, which leads to a new expression of the ultrasonic attenuation valid in molecular crystals. Different forms of this expression are discussed, and comparison with Liebermann's expression used in most of the previous papers shows that the present treatment takes better account of the anisotropy of the solid state. The fit of experimental results obtained for some ionic-molecular crystals also shows that the expression derived here gives better agreement than does Liebermann's. Finally, it is shown that in the framework of the present treatment and under rather general conditions, the anisotropy affects primarily the magnitude of the ultrasonic absorption due to the molecular relaxation, but it does not affect its frequency dependence.

  3. Pure dysarthria due to an insular infarction.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Saiko; Kamitsukasa, Ikuo

    2010-06-01

    Cortical infarction presenting with pure dysarthria is rarely reported. Previous studies have reported pure dysarthria due to cortical stroke at the precentral gyrus or middle frontal gyrus. We report a 72-year-old man who developed pure dysarthria caused by an acute cortical infarction in the insular cortex. The role of the insula in language has been difficult to assess clinically because of the rarity of pure insular strokes. Our patient showed pure dysarthria without aphasia, indicating that pure dysarthria can be the sole manifestation of insular infarctions.

  4. Photoacoustic imaging: consideration of bandwidth of ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi; Xing, Da; Wang, Yi; Gu, Huaiming; Yang, Diwu; Chen, Qun

    2005-04-01

    Photoacoustic tomography is a potential and noninvasive medical imaging technology. It combines the advantages of pure optic imaging and pure ultrasound imaging. Photoacoustic signals induced by a short pulse laser cover a wide spectral range. We have explored the frequency spectrum of absorbers with different sizes and the influence of photoacoustic signals with different spectral components on photoacoustic imaging. The simulations and experiments demonstrated that the major frequency ranges of photoacoustic pressures of absorbers with diameters of ~cm, ~mm and hundreds of mm are about 20kHz~300kHz, 70kHz~2.5MHz and 400kHz~20MHz, respectively. The low spectral components of photoacoustic signals contribute to the non-boundary region of absorbers, and the high spectral components contribute to small structures, especially, to boundaries. It suggests that the ultrasonic transducers used to detect photoacoustic pressures should be designed and selected according to the frequency ranges of absorbers.

  5. Ultrasonic metal etching for metallographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, S. G.

    1971-01-01

    Ultrasonic etching delineates microstructural features not discernible in specimens prepared for metallographic analysis by standard chemical etching procedures. Cavitation bubbles in ultrasonically excited water produce preferential damage /etching/ of metallurgical phases or grain boundaries, depending on hardness of metal specimens.

  6. Multiple pure tone noise prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Sharma, Anupam; Paliath, Umesh; Shieh, Chingwei

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a fully numerical method for predicting multiple pure tones, also known as “Buzzsaw” noise. It consists of three steps that account for noise source generation, nonlinear acoustic propagation with hard as well as lined walls inside the nacelle, and linear acoustic propagation outside the engine. Noise generation is modeled by steady, part-annulus computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. A linear superposition algorithm is used to construct full-annulus shock/pressure pattern just upstream of the fan from part-annulus CFD results. Nonlinear wave propagation is carried out inside the duct using a pseudo-two-dimensional solution of Burgers' equation. Scattering from nacelle lip as well as radiation to farfield is performed using the commercial solver ACTRAN/TM. The proposed prediction process is verified by comparing against full-annulus CFD simulations as well as against static engine test data for a typical high bypass ratio aircraft engine with hardwall as well as lined inlets. Comparisons are drawn against nacelle unsteady pressure transducer measurements at two axial locations as well as against near- and far-field microphone array measurements outside the duct. This is the first fully numerical approach (no experimental or empirical input is required) to predict multiple pure tone noise generation, in-duct propagation and far-field radiation. It uses measured blade coordinates to calculate MPT noise.

  7. Study of ultrasonic thermometry based on ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ruixi; Xiong, Qingyu; Wang, Lijie; Wang, Kai; Shen, Xuehua; Liang, Shan; Shi, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasonic thermometry is a kind of acoustic pyrometry and it has been evolving as a new temperature measurement technology for various environment. However, the accurate measurement of the ultrasonic time-of-flight is the key for ultrasonic thermometry. In this paper, we study the ultrasonic thermometry technique based on ultrasonic time-of-flight measurement with a pair of ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving signal. The ultrasonic transducers are installed in a single path which ultrasonic travels. In order to validate the performance of ultrasonic thermometry, we make a contrast about the absolute error between the measured temperature value and the practical one. With and without heater source, the experimental results indicate ultrasonic thermometry has high precision of temperature measurement.

  8. Separation characteristics of alcohol from aqueous solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Keiji; Mochida, Kyosuke; Asakura, Yoshiyuki; Koda, Shinobu

    2014-11-01

    The generation rate of ultrasonically atomized droplets and the alcohol concentration in droplets were estimated by measuring the flow rate and the alcohol concentration of vapors from a bulk solution with a fountain. The effect of the alcohol concentration in the bulk solution on the generation rate of droplets and the alcohol concentration in droplets were investigated. The ultrasonic frequency was 2.4MHz, and ethanol and methanol aqueous solutions were used as samples. The generation rate of droplets for ethanol was smaller than that for methanol at the same alcohol molar fraction in the bulk solution. For both solutions, at low alcohol concentration in the bulk solution, the alcohol concentration in droplets was lower than that in vapors and the atomized droplets were visible. On the other side, at high concentration, the concentration in droplets exceeded that in vapors and the atomized droplets became invisible. These results could be explained that the alcohol-rich clusters in the bulk solution were preferentially atomized by ultrasonic irradiation. The concentration in droplets for ethanol was higher than that for methanol at low alcohol concentration because the amount of alcohol-rich clusters was larger. When the alcohol molar fraction was greater than 0.6, the atomized droplets almost consisted of pure alcohol.

  9. Selective generation of ultrasonic Lamb waves by electromagnetic acoustic transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming-Liang; Deng, Ming-Xi; Gao, Guang-Jian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we describe a modal expansion approach for the analysis of the selective generation of ultrasonic Lamb waves by electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs). With the modal expansion approach for waveguide excitation, an analytical expression of the Lamb wave’s mode expansion coefficient is deduced, which is related to the driving frequency and the geometrical parameters of the EMAT’s meander coil, and lays a theoretical foundation for exactly analyzing the selective generation of Lamb waves with EMATs. The influences of the driving frequency on the mode expansion coefficient of ultrasonic Lamb waves are analyzed when the EMAT’s geometrical parameters are given. The numerical simulations and experimental examinations show that the ultrasonic Lamb wave modes can be effectively regulated (strengthened or restrained) by choosing an appropriate driving frequency of EMAT, with the geometrical parameters given. This result provides a theoretical and experimental basis for selectively generating a single and pure Lamb wave mode with EMATs. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474361 and 11274388).

  10. Ultrasonic propulsion of kidney stones

    PubMed Central

    May, Philip C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Ultrasonic propulsion is a novel technique that uses short bursts of focused ultrasonic pulses to reposition stones transcutaneously within the renal collecting system and ureter. The purpose of this review is to discuss the initial testing of effectiveness and safety, directions for refinement of technique and technology, and opinions on clinical application. Recent findings Preclinical studies with a range of probes, interfaces, and outputs have demonstrated feasibility and consistent safety of ultrasonic propulsion with room for increased outputs and refinement toward specific applications. Ultrasonic propulsion was used painlessly and without adverse events to reposition stones in 14 of 15 human study participants without restrictions on patient size, stone size, or stone location. The initial feasibility study showed applicability in a range of clinically relevant situations, including facilitating passage of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, moving a large stone at the UPJ with relief of pain, and differentiating large stones from a collection of small fragments. Summary Ultrasonic propulsion shows promise as an office-based system for transcutaneously repositioning kidney stones. Potential applications include facilitating expulsion of residual fragments following ureteroscopy or shock wave lithotripsy, repositioning stones prior to treatment, and repositioning obstructing UPJ stones into the kidney to alleviate acute renal colic. PMID:26845428

  11. Dermabrasion using an ultrasonic surgical aspirator.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Kondo, S; Sumiya, N; Yoshii, M; Otani, K; Wako, M

    1996-04-01

    We used an ultrasonic surgical aspirator on the epidermal surface to perform dermabrasion instead of the conventional motor-driven grinder. It was determined on histologic examination that it is possible to fragment the epidermis with greater selectively using the ultrasonic surgical aspirator. Abrasion also can be performed safely on spotty lesions and intricate, problematic regions with the ultrasonic surgical aspirator. We feel that the ultrasonic surgical aspirator is a promising device for use in dermabrasion.

  12. Ultrasonic stir welding process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An ultrasonic stir welding device provides a method and apparatus for elevating the temperature of a work piece utilizing at least one ultrasonic heater. Instead of relying on a rotating shoulder to provide heat to a workpiece an ultrasonic heater is utilized to provide ultrasonic energy to the workpiece. A rotating pin driven by a motor assembly performs the weld on the workpiece. A handheld version can be constructed as well as a fixedly mounted embodiment.

  13. Application and development of ultrasonics in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2013-11-01

    Since the 1950s, dentistry's ultrasonic instruments have developed rapidly. Because of better visualization, operative convenience, and precise cutting ability, ultrasonic instruments are widely and efficiently applied in the dental field. This article describes the development and improvement of ultrasonic instruments in several dental fields. Although some issues still need clarification, the results of previous studies indicate that ultrasonic instruments have a high potential to become convenient and efficient dental tools and deserve further development.

  14. High temperature pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Caines, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    A pressure coupled ultrasonic waveguide is provided to which one end may be attached a transducer and at the other end a high temperature material for continuous ultrasonic testing of the material. The ultrasonic signal is coupled from the waveguide into the material through a thin, dry copper foil.

  15. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, M.S.; Harris, R.V.

    1999-03-23

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  16. Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Harris, Robert V.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  17. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  18. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic transducer. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic transducer is a device applied to the skin to transmit and...

  19. Application of ultrasonic guided waves to the characterization of texture in metal sheets of cubic and hexagonal crystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yan.

    1990-10-08

    Ultrasonic techniques have recently been applied to the texture characterization in polycrystalline aggregates of hexagonal crystals. The basis of this application lies in the relations between the elastic constants {bar C}{sub ij} of the aggregates, which can be inferred from ultrasonic wave velocity measurements, and the orientation distribution coefficients. This communication present such relations for aggregates which possess orthotopic material symmetry and hexagonal crystal symmetry for Voigt, Reuss, and Hill averaging methods in a unified and concise representation.

  20. Combined rheological and ultrasonic study of alginate and pectin gels near the sol-gel transition.

    PubMed

    Audebrand, Michel; Kolb, Max; Axelos, Monique A V

    2006-10-01

    The sol-gel transition of biopolymer mixtures has been investigated by rheological and ultrasonic measurements. A scaling analysis of the data was performed for both types of measurements. A gel time was determined from rheology for the pure pectin samples, and the data could be fitted to a universal scaling form near the transition point. Its critical exponents are in good agreement with the predictions of scalar percolation theory. In addition, the ultrasonic signal of the pectin samples close to the transition was analyzed in terms of a high-frequency scaling approach for the attenuation and the velocity. For the alginate samples and the mixtures, for which the gel point cannot be determined reliably from rheology, the ultrasonic measurements were analyzed using the same scaling form as for the pectin sample, thus providing a method for estimating the gel point, even in the absence of rheological data.

  1. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-01

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20mol% ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  2. In situ x-ray diffraction measurements of the capillary fountain jet produced via ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Douguchi, Junya; Kumagai, Atsushi; Iijima, Takao; Tomida, Yukinobu; Miyamoto, Toshiaki; Matsuura, Kazuo

    2006-11-07

    In situ x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out for investigating the liquid structure in the ultrasonic fountain jet to consider the mechanism of the "ultrasonic ethanol separation" reported by Sato et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 114, 2382 (2001)]. For pure liquids (water and ethanol), it was found that the high frequency ultrasound does not affect the liquid structure microscopically. For the 20 mol % ethanol-water mixture, the estimated ethanol mole fraction in the ultrasonic fountain jet by using the position of the main maximum in the x-ray diffraction profile coincided with that in the reservoir. This result suggests that the ethanol separation is not caused by any distorted liquid structure under the ultrasound irradiation and occurs when or after the generation of the liquid droplet mist.

  3. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  4. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  5. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, Charles F.; Howard, Boyd D.

    1998-01-01

    A flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus, comprising a flexible, hollow shaft that carries a plurality of modules, including at least one rotatable ultrasonic transducer, a motor/gear unit, and a position/signal encoder. The modules are connected by flexible knuckle joints that allow each module of the apparatus to change its relative orientation with respect to a neighboring module, while the shaft protects electrical wiring from kinking or buckling while the apparatus moves around a tight corner. The apparatus is moved through a pipe by any suitable means, including a tether or drawstring attached to the nose or tail, differential hydraulic pressure, or a pipe pig. The rotational speed of the ultrasonic transducer and the forward velocity of the apparatus are coordinated so that the beam sweeps out the entire interior surface of the pipe, enabling the operator to accurately assess the condition of the pipe wall and determine whether or not leak-prone corrosion damage is present.

  6. 76 FR 69284 - Pure Magnesium From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Pure Magnesium From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject... order on pure magnesium from China would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence of material... USITC Publication 4274 (October 2011), entitled Pure Magnesium from China: Investigation No....

  7. Ultrasonic fluid densitometry and densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, M.S.; Lail, J.C.

    1998-01-13

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge having an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the fluid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the fluid. The invention also includes a wedge having at least two transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface. 6 figs.

  8. Ultrasonic fluid densitometry and densitometer

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.; Lail, Jason C.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge having an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the fluid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the fluid. The invention also includes a wedge having at least two transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

  9. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1987-12-15

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder is disclosed. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws. 5 figs.

  10. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, Donald W.; Johnson, John A.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    1987-01-01

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  11. Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system

    DOEpatents

    Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

    1985-09-04

    A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

  12. Improved Portable Ultrasonic Leak Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C.; Moerk, John S.; Haskell, William D.; Cox, Robert B.; Polk, Jimmy D.; Strobel, James P.; Luaces, Frank

    1995-01-01

    Improved portable ultrasonic leak detector features three interchangeable ultrasonic-transducer modules, each suited for operation in unique noncontact or contact mode. One module equipped with ultrasound-collecting horn for use in scanning to detect leaks from distance; horn provides directional sensitivity pattern with sensitivity multiplied by factor of about 6 in forward direction. Another module similar, does not include horn; this module used for scanning close to suspected leak, where proximity of leak more than offsets loss of sensitivity occasioned by lack of horn. Third module designed to be pressed against leaking vessel; includes rugged stainless-steel shell. Improved detectors perform significantly better, smaller, more rugged, and greater sensitivity.

  13. Ultrasonics: Fundamentals, Technologies, and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, Dale; Bond, Leonard J.

    2011-09-17

    This is a new edition of a bestselling industry reference. Discusses the science, technology, and applications of low and high power ultrasonics, including industrial implementations and medical uses. Reviews the basic equations of acoustics, starting from basic wave equations and their applications. New material on property determination, inspection of metals (NDT) and non-metals, imaging, process monitoring and control. Expanded discussion of transducers, transducer wave-fields, scattering, attenuation and measurement systems and models. New material that discusses high power ultrasonics - in particular using mechanical effects and sonochemistry, including applications to nano-materials. Examines diagnosis, therapy, and surgery from a technology and medical physics perspective.

  14. Ultrasonic investigation of the superconducting properties of the Nb-Mo system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    The superconducting properties of single crystals of Nb and two alloys of Nb with Mo were investigated by ultrasonic techniques. The results of measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation and velocities as a function of temperature, Mo composition, crystallographic direction, and ultrasonic frequency are reported. The attenuation and small velocity changes associated with the superconductivity of the samples are shown to be dependent on the sample resistivity ratio which varied from 4.3 for Nb-9% Mo to 6500 for pure Nb. The ultrasonic attenuation data are analyzed in terms of the superconducting energy gap term of the BCS theory. A new model is proposed for the analysis of ultrasonic attenuation in pure superconductors with two partially decoupled energy bands. To analyze the attenuation in pure superconducting Nb, the existence of two energy gaps was assumed to be associated with the two partially decoupled energy bands. One of the gaps was found to have the normal BCS value of 3.4 and the other gap was found to have the anomalously large value of 10. No experimental evidence was found to suggest that the second energy gap had a different transition temperature. The interpretation of the results for the Nb-Mo alloys is shown to be complicated by the possible existence of a second superconducting phase in Nb-Mo alloys with a transition temperature of 0.35 of the transition temperature of the first phase. The elastic constants of Nb and Nb-Mo alloys are shown to be approximately independent of Mo composition to nine atomic percent Mo. These results do not agree with the current microscopic theory of transition temperature for the transition elements.

  15. Ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution by ultrasonic atomization and its proposed mechanism based on parametric decay instability of capillary wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2001-02-01

    We show the experimental data of selective ethanol separation from ethanol-water solution, using ultrasonic atomization. Pure ethanol could be obtained directly from a solution with several mol% ethanol-water solution at 10 °C. This result can be explained in terms of parametric decay instability of capillary wave, in which high localization and accumulation of acoustic energy occur, leading to ultrasonic atomization. That is, parametric decay instability condenses the energy of longitudinal waves in a highly localized surface area of the capillary wave, and causes ultrasonic atomization.

  16. Small-angle x-ray scattering measurement of a mist of ethanol nanodroplets: An approach to understanding ultrasonic separation of ethanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Yohko F.; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fukazu, Tetsuo; Abe, Fusatsugu; Wakisaka, Akihiro; Kobara, Hitomi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Kumagai, Atsushi; Katsuya, Yoshio; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2007-07-01

    Small-angle x-ray scattering measurements using a brilliant x-ray source revealed nanometer sized liquid droplets in a mist formed by ultrasonic atomization. Ultrasonic atomization of ethanol-water mixtures produced a combination of water-rich droplets of micrometer order and ethanol-rich droplets as small as 1nm, which is 10-3 times smaller than the predicted size. These sizes were also obtained for mists generated from the pure liquids. These results will help to clarify the mechanism of "ultrasonic ethanol separation," which has the potential to become an alternative to distillation.

  17. Small-angle x-ray scattering measurement of a mist of ethanol nanodroplets: an approach to understanding ultrasonic separation of ethanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Yano, Yohko F; Matsuura, Kazuo; Fukazu, Tetsuo; Abe, Fusatsugu; Wakisaka, Akihiro; Kobara, Hitomi; Kaneko, Kazuyuki; Kumagai, Atsushi; Katsuya, Yoshio; Tanaka, Masahiko

    2007-07-21

    Small-angle x-ray scattering measurements using a brilliant x-ray source revealed nanometer sized liquid droplets in a mist formed by ultrasonic atomization. Ultrasonic atomization of ethanol-water mixtures produced a combination of water-rich droplets of micrometer order and ethanol-rich droplets as small as 1 nm, which is 10(-3) times smaller than the predicted size. These sizes were also obtained for mists generated from the pure liquids. These results will help to clarify the mechanism of "ultrasonic ethanol separation," which has the potential to become an alternative to distillation.

  18. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  19. Materials analysis by ultrasonics: Metals, ceramics, composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properties, and dynamic response.

  20. Numerical simulation of the red blood cell aggregation and deformation behaviors in ultrasonic field.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojian; Huang, Biao; Wang, Guoyu; Fu, Xiaoying; Qiu, Sicong

    2016-08-16

    The objective of this paper is to propose an immersed boundary lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM) considering the ultrasonic effect to simulate red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and deformation in ultrasonic field. Numerical examples involving the typical streamline, normalized out-of-plane vorticity contours and vector fields in pure plasma under three different ultrasound intensities are presented. Meanwhile, the corresponding transient aggregation behavior of RBCs, with special emphasis on the detailed process of RBC deformation, is shown. The numerical results reveal that the ultrasound wave acted on the pure plasma can lead to recirculation flow, which contributes to the RBCs aggregation and deformation in microvessel. Furthermore, increasing the intensity of the ultrasound wave can significantly enhance the aggregation and deformation of the RBCs. And the formation of the RBCs aggregation leads to the fluctuated and dropped vorticity value of plasma in return.

  1. Wire Crimp Connectors Verification using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Perey, Daniel F.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp connections is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp connector and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which previously has been used to assess crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies (missing wire strands, incorrect wire gauge, incomplete wire insertion in connector) are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with pull-testing data) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying the technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented.

  2. Comparison of dislocation damping in aluminum-based metal-matrix composites with that in pure aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfenden, A.; Cook, L. S.

    The piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique was used at frequencies near 80 kHz and at temperatures in the range 300-1150 K to make measurements of mechanical damping, dynamic Young's modulus and strain amplitude on small specimens of pure aluminum and several metal matrix composites. The results permitted an elucidation of the dependence of damping level on strain amplitude and temperature. The study also permitted an examination of some aspects of the damping mechanisms, in particular dislocation damping.

  3. Cutting Head for Ultrasonic Lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, Earl D. (Inventor); Goodfriend, Roger (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup-shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduces breakage thereof.

  4. Improved ultrasonic biomedical measuring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Device for making measurements of organs in living specimens and recording movements of organs is described. System uses series of ultrasonic pulses beamed into body of animal and reflected echo pulses are picked up by transducers and recorded. Diagram of equipment required and method of application is included.

  5. Ultrasonic lithotripsy of bladder stones.

    PubMed

    Cetin, S; Ozgür, S; Yazicioğlu, A; Unsal, K; Ilker, Y

    1988-01-01

    In the second half of 1985, 15 patients with 25 bladder stones were treated with Lutzeyer's Ultrasonic Lithotriptor. Of the patients 13 underwent additional operations, mostly transurethral resection of the prostate. The average duration of lithotripsy was 30.5 minutes. Some difficulties were experienced especially when drilling hard stones and as a complication late urethral bleeding occurred in one patient.

  6. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  7. Ultrasonic-impact grinder system

    DOEpatents

    Calkins, N.C.

    1982-09-30

    The disclosure relates to an ultrasonic impact grinding apparatus utilizing a counterweight to set an unloaded friction free condition. An added weight is used to optimize feed rate in accordance with the material to be cut, tool size and the like.

  8. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  9. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

  10. Ultrasonic Evaluation of Fatigue Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, P.; Singher, L.; Notea, A.

    2004-02-01

    Despite the fact that most engineers and designers are aware of fatigue, many severe breakdowns of industrial plant and machinery still occur due to fatigue. In effect, it's been estimated that fatigue causes at least 80% of the failures in modern engineering components. From an operational point of view, the detection of fatigue damage, preferably at a very early stage, is a critically important consideration in order to prevent possible catastrophic equipment failure and associated losses. This paper describes the investigation involving the use of ultrasonic waves as a potential tool for early detection of fatigue damage. The parameters investigated were the ultrasonic wave velocities (longitudinal and transverse waves) and attenuation coefficient before fatigue damage and after progressive stages of fatigue. Although comparatively small uncertainties were observed, the feasibility of utilizing the velocity of ultrasonic waves as a fatigue monitor was barely substantiated within actual research conditions. However, careful measurements of the ultrasonic attenuation parameter had demonstrated its potential to provide an early assessment of damage during fatigue.

  11. Federal technology alert: Ultrasonic humidifiers

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    Humidifiers are used in buildings to maintain humidity levels to ensure quality and handling capabilities in manufacturing processes, to lower the transmission rate of disease-causing bacteria in hospitals, to reduce static electricity in manufacturing clean rooms and in computer rooms, and to provide higher levels of employee comfort in offices. Ultrasonic humidifiers generate a water mist without raising its temperature. An electronic oscillation is converted to a mechanical oscillation using a piezo disk immersed in a reservoir of mineral-free water. The mechanical oscillation is directed at the surface of the water, where at very high frequencies it creates a very fine mist of water droplets. This adiabatic process, which does not heat the supply water, reduces humidifier energy use by 90 to 93% compared with systems that do boil the water. Ultrasonic humidifiers have been demonstrated to be more efficient and to require less maintenance than competing humidifier technologies such as electrode canisters, quartz lamps, and indirect steam-to-steam. They do not require anticorrosive additives that affect the indoor air quality of buildings using direct steam humidifiers. There are two potential disadvantages of ultrasonic humidifiers. They must use mineral-free, deionized water or water treated with reverse osmosis. Treated water reduces maintenance costs because it eliminates calcium deposits, but increases other operating costs. Also, the cool mist from ultrasonic humidifiers absorbs energy from the supply air as it evaporates and provides a secondary cooling effect.

  12. Ultrasonic scanner for footprint identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derr, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    Scanner includes transducer, acoustical drive, acoustical receiver, X and Y position indicators, and cathode-ray tube. Transducer sends ultrasonic pulses into shoe sole or shoeprint. Reflected signals are picked up by acoustic receiver and fed to cathode-ray tube. Resulting display intensity is directly proportional to reflected signal magnitude.

  13. A Simulation Study to Explain the Variability of Ultrasonic Attenuation Measurement in RTM Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonné, Sébastien; Lhémery, Alain; Thévenot, Françoise

    2004-02-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation is strongly variable and possibly high in parts made of RTM (resin transfer molding) composite that often possess an irregular inner structure. To explain this, models of attenuation phenomena at different scales are used in an overall model of wave propagation: multiple scattering by fibers coupled with viscoelastic losses, viscoelastic losses in pure matrix layers, scattering by porosities and by irregular interface geometry. A statistical study with variable structural parameters successfully explains amplitude variability experimentally observed.

  14. Ultrasonic/Sonic Impacting Penetrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Chang, Zensheu; Sherrit, Stewart; Stark, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic/sonic impacting penetrators (USIPs) are recent additions to the series of apparatuses based on ultrasonic/sonic drill corers (USDCs). A USIP enables a rod probe to penetrate packed soil or another substance of similar consistency, without need to apply a large axial force that could result in buckling of the probe or in damage to some buried objects. USIPs were conceived for use in probing and analyzing soil to depths of tens of centimeters in the vicinity of buried barrels containing toxic waste, without causing rupture of the barrels. USIPs could also be used for other purposes, including, for example, searching for pipes, barrels, or other hard objects buried in soil; and detecting land mines. USDCs and other apparatuses based on USDCs have been described in numerous previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. The ones reported previously were designed, variously, for boring into, and/or acquiring samples of, rock or other hard, brittle materials of geological interest. To recapitulate: A USDC can be characterized as a lightweight, low-power, piezoelectrically driven jackhammer in which ultrasonic and sonic vibrations are generated and coupled to a tool bit. As shown in the figure, a basic USDC includes a piezoelectric stack, a backing and a horn connected to the stack, a free mass (free in the sense that it can slide axially a short distance between the horn and the shoulder of tool bit), and a tool bit, i.e., probe for USIP. The piezoelectric stack is driven at the resonance frequency of the stack/horn/backing assembly to create ultrasonic vibrations that are mechanically amplified by the horn. To prevent fracture during operation, the piezoelectric stack is held in compression by a bolt. The bouncing of the free mass between the horn and the tool bit at sonic frequencies generates hammering actions to the bit that are more effective for drilling than is the microhammering action of ultrasonic vibrations in ordinary ultrasonic drills. The hammering actions

  15. Studies to control biofilm formation by coupling ultrasonication of natural waters and anodization of titanium.

    PubMed

    Nithila, S D Ruth; Anandkumar, B; Vanithakumari, S C; George, R P; Mudali, U Kamachi; Dayal, R K

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the combined effect of ultrasonication of natural waters and anodization of titanium on microbial density and biofilm formation tendency on titanium surfaces. Application of 24 kHz, 400 W high power ultrasound through a 14 mm horn type SS (stainless steel) Sonicator with medium amplitude of 60% for 30 min brought about three order decrease in total bacterial density of laboratory tap water, cooling tower water and reservoir water and two order decrease in seawater. Studies on the effect of ultrasonication on dilute pure cultures of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria showed five order and three order decrease for Pseudomonas sp. and Flavobacterium sp. respectively and two order and less than one order decrease for Bacillus sp. and Micrococcus sp. respectively. Ultrasonication increased lag phase and reduced logarithmic population increase and specific growth rate of Gram-negative bacteria whereas for Gram-positive bacteria specific growth rate increased. Studies on the biofilm formation tendency of these ultrasonicated mediums on titanium surface showed one order reduction under all conditions. Detailed biofilm imaging by advanced microscopic techniques like AFM, SEM and epifluorescence microscopy clearly visualized the lysed/damaged cells and membrane perforations due to ultrasonication. Combination of ultrasonication and anodization brought about maximum decrease in bacterial density and biofilm formation with greater than two order decrease in seawater, two order decrease in Bacillus sp. culture and more than four order decrease in Flavobacterium sp. culture establishing the synergistic effect of anodization and ultrasonication in this study.

  16. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  17. Reduced scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations in the BTBR T+tf/J mouse model of autism.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, M; Roullet, F I; Crawley, J N

    2011-02-01

    Qualitative impairments in communication, such as delayed language and poor interactive communication skills, are fundamental to the diagnosis of autism. Investigations into social communication in adult BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) mice are needed to determine whether this inbred strain incorporates phenotypes relevant to the second diagnostic symptom of autism, communication deficits, along with its strong behavioral phenotypes relevant to the first and third diagnostic symptoms, impairments in social interactions and high levels of repetitive behavior. The aim of the present study was to simultaneously measure female urine-elicited scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations in adult male BTBR mice, in comparison with a standard control strain with high sociability, C57BL/6J (B6), for the assessment of a potential communication deficit in BTBR. Adult male BTBR mice displayed lower scent marking and minimal ultrasonic vocalization responses to female urine obtained from both B6 and BTBR females. Lower scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations in a social setting by BTBR, as compared with B6, are consistent with the well-replicated social deficits in this inbred mouse strain. Our findings support the interpretation that BTBR incorporate communication deficits, and suggest that scent marking and ultrasonic vocalizations offer promising measures of interest in social cues that may be widely applicable to investigations of mouse models of autism.

  18. Coded excitation ultrasonic needle tracking: An in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wenfeng; Ginsberg, Yuval; West, Simeon J.; Nikitichev, Daniil I.; Ourselin, Sebastien; David, Anna L.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Accurate and efficient guidance of medical devices to procedural targets lies at the heart of interventional procedures. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used for device guidance, but determining the location of the device tip can be challenging. Various methods have been proposed to track medical devices during ultrasound-guided procedures, but widespread clinical adoption has remained elusive. With ultrasonic tracking, the location of a medical device is determined by ultrasonic communication between the ultrasound imaging probe and a transducer integrated into the medical device. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the transducer data is an important determinant of the depth in tissue at which tracking can be performed. In this paper, the authors present a new generation of ultrasonic tracking in which coded excitation is used to improve the SNR without spatial averaging. Methods A fiber optic hydrophone was integrated into the cannula of a 20 gauge insertion needle. This transducer received transmissions from the ultrasound imaging probe, and the data were processed to obtain a tracking image of the needle tip. Excitation using Barker or Golay codes was performed to improve the SNR, and conventional bipolar excitation was performed for comparison. The performance of the coded excitation ultrasonic tracking system was evaluated in an in vivo ovine model with insertions to the brachial plexus and the uterine cavity. Results Coded excitation significantly increased the SNRs of the tracking images, as compared with bipolar excitation. During an insertion to the brachial plexus, the SNR was increased by factors of 3.5 for Barker coding and 7.1 for Golay coding. During insertions into the uterine cavity, these factors ranged from 2.9 to 4.2 for Barker coding and 5.4 to 8.5 for Golay coding. The maximum SNR was 670, which was obtained with Golay coding during needle withdrawal from the brachial plexus. Range sidelobe artifacts were observed in tracking images

  19. Novel method for driving the ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeoung woo; Dong, Shuxiang; Laoratanakul, Pitak; Uchino, Kenji; Park, Tae gone

    2002-10-01

    This paper reports a novel driving method for an annular plate-type ultrasonic motor. Instead of the direct current/alternating current (DC/AC) converter type driver using conventional electromagnetic transformer, a compact disc-type piezoelectric transformer is used to obtain high voltage output for driving the ultrasonic motor. The piezoelectric transformer is operated in the radial vibration mode at resonance frequency close to the resonance frequency of the ultrasonic motor. Later, it was found that the piezoelectric transformer could drive the ultrasonic motor, even if their resonance frequencies are not exactly the same by incorporating the matching network in the circuit. The maximum speed of the ultrasonic motor obtained by using this driving method is over 300 rpm. It is believed that the results of this study will have impact on the integration and miniaturization of the ultrasonic motor and its driving circuit.

  20. Unified Ultrasonic/Eddy-Current Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James; Butler, David W.

    1993-01-01

    Imaging station for detecting cracks and flaws in solid materials developed combining both ultrasonic C-scan and eddy-current imaging. Incorporation of both techniques into one system eliminates duplication of computers and of mechanical scanners; unifies acquisition, processing, and storage of data; reduces setup time for repetitious ultrasonic and eddy-current scans; and increases efficiency of system. Same mechanical scanner used to maneuver either ultrasonic or eddy-current probe over specimen and acquire point-by-point data. For ultrasonic scanning, probe linked to ultrasonic pulser/receiver circuit card, while, for eddy-current imaging, probe linked to impedance-analyzer circuit card. Both ultrasonic and eddy-current imaging subsystems share same desktop-computer controller, containing dedicated plug-in circuit boards for each.

  1. Techniques for enhancing laser ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J; Chinn, D; Huber, R; Spicer, J; Thomas, G

    1999-02-16

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is an extremely powerful tool for characterizing materials and detecting defects. A majority of the ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation is performed with piezoelectric transducers that generate and detect high frequency acoustic energy. The liquid needed to couple the high frequency acoustic energy from the piezoelectric transducers restricts the applicability of ultrasonics. For example, traditional ultrasonics cannot evaluate parts at elevated temperatures or components that would be damaged by contact with a fluid. They are developing a technology that remotely generates and detects the ultrasonic pulses with lasers and consequently there is no requirement for liquids. Thus the research in laser-based ultrasound allows them to solve inspection problems with ultrasonics that could not be done before. This technology has wide application in many Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory programs, especially when remote and/or non-contact sensing is necessary.

  2. Enhanced ultrasonic characterization of assemblies, TLL_19

    SciTech Connect

    Chinn, D; Thomas, G

    1998-09-01

    Bonded joints, such as the autoclave bond, are critical to the performance of weapon systems. A nondestructive method to assess the integrity of these bonds is needed to certify the weapon for extended life. This project is developing ultrasonic technologies for bond quality assessment. Existing ultrasonic technology easily maps totally unbonded areas in a bond line but does not measure the quality of the bond. We are extracting information from the ultrasonic signals to quantify the mechanical. properties and assess the durability of the bond. Our approach is based on advanced signal processing and artificial intelligence techniques that process information from the ultrasonic signal after it interacts with the bondline. Computer algorithms recognize variations in bond quality from the acoustic signals. The ultrasonic signal processing and bond classification software will be installed on ultrasonic scanners at the appropriate sites.

  3. Ultrasonic ranging for the oculometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic tracking techniques are investigated for an oculometer. Two methods are reported in detail. The first is based on measurements of time from the start of a transmit burst to a received echo. Knowing the sound velocity, distance can be calculated. In the second method, a continuous signal is transmitted. Target movement causes phase shifting of the echo. By accumulating these phase shifts, tracking from a set point can be achieved. Both systems have problems with contoured targets, but work well on flat plates and the back of a human head. Also briefly reported is an evaluation of an ultrasonic ranging system. Interface circuits make this system compatible with the echo time design. While the system is consistently accurate, it has a beam too narrow for oculometer use. Finally, comments are provided on a tracking system using the Doppler frequency shift to give range data.

  4. Cavitation-controlled ultrasonic agitator

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, S.H.; Lawrence, W.P.; Raptis, A.C.

    1989-10-01

    High-intensity ultrasound generally produces nonlinear acoustic cavitation and streaming in liquids. The ultrasonic energy required to cause cavitation and streaming in a liquid depends on the physical properties of the liquid, e.g., surface tension, viscosity, and entrained gases. Both cavitation and streaming generate acoustic noise whose signatures may be used to distinguish the stage of agitation and thus allow the process to be controlled. An ultrasonic agitator has been designed for application in a confined area with a high-temperature, high-pressure, and corrosive environment. Control of this agitator is based on the detection of noise levels and subharmonics produced during cavitation and streaming. Noise signatures of agitation in different liquids and in liquids with particles have been determined, and discussed. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, Morris S.; Schuster, George J.; Skorpik, James R.

    1997-01-01

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part.

  6. Ultrasonic material hardness depth measurement

    DOEpatents

    Good, M.S.; Schuster, G.J.; Skorpik, J.R.

    1997-07-08

    The invention is an ultrasonic surface hardness depth measurement apparatus and method permitting rapid determination of hardness depth of shafts, rods, tubes and other cylindrical parts. The apparatus of the invention has a part handler, sensor, ultrasonic electronics component, computer, computer instruction sets, and may include a display screen. The part handler has a vessel filled with a couplant, and a part rotator for rotating a cylindrical metal part with respect to the sensor. The part handler further has a surface follower upon which the sensor is mounted, thereby maintaining a constant distance between the sensor and the exterior surface of the cylindrical metal part. The sensor is mounted so that a front surface of the sensor is within the vessel with couplant between the front surface of the sensor and the part. 12 figs.

  7. Ultrasonic enhancement of battery diffusion.

    PubMed

    Hilton, R; Dornbusch, D; Branson, K; Tekeei, A; Suppes, G J

    2014-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that sonic energy can be harnessed to enhance convection in Galvanic cells during cyclic voltammetry; however, the practical value of this approach is limited due to the lack of open volumes for convection patterns to develop in most batteries. This study evaluates the ability of ultrasonic waves to enhance diffusion in membrane separators commonly used in sandwich-architecture batteries. Studies include the measuring of open-circuit performance curves to interpret performances in terms of reductions in concentration overpotentials. The use of a 40 kHz sonicator bath can consistently increase the voltage of the battery and reduce overpotential losses up to 30%. This work demonstrates and quantifies battery enhancement due to enhanced diffusion made possible with ultrasonic energy.

  8. Ultrasonic attenuation in pearlitic steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2014-03-01

    Expressions for the attenuation coefficients of longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic waves are developed for steel with pearlitic microstructure. This type of lamellar duplex microstructure influences attenuation because of the lamellar spacing. In addition, longitudinal attenuation measurements were conducted using an unfocused transducer with 10 MHz central frequency on the cross section of a quenched railroad wheel sample. The dependence of longitudinal attenuation on the pearlite microstructure is observed from the changes of longitudinal attenuation from the quenched tread surface to deeper locations. The results show that the attenuation value is lowest and relatively constant within the quench depth, then increases linearly. The experimental results demonstrate a reasonable agreement with results from the theoretical model. Ultrasonic attenuation provides an important non-destructive method to evaluate duplex microstructure within grains which can be implemented for quality control in conjunction with other manufacturing processes.

  9. Discriminating ultrasonic proximity detection system

    DOEpatents

    Annala, Wayne C.

    1989-01-01

    This invention uses an ultrasonic transmitter and receiver and a microprocessor to detect the presence of an object. In the reset mode the invention uses a plurality of echoes from each ultrasonic burst to create a reference table of the echo-burst-signature of the empty monitored environment. The invention then processes the reference table so that it only uses the most reliable data. In the detection mode the invention compares the echo-burst-signature of the present environment with the reference table, detecting an object if there is a consistent difference between the echo-burst-signature of the empty monitored environment recorded in the reference table and the echo-burst-signature of the present environment.

  10. Ultrasonic disruption of algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, P. M.; Nowotarski, K.; Joyce, E. M.; Mason, T. J.

    2012-05-01

    During last decade there has been increasing interest in the production of sustainable fuels from microalgae (R.H. Wijffels and M.J. Barbosa, 2010; Singh et al 2011; D.H. Lee 2011). The aim of this project was to determine if algal cells can be ultrasonically disrupted to release lipids for biofuel production. Ultrasonic disruption of two unicellular algal species: Dunnaliella salina and Nannochloropsis oculata was investigated using a 20 kHz probe. Haemocytometer, optical density, UV-Vis, fluoro-spectrophotometer and confocal microscopy results demonstrated complete cell destruction of Dunaliella salina within 16 minutes of sonication. Results obtained for Nannochloropsis oculata differed in that ultrasound dispersed clumped cells with little or no cell disruption, as observed by haemocytometer and confocal microscopy analysis. However, UV-Visible and fluoro-spectrophotometer analysis indicated chlorophyll release following sonication, suggesting some cell disruption had occurred.

  11. Lamb Wave Multitouch Ultrasonic Touchscreen.

    PubMed

    Firouzi, Kamyar; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Carver, Thomas E; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus Pierre T

    2016-12-01

    Touchscreen sensors are widely used in many devices such as smart phones, tablets, and laptops with diverse applications. We present the design, analysis, and implementation of an ultrasonic touchscreen system that utilizes the interaction of transient Lamb waves with objects in contact with the screen. It attempts to improve on the existing ultrasound technologies, with the potential of addressing some of the weaknesses of the dominant technologies, such as the capacitive or resistive ones. Compared with the existing ultrasonic and acoustic modalities, among other advantages, it provides the capability of detecting several simultaneous touch points and also a more robust performance. The localization algorithm, given the hardware design, can detect several touch points with a very limited number of measurements (one or two). This in turn can significantly reduce the manufacturing cost.

  12. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  13. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    MacKenzie, D.; Odell, C.

    1994-03-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning apparatus is described for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The apparatus includes an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface. 3 figures.

  14. Ultrasonic cleaning of interior surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Odell, D. MacKenzie C.

    1996-01-01

    An ultrasonic cleaning method for cleaning the interior surfaces of tubes. The method uses an ultrasonic generator and reflector each coupled to opposing ends of the open-ended, fluid-filled tube. Fluid-tight couplings seal the reflector and generator to the tube, preventing leakage of fluid from the interior of the tube. The reflector and generator are operatively connected to actuators, whereby the distance between them can be varied. When the distance is changed, the frequency of the sound waves is simultaneously adjusted to maintain the resonant frequency of the tube so that a standing wave is formed in the tube, the nodes of which are moved axially to cause cavitation along the length of the tube. Cavitation maximizes mechanical disruption and agitation of the fluid, dislodging foreign material from the interior surface.

  15. Ultrasonic analysis of bolt preloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollins, F. R., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    This paper covers an investigation into the feasibility of analyzing bolt preloads by ultrasonic techniques. Various techniques were evaluated and a pulse echo inteferometric method was selected for experimental testing. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the interferometer response was found to be linearly related to tensile stresses oriented parallel to the bolt axis. Under rather idealized conditions, bolt loads can be determined with errors of less than 1%. The ultimate operational accuracy depends on a number of variables, such as bolt dimensions and geometry, bolt temperature, uniformity of stresses, and bolt materials, but load analyses to within + or - 3% are readily achievable. Best results are obtained with the ultrasonic transducer contact coupled to a small flat area near the center of the bolt head. The transducer can be applied and measurements made without interfering with normal wrenching operations. Prototype instrumentation is described and calibration results are tabulated for numerous bolt sizes and materials.

  16. Fundamentals of picosecond laser ultrasonics.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Osamu; Larciprete, Maria Cristina; Li Voti, Roberto; Wright, Oliver B

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article is to provide an introduction to picosecond laser ultrasonics, a means by which gigahertz-terahertz ultrasonic waves can be generated and detected by ultrashort light pulses. This method can be used to characterize materials with nanometer spatial resolution. With reference to key experiments, we first review the theoretical background for normal-incidence optical detection of longitudinal acoustic waves in opaque single-layer isotropic thin films. The theory is extended to handle isotropic multilayer samples, and is again compared to experiment. We then review applications to anisotropic samples, including oblique-incidence optical probing, and treat the generation and detection of shear waves. Solids including metals and semiconductors are mainly discussed, although liquids are briefly mentioned.

  17. Ultrasonic Imaging and Automated Flaw Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    imager sold by Searle Ultrasound. An LSI-11 microcomputer is interfaced to the imager with custom designed modules. Ultrasonic image data is loaded...phased array ultrasonic imager, an LSI-11 microcomputer , and an assortment of custom-designed electronic modules. There is also a CRT display terminal...AD CONTRACTOR REPORT ARCCB-CR-86011 ULTRASONIC IMAGING AND AUTOMATED FLAW DETECTION SYSTEM L. JONES DTIC3ZLECTE J. F. MC DONALD JUNCTE G.P

  18. Calorimetric measurement of energy of ultrasonic cleaners

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1994-11-01

    The development of a calorimeter that measured the power within an ultrasonic cleaning tank is presented. The principle involved is explained. Several types of calorimeter that were tested are described. Measurement of the power in an ultrasonic cleaner permits: (1) comparing different ultrasonic cleaners; (2) monitoring the performance of a specific cleaner; (3) measuring the distribution of power in a cleaning tank, and (4) evaluating the effects of process variables on the power.

  19. Ultrasonic Bonding of Solar-Cell Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rolling ultrasonic spot-bonding method successfully joins aluminum interconnect fingers to silicon solar cells with copper metalization. Technique combines best features of ultrasonic rotary seam welding and ultrasonic spot bonding: allows fast bond cycles and high indexing speeds without use of solder or flux. Achieves reliable bonds at production rates without damage to solar cells. Bonding system of interest for all solar-cell assemblies and other assemblies using flat leads (rather than round wires).

  20. Degassing of Aluminum Alloys Using Ultrasonic Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, T. T.; Han, Q.; Xu, H.

    2006-06-01

    The research was intended to lead to a better fundamental understanding of the effect of ultrasonic energy on the degassing of liquid metals and to develop practical approaches for the ultrasonic degassing of alloys. The goals of the project described here were to evaluate core principles, establish a quantitative basis for the ultrasonic degassing of aluminum alloy melts, and demonstrate the application of ultrsaonic processing during ingot casting and foundry shape casting.

  1. Post-stroke pure apraxia of speech - A rare experience.

    PubMed

    Polanowska, Katarzyna Ewa; Pietrzyk-Krawczyk, Iwona

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder, most typically caused by stroke, which in its "pure" form (without other speech-language deficits) is very rare in clinical practice. Because some observable characteristics of AOS overlap with more common verbal communication neurologic syndromes (i.e. aphasia, dysarthria) distinguishing them may be difficult. The present study describes AOS in a 49-year-old right-handed male after left-hemispheric stroke. Analysis of his articulatory and prosodic abnormalities in the context of intact communicative abilities as well as description of symptoms dynamics over time provides valuable information for clinical diagnosis of this specific disorder and prognosis for its recovery. This in turn is the basis for the selection of appropriate rehabilitative interventions.

  2. Ultrasonic Attenuation in Zircaloy-4

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.P.; Banchik, A.D.; Lopez Pumarega, M.I.; Ruzzante, J.E.

    2005-04-09

    In this work the relationship between Zircaloy-4 grain size and ultrasonic attenuation behavior was studied for longitudinal waves in the frequency range of 10-90 MHz. The attenuation was analyzed as a function of frequency for samples with different mechanical and heat treatments having recrystallized and Widmanstatten structures with different grain size. The attenuation behavior was analyzed by different scattering models, depending on grain size, wavelength and frequency.

  3. Nonlinear Ultrasonic Phased Array Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, J. N.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-10-01

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  4. Nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging.

    PubMed

    Potter, J N; Croxford, A J; Wilcox, P D

    2014-10-03

    This Letter reports a technique for the imaging of acoustic nonlinearity. By contrasting the energy of the diffuse field produced through the focusing of an ultrasonic array by delayed parallel element transmission with that produced by postprocessing of sequential transmission data, acoustic nonlinearity local to the focal point is measured. Spatially isolated wave distortion is inferred without requiring interrogation of the wave at the inspection point, thereby allowing nonlinear imaging through depth.

  5. Cutting head for ultrasonic lithotripsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anguluo, E. D.; Goodfriend, R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A cutting head for attachment to the end of the wire probe of an ultrasonic kidney stone disintegration instrument is described. The cutting head has a plurality of circumferentially arranged teeth formed at one end thereof to provide a cup shaped receptacle for kidney stones encountered during the disintegration procedure. An integral reduced diameter collar diminishes stress points in the wire and reduce breakage thereof.

  6. Method of preparing pure fluorine gas

    DOEpatents

    Asprey, Larned B.

    1976-01-01

    A simple, inexpensive system for purifying and storing pure fluorine is described. The method utilizes alkali metal-nickel fluorides to absorb tank fluorine by forming nickel complex salts and leaving the gaseous impurities which are pumped away. The complex nickel fluoride is then heated to evolve back pure gaseous fluorine.

  7. Pure ovarian choriocarcinoma: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Mood, Narges Izadi; Samadi, Nasrin; Rahimi-Moghaddam, Parvaneh; Sarmadi, Soheila; Eftekhar, Zahra; Yarandi, Fariba

    2009-01-01

    Pure primary ovarian choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare condition of gestational or nongestational origin. The possibility of gestational origin can be suspected by the presence of a corpus luteum of pregnancy but definite diagnosis would be based on genetic analysis. Here, we present two cases of pure ovarian choriocarcinoma in the forth decade of life with the possibility of gestational origin. PMID:21772904

  8. Stresses in ultrasonically assisted bone cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, K.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Bäker, M.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2009-08-01

    Bone cutting is a frequently used procedure in the orthopaedic surgery. Modern cutting techniques, such as ultrasonic assisted drilling, enable surgeons to perform precision operations in facial and spinal surgeries. Advanced understanding of the mechanics of bone cutting assisted by ultrasonic vibration is required to minimise bone fractures and to optimise the technique performance. The paper presents results of finite element simulations on ultrasonic and conventional bone cutting analysing the effects of ultrasonic vibration on cutting forces and stress distribution. The developed model is used to study the effects of cutting and vibration parameters (e.g. amplitude and frequency) on the stress distributions in the cutting region.

  9. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, M.S.; Brodeur, P.H.; Jackson, T.G.

    1998-07-14

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated. 20 figs.

  10. Out-of-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Maclin S.; Brodeur, Pierre H.; Jackson, Theodore G.

    1998-01-01

    A method for improving the accuracy of measuring the velocity and time of flight of ultrasonic signals through moving web-like materials such as paper, paperboard and the like, includes a pair of ultrasonic transducers disposed on opposing sides of a moving web-like material. In order to provide acoustical coupling between the transducers and the web-like material, the transducers are disposed in fluid-filled wheels. Errors due to variances in the wheel thicknesses about their circumference which can affect time of flight measurements and ultimately the mechanical property being tested are compensated by averaging the ultrasonic signals for a predetermined number of revolutions. The invention further includes a method for compensating for errors resulting from the digitization of the ultrasonic signals. More particularly, the invention includes a method for eliminating errors known as trigger jitter inherent with digitizing oscilloscopes used to digitize the signals for manipulation by a digital computer. In particular, rather than cross-correlate ultrasonic signals taken during different sample periods as is known in the art in order to determine the time of flight of the ultrasonic signal through the moving web, a pulse echo box is provided to enable cross-correlation of predetermined transmitted ultrasonic signals with predetermined reflected ultrasonic or echo signals during the sample period. By cross-correlating ultrasonic signals in the same sample period, the error associated with trigger jitter is eliminated.

  11. Ultrasonic stress measurements in prestressing tendons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washer, Glenn A.; Green, Robert E.

    2002-05-01

    The goal of this research was to examine ultrasonic stress measurement techniques for the condition assessment of prestressing tendons. Acoustoelastic measurements were made in prestressing rods and strands, and constants are reported that relate the change in ultrasonic velocity to the change in stress. The effects of dispersion in prestressing tendons, which act as circular wave guides for ultrasonic waves, were measured and evaluated. For this research, narrow-band, noncontact Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) were designed to launch and receive ultrasonic waves propagating within the tendons.

  12. Noncontacting ultrasonic and electromagnetic HTS tape NDE

    SciTech Connect

    Telschow, K.L.; Bruneel, F.W.; Walter, J.B.; Koo, L.S.

    1996-10-01

    Two noncontacting nondestructive evaluation techniques (electromagnetic and ultrasonic) for inspection of high temperature superconducting tapes are described. Results for Ag-clad BSCCO tapes are given.

  13. Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

    1998-06-23

    A flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus, comprises a flexible, hollow shaft that carries a plurality of modules, including at least one rotatable ultrasonic transducer, a motor/gear unit, and a position/signal encoder. The modules are connected by flexible knuckle joints that allow each module of the apparatus to change its relative orientation with respect to a neighboring module, while the shaft protects electrical wiring from kinking or buckling while the apparatus moves around a tight corner. The apparatus is moved through a pipe by any suitable means, including a tether or drawstring attached to the nose or tail, differential hydraulic pressure, or a pipe pig. The rotational speed of the ultrasonic transducer and the forward velocity of the apparatus are coordinated so that the beam sweeps out the entire interior surface of the pipe, enabling the operator to accurately assess the condition of the pipe wall and determine whether or not leak-prone corrosion damage is present. 7 figs.

  14. Ultrasonic NDE of Multilayered Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Quarry, M J; Fisher, K A; Lehman, S K

    2005-02-14

    This project developed ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation techniques based on guided and bulk waves in multilayered structures using arrays. First, a guided wave technique was developed by preferentially exciting dominant modes with energy in the layer of interest via an ultrasonic array. Second, a bulk wave technique uses Fermat's principle of least time as well as wave-based properties to reconstruct array data and image the multilayered structure. The guided wave technique enables the inspection of inaccessible areas of a multilayered structure without disassembling it. Guided waves propagate using the multilayer as a waveguide into the inaccessible areas from an accessible position. Inspecting multi-layered structures with a guided wave relies on exciting modes with sufficient energy in the layer of interest. Multilayered structures are modeled to determine the possible modes and their distribution of energy across the thickness. Suitable modes were determined and excited by designing arrays with the proper element spacing and frequency. Bulk wave imaging algorithms were developed to overcome the difficulties of multiple reflections and refractions at interfaces. Reconstruction algorithms were developed to detect and localize flaws. A bent-ray algorithm incorporates Fermat's principle to correct time delays in the ultrasonic data that result from the difference in wave speeds in each layer and refractions at the interfaces. A planar wave-based algorithm was developed using the Green function for the multilayer structure to enhance focusing on reception for improved imaging.

  15. Predictive simulation of nonlinear ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2012-04-01

    Most of the nonlinear ultrasonic studies to date have been experimental, but few theoretical predictive studies exist, especially for Lamb wave ultrasonic. Compared with nonlinear bulk waves and Rayleigh waves, nonlinear Lamb waves for structural health monitoring become more challenging due to their multi-mode dispersive features. In this paper, predictive study of nonlinear Lamb waves is done with finite element simulation. A pitch-catch method is used to interrogate a plate with a "breathing crack" which opens and closes under tension and compression. Piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) used as transmitter and receiver are modeled with coupled field elements. The "breathing crack" is simulated via "element birth and death" technique. The ultrasonic waves generated by the transmitter PWAS propagate into the structure, interact with the "breathing crack", acquire nonlinear features, and are picked up by the receiver PWAS. The features of the wave packets at the receiver PWAS are studied and discussed. The received signal is processed with Fast Fourier Transform to show the higher harmonics nonlinear characteristics. A baseline free damage index is introduced to assess the presence and the severity of the crack. The paper finishes with summary, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  16. Ultrasonic ray models for complex geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumm, A.

    2000-05-01

    Computer Aided Design techniques have become an inherent part of many industrial applications and are also gaining popularity in Nondestructive Testing. In sound field calculations, CAD representations can contribute to one of the generic problem in ultrasonic modeling, the wave propagation in complex geometries. Ray tracing codes were the first to take account of the geometry, providing qualitative information on beam propagation, such as geometrical echoes, multiple sound paths and possible conversions between wave modes. The forward ray tracing approach is intuitive and straightforward and can evolve towards a more quantitative code if transmission, divergence and polarization information is added. If used to evaluate the impulse response of a given geometry, an approximated time-dependent received signal can be obtained after convolution with the excitation signal. The more accurate reconstruction of a sound field after interaction with a geometrical interface according to ray theory requires inverse (or Fermat) ray-tracing to obtain the contribution of each elementary point source to the field at a given observation point. The resulting field of a finite transducer can then be obtained after integration over all point sources. While conceptionally close to classical ray tracing, this approach puts more stringent requirements on the CAD representation employed and is more difficult to extend towards multiple interfaces. In this communication we present examples for both approaches. In a prospective step, the link between both ray techniques is shown, and we illustrate how a combination of both approaches contributes to the solution of an industrial problem.

  17. Transracial Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Arthur L.

    This book explores and explains communication among different racial groups within the scope of existing communication theory. Following a brief introduction, chapters cover "Directions in Transracial Communication" (definitions, process, structurization, and purpose); "Culture and Transracial Communication" (a viewpoint on…

  18. Method and means of transmitting and receiving broad-band unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Donald O.; Hsu, David K.

    1993-12-14

    The invention includes a means and method for transmitting and receiving broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection. The method comprises generating a generally unipolar ultrasonic stress pulse from a low impedance voltage pulse transmitter along a low impedance electrical pathway to an ultrasonic transducer, and receiving the reflected echo of the pulse by the transducer, converting it to a voltage signal, and passing it through a high impedance electrical pathway to an output. The means utilizes electrical components according to the method. The means and method allow a single transducer to be used in a pulse/echo mode, and facilitates alternatingly transmitting and receiving the broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses.

  19. Method and means of transmitting and receiving broad-band unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, D.O.; Hsu, D.K.

    1993-12-14

    The invention includes a means and method for transmitting and receiving broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses for ultrasonic inspection. The method comprises generating a generally unipolar ultrasonic stress pulse from a low impedance voltage pulse transmitter along a low impedance electrical pathway to an ultrasonic transducer, and receiving the reflected echo of the pulse by the transducer, converting it to a voltage signal, and passing it through a high impedance electrical pathway to an output. The means utilizes electrical components according to the method. The means and method allow a single transducer to be used in a pulse/echo mode, and facilitates alternatingly transmitting and receiving the broadband, unipolar, ultrasonic pulses. 25 figures.

  20. Ultrasonic studies of fly ash/polyurea composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jing; Amirkhizi, Alireza V.; Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Wu, Gaohui

    2013-04-01

    Due to its excellent thermo-mechanical properties, polyurea is attracting more and more attention in blast-mitigating applications. In order to enhance its capability of blast-induced stress-wave management, we seek to develop polyurea-based composites in this work. Fly ash which consists of hollow particles with porous shell and low apparent density was chosen as filler and a series of fly ash/polyurea composites with various fly ash volume fractions were fabricated. The dynamic mechanical behavior of the composites was determined by a personal computer (PC) based ultrasonic system in the 0.5-2MHz frequency range between -60°C to 30°C temperatures. Velocity and attenuation of both longitudinal and shear ultrasonic waves were measured. The complex longitudinal and shear moduli were then computed from these measurements. Combining these results provided an estimate of the complex bulk and Young's moduli of the fly ash/polyurea composites at high frequencies. These results will be presented and compared with those of pure polyurea elastomer.

  1. Ultrasonic attenuation and speed of sound of cornstarch suspensions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin L; Holland, Mark R; Miller, James G; Katz, Jonathan I

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this study is to contribute to the physics underlying the material properties of suspensions that exhibit shear thickening through the ultrasonic characterization of suspensions of cornstarch in a density-matched solution. Ultrasonic measurements at frequencies in the range of 4 to 8 MHz of the speed of sound and the frequency-dependent attenuation properties are reported for concentrations of cornstarch in a density-matched aqueous (cesium chloride brine) suspension, ranging up to 40% cornstarch. The speed of sound is found to range from 1483 ± 10 m/s in pure brine to 1765 ± 9 m/s in the 40% cornstarch suspension. The bulk modulus of a granule of cornstarch is inferred to be 1.2(± 0.1) × 10(10) Pa. The attenuation coefficient at 5 MHz increases from essentially zero in brine to 12.0 ± 1.2 dB/cm at 40% cornstarch.

  2. Bubble colloidal AFM probes formed from ultrasonically generated bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Lee, Judy; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2008-02-05

    Here we introduce a simple and effective experimental approach to measuring the interaction forces between two small bubbles (approximately 80-140 microm) in aqueous solution during controlled collisions on the scale of micrometers to nanometers. The colloidal probe technique using atomic force microscopy (AFM) was extended to measure interaction forces between a cantilever-attached bubble and surface-attached bubbles of various sizes. By using an ultrasonic source, we generated numerous small bubbles on a mildly hydrophobic surface of a glass slide. A single bubble picked up with a strongly hydrophobized V-shaped cantilever was used as the colloidal probe. Sample force measurements were used to evaluate the pure water bubble cleanliness and the general consistency of the measurements.

  3. Conformal pure radiation with parallel rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leistner, Thomas; Nurowski, Paweł

    2012-03-01

    We define pure radiation metrics with parallel rays to be n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian metrics that admit a parallel null line bundle K and whose Ricci tensor vanishes on vectors that are orthogonal to K. We give necessary conditions in terms of the Weyl, Cotton and Bach tensors for a pseudo-Riemannian metric to be conformal to a pure radiation metric with parallel rays. Then, we derive conditions in terms of the tractor calculus that are equivalent to the existence of a pure radiation metric with parallel rays in a conformal class. We also give analogous results for n-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian pp-waves.

  4. Transducer Joint for Kidney-Stone Ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angulo, E. D.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic therapy for kidney stones improved by new way of connecting wire-probe ultrasonic waveguide to transducer. Improved mounting allows joint to last long enough for effective treatment. Sheath and rubber dampers constrain lateral vibration of wire waveguide. Combination of V-shaped mounting groove, sheath, and rubber dampers increases life expectancy of wire 15 times or more.

  5. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  6. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2880 - Ultrasonic transducer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... structures. This device includes phased arrays and two-dimensional scanning transducers. (b) Classification... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic transducer. 870.2880 Section 870.2880...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2880 Ultrasonic...

  8. Broadband, High-Temperature Ultrasonic Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, F. Raymond; Winfree, William P.; Barrows, Danny A.

    1995-01-01

    Materials chosen for endurance at high temperatures and acoustic coupling and damping. Acoustic transducer designed to exhibit broad frequency response and to survive temperatures close to melting points of brazing alloys. Attached directly and continuously to hot object monitored ultrasonically: for example, it can be attached to relatively cool spot on workpiece during brazing for taking ultrasonic quality-control measurements.

  9. Physiologic mechanism of the ultrasonically activated scalpel.

    PubMed

    McCarus, S D

    1996-08-01

    An ultrasonically activated scalpel was developed and used clinically to provide hemostatic cutting in laparoscopic surgery. Results of experimental work with the ultrasonic scalpel blades were compared with those of electrosurgery and lasers. Some features that distinguish this energy form may confer specific advantages in various surgical procedures.

  10. Ultrasonic cold forming of aircraft sheet materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devine, J.; Krause, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Ultrasonic forming was investigated as a means for shaping aircraft sheet materials, including titanium 6Al-4V alloy, nickel, and stainless steel AM355-CRT, into a helicopter rotor blade nosecap contour. Equipment for static forming of small coupons consisted of a modified 4000 watt ultrasonic spot welder provided with specially designed punch and die sets. The titanium alloy was successfully formed to a 60 degree angle in one step with ultrasonics, but invariably cracked under static force alone. Nickel had a low enough yield strength that it could be successfully formed either with or without ultrasonics. Insufficient ultrasonic power was available to produce beneficial effect with the high-strength steel. From analogy with commercially used ultrasonic tube drawing, it was postulated that dynamic forming of long lengths of the nosecap geometry could be achieved with an ultrasonic system mounted on a draw bench. It was recommended that the ultrasonic technique be considered for forming other aircraft sheet geometries, particularly involving titanium alloy.

  11. 21 CFR 890.5300 - Ultrasonic diathermy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic diathermy. 890.5300 Section 890.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... medical conditions is a device that applies to specific areas of the body ultrasonic energy at a...

  12. 21 CFR 890.5300 - Ultrasonic diathermy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic diathermy. 890.5300 Section 890.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... medical conditions is a device that applies to specific areas of the body ultrasonic energy at a...

  13. 21 CFR 890.5300 - Ultrasonic diathermy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic diathermy. 890.5300 Section 890.5300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... medical conditions is a device that applies to specific areas of the body ultrasonic energy at a...

  14. Ultrasonic fingerprinting by phased array transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sednev, D.; Kataeva, O.; Abramets, V.; Pushenko, P.; Tverdokhlebova, T.

    2016-06-01

    Increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel that must be under national and international control requires a novel approach to safeguard techniques and equipment. One of the proposed approaches is utilize intrinsic features of casks with spent fuel. In this article an application of a phased array ultrasonic method is considered. This study describes an experimental results on ultrasonic fingerprinting of austenitic steel seam weld.

  15. Ultrasonic Dispersion of Particulate High Density Fuels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    Percent Finer than 0.4 Micron ..... ........... 31 X Pycnometric Determination (Formula A Before and After Ultrasonic Activation...t ueasuretienrts on the slurry could not be made. All of the 32 Table X PYCNOMETRIC DETERMINATION Formula A Before and After Ultrasonic Activation

  16. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth....

  17. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth....

  18. 21 CFR 872.4850 - Ultrasonic scaler.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultrasonic scaler. 872.4850 Section 872.4850 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... calculus deposits from teeth by application of an ultrasonic vibrating scaler tip to the teeth....

  19. Identification of Sintered Irons with Ultrasonic Nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohara, Y.; Kawashima, K.; Murase, M.; Hirose, N.

    2003-03-01

    Two kinds of sinters made of reduced and atomized iron powders were identified by nonlinear ultrasonic measurement to detect higher harmonics generated at micro gaps comparable to the incident wave amplitude using PZT contact transducers of 5 MHz and 10 MHz. Furthermore, the advantage of the nonlinear ultrasonic measurement was demonstrated by the attenuation coefficient measurement for same samples.

  20. Theory and application of ultrasonic microstructural characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, R. Bruce

    1992-10-01

    Ultrasonic microstructural characterization techniques have been developed for a variety of reasons ranging from process control to life extension. The techniques are based on principles of wave propagation and scattering from inhomogeneities. Applications of ultrasonic techniques include predicting sheet metal formability, controlling microstructure in metal-matrix composites, monitoring diffusion bonding, measuring porosity in castings and composites, and designing microstructures for enhanced inspectability.

  1. Ultrasonic Abrasive Removal Of EDM Recast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Johnny L.; Jacobson, Marlowe S.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic abrasive process removes layer of recast material generated during electrical-discharge machining (EDM) of damper pocket on turbine blade. Form-fitted tool vibrated ultrasonically in damper pocket from which material removed. Vibrations activate abrasive in pocket. Amount of material removed controlled precisely.

  2. Quantitative ultrasonic guided wave testing of composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, B. Boro

    2013-01-01

    The advanced composite materials mechanical loads are typically optimized in-plane and not in the thickness. Materials anisotropy represents challenges to conventional ultrasonic nondestructive testing methods such as ultrasonic C-scan mapping. A different ultrasonic testing approach is needed to develop ultrasonic tests that can directly characterize anisotropic mechanical properties of the composite material. Development of new guided wave laser ultrasonic sources and new receiving sensors configurations enable in-plane testing of advanced composites far beyond conventional ultrasonic capabilities. This emerging technology explores the capability of the inhomogeneous, anisotropic composite material to propagate ultrasonic guided waves over a range of distances and part configurations. Appropriate customizing of ultrasonic transduction process enables measurements of material properties and an estimate of damage conditions along in-plane sound propagation path. From guided wave acoustic response, one can develop a meaningful estimate of the material anisotropy such as modulus as well as detect and assess fatigue damage, thermal damage and sense mechanical defect conditions. The reported results show in-situ materials directional properties for unidirectional, isotropic, and woven composite plates.

  3. An Examination of the Feasibility of Ultrasonic Communications Links

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    29 Figure 21. 5-m sound pressure distribution data for various frequencies...31 Figure 22. 10-m sound pressure distribution data for various frequencies. ..................................32 vi Figure 23...15-m sound pressure distribution data for various frequencies. ..................................33 Figure 24. 20-m sound pressure distribution data

  4. Ultrasonic assessment of oil quality during frying.

    PubMed

    Benedito, Jose; Mulet, Antonio; Velasco, J; Dobarganes, M Carmen

    2002-07-31

    In this paper, changes in ultrasonic properties during thermoxidation of virgin olive oil were studied. Samples of virgin olive oil were heated over different periods of time from 2 to 16 h at 200 degrees C. Oil degradation was characterized by means of physical and chemical changes, i.e., viscosity, color, polar compounds, polymers, and polar fatty acids. Ultrasonic measurements were carried out while the oil sample was cooled from 35 to 25 degrees C. It was found that velocity and attenuation measurements were related to viscosity measurements through a classical equation for viscous liquids. The ultrasonic measurements were also related to the percentages of polar compounds and polymers, which shows the feasibility of using ultrasonic properties to monitor oil quality. Nevertheless, as long as the ultrasonic measurements are temperature dependent, this variable must be controlled in order to obtain repetitive and reliable measurements.

  5. Ultrasonic stress wave characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duke, J. C., Jr.; Henneke, E. G., II; Stinchcomb, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    The work reported covers three simultaneous projects. The first project was concerned with: (1) establishing the sensitivity of the acousto-ultrasonic method for evaluating subtle forms of damage development in cyclically loaded composite materials, (2) establishing the ability of the acousto-ultrasonic method for detecting initial material imperfections that lead to localized damage growth and final specimen failure, and (3) characteristics of the NBS/Proctor sensor/receiver for acousto-ultrasonic evaluation of laminated composite materials. The second project was concerned with examining the nature of the wave propagation that occurs during acoustic-ultrasonic evaluation of composite laminates and demonstrating the role of Lamb or plate wave modes and their utilization for characterizing composite laminates. The third project was concerned with the replacement of contact-type receiving piezotransducers with noncontacting laser-optical sensors for acousto-ultrasonic signal acquisition.

  6. Feasibility of transparent flexible ultrasonic haptic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akther, Asma; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kim, Jaehwan

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonic haptics actuator is a device that can create a haptic feedback to user's hand. The modulation of ultrasonic frequency can give different textures to the users. In this study, a feasibility of the ultrasonic haptic actuator made on a flexible piezoelectric substrate is investigated. As the piezoelectric substrate helps to propagate flexural waves, a pair of interdigital transducer (IDT) with reflectors can produce standing waves, which can increase the vibrational displacement of the actuator. A pair of IDT pattern was fabricated on a piezoelectric polymer substrate. A finite element analysis is at first performed to design the actuator. A sinusoidal excitation voltage is applied on IDT electrodes at ultrasonic frequencies and the displacement waveforms are found. The displacement waveforms clearly represent how ultrasonic waves propagate through the piezoelectric substrate.

  7. Nondestructive evaluation by acousto-ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1988-01-01

    Acousto-ultrasonics is an ultrasonic technique that was originally devised to cope with the particular problems associated with nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of fiber/polymer composite structures. The fiber/polymer composites are more attenuating to ultrasound than any other material presently of interest. This limits the applicability of high-frequency ultrasonics. A common use of ultrasound is the imaging of flaws internal to a structure by scattering from the interface with the flaw. However, structural features of composites can scatter ultrasound internally, thus obscuring the flaws. A need relative to composites is to be able to nondestructively measure the strength of laminar boundaries in order to assess the integrity of a structure. Acousto-ultrasonics has exhibited the ability to use the internal scattering to provide information for determining the strength of laminar boundaries. Analysis of acousto-ultrasonic signals by the wave ray paths that compose it leads to waveform partitioning that enhances the sensitivity to mechanical strength parameters.

  8. Making Pure Fine-Grained Inorganic Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.

    1985-01-01

    Sustained arc plasma chemical reactor fabricates very-fine-grained inorganic solids having low thermal conductivity. Powder fabrication method, based on plasma tube technique produces pure solids without contamination commonly produced by grinding.

  9. Quantifying the coherence of pure quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Grogan, Shane; Johnston, Nathaniel; Li, Chi-Kwong; Plosker, Sarah

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, several measures have been proposed for characterizing the coherence of a given quantum state. We derive several results that illuminate how these measures behave when restricted to pure states. Notably, we present an explicit characterization of the closest incoherent state to a given pure state under the trace distance measure of coherence. We then use this result to show that the states maximizing the trace distance of coherence are exactly the maximally coherent states. We define the trace distance of entanglement and show that it coincides with the trace distance of coherence for pure states. Finally, we give an alternate proof to a recent result that the ℓ1 measure of coherence of a pure state is never smaller than its relative entropy of coherence.

  10. Fremdsprachenunterricht als Kommunikationsprozess (Foreign Language Teaching as a Communicative Process). Language Centre News, No. 1. Focus on Spoken Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butzkamm, Wolfgang

    Teaching, as a communicative process, ranges between purely message-oriented communication (the goal) and purely language-oriented communication (a means). Classroom discourse ("Close the window", etc.) is useful as a drill but is also message-oriented. Skill in message-oriented communication is acquired only through practice in this kind of…

  11. Effects of ultrasonic vibration on the micro-molding processing of polylactide.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Matías; Plantá, Xavier; Morell, Mireia; Puiggalí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    A new ultrasonic micro-molding system was used to process polylactide (PLA) and fabricate reduced dimension specimens. Plasticization and molding of PLA were achieved by applying ultrasonic waves after feeding the polymer into a plasticizing chamber. Chemical and physical characteristics of processed PLA varied depending on the processing window (i.e. changes in ultrasonic wave amplitude between 14.2 and 48.1 μm and molding pressure between 0.5 in 6 bars). In terms of chemical effects, the application of ultrasound can lead to lower molecular weights (e.g. decreases of more than 45% in the weight average molecular weight), revealing partial degradation of the material. Also, the processed materials exhibited slightly higher thermal degradability than pure PLA because ultrasonic vibrations break molecular linkages and worsen the polymer structure. Finally, the processing conditions for the preparation of PLA specimens could be optimized without causing degradation and preserving structural characteristics and mechanical properties. Specifically, the use of an amplitude of 48.1 μm and a pressure of 3 bars gave samples with the same molecular weight as the raw material (i.e. 117,500 g/mol as opposed to 117,300 g/mol for Mw).

  12. Characterization of Olive Oil by Ultrasonic and Physico-chemical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alouache, B.; Khechena, F. K.; Lecheb, F.; Boutkedjirt, T.

    Olive oil excels by its nutritional and medicinal benefits. It can be consumed without any treatment. However, its quality can be altered by inadequate storage conditions or if it is mixed with other kinds of oils. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the ability of ultrasonic methods to characterize and control olive oil quality. By using of a transducer of 2.25 MHz nominal frequency, in pulse echo mode, ultrasonic parameters, such as propagation velocity and attenuation,have been measured for pure olive oil and for its mixtures with sunflower oil at different proportions. Mechanical properties, such as density and viscosity, have also been determined. The results of ultrasonic measurements are consistent with those obtained by physico-chemical methods, such as rancidity degree, acid index, UV specific extinction coefficient and viscosity. They show that the ultrasonic method allows to distinguish between mixtures at different proportions. The study allows concluding that ultrasound techniques can be considered as a useful complement to existing physico-chemical analysis techniques.

  13. Dark fermentation on biohydrogen production: Pure culture.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Show, Kuan-Yeow; Su, Ay

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is regarded as an attractive future clean energy carrier due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. While biohydrogen production is still in the early stage of development, there have been a variety of laboratory- and pilot-scale systems developed with promising potential. This work presents a review of literature reports on the pure hydrogen-producers under anaerobic environment. Challenges and perspective of biohydrogen production with pure cultures are also outlined.

  14. Diphenylhydantoin-induced pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Rusia, Usha; Malhotra, Purnima; Joshi, Panul

    2006-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia is an uncommon complication of diphenylhydantoin therapy. It has not been reported in Indian literature. Awareness of the entity helps in establishing the cause of anaemia in these patients and alerts the physicians to the need of comprehensive haematological monitoring in these patients. A case of 58-year-old male who developed pure red cell aplasia following three months of diphenylhydantoin therapy is reported here.

  15. Lase Ultrasonic Web Stiffness tester

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Patterson, Ph.D., IPST at Ga Tech

    2009-01-12

    The objective is to provide a sensor that uses non-contact, laser ultrasonics to measure the stiffness of paper during the manufacturing process. This will allow the manufacturer to adjust the production process in real time, increase filler content, modify fiber refining and as result produce a quality product using less energy. The sensor operates by moving back and forth across the paper web, at pre-selected locations firing a laser at the sheet, measuring the out-of-plane velocity of the sheet then using that measurement to calculate sheet stiffness.

  16. Passive wireless ultrasonic transducer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, C. H.; Croxford, A. J.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2014-02-01

    Inductive coupling and capacitive coupling both offer simple solutions to wirelessly probe ultrasonic transducers. This paper investigates the theory and feasibility of such system in the context of non-destructive evaluation (NDE) applications. Firstly, the physical principles and construction of an inductively coupled transducer system (ICTS) and a capacitively coupled transducer system (CCTS) are introduced. Then the development of a transmission line model with the measured impedance of a bonded piezoelectric ceramic disc representing a sensor attached to an arbitrary solid substrate for both systems is described. The models are validated experimentally. Several applications of CCTS are presented, such CCTS for the underwater and through-composite testing.

  17. Purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Aytar, Murat Hamit; Yener, Ulaş; Ekşi, Murat Şakir; Kaya, Behram; Özgen, Serdar; Sav, Aydin; Alanay, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas present mostly as intradural-extradurally. Purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastoma is a very rare entity. In this study, we aimed to analyze epidemiological perspectives of purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas presented in English medical literature in addition to our own exemplary case. PubMed/MEDLINE was searched using the terms “hemangioblastoma,” “extradural,” “spinal,” and “nerve root.” Demographical variables of age, gender, concomitant presence of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease; spinal imaging and/or intraoperative findings for tumor location were surveyed from retrieved articles. There are 38 patients with purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastoma. The median age is 45 years (range = 24–72 years). Female:male ratio is 0.6. Spinal levels for purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas, in order of decreasing frequency, are thoracic (48.6%), cervical (13.5%), lumbar (13.5%), lumbosacral (10.8%), sacral (8.1%), and thoracolumbar (5.4%). Concomitant presence of VHL disease is 45%. Purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas are very rare and can be confused with other more common extradural spinal cord tumors. Concomitant presence of VHL disease is observed in less than half of the patients with purely extradural spinal nerve root hemangioblastomas. Surgery is the first-line treatment in these tumors. PMID:27891027

  18. Early communication deficits in the Shank1 knockout mouse model for autism spectrum disorder: Developmental aspects and effects of social context.

    PubMed

    Sungur, A Özge; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Wöhr, Markus

    2016-06-01

    Alterations in SHANK genes were repeatedly reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). ASD is a group of neurodevelopmental disorders diagnosed by persistent deficits in social communication/interaction across multiple contexts, with restricted/repetitive patterns of behavior. To date, diagnostic criteria for ASD are purely behaviorally defined and reliable biomarkers have still not been identified. The validity of mouse models for ASD therefore strongly relies on their behavioral phenotype. Here, we studied communication by means of isolation-induced pup ultrasonic vocalizations (USV) in the Shank1 mouse model for ASD by comparing Shank1(-/-) null mutant, Shank1(+/-) heterozygous, and Shank1(+/+) wildtype littermate controls. The first aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of Shank1 deletions on developmental aspects of communication in order to see whether ASD-related communication deficits are due to general impairment or delay in development. Second, we focused on social context effects on USV production. We show that Shank1(-/-) pups vocalized less and displayed a delay in the typical inverted U-shaped developmental USV emission pattern with USV rates peaking on postnatal day (PND) 9, resulting in a prominent genotype difference on PND6. Moreover, testing under social conditions revealed even more prominently genotype-dependent deficits regardless of the familiarity of the social context. As communication by definition serves a social function, introducing a social component to the typically nonsocial test environment could therefore help to reveal communication deficits in mouse models for ASD. Together, these results indicate that SHANK1 is involved in acoustic communication across species, with genetic alterations in SHANK1 resulting in social communication/interaction deficits. Autism Res 2016, 9: 696-709. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225... Devices § 884.2225 Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  20. 21 CFR 884.2660 - Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. 884.2660... Devices § 884.2660 Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. (a) Identification. A fetal ultrasonic monitor is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from the pregnant...

  1. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g.,...

  2. 21 CFR 884.2225 - Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. 884.2225... Devices § 884.2225 Obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager. (a) Identification. An obstetric-gynecologic ultrasonic imager is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from a...

  3. 21 CFR 884.2660 - Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. 884.2660... Devices § 884.2660 Fetal ultrasonic monitor and accessories. (a) Identification. A fetal ultrasonic monitor is a device designed to transmit and receive ultrasonic energy into and from the pregnant...

  4. 21 CFR 882.1925 - Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. 882... Ultrasonic scanner calibration test block. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic scanner calibration test block is a block of material with known properties used to calibrate ultrasonic scanning devices (e.g.,...

  5. 21 CFR 884.2960 - Obstetric ultrasonic transducer and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... obstetric ultrasonic transducer is a device used to apply ultrasonic energy to, and to receive ultrasonic energy from, the body in conjunction with an obstetric monitor or imager. The device converts electrical signals into ultrasonic energy, and vice versa, by means of an assembly distinct from an...

  6. Pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic pringle maneuver in patients with severe cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Shigehito; Nakanishi, Chikashi; Kawagishi, Naoki; Kamei, Takashi; Satomi, Susumu; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy is a standard surgical procedure. However, it is difficult to perform in patients with severe cirrhosis because of fibrosis and a high risk of hemorrhage. We report our recent experience in five cases of pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver in patients with severe cirrhosis. From 2012 to 2014, we performed pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy in five patients with severe liver cirrhosis (indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min [ICG R15] >30% and fibrosis stage f4). A pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver was employed in all patients. We investigated operative time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization and the days when discharge was possible, and compared these findings with those of patients with a normal liver (ICG R15 <10%, f0) who underwent pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy during the same period (n = 7). As a result, operative time, blood loss, duration of hospitalization and the days when discharge was possible were similar in patients with cirrhosis undergoing pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver to those in patients with a normal liver undergoing pure laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. In conclusion, pure laparoscopic hepatectomy combined with a pure laparoscopic Pringle maneuver appears to be safe in patients with severe cirrhosis.

  7. Floating Ultrasonic Transducer Inspection System and Method for Nondestructive Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N. (Inventor); Johnston, Patrick H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for inspecting a structural sample using ultrasonic energy includes positioning an ultrasonic transducer adjacent to a surface of the sample, and then transmitting ultrasonic energy into the sample. Force pulses are applied to the transducer concurrently with transmission of the ultrasonic energy. A host machine processes ultrasonic return pulses from an ultrasonic pulser/receiver to quantify attenuation of the ultrasonic energy within the sample. The host machine detects a defect in the sample using the quantified level of attenuation. The method may include positioning a dry couplant between an ultrasonic transducer and the surface. A system includes an actuator, an ultrasonic transducer, a dry couplant between the transducer the sample, a scanning device that moves the actuator and transducer, and a measurement system having a pulsed actuator power supply, an ultrasonic pulser/receiver, and a host machine that executes the above method.

  8. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aerospace Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, Cara; Johnston, Patrick; Haldren, Harold; Perey, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Composite materials have seen an increased use in aerospace in recent years and it is expected that this trend will continue due to the benefits of reduced weight, increased strength, and other factors. Ongoing work at NASA involves the investigation of the large-scale use of composites for spacecraft structures (SLS components, Orion Composite Crew Module, etc). NASA is also involved in work to enable the use of composites in advanced aircraft structures through the Advanced Composites Project (ACP). In both areas (space and aeronautics) there is a need for new nondestructive evaluation and materials characterization techniques that are appropriate for characterizing composite materials. This paper will present an overview of NASA's needs for characterizing aerospace composites, including a description of planned and ongoing work under ACP for the detection of composite defects such as fiber waviness, reduced bond strength, delamination damage, and microcracking. The research approaches include investigation of angle array, guided wave, and phase sensitive ultrasonic methods. The use of ultrasonic simulation tools for optimizing and developing methods will also be discussed.

  9. Dynamics of ultrasonic additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a solid-state technology for joining similar and dissimilar metal foils near room temperature by scrubbing them together with ultrasonic vibrations under pressure. Structural dynamics of the welding assembly and work piece influence how energy is transferred during the process and ultimately, part quality. To understand the effect of structural dynamics during UAM, a linear time-invariant model is proposed to relate the inputs of shear force and electric current to resultant welder velocity and voltage. Measured frequency response and operating performance of the welder under no load is used to identify model parameters. Using this model and in-situ measurements, shear force and welder efficiency are estimated to be near 2000N and 80% when welding Al 6061-H18 weld foil, respectively. Shear force and welder efficiency have never been estimated before in UAM. The influence of processing conditions, i.e., welder amplitude, normal force, and weld speed, on shear force and welder efficiency are investigated. Welder velocity was found to strongly influence the shear force magnitude and efficiency while normal force and weld speed showed little to no influence. The proposed model is used to describe high frequency harmonic content in the velocity response of the welder during welding operations and coupling of the UAM build with the welder.

  10. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  11. Wire Crimp Termination Verification Using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp terminations is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp termination and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which is a standard for assessing crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies such as undercrimping, missing wire strands, incomplete wire insertion, partial insulation removal, and incorrect wire gauge are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the nondestructive ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with destructive testing) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying this technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented. The instrument is based on a two-jaw type crimp tool suitable for butt-splice type connections. Finally, an approach for application to multipin indenter type crimps will be discussed.

  12. Ultrasonic compaction of granular geological materials.

    PubMed

    Feeney, Andrew; Sikaneta, Sakalima; Harkness, Patrick; Lucas, Margaret

    2017-04-01

    It has been shown that the compaction of granular materials for applications such as pharmaceutical tableting and plastic moulding can be enhanced by ultrasonic vibration of the compaction die. Ultrasonic vibrations can reduce the compaction pressure and increase particle fusion, leading to higher strength products. In this paper, the potential benefits of ultrasonics in the compaction of geological granular materials in downhole applications are explored, to gain insight into the effects of ultrasonic vibrations on compaction of different materials commonly encountered in sub-sea drilling. Ultrasonic vibrations are applied, using a resonant 20kHz compactor, to the compaction of loose sand and drill waste cuttings derived from oolitic limestone, clean quartz sandstone, and slate-phyllite. For each material, a higher strain for a given compaction pressure was achieved, with higher sample density compared to that in the case of an absence of ultrasonics. The relationships between the operational parameters of ultrasonic vibration amplitude and true strain rate are explored and shown to be dependent on the physical characteristics of the compacting materials.

  13. An ultrasonic transducer transient compensator design based on a simplified Variable Structure Control algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shaodong; Wilkinson, Antony J; Paulson, Kevin S

    2014-02-01

    A non-linear control method, known as Variable Structure Control (VSC), is employed to reduce the duration of ultrasonic (US) transducer transients. A physically realizable system using a simplified form of the VSC algorithm is proposed for standard piezoelectric transducers and simulated. Results indicate a VSC-controlled transmitter reduces the transient duration to less than a carrier wave cycle. Applications include high capacity ultrasound communication and localization systems.

  14. Compound cavity theory of resonant phase modulation in laser self-mixing ultrasonic vibration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yufeng; Wang, Ming; Guo, Dongmei

    2016-07-01

    The theoretical basis of self-mixing interference (SMI) employing a resonant phase modulator is explored to prove its tempting advantages. The adopted method induces a pure phase carrier without increasing system complexity. A simple time-domain signal process is used to estimate modulation depth and precisely track vibrating trail, which promises the flexibility of measuring ultrasonic vibration regardless of the constraint of the Bessel functions. The broad bandwidth, low speckle noise, compact, safe, and easy operating SMI system obtains the best resolution of a poor reflection environment. Numerical simulation discusses the spectrum broadening and errors due to multiple reflections. Experimental results agree with theory coherently and are compared with laser Doppler vibration meter showing a dynamical error better than 20 nm in ultrasonic vibration measurement.

  15. Wet-grinding assisted ultrasonic dispersion of pristine multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in chitosan solution.

    PubMed

    Tang, Changyu; Zhou, Tiannan; Yang, Jinghui; Zhang, Qin; Chen, Feng; Fu, Qiang; Yang, Li

    2011-08-01

    Ultrasonication is often used to disperse nano-particles in aqueous solution. However, a good dispersion of nano-particles in aqueous solution is not always achieved, due to the fact that incoming ultrasonicwaves in liquid are usually reflected and damped at the gas/liquid interface. In this work, we report a so-called wet-grinding assisted ultrasonication (GU) method, in which wet-grinding of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in chitosan solution is carried out before ultrasonication. The dispersions of MWCNTs were characterized by visual comparison, UV/vis spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate that the dispersion quality of chitosan/MWCNT suspension prepared by wet-grinding assisted ultrasonication is much better than that by ultrasonication or wet-grinding alone. It was found that wet-grinding could improve the water wettability of MWCNTs and eliminate the barrier of air layer around MWCNTs to ultrasonicwaves. Meanwhile, the composite from the chitosan/MWCNTs suspension prepared by GU method has an obvious improvement in mechanical property compared to pure chitosan. This simple method for integrating MWCNTs and biocompatible chitosan into a homogeneous dispersion may have great potential application in biotechnology, such as preparing composite materials for medicine, bio-fiber, biosensor, antibacterial coating, and cell cultivation.

  16. Nokia PureView oversampling technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuori, Tero; Alakarhu, Juha; Salmelin, Eero; Partinen, Ari

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes Nokia's PureView oversampling imaging technology as well as the product, Nokia 808 PureView, featuring it. The Nokia PureView imaging technology is the combination of a large, super high resolution 41Mpix with high performance Carl Zeiss optics. Large sensor enables a pixel oversampling technique that reduces an image taken at full resolution into a lower resolution picture, thus achieving higher definition and light sensitivity. One oversampled super pixel in image file is formed by using many sensor pixels. A large sensor enables also a lossless zoom. If a user wants to use the lossless zoom, the sensor image is cropped. However, up-scaling is not needed as in traditional digital zooming usually used in mobile devices. Lossless zooming means image quality that does not have the digital zooming artifacts as well as no optical zooming artifacts like zoom lens system distortions. Zooming with PureView is also completely silent. PureView imaging technology is the result of many years of research and development and the tangible fruits of this work are exceptional image quality, lossless zoom, and superior low light performance.

  17. Ultrasonic angle beam standard reflector. [ultrasonic nondestructive inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, R. F., Jr. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method that provides an impression profile in a reference standard material utilized in inspecting critically stressed components with pulsed ultrasound is described. A die stamp having an I letter is used to impress the surface of a reference material. The die stamp is placed against the surface and struck with an inertia imparting member to impress the I in the reference standard material. Upset may appear on the surface as a result of the impression and is removed to form a smooth surface. The stamping and upset removal is repeated until the entire surface area of a depth control platform on the die stamp uniformly contacts the material surface. The I impression profile in the reference standard material is utilized for reflecting pulsed ultrasonic beams for inspection purposes.

  18. On-line ultrasonic gas entrainment monitor

    DOEpatents

    Day, Clifford K.; Pedersen, Herbert N.

    1978-01-01

    Apparatus employing ultrasonic energy for detecting and measuring the quantity of gas bubbles present in liquids being transported through pipes. An ultrasonic transducer is positioned along the longitudinal axis of a fluid duct, oriented to transmit acoustic energy radially of the duct around the circumference of the enclosure walls. The back-reflected energy is received centrally of the duct and interpreted as a measure of gas entrainment. One specific embodiment employs a conical reflector to direct the transmitted acoustic energy radially of the duct and redirect the reflected energy back to the transducer for reception. A modified embodiment employs a cylindrical ultrasonic transducer for this purpose.

  19. Phase-Insensitive Ultrasonic Testing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.

    1995-01-01

    Ultrasonic testing system developed for use in revealing hidden disbonds at rough, inaccessible interfaces between layers of material. Includes array of small piezoelectric transducers, receiving outputs electronically processed individually and combined in such way as to make system phase-insensitive, overcoming limitations imposed by phase-sensitivity. Development of present ultrasonic system and phase-insensitive-array technique which based motivated by need to detect disbonds under conditions of bondline inhibitor, liner, and fuel at ends of segments of solid rocket motor of space shuttle. Here, liner-to-fuel bondline very rough with respect to ultrasonic wavelength.

  20. Time-reversed ultrasonically encoded optical focusing using two ultrasonic transducers for improved ultrasonic axial resolution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Xu, Xiao; Lai, Puxiang; Xu, Daxiong; Wang, Lihong V

    2013-11-01

    Focusing light inside highly scattering media is a challenging task in biomedical optical imaging, manipulation, and therapy. A recent invention has overcome this challenge by time reversing ultrasonically encoded diffuse light to an ultrasound-modulated volume inside a turbid medium. In this technique, a photorefractive (PR) crystal or polymer can be used as the phase conjugate mirror for optical time reversal. Accordingly, a relatively long ultrasound burst, whose duration matches the PR response time of the PR material, is usually used to encode the diffuse light. This long burst results in poor focusing resolution along the acoustic axis. In this work, we propose to use two intersecting ultrasound beams, emitted from two ultrasonic transducers at different frequencies, to modulate the diffuse light at the beat frequency within the intersection volume. We show that the time reversal of the light encoded at the beat frequency can converge back to the intersection volume. Experimentally, an acoustic axial resolution of ~1.1 mm was demonstrated inside turbid media, agreeing with theoretical estimation.

  1. Linear and Nonlinear Ultrasonic Properties of Granular Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonner, B.; Berge, P.A.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.M.; Bertete-Auguirre, H.; Wildenschild, D.; Trombino, C.N.; Hardy, E.

    2000-04-20

    The ultrasonic pulse transmission method (100-500 kHz) was adapted to measure compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities for synthetic soils fabricated from quartz-clay and quartz-peat mixtures. Velocities were determined as samples were loaded by small (up to 0.1 MPa) uniaxial stress to determine how stress at grain contacts affects ave amplitudes, velocities, and frequency content. Samples were fabricated from quartz sand mixed with either a swelling clay or peat (natural cellulose). P velocities in these dry synthetic soil samples were low, ranging from about 230 to 430 m/s for pure sand, about 91 to 420 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 230 to 470 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. S velocities were about half of the P velocity in most cases, about 130 to 250 m/s for pure sand, about 75-220 m/s for sand-peat mixtures, and about 88-220 m/s for dry sand-clay mixtures. These experiments demonstrate that P and S velocities are sensitive to the amount and type of admixed second phase at low concentrations. They found that dramatic increases in all velocities occur with small uniaxial loads, indicating strong nonlinearity of the acoustic properties. Composition and grain packing contribute to the mechanical response at grain contacts and the nonlinear response at low stresses.

  2. Cytotoxicity of gold nanoparticles prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, R; Friedrich, B; Stopić, S; Anžel, I; Tomić, S; Čolić, M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the cytotoxicity of different fractions of gold nanoparticles prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis from gold scrap. The target cells were rat thymocytes, as a type of nonproliferating cells, and L929 mouse fibroblasts, as a type of continuous proliferating cells. Fractions 1 and 2, composed of pure gold nanoparticles, as determined by scanning electron microscopy with a combination of energy dispersive X-ray analysis, were nontoxic for thymocytes, but reduced moderately the proliferative activity of L929 cells. The inhibitory effect of fraction 2, containing particles smaller in size than fraction 1, was stronger. Fraction 3, composed of Au and up to 3% Cu was noncytotoxic for thymocytes, but was cytotoxic for L929 cells. Fraction 4, composed of Au and Ag nanoparticles, and fraction 5, composed of Au together with Cu, Ni, Zn, Fe, and In were cytotoxic for both thymocytes and L929 cells. These results suggest that USP enables the synthesis of pure gold nanoparticles with controlled size, even from gold scrap. However, microstructural analyses and biocompatibility testing are necessary for their proper selection from more cytotoxic gold nanoparticles, contaminated with other elements of gold alloys.

  3. A mechanistic ultrasonic vibration amplitude model during rotary ultrasonic machining of CFRP composites.

    PubMed

    Ning, Fuda; Wang, Hui; Cong, Weilong; Fernando, P K S C

    2017-04-01

    Rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) has been investigated in machining of brittle, ductile, as well as composite materials. Ultrasonic vibration amplitude, as one of the most important input variables, affects almost all the output variables in RUM. Numerous investigations on measuring ultrasonic vibration amplitude without RUM machining have been reported. In recent years, ultrasonic vibration amplitude measurement with RUM of ductile materials has been investigated. It is found that the ultrasonic vibration amplitude with RUM was different from that without RUM under the same input variables. RUM is primarily used in machining of brittle materials through brittle fracture removal. With this reason, the method for measuring ultrasonic vibration amplitude in RUM of ductile materials is not feasible for measuring that in RUM of brittle materials. However, there are no reported methods for measuring ultrasonic vibration amplitude in RUM of brittle materials. In this study, ultrasonic vibration amplitude in RUM of brittle materials is investigated by establishing a mechanistic amplitude model through cutting force. Pilot experiments are conducted to validate the calculation model. The results show that there are no significant differences between amplitude values calculated by model and those obtained from experimental investigations. The model can provide a relationship between ultrasonic vibration amplitude and input variables, which is a foundation for building models to predict other output variables in RUM.

  4. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  5. BRST and the pure spinor formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, J. Antonio

    2008-03-06

    The aim of this talk is to show the relation between the standard BRST approach of the GS superstring with the quantization technics used in the pure spinor approach to superstring. To that end we will use the Batalin-Fradkin-Tyutin (BFT) conversion program of second class constraints to first class constraints in the GS superstring using light cone coordinates. By applying this systematic procedure we were able to obtain a gauge system that is equivalent to the recent model proposed in [1] to relate the GS superstring to the pure spinor formalism.

  6. Pure Apraxia of Speech - A Case Report -

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Ae; Yun, Sang Jin

    2011-01-01

    Apraxia of speech (AOS) is the impairment of motor programming. However, the exact nature of this deficit remains unclear. In particular, AOS without other speech-language deficit is called pure AOS, but it is very rare. When diagnosing AOS, the characteristic of articulation is considered a crucial criterion, which has been proposed for differentiating AOS from phonological and dysarthric disorders. The present study reports on pure AOS in a 37-year-old right-handed male after a left insular, front, temporal infarction. This report may be useful for further AOS study and diagnosis in the clinical setting. PMID:22506197

  7. Minimal covariant observables identifying all pure states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    It has been recently shown by Heinosaari, Mazzarella and Wolf (2013) [1] that an observable that identifies all pure states of a d-dimensional quantum system has minimally 4d-4 outcomes or slightly less (the exact number depending on d). However, no simple construction of this type of minimal observable is known. We investigate covariant observables that identify all pure states and have minimal number of outcomes. It is shown that the existence of this kind of observables depends on the dimension of the Hilbert space.

  8. Ultrasonic atomization for spray drying: a versatile technique for the preparation of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bittner, B; Kissel, T

    1999-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BDA) loaded microspheres with a spherical shape and smooth surface structure were successfully prepared from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) using an ultrasonic nozzle installed in a Niro laboratory spray dryer. Process and formulation parameters were investigated with respect to their influence on microsphere characteristics, such as particle size, loading capacity, and release properties. Preparation of microspheres in yields of more than 50% was achieved using an ultrasonic atomizer connected to a stream of carrier air. Microsphere characteristics could be modified by changing several technological parameters. An increased polymer concentration of the feed generated larger particles with a significantly reduced initial release of the protein. Moreover, microspheres with a smooth surface structure were obtained from the organic polymer solution with the highest viscosity. Microparticles with a low BSA loading showed a large central cavity surrounded by a thin polymer layer in scanning electron microspheres. A high protein loading led to an enlargement of the shell layer, or even to dense particles without any cavities. A continuous in vitro release pattern of BSA was obtained from the particles with low protein loading. Glass transition temperatures (Tg) of the microspheres before and after lyophilization did not differ from those of the BSA loaded particles prepared by spray drying with a rotary atomizer. Analysis of the polymer by gel permeation chromatography indicated that ultrasonication had no effect on polymer molecular weight. Molecular weight and polydispersity of the pure polymer, placebo microspheres prepared by spray drying, and placebo microspheres prepared using the ultrasonic nozzle were in the same range. In conclusion, ultrasonic atomization represents a versatile and reliable technique for the production of protein loaded biodegradable microspheres without inducing a degradation of the polymer matrix. Particle characteristics

  9. Effects of ultrasonication and conventional mechanical homogenization processes on the structures and dielectric properties of BaTiO3 ceramics.

    PubMed

    Akbas, Hatice Zehra; Aydin, Zeki; Yilmaz, Onur; Turgut, Selvin

    2017-01-01

    The effects of the homogenization process on the structures and dielectric properties of pure and Nb-doped BaTiO3 ceramics have been investigated using an ultrasonic homogenization and conventional mechanical methods. The reagents were homogenized using an ultrasonic processor with high-intensity ultrasonic waves and using a compact mixer-shaker. The components and crystal types of the powders were determined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The complex permittivity (ε('), ε″) and AC conductivity (σ') of the samples were analyzed in a wide frequency range of 20Hz to 2MHz at room temperature. The structures and dielectric properties of pure and Nb-doped BaTiO3 ceramics strongly depend on the homogenization process in a solid-state reaction method. Using an ultrasonic processor with high-intensity ultrasonic waves based on acoustic cavitation phenomena can make a significant improvement in producing high-purity BaTiO3 ceramics without carbonate impurities with a small dielectric loss.

  10. Ultrasonic Characterization of Glass Beads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassila, I.; Siiriä, S.; Gates, F. K.; Hæggström, E.

    2008-02-01

    We report on the progress in developing a method for an in-line granule size measurement using ultrasonic through transmission method. The knowledge of granule size is important in the production of pharmaceutical dosage forms where the current optical and rheological methods have limitations such as fouling of the optical windows. The phase velocity of a wave propagated through interstitial air between glass balls of 1, 2 and 10 mm in diameter was 254±5 m/s, 261±3 m/s and 320±9 m/s, respectively. The power spectral density of the received signals showed that high frequencies were attenuated more in case of smaller beads due to increased scattering.

  11. An ultrasonic characterization of ferrofluid.

    PubMed

    Singh, D K; Pandey, D K; Yadav, R R

    2009-12-01

    Nanoparticles of Cr(2)O(3) are prepared through hydrothermal synthesis process using CrO(3)/PVA in aqueous solution using sucrose as a reducing agent. The calcination temperature is taken 300 and 350 degrees C. XRD and SEM of the powdered Cr(2)O(3) particles are done for the characterization. The average particle size is found 30-80 nm. It is found that average particle size increases with calcination temperature. The UV-visible absorption spectra are taken for the study of photo-physical properties of ferrofluids. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurements are performed in Cr(2)O(3) ferrofluid using variable path interferometer and pulse-echo techniques, respectively. The achieved results are discussed in correlation with the magnetic and other physical properties of Cr(2)O(3).

  12. Ultrasonic characterization of porosity: theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    The volume fraction of pores in cast materials is often used as a quality control and product acceptance criterion. In this task-oriented paper, the use of backscattered ultrasound to characterize the volume fraction of pores in A357 cast aluminum is analyzed. Important constraints on possible measurement methods are: (1) single sided access, (2) rapid scan rates, and (3) high sensitivity (i.e., the ability to measure volume fractions on the order of .1%). The structure of this article is as follows. First, general aspects of ultrasonic scattering from porous media are discussed. These general results focus attention on the frequency dependent attentuation which is reviewed next. Then, following a proposal of Gubernatis and Domany (2), a method of determining the volume fraction and pore size is given. This method is then characterized by a figure-of-merit. Finally, the paper is concluded by a summary.

  13. Ultrasonic inspection and deployment apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.; Mech, Jr., Stephen J.

    1984-01-01

    An ultrasonic inspection apparatus for the inspection of metal structures, especially installed pipes. The apparatus combines a specimen inspection element, an acoustical velocity sensing element, and a surface profiling element, all in one scanning head. A scanning head bellows contains a volume of oil above the pipe surface, serving as acoustical couplant between the scanning head and the pipe. The scanning head is mounted on a scanning truck which is mobile around a circular track surrounding the pipe. The scanning truck has sufficient motors, gears, and position encoders to allow the scanning head six degrees of motion freedom. A computer system continually monitors acoustical velocity, and uses that parameter to process surface profiling and inspection data. The profiling data is used to automatically control scanning head position and alignment and to define a coordinate system used to identify and interpret inspection data. The apparatus is suitable for highly automated, remote application in hostile environments, particularly high temperature and radiation areas.

  14. A silicon electrostatic ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kenichiro; Higuchi, Kohei; Tanigawa, Hiroshi

    1989-11-01

    An electric ultrasonic transducer is developed by using a silicon IC process. Design considerations are first presented to obtain high sensitivity and the desired frequency responses in air. The measured transmitter sensitivity is 19.1 dB (0 dB = 1 microbar/V) at a point 50 cm away from the devices, when the devices are operated at 150 kHz. The receiving sensitivity is 0.47 mV/Pa in the 10-130-kHz range, with bias voltages as low as 30 V. An electronic sector scanning operation is also achieved by time-sequentially driving seven elements arranged in a linear array on the same chip. The results should be helpful in the design of phased-array transducers integrated with electronic scanning circuits.

  15. A novel ultrasonic aerosol generator.

    PubMed

    Davies, A; Hudson, N; Pirie, L

    1995-07-01

    An ultrasonic aerosol generator constructed from a domestic humidifier is described which has been used to produce liquid aerosols for physiological investigations. The instrument was constructed from a Pifco domestic humidifier modified to include an energy guide to direct the oscillations of the transducer through the coupling water, which would normally be aerosolized, onto a small membrane based sample chamber containing the liquid to be aerosolized. The size distribution of the aerosol produced was found to be between 2 and 6 mm, optimum for diffuse intrapulmonary deposition. Up to 4 ml/min of aqueous liquid was used; however the sample chamber could be made small enough to contain economic amounts of expensive material to administer by inhalation. The instrument has proved to be reliable over a period of three years.

  16. Ultrasonic sensing of powder densification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Yichi; Wadley, Haydn N. G.; Parthasarathi, Sanjai

    1992-01-01

    An independent scattering theory has been applied to the interpretation of ultrasonic velocity measurements made on porous metal samples produced either by a cold or a high-temperature compaction process. The results suggest that the pores in both processes are not spherical, an aspect ration of 1:3 fitting best with the data for low (less than 4 percent) pore volume fractions. For the hot compacted powders, the pores are smooth due to active diffusional processes during processing. For these types of voids, the results can be extended to a pore fraction of 10 percent, at which point voids form an interconnected network that violates the model assumptions. The cold pressed samples are not as well predicted by the theory because of poor particle bonding.

  17. Electromagnetic transduction of ultrasonic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passarelli, Frank; Alers, George; Alers, Ron

    2012-05-01

    Excitation and detection of ultrasonic vibrations without physical contact has proven to be of great commercial value. First used to excite the resonant vibration of bar shaped laboratory specimens in the 1930's, it was Bruce Thompson's contributions in 1973-5 that launched their practical application to a wide range of difficult NDE problems. As a fresh PhD, he championed the use of mathematical models for the electromagnetic transduction process in order to guide the design and construction of practical transducers. His early papers presented both theoretical and experimental results that exposed the wide range of wave types that could be generated along with the environmental conditions that could be overcome. Several laboratories around the world established research programs to apply the electromagnetic transducer (EMAT) to specific NDE problems. This paper will summarize those applications made by the authors.

  18. Ultrasonic Histotripsy for Tissue Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahk, K. J.; Dhar, D. K.; Malago, M.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation has been considered and investigated as a promising and alternative method to liver transplantation for treating liver-based metabolic disorder in newborns over the past two decades. Although some clinical trials have been conducted and shown clinical benefits and outcomes, it is difficult to deliver and achieve a desired level of integration and transplantation of hepatocytes in the liver parenchyma. To overcome this problem, this work introduces an alternative method to a portal-infused-hepatocyte cell transplantation. To improve the level of engraftment of transplantable hepatocytes, these are injected directly into cavities generated by ultrasonic histotripsy. Histotripsy is an extracorporeal noninvasive technique which has been recently developed using high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for inducing tissue fractionation with no coagulative necrosis. The exact mechanisms for the tissue fractionation are not well understood yet; but the possible mechanisms are thought to be a combination of nonlinear wave propagation effect, explosive bubble growth and ultrasonic atomization. The main objectives of this work are to demonstrate the feasibility of this new cell therapy and evaluate and distinguish between the different types of cavitation activity for either a thermally or a mechanically induced lesion. In the present work, numerical studies on the bubble dynamics (the Gilmore-Akulichev bubble model coupled with the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov equation) and both ex- and in vivo liver experiments are conducted with histological analysis (haematoxylin and eosin stain). The numerical and the experimental results suggest that (a) the acoustic emissions emitted during the thermal ablation and the histotripsy exposure can be distinguished both numerically and experimentally and (b) the proposed cell therapy may potentially form an effective and safe clinical treatment for replacing and correcting disordered hepatocytes, although the

  19. Application of Ultrasonic Dental Scaler for Diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Takasaki, Masaya; Kutami, Tomonori; Mizuno, Takeshi

    Ultrasonic dental scaler is an instrument to remove dental calculi using ultrasonic vibration of a transducer. The conventional transducer has a hose to provide water to scaling point. The hose causes attenuation of the ultrasonic vibration. This paper describes a new transducer design to avoid the attenuation. Design decision by comparison of two types of transducer designs is reported. Additionally, the ultrasonic transducer is used in resonance condition. The resonance frequency, however, is shifted according to value of input voltage to the transducer and condition of contact with tooth or gum. This paper presents a resonance frequency tracing system to solve the frequency shift. Step responses are specified as evaluation of the system. Application of the system to diagnosis is also discussed. Experiments on measurement of object properties are reported. The results indicate possibility that dental health can be investigated by observing the frequency shift during the scaler operation.

  20. Continuous flow measurements using fixed ultrasonic meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oltmann, Rick

    1993-01-01

    USGS has or soon will be installing four continuous flow-monitoring stations in the delta that will use ultrasonic velocity meters (DVM). Funding for the stations has been provided by USGS, DWR, USBR, and Contra Costa Water District.

  1. Semiconductor measurement technology: Microelectronic ultrasonic bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, G. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    Information for making high quality ultrasonic wire bonds is presented as well as data to provide a basic understanding of the ultrasonic systems used. The work emphasizes problems and methods of solving them. The required measurement equipment is first introduced. This is followed by procedures and techniques used in setting up a bonding machine, and then various machine- or operator-induced reliability problems are discussed. The characterization of the ultrasonic system and its problems are followed by in-process bonding studies and work on the ultrasonic bonding (welding) mechanism. The report concludes with a discussion of various effects of bond geometry and wire metallurgical characteristics. Where appropriate, the latest, most accurate value of a particular measurement has been substituted for an earlier reported one.

  2. Tailoring ultrasonic beams with optoacoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Alex; Gspan, Stefan J.; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2003-06-01

    A combination of laser-induced ultrasound generation and ultrasonic holography for spatial control of the generated ultrasonic pulse is presented. Ultrasound is produced by absorption of laser pulses at an absorbing layer in a water tank via the optoacoustic effect. In order to produce a defined ultrasonic frequency in the MHz range, the laser pulses are harmonically time-modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM). Additionally, the laser intensity is spatially controlled. This is realized with a high resolution liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCD). A computer generated pattern is displayed at the LCD and projected by the expanded laser beam to an absorptive layer in the water tank. As a result, the emitted ultrasonic wave emerges in a predetermined way, which is an acoustical analogue to the effect of a "diffractive optical element" in laser optics. The flexible method of optical ultrasound generation and diffractive steering promises new applications in medical and technical ultrasound diagnostics.

  3. Ultrasonically-assisted Thermal Stir Welding System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A welding head assembly has a work piece disposed between its containment plates' opposing surfaces with the work piece being maintained in a plastic state thereof at least in a vicinity of the welding head assembly's stir rod as the rod is rotated about its longitudinal axis. The welding head assembly and the work piece experience relative movement there between in a direction perpendicular to the rod's longitudinal axis as the work piece is subjected to a compressive force applied by the containment plates. A first source coupled to the first containment plate applies a first ultrasonic wave thereto such that the first ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement. A second source coupled to the second containment plate applies a second ultrasonic wave thereto such that the second ultrasonic wave propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.propagates parallel to the direction of relative movement.

  4. Ultrasonic propagation in gases at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, C.; Carnevale, E. H.; Lynworth, L. C.; Uva, S.

    1970-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse method /1 to 3 MHz/ measures both sound speed and absorption in monatomic and polyatomic gases in a temperature range of 300 to 20000 degrees K at atmospheric pressure. Helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and argon are investigated.

  5. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  6. Ultrasonics used to measure residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to measure residual stress in metal structures. By using this method, various forms of wave propagation in metals are possible, and more thorough analysis of complex geometric structures may be had.

  7. Changes in Rat 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations During Dopamine Denervation and Aging: Relevance to Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Aaron M.; Grant, Laura M.; Schallert, Timothy; Ciucci, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Vocal communication is negatively affected by neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, and by aging. The neurological and sensorimotor mechanisms underlying voice deficits in Parkinson disease and aging are not well-understood. Rat ultrasonic vocalizations provide a unique behavioral model for studying communication deficits and the mechanisms underlying these deficits in these conditions. The purpose of this review was to examine the existing literature for methods using rat ultrasonic vocalization with regard to the primary disease pathology of Parkinson disease, dopamine denervation, and aging. Although only a small amount of papers were found for each of these topics, results suggest that both shared and unique acoustic deficits in ultrasonic vocalizations exist across conditions and that these acoustic deficits are due to changes in either dopamine signaling or denervation and in aging models changes to the nucleus ambiguus, at the level of the neuromuscular junction, and the composition of the vocal folds in the larynx. We conclude that ultrasonic vocalizations are a useful tool for studying biologic mechanisms underlying vocal communication deficits in neurodegenerative diseases and aging. PMID:26411763

  8. Ultrasonic Velocities in Lightly-Loaded Natural and Synthetic Granular Media*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Frane, W.; Toffelmier, D.; Carlson, S.; Bonner, B.; Berge, P.

    2002-12-01

    The seismic properties of near surface soils are of interest for a variety of problems, including pore fluid identification and tracking, wave propagation modeling, geotechnical site characterization, static corrections for reflection seismology, and locating underground objects. Ultrasonic velocities increase rapidly when a granular material is loaded as contact stress and area and coordination number of grain contacts increase. Porosity, grain size and distribution, grain shape, and mineralogy all play a role in determining this nonlinear response. We adapted the ultrasonic pulse transmission method to measure compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocities at ultrasonic frequencies (100-500 kHz) for lightly loaded artificial soils (to 0.1 MPa maximum). Samples were fabricated from Ottawa sand (some with montmorillonite added), Santa Cruz beach aggregate, artificial glass beads, and alumina spheres. All materials were characterized with the SEM before the experiments. We focused on packing, mineralogy, and hysteretic effects in our study and found that compressional velocities vary from ~200 to ~700 m/s over the narrow loading range investigated as a result of these effects. In light cyclic loading of pure Ottawa sand we observed hysteretic effects in the shear mode velocity, implicating sticking of the grains. Our measurements demonstrate a cubic relationship between stress and compressional wave velocity for pure quartz sand, as predicted by Hertzian contact theory when grain roughness is incorporated. The sand/clay mixtures were found to have very different properties from pure sand. The clay bridged sand grains creating more area at the contacts and higher sound speeds over the narrow loading range, but suppressed the strong nonlinear behavior predicted by Hertzian contact theory. *This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract number W-7405-ENG

  9. Pure word deafness and pure anarthria in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, O; Suzuki, K; Endo, K; Fujii, T; Mori, E

    2007-04-01

    A 66-year-old right-handed man developed pure anarthria following pure word deafness. In addition to language disorders, his behavior gradually changed and finally included violence against his wife. Brain magnetic resonance imagings revealed atrophy of the left perisylvian area, which included the inferior half of the precentral gyrus and the upper portion of the superior temporal gyrus, consistent with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). It has been documented as either a disorder of expressive language or as an impaired understanding of word meaning. Unlike with pure anarthria, pure word deafness is not included in the clinical diagnostic current criteria for FTD. However, a large variety of language symptoms can appear in FTD according to the distribution of pathological changes in the frontotemporal cortices. This case suggests that pure word deafness could be a prodomal symptom of FTD.

  10. Imaging composite material using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan; Pain, Damien; Wilcox, Paul D.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2012-05-01

    This article describes an experimental procedure for improving the detectability of small defects in composite laminates based on modifications to the total focusing method (TFM) of processing ultrasonic array data to form an image. The TFM is modified to include the directional dependence of ultrasonic velocity. The maximum aperture angle is limited and a Gaussian frequency-domain filter is applied prior to processing. The parameters of maximum aperture angle, filter centre frequency and filter bandwidth are optimized.

  11. Wavelet Transform Signal Processing Applied to Ultrasonics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-01

    THE WAVELET TRANSFORM IS APPLIED TO THE ANALYSIS OF ULTRASONIC WAVES FOR IMPROVED SIGNAL DETECTION AND ANALYSIS OF THE SIGNALS. In instances where...the mother wavelet is well defined, the wavelet transform has relative insensitivity to noise and does not need windowing. Peak detection of...ultrasonic pulses using the wavelet transform is described and results show good detection even when large white noise was added. The use of the wavelet

  12. The design of ultrasonic range finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Yongyi

    2017-03-01

    Electronic rangefinder measurement scope in 0.10˜5.00 m, 1 cm measurement precision, measurement with no direct contact with the object to be tested, able to display measurement results clear and stable. Because ultrasonic directivity is strong, energy consumption is slow, in the medium transmission distance is farther, so ultrasonic often used for distance measurement, such as range finder and level measurement instrument can be done by ultrasound.

  13. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

  14. Extrinsic Fabry-Perot ultrasonic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, J. J.; Berthold, John W., III

    1996-10-01

    We characterized the performance of a commercial fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer for use as an ultrasonic sensor, and compared the performance with a standard lead zirconate titanate (PZT) detector. The interferometer was unstabilized. The results showed that the fiber sensor was about 12 times less sensitive than the PZT detector. Ultrasonic frequency response near 100 kHz was demonstrated. We describe the design of the fiber sensor, the details of the tests performed, and potential applications.

  15. Method of ultrasonic measurement of texture

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R. Bruce; Smith, John F.; Lee, Seung S.; Li, Yan

    1993-10-12

    A method for measuring texture of metal plates or sheets using non-destructive ultrasonic investigation includes measuring the velocity of ultrasonic energy waves in lower order plate modes in one or more directions, and measuring phase velocity dispersion of higher order modes of the plate or sheet if needed. Texture or preferred grain orientation can be derived from these measurements with improves reliability and accuracy. The method can be utilized in production on moving metal plate or sheet.

  16. Method of ultrasonic measurement of texture

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, R.B.; Smith, J.F.; Lee, S.S.; Taejon Ch'ungmam; Yan Li.

    1993-10-12

    A method for measuring texture of metal plates or sheets using non-destructive ultrasonic investigation includes measuring the velocity of ultrasonic energy waves in lower order plate modes in one or more directions, and measuring phase velocity dispersion of higher order modes of the plate or sheet if needed. Texture or preferred grain orientation can be derived from these measurements with improves reliability and accuracy. The method can be utilized in production on moving metal plate or sheet. 9 figures.

  17. Ultrasonic sensor and method of use

    DOEpatents

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    2001-01-01

    An ultrasonic sensor system and method of use for measuring transit time though a liquid sample, using one ultrasonic transducer coupled to a precision time interval counter. The timing circuit captures changes in transit time, representing small changes in the velocity of sound transmitted, over necessarily small time intervals (nanoseconds) and uses the transit time changes to identify the presence of non-conforming constituents in the sample.

  18. General relationships between ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, M.; Jaynes, E. T.; Miller, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    General relationships between the ultrasonic attenuation and dispersion are presented. The validity of these nonlocal relationships hinges only on the properties of causality and linearity, and does not depend upon details of the mechanism responsible for the attenuation and dispersion. Approximate, nearly local relationships are presented and are demonstrated to predict accurately the ultrasonic dispersion in solutions of hemoglobin from the results of attenuation measurements.

  19. Thermography And Ultrasonics Find Flaws In Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Zalameda, Joseph N.; Smith, Barry T.; Winfree, William P.

    1993-01-01

    Flaws first located in infrared imagery, then probed ultrasonically to reveal details. Thermographic and ultrasonic techniques, applied sequentially, constitute basis of developmental method of nondestructive inspection of structures made of lightweight composite materials like carbon-fiber/epoxy-matrix laminates. Method enables rapid detection and evaluation of damage and other flaws in composite structures. Does not require access to both sides of structure to be inspected.

  20. Pure science and the problem of progress.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Heather

    2014-06-01

    How should we understand scientific progress? Kuhn famously discussed science as its own internally driven venture, structured by paradigms. He also famously had a problem describing progress in science, as problem-solving ability failed to provide a clear rubric across paradigm change--paradigm changes tossed out problems as well as solving them. I argue here that much of Kuhn's inability to articulate a clear view of scientific progress stems from his focus on pure science and a neglect of applied science. I trace the history of the distinction between pure and applied science, showing how the distinction came about, the rhetorical uses to which the distinction has been put, and how pure science came to be both more valued by scientists and philosophers. I argue that the distinction between pure and applied science does not stand up to philosophical scrutiny, and that once we relinquish it, we can provide Kuhn with a clear sense of scientific progress. It is not one, though, that will ultimately prove acceptable. For that, societal evaluations of scientific work are needed.

  1. Pure Dephasing of a Vibrational Adbond.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    that pure dephasing terms Involve only one (real) level of the adbond, and that sIngle-phonon proceses are Impossible. Figure 4. The logarithm of the...Crane, Indiana 47522-5050 China Lake, California 93555 Scientific Advisor Naval Civil Engineering Laboratory 1 Commandant of the Marine Corps Attn: Dr. R

  2. Primary pure choriocarcinoma of the liver.

    PubMed

    Fernández Alonso, J; Sáez, C; Pérez, P; Montaño, A; Japón, M A

    1992-04-01

    We report a pure choriocarcinoma of the liver studied at necropsy. The tumour was diagnosed ante-mortem and treated by chemotherapy with no satisfactory response. Previous cases of hepatic choriocarcinoma are reviewed and criteria to diagnose this extragonadal neoplasm are recommended.

  3. Yttria Nanoparticle Reinforced Commercially Pure (CP) Titanium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    nanoparticles as well as titanium boride (TiB) reinforcements were produced through gas atomization. After consolidation and extrusion, room temperature...pure FE iron O oxygen Ti titanium TiB titanium boride TYS tensile yield strength UTS ultimate tensile strength wt% weight percent Y2O3

  4. Purely competitive evolutionary dynamics for games.

    PubMed

    Veller, Carl; Rajpaul, Vinesh

    2012-10-01

    We introduce and analyze a purely competitive dynamics for the evolution of an infinite population subject to a three-strategy game. We argue that this dynamics represents a characterization of how certain systems, both natural and artificial, are governed. In each period, the population is randomly sorted into pairs, which engage in a once-off play of the game; the probability that a member propagates its type to its offspring is proportional only to its payoff within the pair. We show that if a type is dominant (obtains higher payoffs in games with both other types), its "pure" population state, comprising only members of that type, is globally attracting. If there is no dominant type, there is an unstable "mixed" fixed point; the population state eventually oscillates between the three near-pure states. We then allow for mutations, where offspring have a nonzero probability of randomly changing their type. In this case, the existence of a dominant type renders a point near its pure state globally attracting. If no dominant type exists, a supercritical Hopf bifurcation occurs at the unique mixed fixed point, and above a critical (typically low) mutation rate, this fixed point becomes globally attracting: the implication is that even very low mutation rates can stabilize a system that would, in the absence of mutations, be unstable.

  5. Implicit Reading in Chinese Pure Alexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Chunlei; Zhu, Renjing; Xu, Mingwei; Luo, Benyan; Weng, Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that some patients with pure alexia display evidence of implicit access to lexical and semantic information about words that they cannot read explicitly. This phenomenon has not been investigated systematically in Chinese patients. We report here a case study of a Chinese patient who met the criteria for pure…

  6. Predict thermal conductivities of pure gases

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    The programs presented for the TI-59 programmable calculator can determine the thermal conductivity of pure gases and gases at low pressures as well as the effect of pressure on conductivity. They are based on correlations by Eucken, Stiel-Thodos, Misic-Thodos, Roy-Thodos, and Redlich-Kwong.

  7. Characteristic model of travelling wave ultrasonic motor.

    PubMed

    Jingzhuo, Shi; Dongmei, You

    2014-02-01

    In general, the design and analysis of ultrasonic motor and motor's control strategy are based on mathematical model. The academic model is widely used in the analysis of traveling wave ultrasonic motor (TWUSM). But the dispersive characteristic of piezoelectric ceramics and other complicated process, such as the friction, make the model's precision not so accurate. On the other hand, identification modeling method, which is built based on the tested data, has obtained increasing application in the study of ultrasonic motor's control technology. Based on the identification model, many control strategies can be designed easily. But the identification model is an approximate model, so if a more accurate model of ultrasonic motor can be obtained, the analysis and design of motor control system will be more effective. Characteristic model is a kind of identification model which can accurately describe the characteristics of TWUSM. Based on the tested data, this paper proposes the modeling method of ultrasonic motor's characteristic model. The paper also makes a comparison of the effectiveness of different identification algorithms. Aiming at the speed control of ultrasonic motor, the influence of the parameter's initial values on the precision of model is discussed. The calculating results indicate the availability of this characteristic model.

  8. Contact mechanics of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallaschek, Jörg

    1998-06-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are driven by tangential stresses in the interface between stator and rotor. These stresses are generated by the elliptical motion of the material points of the stator or rotor surface and depend on frictional processes in the contact area. The contact mechanics of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors determines the operational characteristics, like rotational speed and torque or transmitted mechanical power and efficiency. Wear properties and lifetime of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors are also determined by contact mechanics. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the state of the art in the understanding of some fundamental processes governing the contact mechanics of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors. After a short introduction, a survey of publications devoted to the subject will be given. Then, an attempt will be made to classify the mechanical models, which were developed in order to explain the contact mechanics of piezoelectric ultrasonic motors, according to the physical effects which have been taken into account in their derivation. Some results concerning the choice of proper contact materials, wear and lifetime of ultrasonic motors will be addressed in a separate section. Finally a summary and outlook will be given and open questions for future research will be formulated.

  9. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  10. A new ultrasonic stride length measuring system.

    PubMed

    Maki, Hiromichi; Ogawa, Hidekuni; Yonezawa, Yoshiharu; Hahn, Allen W; Caldwell, W Morton

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new ultrasonic stride length measuring system for analyzing the human gait. An ultrasonic transmitter, a radio transmitter, a pressure sensor and microcontroller are attached to the subject’s heel on the right shoe and in the direction of the left shoe. Two ultrasonic receivers, a radio receiver, a microcontroller and a 1GB SD memory card are installed on the left shoe. Ultrasonic receivers are attached to the toe and heel, in the direction of the right shoe. When the right foot contacts the ground, its heel-mounted ultrasonic and radio transmitters simultaneously transmit to the left shoe. However, radio propagation velocity is far faster than ultrasonic velocity. Therefore, the radio wave acts as a start signal to the radio receiver of the left shoe, indicating the start of ultrasound transmission from the right shoe. Upon receiving the start signal, the microcontroller timer starts to measure each ultrasound propagation time from the right shoe to the left shoe. Distance between right and left shoes is calculated with the time and ultrasound velocity and stored in the SD memory card. Stride length is calculated with a cosine function, by using the obtained distances and the distance between the toe and heel of the left shoe, by a conventional computer. The stride length can then be used for many characterizations of the subject’s gait.

  11. The acousto-ultrasonic approach. [for NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1988-01-01

    The nature and underlying rationale of the acousto-ultrasonic approach is reviewed, needed advanced signal analysis and evaluation methods suggested, and application potentials discussed. Acousto-ultrasonics is an NDE technique combining aspects of acoustic emission methodology with ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. This approach uses analysis of simulated stress waves for detecting and mapping variations of mechanical properties. Unlike most NDE, acousto-ultrasonics is less concerned with flaw detection than with the assessment of the collective effects of various flaws and material anomalies. Acousto-ultrasonics has been applied chiefly to laminated and filament-wound fiber reinforced composites. It has been used to assess the significant strength and toughness reducing effects that can be wrought by combinations of essentially minor flaws and diffuse flaw populations. Acousto-ultrasonics assesses integrated defect states and the resultant variations in properties such as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and fracture resistance. Matrix cure state, porosity, fiber orientation, fiber volume fraction, fiber-matrix bonding, and interlaminar bond quality are underlying factors.

  12. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  13. Speech Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, William D.

    Presented in this book is a view of speech communication which enables an individual to become fully aware of his or her role as both initiator and recipient of messages. Communication is treated broadly with emphasis on the understanding and skills relating to various types of speech communication across the broad spectrum of human communication.…

  14. Moth hearing and sound communication.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ryo; Takanashi, Takuma; Surlykke, Annemarie

    2015-01-01

    Active echolocation enables bats to orient and hunt the night sky for insects. As a counter-measure against the severe predation pressure many nocturnal insects have evolved ears sensitive to ultrasonic bat calls. In moths bat-detection was the principal purpose of hearing, as evidenced by comparable hearing physiology with best sensitivity in the bat echolocation range, 20-60 kHz, across moths in spite of diverse ear morphology. Some eared moths subsequently developed sound-producing organs to warn/startle/jam attacking bats and/or to communicate intraspecifically with sound. Not only the sounds for interaction with bats, but also mating signals are within the frequency range where bats echolocate, indicating that sound communication developed after hearing by "sensory exploitation". Recent findings on moth sound communication reveal that close-range (~ a few cm) communication with low-intensity ultrasounds "whispered" by males during courtship is not uncommon, contrary to the general notion of moths predominantly being silent. Sexual sound communication in moths may apply to many eared moths, perhaps even a majority. The low intensities and high frequencies explain that this was overlooked, revealing a bias towards what humans can sense, when studying (acoustic) communication in animals.

  15. Micro- and nano-spheres of low melting point metals and alloys, formed by ultrasonic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, H; Reich, S; Popovitz-Biro, R; von Huth, P; Halevy, I; Koltypin, Y; Gedanken, A; Porat, Z

    2013-01-01

    Metals and alloys of low melting points (<430 °C) can be melted in hot silicone oil to form two immiscible liquids. Irradiation of the system with ultrasonic energy induces acoustic cavitation in the oil, which disperses the molten metals into microspheres that solidify rapidly upon cooling. This method has been applied to seven pure metals (Ga, In, Sn, Bi, Pb, Zn, Hg) and two eutectic alloys of gold (Au-Ge and Au-Si). The morphology and composition of the resulting microspheres were examined by SEM and EDS. Eutectic Au-Si formed also crystalline Au nanoparticles, which were separated and studied by HRTEM.

  16. Gas-leak localization using distributed ultrasonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseynov, Javid; Baliga, Shankar; Dillencourt, Michael; Bic, Lubomir; Bagherzadeh, Nader

    2009-03-01

    We propose an ultrasonic gas leak localization system based on a distributed network of sensors. The system deploys highly sensitive miniature Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) microphones and uses a suite of energy-decay (ED) and time-delay of arrival (TDOA) algorithms for localizing a source of a gas leak. Statistical tools such as the maximum likelihood (ML) and the least squares (LS) estimators are used for approximating the source location when closed-form solutions fail in the presence of ambient background nuisance and inherent electronic noise. The proposed localization algorithms were implemented and tested using a Java-based simulation platform connected to four or more distributed MEMS microphones observing a broadband nitrogen leak from an orifice. The performance of centralized and decentralized algorithms under ED and TDOA schemes is analyzed and compared in terms of communication overhead and accuracy in presence of additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN).

  17. Ultrasonic manipulation of particles and cells. Ultrasonic separation of cells.

    PubMed

    Coakley, W T; Whitworth, G; Grundy, M A; Gould, R K; Allman, R

    1994-04-01

    Cells or particles suspended in a sonic standing wave field experience forces which concentrate them at positions separated by half a wavelength. The aims of the study were: (1) To optimise conditions and test theoretical predictions for ultrasonic concentration and separation of particles or cells. (2) To investigate the scale-up of experimental systems. (3) To establish the maximum acoustic pressure to which a suspension might be exposed without inducing order-disrupting cavitation. (4) To compare the efficiencies of techniques for harvesting concentrated particles. The primary outcomes were: (1) To design of an acoustic pressure distribution within cylindrical containers which led to uniformly repeating sound pressure patterns throughout the containers in the standing wave mode, concentrated suspended eukaryotic cells or latex beads in clumps on the axis of wide containers, and provided uniform response of all particle clumps to acoustic harvesting regimes. Theory for the behaviour (e.g. movement to different preferred sites) of particles as a function of specific gravity and compressibility in containers of different lateral dimensions was extended and was confirmed experimentally. Convective streaming in the container was identified as a variable requiring control in the manipulation of particles of 1 micron or smaller size. (2) Consideration of scale-up from the model 10 ml volume led to the conclusion that flow systems in intermediate volume containers have more promise than scaled up batch systems. (3) The maximum acoustic pressures applicable to a suspension without inducing order-disrupting cavitation or excessive conductive streaming at 1 MHz and 3 MHz induce a force equivalent to a centrifugal field of about 10(3) g. (4) The most efficient technique for harvesting concentrated particles was the introduction of a frequency increment between two transducers to form a slowly sweeping pseudo-standing wave. The attractive inter-droplet ultrasonic standing

  18. Method for measuring liquid viscosity and ultrasonic viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Lawrence, William P.; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1994-01-01

    An ultrasonic viscometer and method for measuring fluid viscosity are provided. Ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves are generated and coupled to the fluid. Reflections from the generated ultrasonic shear and longitudinal waves are detected. Phase velocity of the fluid is determined responsive to the detected ultrasonic longitudinal waves reflections. Viscosity of the fluid is determined responsive to the detected ultrasonic shear waves reflections. Unique features of the ultrasonic viscometer include the use of a two-interface fluid and air transducer wedge to measure relative signal change and to enable self calibration and the use of a ratio of reflection coefficients for two different frequencies to compensate for environmental changes, such as temperature.

  19. Ultrasonic imaging in liquid sodium

    SciTech Connect

    Lubeigt, E.; Mensah, S.; Chaix, J.F.; Rakotonarivo, S.; Gobillot, G.

    2015-07-01

    The fourth generation of nuclear reactor can use liquid sodium as the core coolant. When the reactor is operating, sodium temperatures can reach up to 600 deg. C. During maintenance periods, when the reactor is shut down, the coolant temperature is reduced to 200 deg. C. Because molten sodium is optically opaque, ultrasonic imaging techniques are developed for maintenance activities. Under-sodium imaging aims at i) checking the health of immersed structures. It should also allow ii) to assess component degradation or damage as cracks and shape defects as well as iii) the detection of lost objects. The under-sodium imaging system has to sustain high temperature (up to 300 deg. C) and hostility of the sodium environment. Furthermore, specific constraints such as transducers characteristics or the limited sensor mobility in the reactor vessel have to be considered. This work focuses on developing a methodology for detecting damages such as crack defects with ultrasound devices. Surface-breaking cracks or deep cracks are sought in the weld area, as welds are more subject to defects. Traditional methods enabled us to detect emerging cracks of submillimeter size with sodium-compatible high-temperature transducer. The presented approach relies on making use of prior knowledge about the environment through the implementation of differential imaging and time-reversal techniques. Indeed, this approach allows to detect a change by comparison with a reference measurement and by focusing back to any change in the environment. It is a means of analysis and understanding of the physical phenomena making it possible to design more effective inspection strategies. Difference between the measured signals reveals the acoustic field scattered by a perturbation (a crack for instance), which may occur between periodical measurements. The imaging method relies on the adequate combination of two computed ultrasonic fields, one forward and one adjoint. The adjoint field, which carries the

  20. Ultrasonic isolation of buried pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leinov, Eli; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Cawley, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Long-range guided wave testing (GWT) is used routinely for the monitoring and detection of corrosion defects in above ground pipelines. The GWT test range in buried, coated pipelines is greatly reduced compared to above ground configurations due to energy leakage into the embedding soil. In this paper, the effect of pipe coatings on the guided wave attenuation is investigated with the aim of increasing test ranges for buried pipelines. The attenuation of the T(0,1) and L(0,2) guided wave modes is measured using a full-scale experimental apparatus in a fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE)-coated 8 in. pipe, buried in loose and compacted sand. Tests are performed over a frequency range typically used in GWT of 10-35 kHz and compared with model predictions. It is shown that the application of a low impedance coating between the FBE layer and the sand effectively decouples the influence of the sand on the ultrasound leakage from the buried pipe. Ultrasonic isolation of a buried pipe is demonstrated by coating the pipe with a Polyethylene (PE)-foam layer that has a smaller impedance than both the pipe and sand, and has the ability to withstand the overburden load from the sand. The measured attenuation in the buried PE-foam-FBE-coated pipe is found to be substantially reduced, in the range of 0.3-1.2 dB m-1 for loose and compacted sand conditions, compared to measured attenuation of 1.7-4.7 dB m-1 in the buried FBE-coated pipe without the PE-foam. The acoustic properties of the PE-foam are measured independently using ultrasonic interferometry and incorporated into model predictions of guided wave propagation in buried coated pipe. Good agreement is found between the experimental measurements and model predictions. The attenuation exhibits periodic peaks in the frequency domain corresponding to the through-thickness resonance frequencies of the coating layer. The large reduction in guided wave attenuation for PE-coated pipes would lead to greatly increased GWT test ranges; such

  1. Wetting Behavior in Ultrasonic Vibration-Assisted Brazing of Aluminum to Graphite Using Sn-Ag-Ti Active Solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wei-Yuan; Liu, Sen-Hui; Liu, Xin-Ya; Shao, Jia-Lin; Liu, Min-Pen

    2015-03-01

    In this study, Sn-Ag-Ti ternary alloy has been used as the active solder to braze pure aluminum and graphite in atmospheric conditions using ultrasonic vibration as an aid. The authors studied the formation, composition and decomposition temperature of the surface oxides of the active solder under atmospheric conditions. In addition, the wettability of Sn-5Ag-8Ti active solder on the surface of pure aluminum and graphite has also been studied. The results showed that the major components presented in the surface oxides formed on the Sn-5Ag-8Ti active solder under ambient conditions are TiO, TiO2, Ti2O3, Ti3O5 and SnO2. Apart from AgO and Ag2O2, which can be decomposed at the brazing temperature (773 K), other oxides will not be decomposed. The oxide layer comprises composite oxides and it forms a compact layer with a certain thickness to enclose the melted solder, which will prevent the liquid solder from wetting the base metals at the brazing temperature. After ultrasonic vibration, the oxide layer was destroyed and the liquid solder was able to wet and spread out around the base materials. Furthermore, better wettability of the active solder was observed on the surface of graphite and pure aluminum at the brazing temperature of 773-823 K using ultrasonic waves. The ultrasonic wave acts as the dominant driving factor which promotes the wetting and spreading of the liquid solder on the surface of graphite and aluminum to achieve a stable and reliable brazed joint.

  2. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed....

  3. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed....

  4. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed. [5 FR 35,...

  5. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed....

  6. 7 CFR 201.64 - Pure live seed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Pure live seed. 201.64 Section 201.64 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.64 Pure live seed. The tolerance for pure live seed shall be determined by applying the respective tolerances to the germination plus the hard seed and the pure seed. [5 FR 35,...

  7. How Pure Components Control Polymer Blend Miscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Ronald; Lipson, Jane; Higgins, Julia

    2012-02-01

    We present insight into some intriguing relationships revealed by our recent studies of polymer mixture miscibility. Applying our simple lattice-based equation of state, we discuss some of the patterns observed over a sample of experimental blends. We focus on the question of how much key information can one determine from a knowledge of just the pure components only, and further, on the role of separate enthalpic and entropic contributions to the miscibility behavior. One interesting correlation connects the value of the difference in pure component energetic parameters with that of the mixed segment interactions, suggesting new possibilities for predictive modeling. We also show how in some cases these two parameter groupings act as separate controls determining the entropy and enthalpy of mixing. Also discussed are the different patterns exhibited for UCST-type and LCST-type blends, these being revealed in some cases by simple examination of the underlying microscopic parameters.

  8. Pure field theories and MACSYMA algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ament, W. S.

    1977-01-01

    A pure field theory attempts to describe physical phenomena through singularity-free solutions of field equations resulting from an action principle. The physics goes into forming the action principle and interpreting specific results. Algorithms for the intervening mathematical steps are sketched. Vacuum general relativity is a pure field theory, serving as model and providing checks for generalizations. The fields of general relativity are the 10 components of a symmetric Riemannian metric tensor; those of the Einstein-Straus generalization are the 16 components of a nonsymmetric. Algebraic properties are exploited in top level MACSYMA commands toward performing some of the algorithms of that generalization. The light cone for the theory as left by Einstein and Straus is found and simplifications of that theory are discussed.

  9. Physics with chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1993-05-01

    Chemically and isotopically pure semiconductors offer a wealth of interesting physics. We review a number of impurity complexes which were discovered in ultrapure Germanium. They have led the way to the widely pursued studies of hydrogen in numerous semiconductors. Isotope related effects and processes include neutron transmutation doping, a technique used for a number of silicon and germanium devices. Isotopically pure and deliberately mixed crystals of germanium have been grown recently and have been used to study the dependence of the indirect bandgap and phonon properties on the mass and mass disorder of the nuclei. The large number of stable isotopes of the various semiconductors present a great potential for basic and applied studies. Semi-conductor isotope engineering may become a reality because of the new economic and political world order.

  10. Pure connection action principle for general relativity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2011-06-24

    It has already been known for two decades that general relativity can be reformulated as a certain gauge theory, so that the only dynamical field is an SO(3) connection and the spacetime metric appears as a derived object. However, no simple action principle realizing these ideas has been available. A new elegant action principle for such a "pure connection" formulation of GR is described.

  11. Computing Properties Of Pure And Mixed Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    GASPLUS created as two-part code: first designed for use with pure fluids and second designed for use with mixtures of fluids and phases. Offers routines for mathematical modeling of conditions of fluids in pumps, turbines, compressors and other machines. Other routines for calculating performance of para/ortho-hydrogen reactor and heat of para/normal-hydrogen reaction as well as unique convergence routine demonstrates engineering flavor of GASPLUS. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  12. Efficacy of commercially available ultrasonic pest repellent devices to affect behavior of bed bugs (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    PubMed

    Yturralde, K M; Hofstetter, R W

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about the potential for acoustic communication in bed bugs, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae), or the use of sound as cues in host location, although many hemipterans are known to communicate with sound. Most behavioral research has focused on bed bug pheromones that are used in aggregation and as alarm signals. We investigated the influence of sound as a deterrent and as an attractant, either of which could ultimately be used to monitor and control bed bugs. Female bed bugs were tested in two-choice tests with four different commercially available ultrasonic repellent devices. We found that female bed bugs were equally likely to occur in arenas with or without sound produced by ultrasonic devices. These devices did not repel or attract bed bugs during choice trials. However, more bed bugs preferred the middle corridor between the test (sound) and control (no sound) arenas when the sound devices were played. Bed bugs were also more likely to exit the middle corridor during control trials compared with treatment trials with ultrasonic devices. Our results confirm that commercial devices producing ultrasound are not a promising tool for repelling bed bugs.

  13. On constructing purely affine theories with matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.; Liebscher, D.-E.

    2016-08-01

    We explore ways to obtain the very existence of a space-time metric from an action principle that does not refer to it a priori. Although there are reasons to believe that only a non-local theory can viably achieve this goal, we investigate here local theories that start with Schrödinger's purely affine theory (Schrödinger in Space-time structure. Cambridge UP, Cambridge, 1950), where he gave reasons to set the metric proportional to the Ricci curvature aposteriori. When we leave the context of unified field theory, and we couple the non-gravitational matter using some weak equivalence principle, we can show that the propagation of shock waves does not define a lightcone when the purely affine theory is local and avoids the explicit use of the Ricci tensor in realizing the weak equivalence principle. When the Ricci tensor is substituted for the metric, the equations seem to have only a very limited set of solutions. This backs the conviction that viable purely affine theories have to be non-local.

  14. Graphical calculus for Gaussian pure states

    SciTech Connect

    Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Loock, Peter van

    2011-04-15

    We provide a unified graphical calculus for all Gaussian pure states, including graph transformation rules for all local and semilocal Gaussian unitary operations, as well as local quadrature measurements. We then use this graphical calculus to analyze continuous-variable (CV) cluster states, the essential resource for one-way quantum computing with CV systems. Current graphical approaches to CV cluster states are only valid in the unphysical limit of infinite squeezing, and the associated graph transformation rules only apply when the initial and final states are of this form. Our formalism applies to all Gaussian pure states and subsumes these rules in a natural way. In addition, the term 'CV graph state' currently has several inequivalent definitions in use. Using this formalism we provide a single unifying definition that encompasses all of them. We provide many examples of how the formalism may be used in the context of CV cluster states: defining the 'closest' CV cluster state to a given Gaussian pure state and quantifying the error in the approximation due to finite squeezing; analyzing the optimality of certain methods of generating CV cluster states; drawing connections between this graphical formalism and bosonic Hamiltonians with Gaussian ground states, including those useful for CV one-way quantum computing; and deriving a graphical measure of bipartite entanglement for certain classes of CV cluster states. We mention other possible applications of this formalism and conclude with a brief note on fault tolerance in CV one-way quantum computing.

  15. Apparatus for the concurrent ultrasonic inspection of partially completed welds

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, John A.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for the concurrent nondestructive evaluation of partially completed welds is described and which is used in combination with an automated welder and which includes an ultrasonic signal generator mounted on the welder and which generates an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward one side of the partially completed welds; an ultrasonic signal receiver mounted on the automated welder for detecting ultrasonic signals which are transmitted by the ultrasonic signal generator and which are reflected or diffracted from one side of the partially completed weld or which passes through a given region of the partially completed weld; and an analysis assembly coupled with the ultrasonic signal receiver and which processes the ultrasonic signals received by the ultrasonic signal receiver to identify welding flaws in the partially completed weld.

  16. Researches and applications of the ultrasonic emulsifications and dispersions.

    PubMed

    Quanlu, Li; Yinhong, Zhang; Jing, Wu

    2013-11-01

    This paper defines power ultrasonics and their two important directions: Ultrasonic emulsification and dispersion from a practical point of view, brief reports on recent research results are ultrasonic emulsification to be used for the preparation of composite electrorheological fluid, and ultrasonic dispersion to be used dispersion as a new type cold cloud catalytic agent metaldehyde [CH3CH]4-6 (this is used for artificial rain), etc., and produce good results or gain progress. Then, the principle and applications of power ultrasonics (including magnetostriction type ultrasonic transducer and piezoelectric type ultrasonic transducer) in the emulsification or dispersion, are pointed out. Also, ultrasonic extensive applications in chemistry, materials, and life sciences are briefly introduced.

  17. Ultrasonics permits brazing complex stainless steel assembly without flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic vibration of an assembly of stainless steel instrumentation tubes ensures brazing without flux. Vibration with an ultrasonic transducer permits the brazing material to flow down each tube in contact with a seal plug installed in a pressure vessel wall.

  18. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  19. CW ultrasonic bolt tensioning monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A CW ultrasonic device is described for measuring frequency shifts of the peak of a mechanical resonance in a body. One application of the device is measuring the strain in a bolt, and other applications such as measuring the thickness of a body, measuring the depth of a flaw in a body, measuring the elongation of a body, and measuring changes in velocity of sound in a body. The body is connected, by means of a CW transducer, to electrical circuit means including a narrow band RF amplifier to form a closed loop feedback marginal oscillator that frequency locks the device to the peak of a mechanical resonance in the body. When the frequency of this peak changes, because of a physical change in the body, the frequency of the oscillator changes. The device includes an automatic frequency resonant peak tracker that produces a voltage that is related to a change in frequency of the oscillator. This voltage is applied to the RF amplifier to change the center of its frequency band to include the frequency of the peak and is a measure of the frequency shift.

  20. Optimization of Ultrasonic Fabric Cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.

    1998-05-13

    The fundamental purpose of this project was to research and develop a process that would reduce the cost and improve the environmental efficiency of the present dry-cleaning industry. This second phase of research (see report KCP-94-1006 for information gathered during the first phase) was intended to allow the optimal integration of all factors of ultrasonic fabric cleaning. For this phase, Garment Care performed an extensive literature search and gathered data from other researchers worldwide. The Garment Care-AlliedSignal team developed the requirements for a prototype cleaning tank for studies and acquired that tank and the additional equipment required to use it properly. Garment Care and AlliedSignal acquired the transducers and generators from Surftran Martin-Walter in Sterling Heights, Michigan. Amway's Kelly Haley developed the test protocol, supplied hundreds of test swatches, gathered the data on the swatches before and after the tests, assisted with the cleaning tests, and prepared the final analysis of the results. AlliedSignal personnel, in conjunction with Amway and Garment Care staff, performed all the tests. Additional planning is under way for future testing by outside research facilities. The final results indicated repeatable performance and good results for single layered fabric swatches. Swatches that were cleaned as a ''sandwich,'' that is, three or more layers.

  1. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qu, Jianmin

    1999-01-01

    Adhesives and adhesive joints are widely used in various industrial applications to reduce weight and costs, and to increase reliability. For example, advances in aerospace technology have been made possible, in part, through the use of lightweight materials and weight-saving structural designs. Joints, in particular, have been and continue to be areas in which weight can be trimmed from an airframe through the use of novel attachment techniques. In order to save weight over traditional riveted designs, to avoid the introduction of stress concentrations associated with rivet holes, and to take full advantage of advanced composite materials, engineers and designers have been specifying an ever-increasing number of adhesively bonded joints for use on airframes. Nondestructive characterization for quality control and remaining life prediction has been a key enabling technology for the effective use of adhesive joints. Conventional linear ultrasonic techniques generally can only detect flaws (delamination, cracks, voids, etc) in the joint assembly. However, more important to structural reliability is the bond strength. Although strength, in principle, cannot be measured nondestructively, a slight change in material nonlinearity may indicate the onset of failure. Furthermore, microstructural variations due to aging or under-curing may also cause changes in the third order elastic constants, which are related to the ultrasonic nonlinear parameter of the polymer adhesive. It is therefore reasonable to anticipate a correlation between changes in the ultrasonic nonlinear acoustic parameter and the remaining bond strength. It has been observed that higher harmonics of the fundamental frequency are generated when an ultrasonic wave passes through a nonlinear material. It seems that such nonlinearity can be effectively used to characterize bond strength. Several theories have been developed to model this nonlinear effect. Based on a microscopic description of the nonlinear

  2. Soft tissue cutting with ultrasonic mechanical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylie, Mark. P.; McGuinness, Garrett; Gavin, Graham P.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic vibrations transmitted via small diameter wire waveguides represents a technology that has potential for minimally invasive procedures in surgery. This form of energy delivery results in distal tip mechanical vibrations with amplitudes of vibration of up to 50 μm and at frequencies between 20-50 kHz commonly reported. This energy can then be used by micro-cutting surgical tools and end effectors for a range of applications such as bone cutting, cement removal in joint revision surgery and soft tissue cutting. One particular application which has gained regulatory approval in recent years is in the area of cardiovascular surgery in the removal of calcified atherosclerotic plaques and chronic total occlusions. This paper builds on previous work that was focused on the ultrasonic perforation of soft vascular tissue using ultrasonically activated mechanical waveguides and the applied force required to initiate failure in soft tissue when compared with non-ultrasonic waveguides. An ultrasonic device and experimental rig was developed that can deliver ultrasonic vibrations to the distal tip of 1.0 mm diameter nickel-titanium waveguides. The operation of the ultrasonic device has been characterized at 22.5 kHz with achievable amplitudes of vibration in the range of 16 - 40μm. The experimental rig allows the ultrasonically activated waveguide to be advanced through a tissue sample over a range of feedrates and the waveguide-tissue interaction force can be measured during perforation into the tissue. Preliminary studies into the effects of feedrate on porcine aortic arterial tissue perforation forces are presented as part of this work. A range of amplitudes of vibration at the wire waveguide distal tip were examined. The resulting temperature increase when perforating artery wall when using the energized wire waveguides is also examined. Results show a clear multistage failure of the tissue. The first stage involves a rise in force up to some

  3. Ultrasonic Nondestructive Characterization of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ningli

    2011-12-01

    Wave propagation in porous media is studied in a wide range of technological applications. In the manufacturing industry, determining porosity of materials in the manufacturing process is required for strict quality control. In the oil industry, acoustic signals and seismic surveys are used broadly to determine the physical properties of the reservoir rock which is a porous media filled with oil or gas. In porous noise control materials, a precise prediction of sound absorption with frequency and evaluation of tortuosity are necessary. Ultrasonic nondestructive methods are a very important tool for characterization of porous materials. The dissertation deals with two types of porous media: materials with relatively low and closed porosity and materials with comparatively high and open porosity. Numerical modeling, Finite Element simulations and experimental characterization are all discussed in this dissertation. First, ultrasonic scattering is used to determine the porosity in porous media with closed pores. In order get a relationship between the porosity in porous materials and ultrasonic scattering independently and to increase the sensitivity to obtain scattering information, ultrasonic imaging methods are applied and acoustic waves are focused by an acoustic lens. To verify the technique, engineered porous acrylic plates with varying porosity are measured by ultrasonic scanning and ultrasonic array sensors. Secondly, a laser based ultrasonic technique is explored for predicting the mechanical integrity and durability of cementitious materials. The technique used involves the measurement of the phase velocity of fast and slow longitudinal waves in water saturated cement paste. The slow wave velocity is related to the specimen's tortuosity. The fast wave speed is dependent on the elastic properties of porous solid. Experimental results detailing the generation and detection of fast and slow wave waves in freshly prepared and aged water-saturated cement samples

  4. Ultrasonic near-field optical microscopy using a plasmonic nanofocusing probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Phillip; Zhang, Zhen; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic waves are sensitive to the elastic properties of solids and have been applied in a variety of nondestructive materials characterization and metrology applications. The spatial resolution of established ultrasound techniques is limited to the order of the ultrasound wavelength, which is insufficient for nanomechanical characterization and imaging of nanoscale aspects of a material microstructure. Here, we report of an ultrasonic near-field optical microscopy (UNOM) technique that enables local mapping of ultrasound with deep sub-optical wavelength spatial resolution. In this technique, ultrasonic waves generated by a pulsed laser are detected by a scanning near-field optical probe over a broad frequency bandwidth. The scanning probe features a plasmonic nano-focusing lens that concentrates light to a strongly localized focal spot at the tip of the probe. The plasmonic probe enhances the scattering of evanescent light at the probe-tip and enables reliable measurement of the dynamic motion of a vibrating surface. The measurements made by the UNOM are purely optical; therefore, it is independent of mechanical coupling between the probe and the sample, which is one of the limitations of force based scanning probe microscopy methods. The UNOM technique allows for spatially and temporally resolved optical measurements of ultrasound with greater penetration depth, and it combines the benefits of local sensitivity to elastic and optical properties. Experimental results are presented, which demonstrate the potential of the technique for local mapping of subsurface optical absorbers in a soft material with high spatial resolution.

  5. In vitro assessment of an ultrasonic flowmeter for use in ventilated infants.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, P; Cotting, J; Sly, P D

    2000-03-01

    An ultrasonic flowmeter could be advantageous over a differential pressure pneumotachograph having a constant error in varying conditions. The in vitro accuracy of ultrasonic tidal volume (VT) estimates for ventilated infants were evaluated. Flow linearity and frequency response were tested, as was the influence of humidity and oxygen content on the accuracy of VT estimates. The linearity was within the 5% limits between -350 and 350 mL x sec(-1) and was not affected by the presence of an endotracheal tube (ET). The frequency response was flat and unaffected by an ET up to 4.5 Hz. The VT in the range 7-100 mL, in air showed a mean error of 0.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.2-0.4%) with a maximum and minimum of 6.5 and -3.5% respectively. Humidity did not affect accuracy. After calibration in air, the maximal mean error for measurements in pure oxygen was 3.0% (95% CI 1.9-4.1%). Repeated measurements over 5.5 h had a mean error of 0.4% (95% CI -0.7-0.1%). The in vitro evaluation of an ultrasonic flowmeter showed stable accuracy in mechanical ventilation conditions. Changing connection geometry and oxygen content did not increase the error to a clinically relevant degree. The flowmeter could therefore be a better alternative than the pneumotachograph for ventilated infants.

  6. Effect of the cortex on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Holt, Andrew P; Kaste, Sue C

    2011-10-07

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques offer a promising new approach for detecting changes in bone caused by osteoporosis. However, several challenges impede clinical implementation of backscatter techniques. This study examines how the dense outer surface of bone (the cortex) affects backscatter measurements of interior regions of porous (cancellous) bone tissue. Fifty-two specimens of bone were prepared from 13 human femoral heads so that the same region of cancellous bone could be ultrasonically interrogated through the cortex or along directions that avoided the cortex. Backscatter signals were analyzed over a frequency range of 0.8-3.0 MHz to determine two ultrasonic parameters: apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB). The term 'apparent' means that the parameters are sensitive to the frequency-dependent effects of diffraction and attenuation. Significant (p < 0.001) changes in AIB and FSAB indicated that measurements through the cortex decreased the apparent backscattered power and increased the frequency dependence of the power. However, the cortex did not affect the correlation of AIB and FSAB with the x-ray bone mineral density of the specimens. This suggests that results from many previous in vitro backscatter studies of specimens of purely cancellous bone may be extrapolated with greater confidence to in vivo conditions.

  7. Analytical ultrasonics for evaluation of composite materials response. Part 1: Physical interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneke, E. G., II; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomena associated with the propagation of elastic waves in anisotropic materials are discussed. Wave modes propagating in general directions relative to the material coordinate system are not purely longitudinal nor transverse. Hence the generation of ultrasonic waves by common piezoelectric transducers will generate multiple modes to some extent. The received signals will likely be a combination of different modes. When using two transducers to send and receive ultrasonic waves, deviation of the energy flux vector may reduce the apparent value of the received signal unless the proper orientation of the two transducers with respect to one another is taken into account. And application of reflection from plane boundaries for the purposes of making certain measurements may lead to misinterpretation of results unless one is aware of the differences in multiple mode generation and critical angle phenomena between isotropic and anisotropic materials. When studies or characterizations of composite materials by ultrasonics are to be performed, these phenomena must be taken into consideration so that proper and correct application and interpretation of the measurements can be made. Finally, attention must be drawn again to the fact that composite materials are heterogeneous by definition. The results discussed here have been determined for homogeneous materials only. While the assumption of homogeneity appears to be valid for certain wavelength ranges in composites, future work must continue to study the phenomena of wave propagation in anisotropic, nonhomogeneous materials.

  8. Reflection on Teaching and Epistemological Structure: Reflective and Critically Reflective Processes in "Pure/Soft" and "Pure/Hard" Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreber, Carolin; Castleden, Heather

    2009-01-01

    We empirically explored whether academics from pure/soft and pure/hard fields engage in reflective practice on teaching differently and, if so, whether these differences could be partially explained by the epistemological structure of their discipline. Interview data from academics in pure/hard (N = 30) and pure/soft fields (N = 10) were…

  9. Clinical tests of an ultrasonic periodontal probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Lynch, John E.; McCombs, Gayle B.

    2002-05-01

    A new ultrasonic periodontal probe has been developed that offers the potential for earlier detection of periodontal disease activity, non-invasive diagnosis, and greater reliability of measurement. A comparison study of the ultrasonic probe to both a manual probe, and a controlled-force probe was conducted to evaluate its clinical effectiveness. Twelve patients enrolled into this study. Two half-month examinations were conducted on each patient, scheduled one hour apart. A one-way analysis of variance was performed to compare the results for the three sets of probing depth measurements, followed by a repeated measures analysis to assess the reproducibility of the different probing techniques. These preliminary findings indicate that manual and ultrasonic probing measure different features of the pocket. Therefore, it is not obvious how the two depth measurements correspond to each other. However, both methods exhibited a similar tendency toward increasing pocket depths as Gingival Index scores increased. Based on the small sample size, further studies need to be conducted using a larger population of patients exhibiting a wider range of disease activity. In addition, studies that allow histological examination of the pocket after probing will help further evaluate the clinical effectiveness the ultrasonic probe. Future studies will also aid in the development of more effective automated feature recognition algorithms that convert the ultrasonic echoes into pocket depth readings.

  10. Ultrasonic wall loss monitoring of rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacsi, Attila; Cegla, Frederic

    2015-03-01

    Permanently installed ultrasonic thickness monitoring techniques have been shown to be capable of achieving below 100 nanometre standard deviation repeatability under laboratory conditions, far exceeding that of conventional manual ultrasonic inspection techniques. However, it has also been shown that uneven surface conditions that reflect the ultrasonic waves (internal wall roughness) may limit the accuracy of monitoring in practice. Previous studies have reported the uncertainty of ultrasonic measurements taken on different independent realisations of rough surfaces with the same statistical properties. While this is indicative of potential uncertainties, it is important to recognise that real life defect growth (such as corrosion) does not occur in independent instances, but it manifests itself by small random perturbations of the same under-lying surface. Furthermore, in real life applications the accuracy of trend prediction is often more important than thickness accuracy. This paper therefore introduces a new model for simulating the evolution of gradual backwall morphology changes (as would be encountered due to corrosion processes). This model is used to simulate ultrasonic signals for a large number of changing backwall surfaces. The thickness and thickness trend is then extracted from these signals using a number of common signal processing methods. The mean thickness slope and uncertainty in the extracted slope is then evaluated and compared to the actual values. A new signal processing method is also proposed, which is shown to be an order of magnitude more accurate in estimating wall loss trends than any other evaluated method.

  11. Noncontact Acousto-Ultrasonics for Material Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1998-01-01

    A NdYAG 1064 nm, laser pulse was employed to produce ultrasonic waves in specimens of SiC/SiC and SiC/Ti 6-4 composites which are high temperature materials of interest for aerospace applications. Air coupled transducers were used to detect and collect the signals used for acousto-ultrasonic analysis. Conditions for detecting ultrasonic decay signals were examined. The results were compared to those determined on the same specimens with contact coupling. Some non-contact measurements were made employing conventional air focused detectors. Others were performed with a more novel micromachined capacitance transducer. Concerns of the laser-in technology include potential destructiveness of the laser pulse. Repeated laser pulsing at the same location does lead to deterioration of the ultrasonic signal in some materials, but seems to recover with time. Also, unlike contact AU, the frequency regime employed is a function of laser-material interaction rather than the choice of transducers. Concerns of the air coupled-out technology include the effect of air attenuation. This imposes a practical upper limit to frequency of detection. In the case of the experimental specimens studied ultrasonic decay signals could be imaged satisfactorily.

  12. Ultrasonic measurement models for imaging with phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Engle, Brady J.; Sedov, Alexander; Li, Xiongbing

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic imaging measurement models (IMMs) are developed that generate images of flaws by inversion of ultrasonic measurement models. These IMMs are generalizations of the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM). A special case when the flaw is small is shown to generalize physical optics far field inverse scattering (POFFIS) images. The ultrasonic IMMs provide a rational basis for generating and understanding the ultrasonic images produced by delay-and-sum imaging methods.

  13. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  14. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-15

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  15. Lightwave Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rheam, Harry

    1993-01-01

    Describes simple and inexpensive labs for introducing students to fiber optic communications. Students investigate light as a carrier wave; look into the difficulties associated with "light" communication; and learn about modulation, optical fibers, and critical angles. (PR)

  16. Data communications

    SciTech Connect

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining computer communication systems used in nuclear power plants. The recommendations cover three areas important to these communications systems: system design, communication protocols, and communication media. The first area, system design, considers three aspects of system design--questions about architecture, specific risky design elements or omissions to look for in designs being reviewed, and recommendations for multiplexed data communication systems used in safety systems. The second area reviews pertinent aspects of communication protocol design and makes recommendations for newly designed protocols or the selection of existing protocols for safety system, information display, and non-safety control system use. The third area covers communication media selection, which differs significantly from traditional wire and cable. The recommendations for communication media extend or enhance the concerns of published IEEE standards about three subjects: data rate, imported hazards and maintainability.

  17. Communicating science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farris, Gaye S.

    2005-01-01

    For science to have an impact, it must be communicated and easily accessible. The USGS National Wetlands Research Center communicates its research findings through several ways: publishing, the Web, the library, and education and outreach.

  18. Communication (action with communicative content).

    PubMed

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term Communication generally designate the transmission of a message of concepts, feelings or needs from a speaker to a receiver by means of verbal or no verbal language. The pragmatic approach to human communication has put in evidence a further implication of this concept: every behaviour therefore has a value even when it is not intentional. Recently, a more dynamic concept of communication has been elaborated where communication means communicative action. This interpretation is the starting point for the theory of the "communicative acting" and subsequently of the so called discourse ethic elaborated by J. Habermas.

  19. Field testing and applications of the Ultrasonic Ranging and Data (USRAD) System

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, K.S.; Pickering, D.A.; Blair, M.S.; Espegren, M.L.; Nyquist, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    The Ultrasonic Ranging and Data (USRAD) System is a patented, computerized data acquisition system developed to relate the radiological surveyor's precise physical location to instantaneous radiation data taken during walk-on surveys. The USRAD System incorporates three technologies: radio frequency communications, ultrasonics, and microcomputers. Initial field testing of the USRAD System has resulted in several improvements to walk-on radiological surveys including real-time position data, reproducible survey results, on-site verification of survey coverage, on-site data reduction and graphics, and permanent data storage on magnetic media. Although the USRAD System was developed specifically for use with a gamma-ray detector, it is adaptable to other instruments. Applications of the USRAD System may include verification of remediated and uncontaminated areas, emergency response in mapping pollutant locations after accidents, and characterization of hazardous waste areas. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Communication, Communication, Communication! Growth through Laboratory Instructing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jamie J.; DeAngelo, Samantha; Mack, Nancy; Thompson, Claudia; Cooper, Jennifer; Sesma, Arturo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined gains undergraduate students made in their communication and collaboration skills when they served as peer teachers, i.e., laboratory instructors (LIs), for a General Psychology laboratory. Self-ratings of communication and collaboration skills were completed before and after teaching the laboratory. When compared to before the…

  1. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning...

  2. 21 CFR 868.2025 - Ultrasonic air embolism monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. 868.2025 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2025 Ultrasonic air embolism monitor. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic air embolism monitor is a device used to detect air bubbles...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6150 - Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. 880... Personal Use Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6150 Ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments. (a) Identification. An ultrasonic cleaner for medical instruments is a device intended for cleaning...

  4. Ripple Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, R. Stimson

    1980-01-01

    Discusses how surface-dwelling animals use the water surface as a mode of communication by making ripple signals while they swim about. Provides information about surfaces and surface waves, ripple communication in water striders, ripple signal characteristics, sensing and orienting, other modes of communication, and evolution of ripple…

  5. Communicating Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Joyce

    1993-01-01

    Communicating the environmental risk involved in projects like public incinerators is part of the education of the community. Presents an outline for communicating with the community that includes communication within the project office; solicitation of public input; development of small group informational activities; shared responsibilities;…

  6. Existential Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Self, Charles C.

    Focusing on the seminal work "Being and Nothingness," this paper explores the implications of the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre for the study of communication in society. The paper redefines communication from an existential point of view, explores some implications of this redefinition for the study of communication within the social…

  7. Hippocampal body changes in pure partial onset sleep and pure partial onset waking epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Motamedi, Mahmood; Zandieh, Ali; Hajimirzabeigi, Alireza; Tahsini, Majid; Vakhshiteh, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Elham

    2013-09-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate for the first time the hippocampal changes in patients with pure sleep and pure waking epilepsy. A total of 35 patients with pure partial onset sleep epilepsy and 35 patients with pure partial onset waking epilepsy matched for age and sex ratio were enrolled. MR images were analyzed to determine hippocampal body changes. Rounding ratio of hippocampal body was defined as short axis divided by long axis and hippocampal bodies with ratios ≥ 0.70 were considered rounded. Hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy were found in nine (25.7 %) and seven (20.0 %) patients with pure sleep epilepsy, and in 12 (34.3 %) and 11 (31.4 %) patients with pure waking epilepsy, respectively (P > 0.05 for the comparison between sleep and waking epilepsy). However, proportion of subjects with rounded hippocampal bodies (15, 42.9 % vs. 3, 8.6 % for patients with sleep and waking epilepsy, respectively) and rounding ratios of both left and right hippocampal bodies (0.66 ± 0.13 and 0.61 ± 0.12, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in sleep epileptic patients vs. 0.57 ± 0.11 and 0.55 ± 0.11, respectively for left and right hippocampal bodies in waking epileptic patients) were increased in patients with sleep epilepsy (P < 0.05). Further, in sleep epileptic patients with left sided hippocampal body rounding, epileptiform discharges were more readily lateralized to the left temporal lobe (P < 0.05). In conclusion, hippocampal sclerosis and atrophy are not different between pure partial onset sleep and waking epileptic patients. However, rounding ratio and frequency of hippocampal body rounding are increased in sleep epileptic patients.

  8. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Div. of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation; frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness; the two types of transducers; and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  9. Ultrasonic non invasive techniques for microbiological instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elvira, L.; Sierra, C.; Galán, B.; Resa, P.

    2010-01-01

    Non invasive techniques based on ultrasounds have advantageous features to study, characterize and monitor microbiological and enzymatic reactions. These processes may change the sound speed, viscosity or particle distribution size of the medium where they take place, which makes possible their analysis using ultrasonic techniques. In this work, two different systems for the analysis of microbiological liquid media based on ultrasounds are presented. In first place, an industrial application based on an ultrasonic monitoring technique for microbiological growth detection in milk is shown. Such a system may improve the quality control strategies in food production factories, being able to decrease the time required to detect possible contaminations in packed products. Secondly, a study about the growing of the Escherichia coli DH5 α in different conditions is presented. It is shown that the use of ultrasonic non invasive characterization techniques in combination with other conventional measurements like optical density provides complementary information about the metabolism of these bacteria.

  10. Ultrasonic filtration of industrial chemical solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosma, T.

    1974-01-01

    The practical results obtained as a result of filtering industrial chemical solutions under continuous flow conditions with the aid of an ultrasonic filter are presented. The main part of the assembly consists of an ultrasonic generator with an output power of about 400 W and the filtration assembly, in which there is a magnetostrictive amplifier constructed for 20.5 kHz. In addition to ensuring a continuous flow of filtered solution, ultrasonic filters can be replaced or cleaned at intervals of time that are 8-10 times greater than in the case of mechanical filters. They yield considerably better results as far as the size of the filtered particles is concerned. The parameters on which filtration quality depends are also presented.

  11. Folded Resonant Horns for Power Ultrasonic Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Askins, Stephen; Gradziel, Michael; Bao, Xiaoqi; Chang, Zensheu; Dolgin, Benjamin; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Peterson, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Folded horns have been conceived as alternatives to straight horns used as resonators and strain amplifiers in power ultrasonic systems. Such systems are used for cleaning, welding, soldering, cutting, and drilling in a variety of industries. In addition, several previous NASA Tech Briefs articles have described instrumented drilling, coring, and burrowing machines that utilize combinations of sonic and ultrasonic vibrational actuation. The main advantage of a folded horn, relative to a straight horn of the same resonance frequency, is that the folded horn can be made shorter (that is, its greatest linear dimension measured from the outside can be made smaller). Alternatively, for a given length, the resonance frequency can be reduced. Hence, the folded-horn concept affords an additional degree of design freedom for reducing the length of an ultrasonic power system that includes a horn.

  12. Method of noncontacting ultrasonic process monitoring

    DOEpatents

    Garcia, Gabriel V.; Walter, John B.; Telschow, Kenneth L.

    1992-01-01

    A method of monitoring a material during processing comprising the steps of (a) shining a detection light on the surface of a material; (b) generating ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material to cause a change in frequency of the detection light; (c) detecting a change in the frequency of the detection light at the surface of the material; (d) detecting said ultrasonic waves at the surface point of detection of the material; (e) measuring a change in the time elapsed from generating the ultrasonic waves at the surface of the material and return to the surface point of detection of the material, to determine the transit time; and (f) comparing the transit time to predetermined values to determine properties such as, density and the elastic quality of the material.

  13. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1995-03-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation, frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness, the two types of transducers, and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  14. Anechoic chamber qualification at ultrasonic frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenny, Trevor; Anderson, Brian

    2010-10-01

    Qualifying an anechoic chamber for frequencies that extend into the ultrasonic range is necessary for research work involving airborne ultrasonic sound. For example, an anechoic chamber allows for measurements of the direct sound radiated by an object without reflections from walls. The ANSI S12.55/ISO 3745 standard which covers anechoic chamber qualification does not extend into the ultrasonic frequency range, nor have others discussed this frequency range in the literature. An increasing number of technologies are employing ultrasound; hence the need to develop facilities to conduct basic research studies on airborne ultrasound. This presentation will discuss the challenges associated with chamber qualification and present the results for qualification of a chamber at Brigham Young University. [This work has been funded by the Los Alamos National Laboratory

  15. Ultrasonic Welding of Wires and Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Stefan; Wagner, Guntram; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    In the automobile industry, ultrasonic metal welding is an established method. At the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering (WKK) at the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, systematic investigations of the weldability of Al-wires and flat flexible copper cables were carried out. In the case of Al-wires, joints with cross-sectional area of up to 80 mm2 and tensile shear load of about 3500 N were finally realized. Furthermore, methods to reduce unintentional adherence between the sonotrode coupling face and the Al-wires were developed. To realize FFC joints, ultrasonic spot welding systems and ultrasonic torsion welding systems were used. A central purpose of these investigations is the development of a system to enable welding through the insulation of the FFC without weakening the base material.

  16. Signal processor for processing ultrasonic receiver signals

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1980-01-01

    A signal processor is provided which uses an analog integrating circuit in conjunction with a set of digital counters controlled by a precision clock for sampling timing to provide an improved presentation of an ultrasonic transmitter/receiver signal. The signal is sampled relative to the transmitter trigger signal timing at precise times, the selected number of samples are integrated and the integrated samples are transferred and held for recording on a strip chart recorder or converted to digital form for storage. By integrating multiple samples taken at precisely the same time with respect to the trigger for the ultrasonic transmitter, random noise, which is contained in the ultrasonic receiver signal, is reduced relative to the desired useful signal.

  17. Novel Applications of Power Ultrasonic Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Ke-Ming

    Atomization is a process where a liquid is dispersed into droplets in a gas. Ultrasonic atomization was discovered in the 1920s (Loomis and Woods, 1927). Since then, atomization has seen diversified applications in devices such as drug nebulizers, room humidifiers, and air refreshers, as well as in industrial processes such as combustion, prilling, and web coating. In contrast to conventional liquid atomizers, ultrasound atomizers generally handle lower flow rates, and atomization of the liquid is achieved not by pressure, but by the vibration of ultrasonic waves (Morgan, 1993). This latter feature decouples the requirement of orifice geometry and pressure from the flow rate, allowing the flow to be controlled independently. Typically, ultrasonic atomizers excel in accurately processing low flow rates and slurry without clogging issues.

  18. Ultrasonically-assisted Polymer Molding: An Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moles, Matthew; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim

    Energy reduction in extrusion and injection molding processes can be achieved by the introduction of ultrasonic energy. Polymer flow can be enhanced on application of ultrasonic vibration, which can reduce the thermal and pressure input requirements to produce the same molding; higher productivity may also be achieved. In this paper, a design of an ultrasound-assisted injection mold machine is explored. An extrusion-die design was augmented with a commercial 1.5 kW ultrasonic transducer and sonotrode designed to resonate close to 20 kHz with up to 100 μm vibration amplitude. The design was evaluated with modal and thermal analysis using finite-element analysis software. The use of numerical techniques, including computational fluid dynamics, fluid-structure interaction and coupled Lagrangian-Eulerian method, to predict the effect of ultrasound on polymer flow was considered. A sonotrode design utilizing ceramic to enhance thermal isolation was also explored.

  19. Ultrasonic frequency selection for aqueous fine cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Joann F.

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate ultrasonic cleaning systems for precision cleaning effectiveness for oxygen service hardware. This evaluation was specific for Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell Aerospace alloys and machining soils. Machining lubricants and hydraulic fluid were applied as soils to standardized complex test specimens designed to simulate typical hardware. The study consisted of tests which included 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, and 65 kHz ultrasonic cleaning systems. Two size categories of cleaning systems were evaluated, 3- to 10-gal laboratory size tanks and 35- to 320-gal industrial size tanks. The system properties of cavitation, frequency vs. cleaning effectiveness, the two types of transducers, and the power level of the system vs. size of the cleaning tank were investigated. The data obtained from this study was used to select the ultrasonic tanks for the aqueous fine clean facility installed at Rocketdyne.

  20. Laboratory ultrasonic generator. [characteristics of ultrasonic sound generator for experimental and industrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tudose, C.; Dobrescu, F.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of an ultrasonic generator with magnetostrictive amplifiers are described. The generator was designed to supply an output power of about 400 watts at a consumption of about 1 kilowatt. The generator produces sound waves in the frequency range of 18 to 30 KHz. The circuit design is described and examples of the construction are illustrated. The generator is used to study different industrial processes such as the effect of ultrasonic radiation of the emulsification of liquids, the dispersion of solids, and ultrasonic filtration.

  1. Model validation of untethered, ultrasonic neural dust motes for cortical recording.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongjin; Carmena, Jose M; Rabaey, Jan M; Maharbiz, Michel M; Alon, Elad

    2015-04-15

    A major hurdle in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) is the lack of an implantable neural interface system that remains viable for a substantial fraction of the user's lifetime. Recently, sub-mm implantable, wireless electromagnetic (EM) neural interfaces have been demonstrated in an effort to extend system longevity. However, EM systems do not scale down in size well due to the severe inefficiency of coupling radio-waves at those scales within tissue. This paper explores fundamental system design trade-offs as well as size, power, and bandwidth scaling limits of neural recording systems built from low-power electronics coupled with ultrasonic power delivery and backscatter communication. Such systems will require two fundamental technology innovations: (1) 10-100 μm scale, free-floating, independent sensor nodes, or neural dust, that detect and report local extracellular electrophysiological data via ultrasonic backscattering and (2) a sub-cranial ultrasonic interrogator that establishes power and communication links with the neural dust. We provide experimental verification that the predicted scaling effects follow theory; (127 μm)(3) neural dust motes immersed in water 3 cm from the interrogator couple with 0.002064% power transfer efficiency and 0.04246 ppm backscatter, resulting in a maximum received power of ∼0.5 μW with ∼1 nW of change in backscatter power with neural activity. The high efficiency of ultrasonic transmission can enable the scaling of the sensing nodes down to 10s of micrometer. We conclude with a brief discussion of the application of neural dust for both central and peripheral nervous system recordings, and perspectives on future research directions.

  2. Elastic properties of sand-peat moss mixtures from ultrasonic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Trombino, C N

    1998-09-02

    Effective remediation of an environmental site requires extensive knowledge of the geologic setting, as well as the amount and distribution of contaminants. Seismic investigations provide a means to examine the subsurface with minimum disturbance, Laboratory measurements are needed to interpret field data. In this experiment, laboratory tests were performed to characterize manufactured soil samples in terms of their elastic properties. The soil samples consisted of small (mass) percentages (1 to 20 percent) of peat moss mixed with pure quartz sand. Sand was chosen as the major component because its elastic properties are well known except at the lowest pressures. The ultrasonic pulse transmission technique was used to collect elastic wave velocity data. These data were analyzed and mathematically processed to calculate the other elastic properties such as the modulus of elasticity. This experiment demonstrates that seismic data are affected by the amount~of peat moss added to pure sand samples. Elastic wave velocities, velocity gradients, and elastic moduli vary with pressure and peat moss amounts. In particular, ultrasonic response changes dramatically when pore space fills with peat. With some further investigation, the information gathered in this experiment could be applied to seismic field research.

  3. High-frequency, silicon-based ultrasonic nozzles using multiple Fourier horns.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shirley C; Song, Yu L; Tseng, Terry K; Chou, Yuan F; Chen, Wei J; Tsai, Chen S

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents the design, simulation, and characterization of microfabricated 0.5 MHz, silicon-based, ultrasonic nozzles. Each nozzle is made of a piezoelectric drive section and a silicon resonator consisting of multiple Fourier horns, each with half wavelength design and twice amplitude magnification. Results of finite element three-dimensional (3-D) simulation using a commercial program predicted existence of one resonant frequency of pure longitudinal vibration. Both impedance analysis and measurement of longitudinal vibration confirmed the simulation results with one pure longitudinal vibration mode at the resonant frequency in excellent agreement with the design value. Furthermore, at the resonant frequency, the measured longitudinal vibration amplitude at the nozzle tip increases as the number of Fourier horns (n) increases in good agreement with the theoretical values of 2(n). Using this design, very high vibration amplitude gain at the nozzle tip can be achieved with no reduction in the tip cross-sectional area for contact of liquid to be atomized. Therefore, the required electric drive power should be drastically reduced, decreasing the likelihood of transducer failure in ultrasonic atomization.

  4. Ultrasonic precision optical grinding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Michael J.; Bechtold, Michael J.; Fess, Edward; Wolfs, Frank L.; Bechtold, Rob

    2015-10-01

    As optical geometries become more precise and complex and a wider range of materials are used, the processes used for manufacturing become more critical. As the preparatory stage for polishing, this is especially true for grinding. Slow processing speeds, accelerated tool wear, and poor surface quality are often detriments in manufacturing glass and hard ceramics. The quality of the ground surface greatly influences the polishing process and the resulting finished product. Through extensive research and development, OptiPro Systems has introduced an ultrasonic assisted grinding technology, OptiSonic, which has numerous advantages over traditional grinding processes. OptiSonic utilizes a custom tool holder designed to produce oscillations in line with the rotating spindle. A newly developed software package called IntelliSonic is integral to this platform. IntelliSonic automatically characterizes the tool and continuously optimizes the output frequency for optimal cutting while in contact with the part. This helps maintain a highly consistent process under changing load conditions for a more accurate surface. Utilizing a wide variety of instruments, test have proven to show a reduction in tool wear and increase in surface quality while allowing processing speeds to be increased. OptiSonic has proven to be an enabling technology to overcome the difficulties seen in grinding of glass and hard optical ceramics. OptiSonic has demonstrated numerous advantages over the standard CNC grinding process. Advantages are evident in reduced tool wear, better surface quality, and reduced cycle times due to increased feed rates. These benefits can be seen over numerous applications within the precision optics industry.

  5. Wilderness communications.

    PubMed

    Worley, Gordon H

    2011-09-01

    When an emergency situation arises in a remote location, the ability to communicate with outside sources of assistance can prove very valuable. This article reviews the different types of communications technologies available to individuals in remote locations, including satellite telephones, personal locator beacons, satellite messengers, cellular telephones, and the different licensed and non-licensed 2-way radio services available for personal use. It also discusses basic radio communications techniques, emergency communication, requesting ground or air casualty evacuation, and selecting communications devices for different applications.

  6. [XX 'pure' gonadal dysgenesis and XYY syndrome].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2004-02-01

    XX 'pure' gonadal dysgenesis is a disease related to Turner's syndrome. Patients of this disease are characterized by normal female external genitalia, bilateral streak gonads, amenorrhea and sexual infantilism. Recently, it has been reported that point mutations of the FSH receptor gene may be one of cause of this disease. The relationship between criminal behavior and XYY syndrome is still controversial. Increased incidence of disomic sperm in 47,XYY males has been reported by fluorescent in situ hybridization(FISH). Genetic counseling should be done when they undergo intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  7. Electrostatic Precipitation in Nearly Pure Gaseous Nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buhler, Charles; Calle, Carlos; Clements, Sid; Cox, Bobby; Ritz, Mindy

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic precipitation was performed in a nearly pure gaseous nitrogen system as a possible remedy for black dust contaminant from high pressure 6000 psi lines at the NASA Kennedy Space Center. The results of a prototype electrostatic precipitator that was built and tested using nitrogen gas at standard atmospheric pressures is presented. High voltage pulsed waveforms are generated using a rotating spark gap system at 30 Hz. A unique dust delivery system utilizing the Venturi effect was devised that supplies a given amount of dust per unit time for testing purposes.

  8. Pure seminoma: A review and update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Pure seminoma is a rare pathology of the young adult, often discovered in the early stages. Its prognosis is generally excellent and many therapeutic options are available, especially in stage I tumors. High cure rates can be achieved in several ways: standard treatment with radiotherapy is challenged by surveillance and chemotherapy. Toxicity issues and the patients' preferences should be considered when management decisions are made. This paper describes firstly the management of primary seminoma and its nodal involvement and, secondly, the various therapeutic options according to stage. PMID:21819630

  9. Defective spatial imagery with pure Gerstmann's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carota, Antonio; Di Pietro, Marie; Ptak, Radek; Poglia, Davide; Schnider, Armin

    2004-01-01

    Gerstmann's syndrome comprises finger agnosia, peripheral agraphia, anarithmetia, and right-left confusion. We here report a single-case study of an 85-year-old ambidextrous man who exhibited pure Gerstmann's syndrome (i.e., without aphasia) 10 weeks after a stroke involving the angular gyrus in the left parietal lobe. We hypothesize that, in this case, the main cognitive denominator of Gerstmann's tetrad was a severe dysfunction in mental rotation and translation. This report provides further evidence for the spatial nature of Gerstmann's syndrome.

  10. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, Stephen E.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Prorok, Barton C.; Lanagan, Michael T.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1995-01-01

    An article and method of manufacture of (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor.

  11. Synthesis of highly phase pure BSCCO superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Dorris, S.E.; Poeppel, R.B.; Prorok, B.C.; Lanagan, M.T.; Maroni, V.A.

    1995-11-21

    An article and method of manufacture (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor are disclosed. The superconductor is manufactured by preparing a first powdered mixture of bismuth oxide, lead oxide, strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. A second powdered mixture is then prepared of strontium carbonate, calcium carbonate and copper oxide. The mixtures are calcined separately with the two mixtures then combined. The resulting combined mixture is then subjected to a powder in tube deformation and thermal processing to produce a substantially phase pure (Bi, Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor. 5 figs.

  12. Pure phase decoherence in a ring geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z.; Aharony, A.; Entin-Wohlman, O.; Stamp, P. C. E.

    2010-06-15

    We study the dynamics of pure phase decoherence for a particle hopping around an N-site ring, coupled both to a spin bath and to an Aharonov-Bohm flux which threads the ring. Analytic results are found for the dynamics of the influence functional and of the reduced density matrix of the particle, both for initial single wave-packet states, and for states split initially into two separate wave packets moving at different velocities. We also give results for the dynamics of the current as a function of time.

  13. Purely cubic action for string field theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, G. T.; Lykken, J.; Rohm, R.; Strominger, A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that Witten's (1986) open-bosonic-string field-theory action and a closed-string analog can be written as a purely cubic interaction term. The conventional form of the action arises by expansion around particular solutions of the classical equations of motion. The explicit background dependence of the conventional action via the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin operator is eliminated in the cubic formulation. A closed-form expression is found for the full nonlinear gauge-transformation law.

  14. Critical speeding up in pure fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boukari, Hacene; Shaumeyer, J. N.; Briggs, Matthew E.; Gammon, Robert W.

    1990-01-01

    The extreme compressibility of a pure fluid near its critical point significantly affects its bulk dynamic response to temperature changes through adiabatic processes. Equations that describe the dynamics in the absence of gravity are developed, and the magnitude of the effect is illustrated with numerical solutions in one dimension. The results are remarkable: 5 mm of critical xenon, quenched from 20 to 10 mK above its critical temperature, cools by over 99 percent in less than 5 s. Moreover, adiabatic cooling is faster when the fluid is closer to the critical point.

  15. Hydroxyl X2Pi pure rotational transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goorvitch, D.; Goldman, A.; Dothe, Hoang; Tipping, R. H.; Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    We present a list of frequencies, term values, Einstein A values, and assignments for the pure rotational transitions of the X2Pi state of the OH molecule. This list includes transitions from 3 to 2015/cm for Delta-v = 0, v-double-prime = 0-4, and J-double-prime = 0.5-49.5. The A values were computed using recent advances in calculating wave functions for a coupled system and an experimentally derived electric dipole moment function (Nelson et al., 1990) which exhibits curvature.

  16. Synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanocomposite using ultrasonic irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopi, D.; Ansari, M. Thameem; Shinyjoy, E.; Kavitha, L.

    2012-02-01

    Nowadays magnetic hydroxyapatite (m-HAP) has potential applications in biomedicine more especially for bone cancer treatment. In this paper the functionalization of the hydroxyapatite (HAP) with magnetite nanoparticle (MNP) through ultrasonic irradiation technique is reported and its spectral investigation has been carried out. The ultrasonic irradiation with two different frequencies of 28 kHz and 35 kHz at the power of 150 and 320 W, respectively, was employed for the synthesis of m-HAP. The ultrasound irradiation of 35 kHz at 320 W shows the efficient diffusion of MNP to the HAP host matrix leads to the formation of m-HAP. The ultrasonic irradiation technique does not require stabilizers as in the case of coprecipitation method hence the final product of pure m-HAP is obtained. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows the formation of magnetite nanoparticles which are functionalized with hydroxyapatite host matrix. The vibrating sample magnetometer curve exhibits the super paramagnetic property of the samples and the saturation magnetization ( Ms) value of the functionalized magnetic hydroxyapatite. The Ms value is found to be much less than that of pure magnetite nanoparticle and this decrement in Ms is due to the hindrance of magnetic domain of the particles with HAP. The portrayed Raman spectra discriminate between the m-HAP and MNP with corresponding vibrational modes of frequencies. The transmission electron micrograph shows excellent morphology of functionalized m-HAP in nanometer range. The atomic force microscopic investigation shows the 3-dimensional view of crust and trench shape of m-HAP. All these results confirm the formation of magnetic hydroxyapatite nanocomposite with typical magnetic property for biological applications.

  17. Ultrasonic Ranging System With Increased Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, William E.; Johnson, William G.

    1987-01-01

    Master-oscillator frequency increased. Ultrasonic range-measuring system with 0.1-in. resolution provides continuous digital display of four distance readings, each updated four times per second. Four rangefinder modules in system are modified versions of rangefinder used for automatic focusing in commercial series of cameras. Ultrasonic pulses emitted by system innocuous to both people and equipment. Provides economical solutions to such distance-measurement problems as posed by boats approaching docks, truck backing toward loading platform, runway-clearance readout for tail of airplane with high angle attack, or burglar alarm.

  18. Ultrasonic technique for characterizing skin burns

    DOEpatents

    Goans, Ronald E.; Cantrell, Jr., John H.; Meyers, F. Bradford; Stambaugh, Harry D.

    1978-01-01

    This invention, a method for ultrasonically determining the depth of a skin burn, is based on the finding that the acoustical impedance of burned tissue differs sufficiently from that of live tissue to permit ultrasonic detection of the interface between the burn and the underlying unburned tissue. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate. As compared with conventional practice, it provides the important advantage of permitting much earlier determination of whether a burn is of the first, second, or third degree. In the case of severe burns, the usual two - to three-week delay before surgery may be reduced to about 3 days or less.

  19. Computerized certification of digital ultrasonic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, M. W.

    1987-09-01

    A computerized inspection system is being set up at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to enable certification of the Krautkramer Branson ultrasonic instrumentation used extensively in Y-12 production operations. The system takes the data required to certify the linearity and frequency response of the receiver and to certify the correct operation of the pulsers, gates, and computer interface. A subset of the program will be able to verify correct instrumentation in the field by using the actual computer and instrumentation being used for production ultrasonic weld inspections. The system can reduce the certification time from approximately one week to less than an hour.

  20. Characterization methods for ultrasonic test systems

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, L.J.; Becker, F.L.; Bowey, R.E.; Doctor, S.R.; Gribble, R.P.; Posakony, G.J.

    1982-07-01

    Methods for the characterization of ultrasonic transducers (search units) and instruments are presented. The instrument system is considered as three separate components consisting of a transducer, a receiver-display, and a pulser. The operation of each component is assessed independently. The methods presented were chosen because they provide the greatest amount of information about component operation and were not chosen based upon such conditions as cost, ease of operation, field implementation, etc. The results of evaluating a number of commercially available ultrasonic test instruments are presented.

  1. Ultrasonic Device Would Open Pipe Bombs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Raheb, Michael S.; Adams, Marc A.; Zwissler, James G.

    1991-01-01

    Piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer, energized by frequency generator and power supply, vibrates shell of pipe bomb while hardly disturbing explosive inner material. Frequency-control circuitry senses resonance in shell and holds generator at that frequency to induce fatigue cracking in threads of end cap. In addition to disarming bombs, ultrasonically induced fatigue may have other applications. In manufacturing, replaces some machining and cutting operations. In repair of equipment, cleanly and quickly disassembles corroded parts. In demolition of buildings used to dismember steel framework safely and controllably.

  2. Magnetic and ultrasonic investigations on magnetite nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Nabeel Rashin, M; Hemalatha, J

    2012-12-01

    Magnetite nanofluids of various concentrations have been prepared through co-precipitation method. The structural and magnetic properties of the magnetic nanofluids have been analyzed which respectively revealed their face centered cubic crystal structure and super paramagnetic behavior. Ultrasonic investigations have been made for the nanofluids at different temperatures and magnetic fields. Open- and close-packed water structure is considered to explain the temperature effects. The inter particle interactions of surface modified nanomagnetite particle and the cluster formation are realized through the variations in ultrasonic parameters.

  3. Droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Praveen Priyaranjan; Kar, Durga Prasanna; Bhuyan, Satyanarayan

    2016-01-01

    A new technique of droplets merging through wireless ultrasonic actuation has been proposed and experimentally investigated in this work. The proposed method is based on the principle of resonant inductive coupling and piezoelectric resonance. When a mechanical vibration is excited in a piezoelectric plate, the ultrasonic vibration transmitted to the droplets placed on its surface and induces merging. It has been observed that the merging rate of water droplets depends on the operating frequency, mechanical vibration of piezoelectric plate, separation distance between the droplets, and volume of droplets. The investigated technique of droplets merging through piezoelectric actuation is quite useful for microfluidics, chemical and biomedical engineering applications.

  4. Embedded spacecraft thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, Jared W.

    Research has been completed in order to rapidly manufacture spacecraft thermal control technologies embedded in spacecraft structural panels using ultrasonic consolidation. This rapid manufacturing process enables custom thermal control designs in the time frame necessary for responsive space. Successfully embedded components include temperature sensors, heaters, wire harnessing, pre-manufactured heat pipes, and custom integral heat pipes. High conductivity inserts and custom integral pulsating heat pipes were unsuccessfully attempted. This research shows the viability of rapid manufacturing of spacecraft structures with embedded thermal control using ultrasonic consolidation.

  5. Degree of dispersion monitoring by ultrasonic transmission technique and excitation of the transducer's harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schober, G.; Heidemeyer, P.; Kretschmer, K.; Bastian, M.; Hochrein, T.

    2014-05-01

    The degree of dispersion of filled polymer compounds is an important quality parameter for various applications. For instance, there is an influence on the chroma in pigment colored plastics or on the mechanical properties of filled or reinforced compounds. Most of the commonly used offline methods are work-intensive and time-consuming. Moreover, they do not allow an all-over process monitoring. In contrast, the ultrasonic technique represents a suitable robust and process-capable inline method. Here, we present inline ultrasonic measurements on polymer melts with a fundamental frequency of 1 MHz during compounding. In order to extend the frequency range we additionally excite the fundamental and the odd harmonics vibrations at 3 and 5 MHz. The measurements were carried out on a compound consisting of polypropylene and calcium carbonate. For the simulation of agglomerates calcium carbonate with a larger particle size was added with various rates. The total filler content was kept constant. The frequency selective analysis shows a linear correlation between the normalized extinction and the rate of agglomerates simulated by the coarser filler. Further experiments with different types of glass beads with a well-defined particle size verify these results. A clear correlation between the normalized extinction and the glass bead size as well as a higher damping with increasing frequency corresponds to the theoretical assumption. In summary the dispersion quality can be monitored inline by the ultrasonic technique. The excitation of the ultrasonic transducer's harmonics generates more information about the material as the usage of the pure harmonic vibration.

  6. The role of mnemonic processes in pure-target and pure-foil recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Koop, Gregory J; Criss, Amy H; Malmberg, Kenneth J

    2015-04-01

    Surprisingly, response patterns in a recognition memory test are very similar regardless of whether the test list contains both targets and foils or just one class of items. To better understand these effects, we evaluate performance over the course of testing. Output interference (OI) is the decrease in performance across test trials due to an increase in noise caused by encoded test items. Critically, OI is predicted on pure lists if the mnemonic evidence for each test item is evaluated. In two experiments, participants received accurate feedback, no feedback, or random feedback that was unrelated to the response on each test trial and pure or standard test lists. When no feedback was provided, performance was nearly identical for standard and pure test lists, replicating previous findings. Only in the presence of accurate feedback were participants able to successfully adapt to pure list environments and improve their accuracy. Critically, OI was observed, demonstrating that participants continued to evaluate mnemonic evidence even in pure list conditions. We discuss the implication of these data for models of memory.

  7. Pure sources and efficient detectors for optical quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielnicki, Kevin

    Over the last sixty years, classical information theory has revolutionized the understanding of the nature of information, and how it can be quantified and manipulated. Quantum information processing extends these lessons to quantum systems, where the properties of intrinsic uncertainty and entanglement fundamentally defy classical explanation. This growing field has many potential applications, including computing, cryptography, communication, and metrology. As inherently mobile quantum particles, photons are likely to play an important role in any mature large-scale quantum information processing system. However, the available methods for producing and detecting complex multi-photon states place practical limits on the feasibility of sophisticated optical quantum information processing experiments. In a typical quantum information protocol, a source first produces an interesting or useful quantum state (or set of states), perhaps involving superposition or entanglement. Then, some manipulations are performed on this state, perhaps involving quantum logic gates which further manipulate or entangle the intial state. Finally, the state must be detected, obtaining some desired measurement result, e.g., for secure communication or computationally efficient factoring. The work presented here concerns the first and last stages of this process as they relate to photons: sources and detectors. Our work on sources is based on the need for optimized non-classical states of light delivered at high rates, particularly of single photons in a pure quantum state. We seek to better understand the properties of spontaneous parameteric downconversion (SPDC) sources of photon pairs, and in doing so, produce such an optimized source. We report an SPDC source which produces pure heralded single photons with little or no spectral filtering, allowing a significant rate enhancement. Our work on detectors is based on the need to reliably measure single-photon states. We have focused on

  8. Studies on Laser Generated Ultrasonic Waves in Inconel Super Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Pramila, T.; Shukla, Anita; Raghuram, V.

    2010-05-28

    This paper deals with the generation, characterization and analysis of ultrasonic waves generated in a thick stepped sample of inconel super alloy using Laser Based Ultrasonic Technique. Nd-YAG pulsed laser is used for ultrasonic generation while He-Ne laser is used for heterodyne detection. Ultrasonic signals are analyzed using Fourier and wavelet transforms. Here the identification and estimation of velocity of pressure waves is presented. The mechanism of pressure wave generation is discussed in brief. Laser ultrasonics studies of inconel are being reported for the first time.

  9. Consideration of Design Parameters of Ultrasonic Transducer for Fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K. B.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S. D.; Choi, M. Y.

    2005-04-01

    This study was conducted to develop the ultrasonic transducers for non-destructive contact measurement of fruits. The design parameters for ultrasonic transducer such as acoustical impedance of fruits, kinds of piezoelectric materials, ultrasonic wave frequency, and transducer diameter were investigated. In order to match the impedance between piezoelectric material and fruit, various materials were evaluated. And to control the bandwidth of ultrasonic wave of the transducer, various backing materials were fabricated and evaluated. Especially, the wear plate of the transducer was designed and fabricated considering curvature of fruit. Finally, the ultrasonic transducer having 100 kHz of central frequency were fabricated and tested.

  10. Welding apparatus and methods for using ultrasonic sensing

    DOEpatents

    McJunkin, Timothy R.; Johnson, John A.; Larsen, Eric D.; Smartt, Herschel B.

    2006-08-22

    A welding apparatus using ultrasonic sensing is described and which includes a movable welder having a selectively adjustable welding head for forming a partially completed weld in a weld seam defined between adjoining metal substrates; an ultrasonic assembly borne by the moveable welder and which is operable to generate an ultrasonic signal which is directed toward the partially completed weld, and is further reflected from same; and a controller electrically coupled with the ultrasonic assembly and controllably coupled with the welding head, and wherein the controller receives information regarding the ultrasonic signal and in response to the information optimally positions the welding head relative to the weld seam.

  11. Underwater loudness for pure tones: Duration effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cudahy, Edward A.; Schwaller, Derek; Fothergill, David; Wolgemuth, Keith

    2003-04-01

    The loudness of underwater pure tones was measured by loudness matching for pure tones from 100 to 16,000 Hz. The standard was a one second tone at 1000 Hz. The signal duration was varied from 20 milliseconds to 5 seconds. Subjects were instructed to match the loudness of the comparison tone at one of the test frequencies to the loudness of the standard tone. Loudness was measured at the threshold, the most comfortable loudness, and the maximum tolerable loudness. The intensity of the standard was varied randomly across the test series. The subjects were bareheaded U.S. Navy divers tested at a depth of 3 meters. All subjects had normal in-air hearing. Tones were presented to the right side of the subject from an array of underwater sound projectors. The sound pressure level was calibrated at the location of the subject's head with the subject absent. Loudness increased and threshold decreased as duration increased. The effect was greatest at the lowest and highest frequencies. The shape of the loudness contours across frequency and duration derived from these measurements are different from in-air measurements. [Research supported by ONR.

  12. Dead regions and noisiness of pure tones.

    PubMed

    Huss, Martina; Moore, Brian C J

    2005-10-01

    Some hearing-impaired subjects report pure tones as sounding highly distorted and noise-like. We assessed whether such reports indicate that the tone frequency falls inside a dead region (DR). Nine hearing-impaired and four normally hearing subjects rated pure tones on a scale from 1 to 7, where 1 indicates clear tone and 7 indicates noise. A white noise was presented as a reference for a sound that should be rated as 7. Stimuli covered the whole audible range of frequencies and levels. The noisiness ratings were, on average, higher for hearing-impaired subjects than for normally hearing subjects. For the former, the ratings were not markedly different for tones with frequencies just outside or inside a DR. However, ratings always exceeded 3 for tones falling more than 1.5 octaves inside a DR. The results indicate that judgement of a tone as sounding noise-like does not reliably indicate that the tone frequency falls in a DR. Both normally hearing and hearing-impaired subjects rated 0.125 kHz and 12 kHz tones as somewhat noise-like, independently of the existence of a DR.

  13. Light Higgsinos in pure gravity mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jason L.; Ibe, Masahiro; Olive, Keith A.; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2015-03-01

    Pure gravity mediation, with two free parameters, is a minimalistic approach to supergravity models, yet it is capable of incorporating radiative electroweak symmetry breaking, a Higgs mass in agreement with the experimental measurement, without violating any phenomenological constraints. The model may also contain a viable dark matter candidate in the form of a wino. Here, we extend the minimal model by allowing the μ term to be a free parameter equivalent to allowing the two Higgs soft masses, m1 and m2, to differ from other scalar masses, which are set by the gravitino mass. In particular, we examine the region of parameter space where μ ≪m3 /2, in which case the Higgsino becomes the lightest supersymmetric particle and a dark matter candidate. We also consider a generalization of pure gravity mediation that incorporates a Peccei-Quinn symmetry which determines the μ term dynamically. In this case we show that the dark matter may either be in the form of an axion and/or a neutralino and that the lightest supersymmetric particle may be either a wino, bino, or Higgsino.

  14. Time Evolution of Pure Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyama, S. M.

    1981-03-01

    Numerical solutions to the Einstein equations in the case of pure gravitational waves are given. The system is assumed to be axially symmetric and non-rotating. The time symmetric initial data and the conformally flat initial data are obtained by solving the constraint equations at t=0. The time evolution of these initial data depends strongly on the initial amplitude of the gravitational waves. In the case of the low initial amplitude, waves only disperse to null infinity. By comparing the initial gravitational energy with the total energy loss through an r=constant surface, it is concluded that the Newman-Penrose method and the Gibbon-Hawking method are the most desirable for measuring the energy flux of gravitational radiation numerically. In the case that the initial ratio of the spatial extent of the gravitational waves to the Schwarzschild radius (M/2) is smaller than about 300, the waves collapse by themselves, leading to formation of a black hole. The analytic solutions of the linearized Einstein equations for the pure gravitational waves are also shown.

  15. Encoding of ultrasonic vocalizations in the auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Isaac M.; Natan, Ryan G.

    2013-01-01

    One of the central tasks of the mammalian auditory system is to represent information about acoustic communicative signals, such as vocalizations. However, the neuronal computations underlying vocalization encoding in the central auditory system are poorly understood. To learn how the rat auditory cortex encodes information about conspecific vocalizations, we presented a library of natural and temporally transformed ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) to awake rats while recording neural activity in the primary auditory cortex (A1) with chronically implanted multielectrode probes. Many neurons reliably and selectively responded to USVs. The response strength to USVs correlated strongly with the response strength to frequency-modulated (FM) sweeps and the FM rate tuning index, suggesting that related mechanisms generate responses to USVs as to FM sweeps. The response strength further correlated with the neuron's best frequency, with the strongest responses produced by neurons whose best frequency was in the ultrasonic frequency range. For responses of each neuron to each stimulus group, we fitted a novel predictive model: a reduced generalized linear-nonlinear model (GLNM) that takes the frequency modulation and single-tone amplitude as the only two input parameters. The GLNM accurately predicted neuronal responses to previously unheard USVs, and its prediction accuracy was higher than that of an analogous spectrogram-based linear-nonlinear model. The response strength of neurons and the model prediction accuracy were higher for original, rather than temporally transformed, vocalizations. These results indicate that A1 processes original USVs differentially than transformed USVs, indicating preference for temporal statistics of the original vocalizations. PMID:23324323

  16. Ultrasonic Mastering of Filter Flow and Antifouling of Renewable Resources.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2016-04-04

    Inadequate access to pure water and sanitation requires new cost-effective, ergonomic methods with less consumption of energy and chemicals, leaving the environment cleaner and sustainable. Among such methods, ultrasound is a unique means to control the physics and chemistry of complex fluids (wastewater) with excellent performance regarding mass transfer, cleaning, and disinfection. In membrane filtration processes, it overcomes diffusion limits and can accelerate the fluid flow towards the filter preventing antifouling. Here, we outline the current state of knowledge and technological design, with a focus on physicochemical strategies of ultrasound for water cleaning. We highlight important parameters of ultrasound for the delivery of a fluid flow from a technical perspective employing principles of physics and chemistry. By introducing various ultrasonic methods, involving bubbles or cavitation in combination with external fields, we show advancements in flow acceleration and mass transportation to the filter. In most cases we emphasize the main role of streaming and the impact of cavitation with a perspective to prevent and remove fouling deposits during the flow. We also elaborate on the deficiencies of present technologies and on problems to be solved to achieve a wide-spread application.

  17. Viscoacoustic model for near-field ultrasonic levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikhov, Ivan; Chivilikhin, Sergey; Amosov, Alexey; Jeanson, Romain

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasonic near-field levitation allows for contactless support and transportation of an object over vibrating surface. We developed an accurate model predicting pressure distribution in the gap between the surface and levitating object. The formulation covers a wide range of the air flow regimes: from viscous squeezed flow dominating in small gap to acoustic wave propagation in larger gap. The paper explains derivation of the governing equations from the basic fluid dynamics. The nonreflective boundary conditions were developed to properly define air flow at the outlet. Comparing to direct computational fluid dynamics modeling our approach allows achieving good accuracy while keeping the computation cost low. Using the model we studied the levitation force as a function of gap distance. It was shown that there are three distinguished flow regimes: purely viscous, viscoacoustic, and acoustic. The regimes are defined by the balance of viscous and inertial forces. In the viscous regime the pressure in the gap is close to uniform while in the intermediate viscoacoustic and the acoustic regimes the pressure profile is wavy. The model was validated by a dedicated levitation experiment and compared to similar published results.

  18. Viscoacoustic model for near-field ultrasonic levitation.

    PubMed

    Melikhov, Ivan; Chivilikhin, Sergey; Amosov, Alexey; Jeanson, Romain

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasonic near-field levitation allows for contactless support and transportation of an object over vibrating surface. We developed an accurate model predicting pressure distribution in the gap between the surface and levitating object. The formulation covers a wide range of the air flow regimes: from viscous squeezed flow dominating in small gap to acoustic wave propagation in larger gap. The paper explains derivation of the governing equations from the basic fluid dynamics. The nonreflective boundary conditions were developed to properly define air flow at the outlet. Comparing to direct computational fluid dynamics modeling our approach allows achieving good accuracy while keeping the computation cost low. Using the model we studied the levitation force as a function of gap distance. It was shown that there are three distinguished flow regimes: purely viscous, viscoacoustic, and acoustic. The regimes are defined by the balance of viscous and inertial forces. In the viscous regime the pressure in the gap is close to uniform while in the intermediate viscoacoustic and the acoustic regimes the pressure profile is wavy. The model was validated by a dedicated levitation experiment and compared to similar published results.

  19. Diagnostic studies on desolvated aerosols from ultrasonic nebulizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Robert H.; Sohal, Preeti; Liu, Huiying; Montaser, Akbar

    1992-08-01

    Dual-beam, light-scattering interferometry was used for simultaneous measurements of particle-size and particle-velocity distributions, size-velocity correlation, particle number density, and volume flux and span of desolvated aerosols. A commercial ultrasonic nebulizer (USN) and a low-cost, humidifier-based USN were used to nebulize pure water, or aqueous solutions containing H 2SO 4, HNO 3, or NaCl. In general, Sauter mean diameter, velocity of droplets, and volume flux of desolvated aerosol were larger when Ar was used as the injector gas instead of He. Sauter mean diameter increased with acid concentration, but it was independent of salt concentration. The velocity of desolvated droplets did not change with analyte concentration or the temperature of the heating tube. Pulsations and clustering of particles were observed for the first time by time-resolved measurements on the aerosol before injection into an inductively coupled plasma. In certain cases, the local number density of the desolvated particles within the clusters and the diameter of the dry particles varied by a factor of ten on a millisecond time scale. The implications of these observations in plasma spectrochemical measurements are discussed.

  20. Lithium niobate ultrasonic transducer design for Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenjun; Xu, Yuanming; Gu, Yuting

    2015-11-01

    Due to the strong piezoelectric effect possessed by lithium niobate, a new idea that uses lithium niobate to design high-power ultrasonic transducer for Enhanced Oil Recovery technology is proposed. The purpose of this paper is to lay the foundation for the further research and development of high-power ultrasonic oil production technique. The main contents of this paper are as follows: firstly, structure design technique and application of a new high-power ultrasonic transducer are introduced; secondly, the experiment for reducing the viscosity of super heavy oil by this transducer is done, the optimum ultrasonic parameters for reducing the viscosity of super heavy oil are given. Experimental results show that heavy large molecules in super heavy oil can be cracked into light hydrocarbon substances under strong cavitation effect caused by high-intensity ultrasonic wave. Experiment proves that it is indeed feasible to design high-power ultrasonic transducer for ultrasonic oil production technology using lithium niobate.